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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00410
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Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 05-24-2012
Frequency: weekly
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Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
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Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00410
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By BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent Wakulla High School ninth and 10th grade students performed well on the reading portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). The “ rst wave of FCAT scores was released on May 18 by the Florida Department of Education. This years test scores re” ect new, more rigorous standards with cut scores for proficiency made tougher from last year. Of the nine districts in the region, consisting of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor, the Wakulla 10th graders came in at No. 2, behind only Calhoun County. Sixty percent of Wakullas 10th graders scored pro“ cient in reading, coming in sixth highest in the state. Across the state, proficiency was 50 percent. Of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor, the Wakulla ninth graders came in tied for No.1 with Leon County. Fifty-seven percent of ninth graders scored pro“ cient in reading, coming in 10th highest in the state. Across the state, pro“ ciency was 52 percent. It is a tribute to the dedication of our teachers that despite continuously being asked to do more, to set higher standards, all while actually taking home a smaller paycheck with the additional 3 percent they must now pay to the state funds, they still give 100 percent to our students every day,Ž said Superintendent David Miller. They are really an admirable group who has our students best interests at heart, no matter what new challenges they face.Ž FCAT writing scores caused controversy throughout the state when they were “ rst released earlier in May. The FCAT Writing tests given in grades four, eight and ten were completely new and more rigorous this year coupled with higher cut scores. This caused a re-release of cut scores from the Florida Department of Education on May 18 because of the unprecedented drop in scores across the state.Wakullas fourth grade students came in at No. 5 in the state on writing with a mean score of 3.1 on a scale of 1 to 6, with the state average at 3.3. Continued on Page 2A By JENNIFER JENSEN jjensen@thewakullanews.netGeist showed up at the Wakulla County Animal Control Shelter on Feb. 6 without a name, a home and scared to death. Just a little over a month later, the shepherd mix left the shelter happy with a place to call home. He was chosen to participate in the Department of Corrections canine detection training. Currently, he is at the DOCs training center at Tomoka Correctional Institute in the beginning stage of his training. Early reports from my canine trainer indicate that he is doing pretty good so far,Ž says Inspector Supervisor Kevin Dean. Geist was left in the 24/7 outside drop box at the shelter and when he was taken out of the tiny box, Animal Control Director Ivanhoe Carroll says he was scared to death, with his tail between his legs. The shelter is a real scary place,Ž she says. They had no information about Geist. They didnt know how old he was, if he had any allergies, his history or his name. Thats the problem with the drop box,Ž Carroll says. Eventually Geist started to come out of his shell and Animal Control Of“ cer Dale Twist took an interest in him. He caught my eye,Ž Twist says. Not only was he a beautiful dog, he was full of energy. So Twist started taking him out of the shelter to let him run and play fetch. Twist says Geist loved going after the ball and was completely ball driven. Carroll says, He has an incredible ball drive.Ž Which, she says, is necessary for working dogs. After seeing such a drive in Geist, Carroll says she began making some phone calls, trying to “ nd a place for him. She also told Twist that the dog needed a name. Twist chose Geist because it is German for spirit.Ž It was a nice, manly name for a work dog,Ž Twist says. Carroll contacted someone with the Tallahassee-Leon Community Animal Service Center who did an evaluation and also noticed Geists incredible drive. On the evaluation, Geist scored a 6 out of a possible 9 points. With the shelters cooperation with Cauzican Animal Rescue, they made contact with someone at Taylor County Correctional Institute which has worked with Taylor County Animal Control. We work really hard to get the animals placed,Ž Twist says. After contacting Taylor County, they took Geist over for an interview and a K-9 handler assessed him. He did well,Ž Twist says. The handler then called his boss and the next day, the boss was in Wakulla County to see Geist. Continued on Page 12A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 20th Issue Thursday, May 24, 2012 T h r e e S e c t i o n s Three Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews DELINQUENT TAX ROLLS IN THIS ISSUE The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B INDEX OBITUARIES Marvin Stough Barber Dorothy Carrie Holub Feddie L. Hurley Mike Jett Tom H. MaxwellSection CBoard says yes to 2020, later to childrenTAX INITIATIVESBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIn a split vote, it appears the Wakulla 2020 initiative will be on the ballot in November, but the Childrens Services Council is off. Not that the CSC doesnt have support, but commissioners indicated they felt the issue wasnt ripe to be placed on the ballot. As for the 2020 issue, at the board meeting on Monday, May 21, Commissioner Randy Merritt re-stated his concern that the proposal, to use a half-cent sales tax for upgrades to U.S. Highway 319 and potentially other transportation projects in the county, would confuse voters when they are asked to approve the one-cent sales tax in 2014. Commissioner Mike Stewart sided with Merritt. Chairman Alan Brock indicated his support for putting the 2020 issue before voters, countering Merritts concern that he believed voters could distinguish between the two matters. He was joined by Commissioner Jerry Moore who said that, while he didnt believe voters would impose more taxes on themselves in the current economic environment, also said he believed it was up to voters to vote it up or down … which, like several of Moores opinions, drew a raised eyebrow from the chairman. Ultimately, the matter went to Commissioner Lynn Artz as the swing vote. She said she struggled with the issue … and, in fact, Brock had to call for commissioners to clarify their votes after he didnt hear how Artz voted, and she ultimately sided with Brock and Moore to let the 2020 matter move ahead.Continued on Page 3AFCAT scores put Wakulla High in Top 10 in state A DOG’S LIFE Abandoned at the animal shelter a few months ago...Today, Geist is going through training for DOCWakulla Gardens residents face pay for pavingBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCounty commissioners voted unanimously to survey residents of Wakulla Gardens to see if they are willing to pay an assessment to pay for their roads to be paved. The historic subdivision … platted decades before the county had zoning … has small lots and little infrastructure. Several years ago, during storm events, the subdivisions roads ” ooded … and the county got a FEMA grant to “ x the roads. While the rock put down did stabilize the roads, it created another problem: dust. This rock is killing us,Ž one resident told commissioners at their meeting on Monday, May 21. Residents of Wakulla Gardens at the meeting seemed receptive to the idea of paying an annual assessment of about $200 if it means getting the roads paved. In July, surveys will go out to the five units of Wakulla Gardens to see if they are willing to pay. But they were warned, if they reject the idea, there may not be any other solutions. This is the only mechanism weve got to get your roads paved,Ž Commissioner Mike Stewart told the residents. As was noted by citizen Ron Piasecki, who formerly served on the countys Infrastructure Committee, past estimates to pave the 22 miles of roads in the Gardens were upwards of $7 million … that was for contracting the job out. Commissioners credited Public Works Director Cleve Fleming with using ESG crews to do the job in-house at a cost of $5.2 million. County Administrator David Edwards said the cost basically breaks down as $4.2 million for paving and $1 million for some stormwater improvements in the road rights of way. The ballots will go out beginning July 2 to each lot owner in the development asking yes or no to whether they would be willing to pay an assessment estimated at between $190 and $230 per year to pay for the improvements. The surveys would be due back by July 31. Continued on Page 3APHOTOS BY IVANHOE CARROLL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Geist on his “ rst day at shelter, scared, with his tail between his legs. Randy Merritt David MillerState education board lowers FCAT writing threshold, see Page 2ASchool Board discusses AVID, STEM programs, Page 2A Best Western Business of the Year See Page 5A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsSchool Board members discussed the AVID Implementation Agreement for the 2012-13 school year during their meeting held on Monday, May 21. Next year, 225 students in the school system will be in the Advancement Via Individual Determination program. The students are bene“ tting from organizational skills and study skills,Ž said School Board member Becky Cook. Ive had calls from very excited parents, proud of their students.Ž In other matters: € The FloridaLearns STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Scholars Declaration and Program of Study were approved by the Board to give attention to gifted and highachieving students in the district. A task force of businesses that support the program have also approved of the curriculum. The business community members on the taskforce want to make the program very competitive.Ž said Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, € The school board approved the Carl D. Perkins Rural and Sparsely Populated Grant, and the Carl D. Perkins Secondary Career and Technical Education Grant, which help to fund many vocational and career programs, such as web design and carpentry, at the high school. Next year, the District hopes to offer two Computing for College and Careers courses at the Middle School level which will be largely covered by the grant, and will ful“ ll the vocational requirement needed to graduate high school. € The new Reading Endorsement Revisions, as set forth by the Florida Department of Education, were approved, though Beth Mims, Executive Director of Curriculum acknowledged that the changes would be signi“ cantŽ and rigorous.Ž € Changes to the VPK Summer School and Parent Handbook were one of the last items to be discussed on the agenda. A new name and logo, depicting The EagletsŽ was approved, along with minor date and time changes, and a change of the drop-off area location. The next School Board meeting will be June 18.School board discusses AVID, STEM programs By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 15 … To avoid a precipitous drop in student scores the Florida Board of Education last week lowered the passing grade on a statewide writing test in an effort to insulate schools from a decline that would affect school funding. Meeting in an emergency session, the board agreed to lower the passing grade from 4.0 to 3.0 on the FCAT writing assessment for the current school year after statewide numbers showed the passing rate fell through the ” oor, dropping in fourth grade from 81 percent to 27 percent. Eighth and 10th graders experienced similar drops in writing grades. The emergency rule will be in effect for 90 days. The board will address permanent rules within that time But even with the lower standards, more students this year will not receive a satisfactory score, a drop in success that state education of“ cials say is prompted by tougher testing criteria and the fact that each test was scored by two people. The Department of Education took some responsibility for the drop, saying it did not adequately prepare schools and teachers for more rigorous standards that were put in place this year, which included an increased focus on grammar and punctuation. Instead the new standard appears to have been rushed, which led to the dramatic increase in unsatisfactory scores. This conversation should have come up earlier,Ž DOE Secretary Gerard Robinson acknowledged. Well do better going forward.Ž School speci“ c writing scores will not be out until at least the end of the week, leaving many districts in limbo as they wait to see if their schools will garner the necessary scores to keep the overall school grade from dropping, which has “ nancial implications for already cash-strapped districts. Passing scores on the FCAT writing assessment for fourth graders plummeted from 81 percent to 27 percent. Passing scores in eighth grade fell from 82 percent to 33 percent. Tenth graders taking the test saw a similar drop in success. While 80 percent passed the test last year, only 38 percent scored a 4 or above on a 6-point scale this time around. At the 3.0 threshold, 81 percent of fourth graders, 77 percent of eighth graders and 84 percent of 10th graders passed the test. Some board members reluctantly supported the lower standards, but made it clear they would not continue to do so. School scores are expected to be out by the end of the week. The change from 4.0 to 3.0 looks like we are lowering standards,Ž said John Padget. Im only voting on this so we can hold (schools) harmless for this year only.Ž Other board members, however, said the lower scores are not a re” ection of student aptitude, but a change in scoring that has raised the bar. This is absolutely not a retreat,Ž said vice chairman Roberto Martinez. It is maintaining the equivalence with last year, were just using a much more rigorous application of the scoring rubric.Ž The test score drop became the vehicle for parents, teachers and local administrators to vent on the FCAT writing test and testing in general. The board took numerous calls from parents who said the high stakes tests are stressing out their kids. Teachers said they were not given an adequate heads up on what the new criteria would mean. We literally didnt receive much information at all,Ž said Holly Wallace, a writing teacher. We were a little out of touch as far as what exactly the expectations were.Ž Leon County Superintendent Jackie Pons, worried that contrary to the boards assertion that school districts would not be penalized by the new standards, many school districts would still see their school grades fall based on the results of the writing assessment. Despite the lower standard, some districts will still be adversely affected. School grades are partially determined by FCAT scores. Schools that perform poorly must divert resources to “ xing the problem, which takes funds away from other areas. The low scores brought concern from the top as well. Gov. Rick Scott, in a sharply worded statement Monday, said the lower scores were of great concern. The signi“ cant contrast in this years writing scores is an obvious indication that the Department of Education needs to review the issue and recommend an action plan so that our schools, parents, teachers and students have a clear understanding of the results,Ž Scott said. Critics of FCAT testing also used the opportunity to take their shots. State education board lowers FCAT writing thresholdContinued from Page 1AWakulla 8th graders averaged 3.4, exceeding the state average of 3.3 and ranking No. 4 in the state. Wakulla High School 10th graders ranked No. 4 in the state with a 3.3 average to the states 3.4. Only 9th and 10th grade FCAT Reading and 4th, 8th, and 10th grade FCAT Writing scores have been released. Coming later are Reading scores for grades 3 through 8, and Math scores for grades 3 through 10. I am con“ dent that the rest of the scores will re” ect the hard work of our students and teachers,Ž said Miller. However, these test scores are only a snapshot of the variety of ways Wakulla educators prepare our children every day to realize their dreams.ŽFCAT scores put Wakulla in the Top 10 in the stateThe Department of Education has opened a call center to answer parents questions about the FCAT after acknowledging last week that the agency hasn’t always communicated well in the past. The call center is intended, in part, to help the agency with answering questions about the new grading system for the FCAT. The agency began putting more emphasis in the grading on grammar, punctuation and spelling – with disastrous results, and a drop in writing scores last week drew broad criticism. Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson admitted that the educational system probably hadn’t communicated well with parents or schools about the changes. FCAT 2.0 Call Center: DOE experts will be available to answer parent questions from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. Parents may call 866-507-1109, toll-free, to ask questions about FCAT, recent changes to Florida’s accountability system, and how this impacts students and teachers. In addition to the call center, the department started a website to help answer questions, a blog, and a discussion page, and has set up an email for parents to ask questions.DOE moving to provide FCAT info Open: Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 • Sun. 11-9 850 697-9191 Thurs. & Fri. from 11 3 Sunday from 11 3 Full Menu Offered Sun. from 11 9Come Enjoy Live Music on the deck this weekend Provided by Marshall TaylorBeginning Friday at 7OPEN on Memorial Day!Come and Meet Mike Easton & Enjoy Oysters on the Half Shell. Hours:Tu-W & F 10 6 Th 12 8 Sat 8 NOON Sun & Mon Closed850.926.83192809 Crawfordville Hwy across from Hudson Parkwww.root319salon.com A full service hair and nail salon. W elcomesWelcomes iss est Now AvailableƒHave a Manicure or Pedicure in between your color sk bout our pecials! Certi“ed Nail Tech 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Congratulations 2012 PRUDENTIAL – DAVIS PRODUCTIVITY AWARD WINNERS & THE WINNERS OF THE GOVERNOR’S EXCELLENCE AWARD! Recognizing, Rewarding, and Replicating Excellence in State Government since 1989 2 012 PRUD E & THE WIN N A RD WINNERS N CE AWARD!TO THE www.floridataxwatch.org/dpa with partner sponsors

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A But Artz also appeared to wrestle with the concern voiced by Merritt that voters might reject the one-cent sales tax in two years. While 60 percent of that tax goes to transportation spending, the other 40 percent is used for the library and parks and sheriffs office, among other spending. Artz said she also felt bad rejecting the 2020 proposal. I feel like we kind of led 2020 on,Ž she said. If we werent going to do it, we should have let them know.Ž Merritt indicated that one problem he had with the 2020 idea was that it had broadened from the initial proposal to improve U.S. Highway 319 in the Crawfordville area, to something that became about transportation projects throughout the county … a broadening he acknowledged came from the board itself as it sought more county buy-in for the project. Before Artz and Moore had clari“ ed their position, Brock had gotten board members to indicate their positions and believed Merritt and Stewart would prevail with at least three votes. When it appeared 2020 would likely fall off the ballot, citizen Paul Johnson, representing himself as a Chamber member and local business owner, chided the commission and especially Merritt for opposition to the measure. He said the 2020 issue was about economic improvement, not transportation, and felt that the rug had been pulled out from under people who had worked very hard on the issue. Former Chamber president John Shuff, who came up with the 2020 idea and has made it a cornerstone of his campaign for the county commission seat currently held by Artz, agreed with Johnsons comments but said that the board should recognize that 319 is already sti” ing growth in the county. Any tax is a bitter pill,Ž he said, but weve got to keep growing.Ž It remains to be seen if the county can get the language together and approve the ordinance by August so that it appears on the November ballot. As for the childrens support issue, commissioners indicated support, but said they felt the matter hadnt been fully vetted as to what it would actually mean for the county. Artz said she wanted to run the idea by the youth coalition, which heard it, as well as the recreation board and the community center, which hadnt yet heard it, to see if they supported the idea. Brock said the concern expressed by the youth coalition was that any money raised for the CSC would replace rather than enhance county spending. The Children Services Council is a special district created by ordinance and approved by voters through a tax referendum. This would create an independent taxing authority that funds childrens programs and services in the county. It does not replace current programs, but helps to fund them. There are eight counties in the state that have created a CSC and seven of those are independent taxing authorities. Others operate as dependent districts and rely on funding from different sources, such as the county government, according to Florida Childrens Services Council CEO Brittany Birken. The Florida Childrens Council represents the eight special districts in the state and serves to support and connect the councils. Independent Children Services Councils levy ad valorem taxes and the maximum amount that can be levied is 50 cents for every $1,000 of taxable property value. A small portion of the increase in the millage rate, .013, goes to the Florida Childrens Services Council. Birken said they use an equitable dues formula. For St. Lucie County, that amount is around $10,000 annually. According to Brock, about $500,000 would be generated for Wakulla County from the tax. Board says yes to 2020, later to children issueContinued from Page 1A Wakulla Gardens resident Pamela Joy told the board that when she bought her house in the development years ago, her real estate agent told her that the roads would be paved in just a few years. I think this is a plan that will work,Ž Joy said. When Joy mentioned that one concern among residents is speeding … a problem now, but many worry it will worsen on pavement … Edwards responded that the plan includes traffic calming elements for each road. People in Wakulla Gardens are not looking for an ideal solution,Ž said Commissioner Jerry Moore. They are looking for something to stop the dust. My vote is, we do something. It may not be ideal, but we do something.Ž There were some reservations expressed: Paving roads is typically the last thing done in a development, and would certainly cause some problems if sewer is extended to the area. Roads would have to be torn up and re-paved, or pipes run under the road. Commissioner Lynn Artz expressed concern about encouraging growth in that one area. Paving roads will only make the area more attractive, meaning more development and more people moving in there. Artz estimated that there are roughly 1,000 houses and 3,000 residents in the development now. If that increased to 3,000 homes and 9,000 residents, it would mean that about one-quarter of Wakulla Countys population would be living in that few square miles, she said. She warned residents: You are going to have a mess!Ž Some residents appeared irritated at Artz and called back from the audience: Its already a mess!Ž and Pick your mess!Ž While she went along with the idea, Artz said she hoped that the paving would only go forward with a few of the already more developed units in the development. Commissioner Randy Merritt noted that the board will look at the overall vote for the whole Wakulla Gardens subdivision, and then each of the “ ve units individually. Meaning, potentially, that only some areas of the subdivision may get paved … if the property owners are willing to pay.Wakulla Gardens residents face paying for pavingBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt seems there were a few discrepancies in the quit claim deed executed in March 2010 for the St. Marks Re“ nery site to the City of St. Marks. Brian Plant was brought in by the city and City Attorney Ron Mowrey to look over the deed and determine what exactly the city owns. City Commissioner Phil Cantner said, There were very old quit claim deeds that were in conflict all over.Ž As it turns out, Plant found a few errors that needed to be corrected. Plant determined that a few pieces of property that were included on the deed are not actually owned by the city. Included in the deed were four exhibits. Attorney Rhonda DiVagno Morris, who was “ lling in for Mowrey, said a quit claim deed was done for more than the city was entitled to. Plant said the city clearly owned the 55-acre tract where the tanks and buildings sit, which was labeled as exhibit A. That is uncontested, he said. That is what you own and what you want to maintain,Ž Plant said. Plant said it seems someone did a title search and the other pieces of property came up and were added. One of the tracts was never part of the re“ nery property and it is not clear who owns it currently, Plant said. Another tract that was included is owned by a property management company. According to Plant, the house located on that piece of land was included, however, the land the house sits on was not included. The other tract is clearly owned by Murphy Oil, Plant said. DiVagno Morris said those properties will be removed from the deed to clarify the records. In other news: € At the April St. Marks City Commission meeting, the commission approved being the sponsor of a permit for a 10-year extension to reopen the St. Marks Reef, an arti“ cial reef 5 miles out from the St. Marks Lighthouse. Organization for Arti“ cial Reefs and Florida Fish and Wildlife Cconservation Commission are trying to enhance the reef increasing it from 17.3 acres to 42. After applying for the permit, the city heard from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection who told them the biggest the reef can be is 1,519 feet. The proposed reef was 984 feet by 1,870 feet. Mayor Chuck Shields said the state would not issue a permit with the current design. The city commissioners suggested making the reef a square, 1,519 feet by 1,519 feet. DiVagno Morris suggested sending those recommendations to OAR before sending anything back to the state and see if there are any problems with changing the layout. Shields said, It was designed a particular way for a reason.Ž The commission agreed to speak with OAR. € City Manager Zoe Mansfield told the commission she received four bids to take down the rest of the tanks at the old re“ nery site. Mans“ eld said they still have $71,000 left for cleanup. They have until July 31 to spend it. Once the product inside the tanks is removed, Mans“ eld said the tanks will be down and removed in two weeks. The commission will review the bids and select a company at the next meeting. € Mansfield also discussed the status of the Community Redevelopment Block Grant the city received for streetscape improvements. Mans“ eld said the city issued a request for proposals and has received some phone calls about the project. The bid will be awarded at the June 14 meeting.CITY OF ST. MARKSErrors found in St. Marks Re nery deed FILE PHOTOSSome of the re“ nery tanks being taken down from the property in 2010. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners propose to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance. A Public Hearing is scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, June 11, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 18, 2012, and Monday July 16, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.MAY 24, 2012 PUBLIC NOTIFICATION MAY 17, 24, 31 JUNE 7, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing on June 4, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327, to Consider Adopting a Resolution Establishing Rates, Fees, and Charges for the County Sewer System and Consider the Following Ordinance: A copy of this ordinance and the rate resolution shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance and the rate resolution. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. MAY 24, 2012

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Dusty roads may have a solution in Wakulla Gardensl • Prescribed fire training held at Wakulla airport • Marvin Strough Barber obituary •Bobby ‘Bob’ Edward Forham obituary • Airport clearing violates wetlands ordinance • Feddlie L. Hurley obituary • Sheriff’s Report for May 10, 2012• Workshop on airport’s future is planned € thewakullanews.com Follow us onEditor, The News: Crawfordville Elementary Schools Country Fair on April 2nd was a spectacular event! The weather was a mix of sun, warmth, rain and breeze but the crowd was happy, hungry and eager to enjoy the plethora of activities and food. Children got their faces painted, threw balls that dunkedŽ their favorite teacher, played bingo, ate cotton candy, slid down large slides, milked a cow, and participated in games that entertained the whole family. It was a fantastic, fun “ lled day! The success of the festival is due to the dedicated teachers, staff, and parents of Crawfordville; the generous support given from our businesses and community members of Wakulla County; and the dedicated members of the PTA who spent a tremendous amount of time preparing and planning for our Country Fair. Students and parents worked hard selling tickets and baking goodies for our Cake Walk and Sweet Shop. They worked so hard, that enough funds were raised before the day of the festival to put Mrs. Walker on the roof for 24 hours! This event will take place after FCAT! With the help of the Lions Club ” ipping burgers and passing out frosty, cold Pepsi products; the high schools ROTC students working booths and running errands; the Sheriffs Department assisting with security and safety; and volunteers working hard to assist throughout the day, the Crawfordville Country Fair proved to be a day for all to enjoy. I would like to give special thanks to our local businesses for their support as sponsors, for their generous donations, and for their encouraging words about our event. Once again, the community of Wakulla County did not hesitate to support our efforts to raise funds for our school and our students. Crawfordville Elementary School would like to say, THANK YOU,Ž to all of those who were able to donate, attend, and support our 2012 Country Fair! Angela Walker Principal Crawfordville ElementaryREADERS WRITE: anks for support of schools Country Fair Local Dems hosted small county conference Every day is mental health awareness day Concern about bears is very realEditor, The News: I read Mrs. Shulers letter with great interest (Bears are spotted in Crawfordville,Ž Letters, May 10). What has happened is that a huge wild animal has lost his fear of humans. He is probably hungry and he is carnivorous. That means kittens, cats, dogs and other mammals in the neighborhood are in danger. My neighbors … neighbors on our road in Sopchoppy means someone half a mile away … had a nuisance bear in their yard, but they told me it was dif“ cult to convince wildlife of“ cers that the bear should be trapped and removed. (I guess bears are considered innocent until proven guilty.) Later a bear came in my yard twice. I presumed he was the same bear. I had to return to southern Floria and was gone about three weeks. When I came home I asked the neighbors about the bear and they said they hadnt seen him for a while. I was happy to hear he must have found a more prosperous hunting ground. All was “ ne for about two weeks. Then one Sunday afternoon I opened my front door just in time to see my cat standing near the steps, frozen with the hair … all of it … straight up and her eyes bulging. I looked behind her and there was a bear about “ ve feet away on all fours, not moving. She ran inside the house and the bear ran. I watched him and he would go to one side of my house, cross the road, run down the road, return and be on the other side … and this crazy running around went on for a while. Finally he left. Monday morning at 8 a.m., I was awakened by the sound of pounding and scraping on my front door. It was persistent. I got up and looked and saw a huge paw through the frosted pane. Then it stopped and I went to the phone and called the wildlife people. I talked to someone and gave him my name, address and the directions for “ nding my house. I sat and waited. And waited. No one came. Not the whole day. I called back early the next morning. Later a biologist called me and said he wasnt in the of“ ce the day before so a trap couldnt be set up. It was nice to hear from someone but I wonder why it takes a biologist to set a bear trap. However that day at 5:30 p.m. an agent did “ nally mosey to my place with a trap. He set it up at the edge of my yard and at 2 a.m. I heard the trap spring. The agent returned in the morning but said he had to leave and someone else would come. Later another agent arrived. He asked me a question that the “ rst one didnt, could he see my door? I said certainly. It was still covered with paw prints and he also found some on the side of the house which I hadnt noticed. He immediately called his of“ ce and said that the bear was trying to get inside my house. This lead me to believe that no one there had taken the incident seriously or thought my troubles as I had described them improbable. Conclusion: Keep calling and calling. That bear should be removed and resettled. Mickey Skidmore Sopchoppy Editor, The News: May is Mental Health Awareness month but everyday is Mental Health Awareness day for me, taking one day at a time. It is my hope that on June 1st those aware will continue to make others aware of the importance of good mental health. Depression, anxiety, panic attacks, etc. are classi“ ed as mental illness diagnoses. Like physical ailments they can successfully be treated. That fact is not known to society as a whole because of the negative connotation associated with the term mental illness.Ž The road to recovery is long for those suffering imperfect mental health but Wakulla County now has programs to help people take the “ rst step down the road to recovery. NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Wakulla is fortunate to have the Wakulla School Board, Sheriff Donnie Crum, other elected officials, mental health professionals and others from various civic organizations, as working members. Together we offer programs to bene“ t all who are in need of education, support and advocacy in combatting this evergrowing problem. Thank you for your Mental Health Awareness article in the May 17th issue. Sincerely, Jimmie Doyle Crawfordville Dear Editor: The Small County Coalition Conference held May 11…13, at The Inn at Wildwood Resort and hosted by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee was an event that we were excited about having here in our county. We wanted, of course, to show others how beautiful our area is so that they would want to come back. Approximately 125 Democrats from some of our small counties around Florida attended. Our Saturday was a full schedule on many subjects that we Democrats pay special attention to such as Building the Leadership BackŽ and Battling voter Suppression in small countiesŽ and Equality for All: Human Rights in Rural Communities,Ž to name a few. During the Luncheon, we were especially fortunate to have Omar Kahn, Associate Political Director for Obama for America, as our keynote speaker. The end of the day was another eagerly awaited event … the “ sh fry with a live band for entertainment. Poseys catered this event with seafood and all the trimmings and they were masterful in handling the long lines of people anticipating the good food being served from Poseys mobile kitchen. As we all were seated under the huge canopy at round tables with linens, we listened to candidates from the Congressional District Two race and other special guests. After the speakers, the local Coon Bottom Creek Band “ red up and entertained us the remainder of the evening. Sunday concluded the event with a full session from 9 a.m. to noon and sessions included voting updates, social media, and fundraising. I for one, gained a wealth of knowledge from (and met for the “ rst time) some of our most respected elected Democratic of“ cials and look forward to working with them during this election cycle. Also, I feel con“ dent in saying that all attendees left energized to get out the vote,Ž and were moved more than ever to turn our red state blue for 2012. Sincerely,Joan E. Hendrix Crawfordville You might not be aware -this is National EMS Week. The employees in this division often work in extreme conditions and are exposed to the worst situation imaginable. Below is my message for them this week. If you have see any of them this week, or any other times, you might tell them thanks! An open letter to Wakulla EMS: In the short time I have been part of Wakulla EMS you have shown me what a dedicated group of people are involved with this service. Never in my career have I seen workers so willing to go beyond what they are expected to do. So many of you step up and do the after hours things, the responding to the fourthŽ call, caring for more than one patient, rendering top notch care during extended transport times. All this with the attitude of thats just how Wakulla EMS Rollsƒ.Ž Wakulla provides a top-notch Advanced Life Support system because of YOU. The challenges faced in Wakulla are unique to any place experienced by me and most places in the State. Anytime we face the different incident, whether it is a trauma call that it takes 25 minutes to get to, a newborn not breathing, a frequent ” yer that has a true medical emergency, an extrication, or a simple multipatient MVC you do whatever it takes so that the citizens of our county receive better care than could be expected elsewhere. I am truly IMPRESSED. THANK YOU! Mike Morgan Wakulla Fire ChiefThank you, Wakulla EMS, for the job you doBy RITA HANEY There has been, and is currently, a great deal of focus on substance abuse treatment. Addiction is a serious and often dramatic experience. Often there are job losses, legal problems and or medical issues. Due to these financial and emotional dif“ culties the addicted person seeks treatment and she goes for help, but what is the treatment and/ or help the addict desires or has been strongly encouraged into accepting. Substance abuse treatment is a cognitive behavioral approach to therapy. Treatment focus on education (Learning Theory), cognitive awareness which encourages the addict to recognize the futility of continued use of the drug(s) of choice; and the development of strategies for transforming destructive behaviors into healthier, more positive ones. It must be understood alcohol is a drug. Alcohol like other substances changes ones perspective on the world, and can lead to extremely poor decisions. Examples include driving while intoxicated, engaging in risky sexual behavior and impulsive acts such as theft and uncontrollable emotions. Barriers to accepting ones limits regarding drug use are cunning and baf” ing to those of us not affected. In light of these negative side effects it would seem addicts would throw themselves into treatment or beg for help. Sometimes this happens. Otherwise it is the courts, the doctor, or family that insists … enough! Treatment is not a guarantee. Going to prison is not a guarantee. Having severe medical problems is not a guarantee. Families in crises, separations, divorces, are not a guarantee. The interesting and most dif“ cult aspect of addiction is abstinence is not recovery. People have, and do, stop using for days even months and once they pick up the drug, are again on the trip of addiction. Substance abuse treatment is an opening into recovery. Recovery is a process of education, self-understanding and spirituality. Individual therapy can be offered and is often necessary. However, it is the group experience, which offers a unique approach to any therapeutic theory of recovery. A person in a recovery group can bear witness to others who have had the same experiences and recognize this persons journey as their own story, allowing for compassion and understanding for themselves and others. This collaborative experience, whether in a professional treatment or a group such as AA/NA, can offer the hope necessary to begin this process of recovery. Treatment generally has a spiritual component … the need for surrender and a willingness to listen. These two components of recovery … surrender and willingness … are entirely up to the addict. No one can surrender for him; no one can listen for her. The idea of treatment is to provide the education, the safe place for surrender and the spiritual understanding of the journey of recovery. The group offers the comfort of not being alone in what seems to addict an impossible feat. Witnessing to the power of others ability to remain clean and sober adds strength and encouragement. Often we cannot see what is happening to us as individuals, but we can see what is happening to others. And when recovery is witnessed it offers hope. Substance Abuse Treatment facilities and AA/NA are available locally and worldwide. Rita Haney LCSW is a counselor in Crawfordville. She can be reached at 9262039. COLLAGE OF PHOTOS BY MIKE MORGANNeed for substance abuse treatment

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Staff reportBest Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites was named the Business of the Year at the Chamber of Commerces annual Business Excellence Awards Banquet held Thursday, May 17, at the Senior Center. Niraj Patel, owner of Best Western Plus in Medart, accepted the award as the crowd gave him a standing ovation. Other honorees incuded Gail Campbell as Member of the Year. Callway Auto and Truck Repair was named Wakulla Area Business of the Year. Wildwood Resort was given the Chambers Environmental Stewardship Award. Friends of the Wakulla County Library were named Non-Pro“ t Organization of the Year. International Gold Gymnastics was named Start-up Business of the Year. A complete list of nominees will appear in the Business Section of the June 7 issue. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 5A  Workshop to prepare your trees for hurricane seasonThe UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce is holding a Get Your Trees Ready for Hurricane Season workshop on Thursday, May 24, at 7 p.m. "The workshop will focus on helping homeowners identify potential tree problems at the beginning of hurricane season," said Les Harrison, Wakulla County Extension director. "Early detection leaves the homeowner with time to identify the best course of action to protect their property," he said. The Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1, but there has already been one named storm in 2012. The peak of Atlantic hurricane season is mid-September, but storms can make landfall anytime in the season. To sign up call the Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or register at the website: http://wakulla.ifas.u .edu/. The program is free, but pre-registration is recommended to assure ample supply of handouts.. Memorial Day ceremony will be held at courthouseA ceremony to honor the nation's fallen soldiers will be held on the courthouse grounds on Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, beginning at 10 a.m., according to county Veteran Services Of ce J.D. Johnson. The keynote speaker will be Commission Chairman Alan Brock. Memorial Day Blood Drive to be held at Wal-MartSoutheast Community Blood Center will hold a blood drive at the Crawfordville Wal-Mart on Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, at the store. The bloodmobile will be parked outside in the parking lot. Donors will receive a $10 Wal-Mart gift card.  The Wakulla News will close for the holidayThe Wakulla News of ce will be closed May 28 for the Memorial Day holiday. Regular hours will return Tuesday, May 29. Early deadlines will apply for classi ed and display advertising. Classi ed deadline will be Thursday, May 24 at 11 a.m. All display advertising is due Friday at noon proof ads due Thursday at noon. No change in garbage pickups because of holidayThere will be no changes to the solid waste collection for the Memorial Day Holiday on Monday, May 28, according to Waste Pro. All services will be completed on your normal scheduled day. High school yearbooks are still availableThere are more than 100 seniors who have not purchased yearbooks. The yearbook staff will be set up at baccalaureate on May 30 at 7 p.m. and at graduation on June 1 at 7:30 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. The books are $85 and the school is only accepting cash, money orders or cashiers checks. Look for the yearbook stand inside the main gate. Public records forum set by League of Women VotersThe League of Women Voters of Wakulla will host a public records forum headed by Barbara Peterson, president of the First Amendment Foundation, on June 7 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. "We feel very lucky to have her," said Mary Cortese, Wakulla League chair. "She has so much experience and expertise in the open government arena, writing and working in the area for many years." "We feel that this is an important issue and have invited all constitutional of cers, the county administrator, staff and commissioners," said Cortese. Staff ReportsBriefs PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENNiraj Patel of Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites accepts the award for Business of the Year from Chamber President Amy Geiger.Best Western Plus is named 2012 Business of the Year Geiger with Chamber Member of the year Gail Campbell and Bruce Ashley, president of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn an effort to save the county money on its energy bills and help conserve energy, the Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committee heard from Knight Energy Management at its recent meeting and explored the possibility of having them retrofit their lightbulbs and change them to LED lighting. President Kevin Bechtel said a shared savings plan would be done. An auditor would be sent out to review the county facilities and then a certified engineer would also go out and evaluate the facilities. The lightbulbs would then be retrofitted with an LED lightbulb that has a 5-year guarantee. The county would enter into a contract with Knight Energy who would pay the upfront costs and would install the lights. In return, Knight Management would take 80 percent of the savings for the life of the contract. During that time, they would also perform maintenance on the lightbulbs. The savings depends on how long the lights burn in a day,Ž Bechtel said. Lightbulbs would only be retrofitted if there is a saving for the county, he said. He suggested that the county look at where lights are on the most, where the energy bills are the highest. County Administrator David Edwards said he would like Knight Energy Management to come in an do an audit of the board of county commissioners facilities to see if it would be something they might be interested in. The committee also discussed the cost saving measures that have been implemented at the sheriffs office. Mary Dean Barwick said they have been tracking energy usage since 2005, so they have a good collection of data. A restrictor was put on inmate showers at the jail, fluorescent lighting was reduced, windows were tinted, windows were sealed, timers were placed on hotwater heaters, desk heaters were outlawed and a duct system for the dryers was established. The main building uses 175,000 kilowatts, Barwick said. And since October, they have seen it drop to 95,000. The cost has gone from $17,000 a month to $10,000. Barwick was looking to the committee and Talquin Electric Energy Services Specialist Dan Ard for direction on next steps. Ard said to look at HVAC and water heating, which was the largest costs. However, the jail has to meet certain standards so that needed to be kept in mind. If a project has a return on investment of 2 years, it is a no brainer and should be done, he said. Commissioner Lynn Artz suggested the jail look into a solar water heater. Ard said again that he wasnt sure that would be possible for that facility because of the standards it must meet. Committee member Elinor Elfner wondered if the administration building of the sheriffs office needed to have hot water in the bathrooms. It could be cut off, she said. The committee also talked about the comprehensive list of all county buildings and their meter numbers and usage. The committee has been trying to compile an accurate list of county facilities since its inception. The committee is still currently compiling that list. The committee ran into problems with inaccurate square footage and descriptions for buildings not being specific enough. Artz said once that is complete, each department can get historical data and graph it to see the usage. Each department would have a contact person who tracks the usage. When the department has a cost savings, Artz said it could be placed into a green fund for additional projects. Ard said the rule of usage is 1 kilowatt to 1 square foot. The committee agreed to start identifying places for Ard and his team to audit, those ones that are consuming the most energy, prior to the next meeting. The next committee meeting has not yet been scheduled.Energy Conservation Committee looks at LED lighting Friendship Primitive Baptist Church 165 Friendship Church Road, Medart Rev. Mark Hall and Family from Dallas, NCSpecial Singing Nightly Prayer for the sick Anointed Preaching And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the name of the LORD shall be delivered: ... Joel 2:32May 28, 29, 30 at 7PMOn the 27th Homecoming Message at 11AMThere is a blessing just waiting for you! •Interior Remodeling •Doors •Floors •Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling •Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

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Dorothy Carrie Holub, of Crawfordville, passed away on May 17 after a brief illness. Her daughter, Bonnie Holub, and son-in-law, Tim Jordan, were by her bedside. She was born on Nov., 25, 1924, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. She was known for her caring nature, can-do attitude and steadfast work ethic. There was nothing she couldnt do once her mind was set. At age 19, she became a pro“ cient welder in the wartime shipyards of New Orleans, a talent she carried with her for many years, using her welding skills to repair farm equipment and other jobs when needed. While Bonnie was growing up, Dorothy owned and operated the local drug store and old fashioned soda fountain in Coggon, Iowa. She “ xed up a back room with juke box and tables so kids would have a place to go after school to listen to music and dance. When her daughter was in elementary school, Dorothy taught her how to be a top-rate soda jerk,Ž how to give superior customer service and how to run the cash register, thus passing on her values of service, work and responsibility to her young protg, so her daughter could always get a job.Ž When her daughter left for college, Dorothy sold the drug store, moved to Cedar Rapids, and worked at Collins Radio. She also worked in the familys bowling lanes in Marion, Iowa. In 1970 she moved to Indian Rocks Beach and managed a dry cleaning shop, and then to Wakulla County in 1981 where she worked at Wakulla Cleaners. In her 60s, she tried to retire, but that was not to be. She wanted to work, so she began her tenure as a crew leader at the U.S. Forest Service in the Elder American Program in Wakulla. She drove a six packŽ truck to recreation areas in the forest that needed clean-ups and repairs. This was one of her favorite jobs, as she loved being outdoors and being with her hard-working and fun-loving crew. At age 80, when her legs began to weaken, she had to leave the USFS for a less physical job. She was immediately hired as the “ rst paid volunteer coordinator for the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, also a favorite job of hers because of the dedicated volunteers (who became special friends) and visitors she met from around the world. She held this position until illness struck. Dorothy willingly worked until she was 86, and played golf in her spare time. And all of the time, 24/7 she was an exceptional, loving Mother. Another job well done. It wouldnt surprise anyone who knew her, to “ nd she is now leading a special crew of can-do angels on industrious celestial adventures. A memorial celebration of Dorothys life will be held at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1493 Coastal Highway 98, on Sunday, May 27 at 4 p.m. In lieu of ” owers, please do something special to make someone feel special. Dorothy would like that. In addition to Bonnie and Tim, survivors include her special nieces and nephews in Iowa, Louisiana, Texas and Colorado and a host of cherished friends. She was predeceased by her parents, Carlton and Alice Smith of Cedar Rapids, her brother, Harold Smith of Panacea, her sister, Clarice Hicks and brother-in-law, Travis Hicks of Alexandria, La., her sister Joyce Gordon, and brother-in-law, Ralph Gordon of Marion, Iowa. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesChurch Briefs Buckhorn NewsBy ETHEL SKIPPER The Church of Christ Written in Heaven will have their annual Tallahassee District Meeting on May 23 through May 27 with nightly services beginning at 8 p.m. On Friday, May 25, at 10:30 a.m. will be a Womens Day Service. That night, at 7:30 p.m., speaker will be the Right Rev. Christ Burney. A great program on Saturday night by the youth of the church. Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. and Sunday Service begins at noon. We welcome you to these services. Host pastor is Ethel M. Skipper. We wish a happy birthday to Sister Callie Gavin on May 13, Mrs. Mary Green. The Skipper Temple Church of Christ will celebrate its “ fth anniversary at 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy. We welcome you to come help us celebrate. On Friday night, June 1, Mount Olive Church No. 1 pastor Donald Jefferson will be in charge, beginning at 7:30 p.m. On Sunday, June 3, at noon, Deliverance Temple Church of God and Christ from Gretna will be the guest church along with all our visiting friends. Marvin Stough Barber, 85, died on May 16, at Big Bend Hospice House. He was born in Dothan, Ala., and moved here in 1953 from Fort Meade. Survivors include his wife, Mary Frances Barber; two sons, Johnny Barber (Kathy) of Wakulla and Marvin Brian Barber (Vickie) of Woodville; daughter, Cheryl Dunlap (Mike) of Wakulla; 10 grandchildren, and 11 great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his son, William Eric Barber. The funeral service was held on Friday, May 18, at White Primitive Baptist Church in Woodville, with burial at Woodville Cemetery. Viewing was held prior to services. Family received friends at the Fellowship Hall after the service. In lieu of ” owers, contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice House, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard Tallahassee FL 32308. Beggs Funeral Home, 3322 Apalachee Parkway, in Tallahassee, (850) 942-2929 is in charge of arrangements.Marvin Stough Barber Dorothy Carrie Holub Feddie L. Hurley Mike Jett Tom H. Maxwell Feddie L. Hurley, 86, died Sunday, May 20, at Consulate Healthcare in Tallahassee. She was a sweet, gentle and loving person, who dearly loved her family and friends. Visitation was held Wednesday, May 23, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville prior to the services at 3 p.m. with burial to follow at Hurley Hill Cemetery in Spring Creek. Survivors include three sons, J.W. McMullen and Walter McMullen of Spring Creek and Otis McMullen of Everglade City; one daughter, Evelyn L. Johnson of Wacissa; and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by son, Lester L. McMullen; and daughter, Gail Tillman. Arrangements are being handled by Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Tom H. Maxwell, 81, passed away Thursday, May 17, in Crawfordville, surrounded by his loving family. Born Aug. 9, 1930, in Sopchoppy, he was the son of William A. and Lilla L. Langston Maxwell. He was a selfemployed truck driver and attended River of Life Church in Crawfordville. He is survived by his wife, a daughter, stepdaughter, 10 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by a daughter, a grandson, two brothers and two sisters. The funeral was held on Sunday, May 20, at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, with interment at Sopchoppy Cemetery. Online condolences at www.abbeyfh.com. A Celebration of Life for Mike Jett will be held on Saturday, June 2 at 4 p.m. at Capt. Seaniles. All friends and musicians welcome! Bring something to share.Marvin Stough Barber Friendship P.B. to host revival Pioneer Baptist to hold gospel sing Feddie L. Hurley Tom H. Maxwell Mike Jett Dorothy Carrie HolubFriendship Primitive Baptist Church in Medart will feature the Rev. Mark Hall and family from Dallas, N.C., for a revival on Monday, May 28, through Wednesday, May 30, at 7 p.m. nightly. On Sunday, May 27, will be the Homecoming Message at 11 a.m. The church is located at 165 Friendship Church Road in Medart. Pioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide Open Microphone Gospel Sing on Friday, May 25, at 7 p.m. Anyone who enjoys singing or playing gospel music is invited to participate. Others who enjoy listening are encouraged to attend and have a blessed night of worship through music. There is no charge for the concert. Pioneer Baptist Church is located at 486 Beechwood Drive, four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the Dr. MLK Jr. Memorial Road and Spring Creek Highway intersection. Call Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-5224 for more information. We hope to see you.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 7Ahappenings Community Special to The NewsCrawfordville Girl Scout Troop 165 held its Bridging Ceremony on May 15 at 6:30 p.m. at the Christ Church Anglican. The Bridging Ceremony is an activity held to let the girls be recognized and welcomed into another level of Girl Scouting. The Daisy group (blue uniforms) became Brownies and the Brownie group (brown uniforms) became Juniors. Daisy group members are Keira Tuten, Marissa Peddie, Ava DuBois, Chloe Brown and Lily Jedziniak. The brownie group members are Rachel Freeman, Madison Rushing, Marina Harvey, Alysse Warburton, Clara Alford, Summer Broga, Madelyn Montpellier, Madison Brown and Ella Roberts. The leaders are Melissa Alford, Amy Freeman and Amy Brown.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Girls scouts hold bridging ceremony Special to The NewsTwo local kids from Crawfordville are going to Los Angeles this summer to audition for 200-300 national and international directors and agents who are in the entertainment industry. Nathan and Keira Cushard heard an ad on the radio in early January, encouraging kids aged 4-25 to come out to the Civic Center to audition for a talent agency. They both asked their mother if they could attend the auditions, with dreams of one day being TV stars. So, the call was made. The day of the auditions arrived, and 500 kids ” ooded the Civic Center. The kids were split into two groups to audition with two different agents. Brandon Harlow, an agent with I Got Talent, was impressed with what he saw, and both kids made the “ rst cut, returning the following day for a second audition. Out of the original 500 kids, 30 were chosen to attend rehearsals for the next several weekends with national directors who helped them learn acting and modeling techniques. In early February, all the kids put on a showcase for two other national directors where they highlighted their acting, modeling, singing and dancing. Of these, only 10 spots were available to be able to participate in the iPop Convention, International Presentation of Performers, in Los Angeles. Nathan and Keira both were extended the invitation. Due to the high cost for the convention and travel, the kids are working hard with fundraisers to help pay for the expenses of the trip. Partnering with local Pampered Chef Consultant, Angel Vonada (850-4454018), the kids are having a Pampered Chef Mystery Host Sweepstakes. Everyone gets a chance to help them and buy products that will always remind them of their generous donation. A $10 donation enters participants into a chance to win. The grand prize is up to $200 in products. To order, visit www. PamperedChef.biz/Angel. Choose the fundraisers name, IPOP, to place an order online.Local kids head to Los Angeles Nathan CushardKeira Cushard Williams to marry Danielle Koppenaal Danielle Koppenaal of Crawfordville and Brian Williams of Tallahassee announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Robert Koppenaal of Charleston, S.C., and Brenda Aaron of Crawfordville. He is the son of the late David Williams and Susan Williams of Tallahassee. They have planned a wedding for April 2013 in St. George Island. Brian Williams and Danielle Koppenaal, at right Holton graduates from University of Miami Cedric C.J.Ž Holton graduated from the University of Miami on May 11 with a Bachelor of Liberal Arts degree. He majored in criminal justice. He graduated from Wakulla High School in 2008 and received a full football scholarship. He plans to continue his education and receive his masters degree. He hopes to eventually work for the FBI, the DEA or travel with an undercover agency. He is the son of Jeffrey and Rosalind Donaldson. His maternal grandmother is Rosa Lee Jackson. His paternal grandparents are Joe and Mary Holton. His paternal grandfather is the late Tommy Jackson Sr. Cedric Holton Pamela Lourcey, of Crawfordville, recently graduated from Florida Gulf Coast University with a Bachelor of Science degree. Lourcey receives degree from Florida Gulf Coast Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULL SURVICE HAIR SALONHair Place That 850-926-6020We Have Gift Certi“catesBooking NOWProm updo’s starting at$65OOPS!WelcomeMavis 274-0700Miranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 NO QUESTIONS ASKEDLost adult male Chinese Water Crescent/Shitsu Mix.It was last seen around the Centennial Bank area in Crawfordville on May 15. 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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsOn Friday, May 4, Crawfordville Elementary School hosted the annual Fifth Grade Brain Brawl, which is sponsored by the Coastal Optimist Club. Ten students representing “ ve homeroom classes competed against each other answering trivia questions about local, state and American history, government, politics, geography, science, math, spelling and grammar. Team A was lead by Captain Codie Posey. Other members included Dylan Cook, Jonah Harvey, Amanda Hurst and Jada Lassiter as alternate. Leading Team B to victory by a very close margin of only 10 points was Captain Faith Joiner who was supported by Steven Gehrke, Vance Osteen, Charlie Owens and Courtney Herron, Alternate. Amanda Hurst was the Overall Top Scorer, as well as Team As top scorer. Steven Gehrke was the top scorer for Team B. Wakulla County Library Director Scott Joiner served as moderator, Tammy Barfield as time keeper and Susan-Payne Turner as score keeper. Fifth Grade Brain Brawl sponsors were Alisa Adkison and Trish Strickland. Other “ fth grade teachers are Betty Hobbs, Renee Kelly, Barbara Mingledorff and Brandi Panzarino. The Brain Brawl was the prelude of many forthcoming events during one of the busiest months of the year. With only a few weeks remaining as the 2011-2012 school year comes to a rapid end, school administrators Angie Walker and Laura Kelley, re” ect upon successes and gear up to plan for another great year at Crawfordville Elementary School.Crawfordville holds brain brawl SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTeam B takes “ rst place in the Crawfordville brain brawl beating Team A by 10 points. Yearbooks still available for purchaseThere are more than 100 Wakulla High School seniors who have not purchased yearbooks this school year. The yearbook staff will be set up at baccalaureate on May 30 at 7 p.m. and at graduation on June 1 at 7:30 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. The books are $85 and the school is only accepting cash, money orders or cashiers checks. Look for the yearbook stand inside the main gate. CES surpasses 200 million word goalSpecial to The NewsCrawfordville Elementary Schools students are not letting the end of school or summer weather distract them from continuing their hard work and relentless effort toward reaching the schools goal of reading 30,000 books and 200 million words. The closer it gets to the end of the year, the harder the students seem to be pushing themselves. Crawfordville has made reading a priority and the entire Crawfordville team is helping each other stay strong and not lose focus. Each week, for the past three weeks, the school has gained at least three new Million Word Readers, giving the school a total so far of 34 1 million word readers, 10 2 million word readers, two 3 million word readers, and two 4 million word readers. They have 14 teachers who are million word readers and more who are just on the verge of reaching their goal. The CES media specialist, Cindy Burse, initiated the school-wide goal and has been providing incentives like the Million Word Madness T-shirt, while motivating teachers and students throughout the year. Rewards are also offered to students who read 10 or more Sunshine State Reader books, or 10 or more Great Illustrated Classics books. Parents have donated books to support the overwhelming request for some of the more popular titles and series, while our PTA has been generous with their support for the reading program as well. The faculty and staff bring in and trade out novels to keep the books circulating and keep the reading momentum at an all-time high. CES has already read almost 32,000 books and is now well over our 200 million word goal. Popsicles will given to the whole school this week in celebration of the teamwork it has taken to reach their goal. Burse, along with teachers and CES Reading Coach Terry Price, are already planning for next years reading program, adding new incentives, and researching new books for all levels. The goal will always be to increase student participation and the love for reading. DOE unveils numerous resources for parents Special to The NewsThe Florida Department of Education (DOE) launched a host of resources geared toward communicating directly with Floridas parents about public education. The purpose of this effort is to help parents understand Floridas assessment and accountability system, increased standards and how these changes will help prepare K-12 students for college, career and life. Floridas parents and guardians provide invaluable support to our students and the department is committed to ensuring they have the most accurate userfriendly information and resources available,Ž said Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson. New resources for parents include an FCAT 2.0 Call Center, Floridas Path to Success website, DOE Parent Portal by Novachi and Just for Parents e-mail address. See below for details about these resources. FCAT 2.0 Call Center DOE experts will be available to answer parent questions from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. Parents may call 866-507-1109, toll-free, to ask questions about FCAT, recent changes to Floridas accountability system, and how this impacts students and teachers. Floridas Path to Success Visit the Floridas Path to Success website to “ nd out more information about their transition to tougher standards and higher expectations. The website features a letter from Commissioner Robinson, timelines about Floridas education system, a question and answer page, and video from a Florida public school parent. The website is http:// www.” oridapathtosuccess. org/. DOE Parent Portal by Novachi In partnership with Novachi, the department has launched the DOE Parent Portal. This public forum is designed for parents to ask questions and voice ideas at the state level. The portal features a parent blog, discussion board and announcements page with more education resources coming soon. Parents may logon for access to this free user-friendly site. The website is http:// parents.” doe.org/home. DOE Just for Parents E-mail This e-mail address, justforparents@fdoe.org, is especially for Floridas parents to get answers, voice opinions and share ideas with the department. Email school news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is published when space becomes available and is edited for style, clarity and grammar. Ticket SponsorsWalt Disney World Tim Jordan and Bonnie Holub Wildwood Inn and Golf Course St. James Bay Golf Resort Premier Athletics Karla Nelson Photography Crawfordville Martial Arts Acad. Florida Georgia Glass Wal-Mart Crawfordville Elementary School’s “Country Fair”, April 2nd was a spectacular event! The weather was a mix of sun, warmth, rain and breeze but the crowd was happy, hungry and eager to enjoy the plethora of activities and food. Children got their faces painted, threw balls that “dunked” their favorite teacher, played bingo, ate cotton candy, slid down large slides, milked a cow, and participated in games that entertained the whole family. It was a fantastic, fun lled day! The success of the festival is due to the dedicated teachers, staff, and parents of Crawfordville; the generous support given from our businesses and community members of Wakulla County; and the dedicated members of the PTA who spent a tremendous amount of time preparing and planning for our “Country Fair.” Students and parents worked hard selling tickets and baking “goodies” for our Cake Walk and Sweet Shop. They worked so hard, that enough funds were raised before the day of the festival to put Mrs. Walker on the roof for 24 hours! This event will take place after FCAT! With the help of the Lions Club ipping burgers and passing out frosty, cold Pepsi products; the high school’s ROTC students working booths and running errands; the Sheriff’s Department assisting with security and safety; and volunteers working hard to assist throughout the day, the Crawfordville Country Fair proved to be a day for all to enjoy. I would like to give special thanks to our local businesses for their support as sponsors, for their generous donations, and for their encouraging words about our event. Once again, the community of Wakulla County did not hesitate to support our efforts to raise funds for our school and our students. Crawfordville Elementary School would like to say, “THANK YOU,” to all of those who were able to donate, attend, and support our 2012 Country Fair!Ace Hardware Adriene Hill, D.C., PA Ameris Bank Angie’s Marine Supply, Inc. Badcock Home Furnishings Bedfellows Body By Gena Brooks Concrete Capital Bowling Lanes Capital City BankCrawfordville Centennial Bank Coastal Restaurant Costco Dazzles El Jalisco Jimmy John’s Funky Fiddler Evolution Day Spa Green Peridot Salon Hardees of Crawfordville Little Caesars Lube-Xpert Mary Brogan Museum Mike’s Marine Supply Millie Bruce Peppers Mexican Grill Posey’s Steam Room Premier Athletics Purple Martin Nursery Robyn at Evolution Sallie’s Place Sea World Skate World State Farm-Glenda Conley Agent Talk O’The Town Deli The Cottage Collection The Donut Hole The Learning Curve Tutoring Center Vickie Heydenreich Wakulla Dance Academy Wakulla Florist Wakulla Florist & Gift Shop Whaley Photography Wildwood Resort Winn Dixie ZoinksSupporting VendorsFestival Sponsors Silent Auction Millie & Richie Bruce Tiffany Dubois Iris Shores Christy Byrne Cori Revell Marian Revell Jennifer BrooksClay Marshall LovelJean-Claude Picot R. Alan Andrews, PA Angelo & Son Seafood Restaurant & Tropical Trader Shrimp Company B & B Dugger Backwoods Pizza Brian & Tanya English Brooks, LeBoef, Bennett Law Of ce Crawfordville United Methodist Church Fish Camp Restaurant & Marina Florida Air Specialist Frank Mingledorff Hair by Nikki Happy Time Instructional Day Care Inspired Technologies Iris Annes Jimmy John’s Justin Coddington Concrete Pumping Marpan Supply Maximum Building Systems Wakulla Men’s Club Premier Athletics of Wakulla Residential Elevators Rock Solid Design & Cons. Ron & Linda Chason Southway Crane The Wharf Express Traci Cash, CPA

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By LISA KINARDSpecial to The NewsMonday … Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans v Badcock Furniture Rays … Rained out and held as part of a late night double header on Friday. Tuesday … Ameris Bank Sluggers vs Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws … Rained out and held on Wednesday. Wednesday … Ameris Bank Sluggers vs Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws The Ameris Bank Sluggers and Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws came into the game tied for “ rst place. Both teams knew only one team would come away with the regular season championship title. Amazingly, both teams had split their games this season with each winning one, losing one with one tie and had identical records for the season. The Outlaws jumped out to an early lead by scoring two runs in the top of the “ rst off of pitcher Michael McGlamry. Nick Lentz and Skyler Talavera scored on a two out, two strike double by Lucas Briggs This RBI double proved to be enough as the Outlaws went on to win 5-0. They also had runs scored by Lentz in the third, Greysen Rudd in the “ fth and Brandon Bennett in the 6h. Both teams played very good defense. Nick Lentz started on the mound for the Outlaws pitching 4 innings allowing no runs, no hits with six strike outs. Chase Forester was also very effective pitching three innings allowing three hits and no runs. The Outlaw hitters were Rudd and Briggs with 2 apiece and Forester, Lentz, Talavera, Briggs, James Calhoun and Bennett with one each. For the Sluggers, Hits came from McGlamry (double), Thomas Davis and Josh Conway Thursday … Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans v Ameris Bank Sluggers The Titans started things rolling with runs by Zach Norman and John Webe r in the “ rst. Two phenomenal catches by sluggers Noah Isman and Kaleb Langston robbed Jackson Montgomery and Zeke Bryan of hits and RBIs. Michael McGlamry tried to get the Sluggers on the board but some awesome “ eld work by Zeke Bryan kept it the Titans on top. In the third, Sluggers brought the score to 4-1 when Isman came home with hits from Thomas Davis and McGlamry. In the 4th, with Tyler Teegan on the mound, a great throw by Davis to Jake Bryan on “ rst ended the inning for the Titans. Going into the “ fth the Titans were up 5…1 but the Sluggers had a plan. Davis and McGlamry got things moving with hits but another Zeke Bryan catch on the ” y in center “ eld put an end to the momentum. The sixth inning was all Sluggers. Gabe Barwick scored making it 5-2. Thomas Davis smacked a double bringing in three more runs and tying the game at 5 each. McGlamry came home later in the inning to take the lead, but the Titans answered and the game ended with a 6-6 tie. Friday … Early game Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws over the Badcock Furniture Rays Friday … Late Game Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans take the win vs Badcock Furniture Rays As the regular season ends with the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws on top, the Championship serries begins next week. Be sure to catch a game as there are sure to be some memorable moments. Tuesday, May 22 … 1v4 Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws vs Badcock Furniture Rays Thursday, May 24 … 2v3 Ameris Bank Sluggers vs Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans Friday, May 25 … Championship W1 v W2 As always, thank you to our sponsors High Quality Heating & Air, Hamrick Insurance Associates, Ameris Bank, Harrison Bail Bonds, Badcock Furniture and Tallahassee Surgical Associates. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team views SportsBABE RUTH BASEBALLOutlaws take rst place LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMichael McGlamry of the Ameris Bank Sluggers. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Rays are the 2012 Wakulla Cal Ripken Majors Champion. Seeded number 2 to begin the annual year end tournament, the Rays defeated the As in a close 8-5 ballgame in the semi-“ nal. They advanced to the championship game against the Yankees which they won 12-5. Coaches are Lee Lewis, Bubba Dempsey, and Jason Lawhon. Players are Wesley Gowdy, Austin Hogan, Jonah Lawhon, Hayden Thomas, Zeb Lewis, Payton Pittman, Zac Clark, Dalten Wood, Brannon Stringer, Alex Van Der Merve, and Chase Hilyer. Congratulations, Rays!Wakulla Red Sox best Yankees in shootout, 12-10Special to The News The Red Sox and Yankees battled it out Friday, May 18, as they combined for 22 runs. In the end, the Red Sox won the offensive battle 12-10 in six innings. There were 20 hits, including nine extra base hits in the game. What a season,Ž said Red Sox Coach Russell Bryan. I am so proud of all the players. They deserved to win this championship with their hard work and determination. I must say the six teams in this league this year were awesome. A special thanks to Indians Coach Mike Barwick … your inspiration in unforgettable. PICTURED: Justin Bryan, Ethan Strickland, Logan Bruner, Travis Morgan, Trevor Jones, Garrett Sampson; standing: Tanner Marlow, Walker Hammelman, Justin Cardoza, Dominic Vargas, Parker Wilkinson,Paul Kilgore; Coach Russell Bryan, assistant coaches Mark Bryan and Nick Vargas. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRays are league championsCAL RIPKEN MAJORS BASEBALL FROM GOOD TO GREAT !Friends and neighbors, My name is Dr. Kimball Thomas As most of you know by now, I o cially am kicking o my campaign this Saturday. This means that I am o cially applying to be your superintendent of Wakulla County schools. As with any job one applies for, you submit a rsum. I would like to take this opportunity to do so now. I feel that if elected, you, the ci zens, will be my boss. The educa on of our children is very important and I would like you to know about all that I bring to this posi on. A er reading my rsum, I encourage you to check out my past employment and check with my references. This is no more than any person applying for a job would expect of his employer. Should you have any ques ons or comments, please call me or my campaign manager. I promise that I will call you as soon as possible. I would also like to take this opportunity to encourage you to call with your ideas and sugges ons on how we might make our school system be er. Team Leader – 6th Grade Teacher, Wakulla Middle School, Crawfordville 1983 1989 Assistant Principal, Wakulla Middle School, Crawfordville 1989-1993 Principal, James S. Rickards High School, Tallahassee 1993 – 1997 My direct supervisor was the Leon County superintendent (850) 487-7100 Principal, Florida A & M University Developmental Research School FAMU High 1998-2001 My direct supervisor was the Leon County superintendent (850) 487-7100 Senior Pastor, Philadelphia Primi ve Bap st Church, Tallahassee 1999-2001 Educa on Consultant, Florida Department of Educa on, Bureau of School Improvement 2001-2003 I worked under, and with Governor Jeb Bush Director, Federal, State and Compe ve Grants and Programs, 2003-2008 District School Board of Collier County, Naples My direct supervisor was the Collier County superintendent (239) 377-0001 Assistant Professor/Lecturer, Gainesville State College, Gainsville, GA 2008 -2011 I worked directly under the president of the college (678) 717-3639 Principal, East Gadsden High School, Havana 2011-Present My campaign manager is Jay S. Herring ( 850) 294-3270 Personal reference Ronnie Gray (850) 926-7074I welcome all of your sugges ons, let’s talk. Please Join us Saturday, May 26th at Hudson Park in downtown Crawfordville. There will be an array of guest speakers and live music Free BBQ will be o ered!Poli cal adver sement paid for and approved by Dr. Kimballl “Kim” Thomas, NPA for Wakulla County Superintendent of Schools LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Will be closed on Memorial Day Monday, May 28. Deadline for display advertisments requiring proofs and classi ed ads is Thursday, May 24 by 11 a.m. All other advertising is due by Friday, May 25

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By MARJ LAWEar protection is important at every shooting range. You must wear it if you are shooting at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Range in Sopchoppy. Guns make a lot of noise. If youre going to the range, and you want to have good ear protection, what will you choose? The least expensive route is to get squishy foam pillow-like earplugs. You roll these between your “ ngers to compress them, and then you stick them into your ears. They swell back up and conform to the shape of your ears. Mostly. Sometimes you hear sound that is not muf” ed. Then you have to take them out, compress them again, and insert once more. Sometimes you wiggle them with your index finger once theyre in. You will know when the sound is muf” ed. Trust me. Another very inexpensive (yes, were talking under $2) way to go is to “ nd ear buds. These are foam, but the part that goes in your ears is smaller than the abovementioned earplugs. They are attached with a cord, so you can pull them out and hang them around your neck when the range is coldŽ and no one is shooting. Theres a small plastic tab at the outer ear portion of the buds. You can turn it gently until the buds are “ rmly in place. You will know when the sound is muf” ed. Trust me. A third option is ear protection that looks like music headphones. They slide over your head just like headphones, and a cushion wraps around your ear to keep sound out. They give a more professional appearance, but the ones Ive seen that are under $50 reduce the sound only as much as those very cheap ear buds and pillows. Go “ gure. Another similar option can be headphones running on batteries to allow you to hear a person talking, but they blot out sudden sharp noises like guns going off. How do they do that? I dont have a clue, but they work. They muf” e sound as well as other headphones and ear buds and plugs. My personal favorite option is a combination of ear buds and headphones. When you wear both at the same time, the sound is really very muf” ed. This is especially good when you or your neighbor shoot high-caliber guns or ri” es. The only drawback I notice is that wearing headphones in Florida is hot and your ears get all sweaty in the spring, summer and fall. Im still going to use the combination buds and headphones, though. If the buds reduce noise by 26 decibels, and the phones by 24 decibels, then the combination of the two isƒ more. Trust me.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement. Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBetween painting an 8x8-foot mural for a local client, working on a pool and waterfall, clearing out a number of weedŽ pines and sweet guns and plus getting a spring cold (ugh!), Ive missed writing my Wakulla Wildlife articles recently and I apologize. Spring has sprung through and this last week we “ nally had a nice afternoon rain, and as usual in early May, the humidity, after the “ rst rains, immediately jumped to the point of being uncomfortable! When the long dry days of spring end after the winter cold fronts and rains have basically ended, and the summer thunderstorms start, along with the temperatures in the 80s and 90s, summer really sets in. And here come the yellow or deer ” ies. They have now started … unfortunately! It has been extremely dry, yet spring came and went and my Patti and I tried to absorb as much of the transformation as possible here locally. We watched as our “ rst fruit trees bloomed; the redbuds and dogwoods and wisteria, titi, etc. The azaleas bloomed too, but the drought really restricted their profuse blooming so they werent quite as showy as usual. We planted a number of butter” y and hummingbird attracting plants around our new cement lily pond, and watched as 23 species of butter” ies visited them. A real show. Weve found pig frog tadpoles in the ponds (Ive another pond by my woodworking shop), and some baby banded water snakes plus numerous dragonflies, like the pond hawks, darners, clubtails, etc., are now darting back and forth over the aquatics weve planted. Patti is a nature photographer … a professional since 1981. She is always looking for unique subjects to photograph and send on to her agent. One day I had the pleasure of showing her her “ rst broad-headed skink (one of seven species Ive recorded here). I “ rst observed this impressive reptile crawling along the forest ” oor on Floyd Knobs in Indiana when I was a child. I thought it was a red headed snake, until I “ nally detected its legs. Its head was a full inch across and the jaws looked swollen as if they contained venom, like our rattlers and true moccasin. These gray-bodied lizards get over a foot long and proportionately do have an oversized and strong jawed head (but contain no venom). The head of the bigger males can be fairly reddish orange. Ive chased them 20 feet or more up trees and here I “ nd them often in my barn looking for insects and other small critters. Patti also wished to photograph our local yellow pitcher plants, so we drove over to the Sumatra area to check out the bogs, which contain also the white, and parrot pitcher plants. We also found in Billys BogŽ our “ fth species. (Wed already returned to a place in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge where David Roddenberry of our branch of the Native Plant Society had located some hooded pitcher plants.) The fifth species was the purple pitcher plant, Sarracenia rosea. Just off Tower Road in Tates Hell State Forest we pulled to a stop in the road. Grabbing my binoculars, my suspicions were con“ rmed … an adult Black Bear walking toward us right down our lane. Neat!Enjoying the transition from springWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH HOME ON THE RANGEProtecting your hearing is important on the gun range SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSome different types of ear protection. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA winner in the Childrens Fishing TournamentDillon Harris received a second place trophy in the Childrens Fishing Tournament held Saturday, May 19. Harris caught a 2.5-pound bass in the competition. As prizes, Harris received a rod and reel, tacklebox and sunglasses. The freshwater divisions include bass, pan “ sh and cat“ sh. Saltwater categories include white trout, speckled trout, Spanish mackerel, red“ sh, ” ounder and whiting. No grouper, snapper, amberjack, sharks, rays, hard head or sail“ sh were considered. All anglers received a tournament T-shirt.FWC Facts:Snook can adapt to sudden changes in salinity with the help of chloride cells within their gills. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 27 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle FRANKLIN WA KU LLA JEFFE RS ON & TA YLOR GAG GROUPER 713-0014 99 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Perfect Weather for Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay!SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS $2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 CATCH MORE FISH FREE LINE WINDINGwith purchase Made in USA G BUY IN BULK & SAVE B B B B B B B B B B B B B Y Y U Y U Y U Y Y Y Y U U U U U U Y Y Y UY U U UY Y Y UY U Y I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N B U L K B U L K U L U L K U L L K L & S A V E & S A S A V A VE A VE VE V E BUY IN BULK & SAVE www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water W a t e r W a y s Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Memorial Day is fast upon us and that means a lot of folks out on the water. It goes without saying that even the most experienced boater needs to be extra cautious this weekend. There will be many out on the water who are infrequent or inexperienced boaters. This can be a recipe for disaster. The National Safe Boating Council holds National Safe Boating Week leading up to Memorial Day as the unof“ cial start to the recreational boating season. According to their reports, the U.S. Coast Guard identified Florida as the top-rated state for boating deaths and accidents. While the “ gures are from 2009, Florida ranks at the top of the list in previous years. In 2009, the Coast Guard counted 4,730 accidents that involved 736 deaths, 3,358 injuries and approximately $36 million in damage to property as a result of recreational boating accidents. Of those who drowned, 84 percent were not wearing life jackets. Please do your part to not be a statistic! In addition to preparing for a busy weekend, the Auxiliary has been working hard the last week. Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos and member Mike Harrison were invited to present a water safety and safe boating talk to the “ rst grade at Wakulla COAST Charter School in St. Marks. Christine Saulter, the “ rst grade teacher, invited the Auxiliary in because she is beginning a unit on water safety (including swimming, boating, etc.). The class of 15 students learned about the buddy system, the importance of a ” oat plan and life jacket, as well as how to call for help. It was a fun class for all, including the Auxiliarists. Several members also met down at the communications shed to continue work. The interior was painted and the exterior had a bit more preparation for a new coat of paint in the near future. Saturday was a busy day for us as well. Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon met early Saturday morning to set up for the Armed Forces Day Car Show at the Tallahassee Antique Car Museum. Norma and Phil Hill joined later in the morning. All enjoyed talking to the attendees about the Auxiliary and learning about the cars. Duane and Tim had the honor of selecting a participant for a Coast Guard Trophy … a 1930s Buick. A classy car that best represented the Coast Guard motto of being Semper Paratus … always ready. Also on Saturday, Mark Rosen was coxswain aboard FinLee with owner Steve Hults and a crew of Dave Rabon, Raye Crews and David Guttman. The crew left the dock at 4 p.m. for some night training to help Dave Rabon become a fully quali“ ed crew member. With the help of fellow Auxiliarists Bob Asztalos and Mike Harrison, the team practiced towing Bobs boat. In addition to helping Dave get some training, we never know what conditions we will be called out to for help, so we do our best to practice and make sure we are ready when the call comes. One of the other training items for new crew is to participate in night navigation. For our area, we usually head out to the center channel marker and wait for dusk before making our way back up the channel. On Saturday night, the docks were especially crowded due to a “ shing tournament and the tide was very low. Thankfully, alls well that ends well. With less than two feet of water, the crew found an open spot and docked FinLee, calling it a night. As our motto says, we are Semper Paratus … Always Ready. Are you? And, as Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarist Bob Asztalos gave a presentation to COAST Charter School “ rst graders. Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon set up at the Armed Forces Day Car Show at the Tallahassee Antique Car Museum. Emerald Sink. My most recent cave class visited several dive sites in search of clear water. Emerald Sink came to mind, but is currently unavailable to visitors seeking training. In its day however, Emerald was very popular. I “ rst visited Emerald Sink as a checkout dive site for our FSU scuba classes in the early 1980s. Local divers had constructed a ladder down the steep slopes of the sink, replacing the rope used by swimmers who jumped from trees. The annual ” oods usually demolished the ladder, necessitating periodic new investments. In the 1990s a very nice stairway was constructed that lasted several years. We would bring a dozen students at a time, dive them to 60 feet in the open water for two dives before moving on to ocean dives the next weekend. Emerald Sink was convenient, shallow and usually clear. Midday, the light would shine down the shaft in deep blue emerald rays. The University of Florida would bring their entire class of several hundred students for checkout dives, overwhelming the site but only for one weekend a semester. This site became a favorite cave dive of mine because it connected under the road, to other sinkholes close by. I could swim upstream at a shallow 70 feet to Twin and Cheryl, climb out and walk back to my car. Or I could swim 1,000 feet to the Dark Abyss, turn around and get back in under an hour. These became our after-work swims for exercise. Then one day I was told kids had stolen a car and dumped it in Emerald Sink! Fuel leaked out and contaminated our beautiful dive site. I called friends I knew in state government to get the car out as soon as possible, but found little interest. I “ nally threatened to go to the press regarding the threat to our countys drinking water. The car was quickly removed, but so was our access. The property was soon acquired by the Wakulla Springs State Park and diving was forbidden. Jonny Richards managed to get the attention of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to open Emerald Sink to diving if that community could raise the funds to build proper steps and facilities. Approximately $10,000 was raised, more than enough, and volunteers recruited to do the work. My group alone contributed $1,000 and seven helpers, only to “ nd out later that overbearing standards eliminated all of our contributors but two. The two of us have boycotted ever since out of protest. Today, with an average of only 40 people diving the site a year, the parking lot is overgrown from lack of attention. Heated debate continues about opening our local dive sites to the public while still maintaining the security of our watershed. And the emerald blue waters still ” ow relentlessly on its way to the sea, passing brie” y by this beautiful sinkhole. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday y Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed May 30, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 5:26 AM 3.2 ft. 6:05 AM High 1.5 ft. 10:33 AM 1.5 ft. 11:15 AM -0.0 ft. 12:03 AM 0.2 ft. 12:46 AM 0.4 ft. 1:37 AM 0.7 ft. 2:36 AM 1.0 ft. 3:41 AM Low 3.9 ft. 4:15 PM 3.7 ft. 4:53 PM 3.2 ft. 6:48 AM 3.2 ft. 7:36 AM 3.2 ft. 8:29 AM 3.3 ft. 9:25 AM 3.4 ft. 10:20 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:26 PM 1.6 ft. 12:05 PM 1.6 ft. 1:06 PM 1.4 ft. 2:21 PM 1.1 ft. 3:44 PM 0.7 ft. 5:01 PM Low 3.5 ft. 5:40 PM 3.3 ft. 6:38 PM 3.0 ft. 7:58 PM 2.9 ft. 9:38 PM 3.0 ft. 11:14 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed May 30, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 5:23 AM 3.3 ft. 6:02 AM High 1.6 ft. 10:30 AM 1.6 ft. 11:12 AM -0.0 ft. 12:00 AM 0.2 ft. 12:43 AM 0.5 ft. 1:34 AM 0.8 ft. 2:33 AM 1.1 ft. 3:38 AM Low 3.9 ft. 4:12 PM 3.8 ft. 4:50 PM 3.3 ft. 6:45 AM 3.2 ft. 7:33 AM 3.2 ft. 8:26 AM 3.3 ft. 9:22 AM 3.5 ft. 10:17 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:23 PM 1.7 ft. 12:02 PM 1.7 ft. 1:03 PM 1.6 ft. 2:18 PM 1.2 ft. 3:41 PM 0.7 ft. 4:58 PM Low 3.6 ft. 5:37 PM 3.3 ft. 6:35 PM 3.1 ft. 7:55 PM 2.9 ft. 9:35 PM 3.0 ft. 11:11 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed Ma y 30, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 6:02 AM High 1.3 ft. 11:37 AM -0.1 ft. 12:30 AM -0.0 ft. 1:07 AM 0.2 ft. 1:50 AM 0.4 ft. 2:41 AM 0.7 ft. 3:40 AM 0.9 ft. 4:45 AM Low 3.6 ft. 4:51 PM 3.0 ft. 6:41 AM 3.0 ft. 7:24 AM 3.0 ft. 8:12 AM 3.0 ft. 9:05 AM 3.0 ft. 10:01 AM 3.2 ft. 10:56 AM High 1.4 ft. 12:19 PM 1.4 ft. 1:09 PM 1.4 ft. 2:10 PM 1.3 ft. 3:25 PM 1.0 ft. 4:48 PM 0.6 ft. 6:05 PM Low 3.5 ft. 5:29 PM 3.3 ft. 6:16 PM 3.0 ft. 7:14 PM 2.8 ft. 8:34 PM 2.7 ft. 10:14 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed May 30, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 5:18 AM 2.4 ft. 5:57 AM High 1.1 ft. 10:44 AM 1.1 ft. 11:26 AM -0.0 ft. 12:14 AM 0.1 ft. 12:57 AM 0.3 ft. 1:48 AM 0.5 ft. 2:47 AM 0.7 ft. 3:52 AM Low 2.9 ft. 4:07 PM 2.8 ft. 4:45 PM 2.4 ft. 6:40 AM 2.4 ft. 7:28 AM 2.4 ft. 8:21 AM 2.4 ft. 9:17 AM 2.5 ft. 10:12 AM High -0.1 ft. 11:37 PM 1.1 ft. 12:16 PM 1.1 ft. 1:17 PM 1.0 ft. 2:32 PM 0.8 ft. 3:55 PM 0.5 ft. 5:12 PM Low 2.7 ft. 5:32 PM 2.5 ft. 6:30 PM 2.3 ft. 7:50 PM 2.2 ft. 9:30 PM 2.2 ft. 11:06 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed May 30, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 5:10 AM 2.5 ft. 5:49 AM 2.5 ft. 6:32 AM High 1.4 ft. 10:12 AM 1.5 ft. 10:54 AM 1.5 ft. 11:44 AM 0.2 ft. 12:25 AM 0.4 ft. 1:16 AM 0.7 ft. 2:15 AM 1.0 ft. 3:20 AM Low 3.0 ft. 3:59 PM 2.9 ft. 4:37 PM 2.8 ft. 5:24 PM 2.5 ft. 7:20 AM 2.5 ft. 8:13 AM 2.5 ft. 9:09 AM 2.6 ft. 10:04 AM High -0.1 ft. 11:05 PM -0.0 ft. 11:42 PM 1.5 ft. 12:45 PM 1.4 ft. 2:00 PM 1.1 ft. 3:23 PM 0.7 ft. 4:40 PM Low 2.6 ft. 6:22 PM 2.3 ft. 7:42 PM 2.2 ft. 9:22 PM 2.3 ft. 10:58 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed Ma y 30, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 6:39 AM 2.5 ft. 7:12 AM 2.5 ft. 7:45 AM High 1.7 ft. 9:57 AM 1.7 ft. 10:50 AM 1.6 ft. 11:53 AM 0.1 ft. 12:05 AM 0.3 ft. 12:50 AM 0.6 ft. 1:41 AM 0.9 ft. 2:36 AM Low 2.8 ft. 3:32 PM 2.7 ft. 4:21 PM 2.5 ft. 5:18 PM 2.6 ft. 8:18 AM 2.6 ft. 8:49 AM 2.6 ft. 9:20 AM 2.7 ft. 9:50 AM High -0.2 ft. 10:48 PM -0.0 ft. 11:24 PM 1.4 ft. 1:07 PM 1.2 ft. 2:26 PM 0.8 ft. 3:40 PM 0.5 ft. 4:44 PM Low 2.3 ft. 6:28 PM 2.0 ft. 7:57 PM 1.9 ft. 9:45 PM 2.0 ft. 11:41 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 24 May 30First May 28 Full June 4 Last June 11 New June 19Major Times 11:12 AM 1:12 PM 11:39 PM 1:39 AM Minor Times 4:43 AM 5:43 AM 5:47 PM 6:47 PM Major Times --:---:-12:08 PM 2:08 PM Minor Times 5:25 AM 6:25 AM 6:55 PM 7:55 PM Major Times 12:36 AM 2:36 AM 1:06 PM 3:06 PM Minor Times 6:10 AM 7:10 AM 8:06 PM 9:06 PM Major Times 1:37 AM 3:37 AM 2:08 PM 4:08 PM Minor Times 7:02 AM 8:02 AM 9:16 PM 10:16 PM Major Times 2:39 AM 4:39 AM 3:11 PM 5:11 PM Minor Times 7:59 AM 8:59 AM 10:22 PM 11:22 PM Major Times 3:43 AM 5:43 AM 4:14 PM 6:14 PM Minor Times 9:01 AM 10:01 AM 11:23 PM 12:23 AM Major Times 4:44 AM 6:44 AM 5:14 PM 7:14 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:05 AM 11:05 AM Good Better Best Best++ Better Good Average6:38 am 8:29 pm 9:36 am 11:34 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:38 am 8:30 pm 10:32 am --:-6:38 am 8:30 pm 11:29 am 12:14 am 6:37 am 8:31 pm 12:27 pm 12:51 am 6:37 am 8:32 pm 1:26 pm 1:27 am 6:37 am 8:32 pm 2:26 pm 2:03 am 6:36 am 8:33 pm 3:29 pm 2:39 am20% 27% 33% 39% 46% 53% 60% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Watch out for manatees

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA man charged with his sixth DUI was sentenced to eight years in state prison recently after entering a straight-up plea, meaning there was no deal between the defense and prosecution for a recommended sentence and it was left solely to the discretion of the judge. Walter Carey, 45, entered a plea to the felony charge in open court on May 10 and was sentenced by Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford to three years for the DUI, and “ ve years more for a charge driving after his license was permanently revoked. The prison term ordered was to be followed by two years community control. Carey was charged in 1996 with DUI manslaughter for causing a death while drunk driving, and Judge Fulford said she could not, in good conscience, give Carey any less prison time and have him get back out on the road and kill someone else. Shortly after court, Carey “ led a motion to have the sentence thrown out, claiming he received ineffective assistance of counsel from his attorney Bill Sharp. The motion claims that Sharp was unaware of the prior convictions for leaving the scene of an accident with a death and driving while license suspended or revoked involving death. According to court records, in Aug. 6, 1995, Carey struck a pedestrian walking on State Road 363 in the early morning hours. According to the arrest report, Carey told a witness he was going to call 911 and then drove home and did not call. He told his wife and mother what he had done. The pedestrian died while waiting for Life Flight to arrive. His mother told authorities that she saw him remove bone and tissue from under the car and place it in a burn barrel to get rid of it. In other court matters: € Melvin Santos, 42, pleaded to charges of promoting a sexual performance by a child and, as part of a plea bargain, was sentenced to “ ve years in state prison followed by “ ve years of sex offender probation. Santos entered the plea on May 9 before Judge Fulford. Santos and his girlfriend, Salena McVey, 28, were charged with bringing a teen girl from Perry and Santos photographed McVey and the teen having sex. A felony charge against Santos of sexual activity with a 16-year-old was dropped given his defense that he didnt have sexual contact with the teen. Santos was represented by Tallahassee attorney Greg Cummings. Charges are still pending against McVey. € A 20-year-old Crawfordville man, Michael Skinner, was sentenced to 15 years sex offender probation with a condition that he serve 11 months and 29 days in Wakulla County Jail after he had sex with a 15-year-old girl. He was 19 at the time he allegedly had sex with the girl. If Skinner violates, he faces 10 years in state prison … which was imposed by Judge Fulford but suspended on the condition that he complete probation. The lewd and lascivious battery charges came after Skinner, who was 19 at the time and estranged from his own family, and was living with the girl and her mother. Court testimony indicated the girls mother told Skinner when he came to live in her house not to have sex with her daughter. When the mother found out about some sexual contact between Skinner and the girl, the mother reportedly exploded with anger, punching a wall and yelling. The girl reportedly responded by telling her mother she had been raped by Skinner. Assistant Public Defender Matt Ream, who represented Skinner, contended the sex was consensual, and asked the court to invoke the Romeo and Juliet statute, which mitigates some of the punishment when two young people … one or both of whom are underage, and within a few years of age … are boyfriend-girlfriend and engage in sex. Ream asked that the court consider those factors and sentence Skinner to three years of non-sex offender probation. Judge Fulford did make a downward departure based on findings by the court that the alleged victim was a willing participant and that it was an isolated incident. € Vernon Farnsworth, 33, pleaded no contest on May 9 to burglary and grand theft charges for stealing copper and numerous weapons and was sentenced to “ ve years in state prison followed by “ ve years of probation. According to the arrest report, sheriffs detectives investigating a reported burglary found some items at a Wakulla County pawn shop where Farnsworth had sold them. He was charged with burglary of a dwelling, grand theft of a firearm, grand theft or more than $300 but less than $20,000 and possession of a “ rearm by a convicted felon. Among the items reported missing were copper piping, air conditioner and plow. In an interview with law enforcement, he denied taking a pump shotgun, but did allegedly admit to taking items including a crossbow, camera and several extension cords … which he burned so he could salvage the copper. € In a civil court “ ling, CRE Venture 2011-1 LLC “ led to foreclose on nearly $2 million worth of property owned by Walt Dickson and several of his companies. The foreclosure complaint claims that Wakulla Bank loaned Dickson and his companies more than $1.4 million in 2009, later increased to $1.5 million. In 2011, FDIC as Receiver for Wakulla Bank, assigned the mortgage to CRE Venture, which claims the note is in default and seeks more than $1.9 million representing principal and interest. Among the parcels CRE is seeking to foreclose on are five acres of land in Tarpine and numerous lots in Panacea Mineral Springs and Twin Lakes Estates. Dickson and Panacea Coastal Construction, Panacea Coastal Properties, JerBe-Lou Development are named in the lawsuit, as well as other individuals, W. Brent Dickson, Bess S. Dickson and L. Marvis Thomas.Court shorts Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555 The college of choice! Invest in yourself today Aordable tuition at TCC+higher wages for those with college degrees = A really smart investment GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE Continued from Page 1A He was put through several different tests, including the trainer hiding the ball and seeing if Geist could “ nd it. They liked what they saw and took him. Dean says they look for dogs with a very strong play drive and who are healthy. Those normally make the best canines for us,Ž he says. If Geist passes all the required training, he will eventually replace one of the existing dogs that is ready to retire. We give our canines the best of care,Ž Dean says. They are considered to be upper class in the dog world.Ž The canine detection team is trained to detect drugs, weapons, and other contraband and are used in prisons and on prison grounds, including parking lots, throughout the state. Hes going to make a handler very happy, I think,Ž Twist says. Carroll says Geists story is a successful one. People didnt give up on him,Ž Carroll says. This story is also just one of many, she says. The animal control of“ ce is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. They take in all types of animals, those that are healthy and those that arent. Carroll says if someone does feel they need to give up their pet to please provide animal control with as much information about the pet as they can. This makes it easier when trying to place the animal. To contact animal control, call 926-0902 Those looking to adopt an animal can visit the Wakulla County Animal Shelter located at 1 Oak Street in Crawfordville. The shelter is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, call 926-0890 or 926-0891.Geist is training for DOC By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 22 … Florida home sales fell slightly in April, but state realtors were quick to say Tuesday that median price and pending sales rose dramatically during the month. Figures compiled by the Florida Realtors also showed the inventory of homes available for sale shrunk further as buyers continued to whittle away at the states postcrash backlog of existing homes. Here in Florida, were seeing some strong numbers that show positive momentum for the states housing recovery and our economy,Ž said 2012 Florida Realtors President Summer Greene, in a statement. Sale closings of existing homes fell 0.7 percentage points from April 2011, while condominium sales were off about 4.9 percent. Nationally, sales of single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, increased 10 percent in April from a year ago. A return of normal home buying for occupancy is helping home sales across all price points, and now the recovery appears to be extending to home prices,Ž said Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the National Association of Realtors, in a statement. The general downtrend in both listed and shadow inventory has shifted from a buyers market to one that is much more balanced, but in some areas it has become a sellers market.Ž Median prices for homes rose signi“ cantly in Florida. The statewide median sales price for single-family existing homes in April was $144,350, up 10.2 percent from the year-ago “ gure. The statewide median for townhome-condo properties was $108,000, 16.1 percent more than April 2011. Nationally, median prices increased by 1.9 percent. Part of the increase in home prices is due to a shrinking inventory of homes and condos on the market, said Florida Realtor chief economist John Tuccillo. The backlog of available single family homes fell to a supply of just under six months … in most cases less than half what it was in late 2007. Inventories in the Tampa area fell more than 30 percent between April 2011 and last month. Inventories in Orlando and Miami fell 27 percent and 23 percent respectively during the same period. The housing numbers for the state of Florida continue to signal recovery,Ž Tuccillo said in a statement. Sales in 2012 are above where they were in 2011, a harbinger of a third straight year of improvement.Ž Pending sales were also up sharply, climbing 38 percent statewide from a year ago. Pending sales are those deals that are signed but have yet to close, a process that usually takes one to three months. The interest rate for a 30-year “ xed-rate mortgage averaged 3.91 percent in April 2012, down from the 4.84 percent average during the same month a year earlier, according to Freddie Mac.Home sales steady, price up, backlog downThe statewide median sales price for singlefamily existing homes in April was $144,350, up 10.2 percent from the year-ago “ gure.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsJennifer Gay of Crawfordville reported the theft of cash from her purse at Riversprings Middle School on May 10. The stolen property was valued at $170. The investigation continues. Sgt. Ray Johnson and School Safety Of“ cer Jim Griner investigated. € On May 10, Betty Ward of St. Marks reported the theft of her wallet from a restroom at WalMart. The victim realized she left the wallet and when she returned a short time later, the wallet was returned to her. However, it was missing $180. Other items inside the wallet were not missing. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On May 11, Matthew Thompson of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed an unauthorized charge on his bank account for $200. Someone purchased a camera lens through his account. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 11, Carolyn Castello of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed two unauthorized debits on her bank account. The total amount of the theft is valued at $250. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 11, Leadie Haynes of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief in Sopchoppy. The victims circuit breaker box was damaged and wires were tampered with. Damage was estimated at $300. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. € On May 11, Susan Brumbley of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone inserted wood into her house door lock. Damage to the lock was estimated at $20. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 11, Shane Momier of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed seven unauthorized charges on his bank account. A total of $1,430 worth of charges was created in Washington, D.C., and Maryland. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On May 11, Brian Pellman of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c accident on Shadeville Road just west of Wakulla Springs Road. Pellman was driving westbound on Shadeville Road when a tree collapsed and fell on his truck. Damage was estimated at $6,000 and Fire Rescue and staff from the Road and Bridge Department removed the tree from the roadway. Pellman was not injured. Deputy Mike Zimba, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On May 12, Tabetha Spaulding of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to a home owned by Ellen Sessor of Crawfordville. A white SUV struck the victims mailbox and pushed it down. Deputy Ian Dohme and Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 12, Debra Sparks of Tallahassee reported a trespassing on her Crawfordville property. The victim confronted the trespassers on her property and evidence was collected. A person of interest has been identi“ ed. Deputy Mike Crum and Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. €On May 12, Geary Boston of Crawfordville reported that real estate signs advertising his property were pulled out of the ground and dumped into a ditch. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On May 13, a WalMart customer called in a retail theft. Two male suspects obtained two large televisions from the electronics department and exited the building without paying for them. The televisions are valued at $1,290. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On May 13, Debra Sparks of Tallahassee reported a trespassing at her Crawfordville property. The victim has more than 17 No TrespassingŽ signs on her Riversink area property. Deputy Vicki Mitchell met with Randy Kevin Basore, 53, of Crawfordville and explained to him that he could not use private property as a shortcut to a sinkhole. Basore was arrested for trespassing and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. €On May 13, Deputy Mike Crum recovered a cellphone that was found in the parking lot of the Wakulla County Jail. The phone did not have enough power for Deputy Crum to determine who owned it. It was turned into the Evidence Division. € On May 14, Deputy Ben Steinle investigated a traffic crash at Forest Road 365 and Arran Road. A truck was discovered up against a tree. The driver left the scene of the crash on foot. The case remains open until investigators can speak to the driver, who was later identi“ ed. The family of the driver said he was not seriously injured, but left for Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. € On May 14, Devro Burton of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le his taxes when he discovered that his Social Security number had already been used. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € On May 14, Stefan Floyd of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim checked on his tax refund and discovered that his Social Security number had already been used and his refund had been claimed. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On May 14, Karen Brown of Tallahassee reported a grand theft at Wal-Mart. Items located in the victims purse were reported missing. After, Wal-Mart staff reported recovering some of the items in a fruit bin. The items that havent been recovered are valued at $135. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. € On May 14, Eva Grif“ n of Crawfordville reported the theft of a “ rearm. The “ rearm is valued at $400 and may have been lost during a move from Nevada. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On May 14, Lt. Sherrell Morrison and Deputy Bill Poole investigated two dogs in distress in the Winn-Dixie parking lot. The owner of the dogs was questioned and the animals were allowed to get out of the vehicle. One of the subjects had a theft warrant out of Oregon, but Oregon of“ cials would not extradite. The subjects told law enforcement that they were camping in western Wakulla County and the truck was a rental with an Oklahoma tag. The subjects, from Texas, Oregon and Delaware, had proof of purchase for the groceries and no arrests were made. € On May 14, Jeffrey Cybulski of Crawfordville reported a theft at the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department. A GPS and currency, valued at $250, was stolen from the “ re station. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On May 15, Rachel Pritchard of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. The victims credit card was used to book a Texas hotel room without authorization. The fraud was for $47. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On May 15, Dominique Hawkins of WalMart observed a subject purchase items from the store and return to obtain more items without paying for them. Donna Pauline Hand, 55, of Crawfordville was arrested for retail theft and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. The value of the health and beauty items taken was $37. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On May 15, Melissa Swain of Crawfordville reported the theft of a retail gift card. The card was mailed from a relative but never received by the victim. A person of interest was identi“ ed in the case. The card is valued at $150. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On May 16, David Tomberlin of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from his home. The pills are valued at $50 and suspects have been identified. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On May 16, John Harris of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary and criminal mischief. The front door of his unoccupied home was stolen. The door is valued at $120. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On May 16, Dominique Hawkins of Wal-Mart reported a retail theft. Two female suspects paid for $21 worth of merchandise, but failed to pay for the remaining $213 worth of goods before leaving the store. Melissa Dawn Herndon, 31, of Crawfordville and Charlene Marie Smith, 27, of Crawfordville were arrested and face retail theft charges. They were transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On May 16, James Doyle of Crawfordville reported the theft of tools while he was in the process of moving. The victim reported the theft of $2,100 worth of tools and $75 worth of damage to his home. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On May 17, Lou Ann Hames of Crawfordville reported “ nding personal property along the side of U.S. Highway 98 between Spring Creek Highway and Wakulla Beach Road. The bag contained personal items belonging to a female. The bag was placed in the Evidence Division. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 899 calls for service during the past week including: 17 residential and business alarms; 72 citizen contacts; 22 disturbances; 47 abandoned E-911 calls; 18 regular E-911 calls; 46 investigations; 53 medical emergencies; 244 residential and business security checks; 13 special details; 12 suspicious vehicles; 10 thefts; 56 traf“ c enforcements; 62 traf“ c stops; 11 disabled vehicles; 13 reckless vehicles; 20 wanted people; and 23 watch orders.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recognized Virginia Barnes of Crawfordville with a Distinguished Service Award for providing more than 25 years of “ nancial support to the Florida Youth Ranches. Sheriff Crum presented a certi“ cate to Barnes who was accompanied by her daughter, June Vause. I really appreciate people like Virginia Barnes who recognize an outstanding cause and continue to support that cause for many years,Ž said Crum. I know the young people at the youth ranches appreciate the support as well.ŽFrom FWC NewsOver the past week, the crew of the Gulf Sentry generated the following activity. Of“ cer Joshua Waite observed a vessel operating in a careless manner on the St. Marks River. Upon boarding the vessel and conducting an investigation, it was determined the operator was impaired. Of“ cer Waite arrested the suspect for boating under the in” uence (BUI). The suspect later provided a breath sample that was above the legal limit of .08. On the same day, Of“ cers Matt Gore and Will Raker were conducting water patrol on the Carrabelle River. While conducting a boarding, Of“ cer Gore became suspicious that the operator might be impaired. After conducting his investigation, Of“ cer Gore arrested the individual for BUI/operation while impaired. Later that night, while conducting a resource inspection, Of“ cer Raker issued a citation for possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis. WCSO/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSInterim Sheriff Donnie Crum with Virginia Barnes and her daughter, June VauseBarnes recognized for support of youth ranchWildlife o cers make local arrests on patrol Team Wakulla Wrestling ClubPRESENTSElementary / Middle Wrestling CampHigh / Middle School Wrestling Camp June 4th through 7th at RMS Gym $150Instruction by Darton College Head Coach Mike Miller REGULAR CLUB PRA C TIC E(open to everyone 4 years and older)Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:30pm-7:00pm June 11th through 15th at RMS Gym HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA 000ARJR L o o k i n g f o r Looking for t h e l a t e s t the latest L o c a l N e w s ? Local News? LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMay 20 is a celebration of emancipationBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsThe weather was bright and the mood was festive for the May 20th Celebration held at Mount Trial Baptist Church in Sopchoppy. The event was held in partnership with the Wakulla County Christian Coalition and celebrated May 20, 1865, as the date on which the Emancipation Proclamation was read aloud at the Knott House in Tallahassee by Union General Edward McCook. The Proclamation freed the slaves in the United States, and May 20th is recognized regionally as a date to celebrate African American citizenship. Before the Emancipation Proclamation, black people were just property,Ž said Tanya Price, a member of Mount Trial. This is celebrating that we are citizens. This is not only our heritage, but a big part of American history.Ž Price noted that the 20th of May is only celebrated in this area as the Proclamation was read on different dates all over the nation. The celebration of the reading has been passed down through the generations. Herb Donaldson, an organizer of the event, remembers May 20th as a date when there was always plenty of food in the house. We celebrated with food,Ž he said. It was a day to remember that instead of being able to be with my grandmother in her kitchen, I might have been in someone elses kitchen, working for scraps.Ž Donaldsons hope in organizing the event is to strike a new chord „ to bring people together, not just from their church, or with the people they know; but a chance for all the communities to come together. Its got everything to do with community.Ž Retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Jarvis Rosier, who gave a speech about the African American “ ght for freedom, also spoke about community and how good it felt to be home. Coming down home feels so good when its for such a joyous occasion,Ž said Rosier with a hearty grin. Rosier, who also spoke at St. Johns Episcopal Church on the importance of May 20th, is the Civil War coordinator for the U.S. Colored Troops Education Project, and a member of the National Black Historical Society. Rosier said he has always had a passion for history, and said he felt honored to speak at the Mount Trial May 20th Celebration. A lot of local history has been told here today,Ž said Rosier. Knowing [history], reading it, is to believe it; but seeing history in living form is to conceive it. The more people know about history the less likely they are to repeat it. Its important for the nation as a whole to see that we righted the wrong of slavery „ and its important for the youth to understand that.Ž Some of the activities offered at the celebration were a clothing giveaway, a cake walk, basketball, and a photography exhibit showcasing early African American families of the area. Barbecue and fried chicken were available and a Maypole was set up near the festivities, replete with purple and pink ribbons waving in the breeze. Doris Mackey remembers a Maypole at the May 20th celebrations of the late 1930s, when her grandfather was a deacon at Mount Trial. Mackey noted that the event is good for young people to know where they came from, and to be grateful for the opportunities they have.Ž Dominic Rollins, the youth pastor at Mount Trial, believes that while The event is important to hold at a church, its not just a church thing. This is one of those events that pulls people together. Its not about the food or the music, its about the fellowship.Ž Clarence Davis, a young man of Crawfordville, read the Emancipation Proclamation aloud to a crowd of around 100 people at the event. Reading it aloud, he said, It felt a little closer.Ž To read it was an honor,Ž he said. Gracie Rosier Williams and cousin, retired Sgt. Major Jarvis Rosier. Winding around the Maypole. Jakarin Johnson, Ardria Hughes, Clarence Davis and Diamond Rollins enjoy the festivities. Lining up for homemade treats. Nyla Farmer and Treasure Butler. Wakullas C.O.A.S.T. Charter Schoolƒ A WINNING TEAM! Home Of The StingraysCALL 925-6344WAKULLA COAST CHARTER SCHOOLAlyssa Higgins Principalalyssa.higgins@wcsb.us48 Shell Island Rd. P.O. Box 338 St. Marks, FL. 32355 Wakullas C.O.A.S.T. Charter SchoolƒA WINNING TEAM! wakullaschooldistrict.org Grades K-8 Free Public School & VPK Strong Academic Support Character Development • Art • Music • Technology Marine Aquarium & Butter y Gardens Junior Garden Club Bus Transportation Available National School Lunch Program Free or Reduced Breakfast & Lunch ENROLLMENT APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE2012/2013 REGISTRATION OPENINGS AVAILABLE ENROLL NOW! Historical Photos of Wakulla County People & Places 850-559-4296 DEERWKP C On May 19, 2011 A. J. and Molly Strickland Peck were blessed with Andrew Edward Peck. Drew arrived weighing 6lbs 6oz and 18 inches long and with the biggest dimple in his cheek that his proud Nana and Poppa had ever seen. He is the grandson of Albert and Helen Adams Strickland of Crawfordville, Florida. His great grandparents were the late H. T. and Gladys Adams of Crawfordville and the late Abel and Sadie Mims Strickland of St. Marks. His paternal grandparents are Andy and Susan Niesen Peck of Orlando, Florida. His great grandparents are Jim and Dorothy Schutz Niesen, of Orange City, Florida and the late Andrew and Ruth Higgins Peck.We Love you Drew, Nana and Poppa Happy First Birthday! Happy First Birthday! 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 HOW TO CHOOSE A MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLAN Savvy Senior, Page 3B NUMBERS GAME FOR JOBS, SCHOOLS, LOBBYISTSWeekly Roundup, Page 5B THE ANNUAL SPRING FLINGPhotos, Page 10B Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life By R.H. CARTERSenior Center DirectorLoneliness and social isolation were unfamiliar terms that had no meaning to me when I was “ rst employed by the senior center. Soon I noticed an older gentleman who spent much of his time alone outside the senior center sitting in our swing. One day, I went out and asked him how he enjoyed our meals. He said that our meals was all that he ate. He went on to say that he ate lunch here Tuesday through Friday and carried three meals home on Friday to eat Saturday through Monday. At that time, the senior center was open to seniors only Tuesday through Friday. I responded by saying meals must be the most important service we provide for you. He immediately stood up and said no, this is the only life I have. I sit home Saturday through Monday waiting for Tuesday to come so I can be around other people. That is the most important thing you do for me. We continued this discussion for almost an hour. He described how he had no contact with people except in the senior center and how lonely that was. This was my introduction to loneliness and social isolation. The following week, we began serving seniors Monday through Friday. The main thing creating loneliness and isolation is not being connected to others and not having a sense of belonging. Seniors who retire after a very intense working life may have only job-related friendships. They may “ nd it dif“ cult to rebuild a network that is not connected to work. This is true for men and is becoming increasingly true for women. Seniors who suffer the loss of a spouse are vulnerable to social isolation and loneliness. If they do not have emotional support of family members they are often reluctant to share their predicament with others. This may also present itself in cases of unhappy marriages because their generation is less likely to consider divorce. Loneliness and social isolation impacts every aspect of seniors lives, including mood, health and well being. Problems and phobias are likely to increase especially when the feeling exists that young people are not interested in older people. These feelings impair their immune system and can create depression and result in a decline in general health. This may reduce selfesteem and bring behavioral changes including less physical activity and not eating well. Loneliness and social isolation can increase seniors vulnerability to exploitation. When seniors deteriorate in their minds, then they physically deteriorate as well. Earlier this year, I wrote an article on CELEBRATING LIFE in the senior center. This article described all the food and activities we provide to bring joy and happiness to the senior citizens. The following month I wrote an article on AGING SUCCESSFULLY that discussed health education, health screenings and exercise provided in the senior center. Every activity mentioned in these two articles combats loneliness and isolation. I have read many articles and come face to face with the reality of this mega trend in America...loneliness and social isolation. Exercise that strengthens bodies, parks that bring people together, churches, social clubs and, of course the senior center, are regularly mentioned in our local news and provide services that serve social, psychological and physical needs. I once published a statement that I consider relevant, Enjoy your life … Laughter and joy will lift your spirit, strengthen your body and feed your soul. One of the main needs of seniors is feeling connected and having a sense of belonging to our community. Social isolation is a complex issue. It depends on the quality of relationships, as well as many personal aspects of day to day living. Loneliness and isolation are feelings based on state of mind. It is invisible and very dif“ cult to measure or quantify. However, its consequences are very real and visible because they are so detrimental to individuals and society as a whole even if you only consider the cost of the decrease in mental and physical health. When I came to the senior center, I believed that serving meals was the most important service that we provided. I soon learned and continue to believe that providing seniors THEIR place to share their lives with each other is the most important service we provide.R.H. Carter is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center.Overcoming loneliness and social isolationApril is celebrated with Easter brunch, Volunteer Appreciation Day, Spring Fling, and Earth Day By DIANE LANTER and TAMARA BYRNESof the Senior CenterThe few April showers that we had, brought April and May ” owers to our ” ourishing garden. Tamara, her seniors and the Iris Garden Club have worked very hard to establish the raised beds with tomatoes, squash, onions and watermelon. The Master Gardeners of Leon and Wakulla counties, led by Trevor Hylton, built these beds for the center several years ago. The pergola that Ray Rich so lovingly put together is now covered with cross vines, native honeysuckle and confederate jasmine. The pergola has provided a cool, refreshing place to relax and enjoy the new blooms along our walking trail. Don Allens blueberry bushes have bloomed and blueberries are growing but we are still hoping for the bushes to thrive. Thanks to all who donated tomato cages … our tomatoes are standing up tall and producing nice healthy tomatoes. The pots of fennel and wild” owers have been feeding our butter” y larvae. If you would like a nice place to relax, enjoy the weather or read a book, come by the senior center and enjoy our pergola. Chef Mary “ xed one of her famous brunch menus for us to celebrate Easter at the center. The seniors made the center pieces complete with a bunny. They were raf” ed off and a lucky recipient from each table went home with an Easter basket. Our annual Volunteer Appreciation Day was a great success. We honored more than 150 gracious Wakulla volunteers, who make it possible for us to provide the services that make this senior center a wonderful place to come to for information and activities. Karen Henry, one of our volunteers, was our speaker for the event. She is currently delivering meals to our homebound clients and they are enjoying seeing her and her always smiling face. Thank you, Karen and all of our volunteers. Mid-April we had a visit with Carolyn Kramer and Joey Grubbs, a wonderful singing duo. They had seniors singing and dancing right along with them. We sure do enjoy their visits. It looks like October might be their next visit. On April 21, the center was rocking with the Tallahassee Swing Band. What a time we had rockin and a rollin and swinging each other around the dance ” oor. Chef Marys hors doeuvres were the hit of the party. If you havent tasted Marys Original Peach Preserves, you can purchase jars at the senior center for $6 a jar or three for $15. Earth Day was celebrated all week at the Senior Center. On Monday, Reenie Rogers from New Leaf Market showed the seniors how to make green cleaning products using baking soda and scented essential oils. Continued on Page 4B Shelley Swenson from the extension of“ ce visited during Earth Day week and shared projects with seniors.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSenior Center Director R.H. Carter with Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis at the volunteer luncheon. Another jar of Chef Marys peach preserves are sold at a table set up at the door of the Senior Center. T Like us on

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Friday, May 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, May 26  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. Sunday, May 27  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, May 28  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, May 29  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 30  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, May 31  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Special EventsThursday, May 24  WORKSHOP ON GETTING TREES READY FOR HURRICANE SEASON will be held by the Wakulla Extension Of ce at 7 p.m. The workshop will focus on helping homeowners identify potential tree problems at the beginning of hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1, but there has already been one named storm in 2012. To sign up, call the Wakulla Extension Ofce at 926-3931 or register at the website: http://wakulla. ifas.u .edu/. The program is free, but pre-registration is recommended to assure ample supply of handouts. Saturday, May 26  SHOWING OF “ROOTS” Episodes 5 and 6 at the library at 1 p.m.  SOPCHOPPY OPRY and South Bound Band will welcome guest Shepard Creek at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy School Auditorium. The show will feature a special Memorial Day Tribute to America’s fallen heroes. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711 for more information or for tickets.  MUSICAL DUO JENNINGS AND KELLER will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Jennings and Keller is a Miami, Fla., based acoustic duo perform “fusion folk Americana.” Songwriter Laurie Jennings Oudin is a former Shakespearean actress and caf proprietress, whose vocals and guitar have been described as beautiful and sweet. Dana Keller, a veteran pedal steel, dobro and guitar player, has performed in the studio or on stage with musical legends such as Vince Gill, Ricky Skaggs, Stevie Wonder, Larry Graham, Marvin Gaye, Dave Mason, Johnny Rodriguez and The Allen Brothers, to name a few. Reserve seats by contacting Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or by email at poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Thursday, May 31  PROJECT GRADUATION will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. The event is free to all Wakulla High School seniors. Students will have access to the lodge, swimming area, boat rides, food and entertainment. There will also be gift drawings. Upcoming EventsFriday, June 1  WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION CEREMONY will be held at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Field at J. D. Jones Stadium. Saturday, June 2  MOTORCYCLE POKER RUN “CARDS FOR CARING” will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Capital City Harley Davidson, 1745 Capital Circle NW, Tallahassee. Registration is $15 per bike and $10 for a passenger. The best hand wins $250. For more information call Peggy at 926-5037 or Susan at 519-2292.  GARAGE SALE to bene t the League of Women Voters and its programs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1357 Martin Luther King Road.  BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the library. Sunday, June 3  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Barbara Hines, outreach coordinator for the North Central Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network as she presents “A Sticky Situation: The Naval Stores Industry in North Florida” at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The naval stores industry once dominated vast segments of Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and surrounding counties, including large areas of the St. Marks Refuge. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for information. Saturday, June 16  GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, “The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay” (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 6535857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Workshop on getting trees ready for hurricane season at extension of ce at 7 p.m. Friday night movie at the library. Sopchoppy Opry at Sopchoppy High School Auditorium at 7 p.m. Memorial Day ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorFriends of the Library win 2012 Non-Pro“ t of the Year Im excited to inform you that last week the Friends of the Library won the 2012 Non-Pro“ t Organization of the Year from the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce! The Friends wanted me to pass along their heartfelt thanks to the chamber for selecting them for this great honor and they have every intention of living up to it now and in the future. A few of the reasons mentioned last night by the chamber for selecting the Friends of this award was the more than 20 years of sponsoring the librarys Summer Program for the families of Wakulla County, the purchase this year of 12 new public computers, as well as their assistance in providing funds for our book/materials, and our computer classes. These are only a few of the ways that the Friends support the library and through that support the Wakulla community. Wed also like to take this opportunity to invite all who wish to get involved in supporting the library to join the Friends. Planning is starting on the second annual Silent Auction to be held in September, so if youd like to help or have new ideas on how to continue supporting WCPL please come to the monthly meetings the fourth Thursday of each month at the library. Friday Night Movie Fans of Janet Evanovichs Stephanie Plum series of novels will be pleased to learn that on Friday, May 25, we are showing the film adaptation of the “ rst book in the series, One for the Money.Ž Starring Katherine Heigl, Jason OMara and Debbie Reynolds, this PG-13 rated “ lm tells the story of how Stephanie Plum desperate for a job begins working at her sleazy cousins bail bonding company as a recovery agent. This puts her on the trail of an accused dirty cop who broke her heart in high school so catching him would bring some sweet revenge. But is her prey truly guilty or is he being set up? With action, laughs and a little romance thrown in, this film should have something for everybody. As Evanovich is one of the most popular authors we stock at the library, were hoping for a great crowd for this “ lm. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show and popcorn and water will again be provided by Capital City Bank. Summer Reading Books We have multiple copies of every book on the Wakulla High School Summer Reading List and should have copies of the Sunshine State Reading list books in soon. As we do every year, we strongly encourage parents and students to either check out or get yourself on the hold list for these books early. As the summer goes by, the waiting list only gets longer and we wont be able to guarantee that some copies will be available before school begins again in August. These books arent eligible to be renewed because of the overwhelming demand we receive each year. If there is anything we can do to help you get the summer reading books you need, please talk to us. Library News... Government MeetingsMonday, May 28 COUNTY OFFICES will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday. Tuesday, May 29  WAKULLA COUNTY AIRPORT COMMITTEE will meet at 2 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room.  WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library.  WAKULLA 2020 ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 4 p.m. at the library. Monday, June 4  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular board meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Fusion folk Americana duo Jennings and Keller will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. on May 25. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 3BBy MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 16 … Advocates for the elderly were crushed earlier this year when … after Gov. Rick Scott and top lawmakers vowed to better protect the 80,000 residents of assisted living facilities … no legislation was passed. Months of reports in the Miami Herald of people dying in ALFs statewide … a nearmonthly occurrence since 2002 … prompted Scott to appoint a task force to investigate and a Miami-Dade grand jury to push for tightened oversight. But despite the public momentum, House and Senate leaders couldnt agree on a legislative remedy. After the Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill to beef up inspections of troubled ALFs and shut down the worst offenders, the House refused to take up the measure. Now, though, reform efforts are ramping up again, with the governors ALF task force resuming its meetings in June, said Jane Johnson, health and human services policy coordinator for the governors of“ ce. The panel will add two new members to better represent consumers, one from AARP and one from the Florida Life Care Residents Association, Johnson said. It will hold three meetings at three locations around the state and send its report … including suggested legislation … to the governor in September. That comes as welcome news to many of the 300 volunteers of Floridas LongTerm Care Ombudsman Program, whose job is to advocate for elders who are frail and often mentally ill or isolated from their families. We were all holding our breath, and then, unfortunately, nothing got done,Ž said Carol Weideman, an 11-year veteran of the program and its state council chair. Were hoping this next year will be more productive.Ž A bunch of what we recommended was included in the Senate bills [that failed],Ž said Larry Polivka, director and scholar in residence at the Claude Pepper Foundation, who chaired the workgroup. Most of us would like to see those recommendations taken up again. Its really important that something be passed next year.Ž The original task force included Sen. Ronda Storms, R-Valrico, Rep. Matt Hudson, R-Naples, Charles Corley, Secretary of the Department of Elder Affairs and Elizabeth Dudek, Secretary of the Agency for Health Care Administration. Also represented were members of the long term care industry, the state long-term care ombudsman, advocates and ALF administrators. The panel held three meetings statewide and heard from more than 75 people. Its recommendations included more inspections, especially of facilities with poor records, increased administrator quali“ cations, better training for ALF staff, and more reporting of resident data. It also suggested the state have more enforcement power and other changes. Storms incorporated many of the recommendations into a bill that was passed resoundingly by the Senate, but couldnt “ nd a House sponsor. Despite the failure of the legislation, though, the ombudsman program has continued to call for another key recommendation: protection from arbitrary eviction for ALF residents. State law allows ALF administrators to evict residents for almost any reason on 45 days notice, but the residents … who rent their units … cant challenge an eviction in court. The residents are often fearful of asking for too much because the [ALF] administrators can give them 45 days notice and theyre gone,Ž said Jeanne Anastasi, a volunteer with the ombudsman program. That makes them a little fearful to advocate for themselves.Ž The program investigated 75 inappropriate ALF eviction complaints during 2010-11, according to Jim Crochet, the state ombudsman, as well as 72 complaints of fear of retaliation. Almost three-quarters of the residents have no one,Ž said advocate Win Hoffman. When I ask if their relatives are nearby, their eyes are downcast. The ombudsmen are the only people showing them any care.Ž Dear Savvy Senior, Ill be 65 in a few months … Medicare enrollment age … and am interested in getting a Medicare Advantage plan to cover my health care and prescription drugs. Can you give me some advice on choosing a plan? Searching Senior Dear Searching, Medicare Advantage plans have become increasingly popular among retirees over the past few years. In fact, around one-fourth of all Medicare recipients … nearly 13 million Americans … are currently enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan. Here are some tips and tools to help you choose the best plan for you. Medicare Advantage Sometimes called Medicare Part C, Medicare Advantage plans are government approved health plans sold by private insurance companies that you can choose in place of original Medicare. The vast majority of Advantage plans are managedcare policies such as HMOs or PPOs that require you to get your care within a network of providers. If you join an Advantage plan, the plan will provide all of your Part A (hospital insurance) and Part B (medical insurance) coverage … some plans even offer extra bene“ ts like vision, dental and hearing. And, most plans include Part D prescription drug coverage too. You also need to be aware that the monthly premiums for many Advantage plans are cheaper than if you got original Medicare, plus a separate Part D drug plan and a Medigap policy, but their deductibles and copays are usually higher. That makes these plans better suited for healthier retirees. How to Choose To help you choose a plan, a good “ rst step is to call your doctors and “ nd out which Advantage plans they accept, and which ones they recommend. Then go to the Medicare Plan Finder tool at www.medicare.gov/ find-a-plan and compare those options. When comparing, here are some key points to consider: € Total costs: Look at the plans entire pricing package, not just the premiums and deductibles. Compare the out-of-pocket maximums plus the copays and coinsurance charged for doctor of“ ce visits, hospital stays, diagnostic tests, visits to specialists, prescription drugs and other medical services. This is very important because if you choose an Advantage plan, youre not allowed to purchase a Medigap supplement policy, which means youll be responsible for paying these expenses out of your own pocket. € Drug coverage: Check the plans formulary … the list of prescription drugs covered … to be sure all the medications you take are covered without excessive co-pays or requirements that you try less expensive drugs “ rst. € E xtra bene“ ts: Many Advantage plans include dental, vision and hearing bene“ ts, but they are often limited. Get the details on what exactly is covered. € Out-of-network coverage: Since most Advantage plans limit you to using innetwork doctors only, “ nd out whats covered if you have an emergency outside your network area. This is especially important if you travel extensively or live part of the year outside your network. € Locations: If you dont use any particular doctors and you live in a rural area, make sure the doctors in the plans youre considering are located near you. Also check to see if the hospitals, home health agencies and skilled nursing facilities that the plan covers are nearby too. € Retiree benefits: If you have coverage from a former employer, be sure you speak with the bene“ ts manager, because signing up for Medicare Advantage may void your retiree coverage. Get Help If you dont have a computer to compare plans, or if you dont feel comfortable working through this information on you own, you can get help by calling Medicare at (800) 633-4227. They can do the comparing for you over the phone, and enroll you in a plan when youre ready. Another good resource is your State Health Insurance Assistance Program, which provides free Medicare counseling. Visit shiptalk.org, or call (800) 677-1116 to locate a counselor in your area. And, check out the HealthMetrix Research Cost Share ReportŽ at medicarenewswatch.com. This service chooses the best Advantage plans based on health status. Send your senior questions to Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy SeniorŽ book. By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior How to choose a Medicare Advantage PlanALF Task Force renews reform reportAfter the Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill to beef up inspections of troubled ALFs and shut down the worst o enders, the House refused to take up the measure. e governors ALF task force plans to resume its meetings in June. At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Of“ce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Of“ce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Of“ce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New and Used auto rates as low as 2.5% for quali“ed applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and ”oor rate of 2.5% Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $10 A Week 877676-1403

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1BOn Tuesday, Tamara and the Iris Garden Club, along with several seniors, spruced up our garden area. The Area Agency on Aging from Tallahassee presented our annual Senior Service Day on Wednesday. Medicare, Medicaid and ampli“ ed telephones were distributed along with a hearing screening, as well as energy assistance for the elderly and Social Security questions were handled. On Thursday, our Earth Day activities were presented by Shelley Swenson and Trevor Hylton of the local extension of“ ce and Jo Ann Palmer of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. We ended the week with Bruce Ashley from the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce talking about safe disposal of medications and any pills that might contaminate our ground water if we dispose of them in a hazardous way. Several seniors brought their collections in for disposal. We are glad to have this method available and encourage everyone to take advantage of the service that the sheriffs of“ ce is providing to Wakulla County residents. Nancy Jefferson was back on the last Friday of the month, teaching her Pottery Class. This time, the seniors made inspirational messages on clay tiles for wall hangings. This program is brought to the senior center through the Healing Arts of Wakulla County (HAWC) program. On June 7 from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30, a.m., the Area Agency on Aging in Tallahassee will be holding a public hearing in the dining room of the senior center. If you have any questions, call (850) 926-7145. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBruce Ashley of the sheriffs of“ ce talks about disposal of prescription medications.April is celebrated at Senior CenterNancy Jefferson teaches pottery at the Senior Center.Special to the NewsThe local Home Instead Senior Care of“ ce is offering a unique approach to help area families in Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson and Wakulla counties, plus the Panhandle, manage the challenges of Alzheimers and other dementias, diseases that eventually rob seniors of their memories and independence. Free training for families caring for these older adults is now available through online e-learning modules, available at HelpForAlzheimersFamilies.com. The Alzheimers or Other Dementias CARE: Changing Aging through Research and Education Training Program offers a personal approach to help families care for seniors with Alzheimers disease at home, where 60 to 70 percent live, according to the Alzheimers Association. Until there is a cure, we offer an interim solution,Ž said Scott Harrell, owner of the Home Instead Senior Care of“ ce serving Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson and Wakulla counties, plus the Panhandle. The foundation of the Alzheimers CARE Training Program is an approach called Capturing Lifes JourneyŽ that involves gathering stories and experiences about the senior to help caregivers provide comfort while honoring the individuals past. Because people with Alzheimers disease have dif“ culty with short-term memory, the Capturing Lifes Journey approach taps into long-term memory. The Home Instead Senior Care network assembled the top experts in Alzheimers disease to develop the CARE approach. The training were offering to families is the same kind of training our professional CAREGivers receive,Ž he noted. The program for family caregivers consists of four classes: Alzheimers Disease or Other Dementias Overview; Capturing Lifes Journey; Techniques to Manage Behaviors; and Activities to Encourage Engagement. Also available is a free guide for those who are caring for a loved one with Alzheimers disease or other dementias. Called Helping Families Cope,Ž the guide includes advice to help families keep their loved ones engaged and manage behaviors. CARE is a wonderful hands-on approach that helps caregivers deal with the behavioral changes that too often accompany these disorders … one of the biggest stressors for caregivers,Ž said Dr. Jane F. Potter, chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. There was previously no good program available using adult education techniques to provide hands-on practice in learning how best to help people who have dementia. This is huge,Ž she added. The preferred environment for those with dementia is generally at home,Ž said Potter, who served on the expert panel to help develop content for the Alzheimers CARE Training Program. And yet, families caring for seniors with Alzheimers at home are dealing with challenging behaviors such as anger, aggression, wandering and refusing to eat, according to research conducted for the Home Instead Senior Care network. That makes the Alzheimers Disease or Other Dementias CARE Training Program a solution for the many families in our area who are being impacted each day by devastating side effects of this disease,Ž Harrell said. For more information about free family caregiver training or to obtain a free copy of the Helping Families Cope booklet, contact the local Home Instead Senior Care of“ ce at (850) 297-1897 or visit HelpforAlzheimersFamilies.com.Free Alzheimer’s training is available to local caregivers THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT AGINGDreaming of deep sleepBy MARK UNDERWOODYoure not alone „ nearly half of all Americans are plagued with occasional insomnia, and about 15 percent have chronic sleepless nights. Try these tips to improve the quality of sleep, and the quality of your life. If youre not sleeping well at night you may be at risk for health problems ahead. New research published in The Lancet, the worlds leading medical journal, says that if you have problems sleeping, you are at risk for health problems like diabetes heart failure, anxiety and depression. You may not realize that if you have insomnia you are “ ve times more likely to have anxiety and depression and at double the risk for congestive heart failure and diabetes. Simply put, if youre having sleep problems at night, those sleepless nights can result in numerous health problems. Dif“ culty sleeping can lead to daytime problems too, like mood disorders, irritability and a constant feeling of exhaustion. As people grow older, many experience age-related changes such as decreased quality of sleep. Some people find they have dif“ culty sleeping, as each day is crowded with anxiety and stress. Did you know sleep is crucial to brain health and memory? New research from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has determined that sound quality sleep, can improve cognition (which includes decision decision-making skills, focus, concentration and memory). Did you know that poor quality sleep can also affect your immune system? During sleep, the body produces important proteins called cytokines. These proteins are essential to the effectiveness of the immune system in “ ghting off infection and other adverse effects on the body. Its also true that people who have chronic sleep problems have a weaker defense system against pathogens that cause illness like the common cold. What can you do to improve your sleep? Plenty. You can tip the scales on the side of better sleep with these easy, no-nonsense, better sleep ideas. Six Steps to Better Sleep 1. Upgrade your mattress. Your mattress may be triggering allergies that are playing havoc with your sleep. If your mattress is more than seven years old, it may be time to replace it. Bed bugs hiding deep in mattresses are common sources of asthma and allergies. 2. Cool down. Turn the thermostat down to the mid-60s when you go to bed. Studies have shown that a cool bedroom helps induce sleep. 3. Wear socks. Now that your bedroom is cooler, put on a pair of socks. The American Journal of Physiology suggests wearing socks to bed to achieve better sleep. Your feet are often colder than the rest of the body so wearing socks helps blood vessels in your feet stay dilated resulting in better sleep. 4. Regulate your eating routine Dont eat a big meal right before bedtime, and dont skip dinner so you go to bed hungry. 5. Scratch the screen time. Calm the brain before going to bed. Avoid reading, writing and checking email on your electronic devices before bedtime, and dont watch TV right before you close your eyes. 6. Exercise regularly. If you exercise regularly, at least four times a week, research has shown you may be able to add an hour or more to your usual nights sleep. When you take these steps to improve your sleep, youre moving in the right direction toward a healthier life. Visit www.TheGoodNewsAboutAging.com for more articles and tips for healthy aging.Mark Underwood is a neuroscience researcher, president of Quincy Bioscience, a biotech company in Madison, Wis., focused on the discovery and development of medicines to treat age related memory loss and the diseases of aging. the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Mike HarveyApril 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI really appreciate this program. We eat at all the restaurants participating. 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Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala One Click. Job Resources. Real Results. The Employ Florida network helped me to improve my professional skills and connected me with a training opportunity.Ž THE RESULT: Elizabeth Matthews was trained and hired by Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point. Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disa bilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. T HE RE SU LT: E liz abe th M a tth e w s w as trained and hired by R eg ional M M edical Center Ba y onet Point.ELIZABETH MATTHEWS Monitor Technician and Unit Secretary Hudson, FL R R R R R R e e e a a a l l l l R R R R e e e e s s s s s u u u u u l l l l t t t t s s s s . HIRED EmployFlorida.com1-866-FLA-2345 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INS WELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIR SALON FREE HAIRCUT FEATHER LOCKS are here!!FULL SERVICE FAMILY SALON

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 5BBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 18 … Gov. Rick Scott has spent the past several months talking about two big issues: adding jobs and bolstering the public-education system. So Scott could preen a little Friday when new “ gures showed the states unemployment rate had dropped to 8.7 percent in April, down 0.3 percentage points from March and 1.9 points from April 2011. But the picture in the education system wasnt so upbeat. The state Board of Education called an emergency meeting Tuesday to lower the passing score on statewide writing tests after results showed that most students wouldnt meet more-rigorous standards. After more than a decade of Republican leaders emphasizing the need for higher standards and accountability, some state board members reluctantly approved the change. At the same time, the move added fuel to the arguments of Democrats and the Florida Education Association that the states focus on standardized tests has run amok. CLAWING BACK THE FCAT The Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test has been the backbone of the states controversial efforts to measure the performances of students, teachers and schools. With this years tests, the state ratcheted up the standards for passing the writing portion of the FCAT in fourth, eighth and 10th grades. In part, students needed to score a 4.0 or better on a 6-point grading scale, up from 3.0 last year. Also, the state made other changes, including placing more emphasis on writing basics such as punctuation, capitalization and grammar. But the test results showed a huge drop in the number of students meeting the standards. In fourth grade, the passing rate dropped from 81 percent to 27 percent; in eighth grade, it dropped from 82 percent to 33 percent; and in 10th grade, it dropped from 80 percent to 38 percent. With FCAT scores affecting such sensitive issues as school grades, the state Board of Education moved quickly to call Tuesdays emergency meeting. Board members agreed to dial back the passing score to 3.0 this year, despite some reluctance. The change from 4.0 to 3.0 looks like we are lowering standards, said board member John Padget, of Key West. Im only voting on this so we can hold (schools) harmless for this year only.Ž But other board members rejected the idea that they were lowering standards. This is absolutely not a retreat, said Vice Chairman Roberto Martinez, of Coral Gables. It is maintaining the equivalence with last year, were just using a much more rigorous application of the scoring rubric.Ž Regardless, the change caused the Department of Education to say it did not adequately prepare schools and teachers for the tougher standards. This conversation should have come up earlier, Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson said. Well do better going forward.Ž The change also reignited long-simmering arguments about whether the states heavy reliance on the FCAT is wise. Floridas overemphasis on testing is insane, said former Sen. Dan Gelber, D-Miami Beach. We have become a school system whose entire purpose seems to be to prepare kids for minimal competence tests.Ž For his part, Scott issued a rather-nebulous statement Monday. Our students must know how to read and write, and our education system must be able to measure and benchmark their progress so we can set clear education goals, Scott said in the statement. The signi“ cant contrast in this years writing scores is an obvious indication that the Department of Education needs to review the issue and recommend an action plan so that our schools, parents, teachers and students have a clear understanding of the results.Ž GETTING TO WORK Scott, who won the governors office in 2010 on a theme of Lets Get to Work,Ž was far from nebulous Friday after the April unemployment numbers came out. Floridas jobless rate moved to its lowest point in more than three years and is a clear sign we are moving Florida in a direction that gives businesses and job creators the con“ dence they need to grow and expand, he said in a statement. The jobs report, released by the Department of Economic Opportunity, also included other positive signs. As an example, the number of jobs in Florida was 7,325,300 in April, up 52,600 from last year. Also, the number of counties with double-digit unemployment rates fell from 10 in March to “ ve in April. But other indicators showed that Floridas job problems continue. For instance, one factor in the lower unemployment rate is that the civilian labor force dropped by 28,000 people. Having the unemployment rate fall because people have given up looking for a job is not an improvement, University of Central Florida economist Sean Snaith said. The April numbers came just days after Florida TaxWatch issued a report showing that a government entity is the largest employer in 51 of 67 counties. Scott argues that the key to Floridas economic growth is privatesector jobs. While this analysis does not consider the total size of government employment compared to total private employment, it is certainly clear that the government has a massive direct effect on local economies throughout the state through employment and payroll practices, in addition to the indirect effects that government actions, such as regulation, have on the economy,Ž TaxWatch said in the report. Moreover, for many counties the potential closure of a military base or correctional facility, or large layoffs due to federal, state, or local budget shortfalls, poses a significant economic threat.Ž NO EMPLOYMENT HELP NEEDED HERE While many Florida workers and businesses might be scraping by, Tallahassees lobbying industry appears to be doing just “ ne. Lobbyists this week had to “ le compensation reports for the “ rst three months of the year, which included the 2012 legislative session. Those reports showed that 16 lobbying firms each raked in more than $500,000 in fees during the quarter. Four “ rms collected more than $1 million. Those “ rms were Ballard Partners, GrayRobinson, Ronald L. Book PA and Southern Strategy Group. Among the issues generating large amounts of lobbying fees was the bigmoney “ ght about allowing resort casinos in the state. The casino proposal died, but it could re-emerge … with the possibility of another big payday for lobbyists … in the future. HEADED FOR THE DOOR Steve MacNamara probably wont wind up in any unemployment line. But after a ” urry of critical news reports, the hardcharging MacNamara submitted his resignation last weekend as Scotts chief of staff. Adam Hollingsworth, who served as chief of staff to former Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton, will replace MacNamara as of July 1. MacNamara had planned to leave the Scott adminis-tration by the end of the year, but the critical reports about his handling of such things as government contracts sped up the move. It has been a pleasure and an honor serving you, but the recent media attention I have been receiving has begun to interfere with the day-to-day operations of this of“ ce,Ž MacNamara said in his resignation letter. I feel now is the time to plan for me to depart, for you to name my replacement and for us to work on a smooth transition.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: The state Board of Education lowers the passing score on FCAT writing tests. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Hey governor, its Jim. Im sure you know our friendship has ended, is over, and Im just very saddened by that. But I wanted you to know personally from me that in the future theres probably going to be things coming out that are going to be very hurtful to both you and Carole (Crist). But Ill be honest with you, I dont care anymore because I did everything that I could for you.Ž … Part of a 2011 voice mail message that former state Republican Party Chairman Jim Greer left for former Gov. Charlie Crist. The Tampa Bay Times reported that Crist thought Greer was trying to extort money from him. By MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 18 … Incoming Senate Democratic Leader Chris Smith ratcheted up criticism of Floridas Stand Your GroundŽ law Friday, pointing to a loophole that could endanger some women, rather than protect them. Smiths remarks came in response to a recent case in which a Jacksonville woman was sentenced in a domestic assault case. Smith said the law … which allows people to shoot back when threatened without a duty to retreat … could actually end up making domestic violence victims more vulnerable. Smith, an attorney, said the Stand Your Ground law affords domestic violence victims fewer rights than they had before it was passed in 2005 … unless they have an injunction for protection. An invited guest is considered a resident under the law,Ž he wrote in a recent analysis. This means that as soon as a woman invites her ex-husband to pick up their children at her home, she is powerless to defend herself, even if she holds sole title to the property. Given that most attacks happen at home, by relatives or individuals known to the victim, this loophole in the law is unconscionable.Ž While the Trayvon Martin killing that has brought the Stand Your Ground self-defense law into new focus in Florida involved two young men, Martin and shooter George Zimmerman, some of the focus on the need for a lenient self defense law has begun to focus on the needs of women. Incoming Senate President Don Gaetz and his son, Rep. Matt Gaetz, both Republicans, made that claim in a recent editorial headlined: Calls to repeal Stand Your Ground are antiwoman.Ž Consider an elderly woman in a dimly lit parking lot or a college girl walking to her dorm at night,Ž they wrote in the May 2 Northwest Florida Daily News in Fort Walton Beach. If either was attacked, her duty was to turn her back and try to flee, probably be overcome and raped or killed. Prior to Stand Your Ground, that victim didnt have the choice to defend herself, to meet force with force.Ž Both Gaetz senior, RNiceville, and Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala and House sponsor of the measure, dismissed concerns by Smith that for other women, the law makes things worse. Sen. Smiths been working too hard,Ž said Baxley. He needs to let the Citizen Safety and Protection Task Force, which has a lot of smart people on it, complete their work before he starts proposing changes to statute.Ž The Citizen Safety and Protection Task Force was appointed by Gov. Rick Scott to review the Stand Your Ground law following Martins death Feb. 26 in Sanford in a case that has drawn international attention. Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, entered a not-guilty plea after remaining free for “ ve weeks … until the case had become a national controversy. Now, after an organizational meeting earlier this month, the Scott task force is slated to hold its “ rst public hearing in Sanford on June 12. Baxley is a member of the panel, which has been criticized for including him and two other lawmakers who voted for the Stand Your Ground law … plus a fourth, Jason Brodeur, who was elected in 2010 and sponsored last years law banning doctors from asking patients about guns in their homes. The panels chair, Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll, also voted for Stand Your Ground while a House member. There are no known gun-control advocates on the panel. Smith did not wait for Scott to name his panelists before creating a separate, South Florida-based task force that recommended changes to Stand Your Ground last month. These included grand jury involvement, public education, and a self-defense claims tracking system. On Friday, Smith also said a domestic violence exemption should be part of the overhaul. He said he was very surprisedŽ to discover the domestic violence provision last week after 31-year-old Marissa Alexander of Jacksonville was sentenced in an assault case for “ ring a shot at her husband during a dispute in their home when she said she was under attack. Using a Stand Your Ground defense, Alexander rejected a plea bargain, lost her case and received a 20-year sentence under a minimum-mandatory law for gun crimes. I immediately thought how Gaetz and others are talking about poor, helpless women defending themselves,Ž said Smith. More women are attacked in their homes than in the Publix parking lot.Ž The Gaetzes wrote that [i]mposing a duty-to-” ee (puts) the safety of the rapist above a womans own life. In fact, until Stand Your Ground was passed, criminals were suing victims because victims, in protecting themselves, were allegedly using excessive force against the criminals.Ž Gaetz senior called Smith a good friend and a good lawyer. If he believes that theres a way that we can strengthen Second Amendment protections for battered women, Im all ears, and I cant wait for him to introduce the legislation,Ž Gaetz said.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)A numbers game for jobs, schools, lobbyistsSmith: Battered women not protected by ‘Stand Your Ground’ law The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ

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Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Found Found at the Blue Crab Festival last weekend: a pair of ladys reading or prescription glasses. If yours, please call 926-7102.Ž Announcements A DVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills Drivers -New Freight for Refrigerated & Dry Van lines. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline .com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 Mobile Homes For Sale 2006 CLAYTON HOME 16 x 72, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Make Reasonable Offer (850) 962-2767 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2-story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the water with dock. Light and bright furnished or not. $950 + utilities 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 3BR/2BA, Medart,central h/a,big-fenced yard, very clean, front/back porches, shed. No pets or smking $850/month+deposit. 850-545-0126 Must see!! CRAWFORDVILLE2 BD, 1BA, $575 mo. 1st & last mo. $800 dep (850) 926-5619 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEShell Point Rental 2/2 Town home on Canal, with office or 3rd BR Loft, enjoy your private boat slip and community pool $1,300 mo. 850-509-2667 or 850 -926-7158 CRAWFORDVILLESmall 2/1,$ $600 /mo+ $500 dep. minimum 6 months lease, no pets applications/ refers required (850) 524-3164 Mysterious Waters2BR/2BA, Washer Dryer, wood-detail, vaulted ceiling, large -porch, covered parking, short walk to Wakulla River, community park, boat-ramp, dock $875/mo.incl water & garbage 850-926-6289. Waterfront Rentals PanacaFishermans Retreat Lovely small cottage the water off Mashes Sands Rd $500/mo. Pets Welcome call Lisa (850) 510-2647 Rooms For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE Wakulla Gardens $450 mo. incls. electric Large brick home & kit. (850) 363-9729 Sport/Utility Vehicles CHEVROLET2009 Tahoe LTZ 4WD, 29,700 miles, white, leather, DVD, navigation, sunroof, warranty, excellent condition, $12700, ppeo@netscape.com Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 850-926-3546 5229-0531 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULL A COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCHLOCKONEE BAY TRAIL -PHASE IV Invitation to Bid No. 2012-10 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: Thursday, May 17, 2012 at 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Sealed responses for the OCHLOCKONEE BAY TRAIL-PHASE IV will be received until 10:00 a.m on Friday, June 15, 2012: responses should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Responses received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Administrative: Sheree Keeler, Phone: 850-926-9500, FAX: 950-926-0940, email skeeler@mywakulla.com Technical: George Roland, PE, Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. Phone: 904-828-3900, FAX: 904-367-1692, email geor ge.r oland@kimley hor n.com ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at the location listed above after 8:00 a.m. on Thursday, May 17, 2012. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Sheree Keeler, Grants Coordinator Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 24 and 31, 2012 5229-0531 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5233-0531 v. Kevin Scott Grigsby.Case No. 2012-CA-0007 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-CA-0007 CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff v. KEVIN SCOTT GRIGSBY an individual, UNKNOWN TENANT #1 and UNKNOWN TENANT #2 Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 56 of The Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 18 degrees 22 minutes 14 seconds West along the West boundary of the Northeast Quarter of said Lot 56. H.S., a distance of 2037.62 feet to a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of said Lot 56, H.S., thence run North 71 degrees 29 minutes 54 seconds East 50.05 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 15 degrees 31 minutes 30 seconds West 276.21 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 626.02 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning, continue North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 150.00 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 23 minutes 18 seconds East 292.81 feet to the centerline of a roadway easement, thence run South 71 degrees 39 minutes West along said centerline 150.00 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 23 minutes 17 seconds West 292.32 feet to the point of beginning. (Lot 5 of an unrecorded plat of East Ivan Estates). Subject to a roadway easement over and across the Southerly 20.00 feet thereof. Said property being more recently described by surveyor as follows: Lot 5, East Ivan Estates (Unrecorded), Wakulla County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 56 of The Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 18 degrees 22 minutes 14 seconds West 2037.62 feet; thence North 71 degrees 29 minutes 54 seconds East 50.05 feet; thence North 15 degrees 31 minutes 30 seconds West 276.21 feet; thence North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 626.02 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence leaving said point of beginning run North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 149.87 feet to a concrete monument thence South 18 degrees 26 minutes 07 seconds East 292.81 feet to a point lying on the centerline of a 40 foot wide access easement; thence run along said centerline South 71 degrees 38 minutes 59 seconds West 150.01 feet; thence leaving said centerline run North 18 degrees 24 minutes 27 seconds West 292.32 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to and together with a 10 foot wide utility easement lying over and across the easterly 10 feet described thereof. And also: Together with any and all interest that Grantor may have in those two parcels as granted from Claude W. Tooke and Susie Tooke to Edward Sinnott et al, and recorded in Official Records Book 382, Page 456-457, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with that certain 1986 Chad Mobile Home having VIN#AFLCW2AG240511553, Title #43248298, and Real Property decal number R253847 and that certain 1986 Chad Mobile Home having VIN #AFLCW2BG240511553, Title #43370649, and Real Property decal number R253848. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the 5234-0531 TWN v. Veal James C. Case No. 2011-CA-000263 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2011-CA-000263 COASTAL STATES MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs, James. C. Veal; Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA-00263, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, COASTAL STATES MORTGAGE CORPORATION IS Plaintiff and JAMES C. VEAL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES C. VEAL; CENTENNIAL BANK SUCCESSOR TO WAKULLA BANK; WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANTS (S) IN POSSESSION; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Clerks Conference the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m., on the 21st day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Parcel 1 Lot 1, Wildwood Country Club, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, page 35 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. And Parcel 2 Begin at the Northeast corner of Lot 1 of Wildwood Country Club, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat book 3, page 35 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 49 degrees 02 minutes 40 seconds West along the Northerly boundary of said Lot 97.89 feet; thence run North 87 de grees 22 minutes 19 seconds West along said Northerly boundary 55.00 feet; thence run North 30 degrees 12 minutes 41 seconds East 119.97 feet; thence run South 64 degrees 28 minutes 47 seconds East 154.06 feet; thence run South 34 degrees 08 minutes 38 seconds West 125.64 feet to the Point of Beginning. a/k/a 2 COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 DATED this 19th day of April, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND As Clerk of said Court By; /s/ Desiree D Willis as Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe, Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon county is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. Submitted by: Heller & Zion, LLP, 1428 Brickell Avenue,Suite 700, Maimi, FL 33131 Telephone (305)373-8001, Facsimile: (305)373-8030 File No. 10766.372 Published two times in The Wakulla News May 24th and 31st, 2012 Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT HURLEY’S ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF • RE-ROOFING • SHINGLES • METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net YARD SALE!! Saturday, June 2nd, 8AM-2PM CONTRACTOR:I have new TGI Beams. All 3.5 wide by 14 inches tall. There’s three at 16 feet long and 11 at 10 feet long. Yours for $200. Call 850-962-9092 or 732828-2632.Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $10 A Week 877676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 7B Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of June, 2012. Dated this 14th day of May, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 & 31, 2012 5233-0531 5218-0524 vs. Stephens, Barbara Case No.65-2011-CA-000041 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000190, DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. : BARBARA STEPHENS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000190 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and BARBARA STEPHENS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INCORPORATED AS NOMINEE FOR BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP; TENANT #1, N/K/A ANTHONY STEPHENS are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22, A DIS TANCE OF 248.77 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 61, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1673.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 689.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 311.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 138 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 0 SECONDS WEST 317.88 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 138 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUT H 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SEC ONDS WEST 135.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 317.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLWOING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY LYING 30.00 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22, A DISTANCE OF 248.77 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 61, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 2389.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID CENTERLINE, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 547.98 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 50.00 FEET TO THE CENTERPOINT OF A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS AND THE TERMINATION POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE. A/K/A 44 ANCHORS WAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of CIrcuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5218-0524 5219-0524 Vs. Small Lorie Ann, 65-2011-CA-000186 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000186 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. LORIE ANN SMALL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LORIE ANN SMALL; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; CAPITAL ONE (USA), N.A.; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 56, BLOCK 16, WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 42 RENEGADE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2708 at public sale on June 14, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 3rd day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. May 17 and 24, 2012. 5220-0524 Vs. Reed, Venesha Case No. 65-2011-CA 000150 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000150 US BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. VENESHA REED; CLARENCE REED A/K/A: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VENESHA REED; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 8, BLOCK KŽ, HUDSON HEIGHTS, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 43 DOGWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2096 at public sale on June 14, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the 5221-0524 TWN Vs. Potter, Timothy A. Case No. 11-CA-354-FC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-CA-354-FC, UCN: 652011CA000354XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. TIMOTHY A. POTTER et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-CA-354 FC. UCN: 652011CA000354XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A is the Plaintiff and TIMOTHY A. POTTER; DARDRA REVELL POTTER F/K/A DARDRA B. REVELL; UNKNOWN TENANT NOO.1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at Wakulla County Florida, at 11:00a.m on the 14th dayof June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 19, WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT 3, PAGE 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida on. May 3, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5221-0524 5223-0524 Vs. Kilbourn, Rodney P. Case No. 2011-CA-000364 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.2011-CA-000364 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. RODNEY P. KILBOURN, Defendant, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-364-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and RODNEY P. KILBOURN, is the Defendant, the undersigned will sell to the highest 5224-0524 TWN Vs. Cope, Yolanda Case No. 11-330 FC Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-330-FC, UCN:652011CA000330XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC8, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OC8 Plaintiff vs. YOLANDA COPE; et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ANDRE HARVEY Last Known Address 49 SHOEMAKER CT CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 29, BRIDLEGATE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 57, OF THE PUBLIC OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days fr om first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED ON March 5, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5224-0524 1183-113683WVA 5225-0524 vs. Stalvey, William Keith Case No. 2011 000254CA PUBLIC NOTICE May 14, 2012IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2011000254CA Sunshine Savings Bank f/k/a Sunshine State Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. William Keith Stalvey, Cothee Ann Tomaini, Erin Capital Management, LLC and Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA ST A TUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 30, 2012, in Case Number 2011 000254 CA, of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which Sunshine Savings Bank f/k/a Sunshine State Credit Union is the Plaintiff, and William Keith Stalvey, Cothee Ann Tomaini, Erin Capital Management, LLC and Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327-3136 at 11:00 A.M. on May 31, 2012 the following-described property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 57, Block AŽ, Magnolia Ridge North, a subdivision as per map of plat thereof re corded in Plat Book 3, Pages 55 and 56 of the Public Records of Wakulla County Notice is also given pursuant to § 45.031(2)(f), Florida Statutes, that any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED: May 1, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter as Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, May 17 & 24, 2012 5232-0531 v. Home Placement Inc.Case No. 2011-CA-000212 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000212 PREMIER BANK a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff v. HOME PLACEMENT, INC., a Florida Corporation, R. RICHARD YATES, JR., Corporation R. RICHARD YATES, JR., individually, DANNY R. MCCLELLAN individually, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Lot 28, Block JŽ and Lot 41, Block KŽ of MAGNOLIA GARDENS as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of June, 2012. Dated this 14th day of May, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 & 31, 2012 5232-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on June, 14, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBITS AŽ and BŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 3rd day of May, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 34, A DISTANCE OF 2650.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 858.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 327.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 309.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 156.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261)THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 125.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 156.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 125.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A 15.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS/EGRESS EASEMENT LYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 7.5 FEET THEREOF AND BEING PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 174, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. EXHIBIT BŽ Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, 2650.93 feet to a found 4Žx4Ž concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road S-299 and said POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way run South 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds East 112.89 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 29 minutes 36 seconds West 183.71 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds West 101.83 feet to the Southerly right-of-way of said State Road S-299, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East along said right-of-way 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.45 acres, more or less. The above legal description being more recently surveyed by Thurman Roddenberry and Associates, Inc., dated April 26, 2006, under job no. 90-132, and described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 2650.93 feet to the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Curtis Mill Road (State Road S-299) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 12 seconds East 112.70 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 89 degrees 27 minutes 49 seconds West 183.76 feet to a concrete monument(marked#4261), thence run North 00 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds West 101.74 feet to a nail and cap (marked #7160) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said Curtis Mill Road, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.45 acres, more or less. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5223-0524 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 2nd day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. May 17, 24, 2012 5220-0524. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. Available ASAP. 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. Available May 1. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets.

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5204-0524 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 12-111-DR, Division In the Adoption of Petitioner and Elijah Dale Holman & Simon Ellis Holman Respondent NOTICE OF ACTON FOR ADOPTION TO: Brian Dale Reed c/o The Red Lobster, 435 Shawnee Mall Drive, Shawnee, OK YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for adoption has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Attorney Steven P. Glazer whose address is 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on or before June 01, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: April 26, 2012 (COURT SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit court By: /s/ Irvene Kimbrel, Deputy Clerk Published four times (4) times in the Wakulla News May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 5204-0524 I 5213-0531 vs. Roddenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count I and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count II of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Pr operty THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 & E 1/2 OF SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4) OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAVING AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM AS EASEMENT FOR ROADWAY OVER AND ACCROSS THE NORTH 6 FEET OF SAID PROPERTY. Personal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010 Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24, & 31, 2012 5213-0531#1 5214-0531 vs. Rodenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count III and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count IV of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime) at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL #1 COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND THENCE RUN WEST 641.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 803.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319 AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 104.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WA Y BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 412.07 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 105.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 416.75 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THAT SAME PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL. RECORDS BOOK 23, PAGE 533 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL #3 COMMENCE AT A LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 387.72 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 111.76 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 420.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD 60.21 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNCIL MOORE ROAD RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 551.90 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 167.45 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 650.12 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY 319, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A RADIUS OF 1942.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 11 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 205.21 FEET (CHORD BEING NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 235.07 FEET) TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 142.64 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 85 5215-0524 vs. Vowell, Weldon C. Case No.65-2011-CA-000041 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000041, DIVISION: JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. : THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST WELDON C. VOWEL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL,SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000041 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY is the Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/AWELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C VOWELL, SR, DECEASED; JANICE A. MONTALTO, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR., DECEASED; WELDON C. VOWELL JR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR.., DECEASED; JANICE A. MONTALTO, AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR., DECEASED; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S)WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLIAM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; THE SKETCHLEY LAW FIRM PA; TENANT#1 N/K/A JANE DOE are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3, BLOCK C, HIGHWOODS PLACE, PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 66 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2000 GENE MOBILE HOME, VIN NO. GMHGA1379925361A AND GMGHA1379925361B, TITLE NOS. 81599283 AND 81598714. A/K/A 20 RIDGEWAY COURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2484 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5215-0524 5216-0524 vs. Cannon V. Gordon Case No. 65-2011-CA-000269 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000269, DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. : GORDON V. CANNON A/K/A GORDON VICTOR CANNON et, al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is thePlaintiff and GORDON V. CANNON A/K/A CORDON VICTOR CANNON; LELIA BETH CANNON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS NUMBER 107,108, AND 109, BLOCK 22 OF THE EAST ADDITION TO TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY FLORIDA, AS SHOWN BY THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAID LAND ALSO DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; LOTS NO. 107,108 AND 109 OF THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY FLORIDA, EASTSIDE OR ADDITION AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF RECORD ON PAGE 641 OF DEED BOOK 2 OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 154 WINTER STREET, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with adisability requiring reasonable accomodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5216-0524 5217-0524 vs. Leslie, Shannon K. Case No. 65-2011-CA-000149 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000149, DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. : SHANNON K LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY POPPELL A/K/A SHANNON LARSON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000149 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and SHANNON K LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY POPPEL A/K/A SHANNON LARSON;JARED R LARSON A/K/A JARED RAY LARSON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 6th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA: THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING: THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINN ING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 327.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 665.14 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 327.17 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 664.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS EASEMENT MORE PARTICULARY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A 15 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT LYING 15 FEET EAST OF THE FOLLOWING DE SCRIBED LINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA: THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 664.69 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINING CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 236.33 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A 60 FOOT ROADWAY SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF TERMINUS. A/K/A 80 TANGLEWOOD ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk ** See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accomodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5217-0524 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DEGREES 06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 416.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 320.85 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 53.82 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 1706.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 687.92 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF LOT 77, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 77 A DISTANCE OF 1763.34 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 380.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) SAID POINT BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT 191.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 317, PAGE 416 OF THE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Personal Pr operty Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshall, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010,Count III Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24 & 31, 2012 5214-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5228-0531 TWN re: Estate of Sanders Deborah A. Case No. 12-33CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE; ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISION DEBORAH A. SANDERS Case No. 12 -33CP Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRA TION TO ALL having claims or demands against the above named Estate: You are notified that the administration of the Estate of Deborah A. Sanders Case No. 2012-33CP, is pending in Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, the address of which is: 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The Personal Representative of the Estate is Sam Jack Sanders whose address is: 211 Sanders Cemetery Rd., Sopchoppy, FL 32358. The name and address of the Personal Representatives attorney is set forth below. All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, within three months from the date of the first publication of this Notice, to file with the clerk in the above court, a written statement of any claim against the Estate in the form and manner prescribed in section 733.703 of Fla. Statutes, Rule 5.490 of Fla. Rules of Probate and Guardianship procedure. All claims, demands and objections not so filed will be FOREVER BARRED. Publication of this Notice has begun on the 24th day of May, 2012. CHARLES A. McMURRY, Attorney At Law, 910 N. Duval St. Tallahassee, Florida 32303, Florida Bar No. 03336911 (850)425-3000;Fax(850)224-6655 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 and 31, 2012 5228-0531 5230-0614 TWN Heirs of Martinson Kenneth H., Case No. 12-158CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-158CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN MARTINSON, husband and wife, and as Trustee of THE MARTINSON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN H. MARTINSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 25, Block E. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10972-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5230-0531 5231-0614 TWN heirs of Arnold, Bert C. Case No. 12-159CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-159CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U.ARNOLDHUSBAND AND WIFE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U. ARNOLD, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 53, BlockD. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10951-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the compliaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5231-0531 5235-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-130-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-130-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 22, Block K of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11131-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5235-0614 5236-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-131-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-131-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A 5237-0614 vs. Matthews Dorothy C. Case No: 12-124-CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-124-CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DOROTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DORTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 142, Block A of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10859-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: /s/ Glenda Porter, AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5237-0614 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 19, Block L of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11178-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5236-0614 5227-0531 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Auction Under the authority of the Florida StorageFacility Act the property described below has been seized for non payment of rent and Self Storage Notices other accrued expenses. The property will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the Self Storage Facility Act 83.806 Double D Storage LLC reserves the right to refuse any and all bids. Self Storage Notices Cash only. Troy Hale unit 35 Household items, Terry Pafford Unit#16household, auction to be held @ Double D StorageLLC 289 Cajer Posey Rd Crawfordville FL 32327 June 6, 2012 Self Storage Notices 5211-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CASPIAN I LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2570 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A01 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT 2 BLOCK A LOT 1 OR 722 P305 Name in which assessed RWC INVESTMENTS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 – Page 9B 5209-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 002 5210-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 003 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 710 Year of Issuance2009 law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Description of Property: Parcel # 12-6S-02W 000-03873-000 12-6S-2W P-8-M-55 A PARCEL OF LAND W OF US 98 IN SECTION 12 OR 12P 6 & 7 and OR 74 P 219 Name in which assessed TERRY C NELSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5210-0531 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SEAN HILLIER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2535 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-115-000-11897-000 LOT 115 HS P 20-1-M-25D A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SW 1/4 OF HS 115 OR 611 P 246 Name in which assessed SHEPARD FAMILY TRUST said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 35 38 44 48 55 64 67 70 2 28 56 3 29 57 4 23 45 52 65 18 36 39 53 58 5 15 24 49 6 21 50 68 71 7 30 46 59 8 25 40 54 19 41 66 9 16 42 60 10 26 31 37 51 69 72 11 22 32 43 47 61 12 33 62 13 34 63 ACROSS 1. Become wearisome 5. "Hold on __!" 9. Cruise quarters 14. Bhutan's locale 15. The Mideast's __ Strip 16. Sheepish? 17. Scott Baio sitcom 20. Control mechanism, for short 21. According to __ 22. Took the reins 23. __-Seltzer 25. Mrs. Chaplin 27. Desktop publisher's task 31. Da __, Vietnam 35. Earth-friendly prefix 36. Baby blues 37. NY Met or LA Dodger, e.g. 38. Rep.'s rival 39. Lead tenor in "La Bohme" 43. "What a surprise!" 44. Pub offerings 46. 1964 Oscar winner Kedrova 47. "__ y Pl ata" (Montana's motto) 48. Hang in the hammock 49. Giant's chant 52. "Where there's a __ ..." 54. Of great proportions 55. Audiophile's collection 58. Fit for a king 60. Get naked 64. Auditing firm that merged with Coopers & Lybrand 67. TV exec Spelling 68. Take ten 69. Trapper's trophy 70. Garbo, by birth 71. Tracy's Trueheart 72. Bad day for CaesarDOWN1. Campaign funders, for short 2. Netman Arthur 3. Bull artist 4. Grubs and maggots 5. Get mellower 6. Strutted 7. Basso Pinza 8. "__ believe this?" 9. Skater Sasha 10. Gardner of film 11. Compete in logrolling 12. "Picnic" playwright 13. Have to have 18. One given to vegging out 19. Circulatory blockage 24. Drop for a tencount 26. Massachusetts cape 27. Gas or clutch 28. Amtrak's Northeast Corridor bullet train 29. Morticia's husband 30. "__ Mio" 32. Standoffish 33. India's first prime minister 34. Best man's best friend, maybe 40. Having no pizazz 41. Toss with a spatula 42. Klutzy 45. Ensure, with "up" 49. Took to the air 50. Bandleader Les or Larry 51. Squids' kin 53. Dunne or Papas 55. No brains? 56. Oater challenge 57. Your excellency 59. Suit to __ 61. Felt sorry about 62. Castaway's locale 63. They're often unwelcome at motels 65. Massachusetts cape 66. ACLU concerns: Abbr. American Prole Hometown Content 4/29/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 234 52 678 85 416 1293 79815 4 27 89 3716 200 9 HometownContent 157 8236 9 4 938564721 264197583 895 341267 412675938 673982145 541 236879 786459312 329718456 P A C S P E D A L C P A S A S H E A C E L A D R A W L I A R G O M E Z S I R E L A R V A E S E W C O D L O L L E R I R E N E A G E K A Y O F L E W S A S H A Y E D E L G A R T E Z I O O S O L E A T E E C A N Y O U L I F E L E S S C L O T F L I P R T S C O H E N O A F I S H A V A A N N O C T O P I B I R L A L O O F R U E D I N G E N E H R U I S L E N E E D G R O O M P E T S The Wakulla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSENIOR CITIZEN SPRING FLING PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER SPECIAL TO THE NEWS More photos online at thewakullanews.com CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The Tallahassee Swing Band visited the Senior Center for the Spring Fling on April 21; Senior Center Director R.H. Carter welcomes visitors; a couple enjoy the dance tunes; some great hors doeuvres from Chef Mary and her staff; and dancers swinging to the beat. Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Of“ce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. … 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comAccepting new patients X-Ray Services Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE



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By BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent Wakulla High School ninth and 10th grade students performed well on the reading portion of the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT). The rst wave of FCAT scores was released on May 18 by the Florida Department of Education. This years test scores re ect new, more rigorous standards with cut scores for proficiency made tougher from last year. Of the nine districts in the region, consisting of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor, the Wakulla 10th graders came in at No. 2, behind only Calhoun County. Sixty percent of Wakullas 10th graders scored pro cient in reading, coming in sixth highest in the state. Across the state, proficiency was 50 percent. Of Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla, Jefferson, Liberty, Franklin, Madison, Calhoun and Taylor, the Wakulla ninth graders came in tied for No.1 with Leon County. Fifty-seven percent of ninth graders scored pro- cient in reading, coming in 10th highest in the state. Across the state, pro ciency was 52 percent. It is a tribute to the dedication of our teachers that despite continuously being asked to do more, to set higher standards, all while actually taking home a smaller paycheck with the additional 3 percent they must now pay to the state funds, they still give 100 percent to our students every day, said Superintendent David Miller. They are really an admirable group who has our students best interests at heart, no matter what new challenges they face. FCAT writing scores caused controversy throughout the state when they were rst released earlier in May. The FCAT Writing tests given in grades four, eight and ten were completely new and more rigorous this year coupled with higher cut scores. This caused a re-release of cut scores from the Florida Department of Education on May 18 because of the unprecedented drop in scores across the state.Wakullas fourth grade students came in at No. 5 in the state on writing with a mean score of 3.1 on a scale of 1 to 6, with the state average at 3.3. Continued on Page 2A By JENNIFER JENSEN jjensen@thewakullanews.netGeist showed up at the Wakulla County Animal Control Shelter on Feb. 6 without a name, a home and scared to death. Just a little over a month later, the shepherd mix left the shelter happy with a place to call home. He was chosen to participate in the Department of Corrections canine detection training. Currently, he is at the DOCs training center at Tomoka Correctional Institute in the beginning stage of his training. Early reports from my canine trainer indicate that he is doing pretty good so far, says Inspector Supervisor Kevin Dean. Geist was left in the 24/7 outside drop box at the shelter and when he was taken out of the tiny box, Animal Control Director Ivanhoe Carroll says he was scared to death, with his tail between his legs. The shelter is a real scary place, she says. They had no information about Geist. They didnt know how old he was, if he had any allergies, his history or his name. Thats the problem with the drop box, Carroll says. Eventually Geist started to come out of his shell and Animal Control Of cer Dale Twist took an interest in him. He caught my eye, Twist says. Not only was he a beautiful dog, he was full of energy. So Twist started taking him out of the shelter to let him run and play fetch. Twist says Geist loved going after the ball and was completely ball driven. Carroll says, He has an incredible ball drive. Which, she says, is necessary for working dogs. After seeing such a drive in Geist, Carroll says she began making some phone calls, trying to nd a place for him. She also told Twist that the dog needed a name. Twist chose Geist because it is German for spirit. It was a nice, manly name for a work dog, Twist says. Carroll contacted someone with the Tallahassee-Leon Community Animal Service Center who did an evaluation and also noticed Geists incredible drive. On the evaluation, Geist scored a 6 out of a possible 9 points. With the shelters cooperation with Cauzican Animal Rescue, they made contact with someone at Taylor County Correctional Institute which has worked with Taylor County Animal Control. We work really hard to get the animals placed, Twist says. After contacting Taylor County, they took Geist over for an interview and a K-9 handler assessed him. He did well, Twist says. The handler then called his boss and the next day, the boss was in Wakulla County to see Geist. Continued on Page 12A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 20th Issue Thursday, May 24, 2012 Three Sections Three Sections75 Cents 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews DELINQUENT TAX ROLLS IN THIS ISSUEThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6BINDEX OBITUARIES Marvin Stough Barber Dorothy Carrie Holub Feddie L. Hurley Mike Jett Tom H. MaxwellSection CBoard says yes to 2020, later to childrenTAX INITIATIVESBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIn a split vote, it appears the Wakulla 2020 initiative will be on the ballot in November, but the Childrens Services Council is off. Not that the CSC doesnt have support, but commissioners indicated they felt the issue wasnt ripe to be placed on the ballot. As for the 2020 issue, at the board meeting on Monday, May 21, Commissioner Randy Merritt re-stated his concern that the proposal, to use a half-cent sales tax for upgrades to U.S. Highway 319 and potentially other transportation projects in the county, would confuse voters when they are asked to approve the one-cent sales tax in 2014. Commissioner Mike Stewart sided with Merritt. Chairman Alan Brock indicated his support for putting the 2020 issue before voters, countering Merritts concern that he believed voters could distinguish between the two matters. He was joined by Commissioner Jerry Moore who said that, while he didnt believe voters would impose more taxes on themselves in the current economic environment, also said he believed it was up to voters to vote it up or down which, like several of Moores opinions, drew a raised eyebrow from the chairman. Ultimately, the matter went to Commissioner Lynn Artz as the swing vote. She said she struggled with the issue and, in fact, Brock had to call for commissioners to clarify their votes after he didnt hear how Artz voted, and she ultimately sided with Brock and Moore to let the 2020 matter move ahead.Continued on Page 3AFCAT scores put Wakulla High in Top 10 in state A DOGS LIFEAbandoned at the animal shelter a few months ago...Today, Geist is going through training for DOCWakulla Gardens residents face pay for pavingBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCounty commissioners voted unanimously to survey residents of Wakulla Gardens to see if they are willing to pay an assessment to pay for their roads to be paved. The historic subdivision platted decades before the county had zoning has small lots and little infrastructure. Several years ago, during storm events, the subdivisions roads ooded and the county got a FEMA grant to x the roads. While the rock put down did stabilize the roads, it created another problem: dust. This rock is killing us, one resident told commissioners at their meeting on Monday, May 21. Residents of Wakulla Gardens at the meeting seemed receptive to the idea of paying an annual assessment of about $200 if it means getting the roads paved. In July, surveys will go out to the five units of Wakulla Gardens to see if they are willing to pay. But they were warned, if they reject the idea, there may not be any other solutions. This is the only mechanism weve got to get your roads paved, Commissioner Mike Stewart told the residents. As was noted by citizen Ron Piasecki, who formerly served on the countys Infrastructure Committee, past estimates to pave the 22 miles of roads in the Gardens were upwards of $7 million that was for contracting the job out. Commissioners credited Public Works Director Cleve Fleming with using ESG crews to do the job in-house at a cost of $5.2 million. County Administrator David Edwards said the cost basically breaks down as $4.2 million for paving and $1 million for some stormwater improvements in the road rights of way. The ballots will go out beginning July 2 to each lot owner in the development asking yes or no to whether they would be willing to pay an assessment estimated at between $190 and $230 per year to pay for the improvements. The surveys would be due back by July 31. Continued on Page 3APHOTOS BY IVANHOE CARROLL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Geist on his rst day at shelter, scared, with his tail between his legs. Randy Merritt David MillerState education board lowers FCAT writing threshold, see Page 2ASchool Board discusses AVID, STEM programs, Page 2A Best Western Business of the YearSee Page 5A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsSchool Board members discussed the AVID Implementation Agreement for the 2012-13 school year during their meeting held on Monday, May 21. Next year, 225 students in the school system will be in the Advancement Via Individual Determination program. The students are bene- tting from organizational skills and study skills, said School Board member Becky Cook. Ive had calls from very excited parents, proud of their students. In other matters: The FloridaLearns STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Scholars Declaration and Program of Study were approved by the Board to give attention to gifted and highachieving students in the district. A task force of businesses that support the program have also approved of the curriculum. The business community members on the taskforce want to make the program very competitive. said Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, The school board approved the Carl D. Perkins Rural and Sparsely Populated Grant, and the Carl D. Perkins Secondary Career and Technical Education Grant, which help to fund many vocational and career programs, such as web design and carpentry, at the high school. Next year, the District hopes to offer two Computing for College and Careers courses at the Middle School level which will be largely covered by the grant, and will ful ll the vocational requirement needed to graduate high school. The new Reading Endorsement Revisions, as set forth by the Florida Department of Education, were approved, though Beth Mims, Executive Director of Curriculum acknowledged that the changes would be signi cant and rigorous. Changes to the VPK Summer School and Parent Handbook were one of the last items to be discussed on the agenda. A new name and logo, depicting The Eaglets was approved, along with minor date and time changes, and a change of the drop-off area location. The next School Board meeting will be June 18.School board discusses AVID, STEM programs By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 15 To avoid a precipitous drop in student scores the Florida Board of Education last week lowered the passing grade on a statewide writing test in an effort to insulate schools from a decline that would affect school funding. Meeting in an emergency session, the board agreed to lower the passing grade from 4.0 to 3.0 on the FCAT writing assessment for the current school year after statewide numbers showed the passing rate fell through the oor, dropping in fourth grade from 81 percent to 27 percent. Eighth and 10th graders experienced similar drops in writing grades. The emergency rule will be in effect for 90 days. The board will address permanent rules within that time But even with the lower standards, more students this year will not receive a satisfactory score, a drop in success that state education of cials say is prompted by tougher testing criteria and the fact that each test was scored by two people. The Department of Education took some responsibility for the drop, saying it did not adequately prepare schools and teachers for more rigorous standards that were put in place this year, which included an increased focus on grammar and punctuation. Instead the new standard appears to have been rushed, which led to the dramatic increase in unsatisfactory scores. This conversation should have come up earlier, DOE Secretary Gerard Robinson acknowledged. Well do better going forward. School speci c writing scores will not be out until at least the end of the week, leaving many districts in limbo as they wait to see if their schools will garner the necessary scores to keep the overall school grade from dropping, which has nancial implications for already cash-strapped districts. Passing scores on the FCAT writing assessment for fourth graders plummeted from 81 percent to 27 percent. Passing scores in eighth grade fell from 82 percent to 33 percent. Tenth graders taking the test saw a similar drop in success. While 80 percent passed the test last year, only 38 percent scored a 4 or above on a 6-point scale this time around. At the 3.0 threshold, 81 percent of fourth graders, 77 percent of eighth graders and 84 percent of 10th graders passed the test. Some board members reluctantly supported the lower standards, but made it clear they would not continue to do so. School scores are expected to be out by the end of the week. The change from 4.0 to 3.0 looks like we are lowering standards, said John Padget. Im only voting on this so we can hold (schools) harmless for this year only. Other board members, however, said the lower scores are not a re ection of student aptitude, but a change in scoring that has raised the bar. This is absolutely not a retreat, said vice chairman Roberto Martinez. It is maintaining the equivalence with last year, were just using a much more rigorous application of the scoring rubric. The test score drop became the vehicle for parents, teachers and local administrators to vent on the FCAT writing test and testing in general. The board took numerous calls from parents who said the high stakes tests are stressing out their kids. Teachers said they were not given an adequate heads up on what the new criteria would mean. We literally didnt receive much information at all, said Holly Wallace, a writing teacher. We were a little out of touch as far as what exactly the expectations were. Leon County Superintendent Jackie Pons, worried that contrary to the boards assertion that school districts would not be penalized by the new standards, many school districts would still see their school grades fall based on the results of the writing assessment. Despite the lower standard, some districts will still be adversely affected. School grades are partially determined by FCAT scores. Schools that perform poorly must divert resources to xing the problem, which takes funds away from other areas. The low scores brought concern from the top as well. Gov. Rick Scott, in a sharply worded statement Monday, said the lower scores were of great concern. The signi cant contrast in this years writing scores is an obvious indication that the Department of Education needs to review the issue and recommend an action plan so that our schools, parents, teachers and students have a clear understanding of the results, Scott said. Critics of FCAT testing also used the opportunity to take their shots. State education board lowers FCAT writing thresholdContinued from Page 1AWakulla 8th graders averaged 3.4, exceeding the state average of 3.3 and ranking No. 4 in the state. Wakulla High School 10th graders ranked No. 4 in the state with a 3.3 average to the states 3.4. Only 9th and 10th grade FCAT Reading and 4th, 8th, and 10th grade FCAT Writing scores have been released. Coming later are Reading scores for grades 3 through 8, and Math scores for grades 3 through 10. I am con dent that the rest of the scores will re ect the hard work of our students and teachers, said Miller. However, these test scores are only a snapshot of the variety of ways Wakulla educators prepare our children every day to realize their dreams.FCAT scores put Wakulla in the Top 10 in the stateThe Department of Education has opened a call center to answer parents questions about the FCAT after acknowledging last week that the agency hasnt always communicated well in the past. The call center is intended, in part, to help the agency with answering questions about the new grading system for the FCAT. The agency began putting more emphasis in the grading on grammar, punctuation and spelling with disastrous results, and a drop in writing scores last week drew broad criticism. Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson admitted that the educational system probably hadnt communicated well with parents or schools about the changes. FCAT 2.0 Call Center: DOE experts will be available to answer parent questions from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. Parents may call 866-507-1109, toll-free, to ask questions about FCAT, recent changes to Floridas accountability system, and how this impacts students and teachers. In addition to the call center, the department started a website to help answer questions, a blog, and a discussion page, and has set up an email for parents to ask questions.DOE moving to provide FCAT info Open: Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sun. 11-9 850 697-9191 Thurs. & Fri. from 11 3 Sunday from 11 3 Full Menu Offered Sun. from 11 9Come Enjoy Live Music on the deck this weekend Provided by Marshall TaylorBeginning Friday at 7OPEN on Memorial Day!Come and Meet Mike Easton & Enjoy Oysters on the Half Shell. Hours:Tu-W & F 10 6 Th 12 8 Sat 8 NOON Sun & Mon Closed850.926.83192809 Crawfordville Hwy across from Hudson Parkwww.root319salon.com A full service hair and nail salon. W elcomesWelcomes iss est Now AvailableHave a Manicure or Pedicure in between your color sk bout our pecials! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A But Artz also appeared to wrestle with the concern voiced by Merritt that voters might reject the one-cent sales tax in two years. While 60 percent of that tax goes to transportation spending, the other 40 percent is used for the library and parks and sheriffs office, among other spending. Artz said she also felt bad rejecting the 2020 proposal. I feel like we kind of led 2020 on, she said. If we werent going to do it, we should have let them know. Merritt indicated that one problem he had with the 2020 idea was that it had broadened from the initial proposal to improve U.S. Highway 319 in the Crawfordville area, to something that became about transportation projects throughout the county a broadening he acknowledged came from the board itself as it sought more county buy-in for the project. Before Artz and Moore had clari ed their position, Brock had gotten board members to indicate their positions and believed Merritt and Stewart would prevail with at least three votes. When it appeared 2020 would likely fall off the ballot, citizen Paul Johnson, representing himself as a Chamber member and local business owner, chided the commission and especially Merritt for opposition to the measure. He said the 2020 issue was about economic improvement, not transportation, and felt that the rug had been pulled out from under people who had worked very hard on the issue. Former Chamber president John Shuff, who came up with the 2020 idea and has made it a cornerstone of his campaign for the county commission seat currently held by Artz, agreed with Johnsons comments but said that the board should recognize that 319 is already sti ing growth in the county. Any tax is a bitter pill, he said, but weve got to keep growing. It remains to be seen if the county can get the language together and approve the ordinance by August so that it appears on the November ballot. As for the childrens support issue, commissioners indicated support, but said they felt the matter hadnt been fully vetted as to what it would actually mean for the county. Artz said she wanted to run the idea by the youth coalition, which heard it, as well as the recreation board and the community center, which hadnt yet heard it, to see if they supported the idea. Brock said the concern expressed by the youth coalition was that any money raised for the CSC would replace rather than enhance county spending. The Children Services Council is a special district created by ordinance and approved by voters through a tax referendum. This would create an independent taxing authority that funds childrens programs and services in the county. It does not replace current programs, but helps to fund them. There are eight counties in the state that have created a CSC and seven of those are independent taxing authorities. Others operate as dependent districts and rely on funding from different sources, such as the county government, according to Florida Childrens Services Council CEO Brittany Birken. The Florida Childrens Council represents the eight special districts in the state and serves to support and connect the councils. Independent Children Services Councils levy ad valorem taxes and the maximum amount that can be levied is 50 cents for every $1,000 of taxable property value. A small portion of the increase in the millage rate, .013, goes to the Florida Childrens Services Council. Birken said they use an equitable dues formula. For St. Lucie County, that amount is around $10,000 annually. According to Brock, about $500,000 would be generated for Wakulla County from the tax. Board says yes to 2020, later to children issueContinued from Page 1A Wakulla Gardens resident Pamela Joy told the board that when she bought her house in the development years ago, her real estate agent told her that the roads would be paved in just a few years. I think this is a plan that will work, Joy said. When Joy mentioned that one concern among residents is speeding a problem now, but many worry it will worsen on pavement Edwards responded that the plan includes traffic calming elements for each road. People in Wakulla Gardens are not looking for an ideal solution, said Commissioner Jerry Moore. They are looking for something to stop the dust. My vote is, we do something. It may not be ideal, but we do something. There were some reservations expressed: Paving roads is typically the last thing done in a development, and would certainly cause some problems if sewer is extended to the area. Roads would have to be torn up and re-paved, or pipes run under the road. Commissioner Lynn Artz expressed concern about encouraging growth in that one area. Paving roads will only make the area more attractive, meaning more development and more people moving in there. Artz estimated that there are roughly 1,000 houses and 3,000 residents in the development now. If that increased to 3,000 homes and 9,000 residents, it would mean that about one-quarter of Wakulla Countys population would be living in that few square miles, she said. She warned residents: You are going to have a mess! Some residents appeared irritated at Artz and called back from the audience: Its already a mess! and Pick your mess! While she went along with the idea, Artz said she hoped that the paving would only go forward with a few of the already more developed units in the development. Commissioner Randy Merritt noted that the board will look at the overall vote for the whole Wakulla Gardens subdivision, and then each of the ve units individually. Meaning, potentially, that only some areas of the subdivision may get paved if the property owners are willing to pay.Wakulla Gardens residents face paying for pavingBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt seems there were a few discrepancies in the quit claim deed executed in March 2010 for the St. Marks Re nery site to the City of St. Marks. Brian Plant was brought in by the city and City Attorney Ron Mowrey to look over the deed and determine what exactly the city owns. City Commissioner Phil Cantner said, There were very old quit claim deeds that were in conflict all over. As it turns out, Plant found a few errors that needed to be corrected. Plant determined that a few pieces of property that were included on the deed are not actually owned by the city. Included in the deed were four exhibits. Attorney Rhonda DiVagno Morris, who was lling in for Mowrey, said a quit claim deed was done for more than the city was entitled to. Plant said the city clearly owned the 55-acre tract where the tanks and buildings sit, which was labeled as exhibit A. That is uncontested, he said. That is what you own and what you want to maintain, Plant said. Plant said it seems someone did a title search and the other pieces of property came up and were added. One of the tracts was never part of the re nery property and it is not clear who owns it currently, Plant said. Another tract that was included is owned by a property management company. According to Plant, the house located on that piece of land was included, however, the land the house sits on was not included. The other tract is clearly owned by Murphy Oil, Plant said. DiVagno Morris said those properties will be removed from the deed to clarify the records. In other news: At the April St. Marks City Commission meeting, the commission approved being the sponsor of a permit for a 10-year extension to reopen the St. Marks Reef, an arti cial reef 5 miles out from the St. Marks Lighthouse. Organization for Arti- cial Reefs and Florida Fish and Wildlife Cconservation Commission are trying to enhance the reef increasing it from 17.3 acres to 42. After applying for the permit, the city heard from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection who told them the biggest the reef can be is 1,519 feet. The proposed reef was 984 feet by 1,870 feet. Mayor Chuck Shields said the state would not issue a permit with the current design. The city commissioners suggested making the reef a square, 1,519 feet by 1,519 feet. DiVagno Morris suggested sending those recommendations to OAR before sending anything back to the state and see if there are any problems with changing the layout. Shields said, It was designed a particular way for a reason. The commission agreed to speak with OAR. City Manager Zoe Mansfield told the commission she received four bids to take down the rest of the tanks at the old re- nery site. Mans eld said they still have $71,000 left for cleanup. They have until July 31 to spend it. Once the product inside the tanks is removed, Mans- eld said the tanks will be down and removed in two weeks. The commission will review the bids and select a company at the next meeting. Mansfield also discussed the status of the Community Redevelopment Block Grant the city received for streetscape improvements. Mans eld said the city issued a request for proposals and has received some phone calls about the project. The bid will be awarded at the June 14 meeting.CITY OF ST. MARKSErrors found in St. Marks Re nery deed FILE PHOTOSSome of the re nery tanks being taken down from the property in 2010. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners propose to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance. A Public Hearing is scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, June 11, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 18, 2012, and Monday July 16, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.MAY 24, 2012 PUBLIC NOTIFICATION MAY 17, 24, 31 JUNE 7, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing on June 4, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327, to Consider Adopting a Resolution Establishing Rates, Fees, and Charges for the County Sewer System and Consider the Following Ordinance: A copy of this ordinance and the rate resolution shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance and the rate resolution. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. MAY 24, 2012

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Dusty roads may have a solution in Wakulla Gardensl Prescribed fire training held at Wakulla airport Marvin Strough Barber obituary Bobby Bob Edward Forham obituary Airport clearing violates wetlands ordinance Feddlie L. Hurley obituary Sheriffs Report for May 10, 2012 Workshop on airports future is planned thewakullanews.com Follow us onEditor, The News: Crawfordville Elementary Schools Country Fair on April 2nd was a spectacular event! The weather was a mix of sun, warmth, rain and breeze but the crowd was happy, hungry and eager to enjoy the plethora of activities and food. Children got their faces painted, threw balls that dunked their favorite teacher, played bingo, ate cotton candy, slid down large slides, milked a cow, and participated in games that entertained the whole family. It was a fantastic, fun lled day! The success of the festival is due to the dedicated teachers, staff, and parents of Crawfordville; the generous support given from our businesses and community members of Wakulla County; and the dedicated members of the PTA who spent a tremendous amount of time preparing and planning for our Country Fair. Students and parents worked hard selling tickets and baking goodies for our Cake Walk and Sweet Shop. They worked so hard, that enough funds were raised before the day of the festival to put Mrs. Walker on the roof for 24 hours! This event will take place after FCAT! With the help of the Lions Club ipping burgers and passing out frosty, cold Pepsi products; the high schools ROTC students working booths and running errands; the Sheriffs Department assisting with security and safety; and volunteers working hard to assist throughout the day, the Crawfordville Country Fair proved to be a day for all to enjoy. I would like to give special thanks to our local businesses for their support as sponsors, for their generous donations, and for their encouraging words about our event. Once again, the community of Wakulla County did not hesitate to support our efforts to raise funds for our school and our students. Crawfordville Elementary School would like to say, THANK YOU, to all of those who were able to donate, attend, and support our 2012 Country Fair! Angela Walker Principal Crawfordville ElementaryREADERS WRITE: anks for support of schools Country Fair Local Dems hosted small county conference Every day is mental health awareness day Concern about bears is very realEditor, The News: I read Mrs. Shulers letter with great interest (Bears are spotted in Crawfordville, Letters, May 10). What has happened is that a huge wild animal has lost his fear of humans. He is probably hungry and he is carnivorous. That means kittens, cats, dogs and other mammals in the neighborhood are in danger. My neighbors neighbors on our road in Sopchoppy means someone half a mile away had a nuisance bear in their yard, but they told me it was dif cult to convince wildlife of cers that the bear should be trapped and removed. (I guess bears are considered innocent until proven guilty.) Later a bear came in my yard twice. I presumed he was the same bear. I had to return to southern Floria and was gone about three weeks. When I came home I asked the neighbors about the bear and they said they hadnt seen him for a while. I was happy to hear he must have found a more prosperous hunting ground. All was ne for about two weeks. Then one Sunday afternoon I opened my front door just in time to see my cat standing near the steps, frozen with the hair all of it straight up and her eyes bulging. I looked behind her and there was a bear about ve feet away on all fours, not moving. She ran inside the house and the bear ran. I watched him and he would go to one side of my house, cross the road, run down the road, return and be on the other side and this crazy running around went on for a while. Finally he left. Monday morning at 8 a.m., I was awakened by the sound of pounding and scraping on my front door. It was persistent. I got up and looked and saw a huge paw through the frosted pane. Then it stopped and I went to the phone and called the wildlife people. I talked to someone and gave him my name, address and the directions for nding my house. I sat and waited. And waited. No one came. Not the whole day. I called back early the next morning. Later a biologist called me and said he wasnt in the of ce the day before so a trap couldnt be set up. It was nice to hear from someone but I wonder why it takes a biologist to set a bear trap. However that day at 5:30 p.m. an agent did nally mosey to my place with a trap. He set it up at the edge of my yard and at 2 a.m. I heard the trap spring. The agent returned in the morning but said he had to leave and someone else would come. Later another agent arrived. He asked me a question that the rst one didnt, could he see my door? I said certainly. It was still covered with paw prints and he also found some on the side of the house which I hadnt noticed. He immediately called his of ce and said that the bear was trying to get inside my house. This lead me to believe that no one there had taken the incident seriously or thought my troubles as I had described them improbable. Conclusion: Keep calling and calling. That bear should be removed and resettled. Mickey Skidmore Sopchoppy Editor, The News: May is Mental Health Awareness month but everyday is Mental Health Awareness day for me, taking one day at a time. It is my hope that on June 1st those aware will continue to make others aware of the importance of good mental health. Depression, anxiety, panic attacks, etc. are classi ed as mental illness diagnoses. Like physical ailments they can successfully be treated. That fact is not known to society as a whole because of the negative connotation associated with the term mental illness. The road to recovery is long for those suffering imperfect mental health but Wakulla County now has programs to help people take the rst step down the road to recovery. NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Wakulla is fortunate to have the Wakulla School Board, Sheriff Donnie Crum, other elected officials, mental health professionals and others from various civic organizations, as working members. Together we offer programs to bene t all who are in need of education, support and advocacy in combatting this evergrowing problem. Thank you for your Mental Health Awareness article in the May 17th issue. Sincerely, Jimmie Doyle Crawfordville Dear Editor: The Small County Coalition Conference held May 113, at The Inn at Wildwood Resort and hosted by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee was an event that we were excited about having here in our county. We wanted, of course, to show others how beautiful our area is so that they would want to come back. Approximately 125 Democrats from some of our small counties around Florida attended. Our Saturday was a full schedule on many subjects that we Democrats pay special attention to such as Building the Leadership Back and Battling voter Suppression in small counties and Equality for All: Human Rights in Rural Communities, to name a few. During the Luncheon, we were especially fortunate to have Omar Kahn, Associate Political Director for Obama for America, as our keynote speaker. The end of the day was another eagerly awaited event the sh fry with a live band for entertainment. Poseys catered this event with seafood and all the trimmings and they were masterful in handling the long lines of people anticipating the good food being served from Poseys mobile kitchen. As we all were seated under the huge canopy at round tables with linens, we listened to candidates from the Congressional District Two race and other special guests. After the speakers, the local Coon Bottom Creek Band red up and entertained us the remainder of the evening. Sunday concluded the event with a full session from 9 a.m. to noon and sessions included voting updates, social media, and fundraising. I for one, gained a wealth of knowledge from (and met for the rst time) some of our most respected elected Democratic of cials and look forward to working with them during this election cycle. Also, I feel con dent in saying that all attendees left energized to get out the vote, and were moved more than ever to turn our red state blue for 2012. Sincerely,Joan E. Hendrix Crawfordville You might not be aware -this is National EMS Week. The employees in this division often work in extreme conditions and are exposed to the worst situation imaginable. Below is my message for them this week. If you have see any of them this week, or any other times, you might tell them thanks! An open letter to Wakulla EMS: In the short time I have been part of Wakulla EMS you have shown me what a dedicated group of people are involved with this service. Never in my career have I seen workers so willing to go beyond what they are expected to do. So many of you step up and do the after hours things, the responding to the fourth call, caring for more than one patient, rendering top notch care during extended transport times. All this with the attitude of thats just how Wakulla EMS Rolls. Wakulla provides a top-notch Advanced Life Support system because of YOU. The challenges faced in Wakulla are unique to any place experienced by me and most places in the State. Anytime we face the different incident, whether it is a trauma call that it takes 25 minutes to get to, a newborn not breathing, a frequent yer that has a true medical emergency, an extrication, or a simple multipatient MVC you do whatever it takes so that the citizens of our county receive better care than could be expected elsewhere. I am truly IMPRESSED. THANK YOU! Mike Morgan Wakulla Fire ChiefThank you, Wakulla EMS, for the job you doBy RITA HANEY There has been, and is currently, a great deal of focus on substance abuse treatment. Addiction is a serious and often dramatic experience. Often there are job losses, legal problems and or medical issues. Due to these financial and emotional dif culties the addicted person seeks treatment and she goes for help, but what is the treatment and/ or help the addict desires or has been strongly encouraged into accepting. Substance abuse treatment is a cognitive behavioral approach to therapy. Treatment focus on education (Learning Theory), cognitive awareness which encourages the addict to recognize the futility of continued use of the drug(s) of choice; and the development of strategies for transforming destructive behaviors into healthier, more positive ones. It must be understood alcohol is a drug. Alcohol like other substances changes ones perspective on the world, and can lead to extremely poor decisions. Examples include driving while intoxicated, engaging in risky sexual behavior and impulsive acts such as theft and uncontrollable emotions. Barriers to accepting ones limits regarding drug use are cunning and baf ing to those of us not affected. In light of these negative side effects it would seem addicts would throw themselves into treatment or beg for help. Sometimes this happens. Otherwise it is the courts, the doctor, or family that insists enough! Treatment is not a guarantee. Going to prison is not a guarantee. Having severe medical problems is not a guarantee. Families in crises, separations, divorces, are not a guarantee. The interesting and most dif cult aspect of addiction is abstinence is not recovery. People have, and do, stop using for days even months and once they pick up the drug, are again on the trip of addiction. Substance abuse treatment is an opening into recovery. Recovery is a process of education, self-understanding and spirituality. Individual therapy can be offered and is often necessary. However, it is the group experience, which offers a unique approach to any therapeutic theory of recovery. A person in a recovery group can bear witness to others who have had the same experiences and recognize this persons journey as their own story, allowing for compassion and understanding for themselves and others. This collaborative experience, whether in a professional treatment or a group such as AA/NA, can offer the hope necessary to begin this process of recovery. Treatment generally has a spiritual component the need for surrender and a willingness to listen. These two components of recovery surrender and willingness are entirely up to the addict. No one can surrender for him; no one can listen for her. The idea of treatment is to provide the education, the safe place for surrender and the spiritual understanding of the journey of recovery. The group offers the comfort of not being alone in what seems to addict an impossible feat. Witnessing to the power of others ability to remain clean and sober adds strength and encouragement. Often we cannot see what is happening to us as individuals, but we can see what is happening to others. And when recovery is witnessed it offers hope. Substance Abuse Treatment facilities and AA/NA are available locally and worldwide. Rita Haney LCSW is a counselor in Crawfordville. She can be reached at 9262039. COLLAGE OF PHOTOS BY MIKE MORGANNeed for substance abuse treatment

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Staff reportBest Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites was named the Business of the Year at the Chamber of Commerces annual Business Excellence Awards Banquet held Thursday, May 17, at the Senior Center. Niraj Patel, owner of Best Western Plus in Medart, accepted the award as the crowd gave him a standing ovation. Other honorees incuded Gail Campbell as Member of the Year. Callway Auto and Truck Repair was named Wakulla Area Business of the Year. Wildwood Resort was given the Chambers Environmental Stewardship Award. Friends of the Wakulla County Library were named Non-Pro t Organization of the Year. International Gold Gymnastics was named Start-up Business of the Year. A complete list of nominees will appear in the Business Section of the June 7 issue. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 5A Workshop to prepare your trees for hurricane seasonThe UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce is holding a Get Your Trees Ready for Hurricane Season workshop on Thursday, May 24, at 7 p.m. The workshop will focus on helping homeowners identify potential tree problems at the beginning of hurricane season, said Les Harrison, Wakulla County Extension director. Early detection leaves the homeowner with time to identify the best course of action to protect their property, he said. The Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1, but there has already been one named storm in 2012. The peak of Atlantic hurricane season is mid-September, but storms can make landfall anytime in the season. To sign up call the Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or register at the website: http://wakulla.ifas.u .edu/. The program is free, but pre-registration is recommended to assure ample supply of handouts.. Memorial Day ceremony will be held at courthouseA ceremony to honor the nations fallen soldiers will be held on the courthouse grounds on Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, beginning at 10 a.m., according to county Veteran Services Of ce J.D. Johnson. The keynote speaker will be Commission Chairman Alan Brock. Memorial Day Blood Drive to be held at Wal-MartSoutheast Community Blood Center will hold a blood drive at the Crawfordville Wal-Mart on Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, at the store. The bloodmobile will be parked outside in the parking lot. Donors will receive a $10 Wal-Mart gift card. The Wakulla News will close for the holidayThe Wakulla News of ce will be closed May 28 for the Memorial Day holiday. Regular hours will return Tuesday, May 29. Early deadlines will apply for classi ed and display advertising. Classi ed deadline will be Thursday, May 24 at 11 a.m. All display advertising is due Friday at noon proof ads due Thursday at noon. No change in garbage pickups because of holidayThere will be no changes to the solid waste collection for the Memorial Day Holiday on Monday, May 28, according to Waste Pro. All services will be completed on your normal scheduled day. High school yearbooks are still availableThere are more than 100 seniors who have not purchased yearbooks. The yearbook staff will be set up at baccalaureate on May 30 at 7 p.m. and at graduation on June 1 at 7:30 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. The books are $85 and the school is only accepting cash, money orders or cashiers checks. Look for the yearbook stand inside the main gate. Public records forum set by League of Women VotersThe League of Women Voters of Wakulla will host a public records forum headed by Barbara Peterson, president of the First Amendment Foundation, on June 7 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. We feel very lucky to have her, said Mary Cortese, Wakulla League chair. She has so much experience and expertise in the open government arena, writing and working in the area for many years. We feel that this is an important issue and have invited all constitutional of cers, the county administrator, staff and commissioners, said Cortese. Staff ReportsBriefs PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENNiraj Patel of Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites accepts the award for Business of the Year from Chamber President Amy Geiger.Best Western Plus is named 2012 Business of the Year Geiger with Chamber Member of the year Gail Campbell and Bruce Ashley, president of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn an effort to save the county money on its energy bills and help conserve energy, the Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committee heard from Knight Energy Management at its recent meeting and explored the possibility of having them retrofit their lightbulbs and change them to LED lighting. President Kevin Bechtel said a shared savings plan would be done. An auditor would be sent out to review the county facilities and then a certified engineer would also go out and evaluate the facilities. The lightbulbs would then be retrofitted with an LED lightbulb that has a 5-year guarantee. The county would enter into a contract with Knight Energy who would pay the upfront costs and would install the lights. In return, Knight Management would take 80 percent of the savings for the life of the contract. During that time, they would also perform maintenance on the lightbulbs. The savings depends on how long the lights burn in a day, Bechtel said. Lightbulbs would only be retrofitted if there is a saving for the county, he said. He suggested that the county look at where lights are on the most, where the energy bills are the highest. County Administrator David Edwards said he would like Knight Energy Management to come in an do an audit of the board of county commissioners facilities to see if it would be something they might be interested in. The committee also discussed the cost saving measures that have been implemented at the sheriffs office. Mary Dean Barwick said they have been tracking energy usage since 2005, so they have a good collection of data. A restrictor was put on inmate showers at the jail, fluorescent lighting was reduced, windows were tinted, windows were sealed, timers were placed on hotwater heaters, desk heaters were outlawed and a duct system for the dryers was established. The main building uses 175,000 kilowatts, Barwick said. And since October, they have seen it drop to 95,000. The cost has gone from $17,000 a month to $10,000. Barwick was looking to the committee and Talquin Electric Energy Services Specialist Dan Ard for direction on next steps. Ard said to look at HVAC and water heating, which was the largest costs. However, the jail has to meet certain standards so that needed to be kept in mind. If a project has a return on investment of 2 years, it is a no brainer and should be done, he said. Commissioner Lynn Artz suggested the jail look into a solar water heater. Ard said again that he wasnt sure that would be possible for that facility because of the standards it must meet. Committee member Elinor Elfner wondered if the administration building of the sheriffs office needed to have hot water in the bathrooms. It could be cut off, she said. The committee also talked about the comprehensive list of all county buildings and their meter numbers and usage. The committee has been trying to compile an accurate list of county facilities since its inception. The committee is still currently compiling that list. The committee ran into problems with inaccurate square footage and descriptions for buildings not being specific enough. Artz said once that is complete, each department can get historical data and graph it to see the usage. Each department would have a contact person who tracks the usage. When the department has a cost savings, Artz said it could be placed into a green fund for additional projects. Ard said the rule of usage is 1 kilowatt to 1 square foot. The committee agreed to start identifying places for Ard and his team to audit, those ones that are consuming the most energy, prior to the next meeting. The next committee meeting has not yet been scheduled.Energy Conservation Committee looks at LED lighting Friendship Primitive Baptist Church 165 Friendship Church Road, Medart Rev. Mark Hall and Family from Dallas, NCSpecial Singing Nightly Prayer for the sick Anointed Preaching And it shall come to pass, that whosoever shall call on the name of the LORD shall be delivered: ... Joel 2:32May 28, 29, 30 at 7PMOn the 27th Homecoming Message at 11AMThere is a blessing just waiting for you! Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

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Dorothy Carrie Holub, of Crawfordville, passed away on May 17 after a brief illness. Her daughter, Bonnie Holub, and son-in-law, Tim Jordan, were by her bedside. She was born on Nov., 25, 1924, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. She was known for her caring nature, can-do attitude and steadfast work ethic. There was nothing she couldnt do once her mind was set. At age 19, she became a pro cient welder in the wartime shipyards of New Orleans, a talent she carried with her for many years, using her welding skills to repair farm equipment and other jobs when needed. While Bonnie was growing up, Dorothy owned and operated the local drug store and old fashioned soda fountain in Coggon, Iowa. She xed up a back room with juke box and tables so kids would have a place to go after school to listen to music and dance. When her daughter was in elementary school, Dorothy taught her how to be a top-rate soda jerk, how to give superior customer service and how to run the cash register, thus passing on her values of service, work and responsibility to her young protg, so her daughter could always get a job. When her daughter left for college, Dorothy sold the drug store, moved to Cedar Rapids, and worked at Collins Radio. She also worked in the familys bowling lanes in Marion, Iowa. In 1970 she moved to Indian Rocks Beach and managed a dry cleaning shop, and then to Wakulla County in 1981 where she worked at Wakulla Cleaners. In her 60s, she tried to retire, but that was not to be. She wanted to work, so she began her tenure as a crew leader at the U.S. Forest Service in the Elder American Program in Wakulla. She drove a six pack truck to recreation areas in the forest that needed clean-ups and repairs. This was one of her favorite jobs, as she loved being outdoors and being with her hard-working and fun-loving crew. At age 80, when her legs began to weaken, she had to leave the USFS for a less physical job. She was immediately hired as the rst paid volunteer coordinator for the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, also a favorite job of hers because of the dedicated volunteers (who became special friends) and visitors she met from around the world. She held this position until illness struck. Dorothy willingly worked until she was 86, and played golf in her spare time. And all of the time, 24/7 she was an exceptional, loving Mother. Another job well done. It wouldnt surprise anyone who knew her, to nd she is now leading a special crew of can-do angels on industrious celestial adventures. A memorial celebration of Dorothys life will be held at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1493 Coastal Highway 98, on Sunday, May 27 at 4 p.m. In lieu of owers, please do something special to make someone feel special. Dorothy would like that. In addition to Bonnie and Tim, survivors include her special nieces and nephews in Iowa, Louisiana, Texas and Colorado and a host of cherished friends. She was predeceased by her parents, Carlton and Alice Smith of Cedar Rapids, her brother, Harold Smith of Panacea, her sister, Clarice Hicks and brother-in-law, Travis Hicks of Alexandria, La., her sister Joyce Gordon, and brother-in-law, Ralph Gordon of Marion, Iowa. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesChurch Briefs Buckhorn NewsBy ETHEL SKIPPER The Church of Christ Written in Heaven will have their annual Tallahassee District Meeting on May 23 through May 27 with nightly services beginning at 8 p.m. On Friday, May 25, at 10:30 a.m. will be a Womens Day Service. That night, at 7:30 p.m., speaker will be the Right Rev. Christ Burney. A great program on Saturday night by the youth of the church. Sunday School is at 10:30 a.m. and Sunday Service begins at noon. We welcome you to these services. Host pastor is Ethel M. Skipper. We wish a happy birthday to Sister Callie Gavin on May 13, Mrs. Mary Green. The Skipper Temple Church of Christ will celebrate its fth anniversary at 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy. We welcome you to come help us celebrate. On Friday night, June 1, Mount Olive Church No. 1 pastor Donald Jefferson will be in charge, beginning at 7:30 p.m. On Sunday, June 3, at noon, Deliverance Temple Church of God and Christ from Gretna will be the guest church along with all our visiting friends. Marvin Stough Barber, 85, died on May 16, at Big Bend Hospice House. He was born in Dothan, Ala., and moved here in 1953 from Fort Meade. Survivors include his wife, Mary Frances Barber; two sons, Johnny Barber (Kathy) of Wakulla and Marvin Brian Barber (Vickie) of Woodville; daughter, Cheryl Dunlap (Mike) of Wakulla; 10 grandchildren, and 11 great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his son, William Eric Barber. The funeral service was held on Friday, May 18, at White Primitive Baptist Church in Woodville, with burial at Woodville Cemetery. Viewing was held prior to services. Family received friends at the Fellowship Hall after the service. In lieu of owers, contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice House, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard Tallahassee FL 32308. Beggs Funeral Home, 3322 Apalachee Parkway, in Tallahassee, (850) 942-2929 is in charge of arrangements.Marvin Stough Barber Dorothy Carrie Holub Feddie L. Hurley Mike Jett Tom H. Maxwell Feddie L. Hurley, 86, died Sunday, May 20, at Consulate Healthcare in Tallahassee. She was a sweet, gentle and loving person, who dearly loved her family and friends. Visitation was held Wednesday, May 23, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville prior to the services at 3 p.m. with burial to follow at Hurley Hill Cemetery in Spring Creek. Survivors include three sons, J.W. McMullen and Walter McMullen of Spring Creek and Otis McMullen of Everglade City; one daughter, Evelyn L. Johnson of Wacissa; and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by son, Lester L. McMullen; and daughter, Gail Tillman. Arrangements are being handled by Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Tom H. Maxwell, 81, passed away Thursday, May 17, in Crawfordville, surrounded by his loving family. Born Aug. 9, 1930, in Sopchoppy, he was the son of William A. and Lilla L. Langston Maxwell. He was a selfemployed truck driver and attended River of Life Church in Crawfordville. He is survived by his wife, a daughter, stepdaughter, 10 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by a daughter, a grandson, two brothers and two sisters. The funeral was held on Sunday, May 20, at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, with interment at Sopchoppy Cemetery. Online condolences at www.abbeyfh.com. A Celebration of Life for Mike Jett will be held on Saturday, June 2 at 4 p.m. at Capt. Seaniles. All friends and musicians welcome! Bring something to share.Marvin Stough Barber Friendship P.B. to host revival Pioneer Baptist to hold gospel sing Feddie L. Hurley Tom H. Maxwell Mike Jett Dorothy Carrie HolubFriendship Primitive Baptist Church in Medart will feature the Rev. Mark Hall and family from Dallas, N.C., for a revival on Monday, May 28, through Wednesday, May 30, at 7 p.m. nightly. On Sunday, May 27, will be the Homecoming Message at 11 a.m. The church is located at 165 Friendship Church Road in Medart. Pioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide Open Microphone Gospel Sing on Friday, May 25, at 7 p.m. Anyone who enjoys singing or playing gospel music is invited to participate. Others who enjoy listening are encouraged to attend and have a blessed night of worship through music. There is no charge for the concert. Pioneer Baptist Church is located at 486 Beechwood Drive, four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the Dr. MLK Jr. Memorial Road and Spring Creek Highway intersection. Call Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-5224 for more information. We hope to see you.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 7Ahappenings Community Special to The NewsCrawfordville Girl Scout Troop 165 held its Bridging Ceremony on May 15 at 6:30 p.m. at the Christ Church Anglican. The Bridging Ceremony is an activity held to let the girls be recognized and welcomed into another level of Girl Scouting. The Daisy group (blue uniforms) became Brownies and the Brownie group (brown uniforms) became Juniors. Daisy group members are Keira Tuten, Marissa Peddie, Ava DuBois, Chloe Brown and Lily Jedziniak. The brownie group members are Rachel Freeman, Madison Rushing, Marina Harvey, Alysse Warburton, Clara Alford, Summer Broga, Madelyn Montpellier, Madison Brown and Ella Roberts. The leaders are Melissa Alford, Amy Freeman and Amy Brown.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Girls scouts hold bridging ceremony Special to The NewsTwo local kids from Crawfordville are going to Los Angeles this summer to audition for 200-300 national and international directors and agents who are in the entertainment industry. Nathan and Keira Cushard heard an ad on the radio in early January, encouraging kids aged 4-25 to come out to the Civic Center to audition for a talent agency. They both asked their mother if they could attend the auditions, with dreams of one day being TV stars. So, the call was made. The day of the auditions arrived, and 500 kids ooded the Civic Center. The kids were split into two groups to audition with two different agents. Brandon Harlow, an agent with I Got Talent, was impressed with what he saw, and both kids made the rst cut, returning the following day for a second audition. Out of the original 500 kids, 30 were chosen to attend rehearsals for the next several weekends with national directors who helped them learn acting and modeling techniques. In early February, all the kids put on a showcase for two other national directors where they highlighted their acting, modeling, singing and dancing. Of these, only 10 spots were available to be able to participate in the iPop Convention, International Presentation of Performers, in Los Angeles. Nathan and Keira both were extended the invitation. Due to the high cost for the convention and travel, the kids are working hard with fundraisers to help pay for the expenses of the trip. Partnering with local Pampered Chef Consultant, Angel Vonada (850-4454018), the kids are having a Pampered Chef Mystery Host Sweepstakes. Everyone gets a chance to help them and buy products that will always remind them of their generous donation. A $10 donation enters participants into a chance to win. The grand prize is up to $200 in products. To order, visit www. PamperedChef.biz/Angel. Choose the fundraisers name, IPOP, to place an order online.Local kids head to Los Angeles Nathan Cushard Keira Cushard Williams to marry Danielle Koppenaal Danielle Koppenaal of Crawfordville and Brian Williams of Tallahassee announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Robert Koppenaal of Charleston, S.C., and Brenda Aaron of Crawfordville. He is the son of the late David Williams and Susan Williams of Tallahassee. They have planned a wedding for April 2013 in St. George Island. Brian Williams and Danielle Koppenaal, at right Holton graduates from University of Miami Cedric C.J. Holton graduated from the University of Miami on May 11 with a Bachelor of Liberal Arts degree. He majored in criminal justice. He graduated from Wakulla High School in 2008 and received a full football scholarship. He plans to continue his education and receive his masters degree. He hopes to eventually work for the FBI, the DEA or travel with an undercover agency. He is the son of Jeffrey and Rosalind Donaldson. His maternal grandmother is Rosa Lee Jackson. His paternal grandparents are Joe and Mary Holton. His paternal grandfather is the late Tommy Jackson Sr. Cedric Holton Pamela Lourcey, of Crawfordville, recently graduated from Florida Gulf Coast University with a Bachelor of Science degree. Lourcey receives degree from Florida Gulf Coast Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULL SURVICE HAIR SALONHair Place That 850-926-6020We Have Gift CerticatesBooking NOWProm updos starting at$65OOPS!WelcomeMavis 274-0700Miranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 NO QUESTIONS ASKEDLost adult male Chinese Water Crescent/Shitsu Mix.It was last seen around the Centennial Bank area in Crawfordville on May 15. If seen or found please call 850-688-1277. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsOn Friday, May 4, Crawfordville Elementary School hosted the annual Fifth Grade Brain Brawl, which is sponsored by the Coastal Optimist Club. Ten students representing ve homeroom classes competed against each other answering trivia questions about local, state and American history, government, politics, geography, science, math, spelling and grammar. Team A was lead by Captain Codie Posey. Other members included Dylan Cook, Jonah Harvey, Amanda Hurst and Jada Lassiter as alternate. Leading Team B to victory by a very close margin of only 10 points was Captain Faith Joiner who was supported by Steven Gehrke, Vance Osteen, Charlie Owens and Courtney Herron, Alternate. Amanda Hurst was the Overall Top Scorer, as well as Team As top scorer. Steven Gehrke was the top scorer for Team B. Wakulla County Library Director Scott Joiner served as moderator, Tammy Barfield as time keeper and Susan-Payne Turner as score keeper. Fifth Grade Brain Brawl sponsors were Alisa Adkison and Trish Strickland. Other fth grade teachers are Betty Hobbs, Renee Kelly, Barbara Mingledorff and Brandi Panzarino. The Brain Brawl was the prelude of many forthcoming events during one of the busiest months of the year. With only a few weeks remaining as the 2011-2012 school year comes to a rapid end, school administrators Angie Walker and Laura Kelley, re ect upon successes and gear up to plan for another great year at Crawfordville Elementary School.Crawfordville holds brain brawl SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTeam B takes rst place in the Crawfordville brain brawl beating Team A by 10 points. Yearbooks still available for purchaseThere are more than 100 Wakulla High School seniors who have not purchased yearbooks this school year. The yearbook staff will be set up at baccalaureate on May 30 at 7 p.m. and at graduation on June 1 at 7:30 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. The books are $85 and the school is only accepting cash, money orders or cashiers checks. Look for the yearbook stand inside the main gate. CES surpasses 200 million word goalSpecial to The NewsCrawfordville Elementary Schools students are not letting the end of school or summer weather distract them from continuing their hard work and relentless effort toward reaching the schools goal of reading 30,000 books and 200 million words. The closer it gets to the end of the year, the harder the students seem to be pushing themselves. Crawfordville has made reading a priority and the entire Crawfordville team is helping each other stay strong and not lose focus. Each week, for the past three weeks, the school has gained at least three new Million Word Readers, giving the school a total so far of 34 1 million word readers, 10 2 million word readers, two 3 million word readers, and two 4 million word readers. They have 14 teachers who are million word readers and more who are just on the verge of reaching their goal. The CES media specialist, Cindy Burse, initiated the school-wide goal and has been providing incentives like the Million Word Madness T-shirt, while motivating teachers and students throughout the year. Rewards are also offered to students who read 10 or more Sunshine State Reader books, or 10 or more Great Illustrated Classics books. Parents have donated books to support the overwhelming request for some of the more popular titles and series, while our PTA has been generous with their support for the reading program as well. The faculty and staff bring in and trade out novels to keep the books circulating and keep the reading momentum at an all-time high. CES has already read almost 32,000 books and is now well over our 200 million word goal. Popsicles will given to the whole school this week in celebration of the teamwork it has taken to reach their goal. Burse, along with teachers and CES Reading Coach Terry Price, are already planning for next years reading program, adding new incentives, and researching new books for all levels. The goal will always be to increase student participation and the love for reading. DOE unveils numerous resources for parents Special to The NewsThe Florida Department of Education (DOE) launched a host of resources geared toward communicating directly with Floridas parents about public education. The purpose of this effort is to help parents understand Floridas assessment and accountability system, increased standards and how these changes will help prepare K-12 students for college, career and life. Floridas parents and guardians provide invaluable support to our students and the department is committed to ensuring they have the most accurate userfriendly information and resources available, said Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson. New resources for parents include an FCAT 2.0 Call Center, Floridas Path to Success website, DOE Parent Portal by Novachi and Just for Parents e-mail address. See below for details about these resources. FCAT 2.0 Call Center DOE experts will be available to answer parent questions from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. Parents may call 866-507-1109, toll-free, to ask questions about FCAT, recent changes to Floridas accountability system, and how this impacts students and teachers. Floridas Path to Success Visit the Floridas Path to Success website to nd out more information about their transition to tougher standards and higher expectations. The website features a letter from Commissioner Robinson, timelines about Floridas education system, a question and answer page, and video from a Florida public school parent. The website is http:// www. oridapathtosuccess. org/. DOE Parent Portal by Novachi In partnership with Novachi, the department has launched the DOE Parent Portal. This public forum is designed for parents to ask questions and voice ideas at the state level. The portal features a parent blog, discussion board and announcements page with more education resources coming soon. Parents may logon for access to this free user-friendly site. The website is http:// parents. doe.org/home. DOE Just for Parents E-mail This e-mail address, justforparents@fdoe.org, is especially for Floridas parents to get answers, voice opinions and share ideas with the department. Email school news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is published when space becomes available and is edited for style, clarity and grammar. Ticket SponsorsWalt Disney World Tim Jordan and Bonnie Holub Wildwood Inn and Golf Course St. James Bay Golf Resort Premier Athletics Karla Nelson Photography Crawfordville Martial Arts Acad. Florida Georgia Glass Wal-Mart Crawfordville Elementary Schools Country Fair, April 2nd was a spectacular event! The weather was a mix of sun, warmth, rain and breeze but the crowd was happy, hungry and eager to enjoy the plethora of activities and food. Children got their faces painted, threw balls that dunked their favorite teacher, played bingo, ate cotton candy, slid down large slides, milked a cow, and participated in games that entertained the whole family. It was a fantastic, fun lled day! The success of the festival is due to the dedicated teachers, staff, and parents of Crawfordville; the generous support given from our businesses and community members of Wakulla County; and the dedicated members of the PTA who spent a tremendous amount of time preparing and planning for our Country Fair. Students and parents worked hard selling tickets and baking goodies for our Cake Walk and Sweet Shop. They worked so hard, that enough funds were raised before the day of the festival to put Mrs. Walker on the roof for 24 hours! This event will take place after FCAT! With the help of the Lions Club ipping burgers and passing out frosty, cold Pepsi products; the high schools ROTC students working booths and running errands; the Sheriffs Department assisting with security and safety; and volunteers working hard to assist throughout the day, the Crawfordville Country Fair proved to be a day for all to enjoy. I would like to give special thanks to our local businesses for their support as sponsors, for their generous donations, and for their encouraging words about our event. Once again, the community of Wakulla County did not hesitate to support our efforts to raise funds for our school and our students. Crawfordville Elementary School would like to say, THANK YOU, to all of those who were able to donate, attend, and support our 2012 Country Fair!Ace Hardware Adriene Hill, D.C., PA Ameris Bank Angies Marine Supply, Inc. Badcock Home Furnishings Bedfellows Body By Gena Brooks Concrete Capital Bowling Lanes Capital City BankCrawfordville Centennial Bank Coastal Restaurant Costco Dazzles El Jalisco Jimmy Johns Funky Fiddler Evolution Day Spa Green Peridot Salon Hardees of Crawfordville Little Caesars Lube-Xpert Mary Brogan Museum Mikes Marine Supply Millie Bruce Peppers Mexican Grill Poseys Steam Room Premier Athletics Purple Martin Nursery Robyn at Evolution Sallies Place Sea World Skate World State Farm-Glenda Conley Agent Talk OThe Town Deli The Cottage Collection The Donut Hole The Learning Curve Tutoring Center Vickie Heydenreich Wakulla Dance Academy Wakulla Florist Wakulla Florist & Gift Shop Whaley Photography Wildwood Resort Winn Dixie ZoinksSupporting VendorsFestival Sponsors Silent Auction Millie & Richie Bruce Tiffany Dubois Iris Shores Christy Byrne Cori Revell Marian Revell Jennifer BrooksClay Marshall LovelJean-Claude Picot R. Alan Andrews, PA Angelo & Son Seafood Restaurant & Tropical Trader Shrimp Company B & B Dugger Backwoods Pizza Brian & Tanya English Brooks, LeBoef, Bennett Law Ofce Crawfordville United Methodist Church Fish Camp Restaurant & Marina Florida Air Specialist Frank Mingledorff Hair by Nikki Happy Time Instructional Day Care Inspired Technologies Iris Annes Jimmy Johns Justin Coddington Concrete Pumping Marpan Supply Maximum Building Systems Wakulla Mens Club Premier Athletics of Wakulla Residential Elevators Rock Solid Design & Cons. Ron & Linda Chason Southway Crane The Wharf Express Traci Cash, CPA

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By LISA KINARDSpecial to The NewsMonday Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans v Badcock Furniture Rays Rained out and held as part of a late night double header on Friday. Tuesday Ameris Bank Sluggers vs Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws Rained out and held on Wednesday. Wednesday Ameris Bank Sluggers vs Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws The Ameris Bank Sluggers and Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws came into the game tied for rst place. Both teams knew only one team would come away with the regular season championship title. Amazingly, both teams had split their games this season with each winning one, losing one with one tie and had identical records for the season. The Outlaws jumped out to an early lead by scoring two runs in the top of the rst off of pitcher Michael McGlamry. Nick Lentz and Skyler Talavera scored on a two out, two strike double by Lucas Briggs. This RBI double proved to be enough as the Outlaws went on to win 5-0. They also had runs scored by Lentz in the third, Greysen Rudd in the fth and Brandon Bennett in the 6h. Both teams played very good defense. Nick Lentz started on the mound for the Outlaws pitching 4 innings allowing no runs, no hits with six strike outs. Chase Forester was also very effective pitching three innings allowing three hits and no runs. The Outlaw hitters were Rudd and Briggs with 2 apiece and Forester, Lentz, Talavera, Briggs, James Calhoun and Bennett with one each. For the Sluggers, Hits came from McGlamry (double), Thomas Davis and Josh Conway. Thursday Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans v Ameris Bank Sluggers The Titans started things rolling with runs by Zach Norman and John Weber in the rst. Two phenomenal catches by sluggers Noah Isman and Kaleb Langston robbed Jackson Montgomery and Zeke Bryan of hits and RBIs. Michael McGlamry tried to get the Sluggers on the board but some awesome eld work by Zeke Bryan kept it the Titans on top. In the third, Sluggers brought the score to 4-1 when Isman came home with hits from Thomas Davis and McGlamry. In the 4th, with Tyler Teegan on the mound, a great throw by Davis to Jake Bryan on rst ended the inning for the Titans. Going into the fth the Titans were up 5 but the Sluggers had a plan. Davis and McGlamry got things moving with hits but another Zeke Bryan catch on the y in center eld put an end to the momentum. The sixth inning was all Sluggers. Gabe Barwick scored making it 5-2. Thomas Davis smacked a double bringing in three more runs and tying the game at 5 each. McGlamry came home later in the inning to take the lead, but the Titans answered and the game ended with a 6-6 tie. Friday Early game Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws over the Badcock Furniture Rays Friday Late Game Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans take the win vs Badcoc k Furniture Rays As the regular season ends with the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws on top, the Championship serries begins next week. Be sure to catch a game as there are sure to be some memorable moments. Tuesday, May 22 1v4 Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws vs Badcock Furniture Rays Thursday, May 24 2v3 Ameris Bank Sluggers vs Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans Friday, May 25 Championship W1 v W2 As always, thank you to our sponsors High Quality Heating & Air, Hamrick Insurance Associates, Ameris Bank, Harrison Bail Bonds, Badcock Furniture and Tallahassee Surgical Associates. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team views SportsBABE RUTH BASEBALLOutlaws take rst place LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMichael McGlamry of the Ameris Bank Sluggers. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Rays are the 2012 Wakulla Cal Ripken Majors Champion. Seeded number 2 to begin the annual year end tournament, the Rays defeated the As in a close 8-5 ballgame in the semi- nal. They advanced to the championship game against the Yankees which they won 12-5. Coaches are Lee Lewis, Bubba Dempsey, and Jason Lawhon. Players are Wesley Gowdy, Austin Hogan, Jonah Lawhon, Hayden Thomas, Zeb Lewis, Payton Pittman, Zac Clark, Dalten Wood, Brannon Stringer, Alex Van Der Merve, and Chase Hilyer. Congratulations, Rays!Wakulla Red Sox best Yankees in shootout, 12-10Special to The News The Red Sox and Yankees battled it out Friday, May 18, as they combined for 22 runs. In the end, the Red Sox won the offensive battle 12-10 in six innings. There were 20 hits, including nine extra base hits in the game. What a season, said Red Sox Coach Russell Bryan. I am so proud of all the players. They deserved to win this championship with their hard work and determination. I must say the six teams in this league this year were awesome. A special thanks to Indians Coach Mike Barwick your inspiration in unforgettable. PICTURED: Justin Bryan, Ethan Strickland, Logan Bruner, Travis Morgan, Trevor Jones, Garrett Sampson; standing: Tanner Marlow, Walker Hammelman, Justin Cardoza, Dominic Vargas, Parker Wilkinson,Paul Kilgore; Coach Russell Bryan, assistant coaches Mark Bryan and Nick Vargas. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRays are league championsCAL RIPKEN MAJORS BASEBALL FROM GOOD TO GREAT !Friends and neighbors, My name is Dr. Kimball Thomas As most of you know by now, I ocially am kicking o my campaign this Saturday. This means that I am o cially applying to be your superintendent of Wakulla County schools. As with any job one applies for, you submit a rsum. I would like to take this opportunity to do so now. I feel that if elected, you, the ci zens, will be my boss. The educa on of our children is very important and I would like you to know about all that I bring to this posi on. A er reading my rsum, I encourage you to check out my past employment and check with my references. This is no more than any person applying for a job would expect of his employer. Should you have any ques ons or comments, please call me or my campaign manager. I promise that I will call you as soon as possible. I would also like to take this opportunity to encourage you to call with your ideas and sugges ons on how we might make our school system be er. Team Leader 6th Grade Teacher, Wakulla Middle School, Crawfordville 1983 1989 Assistant Principal, Wakulla Middle School, Crawfordville 1989-1993 Principal, James S. Rickards High School, Tallahassee 1993 1997 My direct supervisor was the Leon County superintendent (850) 487-7100 Principal, Florida A & M University Developmental Research School FAMU High 1998-2001 My direct supervisor was the Leon County superintendent (850) 487-7100 Senior Pastor, Philadelphia Primive Bap st Church, Tallahassee 1999-2001 Educa on Consultant, Florida Department of Educa on, Bureau of School Improvement 2001-2003 I worked under, and with Governor Jeb Bush Director, Federal, State and Compe ve Grants and Programs, 2003-2008 District School Board of Collier County, Naples My direct supervisor was the Collier County superintendent (239) 377-0001 Assistant Professor/Lecturer, Gainesville State College, Gainsville, GA 2008 -2011 I worked directly under the president of the college (678) 717-3639 Principal, East Gadsden High School, Havana 2011-Present My campaign manager is Jay S. Herring ( 850) 294-3270 Personal reference Ronnie Gray (850) 926-7074I welcome all of your sugges ons, lets talk. Please Join us Saturday, May 26th at Hudson Park in downtown Crawfordville. There will be an array of guest speakers and live music Free BBQ will be o ered!Poli cal adver sement paid for and approved by Dr. Kimballl Kim Thomas, NPA for Wakulla County Superintendent of Schools LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926 or 510 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Will be closed on Memorial Day Monday, May 28. Deadline for display advertisments requiring proofs and classi ed ads is Thursday, May 24 by 11 a.m. All other advertising is due by Friday, May 25

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By MARJ LAWEar protection is important at every shooting range. You must wear it if you are shooting at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Range in Sopchoppy. Guns make a lot of noise. If youre going to the range, and you want to have good ear protection, what will you choose? The least expensive route is to get squishy foam pillow-like earplugs. You roll these between your ngers to compress them, and then you stick them into your ears. They swell back up and conform to the shape of your ears. Mostly. Sometimes you hear sound that is not muf ed. Then you have to take them out, compress them again, and insert once more. Sometimes you wiggle them with your index finger once theyre in. You will know when the sound is muf ed. Trust me. Another very inexpensive (yes, were talking under $2) way to go is to nd ear buds. These are foam, but the part that goes in your ears is smaller than the abovementioned earplugs. They are attached with a cord, so you can pull them out and hang them around your neck when the range is cold and no one is shooting. Theres a small plastic tab at the outer ear portion of the buds. You can turn it gently until the buds are rmly in place. You will know when the sound is muf ed. Trust me. A third option is ear protection that looks like music headphones. They slide over your head just like headphones, and a cushion wraps around your ear to keep sound out. They give a more professional appearance, but the ones Ive seen that are under $50 reduce the sound only as much as those very cheap ear buds and pillows. Go gure. Another similar option can be headphones running on batteries to allow you to hear a person talking, but they blot out sudden sharp noises like guns going off. How do they do that? I dont have a clue, but they work. They muf e sound as well as other headphones and ear buds and plugs. My personal favorite option is a combination of ear buds and headphones. When you wear both at the same time, the sound is really very muf ed. This is especially good when you or your neighbor shoot high-caliber guns or ri es. The only drawback I notice is that wearing headphones in Florida is hot and your ears get all sweaty in the spring, summer and fall. Im still going to use the combination buds and headphones, though. If the buds reduce noise by 26 decibels, and the phones by 24 decibels, then the combination of the two is more. Trust me.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement. Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBetween painting an 8x8-foot mural for a local client, working on a pool and waterfall, clearing out a number of weed pines and sweet guns and plus getting a spring cold (ugh!), Ive missed writing my Wakulla Wildlife articles recently and I apologize. Spring has sprung through and this last week we nally had a nice afternoon rain, and as usual in early May, the humidity, after the rst rains, immediately jumped to the point of being uncomfortable! When the long dry days of spring end after the winter cold fronts and rains have basically ended, and the summer thunderstorms start, along with the temperatures in the 80s and 90s, summer really sets in. And here come the yellow or deer ies. They have now started unfortunately! It has been extremely dry, yet spring came and went and my Patti and I tried to absorb as much of the transformation as possible here locally. We watched as our rst fruit trees bloomed; the redbuds and dogwoods and wisteria, titi, etc. The azaleas bloomed too, but the drought really restricted their profuse blooming so they werent quite as showy as usual. We planted a number of butter y and hummingbird attracting plants around our new cement lily pond, and watched as 23 species of butter ies visited them. A real show. Weve found pig frog tadpoles in the ponds (Ive another pond by my woodworking shop), and some baby banded water snakes plus numerous dragonflies, like the pond hawks, darners, clubtails, etc., are now darting back and forth over the aquatics weve planted. Patti is a nature photographer a professional since 1981. She is always looking for unique subjects to photograph and send on to her agent. One day I had the pleasure of showing her her rst broad-headed skink (one of seven species Ive recorded here). I rst observed this impressive reptile crawling along the forest oor on Floyd Knobs in Indiana when I was a child. I thought it was a red headed snake, until I nally detected its legs. Its head was a full inch across and the jaws looked swollen as if they contained venom, like our rattlers and true moccasin. These gray-bodied lizards get over a foot long and proportionately do have an oversized and strong jawed head (but contain no venom). The head of the bigger males can be fairly reddish orange. Ive chased them 20 feet or more up trees and here I nd them often in my barn looking for insects and other small critters. Patti also wished to photograph our local yellow pitcher plants, so we drove over to the Sumatra area to check out the bogs, which contain also the white, and parrot pitcher plants. We also found in Billys Bog our fth species. (Wed already returned to a place in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge where David Roddenberry of our branch of the Native Plant Society had located some hooded pitcher plants.) The fifth species was the purple pitcher plant, Sarracenia rosea. Just off Tower Road in Tates Hell State Forest we pulled to a stop in the road. Grabbing my binoculars, my suspicions were con rmed an adult Black Bear walking toward us right down our lane. Neat!Enjoying the transition from springWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH HOME ON THE RANGEProtecting your hearing is important on the gun range SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSome different types of ear protection. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA winner in the Childrens Fishing TournamentDillon Harris received a second place trophy in the Childrens Fishing Tournament held Saturday, May 19. Harris caught a 2.5-pound bass in the competition. As prizes, Harris received a rod and reel, tacklebox and sunglasses. The freshwater divisions include bass, pan sh and cat sh. Saltwater categories include white trout, speckled trout, Spanish mackerel, red sh, ounder and whiting. No grouper, snapper, amberjack, sharks, rays, hard head or sail sh were considered. All anglers received a tournament T-shirt.FWC Facts:Snook can adapt to sudden changes in salinity with the help of chloride cells within their gills. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 27 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle FRANKLIN WA KU LLA JEFFE RS ON & TA YLOR GAG GROUPER 713-0014 99 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Perfect Weather for Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay!SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS $2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 CATCH MORE FISH FREE LINE WINDINGwith purchase Made in USA G BUY IN BULK & SAVE B B B B B B B B B B B B B Y Y U Y U Y U Y Y Y Y U U U U U U Y Y Y UY U U UY Y Y UY U Y I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N B U L K B U L K U L U L K U L L K L & S A V E & S A S A V A VE A VE VE V E BUY IN BULK & SAVE www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comMemorial Day is fast upon us and that means a lot of folks out on the water. It goes without saying that even the most experienced boater needs to be extra cautious this weekend. There will be many out on the water who are infrequent or inexperienced boaters. This can be a recipe for disaster. The National Safe Boating Council holds National Safe Boating Week leading up to Memorial Day as the unof cial start to the recreational boating season. According to their reports, the U.S. Coast Guard identified Florida as the top-rated state for boating deaths and accidents. While the gures are from 2009, Florida ranks at the top of the list in previous years. In 2009, the Coast Guard counted 4,730 accidents that involved 736 deaths, 3,358 injuries and approximately $36 million in damage to property as a result of recreational boating accidents. Of those who drowned, 84 percent were not wearing life jackets. Please do your part to not be a statistic! In addition to preparing for a busy weekend, the Auxiliary has been working hard the last week. Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos and member Mike Harrison were invited to present a water safety and safe boating talk to the rst grade at Wakulla COAST Charter School in St. Marks. Christine Saulter, the rst grade teacher, invited the Auxiliary in because she is beginning a unit on water safety (including swimming, boating, etc.). The class of 15 students learned about the buddy system, the importance of a oat plan and life jacket, as well as how to call for help. It was a fun class for all, including the Auxiliarists. Several members also met down at the communications shed to continue work. The interior was painted and the exterior had a bit more preparation for a new coat of paint in the near future. Saturday was a busy day for us as well. Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon met early Saturday morning to set up for the Armed Forces Day Car Show at the Tallahassee Antique Car Museum. Norma and Phil Hill joined later in the morning. All enjoyed talking to the attendees about the Auxiliary and learning about the cars. Duane and Tim had the honor of selecting a participant for a Coast Guard Trophy a 1930s Buick. A classy car that best represented the Coast Guard motto of being Semper Paratus always ready. Also on Saturday, Mark Rosen was coxswain aboard FinLee with owner Steve Hults and a crew of Dave Rabon, Raye Crews and David Guttman. The crew left the dock at 4 p.m. for some night training to help Dave Rabon become a fully quali ed crew member. With the help of fellow Auxiliarists Bob Asztalos and Mike Harrison, the team practiced towing Bobs boat. In addition to helping Dave get some training, we never know what conditions we will be called out to for help, so we do our best to practice and make sure we are ready when the call comes. One of the other training items for new crew is to participate in night navigation. For our area, we usually head out to the center channel marker and wait for dusk before making our way back up the channel. On Saturday night, the docks were especially crowded due to a shing tournament and the tide was very low. Thankfully, alls well that ends well. With less than two feet of water, the crew found an open spot and docked FinLee, calling it a night. As our motto says, we are Semper Paratus Always Ready. Are you? And, as Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarist Bob Asztalos gave a presentation to COAST Charter School rst graders. Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon set up at the Armed Forces Day Car Show at the Tallahassee Antique Car Museum. Emerald Sink. My most recent cave class visited several dive sites in search of clear water. Emerald Sink came to mind, but is currently unavailable to visitors seeking training. In its day however, Emerald was very popular. I rst visited Emerald Sink as a checkout dive site for our FSU scuba classes in the early 1980s. Local divers had constructed a ladder down the steep slopes of the sink, replacing the rope used by swimmers who jumped from trees. The annual oods usually demolished the ladder, necessitating periodic new investments. In the 1990s a very nice stairway was constructed that lasted several years. We would bring a dozen students at a time, dive them to 60 feet in the open water for two dives before moving on to ocean dives the next weekend. Emerald Sink was convenient, shallow and usually clear. Midday, the light would shine down the shaft in deep blue emerald rays. The University of Florida would bring their entire class of several hundred students for checkout dives, overwhelming the site but only for one weekend a semester. This site became a favorite cave dive of mine because it connected under the road, to other sinkholes close by. I could swim upstream at a shallow 70 feet to Twin and Cheryl, climb out and walk back to my car. Or I could swim 1,000 feet to the Dark Abyss, turn around and get back in under an hour. These became our after-work swims for exercise. Then one day I was told kids had stolen a car and dumped it in Emerald Sink! Fuel leaked out and contaminated our beautiful dive site. I called friends I knew in state government to get the car out as soon as possible, but found little interest. I nally threatened to go to the press regarding the threat to our countys drinking water. The car was quickly removed, but so was our access. The property was soon acquired by the Wakulla Springs State Park and diving was forbidden. Jonny Richards managed to get the attention of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to open Emerald Sink to diving if that community could raise the funds to build proper steps and facilities. Approximately $10,000 was raised, more than enough, and volunteers recruited to do the work. My group alone contributed $1,000 and seven helpers, only to nd out later that overbearing standards eliminated all of our contributors but two. The two of us have boycotted ever since out of protest. Today, with an average of only 40 people diving the site a year, the parking lot is overgrown from lack of attention. Heated debate continues about opening our local dive sites to the public while still maintaining the security of our watershed. And the emerald blue waters still ow relentlessly on its way to the sea, passing brie y by this beautiful sinkhole. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday y Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed May 30, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 5:26 AM 3.2 ft. 6:05 AM High 1.5 ft. 10:33 AM 1.5 ft. 11:15 AM -0.0 ft. 12:03 AM 0.2 ft. 12:46 AM 0.4 ft. 1:37 AM 0.7 ft. 2:36 AM 1.0 ft. 3:41 AM Low 3.9 ft. 4:15 PM 3.7 ft. 4:53 PM 3.2 ft. 6:48 AM 3.2 ft. 7:36 AM 3.2 ft. 8:29 AM 3.3 ft. 9:25 AM 3.4 ft. 10:20 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:26 PM 1.6 ft. 12:05 PM 1.6 ft. 1:06 PM 1.4 ft. 2:21 PM 1.1 ft. 3:44 PM 0.7 ft. 5:01 PM Low 3.5 ft. 5:40 PM 3.3 ft. 6:38 PM 3.0 ft. 7:58 PM 2.9 ft. 9:38 PM 3.0 ft. 11:14 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed May 30, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 5:23 AM 3.3 ft. 6:02 AM High 1.6 ft. 10:30 AM 1.6 ft. 11:12 AM -0.0 ft. 12:00 AM 0.2 ft. 12:43 AM 0.5 ft. 1:34 AM 0.8 ft. 2:33 AM 1.1 ft. 3:38 AM Low 3.9 ft. 4:12 PM 3.8 ft. 4:50 PM 3.3 ft. 6:45 AM 3.2 ft. 7:33 AM 3.2 ft. 8:26 AM 3.3 ft. 9:22 AM 3.5 ft. 10:17 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:23 PM 1.7 ft. 12:02 PM 1.7 ft. 1:03 PM 1.6 ft. 2:18 PM 1.2 ft. 3:41 PM 0.7 ft. 4:58 PM Low 3.6 ft. 5:37 PM 3.3 ft. 6:35 PM 3.1 ft. 7:55 PM 2.9 ft. 9:35 PM 3.0 ft. 11:11 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed Ma y 30, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 6:02 AM High 1.3 ft. 11:37 AM -0.1 ft. 12:30 AM -0.0 ft. 1:07 AM 0.2 ft. 1:50 AM 0.4 ft. 2:41 AM 0.7 ft. 3:40 AM 0.9 ft. 4:45 AM Low 3.6 ft. 4:51 PM 3.0 ft. 6:41 AM 3.0 ft. 7:24 AM 3.0 ft. 8:12 AM 3.0 ft. 9:05 AM 3.0 ft. 10:01 AM 3.2 ft. 10:56 AM High 1.4 ft. 12:19 PM 1.4 ft. 1:09 PM 1.4 ft. 2:10 PM 1.3 ft. 3:25 PM 1.0 ft. 4:48 PM 0.6 ft. 6:05 PM Low 3.5 ft. 5:29 PM 3.3 ft. 6:16 PM 3.0 ft. 7:14 PM 2.8 ft. 8:34 PM 2.7 ft. 10:14 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed May 30, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 5:18 AM 2.4 ft. 5:57 AM High 1.1 ft. 10:44 AM 1.1 ft. 11:26 AM -0.0 ft. 12:14 AM 0.1 ft. 12:57 AM 0.3 ft. 1:48 AM 0.5 ft. 2:47 AM 0.7 ft. 3:52 AM Low 2.9 ft. 4:07 PM 2.8 ft. 4:45 PM 2.4 ft. 6:40 AM 2.4 ft. 7:28 AM 2.4 ft. 8:21 AM 2.4 ft. 9:17 AM 2.5 ft. 10:12 AM High -0.1 ft. 11:37 PM 1.1 ft. 12:16 PM 1.1 ft. 1:17 PM 1.0 ft. 2:32 PM 0.8 ft. 3:55 PM 0.5 ft. 5:12 PM Low 2.7 ft. 5:32 PM 2.5 ft. 6:30 PM 2.3 ft. 7:50 PM 2.2 ft. 9:30 PM 2.2 ft. 11:06 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed May 30, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 5:10 AM 2.5 ft. 5:49 AM 2.5 ft. 6:32 AM High 1.4 ft. 10:12 AM 1.5 ft. 10:54 AM 1.5 ft. 11:44 AM 0.2 ft. 12:25 AM 0.4 ft. 1:16 AM 0.7 ft. 2:15 AM 1.0 ft. 3:20 AM Low 3.0 ft. 3:59 PM 2.9 ft. 4:37 PM 2.8 ft. 5:24 PM 2.5 ft. 7:20 AM 2.5 ft. 8:13 AM 2.5 ft. 9:09 AM 2.6 ft. 10:04 AM High -0.1 ft. 11:05 PM -0.0 ft. 11:42 PM 1.5 ft. 12:45 PM 1.4 ft. 2:00 PM 1.1 ft. 3:23 PM 0.7 ft. 4:40 PM Low 2.6 ft. 6:22 PM 2.3 ft. 7:42 PM 2.2 ft. 9:22 PM 2.3 ft. 10:58 PM High Thu May 24, 12 Fri May 25, 12 Sat May 26, 12 Sun May 27, 12 Mon May 28, 12 Tue May 29, 12 Wed Ma y 30, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 6:39 AM 2.5 ft. 7:12 AM 2.5 ft. 7:45 AM High 1.7 ft. 9:57 AM 1.7 ft. 10:50 AM 1.6 ft. 11:53 AM 0.1 ft. 12:05 AM 0.3 ft. 12:50 AM 0.6 ft. 1:41 AM 0.9 ft. 2:36 AM Low 2.8 ft. 3:32 PM 2.7 ft. 4:21 PM 2.5 ft. 5:18 PM 2.6 ft. 8:18 AM 2.6 ft. 8:49 AM 2.6 ft. 9:20 AM 2.7 ft. 9:50 AM High -0.2 ft. 10:48 PM -0.0 ft. 11:24 PM 1.4 ft. 1:07 PM 1.2 ft. 2:26 PM 0.8 ft. 3:40 PM 0.5 ft. 4:44 PM Low 2.3 ft. 6:28 PM 2.0 ft. 7:57 PM 1.9 ft. 9:45 PM 2.0 ft. 11:41 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 24 May 30First May 28 Full June 4 Last June 11 New June 19Major Times 11:12 AM 1:12 PM 11:39 PM 1:39 AM Minor Times 4:43 AM 5:43 AM 5:47 PM 6:47 PM Major Times --:---:-12:08 PM 2:08 PM Minor Times 5:25 AM 6:25 AM 6:55 PM 7:55 PM Major Times 12:36 AM 2:36 AM 1:06 PM 3:06 PM Minor Times 6:10 AM 7:10 AM 8:06 PM 9:06 PM Major Times 1:37 AM 3:37 AM 2:08 PM 4:08 PM Minor Times 7:02 AM 8:02 AM 9:16 PM 10:16 PM Major Times 2:39 AM 4:39 AM 3:11 PM 5:11 PM Minor Times 7:59 AM 8:59 AM 10:22 PM 11:22 PM Major Times 3:43 AM 5:43 AM 4:14 PM 6:14 PM Minor Times 9:01 AM 10:01 AM 11:23 PM 12:23 AM Major Times 4:44 AM 6:44 AM 5:14 PM 7:14 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:05 AM 11:05 AM Good Better Best Best++ Better Good Average6:38 am 8:29 pm 9:36 am 11:34 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:38 am 8:30 pm 10:32 am --:-6:38 am 8:30 pm 11:29 am 12:14 am 6:37 am 8:31 pm 12:27 pm 12:51 am 6:37 am 8:32 pm 1:26 pm 1:27 am 6:37 am 8:32 pm 2:26 pm 2:03 am 6:36 am 8:33 pm 3:29 pm 2:39 am20% 27% 33% 39% 46% 53% 60% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Watch out for manatees

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA man charged with his sixth DUI was sentenced to eight years in state prison recently after entering a straight-up plea, meaning there was no deal between the defense and prosecution for a recommended sentence and it was left solely to the discretion of the judge. Walter Carey, 45, entered a plea to the felony charge in open court on May 10 and was sentenced by Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford to three years for the DUI, and ve years more for a charge driving after his license was permanently revoked. The prison term ordered was to be followed by two years community control. Carey was charged in 1996 with DUI manslaughter for causing a death while drunk driving, and Judge Fulford said she could not, in good conscience, give Carey any less prison time and have him get back out on the road and kill someone else. Shortly after court, Carey led a motion to have the sentence thrown out, claiming he received ineffective assistance of counsel from his attorney Bill Sharp. The motion claims that Sharp was unaware of the prior convictions for leaving the scene of an accident with a death and driving while license suspended or revoked involving death. According to court records, in Aug. 6, 1995, Carey struck a pedestrian walking on State Road 363 in the early morning hours. According to the arrest report, Carey told a witness he was going to call 911 and then drove home and did not call. He told his wife and mother what he had done. The pedestrian died while waiting for Life Flight to arrive. His mother told authorities that she saw him remove bone and tissue from under the car and place it in a burn barrel to get rid of it. In other court matters: Melvin Santos, 42, pleaded to charges of promoting a sexual performance by a child and, as part of a plea bargain, was sentenced to ve years in state prison followed by ve years of sex offender probation. Santos entered the plea on May 9 before Judge Fulford. Santos and his girlfriend, Salena McVey, 28, were charged with bringing a teen girl from Perry and Santos photographed McVey and the teen having sex. A felony charge against Santos of sexual activity with a 16-year-old was dropped given his defense that he didnt have sexual contact with the teen. Santos was represented by Tallahassee attorney Greg Cummings. Charges are still pending against McVey. A 20-year-old Crawfordville man, Michael Skinner, was sentenced to 15 years sex offender probation with a condition that he serve 11 months and 29 days in Wakulla County Jail after he had sex with a 15-year-old girl. He was 19 at the time he allegedly had sex with the girl. If Skinner violates, he faces 10 years in state prison which was imposed by Judge Fulford but suspended on the condition that he complete probation. The lewd and lascivious battery charges came after Skinner, who was 19 at the time and estranged from his own family, and was living with the girl and her mother. Court testimony indicated the girls mother told Skinner when he came to live in her house not to have sex with her daughter. When the mother found out about some sexual contact between Skinner and the girl, the mother reportedly exploded with anger, punching a wall and yelling. The girl reportedly responded by telling her mother she had been raped by Skinner. Assistant Public Defender Matt Ream, who represented Skinner, contended the sex was consensual, and asked the court to invoke the Romeo and Juliet statute, which mitigates some of the punishment when two young people one or both of whom are underage, and within a few years of age are boyfriend-girlfriend and engage in sex. Ream asked that the court consider those factors and sentence Skinner to three years of non-sex offender probation. Judge Fulford did make a downward departure based on findings by the court that the alleged victim was a willing participant and that it was an isolated incident. Vernon Farnsworth, 33, pleaded no contest on May 9 to burglary and grand theft charges for stealing copper and numerous weapons and was sentenced to ve years in state prison followed by ve years of probation. According to the arrest report, sheriffs detectives investigating a reported burglary found some items at a Wakulla County pawn shop where Farnsworth had sold them. He was charged with burglary of a dwelling, grand theft of a firearm, grand theft or more than $300 but less than $20,000 and possession of a rearm by a convicted felon. Among the items reported missing were copper piping, air conditioner and plow. In an interview with law enforcement, he denied taking a pump shotgun, but did allegedly admit to taking items including a crossbow, camera and several extension cords which he burned so he could salvage the copper. In a civil court ling, CRE Venture 2011-1 LLC led to foreclose on nearly $2 million worth of property owned by Walt Dickson and several of his companies. The foreclosure complaint claims that Wakulla Bank loaned Dickson and his companies more than $1.4 million in 2009, later increased to $1.5 million. In 2011, FDIC as Receiver for Wakulla Bank, assigned the mortgage to CRE Venture, which claims the note is in default and seeks more than $1.9 million representing principal and interest. Among the parcels CRE is seeking to foreclose on are five acres of land in Tarpine and numerous lots in Panacea Mineral Springs and Twin Lakes Estates. Dickson and Panacea Coastal Construction, Panacea Coastal Properties, JerBe-Lou Development are named in the lawsuit, as well as other individuals, W. Brent Dickson, Bess S. Dickson and L. Marvis Thomas.Court shorts Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555The college of choice! Invest in yourself today Aordable tuition at TCC+higher wages for those with college degrees = A really smart investment GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Continued from Page 1A He was put through several different tests, including the trainer hiding the ball and seeing if Geist could nd it. They liked what they saw and took him. Dean says they look for dogs with a very strong play drive and who are healthy. Those normally make the best canines for us, he says. If Geist passes all the required training, he will eventually replace one of the existing dogs that is ready to retire. We give our canines the best of care, Dean says. They are considered to be upper class in the dog world. The canine detection team is trained to detect drugs, weapons, and other contraband and are used in prisons and on prison grounds, including parking lots, throughout the state. Hes going to make a handler very happy, I think, Twist says. Carroll says Geists story is a successful one. People didnt give up on him, Carroll says. This story is also just one of many, she says. The animal control of ce is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. They take in all types of animals, those that are healthy and those that arent. Carroll says if someone does feel they need to give up their pet to please provide animal control with as much information about the pet as they can. This makes it easier when trying to place the animal. To contact animal control, call 926-0902 Those looking to adopt an animal can visit the Wakulla County Animal Shelter located at 1 Oak Street in Crawfordville. The shelter is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. For more information, call 926-0890 or 926-0891.Geist is training for DOC By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 22 Florida home sales fell slightly in April, but state realtors were quick to say Tuesday that median price and pending sales rose dramatically during the month. Figures compiled by the Florida Realtors also showed the inventory of homes available for sale shrunk further as buyers continued to whittle away at the states postcrash backlog of existing homes. Here in Florida, were seeing some strong numbers that show positive momentum for the states housing recovery and our economy, said 2012 Florida Realtors President Summer Greene, in a statement. Sale closings of existing homes fell 0.7 percentage points from April 2011, while condominium sales were off about 4.9 percent. Nationally, sales of single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, increased 10 percent in April from a year ago. A return of normal home buying for occupancy is helping home sales across all price points, and now the recovery appears to be extending to home prices, said Lawrence Yun, chief economist for the National Association of Realtors, in a statement. The general downtrend in both listed and shadow inventory has shifted from a buyers market to one that is much more balanced, but in some areas it has become a sellers market. Median prices for homes rose signi cantly in Florida. The statewide median sales price for single-family existing homes in April was $144,350, up 10.2 percent from the year-ago gure. The statewide median for townhome-condo properties was $108,000, 16.1 percent more than April 2011. Nationally, median prices increased by 1.9 percent. Part of the increase in home prices is due to a shrinking inventory of homes and condos on the market, said Florida Realtor chief economist John Tuccillo. The backlog of available single family homes fell to a supply of just under six months in most cases less than half what it was in late 2007. Inventories in the Tampa area fell more than 30 percent between April 2011 and last month. Inventories in Orlando and Miami fell 27 percent and 23 percent respectively during the same period. The housing numbers for the state of Florida continue to signal recovery, Tuccillo said in a statement. Sales in 2012 are above where they were in 2011, a harbinger of a third straight year of improvement. Pending sales were also up sharply, climbing 38 percent statewide from a year ago. Pending sales are those deals that are signed but have yet to close, a process that usually takes one to three months. The interest rate for a 30-year xed-rate mortgage averaged 3.91 percent in April 2012, down from the 4.84 percent average during the same month a year earlier, according to Freddie Mac.Home sales steady, price up, backlog downThe statewide median sales price for singlefamily existing homes in April was $144,350, up 10.2 percent from the year-ago gure.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsJennifer Gay of Crawfordville reported the theft of cash from her purse at Riversprings Middle School on May 10. The stolen property was valued at $170. The investigation continues. Sgt. Ray Johnson and School Safety Of cer Jim Griner investigated. On May 10, Betty Ward of St. Marks reported the theft of her wallet from a restroom at WalMart. The victim realized she left the wallet and when she returned a short time later, the wallet was returned to her. However, it was missing $180. Other items inside the wallet were not missing. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On May 11, Matthew Thompson of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed an unauthorized charge on his bank account for $200. Someone purchased a camera lens through his account. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 11, Carolyn Castello of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed two unauthorized debits on her bank account. The total amount of the theft is valued at $250. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 11, Leadie Haynes of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief in Sopchoppy. The victims circuit breaker box was damaged and wires were tampered with. Damage was estimated at $300. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. On May 11, Susan Brumbley of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone inserted wood into her house door lock. Damage to the lock was estimated at $20. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 11, Shane Momier of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed seven unauthorized charges on his bank account. A total of $1,430 worth of charges was created in Washington, D.C., and Maryland. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On May 11, Brian Pellman of Crawfordville reported a traf c accident on Shadeville Road just west of Wakulla Springs Road. Pellman was driving westbound on Shadeville Road when a tree collapsed and fell on his truck. Damage was estimated at $6,000 and Fire Rescue and staff from the Road and Bridge Department removed the tree from the roadway. Pellman was not injured. Deputy Mike Zimba, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On May 12, Tabetha Spaulding of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to a home owned by Ellen Sessor of Crawfordville. A white SUV struck the victims mailbox and pushed it down. Deputy Ian Dohme and Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 12, Debra Sparks of Tallahassee reported a trespassing on her Crawfordville property. The victim confronted the trespassers on her property and evidence was collected. A person of interest has been identi- ed. Deputy Mike Crum and Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On May 12, Geary Boston of Crawfordville reported that real estate signs advertising his property were pulled out of the ground and dumped into a ditch. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On May 13, a WalMart customer called in a retail theft. Two male suspects obtained two large televisions from the electronics department and exited the building without paying for them. The televisions are valued at $1,290. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On May 13, Debra Sparks of Tallahassee reported a trespassing at her Crawfordville property. The victim has more than 17 No Trespassing signs on her Riversink area property. Deputy Vicki Mitchell met with Randy Kevin Basore, 53, of Crawfordville and explained to him that he could not use private property as a shortcut to a sinkhole. Basore was arrested for trespassing and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. On May 13, Deputy Mike Crum recovered a cellphone that was found in the parking lot of the Wakulla County Jail. The phone did not have enough power for Deputy Crum to determine who owned it. It was turned into the Evidence Division. On May 14, Deputy Ben Steinle investigated a traffic crash at Forest Road 365 and Arran Road. A truck was discovered up against a tree. The driver left the scene of the crash on foot. The case remains open until investigators can speak to the driver, who was later identi ed. The family of the driver said he was not seriously injured, but left for Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. On May 14, Devro Burton of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to le his taxes when he discovered that his Social Security number had already been used. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. On May 14, Stefan Floyd of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim checked on his tax refund and discovered that his Social Security number had already been used and his refund had been claimed. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On May 14, Karen Brown of Tallahassee reported a grand theft at Wal-Mart. Items located in the victims purse were reported missing. After, Wal-Mart staff reported recovering some of the items in a fruit bin. The items that havent been recovered are valued at $135. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. On May 14, Eva Grif n of Crawfordville reported the theft of a rearm. The rearm is valued at $400 and may have been lost during a move from Nevada. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On May 14, Lt. Sherrell Morrison and Deputy Bill Poole investigated two dogs in distress in the Winn-Dixie parking lot. The owner of the dogs was questioned and the animals were allowed to get out of the vehicle. One of the subjects had a theft warrant out of Oregon, but Oregon of cials would not extradite. The subjects told law enforcement that they were camping in western Wakulla County and the truck was a rental with an Oklahoma tag. The subjects, from Texas, Oregon and Delaware, had proof of purchase for the groceries and no arrests were made. On May 14, Jeffrey Cybulski of Crawfordville reported a theft at the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department. A GPS and currency, valued at $250, was stolen from the re station. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On May 15, Rachel Pritchard of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. The victims credit card was used to book a Texas hotel room without authorization. The fraud was for $47. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On May 15, Dominique Hawkins of WalMart observed a subject purchase items from the store and return to obtain more items without paying for them. Donna Pauline Hand, 55, of Crawfordville was arrested for retail theft and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. The value of the health and beauty items taken was $37. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On May 15, Melissa Swain of Crawfordville reported the theft of a retail gift card. The card was mailed from a relative but never received by the victim. A person of interest was identi ed in the case. The card is valued at $150. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On May 16, David Tomberlin of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from his home. The pills are valued at $50 and suspects have been identified. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On May 16, John Harris of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary and criminal mischief. The front door of his unoccupied home was stolen. The door is valued at $120. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On May 16, Dominique Hawkins of Wal-Mart reported a retail theft. Two female suspects paid for $21 worth of merchandise, but failed to pay for the remaining $213 worth of goods before leaving the store. Melissa Dawn Herndon, 31, of Crawfordville and Charlene Marie Smith, 27, of Crawfordville were arrested and face retail theft charges. They were transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On May 16, James Doyle of Crawfordville reported the theft of tools while he was in the process of moving. The victim reported the theft of $2,100 worth of tools and $75 worth of damage to his home. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On May 17, Lou Ann Hames of Crawfordville reported nding personal property along the side of U.S. Highway 98 between Spring Creek Highway and Wakulla Beach Road. The bag contained personal items belonging to a female. The bag was placed in the Evidence Division. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 899 calls f or service during the past week including: 17 residential and business alarms; 72 citizen contacts; 22 disturbances; 47 abandoned E-911 calls; 18 regular E-911 calls; 46 investigations; 53 medical emergencies; 244 residential and business security checks; 13 special details; 12 suspicious vehicles; 10 thefts; 56 traf c enforcements; 62 traf c stops; 11 disabled vehicles; 13 reckless vehicles; 20 wanted people; and 23 watch orders.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recognized Virginia Barnes of Crawfordville with a Distinguished Service Award for providing more than 25 years of nancial support to the Florida Youth Ranches. Sheriff Crum presented a certi cate to Barnes who was accompanied by her daughter, June Vause. I really appreciate people like Virginia Barnes who recognize an outstanding cause and continue to support that cause for many years, said Crum. I know the young people at the youth ranches appreciate the support as well.From FWC NewsOver the past week, the crew of the Gulf Sentry generated the following activity. Of cer Joshua Waite observed a vessel operating in a careless manner on the St. Marks River. Upon boarding the vessel and conducting an investigation, it was determined the operator was impaired. Of cer Waite arrested the suspect for boating under the in uence (BUI). The suspect later provided a breath sample that was above the legal limit of .08. On the same day, Of cers Matt Gore and Will Raker were conducting water patrol on the Carrabelle River. While conducting a boarding, Of cer Gore became suspicious that the operator might be impaired. After conducting his investigation, Of cer Gore arrested the individual for BUI/operation while impaired. Later that night, while conducting a resource inspection, Of cer Raker issued a citation for possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis. WCSO/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSInterim Sheriff Donnie Crum with Virginia Barnes and her daughter, June VauseBarnes recognized for support of youth ranchWildlife o cers make local arrests on patrol Team Wakulla Wrestling ClubPRESENTSElementary / Middle Wrestling CampHigh / Middle School Wrestling Camp June 4th through 7th at RMS Gym $150Instruction by Darton College Head Coach Mike Miller REGULAR CLUB PRA C TIC E(open to everyone 4 years and older)Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:30pm-7:00pm June 11th through 15th at RMS Gym HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA000ARJR Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comMay 20 is a celebration of emancipationBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsThe weather was bright and the mood was festive for the May 20th Celebration held at Mount Trial Baptist Church in Sopchoppy. The event was held in partnership with the Wakulla County Christian Coalition and celebrated May 20, 1865, as the date on which the Emancipation Proclamation was read aloud at the Knott House in Tallahassee by Union General Edward McCook. The Proclamation freed the slaves in the United States, and May 20th is recognized regionally as a date to celebrate African American citizenship. Before the Emancipation Proclamation, black people were just property, said Tanya Price, a member of Mount Trial. This is celebrating that we are citizens. This is not only our heritage, but a big part of American history. Price noted that the 20th of May is only celebrated in this area as the Proclamation was read on different dates all over the nation. The celebration of the reading has been passed down through the generations. Herb Donaldson, an organizer of the event, remembers May 20th as a date when there was always plenty of food in the house. We celebrated with food, he said. It was a day to remember that instead of being able to be with my grandmother in her kitchen, I might have been in someone elses kitchen, working for scraps. Donaldsons hope in organizing the event is to strike a new chord to bring people together, not just from their church, or with the people they know; but a chance for all the communities to come together. Its got everything to do with community. Retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major Jarvis Rosier, who gave a speech about the African American ght for freedom, also spoke about community and how good it felt to be home. Coming down home feels so good when its for such a joyous occasion, said Rosier with a hearty grin. Rosier, who also spoke at St. Johns Episcopal Church on the importance of May 20th, is the Civil War coordinator for the U.S. Colored Troops Education Project, and a member of the National Black Historical Society. Rosier said he has always had a passion for history, and said he felt honored to speak at the Mount Trial May 20th Celebration. A lot of local history has been told here today, said Rosier. Knowing [history], reading it, is to believe it; but seeing history in living form is to conceive it. The more people know about history the less likely they are to repeat it. Its important for the nation as a whole to see that we righted the wrong of slavery and its important for the youth to understand that. Some of the activities offered at the celebration were a clothing giveaway, a cake walk, basketball, and a photography exhibit showcasing early African American families of the area. Barbecue and fried chicken were available and a Maypole was set up near the festivities, replete with purple and pink ribbons waving in the breeze. Doris Mackey remembers a Maypole at the May 20th celebrations of the late 1930s, when her grandfather was a deacon at Mount Trial. Mackey noted that the event is good for young people to know where they came from, and to be grateful for the opportunities they have. Dominic Rollins, the youth pastor at Mount Trial, believes that while The event is important to hold at a church, its not just a church thing. This is one of those events that pulls people together. Its not about the food or the music, its about the fellowship. Clarence Davis, a young man of Crawfordville, read the Emancipation Proclamation aloud to a crowd of around 100 people at the event. Reading it aloud, he said, It felt a little closer. To read it was an honor, he said. Gracie Rosier Williams and cousin, retired Sgt. Major Jarvis Rosier. Winding around the Maypole. Jakarin Johnson, Ardria Hughes, Clarence Davis and Diamond Rollins enjoy the festivities. Lining up for homemade treats. Nyla Farmer and Treasure Butler. Wakullas C.O.A.S.T. Charter School A WINNING TEAM!Home Of The StingraysCALL 925-6344WAKULLA COAST CHARTER SCHOOLAlyssa Higgins Principalalyssa.higgins@wcsb.us48 Shell Island Rd. P.O. Box 338 St. Marks, FL. 32355Wakullas C.O.A.S.T. Charter SchoolA WINNING TEAM!wakullaschooldistrict.org Grades K-8 Free Public School & VPK Strong Academic Support Character Development Art Music Technology Marine Aquarium & Butter y Gardens Junior Garden Club Bus Transportation Available National School Lunch Program Free or Reduced Breakfast & Lunch ENROLLMENT APPLICA TIONS AVAILABLE2012/2013 REGISTRATIONOPENINGS AVAILABLE ENROLL NOW! Historical Photos of Wakulla County People & Places850-559-4296 DEERWKP COn May 19, 2011 A. J. and Molly Strickland Peck were blessed with Andrew Edward Peck. Drew arrived weighing 6lbs 6oz and 18 inches long and with the biggest dimple in his cheek that his proud Nana and Poppa had ever seen. He is the grandson of Albert and Helen Adams Strickland of Crawfordville, Florida. His great grandparents were the late H. T. and Gladys Adams of Crawfordville and the late Abel and Sadie Mims Strickland of St. Marks. His paternal grandparents are Andy and Susan Niesen Peck of Orlando, Florida. His great grandparents are Jim and Dorothy Schutz Niesen, of Orange City, Florida and the late Andrew and Ruth Higgins Peck.We Love you Drew, Nana and PoppaHappy First Birthday! Happy First Birthday! 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 HOW TO CHOOSE A MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PLANSavvy Senior, Page 3BNUMBERS GAME FOR JOBS, SCHOOLS, LOBBYISTSWeekly Roundup, Page 5BTHE ANNUAL SPRING FLINGPhotos, Page 10B Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeBy R.H. CARTERSenior Center DirectorLoneliness and social isolation were unfamiliar terms that had no meaning to me when I was rst employed by the senior center. Soon I noticed an older gentleman who spent much of his time alone outside the senior center sitting in our swing. One day, I went out and asked him how he enjoyed our meals. He said that our meals was all that he ate. He went on to say that he ate lunch here Tuesday through Friday and carried three meals home on Friday to eat Saturday through Monday. At that time, the senior center was open to seniors only Tuesday through Friday. I responded by saying meals must be the most important service we provide for you. He immediately stood up and said no, this is the only life I have. I sit home Saturday through Monday waiting for Tuesday to come so I can be around other people. That is the most important thing you do for me. We continued this discussion for almost an hour. He described how he had no contact with people except in the senior center and how lonely that was. This was my introduction to loneliness and social isolation. The following week, we began serving seniors Monday through Friday. The main thing creating loneliness and isolation is not being connected to others and not having a sense of belonging. Seniors who retire after a very intense working life may have only job-related friendships. They may nd it dif cult to rebuild a network that is not connected to work. This is true for men and is becoming increasingly true for women. Seniors who suffer the loss of a spouse are vulnerable to social isolation and loneliness. If they do not have emotional support of family members they are often reluctant to share their predicament with others. This may also present itself in cases of unhappy marriages because their generation is less likely to consider divorce. Loneliness and social isolation impacts every aspect of seniors lives, including mood, health and well being. Problems and phobias are likely to increase especially when the feeling exists that young people are not interested in older people. These feelings impair their immune system and can create depression and result in a decline in general health. This may reduce selfesteem and bring behavioral changes including less physical activity and not eating well. Loneliness and social isolation can increase seniors vulnerability to exploitation. When seniors deteriorate in their minds, then they physically deteriorate as well. Earlier this year, I wrote an article on CELEBRATING LIFE in the senior center. This article described all the food and activities we provide to bring joy and happiness to the senior citizens. The following month I wrote an article on AGING SUCCESSFULLY that discussed health education, health screenings and exercise provided in the senior center. Every activity mentioned in these two articles combats loneliness and isolation. I have read many articles and come face to face with the reality of this mega trend in America...loneliness and social isolation. Exercise that strengthens bodies, parks that bring people together, churches, social clubs and, of course the senior center, are regularly mentioned in our local news and provide services that serve social, psychological and physical needs. I once published a statement that I consider relevant, Enjoy your life Laughter and joy will lift your spirit, strengthen your body and feed your soul. One of the main needs of seniors is feeling connected and having a sense of belonging to our community. Social isolation is a complex issue. It depends on the quality of relationships, as well as many personal aspects of day to day living. Loneliness and isolation are feelings based on state of mind. It is invisible and very dif cult to measure or quantify. However, its consequences are very real and visible because they are so detrimental to individuals and society as a whole even if you only consider the cost of the decrease in mental and physical health. When I came to the senior center, I believed that serving meals was the most important service that we provided. I soon learned and continue to believe that providing seniors THEIR place to share their lives with each other is the most important service we provide.R.H. Carter is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center.Overcoming loneliness and social isolationApril is celebrated with Easter brunch, Volunteer Appreciation Day, Spring Fling, and Earth Day By DIANE LANTER and TAMARA BYRNESof the Senior CenterThe few April showers that we had, brought April and May owers to our ourishing garden. Tamara, her seniors and the Iris Garden Club have worked very hard to establish the raised beds with tomatoes, squash, onions and watermelon. The Master Gardeners of Leon and Wakulla counties, led by Trevor Hylton, built these beds for the center several years ago. The pergola that Ray Rich so lovingly put together is now covered with cross vines, native honeysuckle and confederate jasmine. The pergola has provided a cool, refreshing place to relax and enjoy the new blooms along our walking trail. Don Allens blueberry bushes have bloomed and blueberries are growing but we are still hoping for the bushes to thrive. Thanks to all who donated tomato cages our tomatoes are standing up tall and producing nice healthy tomatoes. The pots of fennel and wild owers have been feeding our butter y larvae. If you would like a nice place to relax, enjoy the weather or read a book, come by the senior center and enjoy our pergola. Chef Mary xed one of her famous brunch menus for us to celebrate Easter at the center. The seniors made the center pieces complete with a bunny. They were raf ed off and a lucky recipient from each table went home with an Easter basket. Our annual Volunteer Appreciation Day was a great success. We honored more than 150 gracious Wakulla volunteers, who make it possible for us to provide the services that make this senior center a wonderful place to come to for information and activities. Karen Henry, one of our volunteers, was our speaker for the event. She is currently delivering meals to our homebound clients and they are enjoying seeing her and her always smiling face. Thank you, Karen and all of our volunteers. Mid-April we had a visit with Carolyn Kramer and Joey Grubbs, a wonderful singing duo. They had seniors singing and dancing right along with them. We sure do enjoy their visits. It looks like October might be their next visit. On April 21, the center was rocking with the Tallahassee Swing Band. What a time we had rockin and a rollin and swinging each other around the dance oor. Chef Marys hors doeuvres were the hit of the party. If you havent tasted Marys Original Peach Preserves, you can purchase jars at the senior center for $6 a jar or three for $15. Earth Day was celebrated all week at the Senior Center. On Monday, Reenie Rogers from New Leaf Market showed the seniors how to make green cleaning products using baking soda and scented essential oils. Continued on Page 4B Shelley Swenson from the extension of ce visited during Earth Day week and shared projects with seniors.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSenior Center Director R.H. Carter with Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis at the volunteer luncheon. Another jar of Chef Marys peach preserves are sold at a table set up at the door of the Senior Center. T Like us on

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Friday, May 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, May 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. Sunday, May 27 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, May 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, May 29 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 30 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, May 31 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Special EventsThursday, May 24 WORKSHOP ON GETTING TREES READY FOR HURRICANE SEASON will be held by the Wakulla Extension Of ce at 7 p.m. The workshop will focus on helping homeowners identify potential tree problems at the beginning of hurricane season. The Atlantic hurricane season begins June 1, but there has already been one named storm in 2012. To sign up, call the Wakulla Extension Ofce at 926-3931 or register at the website: http://wakulla. ifas.u .edu/. The program is free, but pre-registration is recommended to assure ample supply of handouts. Saturday, May 26 SHOWING OF ROOTS Episodes 5 and 6 at the library at 1 p.m. SOPCHOPPY OPRY and South Bound Band will welcome guest Shepard Creek at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy School Auditorium. The show will feature a special Memorial Day Tribute to Americas fallen heroes. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711 for more information or for tickets. MUSICAL DUO JENNINGS AND KELLER will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Jennings and Keller is a Miami, Fla., based acoustic duo perform fusion folk Americana. Songwriter Laurie Jennings Oudin is a former Shakespearean actress and caf proprietress, whose vocals and guitar have been described as beautiful and sweet. Dana Keller, a veteran pedal steel, dobro and guitar player, has performed in the studio or on stage with musical legends such as Vince Gill, Ricky Skaggs, Stevie Wonder, Larry Graham, Marvin Gaye, Dave Mason, Johnny Rodriguez and The Allen Brothers, to name a few. Reserve seats by contacting Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or by email at poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Thursday, May 31 PROJECT GRADUATION will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. The event is free to all Wakulla High School seniors. Students will have access to the lodge, swimming area, boat rides, food and entertainment. There will also be gift drawings. Upcoming EventsFriday, June 1 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION CEREMONY will be held at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Field at J. D. Jones Stadium. Saturday, June 2 MOTORCYCLE POKER RUN CARDS FOR CARING will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Capital City Harley Davidson, 1745 Capital Circle NW, Tallahassee. Registration is $15 per bike and $10 for a passenger. The best hand wins $250. For more information call Peggy at 926-5037 or Susan at 519-2292. GARAGE SALE to bene t the League of Women Voters and its programs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1357 Martin Luther King Road. BOOK SALE EXTRAVAGANZA will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the library. Sunday, June 3 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Barbara Hines, outreach coordinator for the North Central Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network as she presents A Sticky Situation: The Naval Stores Industry in North Florida at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The naval stores industry once dominated vast segments of Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and surrounding counties, including large areas of the St. Marks Refuge. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for information. Saturday, June 16 GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 6535857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Workshop on getting trees ready for hurricane season at extension of ce at 7 p.m. Friday night movie at the library. Sopchoppy Opry at Sopchoppy High School Auditorium at 7 p.m. Memorial Day ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.comBy SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorFriends of the Library win 2012 Non-Pro t of the Year Im excited to inform you that last week the Friends of the Library won the 2012 Non-Pro t Organization of the Year from the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce! The Friends wanted me to pass along their heartfelt thanks to the chamber for selecting them for this great honor and they have every intention of living up to it now and in the future. A few of the reasons mentioned last night by the chamber for selecting the Friends of this award was the more than 20 years of sponsoring the librarys Summer Program for the families of Wakulla County, the purchase this year of 12 new public computers, as well as their assistance in providing funds for our book/materials, and our computer classes. These are only a few of the ways that the Friends support the library and through that support the Wakulla community. Wed also like to take this opportunity to invite all who wish to get involved in supporting the library to join the Friends. Planning is starting on the second annual Silent Auction to be held in September, so if youd like to help or have new ideas on how to continue supporting WCPL please come to the monthly meetings the fourth Thursday of each month at the library. Friday Night Movie Fans of Janet Evanovichs Stephanie Plum series of novels will be pleased to learn that on Friday, May 25, we are showing the film adaptation of the rst book in the series, One for the Money. Starring Katherine Heigl, Jason OMara and Debbie Reynolds, this PG-13 rated lm tells the story of how Stephanie Plum desperate for a job begins working at her sleazy cousins bail bonding company as a recovery agent. This puts her on the trail of an accused dirty cop who broke her heart in high school so catching him would bring some sweet revenge. But is her prey truly guilty or is he being set up? With action, laughs and a little romance thrown in, this film should have something for everybody. As Evanovich is one of the most popular authors we stock at the library, were hoping for a great crowd for this lm. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show and popcorn and water will again be provided by Capital City Bank. Summer Reading Books We have multiple copies of every book on the Wakulla High School Summer Reading List and should have copies of the Sunshine State Reading list books in soon. As we do every year, we strongly encourage parents and students to either check out or get yourself on the hold list for these books early. As the summer goes by, the waiting list only gets longer and we wont be able to guarantee that some copies will be available before school begins again in August. These books arent eligible to be renewed because of the overwhelming demand we receive each year. If there is anything we can do to help you get the summer reading books you need, please talk to us. Library News... Government MeetingsMonday, May 28 COUNTY OFFICES will be closed for the Memorial Day holiday. Tuesday, May 29 WAKULLA COUNTY AIRPORT COMMITTEE will meet at 2 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. WAKULLA 2020 ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 4 p.m. at the library. Monday, June 4 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular board meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Fusion folk Americana duo Jennings and Keller will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. on May 25. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 3BBy MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 16 Advocates for the elderly were crushed earlier this year when after Gov. Rick Scott and top lawmakers vowed to better protect the 80,000 residents of assisted living facilities no legislation was passed. Months of reports in the Miami Herald of people dying in ALFs statewide a nearmonthly occurrence since 2002 prompted Scott to appoint a task force to investigate and a Miami-Dade grand jury to push for tightened oversight. But despite the public momentum, House and Senate leaders couldnt agree on a legislative remedy. After the Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill to beef up inspections of troubled ALFs and shut down the worst offenders, the House refused to take up the measure. Now, though, reform efforts are ramping up again, with the governors ALF task force resuming its meetings in June, said Jane Johnson, health and human services policy coordinator for the governors of- ce. The panel will add two new members to better represent consumers, one from AARP and one from the Florida Life Care Residents Association, Johnson said. It will hold three meetings at three locations around the state and send its report including suggested legislation to the governor in September. That comes as welcome news to many of the 300 volunteers of Floridas LongTerm Care Ombudsman Program, whose job is to advocate for elders who are frail and often mentally ill or isolated from their families. We were all holding our breath, and then, unfortunately, nothing got done, said Carol Weideman, an 11-year veteran of the program and its state council chair. Were hoping this next year will be more productive. A bunch of what we recommended was included in the Senate bills [that failed], said Larry Polivka, director and scholar in residence at the Claude Pepper Foundation, who chaired the workgroup. Most of us would like to see those recommendations taken up again. Its really important that something be passed next year. The original task force included Sen. Ronda Storms, R-Valrico, Rep. Matt Hudson, R-Naples, Charles Corley, Secretary of the Department of Elder Affairs and Elizabeth Dudek, Secretary of the Agency for Health Care Administration. Also represented were members of the long term care industry, the state long-term care ombudsman, advocates and ALF administrators. The panel held three meetings statewide and heard from more than 75 people. Its recommendations included more inspections, especially of facilities with poor records, increased administrator quali cations, better training for ALF staff, and more reporting of resident data. It also suggested the state have more enforcement power and other changes. Storms incorporated many of the recommendations into a bill that was passed resoundingly by the Senate, but couldnt nd a House sponsor. Despite the failure of the legislation, though, the ombudsman program has continued to call for another key recommendation: protection from arbitrary eviction for ALF residents. State law allows ALF administrators to evict residents for almost any reason on 45 days notice, but the residents who rent their units cant challenge an eviction in court. The residents are often fearful of asking for too much because the [ALF] administrators can give them 45 days notice and theyre gone, said Jeanne Anastasi, a volunteer with the ombudsman program. That makes them a little fearful to advocate for themselves. The program investigated 75 inappropriate ALF eviction complaints during 2010-11, according to Jim Crochet, the state ombudsman, as well as 72 complaints of fear of retaliation. Almost three-quarters of the residents have no one, said advocate Win Hoffman. When I ask if their relatives are nearby, their eyes are downcast. The ombudsmen are the only people showing them any care. Dear Savvy Senior, Ill be 65 in a few months Medicare enrollment age and am interested in getting a Medicare Advantage plan to cover my health care and prescription drugs. Can you give me some advice on choosing a plan? Searching Senior Dear Searching, Medicare Advantage plans have become increasingly popular among retirees over the past few years. In fact, around one-fourth of all Medicare recipients nearly 13 million Americans are currently enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan. Here are some tips and tools to help you choose the best plan for you. Medicare Advantage Sometimes called Medicare Part C, Medicare Advantage plans are government approved health plans sold by private insurance companies that you can choose in place of original Medicare. The vast majority of Advantage plans are managedcare policies such as HMOs or PPOs that require you to get your care within a network of providers. If you join an Advantage plan, the plan will provide all of your Part A (hospital insurance) and Part B (medical insurance) coverage some plans even offer extra bene ts like vision, dental and hearing. And, most plans include Part D prescription drug coverage too. You also need to be aware that the monthly premiums for many Advantage plans are cheaper than if you got original Medicare, plus a separate Part D drug plan and a Medigap policy, but their deductibles and copays are usually higher. That makes these plans better suited for healthier retirees. How to Choose To help you choose a plan, a good rst step is to call your doctors and nd out which Advantage plans they accept, and which ones they recommend. Then go to the Medicare Plan Finder tool at www.medicare.gov/ find-a-plan and compare those options. When comparing, here are some key points to consider: Total costs: Look at the plans entire pricing package, not just the premiums and deductibles. Compare the out-of-pocket maximums plus the copays and coinsurance charged for doctor of ce visits, hospital stays, diagnostic tests, visits to specialists, prescription drugs and other medical services. This is very important because if you choose an Advantage plan, youre not allowed to purchase a Medigap supplement policy, which means youll be responsible for paying these expenses out of your own pocket. Drug coverage: Check the plans formulary the list of prescription drugs covered to be sure all the medications you take are covered without excessive co-pays or requirements that you try less expensive drugs rst. Extra bene ts: Many Advantage plans include dental, vision and hearing bene ts, but they are often limited. Get the details on what exactly is covered. Out-of-network coverage: Since most Advantage plans limit you to using innetwork doctors only, nd out whats covered if you have an emergency outside your network area. This is especially important if you travel extensively or live part of the year outside your network. Locations: If you dont use any particular doctors and y ou live in a rural area, make sure the doctors in the plans youre considering are located near you. Also check to see if the hospitals, home health agencies and skilled nursing facilities that the plan covers are nearby too. Retiree benefits: If you have coverage from a former employer, be sure you speak with the bene ts manager, because signing up for Medicare Advantage may void your retiree coverage. Get Help If you dont have a computer to compare plans, or if you dont feel comfortable working through this information on you own, you can get help by calling Medicare at (800) 633-4227. They can do the comparing for you over the phone, and enroll you in a plan when youre ready. Another good resource is your State Health Insurance Assistance Program, which provides free Medicare counseling. Visit shiptalk.org, or call (800) 677-1116 to locate a counselor in your area. And, check out the HealthMetrix Research Cost Share Report at medicarenewswatch.com. This service chooses the best Advantage plans based on health status. Send your senior questions to Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy Senior book. By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior How to choose a Medicare Advantage PlanALF Task Force renews reform reportAfter the Senate overwhelmingly passed a bill to beef up inspections of troubled ALFs and shut down the worst o enders, the House refused to take up the measure. e governors ALF task force plans to resume its meetings in June. 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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1BOn Tuesday, Tamara and the Iris Garden Club, along with several seniors, spruced up our garden area. The Area Agency on Aging from Tallahassee presented our annual Senior Service Day on Wednesday. Medicare, Medicaid and ampli ed telephones were distributed along with a hearing screening, as well as energy assistance for the elderly and Social Security questions were handled. On Thursday, our Earth Day activities were presented by Shelley Swenson and Trevor Hylton of the local extension of ce and Jo Ann Palmer of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. We ended the week with Bruce Ashley from the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce talking about safe disposal of medications and any pills that might contaminate our ground water if we dispose of them in a hazardous way. Several seniors brought their collections in for disposal. We are glad to have this method available and encourage everyone to take advantage of the service that the sheriffs of ce is providing to Wakulla County residents. Nancy Jefferson was back on the last Friday of the month, teaching her Pottery Class. This time, the seniors made inspirational messages on clay tiles for wall hangings. This program is brought to the senior center through the Healing Arts of Wakulla County (HAWC) program. On June 7 from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30, a.m., the Area Agency on Aging in Tallahassee will be holding a public hearing in the dining room of the senior center. If you have any questions, call (850) 926-7145. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBruce Ashley of the sheriffs of ce talks about disposal of prescription medications.April is celebrated at Senior CenterNancy Jefferson teaches pottery at the Senior Center.Special to the NewsThe local Home Instead Senior Care of ce is offering a unique approach to help area families in Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson and Wakulla counties, plus the Panhandle, manage the challenges of Alzheimers and other dementias, diseases that eventually rob seniors of their memories and independence. Free training for families caring for these older adults is now available through online e-learning modules, available at HelpForAlzheimersFamilies.com. The Alzheimers or Other Dementias CARE: Changing Aging through Research and Education Training Program offers a personal approach to help families care for seniors with Alzheimers disease at home, where 60 to 70 percent live, according to the Alzheimers Association. Until there is a cure, we offer an interim solution, said Scott Harrell, owner of the Home Instead Senior Care of ce serving Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson and Wakulla counties, plus the Panhandle. The foundation of the Alzheimers CARE Training Program is an approach called Capturing Lifes Journey that involves gathering stories and experiences about the senior to help caregivers provide comfort while honoring the individuals past. Because people with Alzheimers disease have dif culty with short-term memory, the Capturing Lifes Journey approach taps into long-term memory. The Home Instead Senior Care network assembled the top experts in Alzheimers disease to develop the CARE approach. The training were offering to families is the same kind of training our professional CAREGivers receive, he noted. The program for family caregivers consists of four classes: Alzheimers Disease or Other Dementias Overview; Capturing Lifes Journey; Techniques to Manage Behaviors; and Activities to Encourage Engagement. Also available is a free guide for those who are caring for a loved one with Alzheimers disease or other dementias. Called Helping Families Cope, the guide includes advice to help families keep their loved ones engaged and manage behaviors. CARE is a wonderful hands-on approach that helps caregivers deal with the behavioral changes that too often accompany these disorders one of the biggest stressors for caregivers, said Dr. Jane F. Potter, chief of the Division of Geriatrics and Gerontology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. There was previously no good program available using adult education techniques to provide hands-on practice in learning how best to help people who have dementia. This is huge, she added. The preferred environment for those with dementia is generally at home, said Potter, who served on the expert panel to help develop content for the Alzheimers CARE Training Program. And yet, families caring for seniors with Alzheimers at home are dealing with challenging behaviors such as anger, aggression, wandering and refusing to eat, according to research conducted for the Home Instead Senior Care network. That makes the Alzheimers Disease or Other Dementias CARE Training Program a solution for the many families in our area who are being impacted each day by devastating side effects of this disease, Harrell said. For more information about free family caregiver training or to obtain a free copy of the Helping Families Cope booklet, contact the local Home Instead Senior Care of ce at (850) 297-1897 or visit HelpforAlzheimersFamilies.com.Free Alzheimers training is available to local caregivers THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT AGINGDreaming of deep sleepBy MARK UNDERWOODYoure not alone nearly half of all Americans are plagued with occasional insomnia, and about 15 percent have chronic sleepless nights. Try these tips to improve the quality of sleep, and the quality of your life. If youre not sleeping well at night you may be at risk for health problems ahead. New research published in The Lancet, the worlds leading medical journal, says that if you have problems sleeping, you are at risk for health problems like diabetes heart failure, anxiety and depression. You may not realize that if you have insomnia you are ve times more likely to have anxiety and depression and at double the risk for congestive heart failure and diabetes. Simply put, if youre having sleep problems at night, those sleepless nights can result in numerous health problems. Dif culty sleeping can lead to daytime problems too, like mood disorders, irritability and a constant feeling of exhaustion. As people grow older, many experience age-related changes such as decreased quality of sleep. Some people find they have dif culty sleeping, as each day is crowded with anxiety and stress. Did you know sleep is crucial to brain health and memory? New research from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has determined that sound quality sleep, can improve cognition (which includes decision decision-making skills, focus, concentration and memory). Did you know that poor quality sleep can also affect your immune system? During sleep, the body produces important proteins called cytokines. These proteins are essential to the effectiveness of the immune system in ghting off infection and other adverse effects on the body. Its also true that people who have chronic sleep problems have a weaker defense system against pathogens that cause illness like the common cold. What can you do to improve your sleep? Plenty. You can tip the scales on the side of better sleep with these easy, no-nonsense, better sleep ideas. Six Steps to Better Sleep 1. Upgrade your mattress. Your mattress may be triggering allergies that are playing havoc with your sleep. If your mattress is more than seven years old, it may be time to replace it. Bed bugs hiding deep in mattresses are common sources of asthma and allergies. 2. Cool down. Turn the thermostat down to the mid-60s when you go to bed. Studies have shown that a cool bedroom helps induce sleep. 3. Wear socks. Now that your bedroom is cooler, put on a pair of socks. The American Journal of Physiology suggests wearing socks to bed to achieve better sleep. Your feet are often colder than the rest of the body so wearing socks helps blood vessels in your feet stay dilated resulting in better sleep. 4. Regulate your eating routine. Dont eat a big meal right before bedtime, and dont skip dinner so you go to bed hungry. 5. Scratch the screen time. Calm the brain before going to bed. Avoid reading, writing and checking email on your electronic devices before bedtime, and dont watch TV right before you close your eyes. 6. Exercise regularly. If you exercise regularly, at least four times a week, research has shown you may be able to add an hour or more to your usual nights sleep. When you take these steps to improve your sleep, youre moving in the right direction toward a healthier life. Visit www.TheGoodNewsAboutAging.com for more articles and tips for healthy aging.Mark Underwood is a neuroscience researcher, president of Quincy Bioscience, a biotech company in Madison, Wis., focused on the discovery and development of medicines to treat age related memory loss and the diseases of aging. the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringMike HarveyApril 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI really appreciate this program. We eat at all the restaurants participating. It is a Great Deal to Win! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 5BBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 18 Gov. Rick Scott has spent the past several months talking about two big issues: adding jobs and bolstering the public-education system. So Scott could preen a little Friday when new gures showed the states unemployment rate had dropped to 8.7 percent in April, down 0.3 percentage points from March and 1.9 points from April 2011. But the picture in the education system wasnt so upbeat. The state Board of Education called an emergency meeting Tuesday to lower the passing score on statewide writing tests after results showed that most students wouldnt meet more-rigorous standards. After more than a decade of Republican leaders emphasizing the need for higher standards and accountability, some state board members reluctantly approved the change. At the same time, the move added fuel to the arguments of Democrats and the Florida Education Association that the states focus on standardized tests has run amok. CLAWING BACK THE FCAT The Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test has been the backbone of the states controversial efforts to measure the performances of students, teachers and schools. With this years tests, the state ratcheted up the standards for passing the writing portion of the FCAT in fourth, eighth and 10th grades. In part, students needed to score a 4.0 or better on a 6-point grading scale, up from 3.0 last year. Also, the state made other changes, including placing more emphasis on writing basics such as punctuation, capitalization and grammar. But the test results showed a huge drop in the number of students meeting the standards. In fourth grade, the passing rate dropped from 81 percent to 27 percent; in eighth grade, it dropped from 82 percent to 33 percent; and in 10th grade, it dropped from 80 percent to 38 percent. With FCAT scores affecting such sensitive issues as school grades, the state Board of Education moved quickly to call Tuesdays emergency meeting. Board members agreed to dial back the passing score to 3.0 this year, despite some reluctance. The change from 4.0 to 3.0 looks like we are lowering standards, said board member John Padget, of Key West. Im only voting on this so we can hold (schools) harmless for this year only. But other board members rejected the idea that they were lowering standards. This is absolutely not a retreat, said Vice Chairman Roberto Martinez, of Coral Gables. It is maintaining the equivalence with last year, were just using a much more rigorous application of the scoring rubric. Regardless, the change caused the Department of Education to say it did not adequately prepare schools and teachers for the tougher standards. This conversation should have come up earlier, Education Commissioner Gerard Robinson said. Well do better going forward. The change also reignited long-simmering arguments about whether the states heavy reliance on the FCAT is wise. Floridas overemphasis on testing is insane, said former Sen. Dan Gelber, D-Miami Beach. We have become a school system whose entire purpose seems to be to prepare kids for minimal competence tests. For his part, Scott issued a rather-nebulous statement Monday. Our students must know how to read and write, and our education system must be able to measure and benchmark their progress so we can set clear education goals, Scott said in the statement. The signi cant contrast in this years writing scores is an obvious indication that the Department of Education needs to review the issue and recommend an action plan so that our schools, parents, teachers and students have a clear understanding of the results. GETTING TO WORK Scott, who won the governors office in 2010 on a theme of Lets Get to Work, was far from nebulous Friday after the April unemployment numbers came out. Floridas jobless rate moved to its lowest point in more than three years and is a clear sign we are moving Florida in a direction that gives businesses and job creators the con dence they need to grow and expand, he said in a statement. The jobs report, released by the Department of Economic Opportunity, also included other positive signs. As an example, the number of jobs in Florida was 7,325,300 in April, up 52,600 from last year. Also, the number of counties with double-digit unemployment rates fell from 10 in March to ve in April. But other indicators showed that Floridas job problems continue. For instance, one factor in the lower unemployment rate is that the civilian labor force dropped by 28,000 people. Having the unemployment rate fall because people have given up looking for a job is not an improvement, University of Central Florida economist Sean Snaith said. The April numbers came just days after Florida TaxWatch issued a report showing that a government entity is the largest employer in 51 of 67 counties. Scott argues that the key to Floridas economic growth is privatesector jobs. While this analysis does not consider the total size of government employment compared to total private employment, it is certainly clear that the government has a massive direct effect on local economies throughout the state through employment and payroll practices, in addition to the indirect effects that government actions, such as regulation, have on the economy, TaxWatch said in the report. Moreover, for many counties the potential closure of a military base or correctional facility, or large layoffs due to federal, state, or local budget shortfalls, poses a significant economic threat. NO EMPLOYMENT HELP NEEDED HERE While many Florida workers and businesses might be scraping by, Tallahassees lobbying industry appears to be doing just ne. Lobbyists this week had to le compensation reports for the rst three months of the year, which included the 2012 legislative session. Those reports showed that 16 lobbying firms each raked in more than $500,000 in fees during the quarter. Four rms collected more than $1 million. Those rms were Ballard Partners, GrayRobinson, Ronald L. Book PA and Southern Strategy Group. Among the issues generating large amounts of lobbying fees was the bigmoney ght about allowing resort casinos in the state. The casino proposal died, but it could re-emerge with the possibility of another big payday for lobbyists in the future. HEADED FOR THE DOOR Steve MacNamara probably wont wind up in any unemployment line. But after a urry of critical news reports, the hardcharging MacNamara submitted his resignation last weekend as Scotts chief of staff. Adam Hollingsworth, who served as chief of staff to former Jacksonville Mayor John Peyton, will replace MacNamara as of July 1. MacNamara had planned to leave the Scott administration by the end of the y ear, but the critical reports about his handling of such things as government contracts sped up the move. It has been a pleasure and an honor serving you, but the recent media attention I have been receiving has begun to interfere with the day-to-day operations of this of ce, MacNamara said in his resignation letter. I feel now is the time to plan for me to depart, for you to name my replacement and for us to work on a smooth transition. STORY OF THE WEEK: The state Board of Education lowers the passing score on FCAT writing tests. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Hey governor, its Jim. Im sure you know our friendship has ended, is over, and Im just very saddened by that. But I wanted you to know personally from me that in the future theres probably going to be things coming out that are going to be very hurtful to both you and Carole (Crist). But Ill be honest with you, I dont care anymore because I did everything that I could for you. Part of a 2011 voice mail message that former state Republican Party Chairman Jim Greer left for former Gov. Charlie Crist. The Tampa Bay Times reported that Crist thought Greer was trying to extort money from him. By MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 18 Incoming Senate Democratic Leader Chris Smith ratcheted up criticism of Floridas Stand Your Ground law Friday, pointing to a loophole that could endanger some women, rather than protect them. Smiths remarks came in response to a recent case in which a Jacksonville woman was sentenced in a domestic assault case. Smith said the law which allows people to shoot back when threatened without a duty to retreat could actually end up making domestic violence victims more vulnerable. Smith, an attorney, said the Stand Your Ground law affords domestic violence victims fewer rights than they had before it was passed in 2005 unless they have an injunction for protection. An invited guest is considered a resident under the law, he wrote in a recent analysis. This means that as soon as a woman invites her ex-husband to pick up their children at her home, she is powerless to defend herself, even if she holds sole title to the property. Given that most attacks happen at home, by relatives or individuals known to the victim, this loophole in the law is unconscionable. While the Trayvon Martin killing that has brought the Stand Your Ground self-defense law into new focus in Florida involved two young men, Martin and shooter George Zimmerman, some of the focus on the need for a lenient self defense law has begun to focus on the needs of women. Incoming Senate President Don Gaetz and his son, Rep. Matt Gaetz, both Republicans, made that claim in a recent editorial headlined: Calls to repeal Stand Your Ground are antiwoman. Consider an elderly woman in a dimly lit parking lot or a college girl walking to her dorm at night, they wrote in the May 2 Northwest Florida Daily News in Fort Walton Beach. If either was attacked, her duty was to turn her back and try to flee, probably be overcome and raped or killed. Prior to Stand Your Ground, that victim didnt have the choice to defend herself, to meet force with force. Both Gaetz senior, RNiceville, and Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala and House sponsor of the measure, dismissed concerns by Smith that for other women, the law makes things worse. Sen. Smiths been working too hard, said Baxley. He needs to let the Citizen Safety and Protection Task Force, which has a lot of smart people on it, complete their work before he starts proposing changes to statute. The Citizen Safety and Protection Task Force was appointed by Gov. Rick Scott to review the Stand Your Ground law following Martins death Feb. 26 in Sanford in a case that has drawn international attention. Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, entered a not-guilty plea after remaining free for ve weeks until the case had become a national controversy. Now, after an organizational meeting earlier this month, the Scott task force is slated to hold its rst public hearing in Sanford on June 12. Baxley is a member of the panel, which has been criticized for including him and two other lawmakers who voted for the Stand Your Ground law plus a fourth, Jason Brodeur, who was elected in 2010 and sponsored last years law banning doctors from asking patients about guns in their homes. The panels chair, Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll, also voted for Stand Your Ground while a House member. There are no known gun-control advocates on the panel. Smith did not wait for Scott to name his panelists before creating a separate, South Florida-based task force that recommended changes to Stand Your Ground last month. These included grand jury involvement, public education, and a self-defense claims tracking system. On Friday, Smith also said a domestic violence exemption should be part of the overhaul. He said he was very surprised to discover the domestic violence provision last week after 31-year-old Marissa Alexander of Jacksonville was sentenced in an assault case for ring a shot at her husband during a dispute in their home when she said she was under attack. Using a Stand Your Ground defense, Alexander rejected a plea bargain, lost her case and received a 20-year sentence under a minimum-mandatory law for gun crimes. I immediately thought how Gaetz and others are talking about poor, helpless women defending themselves, said Smith. More women are attacked in their homes than in the Publix parking lot. The Gaetzes wrote that [i]mposing a duty-to- ee (puts) the safety of the rapist above a womans own life. In fact, until Stand Your Ground was passed, criminals were suing victims because victims, in protecting themselves, were allegedly using excessive force against the criminals. Gaetz senior called Smith a good friend and a good lawyer. If he believes that theres a way that we can strengthen Second Amendment protections for battered women, Im all ears, and I cant wait for him to introduce the legislation, Gaetz said.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)A numbers game for jobs, schools, lobbyistsSmith: Battered women not protected by Stand Your Ground law The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of

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Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Found Found at the Blue Crab Festival last weekend: a pair of ladys reading or prescription glasses. If yours, please call 926-7102. Announcements ADVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills Drivers -New Freight for Refrigerated & Dry Van lines. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline .com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down payment. Call 850-524-4090 Mobile Homes For Sale 2006 CLAYTON HOME 16 x 72, 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath Make Reasonable Offer (850) 962-2767 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2-story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the water with dock. Light and bright furnished or not. $950 + utilities 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 3BR/2BA, Medart,central h/a,big-fenced yard, very clean, front/back porches, shed. No pets or smking $850/month+deposit. 850-545-0126 Must see!! CRAWFORDVILLE2 BD, 1BA, $575 mo. 1st & last mo. $800 dep (850) 926-5619 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEShell Point Rental 2/2 Town home on Canal, with office or 3rd BR Loft, enjoy your private boat slip and community pool $1,300 mo. 850-509-2667 or 850 -926-7158 CRAWFORDVILLESmall 2/1,$ $600 /mo+ $500 dep. minimum 6 months lease, no pets applications/ refers required (850) 524-3164 Mysterious Waters2BR/2BA, Washer Dryer, wood-detail, vaulted ceiling, large -porch, covered parking, short walk to Wakulla River, community park, boat-ramp, dock $875/mo.incl water & garbage 850-926-6289. Waterfront Rentals PanacaFishermans Retreat Lovely small cottage the water off Mashes Sands Rd $500/mo. Pets Welcome call Lisa (850) 510-2647 Rooms For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE Wakulla Gardens $450 mo. incls. electric Large brick home & kit. (850) 363-9729 Sport/Utility Vehicles CHEVROLET2009 Tahoe LTZ 4WD, 29,700 miles, white, leather, DVD, navigation, sunroof, warranty, excellent condition, $12700, ppeo@netscape.com Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 850-926-3546 5229-0531 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULL A COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OCHLOCKONEE BAY TRAIL -PHASE IV Invitation to Bid No. 2012-10 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: Thursday, May 17, 2012 at 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Sealed responses for the OCHLOCKONEE BAY TRAIL-PHASE IV will be received until 10:00 a.m on Friday, June 15, 2012: responses should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Responses received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Administrative: Sheree Keeler, Phone: 850-926-9500, FAX: 950-926-0940, email skeeler@mywakulla.com Technical: George Roland, PE, Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. Phone: 904-828-3900, FAX: 904-367-1692, email geor ge.r oland@kimley hor n.com ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at the location listed above after 8:00 a.m. on Thursday, May 17, 2012. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1-800-955-8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Sheree Keeler, Grants Coordinator Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 24 and 31, 2012 5229-0531 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5233-0531 v. Kevin Scott Grigsby.Case No. 2012-CA-0007 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012-CA-0007 CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff v. KEVIN SCOTT GRIGSBY an individual, UNKNOWN TENANT #1, and UNKNOWN TENANT #2 Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Commence at the Southwest Corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 56 of The Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 18 degrees 22 minutes 14 seconds West along the West boundary of the Northeast Quarter of said Lot 56. H.S., a distance of 2037.62 feet to a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of said Lot 56, H.S., thence run North 71 degrees 29 minutes 54 seconds East 50.05 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 15 degrees 31 minutes 30 seconds West 276.21 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 626.02 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning, continue North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 150.00 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 23 minutes 18 seconds East 292.81 feet to the centerline of a roadway easement, thence run South 71 degrees 39 minutes West along said centerline 150.00 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 23 minutes 17 seconds West 292.32 feet to the point of beginning. (Lot 5 of an unrecorded plat of East Ivan Estates). Subject to a roadway easement over and across the Southerly 20.00 feet thereof. Said property being more recently described by surveyor as follows: Lot 5, East Ivan Estates (Unrecorded), Wakulla County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Southwest corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 56 of The Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 18 degrees 22 minutes 14 seconds West 2037.62 feet; thence North 71 degrees 29 minutes 54 seconds East 50.05 feet; thence North 15 degrees 31 minutes 30 seconds West 276.21 feet; thence North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 626.02 feet to the Point of Beginning, thence leaving said point of beginning run North 71 degrees 27 minutes 45 seconds East 149.87 feet to a concrete monument thence South 18 degrees 26 minutes 07 seconds East 292.81 feet to a point lying on the centerline of a 40 foot wide access easement; thence run along said centerline South 71 degrees 38 minutes 59 seconds West 150.01 feet; thence leaving said centerline run North 18 degrees 24 minutes 27 seconds West 292.32 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to and together with a 10 foot wide utility easement lying over and across the easterly 10 feet described thereof. And also: Together with any and all interest that Grantor may have in those two parcels as granted from Claude W. Tooke and Susie Tooke to Edward Sinnott et al, and recorded in Official Records Book 382, Page 456-457, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with that certain 1986 Chad Mobile Home having VIN#AFLCW2AG240511553, Title #43248298, and Real Property decal number R253847 and that certain 1986 Chad Mobile Home having VIN #AFLCW2BG240511553, Title #43370649, and Real Property decal number R253848. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the 5234-0531 TWN v. Veal James C. Case No. 2011-CA-000263 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2011-CA-000263 COASTAL STATES MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs, James. C. Veal; Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA-00263, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, COASTAL STATES MORTGAGE CORPORATION IS Plaintiff and JAMES C. VEAL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES C. VEAL; CENTENNIAL BANK SUCCESSOR TO WAKULLA BANK; WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANTS (S) IN POSSESSION; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Clerks Conference the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m., on the 21st day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Parcel 1 Lot 1, Wildwood Country Club, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 3, page 35 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. And Parcel 2 Begin at the Northeast corner of Lot 1 of Wildwood Country Club, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat book 3, page 35 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 49 degrees 02 minutes 40 seconds West along the Northerly boundary of said Lot 97.89 feet; thence run North 87 de grees 22 minutes 19 seconds West along said Northerly boundary 55.00 feet; thence run North 30 degrees 12 minutes 41 seconds East 119.97 feet; thence run South 64 degrees 28 minutes 47 seconds East 154.06 feet; thence run South 34 degrees 08 minutes 38 seconds West 125.64 feet to the Point of Beginning. a/k/a 2 COUNTRY CLUB DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 DATED this 19th day of April, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND As Clerk of said Court By; /s/ Desiree D Willis as Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe, Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon county is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. Submitted by: Heller & Zion, LLP, 1428 Brickell Avenue,Suite 700, Maimi, FL 33131 Telephone (305)373-8001, Facsimile: (305)373-8030 File No. 10766.372 Published two times in The Wakulla News May 24th and 31st, 2012 Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT HURLEYS ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF RE-ROOFING SHINGLES METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net YARD SALE!! Saturday, June 2nd, 8AM-2PM CONTRACTOR:I have new TGI Beams. All 3.5 wide by 14 inches tall. Theres three at 16 feet long and 11 at 10 feet long. Yours for $200. Call 850-962-9092 or 732828-2632.Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $10 A Week 877676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 7B Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of June, 2012. Dated this 14th day of May, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 & 31, 2012 5233-0531 5218-0524 vs. Stephens, Barbara Case No.65-2011-CA-000041 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000190, DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. : BARBARA STEPHENS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000190 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and BARBARA STEPHENS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INCORPORATED AS NOMINEE FOR BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP; TENANT #1, N/K/A ANTHONY STEPHENS are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22, A DIS TANCE OF 248.77 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 61, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1673.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 689.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 311.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 138 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 0 SECONDS WEST 317.88 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 138 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUT H 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SEC ONDS WEST 135.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 317.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLWOING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY LYING 30.00 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22, A DISTANCE OF 248.77 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 61, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 2389.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID CENTERLINE, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 547.98 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 50.00 FEET TO THE CENTERPOINT OF A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS AND THE TERMINATION POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE. A/K/A 44 ANCHORS WAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of CIrcuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5218-0524 5219-0524 Vs. Small Lorie Ann, 65-2011-CA-000186 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000186 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. LORIE ANN SMALL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LORIE ANN SMALL; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; CAPITAL ONE (USA), N.A.; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 56, BLOCK 16, WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 42 RENEGADE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2708 at public sale on June 14, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 3rd day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. May 17 and 24, 2012. 5220-0524 Vs. Reed, Venesha Case No. 65-2011-CA 000150 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000150 US BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. VENESHA REED; CLARENCE REED A/K/A: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VENESHA REED; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 8, BLOCK K, HUDSON HEIGHTS, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 43 DOGWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2096 at public sale on June 14, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the 5221-0524 TWN Vs. Potter, Timothy A. Case No. 11-CA-354-FC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-CA-354-FC, UCN: 652011CA000354XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. TIMOTHY A. POTTER et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-CA-354 FC. UCN: 652011CA000354XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A is the Plaintiff and TIMOTHY A. POTTER; DARDRA REVELL POTTER F/K/A DARDRA B. REVELL; UNKNOWN TENANT NOO.1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at Wakulla County Florida, at 11:00a.m on the 14th dayof June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 19, WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT 3, PAGE 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida on. May 3, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5221-0524 5223-0524 Vs. Kilbourn, Rodney P. Case No. 2011-CA-000364 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.2011-CA-000364 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. RODNEY P. KILBOURN, Defendant, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-364-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and RODNEY P. KILBOURN, is the Defendant, the undersigned will sell to the highest 5224-0524 TWN Vs. Cope, Yolanda Case No. 11-330 FC Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-330-FC, UCN:652011CA000330XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC8, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OC8 Plaintiff vs. YOLANDA COPE; et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ANDRE HARVEY Last Known Address 49 SHOEMAKER CT CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 29, BRIDLEGATE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 57, OF THE PUBLIC OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days fr om first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED ON March 5, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5224-0524 1183-113683WVA 5225-0524 vs. Stalvey, William Keith Case No. 2011 000254CA PUBLIC NOTICE May 14, 2012IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2011000254CA Sunshine Savings Bank f/k/a Sunshine State Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. William Keith Stalvey, Cothee Ann Tomaini, Erin Capital Management, LLC and Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA ST A TUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 30, 2012, in Case Number 2011 000254 CA, of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which Sunshine Savings Bank f/k/a Sunshine State Credit Union is the Plaintiff, and William Keith Stalvey, Cothee Ann Tomaini, Erin Capital Management, LLC and Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327-3136 at 11:00 A.M. on May 31, 2012 the following-described property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 57, Block A, Magnolia Ridge North, a subdivision as per map of plat thereof re corded in Plat Book 3, Pages 55 and 56 of the Public Records of Wakulla County Notice is also given pursuant to 45.031(2)(f), Florida Statutes, that any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED: May 1, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter as Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, May 17 & 24, 2012 5232-0531 v. Home Placement Inc.Case No. 2011-CA-000212 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-CA-000212 PREMIER BANK a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff v. HOME PLACEMENT, INC., a Florida Corporation, R. RICHARD YATES, JR., Corporation, R. RICHARD YATES, JR., individually, DANNY R. MCCLELLAN, individually, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to-wit: Lot 28, Block J and Lot 41, Block K of MAGNOLIA GARDENS as per plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the front door of the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 14th day of June, 2012. Dated this 14th day of May, 2012. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 & 31, 2012 5232-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on June, 14, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBITS A and B Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 3rd day of May, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 34, A DISTANCE OF 2650.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 858.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 327.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 309.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 156.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261)THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 125.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 156.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 125.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A 15.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS/EGRESS EASEMENT LYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 7.5 FEET THEREOF AND BEING PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 174, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. EXHIBIT B Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, 2650.93 feet to a found 4x4 concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road S-299 and said POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way run South 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds East 112.89 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 29 minutes 36 seconds West 183.71 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds West 101.83 feet to the Southerly right-of-way of said State Road S-299, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East along said right-of-way 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.45 acres, more or less. The above legal description being more recently surveyed by Thurman Roddenberry and Associates, Inc., dated April 26, 2006, under job no. 90-132, and described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 2650.93 feet to the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Curtis Mill Road (State Road S-299) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 12 seconds East 112.70 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 89 degrees 27 minutes 49 seconds West 183.76 feet to a concrete monument(marked#4261), thence run North 00 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds West 101.74 feet to a nail and cap (marked #7160) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said Curtis Mill Road, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.45 acres, more or less. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5223-0524 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 2nd day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. May 17, 24, 2012 5220-0524. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. Available ASAP. 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. Available May 1. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets.

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5204-0524 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 12-111-DR, Division In the Adoption of Petitioner and Elijah Dale Holman & Simon Ellis Holman Respondent NOTICE OF ACTON FOR ADOPTION TO: Brian Dale Reed c/o The Red Lobster, 435 Shawnee Mall Drive, Shawnee, OK YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for adoption has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Attorney Steven P. Glazer, whose address is 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on or before June 01, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: April 26, 2012 (COURT SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit court By: /s/ Irvene Kimbrel, Deputy Clerk Published four times (4) times in the Wakulla News May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 5204-0524 I 5213-0531 vs. Roddenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count I and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count II of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Pr operty THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 & E 1/2 OF SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4) OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAVING AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM AS EASEMENT FOR ROADWAY OVER AND ACCROSS THE NORTH 6 FEET OF SAID PROPERTY. Personal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010 Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24, & 31, 2012 5213-0531#1 5214-0531 vs. Rodenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count III and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count IV of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime) at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL #1 COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND THENCE RUN WEST 641.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 803.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319 AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 104.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WA Y BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 412.07 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 105.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 416.75 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THAT SAME PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL. RECORDS BOOK 23, PAGE 533 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL #3 COMMENCE AT A LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 387.72 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 111.76 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 420.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD 60.21 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNCIL MOORE ROAD RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 551.90 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 167.45 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 650.12 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY 319, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A RADIUS OF 1942.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 11 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 205.21 FEET (CHORD BEING NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 235.07 FEET) TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 142.64 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 85 5215-0524 vs. Vowell, Weldon C. Case No.65-2011-CA-000041 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000041, DIVISION: JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. : THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST WELDON C. VOWEL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL,SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000041 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY is the Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/AWELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C VOWELL, SR, DECEASED; JANICE A. MONTALTO, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR., DECEASED; WELDON C. VOWELL JR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR.., DECEASED; JANICE A. MONTALTO, AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR., DECEASED; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S)WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLIAM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; THE SKETCHLEY LAW FIRM PA; TENANT#1 N/K/A JANE DOE are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3, BLOCK C, HIGHWOODS PLACE, PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 66 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2000 GENE MOBILE HOME, VIN NO. GMHGA1379925361A AND GMGHA1379925361B, TITLE NOS. 81599283 AND 81598714. A/K/A 20 RIDGEWAY COURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2484 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5215-0524 5216-0524 vs. Cannon V. Gordon Case No. 65-2011-CA-000269 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000269, DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. : GORDON V. CANNON A/K/A GORDON VICTOR CANNON et, al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is thePlaintiff and GORDON V. CANNON A/K/A CORDON VICTOR CANNON; LELIA BETH CANNON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS NUMBER 107,108, AND 109, BLOCK 22 OF THE EAST ADDITION TO TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY FLORIDA, AS SHOWN BY THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAID LAND ALSO DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; LOTS NO. 107,108 AND 109 OF THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY FLORIDA, EASTSIDE OR ADDITION AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF RECORD ON PAGE 641 OF DEED BOOK 2 OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 154 WINTER STREET, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with adisability requiring reasonable accomodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5216-0524 5217-0524 vs. Leslie, Shannon K. Case No. 65-2011-CA-000149 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000149, DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. : SHANNON K LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY POPPELL A/K/A SHANNON LARSON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000149 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and SHANNON K LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY POPPEL A/K/A SHANNON LARSON;JARED R LARSON A/K/A JARED RAY LARSON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 6th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA: THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING: THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINN ING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 327.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 665.14 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 327.17 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 664.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS EASEMENT MORE PARTICULARY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A 15 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT LYING 15 FEET EAST OF THE FOLLOWING DE SCRIBED LINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA: THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 664.69 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINING CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 236.33 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A 60 FOOT ROADWAY SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF TERMINUS. A/K/A 80 TANGLEWOOD ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk ** See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accomodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5217-0524 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DEGREES 06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 416.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 320.85 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 53.82 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 1706.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 687.92 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF LOT 77, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 77 A DISTANCE OF 1763.34 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 380.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) SAID POINT BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT 191.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 317, PAGE 416 OF THE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Personal Pr operty Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshall, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010,Count III Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24 & 31, 2012 5214-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5228-0531 TWN re: Estate of Sanders Deborah A. Case No. 12-33CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE; ESTATE OF PROBATE DIVISION DEBORAH A. SANDERS Case No. 12 -33CP Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRA TION TO ALL having claims or demands against the above named Estate: You are notified that the administration of the Estate of Deborah A. Sanders Case No. 2012-33CP, is pending in Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, the address of which is: 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The Personal Representative of the Estate is Sam Jack Sanders, whose address is: 211 Sanders Cemetery Rd., Sopchoppy, FL 32358. The name and address of the Personal Representatives attorney is set forth below. All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, within three months from the date of the first publication of this Notice, to file with the clerk in the above court, a written statement of any claim against the Estate in the form and manner prescribed in section 733.703 of Fla. Statutes, Rule 5.490 of Fla. Rules of Probate and Guardianship procedure. All claims, demands and objections not so filed will be FOREVER BARRED. Publication of this Notice has begun on the 24th day of May, 2012. CHARLES A. McMURRY, Attorney At Law, 910 N. Duval St. Tallahassee, Florida 32303, Florida Bar No. 03336911 (850)425-3000;Fax(850)224-6655 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 24 and 31, 2012 5228-0531 5230-0614 TWN Heirs of Martinson Kenneth H., Case No. 12-158CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-158CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN MARTINSON, husband and wife, and as Trustee of THE MARTINSON REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF KENNETH H. MARTINSON AND KATHRYN H. MARTINSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 25, Block E. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10972-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5230-0531 5231-0614 TWN heirs of Arnold, Bert C. Case No. 12-159CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-159CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U.ARNOLDHUSBAND AND WIFE, THEIR UNKNOWN SPOUSE(S) ASSIGNS, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), CREDITOR(S), AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST THEM; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS OF BERT C. ARNOLD AND RUTH U. ARNOLD, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 53, BlockD. of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page (s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10951-000 (the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the compliaint or petition. Dated May 9, 2012. (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: Glenda Porter, As DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in the Wakulla News May 24 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5231-0531 5235-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-130-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-130-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 22, Block K of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11131-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5235-0614 5236-0614 v. Select Properties Group LLC Case No. 12-131-CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-131-CA, GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, an administratively dissolved Florida Limited Liability Corporation; SOUTHTRUST BANK,an Alabama Banking Corporation, N/K/A 5237-0614 vs. Matthews Dorothy C. Case No: 12-124-CA IN THE CIRCUIT COURT SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 12-124-CA GOLDEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC., a Florida corporation Plaintiff, vs. DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DOROTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:DOROTHY C. MATTHEWS a/k/a DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS a/k/a DORTHY C. MATHEWS WILLIAMS, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 142, Block A of MAGNOLIA GARDENS, according to the Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-10859-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a de-fault will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA By: /s/ Glenda Porter, AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14, 2012 5237-0614 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration WACHOVIA BANK, N.A., a National BankingAssociation; AND WIREGRASS HOMEBUILDERS, INC., a Georgia Corporation doing business in Florida. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SELECT PROPERTIES GROUP, LLC, AND OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 19, Block L of Magnolia Gardens, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Property Tax Parcel Id# 00-00-078-013-11178-000 has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated:May 17, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA BY: /S/ Glenda Porter AS DEPUTY CLERK Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 24, 31, June 7 & 14th, 2012. 5236-0614 5227-0531 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice of Auction Under the authority of the Florida StorageFacility Act the property described below has been seized for non payment of rent and Self Storage Notices other accrued expenses. The property will be sold at auction to the highest bidder as provided by the Self Storage Facility Act 83.806 Double D Storage LLC reserves the right to refuse any and all bids. Self Storage Notices Cash only. Troy Hale unit 35 Household items, Terry Pafford Unit#16household, auction to be held @ Double D StorageLLC 289 Cajer Posey Rd Crawfordville FL 32327 June 6, 2012 Self Storage Notices 5211-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CASPIAN I LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2570 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A01 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT 2 BLOCK A LOT 1 OR 722 P305 Name in which assessed RWC INVESTMENTS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 Page 9B 5209-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 002 5210-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 003 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 710 Year of Issuance2009 law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Description of Property: Parcel # 12-6S-02W 000-03873-000 12-6S-2W P-8-M-55 A PARCEL OF LAND W OF US 98 IN SECTION 12 OR 12P 6 & 7 and OR 74 P 219 Name in which assessed TERRY C NELSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5210-0531 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SEAN HILLIER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2535 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-115-000-11897-000 LOT 115 HS P 20-1-M-25D A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SW 1/4 OF HS 115 OR 611 P 246 Name in which assessed SHEPARD FAMILY TRUST said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 35 38 44 48 55 64 67 70 2 28 56 3 29 57 4 23 45 52 65 18 36 39 53 58 5 15 24 49 6 21 50 68 71 7 30 46 59 8 25 40 54 19 41 66 9 16 42 60 10 26 31 37 51 69 72 11 22 32 43 47 61 12 33 62 13 34 63 ACROSS 1. Become wearisome 5. "Hold on __!" 9. Cruise quarters 14. Bhutan's locale 15. The Mideast's __ Strip 16. Sheepish? 17. Scott Baio sitcom 20. Control mechanism, for short 21. According to __ 22. Took the reins 23. __-Seltzer 25. Mrs. Chaplin 27. Desktop publisher's task 31. Da __, Vietnam 35. Earth-friendly prefix 36. Baby blues 37. NY Met or LA Dodger, e.g. 38. Rep.'s rival 39. Lead tenor in "La Bohme" 43. "What a surprise!" 44. Pub offerings 46. 1964 Oscar winner Kedrova 47. "__ y Pl ata" (Montana's motto) 48. Hang in the hammock 49. Giant's chant 52. "Where there's a __ ..." 54. Of great proportions 55. Audiophile's collection 58. Fit for a king 60. Get naked 64. Auditing firm that merged with Coopers & Lybrand 67. TV exec Spelling 68. Take ten 69. Trapper's trophy 70. Garbo, by birth 71. Tracy's Trueheart 72. Bad day for CaesarDOWN1. Campaign funders, for short 2. Netman Arthur 3. Bull artist 4. Grubs and maggots 5. Get mellower 6. Strutted 7. Basso Pinza 8. "__ believe this?" 9. Skater Sasha 10. Gardner of film 11. Compete in logrolling 12. "Picnic" playwright 13. Have to have 18. One given to vegging out 19. Circulatory blockage 24. Drop for a tencount 26. Massachusetts cape 27. Gas or clutch 28. Amtrak's Northeast Corridor bullet train 29. Morticia's husband 30. "__ Mio" 32. Standoffish 33. India's first prime minister 34. Best man's best friend, maybe 40. Having no pizazz 41. Toss with a spatula 42. Klutzy 45. Ensure, with "up" 49. Took to the air 50. Bandleader Les or Larry 51. Squids' kin 53. Dunne or Papas 55. No brains? 56. Oater challenge 57. Your excellency 59. Suit to __ 61. Felt sorry about 62. Castaway's locale 63. They're often unwelcome at motels 65. Massachusetts cape 66. ACLU concerns: Abbr.American Prole Hometown Content 4/29/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 234 52 678 85 416 1293 79815 4 27 89 3716 00 9 HometownContent 157 8236 9 4 938564721 264197583 895 341267 412675938 673982145 541 236879 786459312 329718456 P A C S P E D A L C P A S A S H E A C E L A D R A W L I A R G O M E Z S I R E L A R V A E S E W C O D L O L L E R I R E N E A G E K A Y O F L E W S A S H A Y E D E L G A R T E Z I O O S O L E A T E E C A N Y O U L I F E L E S S C L O T F L I P R T S C O H E N O A F I S H A V A A N N O C T O P I B I R L A L O O F R U E D I N G E N E H R U I S L E N E E D G R O O M P E T S The Wakulla News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 24, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSENIOR CITIZEN SPRING FLING PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMore photos online at thewakullanews.comCLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The Tallahassee Swing Band visited the Senior Center for the Spring Fling on April 21; Senior Center Director R.H. Carter welcomes visitors; a couple enjoy the dance tunes; some great hors doeuvres from Chef Mary and her staff; and dancers swinging to the beat. Expert physicians.Quality medical care.Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Center accepts Capital Health Plan and most other insurance carriers. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.comAccepting new patients X-Ray Services Offering specialty care: Capital Regional Cardiology Associates 850-877-0216 Capital Regional Medical Group Podiatry Services 850-878-8235 Capital Regional Surgical Associates 850-219-2306 Robert Frable, DO Aida Torres, ARNPCRAWFORDVILLE