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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00409
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 05-17-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00409
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netMuch of the controversy and frustration with the planned Wakulla County Airport improvements by residents in the area began after land adjacent to Surf Road was cleared and a sign was placed on the property letting people know it was the home of the future airport expansion. That property is owned by Wakulla Airport Properties LLC, with Richard Shepard as its manager. Shepard had the 16 acres cleared because of safety reasons for the airport, he said. The land would be used for taxiways, he said. However, in clearing the land, he violated the countys wetlands ordinance. Shepard appeared before the Code Enforcement Board on May 9 because of the violations, including land cleared in the 75-foot buffer zone of wetlands. There are “ ve areas of wetlands, according to Planning and Community Development Director Luis Serna. The planning and community development department received a complaint of the land clearing on Jan. 25. On Jan. 26, staff found there to be a violation of the development permit application because the clearing was done within 75 feet of wetlands, Serna said. On Feb. 6, Shepard was contacted for remediation. Shepard submitted a plan on March 13, but Serna said it was minimal and not adequate. Another plan was submitted on May 8. Serna said the owner must comply with the need for a plan and for a biologist or other quali“ ed person to review the plan and ensure that it was adequate. Once this is done, the planning staff would review the plan again and the owner could move forward with remediation. If Shepard doesnt follow through, it would be a separate violation. This serves to replace what was there originally,Ž Serna said. When the clearing was done, 140 trees were taken out. Shepard said he intends to plant 1,000 seedlings. Serna said he is not sure if that is adequate, which is why a biologist needs to review the plan.Continued on Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 19th Issue Thursday, May 17, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews DELINQUENT TAX ROLLS IN THIS ISSUE The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 6B Thinking Outside the Book.................................................. Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B INDEX OBITUARIES Bobby ‘Bob’ Edward Fordham Theresa Ann Somerset Section CAirport clearing violated wetlands ordinance By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen they were children, May 20 meant picnics, great food, plaiting the maypole and the community coming together. Once they were older, they began to understand what the community was celebrating. A panel of community members, including Doris Mackey, George Nelson, Josephus Shingles, Betty Jean Slater, Joe Williams and Lacie Hudson, gathered at the library on May 11 for a discussion called Speaking Freely,Ž organized by Herb Donaldson, artistic director of the Palaver Tree Theater, which focused on the history of May 20. May 20 celebrates the announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation in Florida, on May 20, 1865, at the Knott House in Tallahassee. This proclamation came two years after it was “ rst issued by President Abraham Lincoln. Those on the panel re” ected on what May 20 meant to each of them and spoke freely about what it was like growing up in Wakulla County years ago. Nelson said growing up he was told May 20 was for the blacks and July 4 was for the whites. That seemed wrong to me,Ž Nelson said. They all felt May 20 isnt celebrated as much today as it was back then, as many people dont know why May 20 is signi“ cant. Williams said after the freeing of slaves, black people were not entirely free. They did not have full freedom, he said. It was just one step,Ž Williams said. When he was a child, black and white people didnt live near each other. Today, some of his neighbors are white. And the schools were divided by the railroad tracks, with the white school on one side and the black school on the other, he said. I thank God that I have lived to see an extended freedom,Ž Williams said. Shingles, a retired teacher, said, We, as a people, the 20th of May gave us the idea that we could do those things we couldnt have done in the past.Ž Before, Shingles said, they had to ask permission for everything. Continued on Page 5A Workshop on airports future is plannedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWithin the last few months, residents have been asking seeking answers to questions about the future of the Wakulla County Airport in Panacea. A large amount of land was cleared west of the runway with a sign stating that it was the future home of the airport expansion. This caused many residents along Surf Road to become concerned about what impacts this might have, such as noise, planes ying directly over their homes and decreases in property values. Because of all these questions and concerns, the newly formed airport advisory committee asked that the Wakulla County Commission set up a workshop to address those concerns. The commission agreed to set up a workshop, and will set a date at its upcoming meeting on May 21. The airport committee members have said there are no plans to expand the airport, but to bring it up to Department of Transportation standards. Resident and member of the Ochlockonee Bay Alliance, Jim Parham, said the residents have no problem with making the airport safer, but the current plan goes beyond those minimum requirements. He said he was also in support of reverting the airport back to the Tarpine homeowners. Continued on Page 3AFILE PHOTOA photo taken in March of the cleared property that was found in violation.Forestry re ghters use airport for controlled burn and training. See story, Page 2A.Panel discusses meaning of May 20 Sunrise at Live Oak Island JENNIFER JENSENDusty roads may have a solution in Wakulla GardensBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSeveral residents from Wakulla Gardens showed up at the Wakulla County Commission meeting on May 7 seeking help with their roads and introducing themselves to the commissioners. Resident Tammy Hornbaker said the dust from the unpaved roads is unbearable. A limesrock aggregate was applied to the roads to help stabilize them and also help with problems with ” ooding in the area. During disasters and heavy rainfall, roads in this area become impassable. However, with the dry weather, this has caused the roads to be dry and dusty. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the gravel was intended to address ” ooding and has caused unintended problems. Hornbaker told the commissioners that she has been getting signatures for a petition. So far, she has almost 100 signatures from residents in Wakulla Gardens. Each family in the gardens have a story to tell,Ž Hornbaker said. A story of health problems and illnesses, as well as having trouble breathing. Residents said they were told stormwater treatment must be done prior to the roads being paved, but to them, it seems like an empty promise. Continued on Page 2A Playwright Herb Donaldson put together a panel to talk about the signi“ cance of May 20 … celebrated as the day in 1865 when the Emancipation Proclamation freed the slaves in Florida. The panel discussed the changes in race relations they had seen over their lifetime. One member of the panel said when he was growing up, he was told May 20 was for the blacks and July 4 was for the whites. F i r e Firem a t i c s matics F i r e Firem a t i c s matics See Page 14A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AWe deserve to be able to live a dust-free life,Ž said resident Jamaal Dickens. Although several said they understood stormwater needed to be addressed, their main concern currently is the dust and hoped the county could at least do something to help with that problem. There are several infrastructure improvements needed in Wakulla Gardens, including water for lots that arent on central water, stormwater treatment, sewer, “ re hydrants and road paving. County Administrator David Edwards said they are looking into a short term solution for the dust problem, such as applying a dust retardant like Calcium Chloride. However, the problem, as it has always been, is money. At the end of the day, we just dont have money,Ž Edwards said. The cost to apply that mixture is around $87,000 and it will only last, maybe four months, he said. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the biggest issue is stormwater, which does need to be done before road paving. If it isnt, the roads will flood, he said. Commissioner Jerry Moore suggested the commission forget about the other infrastructure problems for now and just focus on getting the road paved. We just have to start paving in Wakulla Gardens,Ž Moore said. Commissioner Randy Merritt pointed out that 10 to 15 roads have already been approved by previous commissions to be paved. Moore said maybe those approvals can be reversed and Wakulla Gardens can move to the top of the list. Chairman Alan Brock said there has been a freeze on road paving and the current commission has not approved funding for new roads to be paved. Those roads that have been paved recently come from other funding sources or have been resurfacing funds which can not be used on unpaved roads. Merritt said he also wanted to make sure the roads that serve the most people are paved “ rst. I think we need to address this logically,Ž Merritt said. The total cost for all improvements is more than $34 million, which was estimated to be around $800 a year per household for 15 years, which would be on top of normal taxes, Commissioiner Lynn Artz said. Theres not a lack of desire,Ž Artz said. This is a huge long term and expensive undertaking.Ž An idea that has been brought up recently and several times in the past is a voluntary assessment. Homeowners within Wakulla Gardens would vote on whether or not they would be willing to pay for infrastructure improvements in their neighborhood. I dont see any other way,Ž Stewart said. The commission discussed sending out a ballot to residents in Wakulla Gardens at the April 16 county commission meeting, but decided to table the item because they wanted a dollar amount, included in the initial ballot survey. The results of the ballot survey would then help the county commission decide whether it wants to move forward or not. The option to move forward with the ballot survey idea will come before the commission at the May 21 meeting, as well as ideas to pay for the short term and long term improvements. Edwards and his staff have developed a short term plan for paving the 21 miles of roads in Wakulla Gardens. Although the county should do stormwater before paving the roads, Edwards said this will give residents a better quality of life and improve property values. The plan would be to pave all roads within Wakulla Gardens in three different phases, starting with the highly traveled roads. All three phases would take two years, he said. They would use existing staff to prepare the roads for paving and the county would bid out the asphalt portion. The cost of these improvements is $5.2 million, which includes minimal stormwater. Edwards said the county would “ nance this project with a bank loan or bond and each property owner would be assessed. The range of the assessment would be between $180 and $235 a year per household. The note would be for 15 or 20 years. There are about 3,000 units in Wakulla Gardens. It gives a fix to the problem on the short term,Ž Edwards said. If approved by the commission, residents would be sent a ballot to vote whether they would pay the assessment for paved roads. If a majority of residents agree and the commission decides to move forward, Edwards said paving could start in the spring of 2013. In the meantime, the county would look at setting up a Community Redevelopment Agency for the Wakulla Gardens area. Edwards said there will be an immediate increase in property values after roads are paved. As the value increases, the tax revenue on the appreciated portion of the value or the increment is set aside for CRA projects. It will be a minimal amount at “ rst, but will continue to grow over time, he said. On top of this, they also want to set aside a portion of the one-cent sales tax revenue for Wakulla Gardens projects. They are also looking at a potential yearly stormwater fee for all newly improved properties, which would be around a small amount. He said they have also looked at a stormwater setup fee for new homes. As Wakulla Gardens builds out, the stormwater problem will be worse,Ž Edwards said. The county will also look at sewer and getting “ re hydrants. It may take a long time for all these improvements to be done, but this gives residents in the area a solution, he said. The county commission meeting is at 5 p.m. on Monday, May 21 in the commission chambers. Dusty roads may have a solution for Wakulla Gardens residentsBy STEVE FULTSSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Forest Service conducted a multiagency training exercise at the Wakulla County airport last Thursday. A UH-1 HueyŽ helicopter ” ew multiple missions to ignite and monitor prescribed live “ re burns in Wakulla County. The large military-type helicopter was accompanied by an aviation ground support crew, which provides portable maintenance and refueling equipment on site. Prescribed “ re is one of the most versatile and cost effective tools land managers use. Prescribed “ re is used to reduce hazardous fuel buildups, thus providing increased protection to people, their homes and the forest. Other uses include disease control in young pines, improving habitat for wildlife, range management, preservation of endangered plant and animal species and the maintenance of “ re dependent ecosystems. Specialists from various state agencies were given training and then taken aloft to actually drop small incendiary devices, which begin the prescribed “ re process. These devices look very similar to ping-pong balls. After being dropped precisely in strategic locations, they ignite and burn white hot. The helicopter and wildland “ re“ ghting crews on the ground closely monitor the “ res progress to assure containment at all times. To learn more about prescribed “ re in Florida, go to YouTube and search Good Fire Prescribed Fire and Healthy ForestsŽ or visit www.” oridaforestservice.com.Prescribed “ re training held at Wakulla airport STEVE FULTS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Huey helicopter with Florida Forestry “ re“ ghters last week. 713-0014 99 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Perfect Weather for Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay!SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10. 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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn 2009, the City of Sopchoppy was awarded $5.1 million, with a $4.3 million grant and a loan of $800,000, to expand the sewer system throughout the city and connect it to the countys sewer treatment plant at Otter Creek. The city is trying to pay off its loan associated with the sewer so that it can hand off the system to the county. At the May 13 city commission meeting, City Clerk Jackie Lawhon got the goahead to pay the remaining balance of the loan, which is $400,000. Lawhon said her recommendation was to go ahead and get it paid. So we can get out from under that,Ž Lawhon said. And once it is paid, the city is free to give the sewer system to the county. The commission voted four to zero, Mayor Colleen Skipper was absent, to have Lawhon pay the remaining balance of the loan. The commission also directed city attorney Dan Cox to go ahead and draft the documents necessary to give the system to Wakulla County. Cox said that may be included in the agreement and may not be necessary. Lawhon said the city would also need to look at the billing for wastewater. Currently, the city bills customers on sewer for the county. Once the citys sewer is turned over to the county it will become a part of their system, Lawhon said, and they will need to look at their agreement for billing services. In other matters before the city commission: € The depot advisory committee is applying for a $35,000 grant on behalf of the city for the depot. The funds are from the Department of Transportation. The application is due June 1 and there is no match required from the city. The money would be used on the inside of the depot. Currently, there are also plans to start laying the bricks at the depot. People can purchase the bricks and have their names on the bricks. The depot also recently received a ” at screen TV to play oral histories in the waiting room section of the depot. € City Commissioner Richard Harden resigned from his position as chairman of the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council. At the city commission meeting, he resigned from the council completely. Harden said he has to take time off from work to attend the meetings. He plans to submit a letter of resignation to County Commissioner Alan Brock who also serves on the TDC. The council voted unanimously to have Commissioner Lara Edwards take Hardens place on the TDC. Harden also announced that he will be resigning from his seat on the city commission effective early November because of his campaign to run for the county commission. € The commission discussed the possibility of establishing a Community Redevelopment Agency to put them in a better position for downtown revitalization grants, as well as funding for those projects. Cox said the downtown area would need to meet the de“ nition of slum or blighted area. The downtown would be considered a blighted area with its inadequate parking, stagnant assessed value and inconsistent layout. The only problem with the CRA is that typically as the value increases, the tax revenue on the appreciated portion of the value or the increment is set aside for CRA projects. However, because the city does not have an ad valorem tax, they would need to look at other options to pay the debt. Cox suggested having a stakeholders meeting to determine the future of downtown Sopchoppy. Lawhon said maybe the city needs to start with that meeting and “ nd out what people in the area would like to see happen, see what their vision is. She added that after the meeting, the commission could develop a 5-year plan with those projects and then chip away at the list over time. The next city commission meeting will be June 18 at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A Several Surf Road residents who are against the airport expansion attended the meeting, many of whom said that the land that was cleared served as a noise buffer. All of a sudden, I lose my buffer,Ž said John Smith, who lives directly across from the clearing. Residents said they hoped the board could require Shepard to put the buffer back as part of the remediation plan. Serna said his job is to ensure the wetland buffer is replaced and the wetlands are protected. Code Enforcement Board Chairman Ron Piasecki said the board did not have anything to do with the controversy with the airport or the remediation plan. The boards job was to look at the violation only. Shepard said that he would try to replant pine trees by the buffer. He said he was told to wait until November to plant them. The board voted unanimously to approve staffs recommendations to require the plan and agreement by June 9 from Shepard. The board stated that the staff could handle the timetable for when the planting should be complete.Airport clearing violated wetlands ordinanceContinued from Page 1AThere had been some discussion by the county commission of turning the airport back over to the Tarpine community, however, it was decided the airport remain county owned so it could still be eligible for state and governmental grants. Due to the lack of resources and staff to operate the airport, the commission decided to create the advisory committee. There is no way the airport can remain public,Ž Parham said. He added that it was too small and the only way it can expand is to acquire more property. The airport covers 13.16 acres of land. In order to make the improvements to the airport, the runway length would be extended from 2,800 feet to 2,972 feet. It would also need to be shifted about 50 feet to the west. The longer the runway, the safer it is,Ž said Committee Chairman John Russell. Airport Operations Supervisor Steve Fults said they want to minimize the effects of the improvements on the surrounding homes, but must be cognizant of safety. Bare minimums arent the goal,Ž Fults said. One of the major safety concerns is the building and hangar that encroach upon the primary surface area. The building that now houses La Cantina Grille is 50 feet within the primary surface area, which is the area surrounding the landing area. Since the county does not own that building, it cannot remove it, so a shift of the runway is necessary. There is also a 13-acre hangar parcel that has hangars that were constructed in 2006 too close to the primary surface area. The property is owned by Panacea Coastal Properties Inc. Committee member Walt Dickson is the president of the company. The 10 hangars were built but have never been placed on the tax roll. This is because the building permits were never closed out, according to County Administrator David Edwards. Dickson said there were some issues with the building department but those have been worked out. Before they can be placed on the tax roll, a certi“ cate of occupancy must be issued, Dickson said. He added that he is working with the county to get it in order. In order to move the runway, land would need to be acquired. In the current Airport Layout Plan, homes along Surf Road at the end of the runway were included to be purchased. However, several of those homeowners are not willing to sell. The airport committee decided it needed to modify the ALP to remove those properties east of Pine Street and Pine Street itself. Russell said that property is not needed. The county received $75,000 from FDOT which was originally intended to pay for runway lighting. Since the plan calls for moving the runway, the committee thought it would be best to use the funds for re-engineering the ALP, appraisals and environmental studies, as well as property acquisition. In order to change how the money will be used, approval is needed from FDOT. According to Russell, representatives with FDOT said that wouldnt be a problem, but a letter from the county outlining the modification would be needed. Surf Road Resident Bill Anderson questioned the makeup of the advisory committee. All have a vested interest, he said. The majority are pilots and live in Tarpine and another is a developer who owns some of the property that would be acquired for the expansion, he said. He added that those other homes in the area have no representation on the committee and this expansion would only bene“ t a small amount of people. Dickson owns property that is on the list to be purchased by the county for the airport and because of this con” ict, he has decided to resign. Dickson was on the committee as a representative of Panacea Waterfronts Florida Committee. He said someone else from the committee will replace him. The workshop on the airport is tentatively scheduled for June 26. The next airport committee meeting is May 29 at 2 p.m. in the county commissioners conference room.Workshop on airports future is plannedCITY OF SOPCHOPPYCity will pay off loan that nanced sewer expansion Airport committee member Walt Dickson resigns over a con” ict of interest as he owns property being considered for the airport expansion Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 18, Noon Publication Date: May 31 Remember This Years Graduateƒ Congratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2012Sponsor Line ........$20 Eighth Page ...........$50 Quarter Page ......$100 .............................................................. $50 Half Page ..............$200 .............................................................. $75 Full Page ...............$300 ............................................................. $125 Back Page .............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons ............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available PUBLIC NOTIFICATION MAY 17, 24, 31 JUNE 7, 2012 City of Sopchoppy For more information, contact City Clerk, Jackie Lawhon or Deputy Clerk Linda Langston at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL or phone 962-4611.MAY 3, 10, 17, 2012CITY ELECTION NOTICE

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Paramedic’s suit against county going to trial • Helen Finch Kyle obituary • Mary Lou Harvey Carter obituary •Babe Ruth Baseball for May 17 • Bears are spotted in Crawfordville • Lee deputy walks for the fallen • James D. Sizemore Sr. obituary• Coast Guard Auxiliary for May 17 € thewakullanews.com Follow us onEditor, The News: I would like to thank our local health care providers for their collaboration … and for the compassion and commitment they showed for the health of our community … on Saturday, May 12. Five clinicians and dozens of other volunteers each donated 5 hours of their time on a Saturday to provide free sports physicals for 155 student athletes. Their goal was to keep local students from being denied an opportunity to play sports because they lack a family doctor, health insurance, or the ability to pay. Dr. Andrea Plaggee, Dr. Matthew Standridge, and Cartier Lammert, ARNP (Tallahassee Memorial Family Medicine), Dr. Chitra Mony (Wakulla Medical Center), and Dr. Howard Kessler provided the medical examinations. Assisting in the clinic were Mary Ellis, RN, Susan Register, and Lisa Sanders. Volunteers staf“ ng the stations for height, weight, pulse, blood pressure, temperature, and vision included Jo Ann Chichetti, Belinda Largent, Anne Van Meter, and “ ve students from the Medical Academy at the High School: Madison Harris, Savannah Harris, Sara Mathis, Amy Walker, and Richard Walker. Volunteers responsible for patient ” ow into and through the clinic included Gail Hickman, Lori Strickland, Jode Yates, Michael Schnorr, Kaitlin Lammert, Jim Hilyer, and Bruce Ashley. Several WCSO deputies under the supervision of Dale Evans assisted with traf“ c ” ow in the parking lot. Coaches from all three schools were on hand for crowd control. Volunteers helping with check-in and paperwork completion included Tanya English, Sally Watson, and Brian English. Sue Morgan and Chris Yates copied and collected completed forms. Lynn Artz was responsible for overall coordination, recruited volunteers, and provided referral information to athletes not initially cleared to participate in sports. Tanya English coordinated the event within the School District and worked with athletic directors and coaches to get the word out to student athletes. Tallahassee-Memorial Family Medicine generously contributed the use of their facility, equipment, and supplies. The Wakulla County Health Department also loaned equipment and donated supplies. The willingness of these hard-working professionals to help our youth in their spare time was inspiring. I am deeply grateful to all involved. Lynn Artz Chair Wakulla Health Care Task Force anks for help with free sports physicals Defending recreational “ shermen Republican fundraiser was a success Don Curtis is candidate for House Wakulla Gardens residents need to attendBy RITA HANEYfor NAMI WakullaNAMI Wakulla and the National Alliance of Mental Illness offer hope to many who live their lives with a mental health disability. The greatest obstacle for the mentally ill is the stigma attached to the illness. The stigma attached with a mental health disability often delays receiving help. The way to reduce stigma is through education and outreach. NAMI Wakulla provides the support necessary to live a full and meaningful life. In addition to services provided directly to the men, women and children who suffer from a debilitating mental illness, NAMI also reaches out to their family members. The stigma of mental illness affects all members of a family. Misunderstanding of what mental illness is leaves the family … not just the person who has the illness … confused, isolated and fearful. Providing education through public awareness seminars and newsletters, NAMI Wakulla reaches out to community members to provide the education and awareness necessary for understanding and promoting compassion within our community, learn to navigate in the world, adjust to medication and reduces stress whether in the work place, family or with friends. For those who suffer from a mental illness, whether it is depression, bi-polar or post-traumatic stress, it is a journey of recovery. Learning how to navigate in the world with a mental illness can be a slow journey toward acceptance. When a man or woman is accepted and appreciated, not for what they do not have, but who they are and what they can be shortens this journey. NAMI provides education, support and community out-reach: € NAMI Wakulla offers monthly free public awareness seminars/programs dealing with various aspects of mental illness often providing the opportunity for a person with a mental illness to talk about their journey to recovery. Providing education to the community with the goal of reducing the stigma and increasing knowledge within the community. Newsletters with informative articles are also available. NAMI Wakulla works with the school system to help both parents and teachers provide support and education to alleviate problems in the classroom and at home with such mental health issues as ADHD. NAMI Wakulla provides support for the person with the mental illness and their families. Families are often unable to help a loved one. Having another parent or spouse to talk with about how they manage can be a blessing. Many times the people closest to those with mental illness feel they are unable to help the person they love. Family to Family support groups are available right here in Wakulla County. These groups aid family members and other loved ones to recognize what they can do. Within a group setting a person can identify with others who share the same or similar symptoms, learning to accept themselves. The group experience can reduce the fear of medication or the various side-effects which often accompany psychotropic medication. Groups can also bring acceptance and reduce the symptoms of depression, bipolar, post-traumatic stress. With some mental illnesses, a group experience may not be the best treatment option … in these instances mental health providers in the community are willing to provide individual sessions. Like any disability or physical illness, acceptance is the key to recovery and group and/ or individual therapy can sometimes provide the necessary support. Living in a community which is resourceful and strong is an advantage to all of us. Those coping with mental health concerns, be it severe depression, bi-polar, schizophrenia or post-traumatic stress can also be blessed with the support and encouragement of the entire community. This is true for adults. For children who suffer from mild to severe symptoms of mental illness, it is a necessity. If you would like to help NAMI Wakulla celebrate Mental Health Month all year long with your time or donations, please contact NAMI Wakulla at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327 or by phone at (850) 926-1033. All programs offered by NAMI Wakulla are free and open to the public: € NAMI Connections … Support Group … Day and Evening groups offered every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Library, and every Tuesday evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla Of“ ce. € Family-to-Family Support Group is offered the second Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla Of“ ce. € Monthly Public Programs are held on the fourth Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club, 64 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.Rita Haney LCSW is a counselor practicing in Crawfordville and writing on behalf of NAMI Wakulla.May is mental health awareness monthEditor, The News: Thank you U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland for taking the unpopular stance of defending the Fishing RightsŽ of Floridas Recreational Fishermen. Also a big thank you to Jim Hutchison Jr., director of The Recreational Fishing Alliance for providing such a clear explanation of why we SportsŽ have suffered in recent years at the hands of the Environmental Defense Fund, the Pew Environmental Group, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and the Obama Administration which are providing huge grants to fund Commercial and Charter Fishing Associations in their efforts to monopolize our publicŽ “ sh stocks. These Associations are thrilled with the current system that allows them to harvest our saltwater public resources 365 days a year because they have catch limits.Ž In establishing the bag limit for Recreational Fishermen, the Gulf Council allows the SportsŽ two red snapper a day and gives them a 40-day red snapper season this year. Of course, every sport “ sherman is going to “ sh every day of the 40 days and harvest his catch shareŽ of 80 Red Snapper per year. I DONT THINK SO! Recreational “ shermen have to work at least “ ve days a week to feed their families and most are lucky to get off on a Saturday to go “ shing. Sunday is reserved for the Lord, the wife and family. That means that the most days the average recreational “ sherman will be able to go snapper “ shing this year is 4 days, that is, IF THE WEATHER AND SEAS PERMIT and there are no kids graduation parties or baseball Saturday games he must attend. NOAA Fisheries, The Obama Administration and the Gulf Council need to get REAL! I dont begrudge commercial “ shermen because they work hard too but recreational “ sherman contribute 200 times more money to Floridas economy than the commercials, and they actually harvest 1/20th of the “ sh. Remember, they “ sh for recreationŽ and enough fresh “ sh for supper. I understand that Rep. Southerland is a recreational “ sherman, and he understands the issues. Thanks again, Steve! Major Alan Lamarche Crawfordville EDITORS NOTE: Biographical information included with the letter notes that Major Lamarche is a retired law enforcement of“ cer, trainer and administrator with a Masters in Criminal Justice Administration. He served as Deputy Director of Law Enforcement for Florida GFC and he has 40 years of experience with Gulf Fisheries. Major Lamarche was one of “ ve candidates nominated by Gov. Scott for a seat on the Gulf Council. The Secretary of Commerce will be making a “ nal selection in June. Editor, The News: The Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee hosted a sell out crowd at its Annual Ronald Reagan Black Tie & Blue Jeans Fund Raising Event at The Bistro at Wildwood on May 3. Filling the Bistro to capacity, the 150-plus Republican faithful included local Republican candidates: (Sheriff) Major Maurice Langston, county commission candidates Ralph Thomas Jr. (District 1), Mike Stewart (District 3), Richard Harden (District 5), and Melisa Taylor, candidate for School Board District 2. Candidates for the Florida House and other 2012 hopefuls were also on hand to get acquainted. According to most attendees, the high point of the evening was the keynote address by Peter Schweizer, Tallahassee resident and best-selling author of Reagans War.Ž Contrasting President Reagans gentlemanly good humor with the sarcastic hyperbole of the current administration, Schweizer revealed heroic aspects of Reagans life little known to most Americans, recalled the former Presidents determination to eliminate the threat of global communism, and extolled Reagans unrelenting belief in the same traditional American values of faith, family, and freedom that form the cornerstone of the Wakulla County Republican Party. This event is one of many held annually by local Republican parties throughout the state of Florida in May in recognition of Ronald Reagans birthday and the profound effect Reagan had on the nation and the world during his Presidency and his lifetime. Kathleen Lamarche Crawfordville Editor, The News: Wakulla Gardens residents have recently begun a uni“ ed push to ask the county commissioners to do something about the dust in Wakulla Gardens. This is now an Agenda item for this next meeting on Monday, May 21. The commissioners will be considering the paving of the Gardens and we are urged to have as many people as possible show at the meeting. The meeting begins at 5 pm, and if you want to speak, Citizens to be Heard is at 6:30 pm. They seem to have arrived at a palatable solution, and are excited to let us know. If you can show up on Monday, please do so. Tammy Hornbaker tamygayehornbaker@yahoo.com Editor, The News: Don Curtis announced his candidacy for the Florida Legislature, House of Representatives, District 7, Republican. Don and his family are long-time residents of Taylor County. He and his wife of 32 years, Michele, live on a farm at Lake Bird where theyve raised their two sons, Ray and Clayton. Now theyve been blessed with a grandson and theres another one on the way! Don is a forester and President of The Forestry Company in Perry. In his career, he has served as Assistant State Forester for Florida, served on the board of the Suwannee River Water Management District, as well as the board at Aucilla Christian Academy, and started the Shady Grove Volunteer Fire Department. Dons focus is, and has been for many years, bringing jobs to this area. We all want a better future for our children and grandchildren,Ž he says. We want them to be able to have good jobs here as they become adults and start their own families. Currently many of them have to go elsewhere for employment and that needs to change.Ž Because of his strong stance on private property rights, Don has been endorsed by the Florida Forestry Association. He also serves on the Leadership Council for the National Federation of Independent Businesses, Florida Chapter. Hes a lifetime member of the National Ri” e Association and a member of the Florida Farm Bureau. Don knows this district well. Hes a conservative, a listener, and a small business owner. For more information, visit the website www.ElectDonCurtis.com. Don Curtis Perry

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 5A  Sheriff’s of ce announces speed enforcement The Wakulla County Sheriff’s Ofce has stepped up traf c enforcement in Wakulla County in an effort to reduce speeding on area roadways. Some of the recent enforcement efforts have centered on Shell Point Road, Old Shell Point Road, Spring Creek Highway, Wakulla Arran Road, Rehwinkel Road, Songbird subdivision, Surf Road, Mashes Sands Road, Wildwood Drive, Cajer Posey Road, Panacea area, Tradewinds subdivision, Whiddon Lake Road, Fishing Fool Street, Savannah Road, Lonnie Raker Lane, Jean Drive and others. Warnings and Uniform Traf c Citations have been issued to motorists on these roads and the patrols will be continuing.  Republicans meet on Thursday at WildwoodThe Wakulla County Executive Committee will meet at the Bistro at Wildwood on Thursday, May 17, at 7 p.m. Those who would like to are invited to join them at 6 p.m. for conversation and a meal. This month, they will hear from Peter Williams, who is a candidate for 2nd Judicial Circuit State Attorney. Williams kicked off his campaign by stating, “After much encouragement from citizens, community leaders, family and friends, I have decided to run for state attorney in the 2nd Judicial Circuit. They believe as I do that the voters deserve a choice and a change. The state attorney should be held accountable to the community and citizens, and they deserve a prosecutor who will enforce the law equally and ensure public safety.”  Wakulla Springs 5K Run is SaturdayThe Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park presents the 2012 Wakulla Springs 5K Run and 1 Mile Fun Run on Saturday, May 19, at Wakulla Springs State Park. This unique run winds through the Sanctuary, a wilderness area of Wakulla Springs State Park which is not open to the general public. Packet pickup and race day registration will begin at 7a.m. The 1 Mile Fun Run will begin at 8 a.m., followed by the 5K Run at 8:30 a.m. For registration forms, visit www. wakullasprings.org/projects.html or register online at www.raceit.com. Fees are $21 for the 5K with shirt, $15 for no shirt option. The one mile fun run is $16 with shirt, $10 no shirt option. For additional information, contact Trudy Thompson at (850) 962-2064. Langston reunion to be held May 19The 13th family reunion for the descendants and relatives of Bill and Sally Roberts Langston will be held May 19, at 11:30 a.m. at the Fort Braden Community Center, 16387 Blountstown Highway, in Tallahassee. Fortress will be in concert and share its ministry with those attending. Family members are asked to bring covered dishes plus beverages. Contact Carol Langston (850) 4211157 or (850) 524-1661 for questions or further information.  Car wash for the Anthony Revell Scholarship is setA car wash to bene t the Anthony Revell Scholarship Fund will be held at Status Liquors, 2415 W. Tennessee St. in Tallahassee on May 19 at 10 a.m. Revell was a corrections of cer in Leon County, and previously in Wakulla, who was killed when his motorcycle was struck by a re truck responding to a call. The scholarship fund in his name is to benefit a student attending the Florida Public Safety Institute (formerly known as Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy). Memorial Day Blood Drive to be held at Wal-MartSoutheast Community Blood Center will hold a blood drive at the Crawfordville Wal-Mart on Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, at the store. The bloodmobile will be parked outside in the parking lot. Donors will receive a $10 Wal-Mart gift card.  No change in garbage pickups because of holidayThere will be no changes to your solid waste collection for the Memorial Day Holiday on Monday, May 28, according to Waste Pro. All services will be completed on your normal scheduled day. Gallery hours set for ‘Facing Liberty’ photo exhibit“Facing Liberty,” a photo exhibit currently on display at G-Signs Gallery as part of the May 20th Celebration, is open Tuesday through Friday from noon to 4 p.m., and Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The exhibit includes historic photos of schools, churches, along with the community at work and play. G-Signs Gallery is located across Crawfordville Highway from the Courthouse – Staff ReportsBriefsContinued from Page 1AIn the 1930s, Shingles said black people were still only able to do what they were told to do. And some of that resentment still exists, on both sides, he said. Once the slaves were freed, many owned land, but they were never shown the responsibility of ownership and didnt know what it took to take care of a piece of land. With freedom comes calluses,Ž Williams said. They gave some examples of this half freedom. They had to go through the back door of a white persons home, they couldnt go through the front door. They had to sit in the back of the bus and couldnt eat at the counter in a diner. In the 1960s, many still didnt consider black people to be equal, Nelson said. As a child, Nelson had to call a white child mister or miss. Williams said the better everyone associates together, the better everyone will get along. Freedom has given us the opportunity to kind of come together,Ž Williams said. When asked if the panel felt the younger generation respects and honors their ancestors, many on the panel said no. Shingles said many young people do not work for what they want, they simply take it. We tend to say that I want what I want and if you got it, Im going to take it,Ž Shingles said. Most on the panel also felt that Wakulla County was still behind and felt many white people in the county did not want black people to have things. Nelson compared Wakulla County to Gadsden County and said they are two separate pictures. The majority of elected officials and people of authority in Gadsden are black, the opposite is true in Wakulla County. He said he envisioned Wakulla County being a mixture of the two. The problem is that some people are still set in their ways, Shingles said. In the early days of integration, I used to say, the only salvation for integration is a few more funerals,Ž Shingles said. And that was on both sides.  Some of these diehards are going to have to die for the situation to get better,Ž he added. Some of the hatred that people feel is being passed down to their children and their children, Nelson said. Shingles said corrective action has to start with each individual. Each person has to correct themselves. If not, Its going to be a festering sore under there and only death is going to correct it,Ž Shingles said. Shingles said what happened, happened, but now they need to “ gure out how to correct it. Mackey said, Weve come a long ways, but were not there yet.Ž She said she taught her children they can be anything they want to be and all are educated. The panel agreed that it must start with the younger generation. We should have a better dialogue with everybody,Ž Shingles said. Discussions like this one will help, he said. People must face the facts about what happened. Several other events are scheduled to celebrate May 20, including a documentary night at the library on May 18 at 5 p.m. and the May 20 celebration on May 19 from noon to 4 p.m. at Mount Trial Church, the old Buckhorn School. For more information about these events, contact Donaldson at (718) 682-3870 or Jenny Jones at 926-7547.Panel discusses meaning of May 20Special to The NewsGovernor Rick Scott announced the reappointment of Eugene Lamb Jr. and Frank S. Messersmith to Tallahassee Community Colleges District Board of Trustees. We appreciate the Governors reappointment of Trustees Lamb and Messersmith,Ž said TCC President Jim Murdaugh. Their reappointment con“ rms that TCCs commitment to providing high quality education with market value, keeping tuition affordable, and supporting economic development in our community is recognized at the highest level.Ž Trustee Lamb was appointed to the Board in 2007 by then-Governor Charlie Crist. He served a term as chair in 2010-11 and was on the Presidential Search Committee that selected Murdaugh as TCCs sixth president. Lamb, who represents Gadsden County, has been a Commissioner with the Gadsden County Board of County Commissioners since 2004. He was athletic director for Gadsden County Schools from 2007 to 2009, a teacher with Leon County Schools from 1971 to 2004 and a recreation supervisor with the City of Tallahassee from 1992 to 2005. Trustee Messersmith is the senior member of TCCs Board, having been appointed by thenGovernor Jeb Bush in 1999 and reappointed by Crist in 2007. His 13-years of service include two terms as chair (2002-03 and 200809). Messersmith, who represents Wakulla County, has been a governmental consultant with FSM Associates since 2000. He served on the Florida Public Safety Commission from 1990 to 1992, in the Florida House of Representatives from 1980 to 1990 and was an assistant to the Sheriff of Palm Beach County from 1968 to 1978. Strong and effective governance by trustees is key to our ability to meet the needs of our community,Ž added Murdaugh. Trustees Lamb and Messersmith are noble ambassadors for the citizens of Gadsden and Wakulla counties, respectively. Their record of responsible trusteeship and stewardship of college resources is commendable.Ž Both Lamb and Messersmith are reappointed for terms beginning May 9, 2012, and ending May 31, 2014. Both appointments are subject to con“ rmation by the Florida Senate.Lamb, Messersmith reappointed to TCC Most on the panel also felt that Wakulla County was still behind and felt many white people in the county did not want black people to have things. Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! 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Bobby BobŽ Edward Fordham, 75, of Crawfordville, died Saturday, May 12, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He was born on Jan. 29, 1937, to Safo Douglas and Edna Pauline Frances Fordham and was reared on a small farm in Rentz, Ga. He joined the U.S. Air Force as a Weather Observer in August 1955. He quickly rose to the rank of sergeant and transferred to London, England. His tour of duty in England was only two years, but an experience he would never forget after growing up on a small farm in Georgia. He married his sweetheart, Shirley Faye Carter, on April 3, 1958. On Oct. 10, 1963, he returned to the U.S. to live once again in his home state of Georgia. After being discharged from the Air Force, he had a variety of jobs … he managed a small grocery store in Albany, Ga., worked as an electronics expert in Jacksonville, managed a Stand n Snack store in downtown Tallahassee and one on the campus of Florida State University, managed a Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant near FSU, worked in construction, and “ nally retired as an inspector from Talquin Electric. In 1971, he moved his wife and children to Wakulla County where he lived until his death. The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 19, at Evergreen Baptist Church, 1702 Evergreen Road, Sylvester, Ga., with interment to follow in the church cemetery. The family will receive friends on Saturday from 10:30 a.m. until service hour at the church. A reception will be held immediately following in the church Fellowship Hall. In lieu of ” owers, a benefit account has been set up for Bobby Fordham at Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 628, Woodville FL 32362, or call (850) 421-3504. Survivors include his wife, Shirley Carter Fordham of Crawfordville; children, Doug Fordham (Lori) of Fayetteville, N.C., Leisha Fordham and Tara Galinos of Tallahassee, Sid Fordham (Sherry) of Crawfordville and Theresa Fuller (Jim) of Montrose, Colo.; a sister, Jean Fellows of Jacksonville; brothers, Mickey Fordham of Houston, Texas, Larry Fordham of El Paso, Texas, and Johnny Fordham of Atlanta; grandchildren, Aubree Tupper, Colby Fordham, Lucas Fordham, Amber Miller, Christina Hodge, Charity Amenta, Brianna Fordham, Ashlea Boutwell and Jacob Fuller; great-grandchildren, Ethan and Viola Rae Tupper, Stihl and Stone Miller, Brody Hodge, Gabriel Amenta and longtime companion Hillary. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by his brother, Carroll Fordham. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesChurch BriefsBobby ‘Bob’ Edward Fordham Theresa Ann Somerset Bobby ‘Bob’ Edward Fordham Theresa Ann SomersetTheresa Ann Somerset, 50, died on Tuesday, May 8, in Crawfordville. She was born in Tallahassee on April 13, 1962. Graveside services were held Thursday, May 10, at Oakland Cemetery in Tallahassee, with a memorial service on Friday, May 11, at Ivan Assembly of God in Crawfordville. She is survived by her husband, Mickey Somerset; four daughters, Cristy Rivers (Jon), Carmen Branchi, Candice Branchi and Heather Drymon; her father, Tommy Thomason; sisters, Jan Brown, Cathy Power and Jo Reeves; and seven grandchildren. Arrangements are being handled by Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com). By Rev. James L. Snyder One of the great joys of getting older, and there is at least one joy involved in this grueling process, is discovering that you were right all the time. I try not to boast here because, well, thats just the kind of person I am. And, Im not going to make a list of all of the things I was rightŽ about. No sense in boasting, but I just cant resist one. Some of these things centered on my relationship with my mother. One advantage a mother has over her children is that sense of authority and being right all the time. Looking back, I can see that she was not right all the time. As a young person, my mother told me things I have since learned not to be true. For example: It takes more than clean underwear to survive an accident. The boogieman under my bed does not exist... any more. None of my friends wants to jump off a bridge. I will grow up even if I dont clean up my plate. And, its almost impossible to behave yourself and have a good time simultaneously. My mother, like other mothers, was not a bad mother. She just had bad information, much of which she got from her mother. Im not sure where grandmother got her information, but it too was wrong. And, when you have bad information, there is nothing more you can do but in” ict it upon your children. And my mother in” icted away at us children. I cant tell you how many times my mother told me to Eat your spinach. Its good for you.Ž When I would protest she would further admonish me by saying, Finish all of your spinach on your plate, it wont kill you.Ž Boy was she wrong. I hate to say, I told you so.Ž However, the temptation is beyond my ability to resist. After all, Im only a man. I guess I never ate enough spinach for the strength to resist everything. For years, I told my mother that spinach was not good for me. Now, I have scienti“ c proof as well as verification from the United States government that spinach can kill you. Where was all this information and government verification when I was young and being force-fed spinach? Of course, there is always the idea that my mother knew this and was simply trying to kill me. No, after further thought, Im sure that is far from being true. But dont think I havent been pondering this, lately. She had plenty of evidence to incite this kind of attitude toward me, I assure you. My mother used everything she could think of to get me to eat my spinach. She used intimidation, arguments and a gold oldfashioned thrashing. None of it seemed to make her spinach taste any better. One of the arguments my mother used to get me to eat spinach was good ole Popeye. Popeye eats spinach,Ž my mother would taunt me. Look at all of the things he does because of eating spinach.Ž Of course, from my observation, Popeye only ate spinach when he was in extreme trouble and his life was being threatened. I tried to have an agreement with my mother that I would eat spinach every time my life was threatened. Then she threatened my life. Her arguments continued. Certainly you want to be like Popeye, dont you?Ž my mother pleaded. To which I responded, Yes, and he smokes a pipe too. Can I smoke a pipe?Ž I did not think it fair for my mother to make me eat spinach and then not allow me to smoke a pipe. If you choose one the other comes too. At the time, my mother was not too amused with my argument concerning Popeyes pipe. I tried explaining that Popeyes use of spinach was only occasionally but his use of the pipe was continuously. This argument had no effect upon my mother, but it did cause severe pain in my left ear as she led me by my ear back to the table to “ nish my spinach. At the time, my mother had a one-track mind, which led to a plate of spinach. I, on the other hand, had a one-track mind, which led as far away from that plate of spinach as possible. Nothing would do but clean up my plate of spinach. Only one mind could win, and it sure wasnt mine. I listened with amusement to all this news concerning spinach this past week. Re” ecting upon this incident from my past, a verse of Scripture came to my mind. Therefore to him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him it is sin.Ž (James 4:17 KJV). At the time of my spinach eating frenzy, my mother thought she was doing the right thing. At the time she was, much to my consternation. Its not so much, what we do, as it is what we know. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship located at 1471 Pine Road in Silver Springs Shores. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores and can be contacted by calling 687-4240. His email address is jamessnyder2@att.net. The Church website is www.whatafellow-ship.com.Mother was wrong about spinachWakulla United Methodist Church will hold a Parsonage Garage Sale on June 1, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on June 2, from 8 a.m. until. The church is located at 918 Woodville Highway, Wakulla Station. Miracle Deliverance Center #2 will be having their second annual Spring Fellowship Praise Bazaar in Hudson Park on Saturday, May 19, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Please come out and join us. Chicken and “ sh dinners will be sold for $8. There will be entertainment and activities for children. For more information, contact Sister Princella Moore at (850) 566-3566 or Deaconess Gail Freeman at (850) 443-0802.Spring Praise Bazaar is Saturday Church Parsonage sale set June 1-2

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Aiden Joshua Hunt will celebrate his “ rst birthday on May 16. He is the son of Josh and Stephanie Hunt of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are Steve and Sherry Waites of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Richard and Shari Hunt of Ochlockonee Bay. His maternal greatgrandparents are the late Bobby Johnson and Frances Johnson of Crawfordville. His paternal great-grandparents are Joe and Betty Oertli of Edgewater. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 7Ahappenings CommunityLove and Godbolt to wed Kiona Love and Danny Kay Godbolt Kiona Love, of Sacramento, Calif., and Danny Kay Godbolt Jr., of Crawfordville, announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Earnie Love and Beverly Bell of Sacramento, Calif. He is the son of Danny and Cynthia Godbolt of Crawfordville. The couple will wed on May 26 at 4 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church. The reception will be held at the Wakulla Shrine Club at 6 p.m. Mr. & Mrs. Shane Spradley of Moody, Ala., announce the engagement of their daughter Amber Michelle Spradley to Tanner Edward Jones. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John David Jones of Crawfordville. She is a graduate of Moody High School in Moody, Ala., and received a cheerleading scholarship to Troy University where she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in business information Systems and is currently in the Education Masters Program. She is employed with the Taylor County School District teaching language arts, coaches the dance team and majorettes for Taylor County and is also employed parttime by Taylor Elite Cheerleading Gym. He is a graduate of Wakulla High School and received a football scholarship to Troy University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science in social sciences and a minor in physical education. He is employed with the Taylor County School District teaching American government, economics and earth space science. In addition, he coaches football and baseball for the Taylor County Bulldogs. The couple will be married on July 8 at The Sonnet House in Leeds, Ala. Jones will marry Spradley Tanner Jones and Amber Spradley Dance Academy scores high at competition Wakulla Dance Academys competition dance teams takes homes numerous awards at the recent Fire and Ice Dance Competition. Special to The NewsWakulla Dance Academys Competition Dance Team traveled to Jacksonville the weekend of April 20 and 21 to compete in the Fire and Ice Dance Competition held at the University of North Floridas Fine Arts Center. The five group numbers performed by the older team members earned Platinum awards, the two group numbers performed by the younger team members earned Gold awards and two solos earned Gold awards. The team took “ rst Place Overall with their production number Boot Scootin; “ rst Place Overall Large Group with their lyrical number Feel My LoveŽ; second Place Overall Small Group for their contemporary number; third Place Overall Small Group for their jazz number; fourth Place Overall Small Group for their hip-hop number; and “ fth Place Overall Small Group for their jazz number. The team also received the Studio Spirit and Sportmanship Award, and a $125 cash award for their lyrical number. The team members are Cadence Brainard, Chloe Brown, Madison Brown, Sarah Chambers, Skyllar Cobb, Tanasha Cooksey, Torie Crum, Ava DuBois, Shawna Gray, Georgia Gumphrey, Mathilda Jensen, Casey Lowe, Marissa Peddie, Alex Porter, Annabelle Slayton, Tatum Tucker, Remie Vause, Jordan Webster, Emily Westmark and Danielle Whiting. Wakulla Dance Academy will host their annual Spring Recital on Saturday, June 9, at 4 p.m. at Chiles High School in Tallahassee. Tickets are $12 in advance, $14 at the door. For more information call the studio at 926-2655.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPantellis graduates from TCCConstantina Pantelis of Crawfordville graduated from Tallahassee Community College with honors on Saturday, April 28. She is the daughter of Patricia Hackworth of Crawfordville. She achieved a straight A average and is on the Presidents List and a member of Phi Theta Kappa. She will continue her education at Florida State University majoring in Middle East studies. She is the mother of a 3-year-old daughter and realizes the importance of education. Constantina Pantelis Happy “ rst birthday, Aiden Hunt Aiden J. Hunt Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555 The college of choice! Invest in yourself today EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT THE RISING COST OF COLLEGEƒ at TCC, tuition is signicantly lower than most other universities and colleges 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolFenner wins contestSpecial to The NewsGage Fenner is a wildcat worthy of special notice. He is the Wakulla Middle school winner of the Tropicanna Speech Contest and the county winner as well. He will soon compete in the district competition at Florida A&M University. His speech is about wrestling and the trials and tribulations of his “ rst year as a participant in that sport. He said that he learned something about himself by winning the speech contest. I never knew I was good at public speaking, and I really like it,Ž he said. Mrs. Byars, the school speech coordinator, said that Fenner was the “ rst WMS student to go to district since Tucker Pearce a few years ago. They are really proud of Gage and wish him all the best. By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 14....... Preliminary grades on a ramped up statewide writing assessment are so bad that state education of“ cials said Monday they will hold an emergency meeting Tuesday to “ gure out what to do next. Passing scores on the FCAT writing assessment plummeted from 81 percent to 27 percent for fourth graders and showed similar drops in eighth and 10th grades, according to statewide results of the FCAT writing assessment released by the Department of Education. Passing scores in eighth grade fell from 82 percent to 33 percent. Tenth graders taking the test saw a similar drop in success. While 80 percent passed the test last year, only 38 percent scored a 4 or above on a 6-point scale this time around. Education of“ cials Monday blamed the plummeting scores on a handful of factors including more rigorous standards. Now, the State Board of Education has to determine what to do with the scores, which have been used to determine school grades. Failing schools are required to put in place certain remedial programs that cost more to provide in times with already tight budgets. Among the changes made over the past two years, this years tests were graded by two reviewers. Test standards were also raised to include more attention to writing conventions like punctuation, capitalization and grammar. The pool of test takers was also expanded to include lower performing students. The combination proved problematic. When the increased threshold of 4.0 was established by rule, the State Board of Education did not have, and could not have had, impact data that would re” ect how the scoring rules changes would impact student results and the school grade calculations,Ž according to a department report justifying the holding of an emergency meeting Tuesday to discuss a plan of action. Based on preliminary results of the 2012 writing assessment, applying the 4.0 threshold in addition to the heightened scoring rules may have unforeseen adverse impacts upon school grades, warranting emergency review by the State Board of Education.Ž In the short term, the board is proposing lowering the passing threshold from 4.0 to 3.5; a reduction that would dramatically increase the number of students having passing scores, but the number would still be signi“ cantly less than the 2011 scores. Under the lower standards, 48 percent of fourth graders, 52 percent of eighth graders and 60 percent of 10th graders would have passed the test. Though improved, the passing percentage is still at least 20 points lower than 2011 scores. Mark Pudlow, spokesman for the Florida Education Association, said the dramatically lower scores point to the shortfalls of relying on such high stakes tests for funding and student assessment. There have been a lot of parents over the years who have been unhappy with the assessments,Ž Pudlow said. Hopefully this will give us a real opportunity to see how we should evaluate students and evaluate teachers.Ž The advocacy group FundEducationNow.org slammed the state education bureaucracy, saying the swing in grades shows that the FCAT is a multi-million dollar sham.Ž FCAT passing scores drop signi“ cantly Recital for Michelle Snow school will be May 18 and 19The students of Michelle Snow School of Music will present their spring recital on Friday, May 18 and Saturday, May 19 at Christ Church Anglican on Highway 98 in Medart. There will be two performances, one on Friday at 7 p.m. and one on Saturday at 11 a.m. The students will be all ages and will be playing a variety of musical styles and instruments. The recital will feature performances from Danyelle Dias, Morgan Terry, Victor Palumbo, Shannon Egler, Joey Rickards, Summer Padgett, Jason Paris, Steven Kinsey, Shea Harrington, Zoie Hill, Makenzie Thompson, Yese Reyes, Jacob Rardin, Marina Harvey, Josh Cook, Emily May, Erin Patrucelli, Jack and Maxwell Mispel, Desmond Maxwell, Rhiannon Beattie, Ryan Crawford, Allison Gordon, Rebecca and Riley Blankenship, Annabell Chancy, Loranda Hutton, Wesley Kyle, Jason Westmark, Precision Rudd, Derisha Jones, Chloe Choquette and Abbott Gauger. The recitals are free and open to the public. They will be followed by a reception. For more information, call 926-7267. omas receives mastersBrandon Scott Thomas received his masters degree in business administration from the University of South Florida on Saturday, May 5 in Tampa. He is the son of Kimball Thomas of Ochlockonee Bay. Gage Fenner Gentry graduates from Auburn with honorsLauren Gentry of Crawfordville graduated Summa Cum Laude from Auburn University as an Honors Scholar with a bachelors degree in psychology on May 7. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, which is the countrys oldest academic honor society and is also a member of Phi Kappa Phi and Golden Key honors societies. She plans to attend Florida State University Law School in the fall. While at Auburn, she participated in a spring break community development project, studied abroad at the University of Salamanca in Spain, worked with autistic children at a local preschool, and served as a Peer Career Advisor at the Auburn University Career Center. Additionally, she served as president and vice president of Omega Phi Alpha, a national community service sorority. This spring, she won the State American History Scholarship Award from the Alabama branch of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America for a research paper. Later this month, she will serve as an intern for Auburns Womens Leadership Institute at their annual Residential Intensive Training conference. She is a 2009 graduate of Wakulla High School and National Merit Scholar. She is the daughter of Angie Gentry of Crawfordville and Jeff Gentry of St. Marks. She has one sister, Melissa, who currently attends Wakulla High School. Her grandparents are Allen and Monica Harvey of Crawfordville and Evelyn and Marshall Gentry of Tallahassee. Lauren Gentry Email your community news to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net. Announcements are published as space becomes available and edited for style, length and clarity. Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Of WakullaHeat i ng & A i rServ i ng Wakulla & Frankl i n Count i es850-926-5592Sales & Serv i ce All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Vacation Bible Schoolat PANACEA 1ST BAPTIST CHURCHMon., June 18TH – Fri., June 22ND6:00 – 8:30p.m. Come join us as we “ y” to some of the world’s greatest natural wonders and encounter our Awesome God and His Amazing Power! This Awesome Week of Fun, Food, and Exciting Learning Opportunities is open to kids ages 4 years – 6th grade. For more information, call 850-984-5206. “Re-Store”Shadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat.  9 a.m. 5 p.m. The Wakulla NewsLook Us Up Online for News, Sports, & Special Events.www.thewakullanews.comAlso check out your Community Calendar

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team views SportsBy LISA KINARDSpecial to The NewsThis week started with the Badcock Furniture Rays vs. the Ameris Bank Sluggers. The Sluggers hitters were Michael McGlamr y with 4 hits on 4 at-bats, Dylan Causseaux with 3 hits, Jake Bryan with 2 hits and Josh Conway with 1 hit. Shane Davis got a hit for the Rays. Final score, 8-0 Sluggers. Tuesday the Badcock Furniture Rays were on the “ eld again against the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans. Hitters for the Rays were Aaron Price, Clayton Burroughs and Brice Brooks with runs scored by Price, Burroughs, Chase Bryan and Bryan Hudson Hitters for the Titans were Zach Norman and John Weber with 2 each, and 1 each for Jordan Vaughan, Jackson Montgomery, Davis Hammond and Zeke Bryan Runs were scored by Norman (2), Weber, Vaughan, Mongomery, Bryan and Jake McCarl. Titans won by a score of 7-4. Thursday, the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws played the Ameris Bank Sluggers in a battle for “ rst place. Jake Bryan started on the mound for the Sluggers. The Outlaws took charge in the top of the “ rst inning, scoring two runs on a hit by Skylar Talavera The Sluggers came back with Michael McGlamry scoring following hits by McGlamry and Dylan Causseaux. The Outlaws added one run in the second but great defensive plays by Kaleb Langston and Gabe Barwick stopped the Outlaws from scoring in the third. The Sluggers added a run when Josh Inman scored in the third. Tyler Teegan pitched for the Sluggers in the fourth and kept the Outlaws from scoring with an awesome catch from David Lamarche for the third out. The Sluggers got hits from Thomas Davis and Jake Bryan in the “ fth but were unable to add to the score. The Outlaws added two in the “ fth to win the game 5-2. Talavera, Greysen Rudd, Nick Lentz, James Calhoun, Brandon Bennett and Jacob Dempsey all had one hit each for the Outlaws. Lentz started on the mound pitching three innings with 5 strikeouts. Chase Forester pitched one inning allowing one unearned run with one strikeout and Rudd pitched one inning and had 2 strikeouts. The Outlaws and Sluggers are now tied for “ rst place and will play for the “ nal time this Tuesday. Friday it was the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans vs. the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws. The Titans had hits from Jordan Vaughn, AC Ginn, Jackson Montgomery and Zeke Bryan Runs were scored by Vaughan, Ginn (2), RJ Kinard (2) and Bryan. The Outlaws had hits from Greysen Rudd (double), Nick Lentz and Skyler Talavera The Outlaws won the game 10…7 with runs scored by Rudd (2), Lentz (2), Talavera (3), James Calhoun and Brandon Bennett (2). Saturday also had action with a double header makeup between the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans and the Badcock Furniture Rays. The Rays threw Shane Davis with Nolan Terry catching. Following a hit by John Weber, Jackson Montgomery got a solid double scoring Weber and Jordan Vaughan Zeke Bryan hit another double scoring RJ Kinard, and Montgomery added a fourth run when he stole home. The Titans threw Vaughan to catcher Zach Norman. Brice Brooks and Davis started things off with bunts. Following a double play, Brooks scored on a error. Terry hit to center “ eld, loading the bases but a strike out and popup ended the inning with bases still loaded. In the second, the Titans left the bases loaded after a hit by Norman and 3 strikeouts for Davis. The Rays answered with another hit by Brooks but 3 strikeouts by Vaughan ended the inning. The third had Davis hitting his stride striking out all three batters he faced. The Titans brought Weber in on the mound with Kinard behind the plate with no hits and kept the score 4-1. The fourth saw Weber getting another hit deep to center“ eld. Due to pitch count, Clayton Burroughs came in to pitch and ended the inning with a double play. Hunter Myers hit a solid shot to centerfield, but outstanding fielding and throwing by Bryan stole the hit from him for the “ rst out. Devin Huber then hit a long ” y ball to right for a hit. Davis got the momentum going with a hit to deep right. Huber later scored on an error. Aaron Price brought Davis home with a hit to make the score to 4-3. With the winning runs on base, Weber dug deep and struck out a Rays slugger to end the drive. Kinard got a hit to the out“ eld but the Titans were unable to add any runs in the “ fth. Montgomery came in as the “ nal pitcher for the Titans. The Titans won the close game, 4-3. The second game of the double-header was also a squeaker. The Titans had hits from Zach Norman (double), Jordan Vaughan, AC Ginn (2), Zeke Bryan, Jacob Sizemore (double) and Davis Hammond with runs by Vaughan (2) and Kinard. The Titans Ginn pitched a complete game with RJ Kinard behind the plate. The Rays had hits from Clayton Burroughs and Jaren Lawhon and pitched Nolan Terry and Lawhon with Burrough catching. They had runs by Burroughs and Terry. The Rays lead most of the game 2…0. In the second, they almost went up 3-0 as Brice Brooks stole home, but a dropped third strike swiftly handled by Kinard and Montgomery negated the run, getting the out before the hitter could get to “ rst. Final score. Titans 3…2. Next week, tournament action begins. Come out and catch the excitement! Mothers Day came 10 minutes early for all the moms of the Wakulla Red Sox 12U travel baseball team, as their sons delivered them their second championship win in less than a month. As midnight approached, the Red Sox closed in on the win in dramatic fashion as they came from behind in the last inning to claim the championship trophy in Valdosta, Ga., on Saturday, May 12. Out of six teams, the Red Sox went undefeated on the day and came out on top in this USSSA Mothers Day Tournament. Way to go Sox!...thanks for our Mothers Day gift! Pictured: Those standing are Manager Keith Anderson, Jared Weber, Jacob Dismuke, Bradley Lord, Connor Strickland, Hunter Greene and Coach Mike Barwick. Kneelling are Bailey Fagan, Thomas Anderson, Will Barwick, Carson Dykes and Hayden Carlton.BABE RUTH BASEBALLOutlaws and Sluggers are tied for rst place TSA Titans Jackson Montgomery gets a lead off second while Badcock Furniture Rays Brice Brooks tries to catch him stealing. TSA Titans AC Ginn makes a run for home. Badcock Furniture Rays Clayton Burroughs gets a hit.PHOTOS BY LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Red Sox do it again12U TRAVEL BASEBALL Team Wakulla Wrestling ClubPRESENTSElementary / Middle Wrestling CampHigh / Middle School Wrestling Camp June 4th through 7th at RMS Gym $150Instruction by Darton College Head Coach Mike Miller REGULAR CLUB PRA C TIC E(open to everyone 4 years and older)Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:30pm-7:00pm June 11th through 15th at RMS Gym Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Last week was absolutely beautiful during the week and then when the weekend got here everything changed. The winds went from calm to howling on Saturday and Sunday. They were “ nally able to “ sh the Kevins Red/Trout Shootout despite the wind and some nice “ sh were caught and big bucks won by some good “ shermen. The team of J&D placed “ rst with a 7.6-pound red and a 5.2-pound trout. For their efforts they won $3,000 and another $1,000 because they had the biggest red and biggest trout of the tournament. The team of Keystone “ nished second with a 7-pound red and 4.5-pound trout and they took home $1,500. This tournament was scheduled for early April but had to be put off then and another weekend because of small craft advisories on the water. There is another tournament that is coming up this weekend and everyone is hoping for good weather and especially the “ shermen. This is the Wakulla County Kids Fishing Tournament that will be held out of Rock Landing in Panacea. They are still looking for some folks to take kids “ shing and donations are always welcome. To make a donation for volunteer to take some kids “ shing contact Larry Massa with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce at 251-5169. Another tournament coming up on June 15, 16 and 17 over Fathers day is the Big Bend Saltwater Classic. This tournament is held out of Carrabelle and attracts folks from all over the Southeast. Last week in the Tallahassee Democrat was a picture of Dr. Joe Camps and a cobia that he caught in a tournament over in Destin. Dr. Camps and several other doctors from Tallahassee “ sh that tournament every year and they “ sh with Capt. Gary Jarvis on the Back Down. Dr. Phil Sharp said that very few cobia were caught or even seen on the “ rst two days of the tournament and the leading “ sh came from off of a wreck. Capt. Jarvis decided on the third day to fish a wreck that he knew held cobia though they werent the big ones like they usually see cruising the beaches. Dr. Camps hooked into and landed a 54-pound cobia that netted them $74,000 from a Calcutta. Several years ago Dr. Sharp caught the winning “ sh for the tournament and Joe said thats why they “ sh with Capt. Jarvis. Fishing has been real good in our area and there are plenty of trout, reds, Spanish, cobia and ” ounder around. A lot of real nice “ sh moved onto the ” ats with this last full moon we had and there are still plenty of “ sh out in deeper water. Some real big trout are moving onto the Shell Point reef on the high tide and will hit topwater early and on cloudy days and the Gulp “ shed straight or under the Cajun Thunder is also working very well. I fished with Jason Fisher from Pennsylvania on Monday and we caught several limits of trout and Jason caught seven sharks. On Tuesday he took his wife and son and of course his son wanted to catch a shark. As luck have it, his mother caught the sharks though he did hook a big one. We did catch about 20 nice Spanish and that made both of them happy. On Wednesday, I took Reagan Hobbs and his 14year-old son Clayton. We “ shed a half-day and came in with “ ve trout, a ” ounder and nine nice Spanish. I “ sh with a lot of young people and he would rank as one of the best fishermen Ive had on my boat including adults and he was extremely polite. The best part was he got so excited when he caught a “ sh. The best young person I have ever “ shed with would have to be Jay Yeltons grandson. Capt. David Fife has still be catching trout and reds around the oyster bars using live bull minnows and the Gulp. David “ shes out of Spring Creek and “ shes from Spring Creek to Panacea. Stephan Shelhaus and his dad from Cincinnati “ shed down here week before last for three days and he said they caught lots of trout, plenty of sharks, six cobia, more Spanish than they could count and a triple tail. Stephan keeps his boat at Shell Island Fish Camp and comes down two or three times a year to “ sh. I was in AMS the other morning getting bait and Bob McCullough was on his way to Mashes Sands. He said he has been getting his limit almost every time he goes using the Gulp and cut bait. Problem is he wouldnt tell me where he was “ shing. Bob is an avid “ sherman and goes once or twice every week. If you can take a couple of kids out on your boat this weekend give Larry Massa a call. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there.Good luck and good “ shing! Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL The shing has been real goodBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA young, male manatee was found dead near the intake canal of the Purdom Generating Station at the end of St. Marks Re“ nery Road by a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission marine of“ cer on Friday, May 11 around 12:45 p.m., according to the FWC. The of“ cer towed the manatee to a boat ramp until the marine biologist could arrive. Biologist Anna Panike drove from St. Petersburg to St. Marks on Saturday to recover the manatee. The manatee was then taken to the FWC Marine Mammal Pathobiology Laboratory for a necropsy. The necropsy was performed on Monday, May 14, but because of the stage of decomposition, a speci“ c cause of death could not be determined, according to Brandon Bassett, manatee mortality database curator with the FWC. It was estimated that the manatee had been dead for 2 to 3 days when it was found, Bassett said. Meconium was found in the large intestine and it takes about a week for that to pass out of the gastrointestinal tract, he said. So we believe that it either was stillborn or died shortly after birth,Ž Bassett said. The manatee was 4.8 feet long. CYNTHIA PAULSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFWC of“ cials load up the dead calf for study. Manatee calf found dead in St. MarksSpecial to The NewsThe U.S. Forest Service invites you to attend BatFest 2012 … a free event being held to gain appreciation for the not-so-cute and furry, but important, bat. With activities geared toward youths, BatFest will be held on Sunday, May 20, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Wakulla Springs State Park. A park admission fee will be charged. This event, hosted by Florida Bat Working Group, is a partnership effort between the U.S. Forest Service, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the University of Florida. Because bats are active at night, few people see them, and even fewer understand or appreciate their importance in our daily lives,Ž said Micah Thorning, wildlife biologist for the U.S. Forest Service. At BatFest you will see live bats and learn everything you ever wanted to know about bats, such as: Why are bats so important? How do bats find insects in the dark? How are bats involved in pollinating ” owers? How can you help bats? Surprisingly little is known about the distribution, habitat associations, and diet of bats living in the forests of north Florida. Experienced volunteer biologists will help uncover new information in this region through bat surveys being done Monday, May 21, through Thursday, May 24, in and around the Apalachicola National Forest.U.S. Forest Service sponsors BatFest 2012 PHOTO BY FWC Captain Jack Fishing Tournament is May 26A “ shing tournament to bene“ t the Alligator Point Volunteer Fire Department and the Capital Area Chapter of the American Red Cross will be held Saturday, May 26. First place in the offshore category is $2,000 and for inshore is $1,000. Entry fee is $350 for offshore for four anglers, $30 per additional, and inshore fee is $175 per boat for two anglers. For more information or to register, contact captainjacktournament@gmail.com. A Seminole bat, which likes Spanish moss. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 27 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle FRANKLIN WA KU LLA JEFFE RS ON & TA YLOR GAG GROUPER CATCH MORE FISH FREE LINE WINDINGwith purchase BUY IN BULK & SAVE B B B B B B B B B B Y Y Y UY UY UY Y Y Y U U U U U U UY U U UY Y Y U Y UY I I I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N B UL K B UL K U L U L K UL L K L & S A V E & S A S A V A V E A V E VE VE BUY IN BULK & SAVE Made in USA 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Don’t make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD I hope all the mothers out there had a very special day Sunday celebrating! Whether you had a calm and relaxing day or one “ lled with organized chaos, hopefully at the end of it all of you felt celebrated and loved. This weekend, several members will be headed in two different directions … some out on the water for a training and safety patrol and others to represent the Coast Guard Auxiliary at the 27th Annual Spring Fling Car and Truck Show at the Tallahassee Car Museum. This years event will help to support the Wounded Warriors Program and the USO. A “ tting tribute on Armed Forces Day. Shifting gears, did you know that on average, a boat weighs about 15 pounds per foot (if it is under 25 feet) plus the engine? So an average 20-foot boat will weigh about 3,000 pounds, not including gear and people. The Coast Guard has listed the average weight of an individual to be 185 pounds, adding almost 1,000 extra pounds with “ ve passengers. All of this weight and no breaks! Rule 6 (Navigation Rules from the USCG) dictates that all boats should operate at a safe speed at all times. This is so that she can be able to respond to avoid collisions and be able to stop safely under all circumstances. Several factors help determine what a safe speed should be. As I have already discussed, visibility is critical in determining speed. If you cant see, neither can anyone else, so slow and steady. Any of you who have been out in the channel and on the sand bars when the weather is nice, know, boats can be packed thick. When traf“ c is heavy, monitor your speed and adjust. Just as important, when up in the rivers there are often several “ shing boats. Please be mindful that a large wake can swamp a small “ shing boat, kayak or canoe. While we are typically surrounded by smaller boats, we do also have our share of larger boats. The ability of the driver to maneuver their boat as well as safely stop also affects their speed. A larger boat will take a lot more power to turn and a lot longer to stop. After dusk, lighting has a great effect on safe boating at any speed. We are part of the forgotten coast and light from shore is limited. Boaters should be aware of how a lack of light or a harsh light from another boat can affect your ability to see what is around you. Adjust your speed accordingly. If all of that were not enough, all boaters must be aware of the wind, sea state and current. We have very strong tides in our area and with the wind can get angry waters. While the bay area may be calm, as you enter into the rivers, the waters can get a good chop. There are also several oyster bars that create additional challenges if you venture outside of the channel. Due to our hazards, we have a well-de“ ned channel to accommodate vessels, such as the barges, that need the depth of the water to avoid running aground and need to monitor their speed to avoid leaving the channel and potentially encountering problems. Speed matters, boats have no brakes! Remember, as Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Threat Fish Project. As an important part and learning exercise for our underwater crime scene investigation students, they had to pick and devise a semester project. In a previous column, Gregg Stanton alluded to the fact that it was imperative for the students to “ nish the project, even if unsuccessful in the stated objective. This provided a sharp contrast to the theoretical classroom thinking. Just as in real life, it is pragmatic problems that inhibit clever ideas, and simpler very often is better. An example of a very successful undertaking was the threat “ sh project: We all know, from experience, that throwing food out onto a pond will have “ sh snatch it up very fast … it is free food, after all, so who wouldnt. Making food available in the context of a feeding station,Ž presented under water on a little plate, showed similar behavior. Even in the presence of people, such as swimmers, “ sh will leave their shelter to gobble up the offered delicacies. This was demonstrated and recorded on video in the kiddy pool at the Panama City jetties. Swimmers and kids playing in the chest-deep water all the time at this site, and “ sh got used to people. The “ sh learned that they need to keep their distance from people, but that there is no immediate threat if everyone is careful. A barracuda, on the other hand, poses a signi“ cant danger to the “ sh. But how good are “ sh in recognizing a barracuda threat, and how do they change their behavior? To answer that question, a photo of a barracuda was printed to a size of approximately two feet. The photo was glued onto cardboard, and the whole board was cut to the shape of the barracuda. The whole assembly was laminated to be water proof. Equipped with ” oating foam on top, the BaracudaŽ was tied to weights using thin “ shing line. This created an underwater object the shape and colors of the predator, ” oating mid-water. The threat “ sh was deployed near feeding stations. The results were immediate and drastic … no more “ sh helping themselves to a meal, swimmers present or not. The efforts for this project were minimal … one dollar spent on food for “ sh, and a day spent on the beach. The outcome was clear and signi“ cant, even today we still talk about it. An example for an unsuccessfulŽ project was the corrosion-experiment: How fast do various metals corrode (rust) in a saltwater environment? A collection of metal pipes (copper, steel, galvanized steel) was mounted on a board using cable ties. The assembly was then transported out into the bay by boat, and deployed at a depth of 10 feet. The location was marked using GPS. No marker buoy was deployed due to the fear of theft both of the experiment and the buoy. A month later, the day was spent trying to “ nd the assembly, unsuccessfully. The efforts for the project were quite signi“ cant: a lot of time wasted and money spent for fuel. The message learned was also very clear: The ocean is huge, and lots of things happen in it, making “ nding objects in it like “ nding the needle in a haystack. Corrosion projects may be better done in a tank in a laboratory. Who do you believe actually learned more from their project? Both parties spent a lot of time thinking about their project. In case of the former project, thinking was done in advance, resulting in a successful project outcome. In the case of the later project, thinking was done afterwards in the form of lessons learned.Ž I cant remember who came up with this, so I quote without reference: Good judgment comes from experience, experience comes from bad judgment. Is that not true for life in general?Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament Committee is hoping to build a love for “ shing in young people through the Annual Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament on Saturday, May 19. The event organizers are seeking sponsors for the tournament which is free to children ages 3 to 15. Organizers are hoping for more than 300 girls and boys to come to Woolley Park in Panacea to take part in the event. Festivities begin at 7 a.m. at Port Panacea Marina and later in the day at Woolley Park in Panacea. Sheriff Donnie Crum and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce have helped organize the event for several years. This is a great opportunity for boys and girls to learn something about the sport of “ shing and enjoy an activity that may become a lifelong hobby,Ž said Sheriff Crum. Fishing is something that people can enjoy well into their retirement years.Ž The last tournament fleet boat will leave the dock from Port Panacea Marina at 8:30 a.m. and the weigh-in at Woolley Park will be held from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Lunch will be provided to all participants at Woolley Park from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. Youths not going out on a family boat or with one of the fleet of volunteer captains may fish from any safe location and bring their catch to Woolley Park. The freshwater divisions include: bass, pan “ sh and catfish. Saltwater categories include: white trout, speckled trout, Spanish mackerel, red“ sh, ” ounder and whiting. No grouper, snapper, amberjack, sharks, rays, hard head or sail“ sh will be considered. All anglers will receive a tournament T-shirt at the registration table. Parents or guardians of children must sign a release form before children board a tournament vessel. Children age “ ve to eight must be accompanied by a parent or guardian and they must wear a Coast Guard approved life jacket. Youths will not only receive a T-shirt and lunch, but an opportunity to participate in games and win trophies as well. Prizes will be given away including fishing poles and tackle boxes. As is true with so many volunteer events, organizers are looking for sponsors. Your contribution of $50 or more will help ensure the success of the tournament. The tournament may be cancelled due to poor weather. All donations to support the tournament will be welcomed. Donations may be made to: Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament, P.O. Box 349, Panacea, FL 32346-0349. For more information, call Lt. Billy Jones of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce at (850) 745-7108.Childrens Fishing Tournament is Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday y Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed May 23, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 1:16 AM 3.0 ft. 1:56 AM 3.1 ft. 2:32 AM 3.2 ft. 3:07 AM 3.3 ft. 3:41 AM 3.3 ft. 4:15 AM 3.3 ft. 4:49 AM High 1.5 ft. 6:30 AM 1.5 ft. 7:06 AM 1.5 ft. 7:40 AM 1.4 ft. 8:13 AM 1.4 ft. 8:46 AM 1.4 ft. 9:20 AM 1.4 ft. 9:55 AM Low 3.5 ft. 12:40 PM 3.6 ft. 1:12 PM 3.7 ft. 1:43 PM 3.8 ft. 2:12 PM 3.9 ft. 2:41 PM 3.9 ft. 3:10 PM 3.9 ft. 3:41 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:38 PM 0.0 ft. 8:14 PM -0.1 ft. 8:48 PM -0.2 ft. 9:21 PM -0.2 ft. 9:52 PM -0.2 ft. 10:22 PM -0.2 ft. 10:53 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed May 23, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 1:13 AM 3.1 ft. 1:53 AM 3.2 ft. 2:29 AM 3.3 ft. 3:04 AM 3.3 ft. 3:38 AM 3.4 ft. 4:12 AM 3.4 ft. 4:46 AM High 1.6 ft. 6:27 AM 1.6 ft. 7:03 AM 1.6 ft. 7:37 AM 1.5 ft. 8:10 AM 1.5 ft. 8:43 AM 1.5 ft. 9:17 AM 1.5 ft. 9:52 AM Low 3.5 ft. 12:37 PM 3.7 ft. 1:09 PM 3.8 ft. 1:40 PM 3.9 ft. 2:09 PM 3.9 ft. 2:38 PM 4.0 ft. 3:07 PM 4.0 ft. 3:38 PM High 0.3 ft. 7:35 PM 0.0 ft. 8:11 PM -0.1 ft. 8:45 PM -0.2 ft. 9:18 PM -0.2 ft. 9:49 PM -0.3 ft. 10:19 PM -0.2 ft. 10:50 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed Ma y 23, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 1:52 AM 2.8 ft. 2:32 AM 2.9 ft. 3:08 AM 3.0 ft. 3:43 AM 3.0 ft. 4:17 AM 3.1 ft. 4:51 AM 3.1 ft. 5:25 AM High 1.3 ft. 7:34 AM 1.3 ft. 8:10 AM 1.3 ft. 8:44 AM 1.3 ft. 9:17 AM 1.3 ft. 9:50 AM 1.3 ft. 10:24 AM 1.3 ft. 10:59 AM Low 3.2 ft. 1:16 PM 3.4 ft. 1:48 PM 3.5 ft. 2:19 PM 3.5 ft. 2:48 PM 3.6 ft. 3:17 PM 3.6 ft. 3:46 PM 3.6 ft. 4:17 PM High 0.2 ft. 8:42 PM 0.0 ft. 9:18 PM -0.1 ft. 9:52 PM -0.2 ft. 10:25 PM -0.2 ft. 10:56 PM -0.2 ft. 11:26 PM -0.2 ft. 11:57 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed May 23, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 1:08 AM 2.2 ft. 1:48 AM 2.3 ft. 2:24 AM 2.4 ft. 2:59 AM 2.4 ft. 3:33 AM 2.5 ft. 4:07 AM 2.5 ft. 4:41 AM High 1.1 ft. 6:41 AM 1.1 ft. 7:17 AM 1.1 ft. 7:51 AM 1.0 ft. 8:24 AM 1.0 ft. 8:57 AM 1.0 ft. 9:31 AM 1.0 ft. 10:06 AM Low 2.6 ft. 12:32 PM 2.7 ft. 1:04 PM 2.8 ft. 1:35 PM 2.8 ft. 2:04 PM 2.9 ft. 2:33 PM 2.9 ft. 3:02 PM 2.9 ft. 3:33 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:49 PM 0.0 ft. 8:25 PM -0.1 ft. 8:59 PM -0.1 ft. 9:32 PM -0.2 ft. 10:03 PM -0.2 ft. 10:33 PM -0.2 ft. 11:04 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed May 23, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 1:00 AM 2.3 ft. 1:40 AM 2.4 ft. 2:16 AM 2.5 ft. 2:51 AM 2.5 ft. 3:25 AM 2.6 ft. 3:59 AM 2.6 ft. 4:33 AM High 1.4 ft. 6:09 AM 1.4 ft. 6:45 AM 1.4 ft. 7:19 AM 1.4 ft. 7:52 AM 1.4 ft. 8:25 AM 1.4 ft. 8:59 AM 1.4 ft. 9:34 AM Low 2.7 ft. 12:24 PM 2.8 ft. 12:56 PM 2.9 ft. 1:27 PM 3.0 ft. 1:56 PM 3.0 ft. 2:25 PM 3.0 ft. 2:54 PM 3.0 ft. 3:25 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:17 PM 0.0 ft. 7:53 PM -0.1 ft. 8:27 PM -0.2 ft. 9:00 PM -0.2 ft. 9:31 PM -0.2 ft. 10:01 PM -0.2 ft. 10:32 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed Ma y 23, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 2:00 AM 2.3 ft. 2:58 AM 2.4 ft. 3:45 AM 2.5 ft. 4:25 AM 2.5 ft. 5:01 AM 2.5 ft. 5:34 AM 2.5 ft. 6:06 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:37 AM 1.6 ft. 6:17 AM 1.7 ft. 6:53 AM 1.7 ft. 7:27 AM 1.8 ft. 8:00 AM 1.8 ft. 8:35 AM 1.8 ft. 9:13 AM Low 2.7 ft. 11:35 AM 2.8 ft. 12:00 PM 2.8 ft. 12:28 PM 2.9 ft. 12:58 PM 2.9 ft. 1:32 PM 2.9 ft. 2:09 PM 2.9 ft. 2:49 PM High -0.0 ft. 6:57 PM -0.2 ft. 7:36 PM -0.3 ft. 8:13 PM -0.3 ft. 8:46 PM -0.3 ft. 9:17 PM -0.3 ft. 9:47 PM -0.2 ft. 10:16 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 10 May 16First May 28 Full June 4 Last May 11 New May 20Major Times 11:05 AM 1:05 PM 11:27 PM 1:27 AM Minor Times 4:29 AM 5:29 AM 5:45 PM 6:45 PM Major Times --:---:-11:49 AM 1:49 PM Minor Times 5:03 AM 6:03 AM 6:38 PM 7:38 PM Major Times 12:12 AM 2:12 AM 12:34 PM 2:34 PM Minor Times 5:40 AM 6:40 AM 7:32 PM 8:32 PM Major Times 12:58 AM 2:58 AM 1:21 PM 3:21 PM Minor Times 6:19 AM 7:19 AM 8:24 PM 9:24 PM Major Times 1:45 AM 3:45 AM 2:09 PM 4:09 PM Minor Times 7:03 AM 8:03 AM 9:15 PM 10:15 PM Major Times 2:34 AM 4:34 AM 2:59 PM 4:59 PM Minor Times 7:51 AM 8:51 AM 10:04 PM 11:04 PM Major Times 3:23 AM 5:23 AM 3:48 PM 5:48 PM Minor Times 8:41 AM 9:41 AM 10:50 PM 11:50 PM Good Better Better Best Best++ Better Good6:42 am 8:25 pm 4:29 am 5:46 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:41 am 8:26 pm 5:04 am 6:39 pm 6:41 am 8:26 pm 5:40 am 7:32 pm 6:40 am 8:27 pm 6:20 am 8:25 pm 6:40 am 8:27 pm 7:04 am 9:16 pm 6:39 am 8:28 pm 7:51 am 10:05 pm 6:39 am 8:29 pm 8:42 am 10:51 pm22% 16% 10% 4% 2% 8% 14% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum and Undersheriff Maurice Langston recognized “ ve deserving individuals who have made outstanding contributions to law enforcement on Monday, May 14 as part of Public Safety Appreciation Day. Detective Nick Boutwell was named the 2012 Law Enforcement Officer of the Year, Lt. Lindsay Maxwell was named Detention Deputy of the Year, Of“ cer Lucy Gowdy was named Communications Of“ cer of the Year, Johnny B. Ross was named Outstanding Citizen in Support of Law Enforcement and Chaplain Dallas Gray was named the Outstanding Volunteer of the Year. € Detective Nick Boutwell is assigned to the Property Crimes section of the sheriffs of“ ce. Detective Boutwell was born in Tallahassee but has lived his entire life in Wakulla County. He attended Shadeville Elementary and Crawfordville Elementary schools, Wakulla Middle School and graduated from Wakulla High School in 2002. Detective Boutwell graduated from North Florida Community College with a certi“ cate in Criminal Justice in 2004 He is attending Saint Leo University part-time studying Criminal Justice. He saw an opportunity to give back to his community and decided to give law enforcement a try. As a deputy, he saw an opportunity to improve the quality of life in the county. His favorite part of the job is solving cases where there appear to be no suspects, recovering and returning stolen property to the proper owner and putting a smile on a childs face. Detective Boutwell remembered helping a young girl who had recently lost her dog. He was able to share a stuffed animal with the young child and bring a smile to her face. I love the interaction with the community,Ž he said. Boutwell was a member of the Wakulla County SWAT Team and is designated as a Special Deputy by the U.S. Marshals of“ ce. He worked his way up from Correctional Of“ cer in 2003 to deputy sheriff in 2004 and detective in 2007. He has served on the Vice and Property Crimes squad since becoming a detective. A lifelong Wakulla County resident, he married the former Amber Cudihy of Marietta, Ga. in December 2006. The couple has two young daughters, Leah and Emma. When he isnt working he enjoys outdoor activities including hunting and “ shing, golf and bicycling. He is a former high school athlete who played football and baseball. I have watched Nick as he has grown from the jail to road patrol deputy to detective,Ž said Sheriff Donnie Crum. He is a tremendously caring and thorough deputy and investigator. Wakulla County is fortunate to have someone like Nick.Ž € Lt. Lindsay Maxwell discovered Wakulla County when she was a student at Florida State University. The Miami native graduated in 2005 with degrees in Criminal Justice and Social Work. She began working at the WCSO in 2006 as a Correctional Of“ cer Assistant. She became certi“ ed as a correctional of“ cer at the Corrections Academy in Madison. Maxwell has worked all over the jail during her employment and her areas of concern now include accreditation, detention training and evaluation in the jail, food service, medical and inmate transportation. During her time in the jail she has been promoted to sergeant and lieutenant. I wasnt expecting it,Ž she said. I love my job. I love the challenges and the coordination required between everybody back there (in the jail). She serves as a liaison between the WCSO and Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and has been working with the contract employees who are in charge of the medical operation, as the new employees balance the inmate medical needs with security concerns. She recently married Transportation Detention Deputy Jansen Maxwell and mains strong ties to her FSU Seminole roots. Without a doubt, Lindsay is the “ nest corrections deputy I have met,Ž said the sheriff. She has done it at such a young age and has shown a tremendous amount of maturity. It is exciting to watch Lindsay grow and think about what she may become in our department.Ž € Correctional Of“ cer Lucy Gowdy called the award an unexpected honor.Ž She grew up in Wakulla County and graduated from Wakulla High School in 1989. She is one of three sisters and three brothers, although one of her brothers has passed away. After serving as the WHS senior class secretary she graduated from Tallahassee Community College with an AA in Criminal Justice. She is attending ITT Technical to receive a Bachelors degree in Criminal Justice. The daughter of Duane Gowdy and Cynthia McDonald, she has worked at the WCSO for 12 years in several divisions. She began working in the E-911 Division before working in the Purchasing of“ ce. She has spent time working in corrections and has the most time serving in the Communications division. I love it,Ž she said of her communications duties. I love working in the Communications Division helping people in the community. I take a great deal of pride in that. You never know what kind of a call you are going to get. You learn to expect the unexpected.Ž She believes in making sure it is safety “ rstŽ as she keeps all public safety of“ cers safe so they can go home to their families at the end of each shift. There is something special about knowing that public safety of“ cers lives are in your hands,Ž she added. I love working with the other dispatchers. We depend on each other.Ž Lucy is a very caring individual,Ž said the sheriff. She has had to step up to the plate and continues to step up to the plate and help with tragedy within her family. She is a tremendous asset to the sheriffs of“ ce. When I call the sheriffs of“ ce and Lucy answers, I know everything will be okay.Ž € Chaplain Dallas Gray was selected as the Volunteer of the Year. Chaplain Gray has served as a Wakulla County Detention Services Volunteer for more years than the Volunteer Service Program has been recognized by the sheriffs office. Gray provides spiritual leadership for as many as 350 inmates in the jail as well as the rest of the law enforcement and WCSO staff. Chaplain Gray has been assigned to provide comfort at crime scenes or notify family members of the death of loved ones. His spiritual guidance has assisted familys get their lives back together following suicides and to parents who have lost children. He has spent time riding with deputies during their patrol shifts and has discussed dietary needs and restrictions with inmates of various faiths. I understand the importance of being available to help deputies who have been affected emotionally by what they have seen during their time in the field,Ž said Chaplain Gray. The greatest impact a chaplain can make is to understand the type of emotions of“ cers go through and build up that level of con“ dence that allows them to open up their lives. It is ful“ lling to sit down with of“ cers and build that level of con“ dence with them for them to open up their life to you. I truly feel like God has called me to do this work.Ž I enjoy doing it,Ž he said. It is very ful“ lling. We do see great tragedies. It will mess you up if you are not prepared by the Lord.Ž When I think of Dallas Gray I think of someone like Emmett Whaley, one of the “ nest preachers I have known,Ž said Sheriff Crum. Dallas is in that category. He is a great Christian. He doesnt get paid a penny to do it, but he is a tremendously caring person.Ž € Johnny B. Ross Jr. was selected as the Citizen of the Year in Support of Law Enforcement. Ross, of Crawfordville, was at a Medart convenience store in March when he discovered that a Canadian tourist left his wallet with cash and valuables as he was getting gas. Ross turned the wallet and fanny pack in to the sheriffs of“ ce and the property was returned to the owner. The Canadian and friends from Quebec met with Sheriff Crum at the sheriffs of“ ce and thanked law enforcement and Ross for being helpful, kind and honest. A Wakulla County native, Ross works as a handyman and has been helped professionally by Sheriff Crum. Ross, who was raised in Sopchoppy, and his wife Belinda have three children. I was very surprised and honored when Sheriff Crum recognized me,Ž he said. It started off with me just trying to do the right thing.Ž Ross was raised by the late Charlotte Rosier and the late Johnny B. Ross, Sr. I give them credit for how things have worked out.Ž Friends saw the newspaper coverage of Ross being recognized by the sheriff for his kind act and many have taken the time to congratulate Ross and shake his hand. I didnt do it for the publicity,Ž he said. I just wanted to do the right thing. Ive been blessed.Ž For Sheriff Crum the change in Ross over the years he has known him has been remarkable. He is an outstanding individual,Ž said the sheriff. I have seen the growth in him and seen him go from negative to positive. He has overcome challenges and is proof that you can get knocked down and you can get back up.Ž The Public Safety Day program was sponsored by A.J. Smith and catered by Poseys. The event is sponsored by the Coastal Optimist Club. Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSt. Marks Post Of“ ce is one of more than 10,000 post of“ ces that will see a reduction in retail hours. The post of“ ce will decrease its retail hours from eight hours a day to just four. Customers will still have the same access to the retail lobby and PO boxes. The U.S. Postal Service announced the new plan on May 9 which will allow the small, rural post of“ ces to remain open. In July 2011, the Postal Service announced that nearly 3,700 post of“ ces out of 31,000 would be studied for possible closure. This is because the post of“ ce has continued to lose money. The year to date net loss for the postal service is $6.5 billion. It was $2.6 billion this same time last year. This plan is expected to save the postal service half a billion dollars annually. The new plan will be implemented over a two-year, multi-phased approach and would not be completed until September 2014, according to the postal service. It is not known when the changes will take place for St. Marks. In 2010, there was a scare that the post of“ ce would close. At that time, the postal service was leasing the building from realtor Debbie Kosec. Kosec needed to sell the building and when she told the postal service, they informed her they had no intention of relocating and the post of“ ce would simply close. In hearing this, City Commissioner Allen Hobbs and his wife, Ruthie, decided to purchase the building. Kosec spoke with representatives from the USPS who agreed to renew their lease until 2022. The current lease at that time ended in 2012.St. Marks Post Of ce will reduce hours Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Correctional Of“ cers received con“ dential information Thursday, May 10 regarding an inmate who was smuggling tobacco into the Wakulla County Jail, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Information was received that trustee inmate Andrew Michael White, 24, of Crawfordville was bringing tobacco into the jail following roadside trash pickup assignments and storing it in his locker under his bunk. A search was conducted of the inmates bunk and locker area and contraband was discovered by Lt. Scott Barwick. Inmate White was confronted by Correctional Of“ cer Jeff Carroll who discovered salvaged tobacco products in Whites boot. Cigars “ lled with cigarette tobacco were con“ scated. They had been placed inside a hole in the boot. Lt. Barwick determined that the inmate had been bringing the tobacco into the facility for approximately one month and trading it with other inmates for canteen items. Smuggling contraband into a detention facility is a third degree felony. Deputy Billy Metcalf and Correctional Officer Anthony Paul also investigated.Trustee arrested for contraband in jail WCSOAndrew Michael White The Wakulla County Sheriff’s Office raised $3,000 for the Wakulla Special Olympics Program last week during a Tip A Cop fundraiser at Posey’s Restaurant in Panacea. On Friday, May 11, Undersheriff Maurice Langston was the guest speaker at the Special Olympics Awards Banquet and presented the check on behalf of Sheriff Donnie Crum. Guests at Posey’s donated to the Special Olympics as law enforcement officers waited tables at lunch and dinner Friday, May 4. Six Special Olympic athletes will be going to Orlando to compete at Disney’s ESPN Wide World of Sports complex. Wakulla High School Special Olympians will compete in track and eld events and Bocce. The banquet included all grade levels of Special Olympic athletes and those who support them. Overall, the district has 120 to 140 student athletes involved in the program. “The Special Olympics teaches the world a lesson and the lesson is simply this, you can turn a disability into a possibility,” said Undersheriff Langston. “These young people have taken a disability and turned it into ability. If you’re an underdog, mentally disabled, physically disabled, if you don’t fit into all circles, if you are not as pretty as others, you can still be a hero. Many of my heroes are in this room today.” Accepting the check on behalf of the school district was Superintendent David Miller, Special Olympics sponsors Sharon Scherbarth and Patricia Bodiford and the athletes who will be traveling to Orlando for the State Special Olympic Games on May 18.Tip A Cop raises $3,000Public Safety Day honorees are recognized WCSOCapt. Larry Massa, who is President of the Coastal Optimist Club, Johnny B. Ross Jr., Of“ cer Lucy Gowdy, Sheriff Donnie Crum, Lt. Lindsay Maxwell, Undersheriff Maurice Langston, Detective Nick Boutwell, and Chaplain Dallas Gray.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn May 6, Chalmer Lamar Mahone, 24, of Tallahassee and Dane Marshall Land, 22, of Woodville were arrested for narcotics violations after Detective Nick Boutwell and Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a complaint of a vehicle racing down Stokley Road in Crawfordville. The law enforcement officials conducted a traf“ c stop on Whiddon Lake Road and discovered that Mahone was operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license with knowledge. Narcotics were reportedly discovered inside the vehicle including some that tested positive for cocaine, and marijuana that was bagged for sale. The marijuana seized from the vehicle weighed 6.5 grams. Marijuana weighing 3.5 grams was allegedly discovered on Mahone as he was searched at the Wakulla County Jail. A tiny amount of cocaine was also observed in the vehicle. Mahone was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge; possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana; introduction of contraband into a detention facility; and possession of drug paraphernalia. Land was charged with possession of marijuana with intent to sell; possession of cocaine and possession of drug paraphernalia. In other activity reported this week by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce: € On May 3, Sherry Dudley of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone defaced a Blue Water Realty Group advertisement sign at a bus stop at 1700 Crawfordville Highway. Damage was estimated at $500. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On May 3, a concerned citizen at the Sopchoppy Express Lane found a lost wallet near the store bathrooms. James Brauer of Fort Myers was determined to be the owner and he was contacted. The wallet and contents were sent to the victim by mail per his request. Detective Matt Helms investigated. € On May 3, Gregory Wright of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. Someone drove onto the victims property, tore up the yard with a vehicle and damaged his mailbox. The mailbox damage was estimated at $10. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On May 3, Sherry ODell of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A wooden fence surrounding the victims swimming pool was damaged. The pump and skimmer were also turned off. Damage is estimated at $75. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On May 3, Walter Connors of Panacea reported a theft. A Navy flag and “ berglass pole were stolen from his condominium. The property is valued at $225. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. € On May 4, Joshua Roddenberry of Crawfordville reported a lost wallet. The victim lost the wallet at an area convenience store. The wallet and contents are valued at $240. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. € On May 4, Sherry Wells of Jacksonville reported a criminal mischief in Panacea. Someone removed four screens from the rear of her residence. Damage was estimated at $80. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On May 4, William Anderson of Panacea reported a business burglary in Panacea. Someone entered the building and stole copper tubing and wiring from the building. The suspects cut their way through a chain link fence and cut a hole in the building. Air conditioning units were damaged while being dismantled. The copper was valued at $500 and damage to the fence and building was estimated at $1,600. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On May 4, Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated a traf“ c accident in Crawfordville. Krissia C. Lawhon of Sopchoppy was stopped at the Wakulla Arran Road traf“ c light at U.S. Highway 319. When the green arrow was illuminated, she began to make a turn toward the south and was struck by a vehicle going northbound on U.S. Highway 319. Armando Lara of Crawfordville struck Lawhons Chevrolet Suburban with a Nissan Frontier. Damage to the Lawhon vehicle was estimated at $2,500 and damage to the Lara vehicle was estimated at $3,500. A witness observed Lara talking on a cellular telephone as he entered the intersection. Lara was found at fault in the accident. There were no injuries to Lawhon, Lara, or two young children in the Lawhon vehicle. € On May 4, Deputy Rachel Oliver responded to Magnolia Ridge in reference to trespassers possibly stealing electricity from an abandoned residence. The inside of the residence had extensive damage to the drywall, mirrors and doors. Damage to the residence was estimated between $15,000 and $20,000. A suspect has been identified and drug paraphernalia was seized from the location. € On May 4, Annette M. Taylor of Crawfordville was involved in a single vehicle accident on Alexander Road in Crawfordville. Taylor was northbound on the road when she observed an animal in the road and swerved to miss it. She lost control of her Dodge, ran off the road and struck a tree. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $20,000. It appeared the vehicle hit the tree and rolled over, landing in the upright position. Wakulla EMS administered medical assistance at the scene. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On May 5, Patricia Weeks of Crawfordville reported a structure fire. Wakulla County Fire“ ghters arrived on the scene and extinguished the blaze. Weeks heard an explosion and observed the shed on “ re. The shed owner, Lee Walker, was out of town at the time of the “ re. He estimated the value of the shed and contents at $5,000. No foul play was observed. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € On May 5, Julia Runyan of Panacea reported a hit and run accident at Coyotes Bar and Grill in Panacea. Witnesses observed an unknown driver strike the victims parked vehicle and leave without leaving any information. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. € On May 6, Debra Sparks of Crawfordville reported a trespass on Riversink Road in Crawfordville. Sparks owns property that borders state land that contains a sinkhole. The property is marked as private property but individuals still use it to access the sinkhole. Garbage was reported scattered on the victims property. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. € On May 6, Deputy Rachel Oliver responded to a “ ght at the Spring Creek Highway Stop N Save. Four subjects were engaged in a parking lot altercation and a large crowd gathered to watch. Deputy Oliver subdued one aggressive “ ghter with her Taser. Three of the subjects ceased “ ghting and sat on the pavement while a fourth subject ran behind the store. The altercation began inside the store and spilled into the parking area. Matthew Ryan Costigan, 28, of Tallahassee, Michael Vincent Costigan, 25, of Crawfordville and Marc Bentley Massey, 25, of Woodville were arrested for one count each of disorderly intoxication and one count each of public affray. All of the subjects refused EMS treatment. Lt. Jimmy Sessor removed the Taser probes from Massey. Lucas James Porter, 28, of Crawfordville contacted law enforcement later and reported that he was also part of the altercation. He was arrested for public affray and disorderly intoxication. All four men were transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. € On May 7, Clara Thomas of Panacea reported a grand theft. Jewelry, valued at $7,300, was reported missing from the victims residence. Persons of interest were identi“ ed. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On May 7, Warren Musselwhite of Lamont reported a residential burglary in St. Marks. Someone damaged the front door of the residence. Inside the home, kitchen cabinet doors were all open. Damage to the home was estimated at $100. Nothing was reported missing. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 7, Roy Ivester of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone damaged the victims mailbox post. Damage was estimated at $20. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 7, Jeffrey Tucker of Panacea reported a business burglary at Wilson Ice House in Panacea. Copper electrical wiring and copper tubing were stolen from the business. A subject cut a hole in a fence to access the building. The stolen items are valued at $2,000 and damage to the business is estimated at $10,000. Detective Derek Lawhon and CSI Rae Eddens investigated. € On May 8, Harold Lee Walker, 56, of Tallahassee was arrested for DUI in Crawfordville. Deputy Mike Zimba observed Walker traveling at him on U.S. Highway 319 at a high rate of speed. The vehicle veered into the deputys lane and forced him to drive into the ditch to avoid a head -on collision. Walker was reportedly clocked at 72 miles per hour in a 45 mile per hour zone and was described as blatant in running the red light at Wal-Mart, traveling more than 60 miles per hour. Deputy Zimba conducted a traf“ c stop and conducted “ eld sobriety exercises which the suspect failed. Walker gave breath samples that registered over the legal limit. He was also issued a Uniform Traf“ c Citation for running the red light. Deputy Nick Gray also investigated. € On May 8, Natalie Revel of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her mailbox. The box was discovered 15 feet from the pole and damage was estimated at $25. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On May 8, Amanda Jones of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Jewelry, electronic games, a television, “ rearm and a computer, valued at $9,600, were stolen from the home. A forced entry was discovered and damage to the home was estimated at $1,100. Deputy Taff Stokley, Lt. Brent Sanders, Lt. Mike Kemp and Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. € On May 8, Debra Sparks of Tallahassee reported a theft at her Riversink Road property in Crawfordville. The victim is having difficulty with individuals trespassing on her property to gain access to a sinkhole. A camera was placed on the property to reduce damage to her fence and property. But the camera, valued at $150, was reported stolen. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 8, Jane Gregory of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tire from a relatives property. The tire is valued at $150. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On May 8, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a two-vehicle crash at the intersection of Highway 267 and Highway 365. Richard Westberry was attempting to make a left hand turn onto Highway 267 from Highway 365 with a Dodge Dakota but did not see Martin Wolf of Alligator Point driving westbound and crashed into the Ford Focus. Both vehicles suffered $5,000 worth of damage and Westberry was found at fault for failure to yield. There were no injuries to Westberry, Wolf or passenger Ursula Wolf. € On May 8, a 16-year-old Crawfordville boy reported the theft of a cellular telephone from his football locker. The phone is valued at $800. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On May 9, Beatrice Rucker of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Rucker and Leroy Carlton Ferrell, 57, of Tallahassee, became involved in a verbal dispute over a cellular telephone bill and Ferrell threw a beer bottle at the front window of Ruckers home. The bottle smashed both panes of a double pane window creating approximately $250 worth of damage. Ferrell was arrested for criminal mischief and disorderly intoxication. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On May 8, Clarice Sanders of Sopchoppy reported a forgery as a suspect, who has been identi“ ed, forged signatures on three checks and cashed them in Crawfordville. The checks, valued at $1,398, were from a business in Sopchoppy. Capt. Chris Savary and Detective Matt Helms investigated. € On May 9, Deloris Causseaux of Crawfordville reported the theft of a terrier puppy from her home. The victim returned home to “ nd her gate open and the dog missing. It is valued at $200. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On May 9, Jeffery Young of Crawfordville reported the theft of currency and cash from his home. A suspect, who has been identi“ ed, took cash and a bicycle to go to the store, but never returned. The bike and cash is valued at $170. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On May 9, Mary Miller of Crawfordville reported the theft of jewelry from a relatives home. The jewelry was valued at $1,000. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 809 calls for service during the past week. At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 19th Hole Wildwood Golf Club Coastal Highway – Crawfordville, FL Come enjoy a honey tasting and special “honey drink” while learning about these important pollinators. 19th Hole Wildwood Golf Club Coastal Highway – Crawfordville, FL Come enjoy a honey tasting and special “honey drink” while learning about these important pollinators. PLEASE JOIN Keep Wakulla County Beautiful PLEASE JOIN Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Special Guest Speakers Bob Livingston, Apalachee Beekeepers Association Sherri Kraeft, UF/IFAS Wakulla County 4-H Special Guest Speakers Bob Livingston, Apalachee Beekeepers Association Sherri Kraeft, UF/IFAS Wakulla County 4-H “Green Drinks” Tuesday, May 22 at 6:30pm “Bees and Their Importance” “Green Drinks” Tuesday, May 22 at 6:30pm “Bees and Their Importance” For our monthly For our monthly RSVP to helpkwcb@gmail.com RSVP to helpkwcb@gmail.com We add an important bene“t to our free debit cards. Instant. The bene“t of our free instant-issue debit card is that you can get it today and use it today. Its that easy. And with Centennial Bank, you can also use any ATM in the country, free*. Any ATM at all. Just a few more ways we offer banking that comes to you.*Some restrictions may apply. See bank for details. Fire ghters compete in FirematicsBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsWakulla County “ re“ ghters reported to Hudson Park Saturday, May 12 without a “ re in sight. Crawfordville drivers passing by the park may have been surprised to see “ re“ ghters out“ tted in full gear racing around to blast water from heavy hoses as their “ re trucks sat nearby … no lights ” ashing, no alarms sounding. The event was a countywide “ rematics competition in which local volunteer and professional “ re“ ghters teamed up to compete in timed exercises „ the busted hose drill, the section race, the hose roll relay and the barrel roll. Ian Brazier, organizer of the competition, noted that it has been nearly 20 years since the last competition, but said, Its important to see how well our “ re“ ghters are trained, the amount of time we put in to keep the community safe.Ž With 11 “ re stations in the county, Brazier acknowledged a need for department uni“ cation. Any interested “ re“ ghters put their names in a hat which was drawn from to decide the teams for the competition. In this way, stations didnt compete against each other, but worked alongside one another. Allen Harvey Sr., the “ rst volunteer “ re chief of the Crawfordville station, and the first organizer of the event for Wakulla County, said he “ rst saw the competition at a state Firemens Association gathering and decided it could be a great bene“ t to the “ re“ ghters of Wakulla County. Its about skills enhancement, improvement, and it builds up a lot of morale,Ž said Harvey. Also represented at the event was the Wakulla County Explorers Program, started in 2009 for high school students who show an interest in “ re“ ghting. The explorers meet two times monthly for training and instruction. This gives kids an opportunity to learn about being a “ re“ ghter,Ž said Michael Meaney, an assistant counselor for the program. We treat the explorers like they are “ re“ ghters. They learn leadership skills, discipline and theyre expected to meet goals. They learn lessons that they can apply at home and take to school. The explorers are trained as “ rst responders and receive CPR certi“ cation free of charge, in a curriculum that starts them off ahead in their goal of becoming “ re“ ghters,Ž said Meaney. Ethan Trumbull, an eighth grader and the youngest member of the explorers, comes from a family of “ re“ ghters, and wants to be an Army “ re“ ghter, himself. I started at the earliest age,Ž said Trumbull, I want to carry on the dream.Ž Another Explorer, 11th grader David Moss was inspired to be a firefighter as a “ fth grader, when he observed the events of Sept. 11. If Im brave and strong, I know I can push through it.Ž The desire to help others was a key reason for Trey Taylor to join the Volunteer Fire Department at the age of 18. Its important … being there for people when theyre at their worst,Ž he said. If we can help to contain the “ re, save just one room. Its important.Ž The seriousness of the work was tempered by the festivity of the event. Hamburgers and hot dogs were sold, a shotgun raf” e took place, and a chance for kids to see the “ re trucks and hoses rounded out the event. All proceeds will go to the Explorers program,Ž said Bill Russell, president of the Wakulla County United Fire“ ghters Association and “ re chief for the Ochlockonee Bay station. A competition like this also allows different stations around the County to have a little fun,Ž said Meaney. The team of Mike Meaney (volunteer from station 8, Crawfordville), Jerry Johnson (career “ re“ ghter from station 12, Crawfordville), Jeff Cybulski (volunteer from station 4, Apalachee Bay) and Danny Aaron (volunteer from station 6, Panacea) won the Busted Hose Drill, the Section Race and the Barrell Roll. They were also our overall Firematics Champions for 2012. The team of Trey Taylor (volunteer from station 8, Crawfordville), Eric Wells (volunteer from station 6, Panacea), Andy Bowman (volunteer from station 8, Crawfordville) and Ian Brazier (volunteer from station 8, Crawfordville) won the Hose Roll Relay.Firematics results:Eric Wells, Andy Bowman, Trey Taylor and Ian Brazier get ready to beat the heat. Jessi Embleton shares a high-“ ve with her son, Payton Embleton. Wakulla County Explorers, showing off skills learned in “ re“ ghter training.PHOTOS BY LUCY CARTER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS More photos online at thewakullanews.com

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& Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn 1990, a creative program began at Shands at the University of Florida called Arts in Medicine. A group of physicians and nurses started the project to see if a collaboration with local artists might help reduce the stress of hospitalization. The programs focused on visual, literacy, musical and performance arts. They began to see the healing power of the arts. In 2008, this program expanded to rural communities, thanks to funding provided by the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment of the Arts. Franklin County was the “ rst to implement the program. Now, eight communities have an Arts in Healthcare program, including Wakulla County. Healing Arts of Wakulla County launched in December of last year at a community event to inform residents of this unique opportunity. HAWC is a joint effort of the Health Care Task Force, NAMI Wakulla, Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and the Palaver Tree Theater Co. Wakulla County faces challenges with the program because it is the only community without a hospital that was chosen to participate. Members of HAWC must come up with innovative and unique ideas that involve the arts and promote health and well-being for all residents of Wakulla County. Gail Campbell, executive director of HAWC, said Franklin County approached the coalition for youth about pursuing the program for Wakulla County. She said they understood arts as a healing force and it seems those members of HAWC agree. The program is still in the early stages in Wakulla County, but Campbell said the hope is for HAWC to turn into a true arts alliance. The group is made up of Campbell, President Herb Donaldson, President-elect Grace Keith of the health department and Secretary Rick Jackley of Ribits Ceramic Studio. Other members include artist Paul Fortier, County Commissioner Lynn Artz, Tamara Byrnes of the Senior Center, Jimmie Doyle of NAMI, Sherri Kraeft of the extension of“ ce and Greg Jackson of G-Signs. The team is currently working on its organizational structure and strategic plan. Campbell said a solid foundation is needed for the program to be successful, as well as community buy-in. HAWC will grow wings and ” y,Ž Campbell said. The nine-member board will be the driving force, she said, but they also will partner with local artists, healthcare providers and instructors. There are several projects that are in the developing stages or already started. Nancy Jefferson and Haydee Jackley have brought enhanced art programming to Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center, which includes painting and pinch pottery. Those who participate in the program are asked to “ ll out an evaluation form so HAWC knows how the artists are performing. So far, Campbell said, the evaluations have been good. This program will eventually also be offered at the Senior Center. Another program that focuses on senior citizens is the Senior Stories Multimedia Project at Eden Springs. Fortier and his family are leading the project, which takes the persons life story and in” uences based on several interviews with them and creates multimedia web presentations that include portrait paintings, presentations with animation and music, matted prints of the painting and website. One life story is almost complete. Fortier said he expects to “ nish the painting by mid-May and then he and his son will begin working on the animated sequences. While they are working on this story, Fortiers wife and two daughters will start interviewing two other Eden Springs residents. Great care will be taken during the course of this project to develop engaging presentations that highlight the individuality of each subject and showcase each residents unique approach to lifes challenges,Ž Fortier said. In the end, the project will be given to the family as a gift. Fortier also plans to contact Big Bend Hospice. A project that has yet to launch is the Empty Bowl Project by Haydee Jackley of Ribits Ceramic Studio. The idea is that artists and people in the community will create handcrafted bowls. Then a fundraiser will held where guests are invited to purchase a simple meal of soup and bread. Guests will keep the bowl as a reminder of all the empty bowls in the world. All proceeds will be donated to the local food pantries. Continued on Page 4B Healing Arts of WakullaBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsFor two days in February a few members of HAWC, Healing Arts of Wakulla County, were invited to attend the Arts in Healthcare for Rural Communities Training Program in Franklin County. Those in attendance from our area were Haydee and Rick Jackley of Ribits Ceramics, Tamara Byrnes of the Wakulla County Senior Center, Gail Campbell, who began as the initial point person for HAWC, and me, representing Palaver Tree Theater. The goal of the training session was to introduce participants to the broader concept of arts in medicine, and to either inspire, or initiate, health and wellbeing programs in their communities. Jill Sonke, director of the UF Center for Arts in Medicine, coordinates rural training program initiatives for nine counties throughout Florida. “It’s a delight,” said Sonke. “I get to learn so much about communities in general. The diversity of each location, their issues and health disparities, along with the way people live and the challenges they face.” For HAWC, one of those challenges is guring out what type of community roadmap it wishes to create. In order to do this it must search out what the community itself is lacking. In short, it must target the needs. And like any target, the needs will always be moving. Obesity, smoking, depression, mental health concerns, diabetes, disease prevention, nutrition, teen pregnancy, substance abuse and all that comes with the aging process – are real issues for many in Wakulla County. Though there are organizations that may address these things individually, their resources are limited. Continued on Page 3BPAUL FORTIER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA work in progress by artist Paul Fortier as part of his Senior Stories project, in collaboration with HAWC.Group looks at innovative ways to use arts to promote health A look at the training for arts in medicine received by local volunteers

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, May 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, May 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY, R. Don McLeod Chapter, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. For more information, call Louise Thomas at 962-1945.C Sunday, May 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, May 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, May 22  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, May 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Special EventsThursday, May 17  BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS BANQUET will be held by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce at 6:30 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. The guest speaker will be Herb Donaldson, artistic director for the Palaver Tree Theater Co. and president of Healing Arts of Wakulla County. Dinner will also be served. Reservations are due by May 14 at 3 p.m. Call 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com. Friday, May 18  IN BITS AND PIECES, a documentary night, will be held beginning at 5 p.m. at the library. “Crossing Over: How Roots Captivated An Entire Nation,” followed by “Shirley Chisholm ’72.” Go on the road with Shirley Chisholm as she embarks on a journey to become president of the United States, and ending with “The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975.” During the rise of the Black Power Movement, Swedish TV journalists documented an unfolding cultural revolution for their audiences back home.  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING will be held for Anytime Fitness, which is under new ownership, MEA Fitness, LLC, at 2 p.m. They are located at 10 Preston Circle, Crawfordville.  SABAL will be performing at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Musicians, singers and songwriters, Fred Figueroa, Kevan McCann, Carly Bak and Craig Daniel Hardin, blend their styles into a harmonious ensemble of original swampy Americana. Bak, with her gutsy and bluesy vocals, is a talented songwriter. Figueroa is on the harmonica, guitar and vocals. McCann, nicknamed “Mr. Smooth,” performs dulcet bass rhythms, and Hardin adds a rooted, current sound bringing a consciousness to the musical blend. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $12.50. Saturday, May 19  MAY 20TH CELEBRATION will be held from noon to 4 p.m. at the grounds of the Old Buckhorn School, Mount Trial Church. Planting of the ‘May Pole’, cakewalks, threelegged races, music, food, softball games, free clothing giveaway, Buckhorn Cemetery tour, information on how to research your family tree and more.  WAKULLA SPRINGS 5K RUN AND 1-MILE FUN RUN will be held by the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park at Wakulla Springs State Park. Packet pickup and race day registration will begin at 7 a.m. The 1 Mile Fun Run will begin at 8 a.m., followed by the 5K run at 8:30 a.m. To register online, visit www.raceit.com. For more information, contact Trudy Thompson at (850) 962-2064.  YARD SALE/BAKE SALE FUNDRAISER will be held for the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department at the Shell Point Fire House on from 8 a.m. to noon. The Shell Point Fire House is located on Shell Point Road (on the right as you enter the community of Shell Point Beach.) For questions or to donate items, contact Marion Russ at 926-9023 or on Facebook at Marion Watson Russ.  CHILDREN’S FISHING TOURNAMENT will be held at Port Panacea Marina, Woolley Park, from 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. The last boat will leave at 8:30 a.m. Weigh in will be between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. The tournament is free and open to children 3 to 15 years old. Lunch will be provided for all participants. There will be games, rides and exhibitions from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, contact Larry Massa at 745-7100. Sunday, May 20  BAT FEST 2012 will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 1 to 5 p.m. This is an opportunity for the public to connect with wildlife biologists from across the Southeast and learn about bats, bat biology and conservation. This event is free to the public and is presented by the Florida Bat Working Group in conjunction with the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network 2012 Bat Blitz. There will be crafts, demonstrations, youth conservation talk, a guest speaker and more. Park admission fees apply. Upcoming Events Saturday, May 26  SHOWING OF “ROOTS” Episodes 5 and 6 at the library at 1 p.m.  SOPCHOPPY OPRY presents Southbound Band with special guest Shepherd Creek at 7 p.m. This is a special Memorial Day show. The cost is $10. Call 962-3711 for more information. Thursday, May 31  PROJECT GRADUATION will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. The event is free to all Wakulla High School seniors. Students will have access to the lodge, swimming area, boat rides, food and entertainment. There will also be gift drawings. Friday, June 1  WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION CEREMONY will be held at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Field at J. D. Jones Stadium. Saturday, June 2  MOTORCYCLE POKER RUN “CARDS FOR CARING” will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Capital City Harley Davidson, 1745 Capital Circle NW, Tallahassee. Registration is $15 per bike and $10 for a passenger. The best hand wins $250. For more information call Peggy at 926-5037 or Susan at 519-2292.  GARAGE SALE to bene t the League of Women Voters and its programs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1357 Martin Luther King Road. Sunday, June 3  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Barbara Hines, outreach coordinator for the North Central Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network as she presents “A Sticky Situation: The Naval Stores Industry in North Florida” at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The naval stores industry once dominated vast segments of Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and surrounding counties, including large areas of the St. Marks Refuge. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for information. Saturday, June 16  GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, “The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay” (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Chamber Business Excellence Awards at 6:30 p.m. at the Senior Center. Documentary night at the library at 5 p.m. May 20 Celebration from noon to 4 p.m. at Mount Trial Church. BatFest at Wakulla Springs State Park from 1 to 5 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorSummer Program Information By the time youre reading this hopefully your child has bought home our brochure about our Summer Program of Events at the library. Sponsored annually by the Friends of the Library, this program is probably the most popular thing that we do at the library. This summer, well have reading programs from birth through eighth grades, performers weekly, “ eld trips. This year, we plan to end the summer with our “ rst talent show so that the children who participate in our program can show off their great talents, whatever they may be! Registration will be held on Thursday, June 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. and Friday, June 8 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. with myself and Molly Clore (who will be our interim childrens coordinator this summer while Leilania is on maternity leave) will be on hand to answer any questions and get what we hope to be a record number of children signed up for all the fun this summer. A bouncy house will be on hand for the children to play on while mom and dad get them signed up. If you have any questions or comments dont hesitate to give us a call at 926-7415. Summer Reading Books We have multiple copies of every book on the Wakulla High Summer Reading List and should have copies of the Sunshine State Reading list books in late next week. As we do every year, we strongly encourage parents and students to either check out or get yourself on the hold list for these books early. As the summer goes by the waiting list only gets longer and we wont be able to guarantee that some copies will be available before school begins again in August. These books arent eligible to be renewed because of the overwhelming demand we receive each year. If there is anything we can do to help you get the summer reading books you need please talk to us. Computer Classes We have some great free computer classes available the rest of this month and into June for our patrons. On May 23, we have Microsoft Outlook 2007: Calendars, Task, Notes, & More at 9:30 a.m. followed by Microsoft Excel 2007: More Formulas & Functions IV at 1:30 p.m. Going into June, well have our next round of beginning computer classes along with a special evening round of classes on Digitizing Your Family Heritage for the Genealogy buffs out there. As always these classes are free but do require early registration. Library News... Government MeetingsThursday, May 17  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for a workshop in the commission chambers at 5 p.m. on the public works budget and 5-year plan, followed by another workshop on the Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Master Plan recommendations. Monday, May 21  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, May 22  WAKULLA 2020 ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 4 p.m. at the library. The purpose is to review and prioritize proposed projects included in the Crawfordville Town Plan and identify other needed transportation projects throughout the county.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 3B Shepherd Creek is South Bounds special guest for the Sopchoppy Opry Memorial Day show, Saturday, May 26, at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. The show will feature patriotic songs of the red, white and blue as Americas heroes are honored. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711.Shepherd Creek will play at the Sopchoppy OpryThe Tallahassee band Sabal will perform at Posh Java on Saturday, May 19, at 8 p.m, Musicians, singers and songwriters, Fred Figueroa, Kevan McCann, Carly Bak and Craig Daniel Hardin blend their unique styles of music into a harmonious ensemble of original swampy Americana. Like the tree it takes its name from, the band Sabal represents the people and places of Florida, weaving individual experiences into an impressive and intelligent blend of music. Bak, with her gutsy and bluesy vocals, is a talented songwriter who shines a light from the stage as she shares stories about her life and her childhood infatuation with nature and folklore. Figueroa, on the harmonica, guitar and vocals, adds a style that draws listeners in leaving them spellbound. McCann, nicknamed Mr. Smooth,Ž performs dulcet bass rhythms, adding depth to the unique sound of Sabal. And Hardin adds a rooted, current sound bringing a consciousness to the musical blend that “ nally and collectively de“ nes the music as swamp groove. This group brings to the audience a uniquely enjoyable musical experience. Visit Swamproove.com to learn more and follow their music on YouTube. Tickets are $12.50. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSwamp groove from Sabal at Posh Java on SaturdayContinued from Page 1BThis causes a great deal of stress to both the caregiver and patient. HAWC looks to position itself as a link between both parties, bridging that disconnect of how services are offered and how care is received. For a group like HAWC, still in its infancy, such an enterprise could prove to be overwhelming. But, slowly, partnerships are being born. And though HAWC cannot afford to reinvent the wheel, the months since its initial launch event last December have been used to identify and work with potential partners. Compared to other counties in attendance at the training program, such as Franklin, Immokalee, and Calhoun, Wakulla does not have a hospital or major healthcare facility that allows them to test their efforts in the traditional setting. Im excited by the uniqueness of Wakullas situation,Ž said Jill Sonke, and the way so many are stepping up and saying were concerned about the health of our community members and want to do something to make it better … we want to be involved.Ž Others attending the training spoke of their efforts to build a healthier environment, such as painter and photorealist, Rhonda Long. Originally from Chicago, she currently works as an artist in Immokalee: We have a friend in Fort Myers that has an urban garden,Ž said Rhonda. They work with the enterprise zone and were recently given “ ve acres of land to create a garden for the community. Collard greens, onions, potatoes. They sell it back to the community and put it in the lunch program at the schools, as a way of sustaining themselves. They even sell their vegetables to restaurants in their area.Ž Similar things have been tried in Wakulla, but the running complaint seems to be the poor quality of the soil and lack of consistent produce availability. And though ideas like these may not sound HAWC related, in actuality, they are. For the health and wellbeing of the community is central to the HAWC mission. This is where being uniqueŽ actually comes into play. In January, HAWC members met after their launch event, and though all were eager to be a part of this groundbreaking possibility, no one knew where to start, or how to fully de“ ne the actions to be taken that would bring change about. Hence, the need to attend the training program. You guys (Wakulla),Ž said Jill Sonke, are “ nding some innovative ways to use the arts as very simple, basic interventions. And youre doing it without a healthcare partner. Thats something other communities can learn from. It doesnt take a healthcare institution to impact the healthcare of a community. People can do that.Ž For HAWC to truly takeoff in Wakulla, there has to be a community behind it. And though that number is growing, the need for people to come onboard whose job is in the realm of healthcare (physicians, nurses, nutritionists), as well as those groups involved in the development of sustenance programs for the county, remains a strong one. The Shands Arts in Medicine Program began in the late 80s, and was formally established as a program in the early 90s. In 1996 the Center for Arts in Medicine was developed at UF as an outgrowth of the Shands program, as Jill explained: It started with a couple of artists who happened to be clinicians. They realized they were drawing on their artistic practices to maintain their own wellbeing,Ž she said. They began inviting artists to work with their patients because they thought if it was working to help their own wellbeing (the clinicians), it might work to enhance the patients wellbeing also.Ž The program has grown into a very broad endeavor. They have 15 paid professional artists-in-residence, along with an administrative staff that supports those artists. There are daily arts agendas throughout the week, in almost every discipline. Patients in the hospital have the opportunity to call on an artist, or to work with them at the bedside, or attend a workshop. Staff members are given opportunity to engage in creative processes that help support and sustain them in the dif“ cult work that they do as caregivers. The Center at UF provides education to artists looking to work in the health sciences arena, but who also wish to engage the arts in their work. The Center also provides research to better understand the impact of what arts can do in the healthcare realm and why they are effective. The effect HAWC will have locally remains to be seen. Chances are, it will be unique. It will most de“ nitely be ours. A look at the training received by HAWC volunteersThe group of HAWC volunteers at the recent training in Apalachicola. Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information Special Memorial Day Show SHEPHERD CREEKSopchoppyOpry.com Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. PREPAID MONTHLY PLANS Modern Communications nationwide pre-paid cellular page p l u s U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT $4000 PER MO.DATA CHARGES MAY APPLY Laura M. Mulholland 850-926-23043340 Crawfordville, FL 32327 ART WAREHOUSE Paintings, Sculptures & Carvings Buy Sell ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Mike HarveyApril 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI really appreciate this program. We eat at all the restaurants participating. It is a Great Deal to Win!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a n t n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much!

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1BThe project is intended to create a connection between the community and the bowl, said Rick Jackley. Campbell said they could also get the culinary arts students from Wakulla High School to cook the soup. Haydee Jackley is still in the planning stages of this project and if anyone is interested in helping, they should contact HAWC. Herb Donaldson is focused on another project called Redemption. This will be a series on his Sunday radio program where he interviews professionals in domestic violence, mental illness, substance abuse and child abuse. Donaldson said they will be looking at emotional, physical and psychological health. The group is also looking at offering art at the county health department on Wednesdays when mothers and their babies in the Women, Infants and Children program are there for services. Commissioner Lynn Artz suggested offering pictures or imprints of the babys handprint or footprint that the mother could keep as a memento. Grace Keith said that was definitely a possibility. Those children would be from birth to 5 years old, she said. Other possible projects include cultural heritage through photography and a student art competition at the community center. HAWC members want to engage the schools and the Wakulla Arts Coalition. The HAWC members also discussed the need for additional funding and Campbell received approval to apply for a $25,000 grant through the Division of Cultural Affairs. Its meant to sustain (HAWC),Ž Campbell said. The next community meeting will be held later in the year and will update everyone on the progress of the group. For more information or to get involved, go to HAWCs website at healingartswakulla.org or call 926-3526 or email healingwakulla@gmail.com.Special to The NewsSouth East Eye Specialists in Crawfordville announced their new optometrist Sagar Amin, O.D. He is in the Crawfordville of“ ce Monday through Friday. Dr. Amin was born in Basingstoke, England, but raised in Tallahassee where he graduated from Leon High School. He graduated from Florida State with a Bachelor of Science in biology. He graduated from Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry with a doctor of optometry. His specialties are ocular disease diagnosis and management and contact lenses. Dr. Amin volunteered for Unite for Sight, a nonpro“ t organization, in 2006. He has traveled to India to provide eye care for multiple underserved rural communities. Dr. Amin currently resides in Tallahassee and enjoys Florida State athletics and golf. Southeast Eye Specialist is located at 2140 Crawfordville Highway. They are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Their number is 9269213.Special to The NewsExplore the vast range of creative possibilities and technological processes of modern photography through Diversity and Creativity: Photography in the 21st Century, an exhibition opened May 11 at the Gadsden Arts Center. This show, guest-curated by photographer Jessie Lovano-Kerr, features new work by accomplished photographers Edward Babcock, Robert Constand, Barbara Aleene Edwards, Bill Humphries, Jim Miller, David Moynahan and Stewart Nelson. Audiowood, a new sculpture by Joel Scilley, will be exhibited alongside the photography in the main gallery, presenting works that combine audio technology with traditional woodcraft to create functional works of art. Scilley is a designer, carpenter and woodworker who recently relocated his Audiowood Studio to Grand Ridge. He has lived or studied in Pittsburgh, New York, California and Europe, and his work has been featured in the New York Times and Wired magazine. In the Zoe Golloway Exhibit Hall, painters Randy and Debra Brienen will share Town and Country, an exhibit of new acrylic paintings featuring Gadsden County scenes. Randy is a formally trained artist who paints in a contemporary style, while Debra is a self-taught artist who prefers realism. The Gadsden Arts Center will also present all new works of art in a wide range of mediums by 47 Artists Guild Members, works of art from students at R.F. Munroe Day School and Shanks Middle School, works by student Kaia Miller and new selections from the GAC Vernacular Art Collection. These exhibitions opened May 11 at the Gadsden Arts Center and continue through July 28. Everyone is welcome … join us to celebrate our regions artistic talent. For more information, visit the website at www.gadsdenarts.org. The Gadsden Arts Center is located on Quincys historic Courthouse Square at 13 N. Madison St. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $1 (members and children admitted free). Amenities include six gallery spaces, the museum gift shop, and the Mainstreet Caf, open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Catering services and guided tours are available by calling (850) 8754866. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSome of the artwork on display at the Gadsden Art Center this month through July 28.Gadsden Arts exhibits feature photography and audiowood sculptures SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHaydee Jackley of Ribits Ceramic Studio is a member of HAWC.HAWC looks at ways to use arts to promote health Dr. Sagar Amin joins South East Eye Specialists Dr. Sagar Amin, O.D. Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 18, Noon Publication Date: May 31 Remember This Years Graduateƒ Congratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2012Sponsor Line ........$20 Eighth Page ...........$50 Quarter Page ......$100 .............................................................. $50 Half Page ..............$200 .............................................................. $75 Full Page ...............$300 ............................................................. $125 Back Page .............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons ............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available WINDOWSBest Window...Best Price...Best Choice! 1” Double Pane Insulated Glass $179*Any size Installed of TALLAHASSEE COME VISIT US AT GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL850-519-5056www.abcwintallahassee.com Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 5BJam 4 Camp is held April 28By SHERRI KRAEFTUF/IFAS Wakulla County 4-H AgentWakulla County 4-H hosted its second annual Jam 4 Camp Fundraiser on April 28 in Hudson Park. As the “ ve invited bands played everything from gospel to punk to bluegrass, parents and kids enjoyed the vendor booths and activities. While the primary purpose for the event is to raise scholarship money for kids to be able to attend 4-H Summer camps, it is also an opportunity for the community to learn more about our local 4-H programs throughout the year. Thanks to the continued support and enthusiasm of our current 4-H volunteers, sponsors, parents and members, we were able to raise over $4,000 this year. In addition to the band competition, members conducted a silent auction and signed up for all “ ve camp offerings this summer. The Jam 4 Camp champ this year was Backlash, which raised $158 in scholarship donations. There are lots of exciting things to do in 4-H this summer including sewing and quilting camp, home economics in Bachelor/ Bachelorette Camp, refashioning clothing and accessories in Project Runway and of course, the traditional residential camping experience at Camp Cherry Lake. Throughout the year and especially in the camping programs, youth develop life skills in areas like leadership, independence, selfreliance, teamwork, decision making and critical thinking. If your child has not yet signed up and is interested in a quality, fun educational experience, please contact the Extension Of“ ce at 9263931 or come by and pick up a camp application. Scholarship awards will be given as funds are available and the deadline to apply for all scholarships is May 25, 2012. Camp and scholarship information are also available at our website http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu/4-h/4-hyouth-development/campcherry-lake. We would like to thank the following donors, sponsors, volunteers and vendors for their time and support: Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Coca-Cola of Tallahassee, Wakulla Mens Club, Lube X-pert, Jared Miller, Donnie Sparkman, Roxana Lamothe, Mrs. Alice Veasman, Talquin Electric, The Wakulla News, Harbor Point Realty, Iris Annes, Purple Martin Nurseries, Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, Best Western Crawfordville, Salty Creations, Daves Bootleg Honey, Wakulla Christian School, Wakulla Senior Center, Scrabbled Creations, Artistic Creations, Fun Inflatables, Rod and Rocks, Buckhorn Masonic Lodge, Skye Creations, 2-11 Big Bend, Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC), Capital City Bank, SWAT, Mikes Seafood, Wakulla.com, Ashleys Feed, Carries Cove … Louise Kreuger, Cypress Run Farms, Best Western Crawfordville, Designs by Susan at Menagerie, Auto Trim Designs, Michelle McKenzie, Peggy Mackin, Dave Seal, Jo Ann Palmer, Woody Palmer, Esther Harrison, Sue Sullivan, Mimi DeArruginaga, Alison Bussey, Stacy Harvey, Lori Gilbertson, Shelley Swenson, Alan Brock, Mischa Steurer, Judy Paris, Norma Parramore, Priscilla Weaver, Kourtney Meadowcroft, Mary Katherine Westmark, Pat Harvey, Debbie Madden, Andrea Carter, Herb Donaldson, Tonya Hobby, Calandra Portalatin and Laurie Westbrook. For information regarding any of the programs offered by Wakulla County 4-H, please contact Sherri Kraeft, 4-H Agent at sjkraeft@u” edu. 4-H is a community of young people across America who are learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. 4-H is open to all youth between the ages of 5-18 regardless of gender, race, creed, color, religion, or disability. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS4-H agent Sherri Kraeft with 4-H supporters and Jam 4 Camp champs Backlash. Coon Bottom Creek Band performing bluegrass music for the crowd. Kathy Asbell of Refuge House with a informational table at the event. Audience members set up to listen to bands perform at Jam 4 Camp. A moonwalk at Jam 4 Camp. A vendor at Jam 4 Camp. Singer and “ ddle player Chelsea Dix Kessler of Coon Bottom performing on the Jam 4 Camp stage.

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 11 … The Florida Supreme Court took center stage this week as it reversed itself and approved term limits for local of“ cials while hearing arguments in a handful of cases that will affect homeowners, legal immigrants and potential deportees. Gearing up for November, state election of“ cials estimate that as many as 180,000 ineligible voters may be on the states voter rolls. The November hazing death of Florida A&M University drum major Robert Champion prompted Floridas university system chancellor to urge FAMU trustees not to strike up the band quite yet as the university continues to battle fallout from the tragedy, which also forced the retirement of the Marching 100 director, Julian White. Meanwhile, Gov. Rick Scotts popularity rises with the economy as at least one poll released this week show that more Floridians think he is doing a good job. The down side is that a larger share continue to think he is not. HIGH COURT IN HIGH GEAR The Florida Supreme Court had a busy week that included a full docket of closely watched cases and at least one decision that will have election implications in the fall. The states highest court backed away from an earlier ruling to decide voters in charter counties can impose term limits if they want on local of“ cials. The immediate cases involved the ability of voters in Broward and Sarasota Counties to place term limits on county commissioners. While upholding the term limits Broward and Sarasota county residents placed on their commissioners, the court also retreated from a 2002 ruling that blocked term limits for other of“ ces, such as clerks of court. The rulings are expected to have a broader impact on other elections in 10 charter counties, which are allowed more leeway in their election procedures. Charters in at least 10 counties … Broward, Brevard, Clay, Duval, Hillsborough, Orange, Palm Beach, Polk, Sarasota and Volusia … include term limits for commissioners, according to a court “ ling by the Florida Association of Counties. More than 80 percent of Broward voters in 2000 approved limiting county commissioners to three consecutive four-year terms, but resident William Telli later “ led a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the limits. In 2002, justices ruled 4-3 that term limits could not be imposed on some county of“ ces that are outlined in the constitution --clerk of court, sheriff, tax collector, property appraiser and elections supervisor. The court this week receded from that opinion. The court said then that term limits were a form of disqualifying candidates that was not allowed in the constitution. Two current justices, R. Fred Lewis and Barbara Pariente, were in the majority in 2002. FORECLOSURES The courts oral argument docket was jammed with high pro“ le cases this week including a case to determine whether lenders caught forging documents can escape scrutiny by simply dismissing the foreclosure case. The decision could reopen thousands of cases in which mortgage holders and their law “ rms allegedly falsified documents to speed up foreclosures. It could also serve as a template for actions in other states where courts play an integral role in the foreclosure process. Roman Pino purchased a home in 2006. Two years later he fell behind in his payments and the bank began foreclosure proceedings. During the proceedings, Pinos attorney discovered that the law “ rm handling the lenders case had backdated documents and forged signatures. When it became known, the bank dropped the foreclosure case and then re“ led it with the appropriate paperwork. Pinos trial attorney argued that the second lawsuit should be dropped as a sanction for producing fraudulent documents in the “ rst trial. Both the trial court and Fourth District Court of the Appeal rejected the appeal. The implications are huge and justices appeared wary of making a decision that would revisit thousands of claims made since the housing bubble burst in 2008. Following a 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision in a Kentucky case, the high court also took up a trio of cases addressing how much attorneys must advise clients who are not U.S. citizens that their decision on how to plead could have them deported. The cases come two years after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Padilla v. Kentucky that attorneys must advise non-citizen clients about the deportation risks of a guilty plea. The ruling has sparked a ” urry of cases from defendants who are not U.S. citizens and whose cases were decided before Padilla or while the Kentucky case was working its way through the court. Nearly 50 Florida cases have already been “ led. VOTING RANKS DRAW QUESTIONS State election officials say as many as 180,000 ineligible voters may be on the state rolls as attention again turns to voter fraud in a critical swing state. When matching voter rolls against newly available citizenship data from the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, election of“ cials found that number of possible matches, and began further investigating each one to see if they were likely to be wrongly registered to vote. Of“ cials reported earlier this week that they had forwarded the “ rst batch of those names, about 2,600 to local supervisors of elections for further review and for each voter to be noti“ ed that they were on a list of people suspected of being illegally registered. Some Democrats and voting rights groups have criticized the new effort to find suspected ineligible voters. An ACLU of“ cial said this week that state of“ cials were looking for cover while trying to disenfranchise voters. Many of those identi“ ed so far have been in South Florida. Local media in Miami reported this week that the supervisor in MiamiDade County had been sent about 2,000 of the 2,600 initially identi“ ed suspect voters. Sen. Nan Rich, the outgoing leader of Democrats in the Senate and a candidate for governor, said as much energy should be spent on making it easier for voters to cast ballots. I certainly support an initiative that would remove people from the voter rolls that are not eligible to vote,Ž Rich said. But weve had so much effort to suppress the vote. It would be nice if we put this much effort into making sure those who are eligible to vote can vote.Ž FAMU Chancellor Frank Brogan called on Florida A&M University to continue the suspension of its Marching 100 band, saying that the band should remain idle until investigations into hazing and other matters are resolved. Brogans announcement came the same day that long-time director Julian White announced his retirement. White, 71, had been on administrative leave since Champions death. Both announcements came after revelations earlier in the week that nearly a quarter of the marching band arent even FAMU students, an apparent breach of university policy that could potentially lead to sanctions by governing bodies. Champion, 26, was allegedly beaten to death in a ritual hazing on board a charter bus during a band trip to Orlando in November. His death prompted university of“ cials to suspend activities of the vaunted marching band while the investigation continued. In a letter to the board of trustees, FAMU President James Ammons suggested he was considering allowing the band to resume its activities. The band has been inactive since shortly after Champions death. Brogan said he supports the university, but at the same time, our concerns continue to mount regarding the ever-increasing body of issues that harm the institution, its students and, therefore, our State University System as a whole.Ž SCOTT POPULARITY UP IN POLL A Suffolk University/ WSVN-Miami poll released this week shows the governors favorability rating climbing seven percentage points since the last poll in January. The survey of likely voters showed 42 percent approved of Scotts job as governor, while 44 percent disapproved -in late January, the survey found 35 percent approval and 45 percent disapproval. STORY OF THE WEEK: Florida Supreme Court upholds term limits for local of“ cials. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Reinstating the band prior to these issues being resolved would sidestep efforts underway, which could impact the bands long-term survival.Ž Florida Chancellor Frank Brogan in a letter to FAMU Board of Trustees urging them keep the Marching 100 suspended until an investigation in the death of drum major Robert Champion and “ nancial inconsistencies with the band are resolved.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)High court is in high gear Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Go to AnyGivenTimeJax.com to enter to win a vacation in sunny Jacksonville! SO MUCH TO DO, ANY GIVEN TIME. 13 Months … For only $31Call 1-877-401-6408Price good for in county subscriptions only. Offer available until 5/31/2012 is offering Remember those who died for our freedom on Memorial Day. Remember those who died for our freedom on Memorial Day. May 28, 2012 May 28, 2012 Subscription Special

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Jokes and Riddles A: It was too heavy for him to carry.Question: Why did the cowboy ride his horse?Question: What’s the hardest thing about learning to ride a horse?A: The ground! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 7B This page sponsored in part by: COLORING PICTURE If you have ever been to a rodeo, you might have seen a rodeo clown or two. Most work in teams, and along with entertaining the crowd between events, they may also have to protect fallen bull riders. Whether they get bucked off or jump off, bull riders need someone to distract the bull as they make their way out of the ring. With their bright clothes and protective gear underneath, rodeo clowns do just that. Rodeo clowns shout, wave their hat, run all over and do whatever it takes to get the bull to look at them instead of the rider. Should the rider get caught up in the straps on the bull, rodeo clowns must work hard to free them. Being a rodeo clown can be a dangerous job. Clownin’ Around Can Be Serious Work Rodeos have several events to compete in. Fill in the blanks to name some of the events found at a rodeo.Answers: 1) Calf Roping, 2) Bronc Riding, 3) Barrel Racing, 4) Breakaway Roping, 5) Goat Tying, 6) Team Roping, 7) Steer Wrestling Name That Event Name That Event C __ L F R O __ I N __ B R __ N C R __ D __ N G B A __ __ E L R A __ I N __ B R __ __ K A W A Y R O __ I __ G G __ __ T T Y I N __ T __ __ M R __ P I N G S T __ __ R W R __ S T __ I N G 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 List 10 words that rhyme with “rope.” 1. ____________ 2. _____________ 3. _____________ 4. ____________ 5. _____________ 6. _____________ 7. ___________ 8. _____________ 9. ____________ 10. ____________Some answers: cope, hope, lope, mope, nope, pope, scope, soap, slope, taupe What Rhymes with…1) “Rodeo” comes from the Spanish word meaning “round up.” Fact or Fiction? 2) Most rodeos allow only men over the age of 50 to compete. Fact or Fiction? 3) All rodeos are held outside. Fact or Fiction? 4) Some rodeos are so big they are shown on TV. Fact or Fiction? 5) Some rodeos crown a rodeo queen. Fact or Fiction? 6) Most rodeos start off with the “Grand Entry,” or introduction of competitors, officials, sponsors, the queen and her court, and more. Fact or Fiction? 7) During the Grand Entry, the American anthem, “America the Beautiful,” is usually performed. Fact or Fiction? 8) Rodeo competitions are divided into two groups: timed and rough stock. Fact or Fiction? 9) Some rodeos have competitions for kids. Fact or Fiction? 10) Some rodeos have live music at intermission. Fact or Fiction? Facto or Fiction? Rodeo Challenge Rodeos are exciting and usually keep people watching from start to finish. Here are some questions about rodeos. How many can you answer correctly?

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Lost Beagle, Male Name Cash 8 yrs. old, house dog missing since 12th Wakulla Gardens Area Health problems (850) 926-5205 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Found Found at the Blue Crab Festival last weekend: a pair of ladys reading or prescription glasses. If yours, please call 926-7102.Ž Announcements A DVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Become a driver for Schneider National! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks 888-368-1964 Drivers Regional Refrigerated& Dry Van Freight. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com General Help Potential to Generate $4000. to $20,000. or more a month with this activity No selling. Experience financial & time freedom. Call 352-445-1385 Financial Fr eedomW ay.info. Career Opportunities A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401k, 2 Mo. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782www.me ltontruck.com/ drive Auctions AUCTION CALL CENTER CLOSINGŽ Computers, furniture, generator + MORE! bid online thru May 15th www.one mor e time.u s Live Auction May 18th at 10am 6671 Caroline St Milton FL; 18% BP live. Gaddis & Associates 850-227-8280 1 More Auction Services, 407-466-2270 www.one mor e time.u s Fritz Real Estate and Auctions Lic. Real Estate Broker 800-422-9155 AU2871-AB2650 Garage/ Yard Sales PANACEA Thur. Fri. & Sat. 9a-4pHUGE ESTATE SALE Tools, Toys, Household and much much more.280 Tower Road Garage/ Yard Sales NedartSat, May 19th 8am to 1pm, 5 miles south on Hwy 319, at the old Dinglers Barber Shop Household items, wichker furn,a clown collection inc. Emmett Kelley Jr., also Vintageitems and much more SHELL POINTSat, May 19th 8amto 4pm Asstd furn. inc. queen sofa sleeper, glassware, dishes, punch bowl, printer, ladies clothing, and many hshld items left on Royster Drive off Shell Point Rd. Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA on 5 acres (48 Willie Jenkins Rd.), NE Wakulla County. $800/month. Call 850-510-6200. CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $675 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-524-4090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2-story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. Available June 1st. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Efficiencies/ Cottages Furnished Cottage 1/1 over looking lake $600/ incls electric water /garbage, call evenings (850) 962-2520 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the water with dock. Light and bright furnished or not. $950 + utilities 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEShell Point Rental 2/2 Town home on Canal, with office or 3rd BR Loft, enjoy your private boat slip and community pool $1,300 mo. 850-509-2667 or 850 -926-7158 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 926-3832 CRAWFORDVILLESmall 2/1,$ $600 /mo+ $500 dep. minimum 6 months lease, no pets applications/ refers required (850) 524-3164 CRAWFORDVILLE very nice 3bdr/2 ba in Magnolia Gardens 42 Ted Lott Lane $850pr mth, $850 sec no pets, call Gene @ 850-510-6446 Mysterious Waters2BR/2BA, W/Dappls, wood-detail, vaulted ceiling, large -porch, covered parking, short walk to Wakulla River, community park, boat-ramp, dock $875/mo.incl water & garbage 850-926-6289. Waterfront Rentals PanacaFishermans Retreat Lovely small cottage the water off Mashes Sands Rd $500/mo. Pets Welcome call Lisa (850) 510-2647 SHELL POINTFOR RENT OR SALE 30 Janet Drive, Paradise V illage Shell Point Beach newly renovated, 3bdr, 2ba, granite kitchen, tile bath, wood floors, wkshop, canal, dock. Gated Community w/pool & lawncare. $1200. pr mnth (850) 926-5930 Auctions Estates ORLANDO AUCTIONSNo Minimums, No Reserves! Inventory of Cabinet Manuf. Facility, May 16, Bankruptcy & Consignment Auctions, May 19. Ewald Auction Rlty AB2473/AU1340 10% BP 407-275-6853 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 850-926-3546 FUNDRAISER YARD SALE / BAKE SALE Lots of Great Items! FINANCIAL ADVISORGulf, Wakulla Counties and surrounding communities. Ideal candidates must have excellent sales skills, demonstrates leadership skills and have a high degree of personal integrity. This individual will sell investment products and services through Invest Financial Corp., a registered Broker/Dealer, member FINRA and SIPC. Series 7 and 66 licenses and life, health and variable annuities licenses are required. Associates or Bachelors degree in business or “nance from an accredited college. Relevant experience may substitute for the education requirement. We offer a competitive salary, promote family values, but most of all, provide our associates with a stimulating, pleasant and fun place to build a career. For consideration please visit: www.ccbg.com Requisition #623 EOE/Drug-Free Workplace A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432“we sell and service most makes and models” Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 HURLEY’S ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF • RE-ROOFING • SHINGLES • METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMP OUTS & REPAIRS SEPTIC TANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMIT ASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $475mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $450mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker GET ThenewsDELIVERED EACH WEEK! Call 18 77-401-640 8

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 9B RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. Available ASAP. 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. Available May 1. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. 5203-0517 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, May 21, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE : Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 May 17, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5217-0524 vs. Leslie, Shannon K. Case No. 65-2011-CA-000149 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000149, DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. : SHANNON K LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY POPPELL A/K/A SHANNON LARSON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000149 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the 5218-0524 vs. Stephens, Barbara Case No.65-2011-CA-000041 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000190, DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. : BARBARA STEPHENS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000190 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and BARBARA STEPHENS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INCORPORATED AS NOMINEE FOR BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP; TENANT #1, N/K/A ANTHONY STEPHENS are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22, A DIS TANCE OF 248.77 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 61, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1673.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 689.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 311.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 138 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 0 SECONDS WEST 317.88 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 138 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUT H 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SEC ONDS WEST 135.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 317.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLWOING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY LYING 30.00 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22, A DISTANCE OF 248.77 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 61, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 2389.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID CENTERLINE, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 547.98 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 50.00 FEET TO THE CENTERPOINT OF A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS AND THE TERMINATION POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE. A/K/A 44 ANCHORS WAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of CIrcuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5218-0524 5219-0524 Vs. Small Lorie Ann, 65-2011-CA-000186 Notice of Sale 5220-0524 Vs. Reed, Venesha Case No. 65-2011-CA 000150 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000150 US BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. VENESHA REED; CLARENCE REED A/K/A: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VENESHA REED; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 8, BLOCK KŽ, HUDSON HEIGHTS, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 43 DOGWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2096 at public sale on June 14, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 2nd day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. May 17, 24, 2012 5220-0524. 5221-0524 TWN Vs. Potter, Timothy A. Case No. 11-CA-354-FC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-CA-354-FC, UCN: 652011CA000354XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. TIMOTHY A. POTTER et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-CA-354 FC. UCN: 652011CA000354XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A is the Plaintiff and TIMOTHY A. POTTER; DARDRA REVELL POTTER F/K/A DARDRA B. REVELL; UNKNOWN TENANT NOO.1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at Wakulla County Florida, at 11:00a.m on the 14th dayof June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 19, WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT 3, PAGE 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida on. May 3, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5221-0524 5223-0524 Vs. Kilbourn, Rodney P. Case No. 2011-CA-000364 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.2011-CA-000364 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. RODNEY P. KILBOURN, Defendant, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-364-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and RODNEY P. KILBOURN, is the Defendant, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on June, 14, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBITS AŽ and BŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 3rd day of May, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 34, A DISTANCE OF 2650.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 858.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 327.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 309.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 156.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261)THENCE RUN NORTH 89 5224-0524 TWN Vs. Cope, Yolanda Case No. 11-330 FC Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-330-FC, UCN:652011CA000330XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC8, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OC8 Plaintiff vs. YOLANDA COPE; et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ANDRE HARVEY Last Known Address 49 SHOEMAKER CT CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 29, BRIDLEGATE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 57, OF THE PUBLIC OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days fr om first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED ON March 5, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5224-0524 1183-113683WVA 5225-0524 vs. Stalvey, William Keith Case No. 2011 000254CA PUBLIC NOTICE May 14, 2012IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2011000254CA Sunshine Savings Bank f/k/a Sunshine State Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. William Keith Stalvey, Cothee Ann Tomaini, Erin Capital Management, LLC and Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA ST A TUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 30, 2012, in Case Number 2011 000254 CA, of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which Sunshine Savings Bank f/k/a Sunshine State Credit Union is the Plaintiff, and William Keith Stalvey, Cothee Ann Tomaini, Erin Capital Management, LLC and Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327-3136 at 11:00 A.M. on May 31, 2012 the following-described property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 57, Block AŽ, Magnolia Ridge North, a subdivision as per map of plat thereof re corded in Plat Book 3, Pages 55 and 56 of the Public Records of Wakulla County Notice is also given pursuant to § 45.031(2)(f), Florida Statutes, that any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED: May 1, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter as Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, May 17 & 24, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DEGREES 36 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 125.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 156.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 125.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A 15.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS/EGRESS EASEMENT LYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 7.5 FEET THEREOF AND BEING PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 174, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. EXHIBIT BŽ Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, 2650.93 feet to a found 4Žx4Ž concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road S-299 and said POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way run South 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds East112.89 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 29 minutes 30 seconds West 183.71 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds West 101.83 feet to the Southerly right-of-way of said State Road S-299, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East along said right-of-way 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.45 acres, more or less. The above legal description being more recently surveyed by Thurman Roddenberry and Associates, Inc., dated April 26, 2006, under job no. 90-132, and described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 2650.93 feet to the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Curtis Mill Road (State Road S-299) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 12 seconds East 112.70 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 89 degrees 27 minutes 49 seconds West 183.76 feet to a concrete monument(marked#4261), thence run North 00 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds West 101.74 feet to a nail and cap (marked #7160) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said Curtis Mill Road, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.45 acres, more or less. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5223-0524 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000186 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. LORIE ANN SMALL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LORIE ANN SMALL; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; CAPITAL ONE (USA), N.A.; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 56, BLOCK 16, WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 42 RENEGADE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2708 at public sale on June 14, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 3rd day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. May 17 and 24, 2012. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 1 00006-MHO P-0001000 $566.69 TURNER ELIJAH PO BOX 1655 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 2 00040-000 P-0003800 $3,669.76 ANGELOS SEAFOOD RESTAURANT H/O ANGELO E PETRANDIS P O BOX 159 PANACEA, FL 32346 3 00045-025 P-0004100 $1,576.75 ATTACK ONE FIRE MANAGEMENT SERVICE 342 GUY STRICKLAND RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 4 00054-040 P-0005000 $550.75 BARINEAU LARSON HOLDINGS, INC D/B/A WAKULLA LUMBER & TRUSSES PO BOX 640 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 5 00080-021 P-0005900 $1,382.74 BEN WITHERS INC P O BOX 908 PANACEA, FL 32346 6 00090-000 P-0007400 $315.08 BROOKS WELDING & MACHINE SHOP INC C/O BERNARD BROOKS PO BOX 82 PANACEA, FL 32346 7 00146-500 P-0009300 $2,227.74 CAUSSEAUXS TRACTOR WORKS JOE EARL CAUSSEAUX 140 SANDERS CEMETRY SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 8 00149-100 P-0010500 $184.63 CORBINS TRACTOR SERVICE 149 RIO PAZ TRACE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 9 00396-000 P-0021500 $174.72 GLENDAS COUNTRY STORE 282 PIXIE CIRCLE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 10 00790-000 P-0033100 $678.70 M & L PLUMBING, INC. 4417 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 11 00851-000 P-0034100 $1,915.31 M T S DIRECTIONAL BORING INC 172 SWEETWATER CIR CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 12 00908-000 P-0036200 $268.92 OCHLOCKONEE BAY REALTY TIMOTHY R JORDAN P O BOX 556 PANACEA, FL 32346-0556 13 00915-005 P-0036700 $109.14 OUZTS TOO 7968 COASTAL HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 14 00980-000 P-0039200 $411.74 POSEYS SEAFOOD & CRABSHELL INC P O BOX 294 PANACEA, FL 32346 15 00990-001 P-0040000 $1,865.40 LAND OF WAKULLA INC P O BOX 1137 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 16 01026-000 P-0041400 $407.60 NORTH FLORIDA TITLE SERVICES D/B/A RESEARCH EXPRESS 457 HUNTERS TRACE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-1641 17 01150-007 P-0045400 $926.72 SPECIALTY METAL FABRICATIONS INC 1884 WOODVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 18 01247-002 P-0048200 $1,341.85 SUNSHINE CAR CARE, LLC # 206 C/O DAN HINCHEE 2235 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 19 01260-000 P-0048300 $86.39 SWEET MAGNOLIA INN BED & BREAFAST PO BOX 13463 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32317 20 01275-704 P-0048500 $87.08 TALLAHASSEE TURF 2582 SURF RD PANACEA, FL 32346 21 01384-000 P-0051100 $454.69 W L ROBERTS INC P O BOX 730 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 22 01407-000 P-0052400 $669.69 WAKULLA COLLISION CENTER INC 2170 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 23 01410-003 P-0053000 $9.63 WAKULLA BANK WINN-DIXIE BRANCH C/O WALTER DODSON P O BOX 610 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 24 01482-561 P-0054900 $251.92 WESTERN FINANCE & LEASING, INC 503 HIGHWAY 2 W DEVILS LAKE, ND 58301 25 01627-000 P-0058100 $3,891.15 SUMMITT OUTDOOR ADVERTISING 313 WILLIAMS ST STE 9 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 26 01638-000 P-0058800 $39.59 WILDWOOD RESORT, INC. PO BOX 40 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 27 01638-001 P-0058900 $4,240.51 WILDWOOD GOLF OPERATIONS, LLC 3870 COASTAL HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 28 01638-002 P-0059000 $6,485.74 WILDWOOD OPERATIONS. LLC 3896 COASTAL HIGHWAY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 29 01663-000 P-0060700 $3,305.94 PICHARD BROTHERS LAND CLEARING 117 PROVO PLACE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 30 01714-000 P-0064100 $1,893.56 T & T LAND SERVICES INC 53 FISHING POOL STREET PANACEA, FL 32346 31 01727-000 P-0064900 $3,207.84 ENVISION CREDIT UNION WAL-MART CRAWFORDVILLE PO BOX 5198 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32314-5198 32 01762-000 P-0067500 $194.73 SOUTHERN TRADITION BUILDERS, INC 111 BELLE FORBES LANE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 33 01764-000 P-0067600 $194.73 SOUTHERN HOMES PROPERTY & DEVELOPMENT, INC 3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY SUITE B6 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 34 01770-000 P-0068100 $1,225.00 NATS FOOD MART, INC DBA: BIG TOP SUPERMARKET #2 P.O. BOX 1043 PANACEA, FL 32346 35 01792-000 P-0069900 $1,665.85 WAKULLA EQUIPMENT RENTAL, INC 1709C CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 36 01829-000 P-0073300 $991.92 RUMMYS LLC 2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 37 01856-000 P-0075200 $3,117.75 GULF COAST ICE DIST. LLC 3919 CHAIRES CROSSR0AD ATTN: ED RICORD TALLAHASSEE, FL 32317 38 01861-000 P-0075700 $437.44 STEDEBANI ENTERPRISE CO, INC. 1239 COASTAL HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 39 01862-000 P-0075800 $2,302.11 BEST VALUE TIRE & AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALTIES, LLC 2106 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 NOTICE OF DELINQUENT TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES FOR 2011AS PROVIDED BY CHAPTER 197.016, ACTS OF 1972, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES ASSESSED FOR 2011 AR E NOW DELINQUENT AND BEGINNING WITH APRIL 1, SUCH TAXES ARE DRAWING INTEREST OF 1-1/2% PER MONTH, PLUS THE PROPORTIONATE COST OF PUBLISHING THIS NOT ICE. UNLESS THE AMOUNT SET OPPOSITE EACH NAME BELOW, WHICH INCLUDES THE COST OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND PENALTIES, ARE PAID BY THE LAST DAY OF MAY 2012, WA RRANTS WILL BE ISSUED HEREON DIRECTING LEVY UPON AND SEIZURE OF THE TANGIBLE PERSONALPROPERTY OF THE TAXPAYERS. MAY 17, 2012 Plaintiff and SHANNON K LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY POPPEL A/K/A SHANNON LARSON;JARED R LARSON A/K/A JARED RAY LARSON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 6th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA: THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING: THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINN ING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 327.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 665.14 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 327.17 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 664.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS EASEMENT MORE PARTICULARY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A 15 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT LYING 15 FEET EAST OF THE FOLLOWING DE SCRIBED LINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA: THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 664.69 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINING CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 236.33 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A 60 FOOT ROADWAY SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF TERMINUS. A/K/A 80 TANGLEWOOD ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk ** See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accomodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5216-0524 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5204-0524 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 12-111-DR, Division In the Adoption of Petitioner and Elijah Dale Holman & Simon Ellis Holman Respondent NOTICE OF ACTON FOR ADOPTION TO: Brian Dale Reed c/o The Red Lobster, 435 Shawnee Mall Drive, Shawnee, OK YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for adoption has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Attorney Steven P. Glazer whose address is 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on or before June 01, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address 5208-0517 Vs.Darnell, Gordon T. Case No. 2011-CA-377 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-3CA-377 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100 Jacksonville, Florida 32256 Plaintiff, v. GORDON T. DARNELL, MARY H. DARNELL, LAWRENCE ALLEN MYERS, LYNN BROTHERS MARINA, FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION, and CAPITAL CITY BANK, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 12 IN BLOCK 20 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT III, AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 43 OF PLAT BOOK NO. ONE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING SHOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 13 IN BLOCK 20 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, SECTION 3 AS SHOWN BY A PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 43, PLAT BOOK 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING SHOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 44 IN BLOCK 20 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, SECTION 3 AS SHOWN BY A PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 43, PLAT BOOK 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LOT 45, BLOCK 20, UNIT 3 OF WAKULLA GARDENS AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY DATED JULY 17, 2007 PREPAREDBY EDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., JOB #07-207 AS FOLLOWS: LOT 12, 13, 44, AND 45, BLOCK 20, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT THREE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999 OMNI MOBILE HOME, ID# 067877AB. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the W akulla County Court house, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy, Crawfor dville, Florida 32327 at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 31st day of May, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.,Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 10 & May 17, 2012 5208-0517 5212-0517 TWN Vs. West, Roy D. Case No. 12-10 PC Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 12-10-FC, UCN: 652012CA000010XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. ROY D. WEST; et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DOROTHY M. GORDON Last Known Address 33 CARD LN CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 99 OF THE REFUGE AT PANACEA, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 18-22, OF THE PUBLIC OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days fr om first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED ON February 10, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 10 & 17, 2012 5212-0517 1183-114254WVA 5213-0531 vs. Roddenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count I and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count II of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Pr operty THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 & E 1/2 OF SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4) OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAVING AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM AS EASEMENT FOR ROADWAY OVER AND ACCROSS THE NORTH 6 FEET OF SAID PROPERTY. Personal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. 5214-0531 vs. Rodenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. 5215-0524 vs. Vowell, Weldon C. Case No.65-2011-CA-000041 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000041, DIVISION: JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. : THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST WELDON C. VOWEL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL,SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000041 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY is the Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/AWELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C VOWELL, SR, DECEASED; JANICE A. MONTALTO, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR., DECEASED; WELDON C. VOWELL JR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR.., DECEASED; JANICE A. MONTALTO, AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTA TE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR., DECEASED; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S)WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLIAM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; THE SKETCHLEY LAW FIRM PA; TENANT#1 N/K/A JANE DOE are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3, BLOCK C, HIGHWOODS PLACE, PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 66 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2000 GENE MOBILE HOME, VIN NO. GMHGA1379925361A AND GMGHA1379925361B, TITLE NOS. 81599283 AND 81598714. A/K/A 20 RIDGEWAY COURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2484 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5215-0524 5216-0524 vs. Cannon V. Gordon Case No. 65-2011-CA-000269 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000269, DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. : GORDON V. CANNON A/K/A GORDON VICTOR CANNON et, al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is thePlaintiff and GORDON V. CANNON A/K/A CORDON VICTOR CANNON; LELIA BETH CANNON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS NUMBER 107,108, AND 109, BLOCK 22 OF THE EAST ADDITION TO TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY FLORIDA, AS SHOWN BY THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAID LAND ALSO DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; LOTS NO. 107,108 AND 109 OF THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY FLORIDA, EASTSIDE OR ADDITION AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF RECORD ON PAGE 641 OF DEED BOOK 2 OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 154 WINTER STREET, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with adisability requiring reasonable accomodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5216-0524 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count III and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count IV of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime) at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL #1 COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND THENCE RUN WEST 641.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 803.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319 AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 104.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 412.07 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 105.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 416.75 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THAT SAME PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL. RECORDS BOOK 23, PAGE 533 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL #3 COMMENCE AT A LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 387.72 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 111.76 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 420.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD 60.21 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNCIL MOORE ROAD RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 551.90 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 167.45 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 650.12 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY 319, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A RADIUS OF 1942.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 11 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 205.21 FEET (CHORD BEING NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 235.07 FEET) TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 142.64 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 416.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 320.85 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 53.82 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 1706.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 687.92 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF LOT 77, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 77 A DISTANCE OF 1763.34 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 380.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) SAID POINT BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT 191.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 317, PAGE 416 OF THE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Personal Pr operty Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshall, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010,Count III Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24 & 31, 2012 5214-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010 Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24, & 31, 2012 5213-0531#1 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 – Page 11B 5207-0517 Vs. Tillman, Robert Case No. 2010-210 CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2010-210 CA AMERICAN BANKING COMPANY D/B/A AMERIS BANK 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100, Jacksonville, Florida, 32256 Plaintiff, v. ROBERT SHANNON TILLMAN, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 8, BLOCK C, AMELIAWOOD SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION OF A PART OF LOT 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 6 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 31st day of May, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: April 26, 2012 (COURT SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit court By: /s/ Irvene Kimbrel, Deputy Clerk Published four times (4) times in the Wakulla News May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 5204-0524I Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5209-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 002 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SEAN HILLIER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2535 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-115-000-11897-000 LOT 115 HS P 20-1-M-25D A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SW 1/4 OF HS 115 OR 611 P 246 Name in which assessed SHEPARD FAMILY TRUST said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 5210-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 003 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES, LLC the holder of the 5211-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CASPIAN I LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2570 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A01 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT 2 BLOCK A LOT 1 OR 722 P305 Name in which assessed RWC INVESTMENTS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green CircleTallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff Robert S. Tillman,33 Equine Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32317 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 10 & 17, 2012 5207-0517 following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 710 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 12-6S-02W 000-03873-000 12-6S-2W P-8-M-55 A PARCEL OF LAND W OF US 98 IN SECTION 12 OR 12P 6 & 7 and OR 74 P 219 Name in which assessed TERRY C NELSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 25 36 40 43 46 54 62 66 69 2 20 26 55 3 27 56 4 23 41 57 5 37 50 21 28 47 63 67 70 6 15 18 29 44 51 7 30 48 58 8 24 38 59 9 31 42 52 22 39 53 64 68 71 10 16 19 32 49 11 33 45 60 12 34 61 13 35 65 ACROSS 1. Instruments struck with mallets 6. "Guarding __" (MacLaine movie) 10. Pork serving 14. The Who's "Tommy," for one 15. The Beehive State 16. Follow a trail 17. Purge, Pied Piperstyle 18. __ fide 19. Spheroid hairdo 20. 1976 Sean Connery film 23. Gorcey or Durocher 24. Jiffy 25. Cartoon skunk Le Pew 28. Diarist Anas 31. Garlicky seafood dish 36. Wolfed down 37. High points 39. Organizer's organization 40. 1968 Richard Burton film 43. Part of the giblets 44. Russell who played Braddock 45 Artist Gerard __ Borch 46. Pleasant to look at 48. __-Wan Kenobi 49. It's right in an atlas 50. "__ you nuts?" 52. Figs. 54. 1984 Matt Dillon film 62. Go hither and yon 63. Mischievous spirit 64. Periodicals, for short 66. "__ from Muskogee" 67. Some sibs 68. One of the Bronts 69. Cry out loud 70. Bront's Jane 71. Lavisher of attentionDOWN1. Word on a penny 2. Abbr. on a phone 3. Rex's detective 4. '40s pinup Betty 5. "Socrate" composer Erik 6. Oompah sounder 7. Thames town 8. Makes smoother 9. Brin gs dishonor to 10. Burn the surface of 11. LP player 12. Cajun veggie 13. Hacienda hand 21. Present time 22. Point a finger at 25. Ratchet mates 26. Code of conduct 27. Royal pain 29. Apple model 30. United __ College Fund 32. Trinidad/Tobago divider 33. Sporty Mazda 34. Pumice openings 35. Chemically nonreactive 37. Obsolescent roof topper 38. Messy eater, e.g. 41. Toon Chihuahua 42. "Dallas" family name 47. Swimmer Buster 49. Word preceding dog or Pie 51. Atlanta university 53. Moved like the Blob 54. Where Paris took Helen 55. __ up (falsify) 56. Villain's work 57. Have a hunch 58. Stereotypical lab assistant 59. Big letters on Wall St. 60. Monogram part: Abbr. 61. Strike out 65. Neighbor of Turk. American Prole Hometown Content 4/22/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 4 516 3782 825 2973 894 7 591 568 2379 200 9 HometownContent 618 2935 4 7 972541836 453786912 167 832459 249165783 385974261 736 459128 591628374 824317695 G O D P A W L S T R O Y O P E R E T H I C H O K E N E R O P E E V E E V I L G R A B L E R E N F E E L S A T I E A E R I A L N O N C E C R A B B E T U B A I M A C E M O R Y E T O N N E G R O I G O R S A N D S S L O B N Y S E S H A M E S E W I N G A C C U S E O O Z E D C H A R A N D E S K I M O H I F I M I A T A I N I T O K R A P O R E S D E L E P E O N I N E R T S Y R

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comRiversink, Medart students unveil murals at marine lab Special to The NewsGovernment entities are some of the largest employers in nearly every county in Florida, according to a new analysis released today by Florida TaxWatch, the nonpartisan, nonpro“ t research institution headquartered in Tallahassee. The Briefing surveys the signi“ cance of publicsector employment in Florida counties by examining the 10 largest employers per county, and “ nds that public employers are the top employer (by number of employees) in 51 of the 67 counties in Florida, and one of the top “ ve employers in every single county in the state. Additionally, the analysis “ nds that 57 counties have at least three public entities in the top 10, and “ ve counties have at least six public entities in their top ten. This analysis shows that public entities are a major employer in nearly every county in Florida,Ž said Dominic M. Calabro, President and CEO of Florida TaxWatch. Often, we think of counties with large public institutions „ such as prisons, military bases, and universities „ as the main government-supported parts of the state, but as this research shows, a signi“ cant amount of the public entities in the list of top 10 employers are local government entities that touch Floridians each and every day.Ž The Briefing includes a county-by-county breakdown of public employers, ranked by number of employees, and an additional graphic showing statewide views of the results. Florida TaxWatch is a statewide, nonpartisan, nonpro“ t research institute. Its mission is to provide high quality, independent research and education on government revenues, expenditures, taxation, public policies and programs. Visit the website at www. FloridaTaxWatch.org.Taxwatch: Public entities are signi“ cant employer Students and art teachers from all contributing schools in front of the mural wall displaying the murals painted by Koenig Brothers Design, Franklin Middle School, and SAIL High School. Riversink art teacher Jennifer Brooks with art students who helped with Riversinks conservation themed mural. Medart Elementary art teacher Diane Perez with students in the art club who contributed to Medarts peaceful manatee mural. By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar“ eld@thewakullanews.netOn Saturday, April 21, students and art teachers gathered at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory at Turkey Point for the unveiling of six murals, “ ve of which were painted by students from area schools. Working under the theme Conservation: Taking Care of the River, Bay and Gulf,Ž students, guided by their art teachers, painted the murals to boost awareness of the need to protect our local waterways. Participating schools were Franklin County Middle School, Wakullas Medart Elementary and Riversink Elementary schools, Tallahassees Alfred B. Maclay School and SAIL High School. Koenig Brothers Design also contributed to the project with the sixth mural. To see more pictures of the mural wall, see this story at thewakullanews.com. LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deli of the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netMuch of the controversy and frustration with the planned Wakulla County Airport improvements by residents in the area began after land adjacent to Surf Road was cleared and a sign was placed on the property letting people know it was the home of the future airport expansion. That property is owned by Wakulla Airport Properties LLC, with Richard Shepard as its manager. Shepard had the 16 acres cleared because of safety reasons for the airport, he said. The land would be used for taxiways, he said. However, in clearing the land, he violated the countys wetlands ordinance. Shepard appeared before the Code Enforcement Board on May 9 because of the violations, including land cleared in the 75-foot buffer zone of wetlands. There are ve areas of wetlands, according to Planning and Community Development Director Luis Serna. The planning and community development department received a complaint of the land clearing on Jan. 25. On Jan. 26, staff found there to be a violation of the development permit application because the clearing was done within 75 feet of wetlands, Serna said. On Feb. 6, Shepard was contacted for remediation. Shepard submitted a plan on March 13, but Serna said it was minimal and not adequate. Another plan was submitted on May 8. Serna said the owner must comply with the need for a plan and for a biologist or other quali ed person to review the plan and ensure that it was adequate. Once this is done, the planning staff would review the plan again and the owner could move forward with remediation. If Shepard doesnt follow through, it would be a separate violation. This serves to replace what was there originally, Serna said. When the clearing was done, 140 trees were taken out. Shepard said he intends to plant 1,000 seedlings. Serna said he is not sure if that is adequate, which is why a biologist needs to review the plan.Continued on Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 19th Issue Thursday, May 17, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents kll h h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews DELINQUENT TAX ROLLS IN THIS ISSUEThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 6B Thinking Outside the Book.................................................. Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9BINDEX OBITUARIES Bobby Bob Edward Fordham Theresa Ann Somerset Section CAirport clearing violated wetlands ordinance By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen they were children, May 20 meant picnics, great food, plaiting the maypole and the community coming together. Once they were older, they began to understand what the community was celebrating. A panel of community members, including Doris Mackey, George Nelson, Josephus Shingles, Betty Jean Slater, Joe Williams and Lacie Hudson, gathered at the library on May 11 for a discussion called Speaking Freely, organized by Herb Donaldson, artistic director of the Palaver Tree Theater, which focused on the history of May 20. May 20 celebrates the announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation in Florida, on May 20, 1865, at the Knott House in Tallahassee. This proclamation came two years after it was rst issued by President Abraham Lincoln. Those on the panel re ected on what May 20 meant to each of them and spoke freely about what it was like growing up in Wakulla County years ago. Nelson said growing up he was told May 20 was for the blacks and July 4 was for the whites. That seemed wrong to me, Nelson said. They all felt May 20 isnt celebrated as much today as it was back then, as many people dont know why May 20 is signi cant. Williams said after the freeing of slaves, black people were not entirely free. They did not have full freedom, he said. It was just one step, Williams said. When he was a child, black and white people didnt live near each other. Today, some of his neighbors are white. And the schools were divided by the railroad tracks, with the white school on one side and the black school on the other, he said. I thank God that I have lived to see an extended freedom, Williams said. Shingles, a retired teacher, said, We, as a people, the 20th of May gave us the idea that we could do those things we couldnt have done in the past. Before, Shingles said, they had to ask permission for everything. Continued on Page 5A Workshop on airports future is plannedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWithin the last few months, residents have been asking seeking answers to questions about the future of the Wakulla County Airport in Panacea. A large amount of land was cleared west of the runway with a sign stating that it was the future home of the airport expansion. This caused many residents along Surf Road to become concerned about what impacts this might have, such as noise, planes ying directly over their homes and decreases in property values. Because of all these questions and concerns, the newly formed airport advisory committee asked that the Wakulla County Commission set up a workshop to address those concerns. The commission agreed to set up a workshop, and will set a date at its upcoming meeting on May 21. The airport committee members have said there are no plans to expand the airport, but to bring it up to Department of Transportation standards. Resident and member of the Ochlockonee Bay Alliance, Jim Parham, said the residents have no problem with making the airport safer, but the current plan goes beyond those minimum requirements. He said he was also in support of reverting the airport back to the Tarpine homeowners. Continued on Page 3AFILE PHOTOA photo taken in March of the cleared property that was found in violation.Forestry re ghters use airport for controlled burn and training. See story, Page 2A.Panel discusses meaning of May 20 Sunrise at Live Oak IslandJENNIFER JENSENDusty roads may have a solution in Wakulla GardensBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSeveral residents from Wakulla Gardens showed up at the Wakulla County Commission meeting on May 7 seeking help with their roads and introducing themselves to the commissioners. Resident Tammy Hornbaker said the dust from the unpaved roads is unbearable. A limesrock aggregate was applied to the roads to help stabilize them and also help with problems with ooding in the area. During disasters and heavy rainfall, roads in this area become impassable. However, with the dry weather, this has caused the roads to be dry and dusty. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the gravel was intended to address ooding and has caused unintended problems. Hornbaker told the commissioners that she has been getting signatures for a petition. So far, she has almost 100 signatures from residents in Wakulla Gardens. Each family in the gardens have a story to tell, Hornbaker said. A story of health problems and illnesses, as well as having trouble breathing. Residents said they were told stormwater treatment must be done prior to the roads being paved, but to them, it seems like an empty promise. Continued on Page 2A Playwright Herb Donaldson put together a panel to talk about the signi cance of May 20 celebrated as the day in 1865 when the Emancipation Proclamation freed the slaves in Florida. The panel discussed the changes in race relations they had seen over their lifetime. One member of the panel said when he was growing up, he was told May 20 was for the blacks and July 4 was for the whites. FireFirematics matics FireFirematics maticsSee Page 14A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AWe deserve to be able to live a dust-free life, said resident Jamaal Dickens. Although several said they understood stormwater needed to be addressed, their main concern currently is the dust and hoped the county could at least do something to help with that problem. There are several infrastructure improvements needed in Wakulla Gardens, including water for lots that arent on central water, stormwater treatment, sewer, re hydrants and road paving. County Administrator David Edwards said they are looking into a short term solution for the dust problem, such as applying a dust retardant like Calcium Chloride. However, the problem, as it has always been, is money. At the end of the day, we just dont have money, Edwards said. The cost to apply that mixture is around $87,000 and it will only last, maybe four months, he said. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the biggest issue is stormwater, which does need to be done before road paving. If it isnt, the roads will flood, he said. Commissioner Jerry Moore suggested the commission forget about the other infrastructure problems for now and just focus on getting the road paved. We just have to start paving in Wakulla Gardens, Moore said. Commissioner Randy Merritt pointed out that 10 to 15 roads have already been approved by previous commissions to be paved. Moore said maybe those approvals can be reversed and Wakulla Gardens can move to the top of the list. Chairman Alan Brock said there has been a freeze on road paving and the current commission has not approved funding for new roads to be paved. Those roads that have been paved recently come from other funding sources or have been resurfacing funds which can not be used on unpaved roads. Merritt said he also wanted to make sure the roads that serve the most people are paved rst. I think we need to address this logically, Merritt said. The total cost for all improvements is more than $34 million, which was estimated to be around $800 a year per household for 15 years, which would be on top of normal taxes, Commissioiner Lynn Artz said. Theres not a lack of desire, Artz said. This is a huge long term and expensive undertaking. An idea that has been brought up recently and several times in the past is a voluntary assessment. Homeowners within Wakulla Gardens would vote on whether or not they would be willing to pay for infrastructure improvements in their neighborhood. I dont see any other way, Stewart said. The commission discussed sending out a ballot to residents in Wakulla Gardens at the April 16 county commission meeting, but decided to table the item because they wanted a dollar amount, included in the initial ballot survey. The results of the ballot survey would then help the county commission decide whether it wants to move forward or not. The option to move forward with the ballot survey idea will come before the commission at the May 21 meeting, as well as ideas to pay for the short term and long term improvements. Edwards and his staff have developed a short term plan for paving the 21 miles of roads in Wakulla Gardens. Although the county should do stormwater before paving the roads, Edwards said this will give residents a better quality of life and improve property values. The plan would be to pave all roads within Wakulla Gardens in three different phases, starting with the highly traveled roads. All three phases would take two years, he said. They would use existing staff to prepare the roads for paving and the county would bid out the asphalt portion. The cost of these improvements is $5.2 million, which includes minimal stormwater. Edwards said the county would nance this project with a bank loan or bond and each property owner would be assessed. The range of the assessment would be between $180 and $235 a year per household. The note would be for 15 or 20 years. There are about 3,000 units in Wakulla Gardens. It gives a fix to the problem on the short term, Edwards said. If approved by the commission, residents would be sent a ballot to vote whether they would pay the assessment for paved roads. If a majority of residents agree and the commission decides to move forward, Edwards said paving could start in the spring of 2013. In the meantime, the county would look at setting up a Community Redevelopment Agency for the Wakulla Gardens area. Edwards said there will be an immediate increase in property values after roads are paved. As the value increases, the tax revenue on the appreciated portion of the value or the increment is set aside for CRA projects. It will be a minimal amount at rst, but will continue to grow over time, he said. On top of this, they also want to set aside a portion of the one-cent sales tax revenue for Wakulla Gardens projects. They are also looking at a potential yearly stormwater fee for all newly improved properties, which would be around a small amount. He said they have also looked at a stormwater setup fee for new homes. As Wakulla Gardens builds out, the stormwater problem will be worse, Edwards said. The county will also look at sewer and getting re hydrants. It may take a long time for all these improvements to be done, but this gives residents in the area a solution, he said. The county commission meeting is at 5 p.m. on Monday, May 21 in the commission chambers. Dusty roads may have a solution for Wakulla Gardens residentsBy STEVE FULTSSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Forest Service conducted a multiagency training exercise at the Wakulla County airport last Thursday. A UH-1 Huey helicopter ew multiple missions to ignite and monitor prescribed live re burns in Wakulla County. The large military-type helicopter was accompanied by an aviation ground support crew, which provides portable maintenance and refueling equipment on site. Prescribed re is one of the most versatile and cost effective tools land managers use. Prescribed re is used to reduce hazardous fuel buildups, thus providing increased protection to people, their homes and the forest. Other uses include disease control in young pines, improving habitat for wildlife, range management, preservation of endangered plant and animal species and the maintenance of re dependent ecosystems. Specialists from various state agencies were given training and then taken aloft to actually drop small incendiary devices, which begin the prescribed re process. These devices look very similar to ping-pong balls. After being dropped precisely in strategic locations, they ignite and burn white hot. The helicopter and wildland re ghting crews on the ground closely monitor the res progress to assure containment at all times. To learn more about prescribed re in Florida, go to YouTube and search Good Fire Prescribed Fire and Healthy Forests or visit www. oridaforestservice.com.Prescribed re training held at Wakulla airport STEVE FULTS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Huey helicopter with Florida Forestry re ghters last week. 713-0014 99 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Perfect Weather for Outdoor Seating Overlooking Beautiful Dickerson Bay!SATURDAY AND SUNDAY LUNCH SPECIALS 11a.m. 3p.m. All Under $10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS $2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 Hours:Tu-W & F 10 6 Th 12 8 Sat 8 NOON Sun & Mon Closed850.926.83192809 Crawfordville Hwy across from Hudson Parkwww.root319salon.com A full service hair and nail salon. 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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn 2009, the City of Sopchoppy was awarded $5.1 million, with a $4.3 million grant and a loan of $800,000, to expand the sewer system throughout the city and connect it to the countys sewer treatment plant at Otter Creek. The city is trying to pay off its loan associated with the sewer so that it can hand off the system to the county. At the May 13 city commission meeting, City Clerk Jackie Lawhon got the goahead to pay the remaining balance of the loan, which is $400,000. Lawhon said her recommendation was to go ahead and get it paid. So we can get out from under that, Lawhon said. And once it is paid, the city is free to give the sewer system to the county. The commission voted four to zero, Mayor Colleen Skipper was absent, to have Lawhon pay the remaining balance of the loan. The commission also directed city attorney Dan Cox to go ahead and draft the documents necessary to give the system to Wakulla County. Cox said that may be included in the agreement and may not be necessary. Lawhon said the city would also need to look at the billing for wastewater. Currently, the city bills customers on sewer for the county. Once the citys sewer is turned over to the county it will become a part of their system, Lawhon said, and they will need to look at their agreement for billing services. In other matters before the city commission: The depot advisory committee is applying for a $35,000 grant on behalf of the city for the depot. The funds are from the Department of Transportation. The application is due June 1 and there is no match required from the city. The money would be used on the inside of the depot. Currently, there are also plans to start laying the bricks at the depot. People can purchase the bricks and have their names on the bricks. The depot also recently received a at screen TV to play oral histories in the waiting room section of the depot. City Commissioner Richard Harden resigned from his position as chairman of the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council. At the city commission meeting, he resigned from the council completely. Harden said he has to take time off from work to attend the meetings. He plans to submit a letter of resignation to County Commissioner Alan Brock who also serves on the TDC. The council voted unanimously to have Commissioner Lara Edwards take Hardens place on the TDC. Harden also announced that he will be resigning from his seat on the city commission effective early November because of his campaign to run for the county commission. The commission discussed the possibility of establishing a Community Redevelopment Agency to put them in a better position for downtown revitalization grants, as well as funding for those projects. Cox said the downtown area would need to meet the de nition of slum or blighted area. The downtown would be considered a blighted area with its inadequate parking, stagnant assessed value and inconsistent layout. The only problem with the CRA is that typically as the value increases, the tax revenue on the appreciated portion of the value or the increment is set aside for CRA projects. However, because the city does not have an ad valorem tax, they would need to look at other options to pay the debt. Cox suggested having a stakeholders meeting to determine the future of downtown Sopchoppy. Lawhon said maybe the city needs to start with that meeting and nd out what people in the area would like to see happen, see what their vision is. She added that after the meeting, the commission could develop a 5-year plan with those projects and then chip away at the list over time. The next city commission meeting will be June 18 at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A Several Surf Road residents who are against the airport expansion attended the meeting, many of whom said that the land that was cleared served as a noise buffer. All of a sudden, I lose my buffer, said John Smith, who lives directly across from the clearing. Residents said they hoped the board could require Shepard to put the buffer back as part of the remediation plan. Serna said his job is to ensure the wetland buffer is replaced and the wetlands are protected. Code Enforcement Board Chairman Ron Piasecki said the board did not have anything to do with the controversy with the airport or the remediation plan. The boards job was to look at the violation only. Shepard said that he would try to replant pine trees by the buffer. He said he was told to wait until November to plant them. The board voted unanimously to approve staffs recommendations to require the plan and agreement by June 9 from Shepard. The board stated that the staff could handle the timetable for when the planting should be complete.Airport clearing violated wetlands ordinanceContinued from Page 1AThere had been some discussion by the county commission of turning the airport back over to the Tarpine community, however, it was decided the airport remain county owned so it could still be eligible for state and governmental grants. Due to the lack of resources and staff to operate the airport, the commission decided to create the advisory committee. There is no way the airport can remain public, Parham said. He added that it was too small and the only way it can expand is to acquire more property. The airport covers 13.16 acres of land. In order to make the improvements to the airport, the runway length would be extended from 2,800 feet to 2,972 feet. It would also need to be shifted about 50 feet to the west. The longer the runway, the safer it is, said Committee Chairman John Russell. Airport Operations Supervisor Steve Fults said they want to minimize the effects of the improvements on the surrounding homes, but must be cognizant of safety. Bare minimums arent the goal, Fults said. One of the major safety concerns is the building and hangar that encroach upon the primary surface area. The building that now houses La Cantina Grille is 50 feet within the primary surface area, which is the area surrounding the landing area. Since the county does not own that building, it cannot remove it, so a shift of the runway is necessary. There is also a 13-acre hangar parcel that has hangars that were constructed in 2006 too close to the primary surface area. The property is owned by Panacea Coastal Properties Inc. Committee member Walt Dickson is the president of the company. The 10 hangars were built but have never been placed on the tax roll. This is because the building permits were never closed out, according to County Administrator David Edwards. Dickson said there were some issues with the building department but those have been worked out. Before they can be placed on the tax roll, a certi cate of occupancy must be issued, Dickson said. He added that he is working with the county to get it in order. In order to move the runway, land would need to be acquired. In the current Airport Layout Plan, homes along Surf Road at the end of the runway were included to be purchased. However, several of those homeowners are not willing to sell. The airport committee decided it needed to modify the ALP to remove those properties east of Pine Street and Pine Street itself. Russell said that property is not needed. The county received $75,000 from FDOT which was originally intended to pay for runway lighting. Since the plan calls for moving the runway, the committee thought it would be best to use the funds for re-engineering the ALP, appraisals and environmental studies, as well as property acquisition. In order to change how the money will be used, approval is needed from FDOT. According to Russell, representatives with FDOT said that wouldnt be a problem, but a letter from the county outlining the modification would be needed. Surf Road Resident Bill Anderson questioned the makeup of the advisory committee. All have a vested interest, he said. The majority are pilots and live in Tarpine and another is a developer who owns some of the property that would be acquired for the expansion, he said. He added that those other homes in the area have no representation on the committee and this expansion would only bene t a small amount of people. Dickson owns property that is on the list to be purchased by the county for the airport and because of this con ict, he has decided to resign. Dickson was on the committee as a representative of Panacea Waterfronts Florida Committee. He said someone else from the committee will replace him. The workshop on the airport is tentatively scheduled for June 26. The next airport committee meeting is May 29 at 2 p.m. in the county commissioners conference room.Workshop on airports future is plannedCITY OF SOPCHOPPYCity will pay off loan that nanced sewer expansion Airport committee member Walt Dickson resigns over a con ict of interest as he owns property being considered for the airport expansion Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 18, Noon Publication Date: May 31 Remember This Years Graduate Congratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2012Sponsor Line ........$20 Eighth Page ...........$50 Quarter Page ......$100 .............................................................. $50 Half Page ..............$200 .............................................................. $75 Full Page ...............$300 ............................................................. $125 Back Page .............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons ............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available PUBLIC NOTIFICATION MAY 17, 24, 31 JUNE 7, 2012 City of Sopchoppy For more information, contact City Clerk, Jackie Lawhon or Deputy Clerk Linda Langston at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL or phone 962-4611.MAY 3, 10, 17, 2012CITY ELECTION NOTICE

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Paramedics suit against county going to trial Helen Finch Kyle obituary Mary Lou Harvey Carter obituary Babe Ruth Baseball for May 17 Bears are spotted in Crawfordville Lee deputy walks for the fallen James D. Sizemore Sr. obituary Coast Guard Auxiliary for May 17 thewakullanews.com Follow us onEditor, The News: I would like to thank our local health care providers for their collaboration and for the compassion and commitment they showed for the health of our community on Saturday, May 12. Five clinicians and dozens of other volunteers each donated 5 hours of their time on a Saturday to provide free sports physicals for 155 student athletes. Their goal was to keep local students from being denied an opportunity to play sports because they lack a family doctor, health insurance, or the ability to pay. Dr. Andrea Plaggee, Dr. Matthew Standridge, and Cartier Lammert, ARNP (Tallahassee Memorial Family Medicine), Dr. Chitra Mony (Wakulla Medical Center), and Dr. Howard Kessler provided the medical examinations. Assisting in the clinic were Mary Ellis, RN, Susan Register, and Lisa Sanders. Volunteers staf ng the stations for height, weight, pulse, blood pressure, temperature, and vision included Jo Ann Chichetti, Belinda Largent, Anne Van Meter, and ve students from the Medical Academy at the High School: Madison Harris, Savannah Harris, Sara Mathis, Amy Walker, and Richard Walker. Volunteers responsible for patient ow into and through the clinic included Gail Hickman, Lori Strickland, Jode Yates, Michael Schnorr, Kaitlin Lammert, Jim Hilyer, and Bruce Ashley. Several WCSO deputies under the supervision of Dale Evans assisted with traf c ow in the parking lot. Coaches from all three schools were on hand for crowd control. Volunteers helping with check-in and paperwork completion included Tanya English, Sally Watson, and Brian English. Sue Morgan and Chris Yates copied and collected completed forms. Lynn Artz was responsible for overall coordination, recruited volunteers, and provided referral information to athletes not initially cleared to participate in sports. Tanya English coordinated the event within the School District and worked with athletic directors and coaches to get the word out to student athletes. Tallahassee-Memorial Family Medicine generously contributed the use of their facility, equipment, and supplies. The Wakulla County Health Department also loaned equipment and donated supplies. The willingness of these hard-working professionals to help our youth in their spare time was inspiring. I am deeply grateful to all involved. Lynn Artz Chair Wakulla Health Care Task Force anks for help with free sports physicals Defending recreational shermen Republican fundraiser was a success Don Curtis is candidate for House Wakulla Gardens residents need to attendBy RITA HANEYfor NAMI WakullaNAMI Wakulla and the National Alliance of Mental Illness offer hope to many who live their lives with a mental health disability. The greatest obstacle for the mentally ill is the stigma attached to the illness. The stigma attached with a mental health disability often delays receiving help. The way to reduce stigma is through education and outreach. NAMI Wakulla provides the support necessary to live a full and meaningful life. In addition to services provided directly to the men, women and children who suffer from a debilitating mental illness, NAMI also reaches out to their family members. The stigma of mental illness affects all members of a family. Misunderstanding of what mental illness is leaves the family not just the person who has the illness confused, isolated and fearful. Providing education through public awareness seminars and newsletters, NAMI Wakulla reaches out to community members to provide the education and awareness necessary for understanding and promoting compassion within our community, learn to navigate in the world, adjust to medication and reduces stress whether in the work place, family or with friends. For those who suffer from a mental illness, whether it is depression, bi-polar or post-traumatic stress, it is a journey of recovery. Learning how to navigate in the world with a mental illness can be a slow journey toward acceptance. When a man or woman is accepted and appreciated, not for what they do not have, but who they are and what they can be shortens this journey. NAMI provides education, support and community out-reach: NAMI Wakulla offers monthly free public awareness seminars/programs dealing with various aspects of mental illness often providing the opportunity for a person with a mental illness to talk about their journey to recovery. Providing education to the community with the goal of reducing the stigma and increasing knowledge within the community. Newsletters with informative articles are also available. NAMI Wakulla works with the school system to help both parents and teachers provide support and education to alleviate problems in the classroom and at home with such mental health issues as ADHD. NAMI Wakulla provides support for the person with the mental illness and their families. Families are often unable to help a loved one. Having another parent or spouse to talk with about how they manage can be a blessing. Many times the people closest to those with mental illness feel they are unable to help the person they love. Family to Family support groups are available right here in Wakulla County. These groups aid family members and other loved ones to recognize what they can do. Within a group setting a person can identify with others who share the same or similar symptoms, learning to accept themselves. The group experience can reduce the fear of medication or the various side-effects which often accompany psychotropic medication. Groups can also bring acceptance and reduce the symptoms of depression, bipolar, post-traumatic stress. With some mental illnesses, a group experience may not be the best treatment option in these instances mental health providers in the community are willing to provide individual sessions. Like any disability or physical illness, acceptance is the key to recovery and group and/ or individual therapy can sometimes provide the necessary support. Living in a community which is resourceful and strong is an advantage to all of us. Those coping with mental health concerns, be it severe depression, bi-polar, schizophrenia or post-traumatic stress can also be blessed with the support and encouragement of the entire community. This is true for adults. For children who suffer from mild to severe symptoms of mental illness, it is a necessity. If you would like to help NAMI Wakulla celebrate Mental Health Month all year long with your time or donations, please contact NAMI Wakulla at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327 or by phone at (850) 926-1033. All programs offered by NAMI Wakulla are free and open to the public: NAMI Connections Support Group Day and Evening groups offered every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Library, and every Tuesday evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla Of- ce. Family-to-Family Support Group is offered the second Thursday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla Of ce. Monthly Public Programs are held on the fourth Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club, 64 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.Rita Haney LCSW is a counselor practicing in Crawfordville and writing on behalf of NAMI Wakulla.May is mental health awareness monthEditor, The News: Thank you U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland for taking the unpopular stance of defending the Fishing Rights of Floridas Recreational Fishermen. Also a big thank you to Jim Hutchison Jr., director of The Recreational Fishing Alliance for providing such a clear explanation of why we Sports have suffered in recent years at the hands of the Environmental Defense Fund, the Pew Environmental Group, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and the Obama Administration which are providing huge grants to fund Commercial and Charter Fishing Associations in their efforts to monopolize our public sh stocks. These Associations are thrilled with the current system that allows them to harvest our saltwater public resources 365 days a year because they have catch limits. In establishing the bag limit for Recreational Fishermen, the Gulf Council allows the Sports two red snapper a day and gives them a 40-day red snapper season this year. Of course, every sport sherman is going to sh every day of the 40 days and harvest his catch share of 80 Red Snapper per year. I DONT THINK SO! Recreational shermen have to work at least ve days a week to feed their families and most are lucky to get off on a Saturday to go shing. Sunday is reserved for the Lord, the wife and family. That means that the most days the average recreational sherman will be able to go snapper shing this year is 4 days, that is, IF THE WEATHER AND SEAS PERMIT and there are no kids graduation parties or baseball Saturday games he must attend. NOAA Fisheries, The Obama Administration and the Gulf Council need to get REAL! I dont begrudge commercial shermen because they work hard too but recreational sherman contribute 200 times more money to Floridas economy than the commercials, and they actually harvest 1/20th of the sh. Remember, they sh for recreation and enough fresh sh for supper. I understand that Rep. Southerland is a recreational sherman, and he understands the issues. Thanks again, Steve! Major Alan Lamarche Crawfordville EDITORS NOTE: Biographical information included with the letter notes that Major Lamarche is a retired law enforcement of cer, trainer and administrator with a Masters in Criminal Justice Administration. He served as Deputy Director of Law Enforcement for Florida GFC and he has 40 years of experience with Gulf Fisheries. Major Lamarche was one of ve candidates nominated by Gov. Scott for a seat on the Gulf Council. The Secretary of Commerce will be making a nal selection in June. Editor, The News: The Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee hosted a sell out crowd at its Annual Ronald Reagan Black Tie & Blue Jeans Fund Raising Event at The Bistro at Wildwood on May 3. Filling the Bistro to capacity, the 150-plus Republican faithful included local Republican candidates: (Sheriff) Major Maurice Langston, county commission candidates Ralph Thomas Jr. (District 1), Mike Stewart (District 3), Richard Harden (District 5), and Melisa Taylor, candidate for School Board District 2. Candidates for the Florida House and other 2012 hopefuls were also on hand to get acquainted. According to most attendees, the high point of the evening was the keynote address by Peter Schweizer, Tallahassee resident and best-selling author of Reagans War. Contrasting President Reagans gentlemanly good humor with the sarcastic hyperbole of the current administration, Schweizer revealed heroic aspects of Reagans life little known to most Americans, recalled the former Presidents determination to eliminate the threat of global communism, and extolled Reagans unrelenting belief in the same traditional American values of faith, family, and freedom that form the cornerstone of the Wakulla County Republican Party. This event is one of many held annually by local Republican parties throughout the state of Florida in May in recognition of Ronald Reagans birthday and the profound effect Reagan had on the nation and the world during his Presidency and his lifetime. Kathleen Lamarche Crawfordville Editor, The News: Wakulla Gardens residents have recently begun a uni ed push to ask the county commissioners to do something about the dust in Wakulla Gardens. This is now an Agenda item for this next meeting on Monday, May 21. The commissioners will be considering the paving of the Gardens and we are urged to have as many people as possible show at the meeting. The meeting begins at 5 pm, and if you want to speak, Citizens to be Heard is at 6:30 pm. They seem to have arrived at a palatable solution, and are excited to let us know. If you can show up on Monday, please do so. Tammy Hornbaker tamygayehornbaker@yahoo.com Editor, The News: Don Curtis announced his candidacy for the Florida Legislature, House of Representatives, District 7, Republican. Don and his family are long-time residents of Taylor County. He and his wife of 32 years, Michele, live on a farm at Lake Bird where theyve raised their two sons, Ray and Clayton. Now theyve been blessed with a grandson and theres another one on the way! Don is a forester and President of The Forestry Company in Perry. In his career, he has served as Assistant State Forester for Florida, served on the board of the Suwannee River Water Management District, as well as the board at Aucilla Christian Academy, and started the Shady Grove Volunteer Fire Department. Dons focus is, and has been for many years, bringing jobs to this area. We all want a better future for our children and grandchildren, he says. We want them to be able to have good jobs here as they become adults and start their own families. Currently many of them have to go elsewhere for employment and that needs to change. Because of his strong stance on private property r ights, Don has been endorsed by the Florida Forestry Association. He also serves on the Leadership Council for the National Federation of Independent Businesses, Florida Chapter. Hes a lifetime member of the National Ri e Association and a member of the Florida Farm Bureau. Don knows this district well. Hes a conservative, a listener, and a small business owner. For more information, visit the website www.ElectDonCurtis.com. Don Curtis Perry

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 5A Sheriffs of ce announces speed enforcement The Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce has stepped up traf c enforcement in Wakulla County in an effort to reduce speeding on area roadways. Some of the recent enforcement efforts have centered on Shell Point Road, Old Shell Point Road, Spring Creek Highway, Wakulla Arran Road, Rehwinkel Road, Songbird subdivision, Surf Road, Mashes Sands Road, Wildwood Drive, Cajer Posey Road, Panacea area, Tradewinds subdivision, Whiddon Lake Road, Fishing Fool Street, Savannah Road, Lonnie Raker Lane, Jean Drive and others. Warnings and Uniform Traf c Citations have been issued to motorists on these roads and the patrols will be continuing. Republicans meet on Thursday at WildwoodThe Wakulla County Executive Committee will meet at the Bistro at Wildwood on Thursday, May 17, at 7 p.m. Those who would like to are invited to join them at 6 p.m. for conversation and a meal. This month, they will hear from Peter Williams, who is a candidate for 2nd Judicial Circuit State Attorney. Williams kicked off his campaign by stating, After much encouragement from citizens, community leaders, family and friends, I have decided to run for state attorney in the 2nd Judicial Circuit. They believe as I do that the voters deserve a choice and a change. The state attorney should be held accountable to the community and citizens, and they deserve a prosecutor who will enforce the law equally and ensure public safety. Wakulla Springs 5K Run is SaturdayThe Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park presents the 2012 Wakulla Springs 5K Run and 1 Mile Fun Run on Saturday, May 19, at Wakulla Springs State Park. This unique run winds through the Sanctuary, a wilderness area of Wakulla Springs State Park which is not open to the general public. Packet pickup and race day registration will begin at 7a.m. The 1 Mile Fun Run will begin at 8 a.m., followed by the 5K Run at 8:30 a.m. For registration forms, visit www. wakullasprings.org/projects.html or register online at www.raceit.com. Fees are $21 for the 5K with shirt, $15 for no shirt option. The one mile fun run is $16 with shirt, $10 no shirt option. For additional information, contact Trudy Thompson at (850) 962-2064. Langston reunion to be held May 19The 13th family reunion for the descendants and relatives of Bill and Sally Roberts Langston will be held May 19, at 11:30 a.m. at the Fort Braden Community Center, 16387 Blountstown Highway, in Tallahassee. Fortress will be in concert and share its ministry with those attending. Family members are asked to bring covered dishes plus beverages. Contact Carol Langston (850) 4211157 or (850) 524-1661 for questions or further information. Car wash for the Anthony Revell Scholarship is setA car wash to bene t the Anthony Revell Scholarship Fund will be held at Status Liquors, 2415 W. Tennessee St. in Tallahassee on May 19 at 10 a.m. Revell was a corrections of cer in Leon County, and previously in Wakulla, who was killed when his motorcycle was struck by a re truck responding to a call. The scholarship fund in his name is to benefit a student attending the Florida Public Safety Institute (formerly known as Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy). Memorial Day Blood Drive to be held at Wal-MartSoutheast Community Blood Center will hold a blood drive at the Crawfordville Wal-Mart on Memorial Day, Monday, May 28, at the store. The bloodmobile will be parked outside in the parking lot. Donors will receive a $10 Wal-Mart gift card. No change in garbage pickups because of holidayThere will be no changes to your solid waste collection for the Memorial Day Holiday on Monday, May 28, according to Waste Pro. All services will be completed on your normal scheduled day. Gallery hours set for Facing Liberty photo exhibitFacing Liberty, a photo exhibit currently on display at G-Signs Gallery as part of the May 20th Celebration, is open Tuesday through Friday from noon to 4 p.m., and Saturdays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The exhibit includes historic photos of schools, churches, along with the community at work and play. G-Signs Gallery is located across Crawfordville Highway from the Courthouse. Staff ReportsBriefsContinued from Page 1AIn the 1930s, Shingles said black people were still only able to do what they were told to do. And some of that resentment still exists, on both sides, he said. Once the slaves were freed, many owned land, but they were never shown the responsibility of ownership and didnt know what it took to take care of a piece of land. With freedom comes calluses, Williams said. They gave some examples of this half freedom. They had to go through the back door of a white persons home, they couldnt go through the front door. They had to sit in the back of the bus and couldnt eat at the counter in a diner. In the 1960s, many still didnt consider black people to be equal, Nelson said. As a child, Nelson had to call a white child mister or miss. Williams said the better everyone associates together, the better everyone will get along. Freedom has given us the opportunity to kind of come together, Williams said. When asked if the panel felt the younger generation respects and honors their ancestors, many on the panel said no. Shingles said many young people do not work for what they want, they simply take it. We tend to say that I want what I want and if you got it, Im going to take it, Shingles said. Most on the panel also felt that Wakulla County was still behind and felt many white people in the county did not want black people to have things. Nelson compared Wakulla County to Gadsden County and said they are two separate pictures. The majority of elected officials and people of authority in Gadsden are black, the opposite is true in Wakulla County. He said he envisioned Wakulla County being a mixture of the two. The problem is that some people are still set in their ways, Shingles said. In the early days of integration, I used to say, the only salvation for integration is a few more funerals, Shingles said. And that was on both sides. Some of these diehards are going to have to die for the situation to get better, he added. Some of the hatred that people feel is being passed down to their children and their children, Nelson said. Shingles said corrective action has to start with each individual. Each person has to correct themselves. If not, Its going to be a festering sore under there and only death is going to correct it, Shingles said. Shingles said what happened, happened, but now they need to gure out how to correct it. Mackey said, Weve come a long ways, but were not there yet. She said she taught her children they can be anything they want to be and all are educated. The panel agreed that it must start with the younger generation. We should have a better dialogue with everybody, Shingles said. Discussions like this one will help, he said. People must face the facts about what happened. Several other events are scheduled to celebrate May 20, including a documentary night at the library on May 18 at 5 p.m. and the May 20 celebration on May 19 from noon to 4 p.m. at Mount Trial Church, the old Buckhorn School. For more information about these events, contact Donaldson at (718) 682-3870 or Jenny Jones at 926-7547.Panel discusses meaning of May 20Special to The NewsGovernor Rick Scott announced the reappointment of Eugene Lamb Jr. and Frank S. Messersmith to Tallahassee Community Colleges District Board of Trustees. We appreciate the Governors reappointment of Trustees Lamb and Messersmith, said TCC President Jim Murdaugh. Their reappointment con- rms that TCCs commitment to providing high quality education with market value, keeping tuition affordable, and supporting economic development in our community is recognized at the highest level. Trustee Lamb was appointed to the Board in 2007 by then-Governor Charlie Crist. He served a term as chair in 2010-11 and was on the Presidential Search Committee that selected Murdaugh as TCCs sixth president. Lamb, who represents Gadsden County, has been a Commissioner with the Gadsden County Board of County Commissioners since 2004. He was athletic director for Gadsden County Schools from 2007 to 2009, a teacher with Leon County Schools from 1971 to 2004 and a recreation supervisor with the City of Tallahassee from 1992 to 2005. Trustee Messersmith is the senior member of TCCs Board, having been appointed by thenGovernor Jeb Bush in 1999 and reappointed by Crist in 2007. His 13-years of service include two terms as chair (2002-03 and 200809). Messersmith, who represents Wakulla County, has been a governmental consultant with FSM Associates since 2000. He served on the Florida Public Safety Commission from 1990 to 1992, in the Florida House of Representatives from 1980 to 1990 and was an assistant to the Sheriff of Palm Beach County from 1968 to 1978. Strong and effective governance by trustees is key to our ability to meet the needs of our community, added Murdaugh. Trustees Lamb and Messersmith are noble ambassadors for the citizens of Gadsden and Wakulla counties, respectively. Their record of responsible trusteeship and stewardship of college resources is commendable. Both Lamb and Messersmith are reappointed for terms beginning May 9, 2012, and ending May 31, 2014. Both appointments are subject to con- rmation by the Florida Senate.Lamb, Messersmith reappointed to TCC Most on the panel also felt that Wakulla County was still behind and felt many white people in the county did not want black people to have things. Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Ofce (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Ofce (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Ofce (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! 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Bobby Bob Edward Fordham, 75, of Crawfordville, died Saturday, May 12, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He was born on Jan. 29, 1937, to Safo Douglas and Edna Pauline Frances Fordham and was reared on a small farm in Rentz, Ga. He joined the U.S. Air Force as a Weather Observer in August 1955. He quickly rose to the rank of sergeant and transferred to London, England. His tour of duty in England was only two years, but an experience he would never forget after growing up on a small farm in Georgia. He married his sweetheart, Shirley Faye Carter, on April 3, 1958. On Oct. 10, 1963, he returned to the U.S. to live once again in his home state of Georgia. After being discharged from the Air Force, he had a variety of jobs he managed a small grocery store in Albany, Ga., worked as an electronics expert in Jacksonville, managed a Stand n Snack store in downtown Tallahassee and one on the campus of Florida State University, managed a Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant near FSU, worked in construction, and nally retired as an inspector from Talquin Electric. In 1971, he moved his wife and children to Wakulla County where he lived until his death. The funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 19, at Evergreen Baptist Church, 1702 Evergreen Road, Sylvester, Ga., with interment to follow in the church cemetery. The family will receive friends on Saturday from 10:30 a.m. until service hour at the church. A reception will be held immediately following in the church Fellowship Hall. In lieu of owers, a benefit account has been set up for Bobby Fordham at Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 628, Woodville FL 32362, or call (850) 421-3504. Survivors include his wife, Shirley Carter Fordham of Crawfordville; children, Doug Fordham (Lori) of Fayetteville, N.C., Leisha Fordham and Tara Galinos of Tallahassee, Sid Fordham (Sherry) of Crawfordville and Theresa Fuller (Jim) of Montrose, Colo.; a sister, Jean Fellows of Jacksonville; brothers, Mickey Fordham of Houston, Texas, Larry Fordham of El Paso, Texas, and Johnny Fordham of Atlanta; grandchildren, Aubree Tupper, Colby Fordham, Lucas Fordham, Amber Miller, Christina Hodge, Charity Amenta, Brianna Fordham, Ashlea Boutwell and Jacob Fuller; great-grandchildren, Ethan and Viola Rae Tupper, Stihl and Stone Miller, Brody Hodge, Gabriel Amenta and longtime companion Hillary. In addition to his parents, he was predeceased by his brother, Carroll Fordham. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and events Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1st Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesChurch BriefsBobby Bob Edward Fordham Theresa Ann Somerset Bobby Bob Edward Fordham Theresa Ann SomersetTheresa Ann Somerset, 50, died on Tuesday, May 8, in Crawfordville. She was born in Tallahassee on April 13, 1962. Graveside services were held Thursday, May 10, at Oakland Cemetery in Tallahassee, with a memorial service on Friday, May 11, at Ivan Assembly of God in Crawfordville. She is survived by her husband, Mickey Somerset; four daughters, Cristy Rivers (Jon), Carmen Branchi, Candice Branchi and Heather Drymon; her father, Tommy Thomason; sisters, Jan Brown, Cathy Power and Jo Reeves; and seven grandchildren. Arrangements are being handled by Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com). By Rev. James L. Snyder One of the great joys of getting older, and there is at least one joy involved in this grueling process, is discovering that you were right all the time. I try not to boast here because, well, thats just the kind of person I am. And, Im not going to make a list of all of the things I was right about. No sense in boasting, but I just cant resist one. Some of these things centered on my relationship with my mother. One advantage a mother has over her children is that sense of authority and being right all the time. Looking back, I can see that she was not right all the time. As a young person, my mother told me things I have since learned not to be true. For example: It takes more than clean underwear to survive an accident. The boogieman under my bed does not exist... any more. None of my friends wants to jump off a bridge. I will grow up even if I dont clean up my plate. And, its almost impossible to behave yourself and have a good time simultaneously. My mother, like other mothers, was not a bad mother. She just had bad information, much of which she got from her mother. Im not sure where grandmother got her information, but it too was wrong. And, when you have bad information, there is nothing more you can do but in ict it upon your children. And my mother in icted away at us children. I cant tell you how many times my mother told me to Eat your spinach. Its good for you. When I would protest she would further admonish me by saying, Finish all of your spinach on your plate, it wont kill you. Boy was she wrong. I hate to say, I told you so. However, the temptation is beyond my ability to resist. After all, Im only a man. I guess I never ate enough spinach for the strength to resist everything. For years, I told my mother that spinach was not good for me. Now, I have scienti c proof as well as verification from the United States government that spinach can kill you. Where was all this information and government verification when I was young and being force-fed spinach? Of course, there is always the idea that my mother knew this and was simply trying to kill me. No, after further thought, Im sure that is far from being true. But dont think I havent been pondering this, lately. She had plenty of evidence to incite this kind of attitude toward me, I assure you. My mother used everything she could think of to get me to eat my spinach. She used intimidation, arguments and a gold oldfashioned thrashing. None of it seemed to make her spinach taste any better. One of the arguments my mother used to get me to eat spinach was good ole Popeye. Popeye eats spinach, my mother would taunt me. Look at all of the things he does because of eating spinach. Of course, from my observation, Popeye only ate spinach when he was in extreme trouble and his life was being threatened. I tried to have an agreement with my mother that I would eat spinach every time my life was threatened. Then she threatened my life. Her arguments continued. Certainly you want to be like Popeye, dont you? my mother pleaded. To which I responded, Yes, and he smokes a pipe too. Can I smoke a pipe? I did not think it fair for my mother to make me eat spinach and then not allow me to smoke a pipe. If you choose one the other comes too. At the time, my mother was not too amused with my argument concerning Popeyes pipe. I tried explaining that Popeyes use of spinach was only occasionally but his use of the pipe was continuously. This argument had no effect upon my mother, but it did cause severe pain in my left ear as she led me by my ear back to the table to nish my spinach. At the time, my mother had a one-track mind, which led to a plate of spinach. I, on the other hand, had a one-track mind, which led as far away from that plate of spinach as possible. Nothing would do but clean up my plate of spinach. Only one mind could win, and it sure wasnt mine. I listened with amusement to all this news concerning spinach this past week. Re ecting upon this incident from my past, a verse of Scripture came to my mind. Therefore to him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him it is sin. (James 4:17 KJV). At the time of my spinach eating frenzy, my mother thought she was doing the right thing. At the time she was, much to my consternation. Its not so much, what we do, as it is what we know. The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship located at 1471 Pine Road in Silver Springs Shores. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores and can be contacted by calling 687-4240. His email address is jamessnyder2@att.net. The Church website is www.whatafellow-ship.com.Mother was wrong about spinachWakulla United Methodist Church will hold a Parsonage Garage Sale on June 1, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on June 2, from 8 a.m. until. The church is located at 918 Woodville Highway, Wakulla Station. Miracle Deliverance Center #2 will be having their second annual Spring Fellowship Praise Bazaar in Hudson Park on Saturday, May 19, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Please come out and join us. Chicken and sh dinners will be sold for $8. There will be entertainment and activities for children. For more information, contact Sister Princella Moore at (850) 566-3566 or Deaconess Gail Freeman at (850) 443-0802.Spring Praise Bazaar is Saturday Church Parsonage sale set June 1-2

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Aiden Joshua Hunt will celebrate his rst birthday on May 16. He is the son of Josh and Stephanie Hunt of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are Steve and Sherry Waites of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Richard and Shari Hunt of Ochlockonee Bay. His maternal greatgrandparents are the late Bobby Johnson and Frances Johnson of Crawfordville. His paternal great-grandparents are Joe and Betty Oertli of Edgewater. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 7Ahappenings CommunityLove and Godbolt to wed Kiona Love and Danny Kay Godbolt Kiona Love, of Sacramento, Calif., and Danny Kay Godbolt Jr., of Crawfordville, announce their engagement. She is the daughter of Earnie Love and Beverly Bell of Sacramento, Calif. He is the son of Danny and Cynthia Godbolt of Crawfordville. The couple will wed on May 26 at 4 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church. The reception will be held at the Wakulla Shrine Club at 6 p.m. Mr. & Mrs. Shane Spradley of Moody, Ala., announce the engagement of their daughter Amber Michelle Spradley to Tanner Edward Jones. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John David Jones of Crawfordville. She is a graduate of Moody High School in Moody, Ala., and received a cheerleading scholarship to Troy University where she graduated with a Bachelor of Science in business information Systems and is currently in the Education Masters Program. She is employed with the Taylor County School District teaching language arts, coaches the dance team and majorettes for Taylor County and is also employed parttime by Taylor Elite Cheerleading Gym. He is a graduate of Wakulla High School and received a football scholarship to Troy University, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Science in social sciences and a minor in physical education. He is employed with the Taylor County School District teaching American government, economics and earth space science. In addition, he coaches football and baseball for the Taylor County Bulldogs. The couple will be married on July 8 at The Sonnet House in Leeds, Ala. Jones will marry Spradley Tanner Jones and Amber Spradley Dance Academy scores high at competition Wakulla Dance Academys competition dance teams takes homes numerous awards at the recent Fire and Ice Dance Competition. Special to The NewsWakulla Dance Academys Competition Dance Team traveled to Jacksonville the weekend of April 20 and 21 to compete in the Fire and Ice Dance Competition held at the University of North Floridas Fine Arts Center. The five group numbers performed by the older team members earned Platinum awards, the two group numbers performed by the younger team members earned Gold awards and two solos earned Gold awards. The team took rst Place Overall with their production number Boot Scootin; rst Place Overall Large Group with their lyrical number Feel My Love; second Place Overall Small Group for their contemporary number; third Place Overall Small Group for their jazz number; fourth Place Overall Small Group for their hip-hop number; and fth Place Overall Small Group for their jazz number. The team also received the Studio Spirit and Sportmanship Award, and a $125 cash award for their lyrical number. The team members are Cadence Brainard, Chloe Brown, Madison Brown, Sarah Chambers, Skyllar Cobb, Tanasha Cooksey, Torie Crum, Ava DuBois, Shawna Gray, Georgia Gumphrey, Mathilda Jensen, Casey Lowe, Marissa Peddie, Alex Porter, Annabelle Slayton, Tatum Tucker, Remie Vause, Jordan Webster, Emily Westmark and Danielle Whiting. Wakulla Dance Academy will host their annual Spring Recital on Saturday, June 9, at 4 p.m. at Chiles High School in Tallahassee. Tickets are $12 in advance, $14 at the door. For more information call the studio at 926-2655.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPantellis graduates from TCCConstantina Pantelis of Crawfordville graduated from Tallahassee Community College with honors on Saturday, April 28. She is the daughter of Patricia Hackworth of Crawfordville. She achieved a straight A average and is on the Presidents List and a member of Phi Theta Kappa. She will continue her education at Florida State University majoring in Middle East studies. She is the mother of a 3-year-old daughter and realizes the importance of education. Constantina Pantelis Happy rst birthday, Aiden Hunt Aiden J. Hunt Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555The college of choice! Invest in yourself today EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT THE RISING COST OF COLLEGE at TCC, tuition is signicantly lower than most other universities and colleges 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. ----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolFenner wins contestSpecial to The NewsGage Fenner is a wildcat worthy of special notice. He is the Wakulla Middle school winner of the Tropicanna Speech Contest and the county winner as well. He will soon compete in the district competition at Florida A&M University. His speech is about wrestling and the trials and tribulations of his rst year as a participant in that sport. He said that he learned something about himself by winning the speech contest. I never knew I was good at public speaking, and I really like it, he said. Mrs. Byars, the school speech coordinator, said that Fenner was the rst WMS student to go to district since Tucker Pearce a few years ago. They are really proud of Gage and wish him all the best. By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 14....... Preliminary grades on a ramped up statewide writing assessment are so bad that state education of cials said Monday they will hold an emergency meeting Tuesday to gure out what to do next. Passing scores on the FCAT writing assessment plummeted from 81 percent to 27 percent for fourth graders and showed similar drops in eighth and 10th grades, according to statewide results of the FCAT writing assessment released by the Department of Education. Passing scores in eighth grade fell from 82 percent to 33 percent. Tenth graders taking the test saw a similar drop in success. While 80 percent passed the test last year, only 38 percent scored a 4 or above on a 6-point scale this time around. Education of cials Monday blamed the plummeting scores on a handful of factors including more rigorous standards. Now, the State Board of Education has to determine what to do with the scores, which have been used to determine school grades. Failing schools are required to put in place certain remedial programs that cost more to provide in times with already tight budgets. Among the changes made over the past two years, this years tests were graded by two reviewers. Test standards were also raised to include more attention to writing conventions like punctuation, capitalization and grammar. The pool of test takers was also expanded to include lower performing students. The combination proved problematic. When the increased threshold of 4.0 was established by rule, the State Board of Education did not have, and could not have had, impact data that would re ect how the scoring rules changes would impact student results and the school grade calculations, according to a department report justifying the holding of an emergency meeting Tuesday to discuss a plan of action. Based on preliminary results of the 2012 writing assessment, applying the 4.0 threshold in addition to the heightened scoring rules may have unforeseen adverse impacts upon school grades, warranting emergency review by the State Board of Education. In the short term, the board is proposing lowering the passing threshold from 4.0 to 3.5; a reduction that would dramatically increase the number of students having passing scores, but the number would still be signi cantly less than the 2011 scores. Under the lower standards, 48 percent of fourth graders, 52 percent of eighth graders and 60 percent of 10th graders would have passed the test. Though improved, the passing percentage is still at least 20 points lower than 2011 scores. Mark Pudlow, spokesman for the Florida Education Association, said the dramatically lower scores point to the shortfalls of relying on such high stakes tests for funding and student assessment. There have been a lot of parents over the years who have been unhappy with the assessments, Pudlow said. Hopefully this will give us a real opportunity to see how we should evaluate students and evaluate teachers. The advocacy group FundEducationNow.org slammed the state education bureaucracy, saying the swing in grades shows that the FCAT is a multi-million dollar sham. FCAT passing scores drop signi cantly Recital for Michelle Snow school will be May 18 and 19The students of Michelle Snow School of Music will present their spring recital on Friday, May 18 and Saturday, May 19 at Christ Church Anglican on Highway 98 in Medart. There will be two performances, one on Friday at 7 p.m. and one on Saturday at 11 a.m. The students will be all ages and will be playing a variety of musical styles and instruments. The recital will feature performances from Danyelle Dias, Morgan Terry, Victor Palumbo, Shannon Egler, Joey Rickards, Summer Padgett, Jason Paris, Steven Kinsey, Shea Harrington, Zoie Hill, Makenzie Thompson, Yese Reyes, Jacob Rardin, Marina Harvey, Josh Cook, Emily May, Erin Patrucelli, Jack and Maxwell Mispel, Desmond Maxwell, Rhiannon Beattie, Ryan Crawford, Allison Gordon, Rebecca and Riley Blankenship, Annabell Chancy, Loranda Hutton, Wesley Kyle, Jason Westmark, Precision Rudd, Derisha Jones, Chloe Choquette and Abbott Gauger. The recitals are free and open to the public. They will be followed by a reception. For more information, call 926-7267. omas receives mastersBrandon Scott Thomas received his masters degree in business administration from the University of South Florida on Saturday, May 5 in Tampa. He is the son of Kimball Thomas of Ochlockonee Bay. Gage Fenner Gentry graduates from Auburn with honorsLauren Gentry of Crawfordville graduated Summa Cum Laude from Auburn University as an Honors Scholar with a bachelors degree in psychology on May 7. She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, which is the countrys oldest academic honor society and is also a member of Phi Kappa Phi and Golden Key honors societies. She plans to attend Florida State University Law School in the fall. While at Auburn, she participated in a spring break community development project, studied abroad at the University of Salamanca in Spain, worked with autistic children at a local preschool, and served as a Peer Career Advisor at the Auburn University Career Center. Additionally, she served as president and vice president of Omega Phi Alpha, a national community service sorority. This spring, she won the State American History Scholarship Award from the Alabama branch of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America for a research paper. Later this month, she will serve as an intern for Auburns Womens Leadership Institute at their annual Residential Intensive Training conference. She is a 2009 graduate of Wakulla High School and National Merit Scholar. She is the daughter of Angie Gentry of Crawfordville and Jeff Gentry of St. Marks. She has one sister, Melissa, who currently attends Wakulla High School. Her grandparents are Allen and Monica Harvey of Crawfordville and Evelyn and Marshall Gentry of Tallahassee. Lauren Gentry Email your community news to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net. Announcements are published as space becomes available and edited for style, length and clarity. Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S P a a u u l l s s , W W e e l l G G e e t T h h e e m m A A l l l l ! 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICE EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr sTM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Vacation Bible Schoolat PANACEA 1ST BAPTIST CHURCHMon., June 18TH Fri., June 22ND6:00 8:30p.m. Come join us as we y to some of the worlds greatest natural wonders and encounter our Awesome God and His Amazing Power! This Awesome Week of Fun, Food, and Exciting Learning Opportunities is open to kids ages 4 years 6th grade. For more information, call 850-984-5206. Re-StoreShadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m. The Wakulla NewsLook Us Up Online for News, Sports, & Special Events.www.thewakullanews.comAlso check out your Community Calendar

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team views SportsBy LISA KINARDSpecial to The NewsThis week started with the Badcock Furniture Rays vs. the Ameris Bank Sluggers. The Sluggers hitters were Michael McGlamr y with 4 hits on 4 at-bats, Dylan Causseaux with 3 hits, Jake Bryan with 2 hits and Josh Conway with 1 hit. Shane Davis got a hit for the Rays. Final score, 8-0 Sluggers. Tuesday the Badcock Furniture Rays were on the eld again against the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans. Hitters for the Rays were Aaron Price, Clayton Burroughs and Brice Brooks with runs scored by Price, Burroughs, Chase Bryan and Bryan Hudson Hitters for the Titans were Zach Norman and John Weber with 2 each, and 1 each for Jordan Vaughan, Jackson Montgomery, Davis Hammond and Zeke Bryan Runs were scored by Norman (2), Weber, Vaughan, Mongomery, Bryan and Jake McCarl. Titans won by a score of 7-4. Thursday, the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws played the Ameris Bank Sluggers in a battle for rst place. Jake Bryan started on the mound for the Sluggers. The Outlaws took charge in the top of the rst inning, scoring two runs on a hit by Skylar Talavera. The Sluggers came back with Michael McGlamry scoring following hits by McGlamry and Dylan Causseaux. The Outlaws added one run in the second but great defensive plays by Kaleb Langston and Gabe Barwick stopped the Outlaws from scoring in the third. The Sluggers added a run when Josh Inman scored in the third. Tyler Teegan pitched for the Sluggers in the fourth and kept the Outlaws from scoring with an awesome catch from David Lamarche for the third out. The Sluggers got hits from Thomas Davis and Jake Bryan in the fth but were unable to add to the score. The Outlaws added two in the fth to win the game 5-2. Talavera, Greysen Rudd, Nick Lentz, James Calhoun, Brandon Bennett and Jacob Dempsey all had one hit each for the Outlaws. Lentz started on t he mound pitching three innings with 5 strikeouts. Chase Forester pitched one inning allowing one unearned run with one strikeout and Rudd pitched one inning and had 2 strikeouts. The Outlaws and Sluggers are now tied for rst place and will play for the nal time this Tuesday. Friday it was the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans vs. the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws. The Titans had hits from Jordan Vaughn, AC Ginn, Jackson Montgomery and Zeke Bryan Runs were scored by Vaughan, Ginn (2), RJ Kinard (2) and Bryan. The Outlaws had hits from Greysen Rudd (double), Nick Lentz and Skyler Talavera The Outlaws won the game 10 with runs scored by Rudd (2), Lentz (2), Talavera (3), James Calhoun and Brandon Bennett (2). Saturday also had action with a double header makeup between the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans and the Badcock Furniture Rays. The Rays threw Shane Davis with Nolan Terry catching. Following a hit by John Weber, Jackson Montgomery got a solid double scoring Weber and Jordan Vaughan. Zeke Bryan hit another double scoring RJ Kinard, and Montgomery added a fourth run when he stole home. The Titans threw Vaughan to catcher Zach Norman. Brice Brooks and Davis started things off with bunts. Following a double play, Brooks scored on a error. Terry hit to center eld, loading the bases but a strike out and popup ended the inning with bases still loaded. In the second, the Titans left the bases loaded after a hit by Norman and 3 strikeouts for Davis. The Rays answered with another hit by Brooks but 3 strikeouts by Vaughan ended the inning. The third had Davis hitting his stride striking out all three batters he faced. The Titans brought Weber in on the mound with Kinard behind the plate with no hits and kept the score 4-1. The fourth saw Weber getting another hit deep to center eld. Due to pitch count, Clayton Burroughs came in to pitch and ended the inning with a double play. Hunter Myers hit a solid shot to centerfield, but outstanding fielding and throwing by Bryan stole the hit from him for the rst out. Devin Huber then hit a long y ball to right for a hit. Davis got the momentum going with a hit to deep right. Huber later scored on an error. Aaron Price brought Davis home with a hit to make the score to 4-3. With the winning runs on base, Weber dug deep and struck out a Rays slugger to end the drive. Kinard got a hit to the out eld but the Titans were unable to add any runs in the fth. Montgomery came in as the nal pitcher for the Titans. The Titans won the close game, 4-3. The second g ame of the double-header was also a squeaker. The Titans had hits from Zach Norman (double), Jordan Vaughan, AC Ginn (2), Zeke Bryan, Jacob Sizemore (double) and Davis Hammond with runs by Vaughan (2) and Kinard. The Titans Ginn pitched a complete game with RJ Kinard behind the plate. The Rays had hits from Clayton Burroughs and Jaren Lawhon and pitched Nolan Terry and Lawhon with Burrough catching. They had runs by Burroughs and Terry. The Rays lead most of the game 2. In the second, they almost went up 3-0 as Brice Brooks stole home, but a dropped third strike swiftly handled by Kinard and Montgomery negated the run, getting the out before the hitter could get to rst. Final score. Titans 3. Next week, tournament action begins. Come out and catch the excitement! Mothers Day came 10 minutes early for all the moms of the Wakulla Red Sox 12U travel baseball team, as their sons delivered them their second championship win in less than a month. As midnight approached, the Red Sox closed in on the win in dramatic fashion as they came from behind in the last inning to claim the championship trophy in Valdosta, Ga., on Saturday, May 12. Out of six teams, the Red Sox went undefeated on the day and came out on top in this USSSA Mothers Day Tournament. Way to go Sox!...thanks for our Mothers Day gift! Pictured: Those standing are Manager Keith Anderson, Jared Weber, Jacob Dismuke, Bradley Lord, Connor Strickland, Hunter Greene and Coach Mike Barwick. Kneelling are Bailey Fagan, Thomas Anderson, Will Barwick, Carson Dykes and Hayden Carlton.BABE RUTH BASEBALLOutlaws and Sluggers are tied for rst place TSA Titans Jackson Montgomery gets a lead off second while Badcock Furniture Rays Brice Brooks tries to catch him stealing. TSA Titans AC Ginn makes a run for home. Badcock Furniture Rays Clayton Burroughs gets a hit.PHOTOS BY LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Red Sox do it again12U TRAVEL BASEBALL Team Wakulla Wrestling ClubPRESENTSElementary / Middle Wrestling CampHigh / Middle School Wrestling Camp June 4th through 7th at RMS Gym $150Instruction by Darton College Head Coach Mike Miller REGULAR CLUB PRA C TIC E(open to everyone 4 years and older)Tuesdays and Thursdays 5:30pm-7:00pm June 11th through 15th at RMS Gym Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of Experience MV82996 rs r s MOBILE REPAIR LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926 or 510 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

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Last week was absolutely beautiful during the week and then when the weekend got here everything changed. The winds went from calm to howling on Saturday and Sunday. They were nally able to sh the Kevins Red/Trout Shootout despite the wind and some nice sh were caught and big bucks won by some good shermen. The team of J&D placed rst with a 7.6-pound red and a 5.2-pound trout. For their efforts they won $3,000 and another $1,000 because they had the biggest red and biggest trout of the tournament. The team of Keystone nished second with a 7-pound red and 4.5-pound trout and they took home $1,500. This tournament was scheduled for early April but had to be put off then and another weekend because of small craft advisories on the water. There is another tournament that is coming up this weekend and everyone is hoping for good weather and especially the shermen. This is the Wakulla County Kids Fishing Tournament that will be held out of Rock Landing in Panacea. They are still looking for some folks to take kids shing and donations are always welcome. To make a donation for volunteer to take some kids shing contact Larry Massa with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce at 251-5169. Another tournament coming up on June 15, 16 and 17 over Fathers day is the Big Bend Saltwater Classic. This tournament is held out of Carrabelle and attracts folks from all over the Southeast. Last week in the Tallahassee Democrat was a picture of Dr. Joe Camps and a cobia that he caught in a tournament over in Destin. Dr. Camps and several other doctors from Tallahassee sh that tournament every year and they sh with Capt. Gary Jarvis on the Back Down. Dr. Phil Sharp said that very few cobia were caught or even seen on the rst two days of the tournament and the leading sh came from off of a wreck. Capt. Jarvis decided on the third day to fish a wreck that he knew held cobia though they werent the big ones like they usually see cruising the beaches. Dr. Camps hooked into and landed a 54-pound cobia that netted them $74,000 from a Calcutta. Several years ago Dr. Sharp caught the winning sh for the tournament and Joe said thats why they sh with Capt. Jarvis. Fishing has been real good in our area and there are plenty of trout, reds, Spanish, cobia and ounder around. A lot of real nice sh moved onto the ats with this last full moon we had and there are still plenty of sh out in deeper water. Some real big trout are moving onto the Shell Point reef on the high tide and will hit topwater early and on cloudy days and the Gulp shed straight or under the Cajun Thunder is also working very well. I fished with Jason Fisher from Pennsylvania on Monday and we caught several limits of trout and Jason caught seven sharks. On Tuesday he took his wife and son and of course his son wanted to catch a shark. As luck have it, his mother caught the sharks though he did hook a big one. We did catch about 20 nice Spanish and that made both of them happy. On Wednesday, I took Reagan Hobbs and his 14year-old son Clayton. We shed a half-day and came in with ve trout, a ounder and nine nice Spanish. I sh with a lot of young people and he would rank as one of the best fishermen Ive had on my boat including adults and he was extremely polite. The best part was he got so excited when he caught a sh. The best young person I have ever shed with would have to be Jay Yeltons grandson. Capt. David Fife has still be catching trout and reds around the oyster bars using live bull minnows and the Gulp. David shes out of Spring Creek and shes from Spring Creek to Panacea. Stephan Shelhaus and his dad from Cincinnati shed down here week before last for three days and he said they caught lots of trout, plenty of sharks, six cobia, more Spanish than they could count and a triple tail. Stephan keeps his boat at Shell Island Fish Camp and comes down two or three times a year to sh. I was in AMS the other morning getting bait and Bob McCullough was on his way to Mashes Sands. He said he has been getting his limit almost every time he goes using the Gulp and cut bait. Problem is he wouldnt tell me where he was shing. Bob is an avid sherman and goes once or twice every week. If you can take a couple of kids out on your boat this weekend give Larry Massa a call. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL The shing has been real goodBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA young, male manatee was found dead near the intake canal of the Purdom Generating Station at the end of St. Marks Re nery Road by a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission marine of cer on Friday, May 11 around 12:45 p.m., according to the FWC. The of cer towed the manatee to a boat ramp until the marine biologist could arrive. Biologist Anna Panike drove from St. Petersburg to St. Marks on Saturday to recover the manatee. The manatee was then taken to the FWC Marine Mammal Pathobiology Laboratory for a necropsy. The necropsy was performed on Monday, May 14, but because of the stage of decomposition, a speci c cause of death could not be determined, according to Brandon Bassett, manatee mortality database curator with the FWC. It was estimated that the manatee had been dead for 2 to 3 days when it was found, Bassett said. Meconium was found in the large intestine and it takes about a week for that to pass out of the gastrointestinal tract, he said. So we believe that it either was stillborn or died shortly after birth, Bassett said. The manatee was 4.8 feet long. CYNTHIA PAULSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFWC of cials load up the dead calf for study. Manatee calf found dead in St. MarksSpecial to The NewsThe U.S. Forest Service invites you to attend BatFest 2012 a free event being held to gain appreciation for the not-so-cute and furry, but important, bat. With activities geared toward youths, BatFest will be held on Sunday, May 20, 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Wakulla Springs State Park. A park admission fee will be charged. This event, hosted by Florida Bat Working Group, is a partnership effort between the U.S. Forest Service, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the University of Florida. Because bats are active at night, few people see them, and even fewer understand or appreciate their importance in our daily lives, said Micah Thorning, wildlife biologist for the U.S. Forest Service. At BatFest you will see live bats and learn everything you ever wanted to know about bats, such as: Why are bats so important? How do bats find insects in the dark? How are bats involved in pollinating owers? How can you help bats? Surprisingly little is known about the distribution, habitat associations, and diet of bats living in the forests of north Florida. Experienced volunteer biologists will help uncover new information in this region through bat surveys being done Monday, May 21, through Thursday, May 24, in and around the Apalachicola National Forest.U.S. Forest Service sponsors BatFest 2012 PHOTO BY FWC Captain Jack Fishing Tournament is May 26A shing tournament to bene t the Alligator Point Volunteer Fire Department and the Capital Area Chapter of the American Red Cross will be held Saturday, May 26. First place in the offshore category is $2,000 and for inshore is $1,000. Entry fee is $350 for offshore for four anglers, $30 per additional, and inshore fee is $175 per boat for two anglers. For more information or to register, contact captainjacktournament@gmail.com. A Seminole bat, which likes Spanish moss. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 27 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle FRANKLIN WA KU LLA JEFFE RS ON & TA YLOR GAG GROUPER CATCH MORE FISH FREE LINE WINDINGwith purchase BUY IN BULK & SAVE B B B B B B B B B B Y Y Y UY UY UY Y Y Y U U U U U U UY U U UY Y Y U Y UY I I I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N B UL K B UL K U L U L K UL L K L & S A V E & S A S A V A V E A V E VE VE BUY IN BULK & SAVE Made in USA 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD I hope all the mothers out there had a very special day Sunday celebrating! Whether you had a calm and relaxing day or one lled with organized chaos, hopefully at the end of it all of you felt celebrated and loved. This weekend, several members will be headed in two different directions some out on the water for a training and safety patrol and others to represent the Coast Guard Auxiliary at the 27th Annual Spring Fling Car and Truck Show at the Tallahassee Car Museum. This years event will help to support the Wounded Warriors Program and the USO. A tting tribute on Armed Forces Day. Shifting gears, did you know that on average, a boat weighs about 15 pounds per foot (if it is under 25 feet) plus the engine? So an average 20-foot boat will weigh about 3,000 pounds, not including gear and people. The Coast Guard has listed the average weight of an individual to be 185 pounds, adding almost 1,000 extra pounds with ve passengers. All of this weight and no breaks! Rule 6 (Navigation Rules from the USCG) dictates that all boats should operate at a safe speed at all times. This is so that she can be able to respond to avoid collisions and be able to stop safely under all circumstances. Several factors help determine what a safe speed should be. As I have already discussed, visibility is critical in determining speed. If you cant see, neither can anyone else, so slow and steady. Any of you who have been out in the channel and on the sand bars when the weather is nice, know, boats can be packed thick. When traf c is heavy, monitor your speed and adjust. Just as important, when up in the rivers there are often several shing boats. Please be mindful that a large wake can swamp a small shing boat, kayak or canoe. While we are typically surrounded by smaller boats, we do also have our share of larger boats. The ability of the driver to maneuver their boat as well as safely stop also affects their speed. A larger boat will take a lot more power to turn and a lot longer to stop. After dusk, lighting has a great effect on safe boating at any speed. We are part of the forgotten coast and light from shore is limited. Boaters should be aware of how a lack of light or a harsh light from another boat can affect your ability to see what is around you. Adjust your speed accordingly. If all of that were not enough, all boaters must be aware of the wind, sea state and current. We have very strong tides in our area and with the wind can get angry waters. While the bay area may be calm, as you enter into the rivers, the waters can get a good chop. There are also several oyster bars that create additional challenges if you venture outside of the channel. Due to our hazards, we have a well-de ned channel to accommodate vessels, such as the barges, that need the depth of the water to avoid running aground and need to monitor their speed to avoid leaving the channel and potentially encountering problems. Speed matters, boats have no brakes! Remember, as Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Threat Fish Project. As an important part and learning exercise for our underwater crime scene investigation students, they had to pick and devise a semester project. In a previous column, Gregg Stanton alluded to the fact that it was imperative for the students to nish the project, even if unsuccessful in the stated objective. This provided a sharp contrast to the theoretical classroom thinking. Just as in real life, it is pragmatic problems that inhibit clever ideas, and simpler very often is better. An example of a very successful undertaking was the threat sh project: We all know, from experience, that throwing food out onto a pond will have sh snatch it up very fast it is free food, after all, so who wouldnt. Making food available in the context of a feeding station, presented under water on a little plate, showed similar behavior. Even in the presence of people, such as swimmers, sh will leave their shelter to gobble up the offered delicacies. This was demonstrated and recorded on video in the kiddy pool at the Panama City jetties. Swimmers and kids playing in the chest-deep water all the time at this site, and sh got used to people. The sh learned that they need to keep their distance from people, but that there is no immediate threat if everyone is careful. A barracuda, on the other hand, poses a signi cant danger to the sh. But how good are sh in recognizing a barracuda threat, and how do they change their behavior? To answer that question, a photo of a barracuda was printed to a size of approximately two feet. The photo was glued onto cardboard, and the whole board was cut to the shape of the barracuda. The whole assembly was laminated to be water proof. Equipped with oating foam on top, the Baracuda was tied to weights using thin shing line. This created an underwater object the shape and colors of the predator, oating mid-water. The threat sh was deployed near feeding stations. The results were immediate and drastic no more sh helping themselves to a meal, swimmers present or not. The efforts for this project were minimal one dollar spent on food for sh, and a day spent on the beach. The outcome was clear and signi cant, even today we still talk about it. An example for an unsuccessful project was the corrosion-experiment: How fast do various metals corrode (rust) in a saltwater environment? A collection of metal pipes (copper, steel, galvanized steel) was mounted on a board using cable ties. The assembly was then transported out into the bay by boat, and deployed at a depth of 10 feet. The location was marked using GPS. No marker buoy was deployed due to the fear of theft both of the experiment and the buoy. A month later, the day was spent trying to nd the assembly, unsuccessfully. The efforts for the project were quite signi cant: a lot of time wasted and money spent for fuel. The message learned was also very clear: The ocean is huge, and lots of things happen in it, making nding objects in it lik e nding the needle in a haystack. Corrosion projects may be better done in a tank in a laboratory. Who do you believe actually learned more from their project? Both parties spent a lot of time thinking about their project. In case of the former project, thinking was done in advance, resulting in a successful project outcome. In the case of the later project, thinking was done afterwards in the form of lessons learned. I cant remember who came up with this, so I quote without reference: Good judgment comes from experience, experience comes from bad judgment. Is that not true for life in general?Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament Committee is hoping to build a love for shing in young people through the Annual Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament on Saturday, May 19. The event organizers are seeking sponsors for the tournament which is free to children ages 3 to 15. Organizers are hoping for more than 300 girls and boys to come to Woolley Park in Panacea to take part in the event. Festivities begin at 7 a.m. at Port Panacea Marina and later in the day at Woolley Park in Panacea. Sheriff Donnie Crum and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce have helped organize the event for several years. This is a great opportunity for boys and girls to learn something about the sport of shing and enjoy an activity that may become a lifelong hobby, said Sheriff Crum. Fishing is something that people can enjoy well into their retirement years. The last tournament fleet boat will leave the dock from Port Panacea Marina at 8:30 a.m. and the weigh-in at Woolley Park will be held from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Lunch will be provided to all participants at Woolley Park from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. Youths not going out on a family boat or with one of the fleet of volunteer captains may fish from any safe location and bring their catch to Woolley Park. The freshwater divisions include: bass, pan sh and catfish. Saltwater categories include: white trout, speckled trout, Spanish mackerel, red sh, ounder and whiting. No grouper, snapper, amberjack, sharks, rays, hard head or sail sh will be considered. All anglers will receive a tournament T-shirt at the registration table. Parents or guardians of children must sign a release form before children board a tournament vessel. Children age ve to eight must be accompanied by a parent or guardian and they must wear a Coast Guard approved life jacket. Youths will not only receive a T-shirt and lunch, but an opportunity to participate in games and win trophies as well. Prizes will be given away including fishing poles and tackle boxes. As is true with so many volunteer events, organizers are looking for sponsors. Your contribution of $50 or more will help ensure the success of the tournament. The tournament may be cancelled due to poor weather. All donations to support the tournament will be welcomed. Donations may be made to: Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament, P.O. Box 349, Panacea, FL 32346-0349. For more information, call Lt. Billy Jones of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce at (850) 745-7108.Childrens Fishing Tournament is Saturday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday y Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed May 23, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 1:16 AM 3.0 ft. 1:56 AM 3.1 ft. 2:32 AM 3.2 ft. 3:07 AM 3.3 ft. 3:41 AM 3.3 ft. 4:15 AM 3.3 ft. 4:49 AM High 1.5 ft. 6:30 AM 1.5 ft. 7:06 AM 1.5 ft. 7:40 AM 1.4 ft. 8:13 AM 1.4 ft. 8:46 AM 1.4 ft. 9:20 AM 1.4 ft. 9:55 AM Low 3.5 ft. 12:40 PM 3.6 ft. 1:12 PM 3.7 ft. 1:43 PM 3.8 ft. 2:12 PM 3.9 ft. 2:41 PM 3.9 ft. 3:10 PM 3.9 ft. 3:41 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:38 PM 0.0 ft. 8:14 PM -0.1 ft. 8:48 PM -0.2 ft. 9:21 PM -0.2 ft. 9:52 PM -0.2 ft. 10:22 PM -0.2 ft. 10:53 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed May 23, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 1:13 AM 3.1 ft. 1:53 AM 3.2 ft. 2:29 AM 3.3 ft. 3:04 AM 3.3 ft. 3:38 AM 3.4 ft. 4:12 AM 3.4 ft. 4:46 AM High 1.6 ft. 6:27 AM 1.6 ft. 7:03 AM 1.6 ft. 7:37 AM 1.5 ft. 8:10 AM 1.5 ft. 8:43 AM 1.5 ft. 9:17 AM 1.5 ft. 9:52 AM Low 3.5 ft. 12:37 PM 3.7 ft. 1:09 PM 3.8 ft. 1:40 PM 3.9 ft. 2:09 PM 3.9 ft. 2:38 PM 4.0 ft. 3:07 PM 4.0 ft. 3:38 PM High 0.3 ft. 7:35 PM 0.0 ft. 8:11 PM -0.1 ft. 8:45 PM -0.2 ft. 9:18 PM -0.2 ft. 9:49 PM -0.3 ft. 10:19 PM -0.2 ft. 10:50 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed Ma y 23, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 1:52 AM 2.8 ft. 2:32 AM 2.9 ft. 3:08 AM 3.0 ft. 3:43 AM 3.0 ft. 4:17 AM 3.1 ft. 4:51 AM 3.1 ft. 5:25 AM High 1.3 ft. 7:34 AM 1.3 ft. 8:10 AM 1.3 ft. 8:44 AM 1.3 ft. 9:17 AM 1.3 ft. 9:50 AM 1.3 ft. 10:24 AM 1.3 ft. 10:59 AM Low 3.2 ft. 1:16 PM 3.4 ft. 1:48 PM 3.5 ft. 2:19 PM 3.5 ft. 2:48 PM 3.6 ft. 3:17 PM 3.6 ft. 3:46 PM 3.6 ft. 4:17 PM High 0.2 ft. 8:42 PM 0.0 ft. 9:18 PM -0.1 ft. 9:52 PM -0.2 ft. 10:25 PM -0.2 ft. 10:56 PM -0.2 ft. 11:26 PM -0.2 ft. 11:57 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed May 23, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 1:08 AM 2.2 ft. 1:48 AM 2.3 ft. 2:24 AM 2.4 ft. 2:59 AM 2.4 ft. 3:33 AM 2.5 ft. 4:07 AM 2.5 ft. 4:41 AM High 1.1 ft. 6:41 AM 1.1 ft. 7:17 AM 1.1 ft. 7:51 AM 1.0 ft. 8:24 AM 1.0 ft. 8:57 AM 1.0 ft. 9:31 AM 1.0 ft. 10:06 AM Low 2.6 ft. 12:32 PM 2.7 ft. 1:04 PM 2.8 ft. 1:35 PM 2.8 ft. 2:04 PM 2.9 ft. 2:33 PM 2.9 ft. 3:02 PM 2.9 ft. 3:33 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:49 PM 0.0 ft. 8:25 PM -0.1 ft. 8:59 PM -0.1 ft. 9:32 PM -0.2 ft. 10:03 PM -0.2 ft. 10:33 PM -0.2 ft. 11:04 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed May 23, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 1:00 AM 2.3 ft. 1:40 AM 2.4 ft. 2:16 AM 2.5 ft. 2:51 AM 2.5 ft. 3:25 AM 2.6 ft. 3:59 AM 2.6 ft. 4:33 AM High 1.4 ft. 6:09 AM 1.4 ft. 6:45 AM 1.4 ft. 7:19 AM 1.4 ft. 7:52 AM 1.4 ft. 8:25 AM 1.4 ft. 8:59 AM 1.4 ft. 9:34 AM Low 2.7 ft. 12:24 PM 2.8 ft. 12:56 PM 2.9 ft. 1:27 PM 3.0 ft. 1:56 PM 3.0 ft. 2:25 PM 3.0 ft. 2:54 PM 3.0 ft. 3:25 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:17 PM 0.0 ft. 7:53 PM -0.1 ft. 8:27 PM -0.2 ft. 9:00 PM -0.2 ft. 9:31 PM -0.2 ft. 10:01 PM -0.2 ft. 10:32 PM Low Thu May 17, 12 Fri May 18, 12 Sat May 19, 12 Sun May 20, 12 Mon May 21, 12 Tue May 22, 12 Wed Ma y 23, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 2:00 AM 2.3 ft. 2:58 AM 2.4 ft. 3:45 AM 2.5 ft. 4:25 AM 2.5 ft. 5:01 AM 2.5 ft. 5:34 AM 2.5 ft. 6:06 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:37 AM 1.6 ft. 6:17 AM 1.7 ft. 6:53 AM 1.7 ft. 7:27 AM 1.8 ft. 8:00 AM 1.8 ft. 8:35 AM 1.8 ft. 9:13 AM Low 2.7 ft. 11:35 AM 2.8 ft. 12:00 PM 2.8 ft. 12:28 PM 2.9 ft. 12:58 PM 2.9 ft. 1:32 PM 2.9 ft. 2:09 PM 2.9 ft. 2:49 PM High -0.0 ft. 6:57 PM -0.2 ft. 7:36 PM -0.3 ft. 8:13 PM -0.3 ft. 8:46 PM -0.3 ft. 9:17 PM -0.3 ft. 9:47 PM -0.2 ft. 10:16 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 10 May 16First May 28 Full June 4 Last May 11 New May 20Major Times 11:05 AM 1:05 PM 11:27 PM 1:27 AM Minor Times 4:29 AM 5:29 AM 5:45 PM 6:45 PM Major Times --:---:-11:49 AM 1:49 PM Minor Times 5:03 AM 6:03 AM 6:38 PM 7:38 PM Major Times 12:12 AM 2:12 AM 12:34 PM 2:34 PM Minor Times 5:40 AM 6:40 AM 7:32 PM 8:32 PM Major Times 12:58 AM 2:58 AM 1:21 PM 3:21 PM Minor Times 6:19 AM 7:19 AM 8:24 PM 9:24 PM Major Times 1:45 AM 3:45 AM 2:09 PM 4:09 PM Minor Times 7:03 AM 8:03 AM 9:15 PM 10:15 PM Major Times 2:34 AM 4:34 AM 2:59 PM 4:59 PM Minor Times 7:51 AM 8:51 AM 10:04 PM 11:04 PM Major Times 3:23 AM 5:23 AM 3:48 PM 5:48 PM Minor Times 8:41 AM 9:41 AM 10:50 PM 11:50 PM Good Better Better Best Best++ Better Good6:42 am 8:25 pm 4:29 am 5:46 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:41 am 8:26 pm 5:04 am 6:39 pm 6:41 am 8:26 pm 5:40 am 7:32 pm 6:40 am 8:27 pm 6:20 am 8:25 pm 6:40 am 8:27 pm 7:04 am 9:16 pm 6:39 am 8:28 pm 7:51 am 10:05 pm 6:39 am 8:29 pm 8:42 am 10:51 pm22% 16% 10% 4% 2% 8% 14% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum and Undersheriff Maurice Langston recognized ve deserving individuals who have made outstanding contributions to law enforcement on Monday, May 14 as part of Public Safety Appreciation Day. Detective Nick Boutwell was named the 2012 Law Enforcement Officer of the Year, Lt. Lindsay Maxwell was named Detention Deputy of the Year, Of cer Lucy Gowdy was named Communications Of cer of the Year, Johnny B. Ross was named Outstanding Citizen in Support of Law Enforcement and Chaplain Dallas Gray was named the Outstanding Volunteer of the Year. Detective Nick Boutwell is assigned to the Property Crimes section of the sheriffs of ce. Detective Boutwell was born in Tallahassee but has lived his entire life in Wakulla County. He attended Shadeville Elementary and Crawfordville Elementary schools, Wakulla Middle School and graduated from Wakulla High School in 2002. Detective Boutwell graduated from North Florida Community College with a certi cate in Criminal Justice in 2004 He is attending Saint Leo University part-time studying Criminal Justice. He saw an opportunity to give back to his community and decided to give law enforcement a try. As a deputy, he saw an opportunity to improve the quality of life in the county. His favorite part of the job is solving cases where there appear to be no suspects, recovering and returning stolen property to the proper owner and putting a smile on a childs face. Detective Boutwell remembered helping a young girl who had recently lost her dog. He was able to share a stuffed animal with the young child and bring a smile to her face. I love the interaction with the community, he said. Boutwell was a member of the Wakulla County SWAT Team and is designated as a Special Deputy by the U.S. Marshals of ce. He worked his way up from Correctional Of cer in 2003 to deputy sheriff in 2004 and detective in 2007. He has served on the Vice and Property Crimes squad since becoming a detective. A lifelong Wakulla County resident, he married the former Amber Cudihy of Marietta, Ga. in December 2006. The couple has two young daughters, Leah and Emma. When he isnt working he enjoys outdoor activities including hunting and shing, golf and bicycling. He is a former high school athlete who played football and baseball. I have watched Nick as he has grown from the jail to road patrol deputy to detective, said Sheriff Donnie Crum. He is a tremendously caring and thorough deputy and investigator. Wakulla County is fortunate to have someone like Nick. Lt. Lindsay Maxwell discovered Wakulla County when she was a student at Florida State University. The Miami native graduated in 2005 with degrees in Criminal Justice and Social Work. She began working at the WCSO in 2006 as a Correctional Of cer Assistant. She became certi ed as a correctional of cer at the Corrections Academy in Madison. Maxwell has worked all over the jail during her employment and her areas of concern now include accreditation, detention training and evaluation in the jail, food service, medical and inmate transportation. During her time in the jail she has been promoted to sergeant and lieutenant. I wasnt expecting it, she said. I love my job. I love the challenges and the coordination required between everybody back there (in the jail). She serves as a liaison between the WCSO and Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and has been working with the contract employees who are in charge of the medical operation, as the new employees balance the inmate medical needs with security concerns. She recently married Transportation Detention Deputy Jansen Maxwell and mains strong ties to her FSU Seminole roots. Without a doubt, Lindsay is the nest corrections deputy I have met, said the sheriff. She has done it at such a young age and has shown a tremendous amount of maturity. It is exciting to watch Lindsay grow and think about what she may become in our department. Correctional Of- cer Lucy Gowdy called the award an unexpected honor. She grew up in Wakulla County and graduated from Wakulla High School in 1989. She is one of three sisters and three brothers, although one of her brothers has passed away. After serving as the WHS senior class secretary she graduated from Tallahassee Community College with an AA in Criminal Justice. She is attending ITT Technical to receive a Bachelors degree in Criminal Justice. The daughter of Duane Gowdy and Cynthia McDonald, she has worked at the WCSO for 12 years in several divisions. She began working in the E-911 Division before working in the Purchasing of ce. She has spent time working in corrections and has the most time serving in the Communications division. I love it, she said of her communications duties. I love working in the Communications Division helping people in the community. I take a great deal of pride in that. You never know what kind of a call you are going to get. You learn to expect the unexpected. She believes in making sure it is safety rst as she keeps all public safety of cers safe so they can go home to their families at the end of each shift. There is something special about knowing that public safety of cers lives are in your hands, she added. I love working with the other dispatchers. We depend on each other. Lucy is a very caring individual, said the sheriff. She has had to step up to the plate and continues to step up to the plate and help with tragedy within her family. She is a tremendous asset to the sheriffs of ce. When I call the sheriffs of ce and Lucy answers, I know everything will be okay. Chaplain Dallas Gray was selected as the Volunteer of the Year. Chaplain Gray has served as a Wakulla County Detention Services Volunteer for more years than the Volunteer Service Program has been recognized by the sheriffs office. Gray provides spiritual leadership for as many as 350 inmates in the jail as well as the rest of the law enforcement and WCSO staff. Chaplain Gray has been assigned to provide comf ort at crime scenes or notify family members of the death of loved ones. His spiritual guidance has assisted familys get their lives back together following suicides and to parents who have lost children. He has spent time riding with deputies during their patrol shifts and has discussed dietary needs and restrictions with inmates of various faiths. I understand the importance of being available to help deputies who have been affected emotionally by what they have seen during their time in the field, said Chaplain Gray. The greatest impact a chaplain can make is to understand the type of emotions of cers go through and build up that level of con dence that allows them to open up their lives. It is ful lling to sit down with of- cers and build that level of con dence with them for them to open up their life to you. I truly feel like God has called me to do this work. I enjoy doing it, he said. It is very ful lling. We do see great tragedies. It will mess you up if you are not prepared by the Lord. When I think of Dallas Gray I think of someone like Emmett Whaley, one of the nest preachers I have known, said Sheriff Crum. Dallas is in that category. He is a great Christian. He doesnt get paid a penny to do it, but he is a tremendously caring person. Johnny B. Ross Jr. was selected as the Citizen of the Year in Support of Law Enforcement. Ross, of Crawfordville, was at a Medart convenience store in March when he discovered that a Canadian tourist left his wallet with cash and valuables as he was getting gas. Ross turned the wallet and fanny pack in to the sheriffs of ce and the property was returned to the owner. The Canadian and friends from Quebec met with Sheriff Crum at the sheriffs of ce and thanked law enforcement and Ross for being helpful, kind and honest. A Wakulla County native, Ross works as a handyman and has been helped professionally by Sheriff Crum. Ross, who was raised in Sopchoppy, and his wife Belinda have three children. I was very surprised and honored when Sheriff Crum recognized me, he said. It started off with me just trying to do the right thing. Ross was raised by the late Charlotte Rosier and the late Johnny B. Ross, Sr. I give them credit for how things have worked out. Friends saw the newspaper coverage of Ross being recognized by the sheriff for his kind act and many have taken the time to congratulate Ross and shake his hand. I didnt do it for the publicity, he said. I just wanted to do the right thing. Ive been blessed. For Sheriff Crum the change in Ross over the years he has known him has been remarkable. He is an outstanding individual, said the sheriff. I have seen the growth in him and seen him go from negative to positive. He has overcome challenges and is proof that you can get knocked down and you can get back up. The Public Safety Day program was sponsored by A.J. Smith and catered by Poseys. The event is sponsored by the Coastal Optimist Club. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSt. Marks Post Of ce is one of more than 10,000 post of ces that will see a reduction in retail hours. The post of ce will decrease its retail hours from eight hours a day to just four. Customers will still have the same access to the retail lobby and PO boxes. The U.S. Postal Service announced the new plan on May 9 which will allow the small, rural post of ces to remain open. In July 2011, the Postal Service announced that nearly 3,700 post of ces out of 31,000 would be studied for possible closure. This is because the post of ce has continued to lose money. The year to date net loss for the postal service is $6.5 billion. It was $2.6 billion this same time last year. This plan is expected to save the postal service half a billion dollars annually. The new plan will be implemented over a two-year, multi-phased approach and would not be completed until September 2014, according to the postal service. It is not known when the changes will take place for St. Marks. In 2010, there was a scare that the post of ce would close. At that time, the postal service was leasing the building from realtor Debbie Kosec. Kosec needed to sell the building and when she told the postal service, they informed her they had no intention of relocating and the post of ce would simply close. In hearing this, City Commissioner Allen Hobbs and his wife, Ruthie, decided to purchase the building. Kosec spoke with representatives from the USPS who agreed to renew their lease until 2022. The current lease at that time ended in 2012.St. Marks Post Of ce will reduce hours Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Correctional Of cers received con dential information Thursday, May 10 regarding an inmate who was smuggling tobacco into the Wakulla County Jail, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Information was received that trustee inmate Andrew Michael White, 24, of Crawfordville was bringing tobacco into the jail following roadside trash pickup assignments and storing it in his locker under his bunk. A search was conducted of the inmates bunk and locker area and contraband was discovered by Lt. Scott Barwick. Inmate White was confronted by Correctional Of cer Jeff Carroll who discovered salvaged tobacco products in Whites boot. Cigars lled with cigarette tobacco were con scated. They had been placed inside a hole in the boot. Lt. Barwick determined that the inmate had been bringing the tobacco into the facility for approximately one month and trading it with other inmates for canteen items. Smuggling contraband into a detention facility is a third degree felony. Deputy Billy Metcalf and Correctional Officer Anthony Paul also investigated.Trustee arrested for contraband in jail WCSOAndrew Michael White The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office raised $3,000 for the Wakulla Special Olympics Program last week during a Tip A Cop fundraiser at Poseys Restaurant in Panacea. On Friday, May 11, Undersheriff Maurice Langston was the guest speaker at the Special Olympics Awards Banquet and presented the check on behalf of Sheriff Donnie Crum. Guests at Poseys donated to the Special Olympics as law enforcement officers waited tables at lunch and dinner Friday, May 4. Six Special Olympic athletes will be going to Orlando to compete at Disneys ESPN Wide World of Sports complex. Wakulla High School Special Olympians will compete in track and eld events and Bocce. The banquet included all grade levels of Special Olympic athletes and those who support them. Overall, the district has 120 to 140 student athletes involved in the program. The Special Olympics teaches the world a lesson and the lesson is simply this, you can turn a disability into a possibility, said Undersheriff Langston. These young people have taken a disability and turned it into ability. If youre an underdog, mentally disabled, physically disabled, if you dont fit into all circles, if you are not as pretty as others, you can still be a hero. Many of my heroes are in this room today. Accepting the check on behalf of the school district was Superintendent David Miller, Special Olympics sponsors Sharon Scherbarth and Patricia Bodiford and the athletes who will be traveling to Orlando for the State Special Olympic Games on May 18.Tip A Cop raises $3,000Public Safety Day honorees are recognized WCSOCapt. Larry Massa, who is President of the Coastal Optimist Club, Johnny B. Ross Jr., Of cer Lucy Gowdy, Sheriff Donnie Crum, Lt. Lindsay Maxwell, Undersheriff Maurice Langston, Detective Nick Boutwell, and Chaplain Dallas Gray.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn May 6, Chalmer Lamar Mahone, 24, of Tallahassee and Dane Marshall Land, 22, of Woodville were arrested for narcotics violations after Detective Nick Boutwell and Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a complaint of a vehicle racing down Stokley Road in Crawfordville. The law enforcement officials conducted a traf c stop on Whiddon Lake Road and discovered that Mahone was operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license with knowledge. Narcotics were reportedly discovered inside the vehicle including some that tested positive for cocaine, and marijuana that was bagged for sale. The marijuana seized from the vehicle weighed 6.5 grams. Marijuana weighing 3.5 grams was allegedly discovered on Mahone as he was searched at the Wakulla County Jail. A tiny amount of cocaine was also observed in the vehicle. Mahone was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge; possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana; introduction of contraband into a detention facility; and possession of drug paraphernalia. Land was charged with possession of marijuana with intent to sell; possession of cocaine and possession of drug paraphernalia. In other activity reported this week by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce: On May 3, Sherry Dudley of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone defaced a Blue Water Realty Group advertisement sign at a bus stop at 1700 Crawfordville Highway. Damage was estimated at $500. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On May 3, a concerned citizen at the Sopchoppy Express Lane found a lost wallet near the store bathrooms. James Brauer of Fort Myers was determined to be the owner and he was contacted. The wallet and contents were sent to the victim by mail per his request. Detective Matt Helms investigated. On May 3, Gregory Wright of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. Someone drove onto the victims property, tore up the yard with a vehicle and damaged his mailbox. The mailbox damage was estimated at $10. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On May 3, Sherry ODell of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A wooden fence surrounding the victims swimming pool was damaged. The pump and skimmer were also turned off. Damage is estimated at $75. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On May 3, Walter Connors of Panacea reported a theft. A Navy flag and berglass pole were stolen from his condominium. The property is valued at $225. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. On May 4, Joshua Roddenberry of Crawfordville reported a lost wallet. The victim lost the wallet at an area convenience store. The wallet and contents are valued at $240. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. On May 4, Sherry Wells of Jacksonville reported a criminal mischief in Panacea. Someone removed four screens from the rear of her residence. Damage was estimated at $80. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On May 4, William Anderson of Panacea reported a business burglary in Panacea. Someone entered the building and stole copper tubing and wiring from the building. The suspects cut their way through a chain link fence and cut a hole in the building. Air conditioning units were damaged while being dismantled. The copper was valued at $500 and damage to the fence and building was estimated at $1,600. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On May 4, Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated a traf c accident in Crawfordville. Krissia C. Lawhon of Sopchoppy was stopped at the Wakulla Arran Road traf c light at U.S. Highway 319. When the green arrow was illuminated, she began to make a turn toward the south and was struck by a vehicle going northbound on U.S. Highway 319. Armando Lara of Crawfordville struck Lawhons Chevrolet Suburban with a Nissan Frontier. Damage to the Lawhon vehicle was estimated at $2,500 and damage to the Lara vehicle was estimated at $3,500. A witness observed Lara talking on a cellular telephone as he entered the intersection. Lara was found at fault in the accident. There were no injuries to Lawhon, Lara, or two young children in the Lawhon vehicle. On May 4, Deputy Rachel Oliver responded to Magnolia Ridge in reference to trespassers possibly stealing electricity from an abandoned residence. The inside of the residence had extensive damage to the drywall, mirrors and doors. Damage to the residence was estimated between $15,000 and $20,000. A suspect has been identified and drug paraphernalia was seized from the location. On May 4, Annette M. Taylor of Crawfordville was involved in a single vehicle accident on Alexander Road in Crawfordville. Taylor was northbound on the road when she observed an animal in the road and swerved to miss it. She lost control of her Dodge, ran off the road and struck a tree. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $20,000. It appeared the vehicle hit the tree and rolled over, landing in the upright position. Wakulla EMS administered medical assistance at the scene. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On May 5, Patricia Weeks of Crawfordville reported a structure fire. Wakulla County Fire ghters arrived on the scene and extinguished the blaze. Weeks heard an explosion and observed the shed on re. The shed owner, Lee Walker, was out of town at the time of the re. He estimated the value of the shed and contents at $5,000. No foul play was observed. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. On May 5, Julia Runyan of Panacea reported a hit and run accident at Coyotes Bar and Grill in Panacea. Witnesses observed an unknown driver strike the victims parked vehicle and leave without leaving any information. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. On May 6, Debra Sparks of Crawfordville reported a trespass on Riversink Road in Crawfordville. Sparks owns property that borders state land that contains a sinkhole. The property is marked as private property but individuals still use it to access the sinkhole. Garbage was reported scattered on the victims property. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. On May 6, Deputy Rachel Oliver responded to a ght at the Spring Creek Highway Stop N Save. Four subjects were engaged in a parking lot altercation and a large crowd gathered to watch. Deputy Oliver subdued one aggressive ghter with her Taser. Three of the subjects ceased ghting and sat on the pavement while a fourth subject ran behind the store. The altercation began inside the store and spilled into the parking area. Matthew Ryan Costigan, 28, of Tallahassee, Michael Vincent Costigan, 25, of Crawfordville and Marc Bentley Massey, 25, of Woodville were arrested for one count each of disorderly intoxication and one count each of public affray. All of the subjects refused EMS treatment. Lt. Jimmy Sessor removed the Taser probes from Massey. Lucas James Porter, 28, of Crawfordville contacted law enforcement later and reported that he was also part of the altercation. He was arrested for public affray and disorderly intoxication. All four men were transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. On May 7, Clara Thomas of Panacea reported a grand theft. Jewelry, valued at $7,300, was reported missing from the victims residence. Persons of interest were identi ed. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On May 7, Warren Musselwhite of Lamont reported a residential burglary in St. Marks. Someone damaged the front door of the residence. Inside the home, kitchen cabinet doors were all open. Damage to the home was estimated at $100. Nothing was reported missing. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 7, Roy Ivester of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone damaged the victims mailbox post. Damage was estimated at $20. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 7, Jeffrey Tucker of Panacea reported a business burglary at Wilson Ice House in Panacea. Copper electrical wiring and copper tubing were stolen from the business. A subject cut a hole in a fence to access the building. The stolen items are valued at $2,000 and damage to the business is estimated at $10,000. Detective Derek Lawhon and CSI Rae Eddens investigated. On May 8, Harold Lee Walker, 56, of Tallahassee was arrested for DUI in Crawfordville. Deputy Mike Zimba observed Walker traveling at him on U.S. Highway 319 at a high rate of speed. The vehicle veered into the deputys lane and forced him to drive into the ditch to avoid a head -on collision. Walker was reportedly clocked at 72 miles per hour in a 45 mile per hour zone and was described as blatant in running the red light at Wal-Mart, traveling more than 60 miles per hour. Deputy Zimba conducted a traf c stop and conducted eld sobriety exercises which the suspect failed. W alker gave breath samples that registered over the legal limit. He was also issued a Uniform Traf c Citation for running the red light. Deputy Nick Gray also investigated. On May 8, Natalie Revel of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her mailbox. The box was discovered 15 feet from the pole and damage was estimated at $25. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On May 8, Amanda Jones of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Jewelry, electronic games, a television, rearm and a computer, valued at $9,600, were stolen from the home. A forced entry was discovered and damage to the home was estimated at $1,100. Deputy Taff Stokley, Lt. Brent Sanders, Lt. Mike Kemp and Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. On May 8, Debra Sparks of Tallahassee reported a theft at her Riversink Road property in Crawfordville. The victim is having difficulty with individuals trespassing on her property to gain access to a sinkhole. A camera was placed on the property to reduce damage to her fence and property. But the camera, valued at $150, was reported stolen. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 8, Jane Gregory of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tire from a relatives property. The tire is valued at $150. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On May 8, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a two-vehicle crash at the intersection of Highway 267 and Highway 365. Richard Westberry was attempting to make a left hand turn onto Highway 267 from Highway 365 with a Dodge Dakota but did not see Martin Wolf of Alligator Point driving westbound and crashed into the Ford Focus. Both vehicles suffered $5,000 worth of damage and Westberry was found at fault for failure to yield. There were no injuries to Westberry, Wolf or passenger Ursula Wolf. On May 8, a 16-year-old Crawfordville boy reported the theft of a cellular telephone from his football locker. The phone is valued at $800. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On May 9, Beatrice Rucker of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Rucker and Leroy Carlton Ferrell, 57, of Tallahassee, became involved in a verbal dispute over a cellular telephone bill and Ferrell threw a beer bottle at the front window of Ruckers home. The bottle smashed both panes of a double pane window creating approximately $250 worth of damage. Ferrell was arrested for criminal mischief and disorderly intoxication. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On May 8, Clarice Sanders of Sopchoppy reported a forgery as a suspect, who has been identi ed, forged signatures on three checks and cashed them in Crawfordville. The checks, valued at $1,398, were from a business in Sopchoppy. Capt. Chris Savary and Detective Matt Helms investigated. On May 9, Deloris Causseaux of Crawfordville reported the theft of a terrier puppy from her home. The victim returned home to nd her gate open and the dog missing. It is valued at $200. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On May 9, Jeffery Young of Crawfordville reported the theft of currency and cash from his home. A suspect, who has been identi ed, took cash and a bicycle to go to the store, but never returned. The bike and cash is valued at $170. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On May 9, Mary Miller of Crawfordville reported the theft of jewelry from a relatives home. The jewelry was valued at $1,000. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 809 calls for service during the past week. At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 19th Hole Wildwood Golf Club Coastal Highway Crawfordville, FL Come enjoy a honey tasting and special honey drink while learning about these important pollinators. 19th Hole Wildwood Golf Club Coastal Highway Crawfordville, FL Come enjoy a honey tasting and special honey drink while learning about these important pollinators. PLEASE JOIN Keep Wakulla County Beautiful PLEASE JOIN Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Special Guest Speakers Bob Livingston, Apalachee Beekeepers Association Sherri Kraeft, UF/IFAS Wakulla County 4-H Special Guest Speakers Bob Livingston, Apalachee Beekeepers Association Sherri Kraeft, UF/IFAS Wakulla County 4-H Green Drinks Tuesday, May 22 at 6:30pm Bees and Their Importance Green Drinks Tuesday, May 22 at 6:30pm Bees and Their Importance For our monthly For our monthly RSVP to helpkwcb@gmail.com RSVP to helpkwcb@gmail.com We add an important benet to our free debit cards. Instant. The benet of our free instant-issue debit card is that you can get it today and use it today. Its that easy. And with Centennial Bank, you can also use any ATM in the country, free*. Any ATM at all. Just a few more ways we offer banking that comes to you.*Some restrictions may apply. See bank for details. Fire ghters compete in FirematicsBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsWakulla County re ghters reported to Hudson Park Saturday, May 12 without a re in sight. Crawfordville drivers passing by the park may have been surprised to see re ghters out tted in full gear racing around to blast water from heavy hoses as their re trucks sat nearby no lights ashing, no alarms sounding. The event was a countywide rematics competition in which local volunteer and professional re ghters teamed up to compete in timed exercises the busted hose drill, the section race, the hose roll relay and the barrel roll. Ian Brazier, organizer of the competition, noted that it has been nearly 20 years since the last competition, but said, Its important to see how well our re ghters are trained, the amount of time we put in to keep the community safe. With 11 re stations in the county, Brazier acknowledged a need for department uni cation. Any interested re ghters put their names in a hat which was drawn from to decide the teams for the competition. In this way, stations didnt compete against each other, but worked alongside one another. Allen Harvey Sr., the rst volunteer re chief of the Crawfordville station, and the first organizer of the event for Wakulla County, said he rst saw the competition at a state Firemens Association gathering and decided it could be a great bene t to the re ghters of Wakulla County. Its about skills enhancement, improvement, and it builds up a lot of morale, said Harvey. Also represented at the event was the Wakulla County Explorers Program, started in 2009 for high school students who show an interest in re ghting. The explorers meet two times monthly for training and instruction. This gives kids an opportunity to learn about being a re ghter, said Michael Meaney, an assistant counselor for the program. We treat the explorers like they are re ghters. They learn leadership skills, discipline and theyre expected to meet goals. They learn lessons that they can apply at home and take to school. The explorers are trained as rst responders and receive CPR certi cation free of charge, in a curriculum that starts them off ahead in their goal of becoming re ghters, said Meaney. Ethan Trumbull, an eighth grader and the youngest member of the explorers, comes from a family of re- ghters, and wants to be an Army re ghter, himself. I started at the earliest age, said Trumbull, I want to carry on the dream. Another Explorer, 11th grader David Moss was inspired to be a firefighter as a fth grader, when he observed the events of Sept. 11. If Im brave and strong, I know I can push through it. The desire to help others was a key reason for Trey Taylor to join the Volunteer Fire Department at the age of 18. Its important being there for people when theyre at their worst, he said. If we can help to contain the re, save just one room. Its important. The seriousness of the work was tempered by the festivity of the event. Hamburgers and hot dogs were sold, a shotgun raf e took place, and a chance for kids to see the re trucks and hoses rounded out the event. All proceeds will go to the Explorers program, said Bill R ussell, president of the Wakulla County United Fire- ghters Association and re chief for the Ochlockonee Bay station. A competition like this also allows different stations around the County to have a little fun, said Meaney. The team of Mike Meaney (volunteer from station 8, Crawfordville), Jerry Johnson (career re ghter from station 12, Crawfordville), Jeff Cybulski (volunteer from station 4, Apalachee Bay) and Danny Aaron (volunteer from station 6, Panacea) won the Busted Hose Drill, the Section Race and the Barrell Roll. They were also our overall Firematics Champions for 2012. The team of Trey Taylor (volunteer from station 8, Crawfordville), Eric Wells (volunteer from station 6, Panacea), Andy Bowman (volunteer from station 8, Crawfordville) and Ian Brazier (volunteer from station 8, Crawfordville) won the Hose Roll Relay.Firematics results:Eric Wells, Andy Bowman, Trey Taylor and Ian Brazier get ready to beat the heat. Jessi Embleton shares a high- ve with her son, Payton Embleton. Wakulla County Explorers, showing off skills learned in re ghter training.PHOTOS BY LUCY CARTER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS More photos online at thewakullanews.com

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& Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn 1990, a creative program began at Shands at the University of Florida called Arts in Medicine. A group of physicians and nurses started the project to see if a collaboration with local artists might help reduce the stress of hospitalization. The programs focused on visual, literacy, musical and performance arts. They began to see the healing power of the arts. In 2008, this program expanded to rural communities, thanks to funding provided by the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment of the Arts. Franklin County was the rst to implement the program. Now, eight communities have an Arts in Healthcare program, including Wakulla County. Healing Arts of Wakulla County launched in December of last year at a community event to inform residents of this unique opportunity. HAWC is a joint effort of the Health Care Task Force, NAMI Wakulla, Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and the Palaver Tree Theater Co. Wakulla County faces challenges with the program because it is the only community without a hospital that was chosen to participate. Members of HAWC must come up with innovative and unique ideas that involve the arts and promote health and well-being for all residents of Wakulla County. Gail Campbell, executive director of HAWC, said Franklin County approached the coalition for youth about pursuing the program for Wakulla County. She said they understood arts as a healing force and it seems those members of HAWC agree. The program is still in the early stages in Wakulla County, but Campbell said the hope is for HAWC to turn into a true arts alliance. The group is made up of Campbell, President Herb Donaldson, President-elect Grace Keith of the health department and Secretary Rick Jackley of Ribits Ceramic Studio. Other members include artist Paul Fortier, County Commissioner Lynn Artz, Tamara Byrnes of the Senior Center, Jimmie Doyle of NAMI, Sherri Kraeft of the extension of ce and Greg Jackson of G-Signs. The team is currently working on its organizational structure and strategic plan. Campbell said a solid foundation is needed for the program to be successful, as well as community buy-in. HAWC will grow wings and y, Campbell said. The nine-member board will be the driving force, she said, but they also will partner with local artists, healthcare providers and instructors. There are several projects that are in the developing stages or already started. Nancy Jefferson and Haydee Jackley have brought enhanced art programming to Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center, which includes painting and pinch pottery. Those who participate in the program are asked to ll out an evaluation form so HAWC knows how the artists are performing. So far, Campbell said, the evaluations have been good. This program will eventually also be offered at the Senior Center. Another program that focuses on senior citizens is the Senior Stories Multimedia Project at Eden Springs. Fortier and his family are leading the project, which takes the persons life story and in uences based on several interviews with them and creates multimedia web presentations that include portrait paintings, presentations with animation and music, matted prints of the painting and website. One life story is almost complete. Fortier said he expects to nish the painting by mid-May and then he and his son will begin working on the animated sequences. While they are working on this story, Fortiers wife and two daughters will start interviewing two other Eden Springs residents. Great care will be taken during the course of this project to develop engaging presentations that highlight the individuality of each subject and showcase each residents unique approach to lifes challenges, Fortier said. In the end, the project will be given to the family as a gift. Fortier also plans to contact Big Bend Hospice. A project that has yet to launch is the Empty Bowl Project by Haydee Jackley of Ribits Ceramic Studio. The idea is that artists and people in the community will create handcrafted bowls. Then a fundraiser will held where guests are invited to purchase a simple meal of soup and bread. Guests will keep the bowl as a reminder of all the empty bowls in the world. All proceeds will be donated to the local food pantries. Continued on Page 4B Healing Arts of WakullaBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsFor two days in February a few members of HAWC, Healing Arts of Wakulla County, were invited to attend the Arts in Healthcare for Rural Communities Training Program in Franklin County. Those in attendance from our area were Haydee and Rick Jackley of Ribits Ceramics, Tamara Byrnes of the Wakulla County Senior Center, Gail Campbell, who began as the initial point person for HAWC, and me, representing Palaver Tree Theater. The goal of the training session was to introduce participants to the broader concept of arts in medicine, and to either inspire, or initiate, health and wellbeing programs in their communities. Jill Sonke, director of the UF Center for Arts in Medicine, coordinates rural training program initiatives for nine counties throughout Florida. Its a delight, said Sonke. I get to learn so much about communities in general. The diversity of each location, their issues and health disparities, along with the way people live and the challenges they face. For HAWC, one of those challenges is guring out what type of community roadmap it wishes to create. In order to do this it must search out what the community itself is lacking. In short, it must target the needs. And like any target, the needs will always be moving. Obesity, smoking, depression, mental health concerns, diabetes, disease prevention, nutrition, teen pregnancy, substance abuse and all that comes with the aging process are real issues for many in Wakulla County. Though there are organizations that may address these things individually, their resources are limited. Continued on Page 3BPAUL FORTIER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA work in progress by artist Paul Fortier as part of his Senior Stories project, in collaboration with HAWC.Group looks at innovative ways to use arts to promote health A look at the training for arts in medicine received by local volunteers

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, May 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, May 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY, R. Don McLeod Chapter, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. For more information, call Louise Thomas at 962-1945.C Sunday, May 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, May 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, May 22 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, May 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. Special EventsThursday, May 17 BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS BANQUET will be held by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce at 6:30 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. The guest speaker will be Herb Donaldson, artistic director for the Palaver Tree Theater Co. and president of Healing Arts of Wakulla County. Dinner will also be served. Reservations are due by May 14 at 3 p.m. Call 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com. Friday, May 18 IN BITS AND PIECES, a documentary night, will be held beginning at 5 p.m. at the library. Crossing Over: How Roots Captivated An Entire Nation, followed by Shirley Chisholm . Go on the road with Shirley Chisholm as she embarks on a journey to become president of the United States, and ending with The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975. During the rise of the Black Power Movement, Swedish TV journalists documented an unfolding cultural revolution for their audiences back home. CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING will be held for Anytime Fitness, which is under new ownership, MEA Fitness, LLC, at 2 p.m. They are located at 10 Preston Circle, Crawfordville. SABAL will be performing at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Musicians, singers and songwriters, Fred Figueroa, Kevan McCann, Carly Bak and Craig Daniel Hardin, blend their styles into a harmonious ensemble of original swampy Americana. Bak, with her gutsy and bluesy vocals, is a talented songwriter. Figueroa is on the harmonica, guitar and vocals. McCann, nicknamed Mr. Smooth, performs dulcet bass rhythms, and Hardin adds a rooted, current sound bringing a consciousness to the musical blend. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $12.50. Saturday, May 19 MAY 20TH CELEBRATION will be held from noon to 4 p.m. at the grounds of the Old Buckhorn School, Mount Trial Church. Planting of the May Pole, cakewalks, threelegged races, music, food, softball games, free clothing giveaway, Buckhorn Cemetery tour, information on how to research your family tree and more. WAKULLA SPRINGS 5K RUN AND 1-MILE FUN RUN will be held by the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park at Wakulla Springs State Park. Packet pickup and race day registration will begin at 7 a.m. The 1 Mile Fun Run will begin at 8 a.m., followed by the 5K run at 8:30 a.m. To register online, visit www.raceit.com. For more information, contact Trudy Thompson at (850) 962-2064. YARD SALE/BAKE SALE FUNDRAISER will be held for the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department at the Shell Point Fire House on from 8 a.m. to noon. The Shell Point Fire House is located on Shell Point Road (on the right as you enter the community of Shell Point Beach.) For questions or to donate items, contact Marion Russ at 926-9023 or on Facebook at Marion Watson Russ. CHILDRENS FISHING TOURNAMENT will be held at Port Panacea Marina, Woolley Park, from 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. The last boat will leave at 8:30 a.m. Weigh in will be between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. The tournament is free and open to children 3 to 15 years old. Lunch will be provided for all participants. There will be games, rides and exhibitions from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, contact Larry Massa at 745-7100. Sunday, May 20 BAT FEST 2012 will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 1 to 5 p.m. This is an opportunity for the public to connect with wildlife biologists from across the Southeast and learn about bats, bat biology and conservation. This event is free to the public and is presented by the Florida Bat Working Group in conjunction with the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network 2012 Bat Blitz. There will be crafts, demonstrations, youth conservation talk, a guest speaker and more. Park admission fees apply. Upcoming Events Saturday, May 26 SHOWING OF ROOTS Episodes 5 and 6 at the library at 1 p.m. SOPCHOPPY OPRY presents Southbound Band with special guest Shepherd Creek at 7 p.m. This is a special Memorial Day show. The cost is $10. Call 962-3711 for more information. Thursday, May 31 PROJECT GRADUATION will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. The event is free to all Wakulla High School seniors. Students will have access to the lodge, swimming area, boat rides, food and entertainment. There will also be gift drawings. Friday, June 1 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION CEREMONY will be held at 7 p.m. at Reynolds Field at J. D. Jones Stadium. Saturday, June 2 MOTORCYCLE POKER RUN CARDS FOR CARING will be held to bene t Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Capital City Harley Davidson, 1745 Capital Circle NW, Tallahassee. Registration is $15 per bike and $10 for a passenger. The best hand wins $250. For more information call Peggy at 926-5037 or Susan at 519-2292. GARAGE SALE to bene t the League of Women Voters and its programs from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1357 Martin Luther King Road. Sunday, June 3 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Barbara Hines, outreach coordinator for the North Central Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network as she presents A Sticky Situation: The Naval Stores Industry in North Florida at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The naval stores industry once dominated vast segments of Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and surrounding counties, including large areas of the St. Marks Refuge. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for information. Saturday, June 16 GOLF GONE WILD to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association will be held at St. James Bay Golf Resort. There will be cash prizes, a silent art auction and a nature photography slide-show and presentation, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay (which will soon be a published book), by award-winning nature photographer John Spohrer. The event will bene t the FWMA, a 501(c)3 wildlife rehabilitation center located in Wakulla County that cares for sick, injured and orphaned birds and wildlife in our area. Enjoy golf at the gorgeous Audubon-sanctioned St. James Bay Golf Resort (151 Laughing Gull Lane in Carrabelle, Florida). To help by sponsoring the event or donating auction items, contact Lois Swoboda at 653-5857. For more details, see the brochure on the website at www.wakullawildlife.org or call Lynne Cooper at (850) 697-9507. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Chamber Business Excellence Awards at 6:30 p.m. at the Senior Center. Documentary night at the library at 5 p.m. May 20 Celebration from noon to 4 p.m. at Mount Trial Church. BatFest at Wakulla Springs State Park from 1 to 5 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.comBy SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorSummer Program Information By the time youre reading this hopefully your child has bought home our brochure about our Summer Program of Events at the library. Sponsored annually by the Friends of the Library, this program is probably the most popular thing that we do at the library. This summer, well have reading programs from birth through eighth grades, performers weekly, eld trips. This year, we plan to end the summer with our rst talent show so that the children who participate in our program can show off their great talents, whatever they may be! Registration will be held on Thursday, June 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. and Friday, June 8 from 10 a.m. to noon and 2 to 4 p.m. with myself and Molly Clore (who will be our interim childrens coordinator this summer while Leilania is on maternity leave) will be on hand to answer any questions and get what we hope to be a record number of children signed up for all the fun this summer. A bouncy house will be on hand for the children to play on while mom and dad get them signed up. If you have any questions or comments dont hesitate to give us a call at 926-7415. Summer Reading Books We have multiple copies of every book on the Wakulla High Summer Reading List and should have copies of the Sunshine State Reading list books in late next week. As we do every year, we strongly encourage parents and students to either check out or get yourself on the hold list for these books early. As the summer goes by the waiting list only gets longer and we wont be able to guarantee that some copies will be available before school begins again in August. These books arent eligible to be renewed because of the overwhelming demand we receive each year. If there is anything we can do to help you get the summer reading books you need please talk to us. Computer Classes We have some great free computer classes available the rest of this month and into June for our patrons. On May 23, we have Microsoft Outlook 2007: Calendars, Task, Notes, & More at 9:30 a.m. followed by Microsoft Excel 2007: More Formulas & Functions IV at 1:30 p.m. Going into June, well have our next round of beginning computer classes along with a special evening round of classes on Digitizing Your Family Heritage for the Genealogy buffs out there. As always these classes are free but do require early registration. Library News... Government MeetingsThursday, May 17 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for a workshop in the commission chambers at 5 p.m. on the public works budget and 5-year plan, followed by another workshop on the Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities Master Plan recommendations. Monday, May 21 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, May 22 WAKULLA 2020 ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 4 p.m. at the library. The purpose is to review and prioritize proposed projects included in the Crawfordville Town Plan and identify other needed transportation projects throughout the county.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 3B Shepherd Creek is South Bounds special guest for the Sopchoppy Opry Memorial Day show, Saturday, May 26, at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. The show will feature patriotic songs of the red, white and blue as Americas heroes are honored. Tickets are $10. Call 962-3711.Shepherd Creek will play at the Sopchoppy OpryThe Tallahassee band Sabal will perform at Posh Java on Saturday, May 19, at 8 p.m, Musicians, singers and songwriters, Fred Figueroa, Kevan McCann, Carly Bak and Craig Daniel Hardin blend their unique styles of music into a harmonious ensemble of original swampy Americana. Like the tree it takes its name from, the band Sabal represents the people and places of Florida, weaving individual experiences into an impressive and intelligent blend of music. Bak, with her gutsy and bluesy vocals, is a talented songwriter who shines a light from the stage as she shares stories about her life and her childhood infatuation with nature and folklore. Figueroa, on the harmonica, guitar and vocals, adds a style that draws listeners in leaving them spellbound. McCann, nicknamed Mr. Smooth, performs dulcet bass rhythms, adding depth to the unique sound of Sabal. And Hardin adds a rooted, current sound bringing a consciousness to the musical blend that nally and collectively de- nes the music as swamp groove. This group brings to the audience a uniquely enjoyable musical experience. Visit Swamproove.com to learn more and follow their music on YouTube. Tickets are $12.50. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSwamp groove from Sabal at Posh Java on SaturdayContinued from Page 1BThis causes a great deal of stress to both the caregiver and patient. HAWC looks to position itself as a link between both parties, bridging that disconnect of how services are offered and how care is received. For a group like HAWC, still in its infancy, such an enterprise could prove to be overwhelming. But, slowly, partnerships are being born. And though HAWC cannot afford to reinvent the wheel, the months since its initial launch event last December have been used to identify and work with potential partners. Compared to other counties in attendance at the training program, such as Franklin, Immokalee, and Calhoun, Wakulla does not have a hospital or major healthcare facility that allows them to test their efforts in the traditional setting. Im excited by the uniqueness of Wakullas situation, said Jill Sonke, and the way so many are stepping up and saying were concerned about the health of our community members and want to do something to make it better we want to be involved. Others attending the training spoke of their efforts to build a healthier environment, such as painter and photorealist, Rhonda Long. Originally from Chicago, she currently works as an artist in Immokalee: We have a friend in Fort Myers that has an urban garden, said Rhonda. They work with the enterprise zone and were recently given ve acres of land to create a garden for the community. Collard greens, onions, potatoes. They sell it back to the community and put it in the lunch program at the schools, as a way of sustaining themselves. They even sell their vegetables to restaurants in their area. Similar things have been tried in Wakulla, but the running complaint seems to be the poor quality of the soil and lack of consistent produce availability. And though ideas like these may not sound HAWC related, in actuality, they are. For the health and wellbeing of the community is central to the HAWC mission. This is where being unique actually comes into play. In January, HAWC members met after their launch event, and though all were eager to be a part of this groundbreaking possibility, no one knew where to start, or how to fully de ne the actions to be taken that would bring change about. Hence, the need to attend the training program. You guys (Wakulla), said Jill Sonke, are nding some innovative ways to use the arts as very simple, basic interventions. And youre doing it without a healthcare partner. Thats something other communities can learn from. It doesnt take a healthcare institution to impact the healthcare of a community. People can do that. For HAWC to truly takeoff in Wakulla, there has to be a community behind it. And though that number is growing, the need for people to come onboard whose job is in the realm of healthcare (physicians, nurses, nutritionists), as well as those groups involved in the development of sustenance programs for the county, remains a strong one. The Shands Arts in Medicine Program began in the late 80s, and was formally established as a program in the early 90s. In 1996 the Center for Arts in Medicine was developed at UF as an outgrowth of the Shands program, as Jill explained: It started with a couple of artists who happened to be clinicians. They realized they were drawing on their artistic practices to maintain their own wellbeing, she said. They began inviting artists to work with their patients because they thought if it was working to help their own wellbeing (the clinicians), it might work to enhance the patients wellbeing also. The program has grown into a very broad endeavor. They have 15 paid professional artists-in-residence, along with an administrative staff that supports those artists. There are daily arts agendas throughout the week, in almost every discipline. Patients in the hospital have the opportunity to call on an artist, or to work with them at the bedside, or attend a workshop. Staff members are given opportunity to engage in creative processes that help support and sustain them in the dif cult work that they do as caregivers. The Center at UF provides education to artists looking to work in the health sciences arena, but who also wish to engage the arts in their work. The Center also provides research to better understand the impact of what arts can do in the healthcare realm and why they are effective. The effect HAWC will have locally remains to be seen. Chances are, it will be unique. It will most de nitely be ours. A look at the training received by HAWC volunteersThe group of HAWC volunteers at the recent training in Apalachicola. Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information Special Memorial Day Show SHEPHERD CREEKSopchoppyOpry.com Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. PREPAID MONTHLY PLANS Modern Communicationsnationwide pre-paid cellular page p l u s U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT$4000 PER MO.DATA CHARGES MAY APPLY Laura M. 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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1BThe project is intended to create a connection between the community and the bowl, said Rick Jackley. Campbell said they could also get the culinary arts students from Wakulla High School to cook the soup. Haydee Jackley is still in the planning stages of this project and if anyone is interested in helping, they should contact HAWC. Herb Donaldson is focused on another project called Redemption. This will be a series on his Sunday radio program where he interviews professionals in domestic violence, mental illness, substance abuse and child abuse. Donaldson said they will be looking at emotional, physical and psychological health. The group is also looking at offering art at the county health department on Wednesdays when mothers and their babies in the Women, Infants and Children program are there for services. Commissioner Lynn Artz suggested offering pictures or imprints of the babys handprint or footprint that the mother could keep as a memento. Grace Keith said that was definitely a possibility. Those children would be from birth to 5 years old, she said. Other possible projects include cultural heritage through photography and a student art competition at the community center. HAWC members want to engage the schools and the Wakulla Arts Coalition. The HAWC members also discussed the need for additional funding and Campbell received approval to apply for a $25,000 grant through the Division of Cultural Affairs. Its meant to sustain (HAWC), Campbell said. The next community meeting will be held later in the year and will update everyone on the progress of the group. For more information or to get involved, go to HAWCs website at healingartswakulla.org or call 926-3526 or email healingwakulla@gmail.com.Special to The NewsSouth East Eye Specialists in Crawfordville announced their new optometrist Sagar Amin, O.D. He is in the Crawfordville of ce Monday through Friday. Dr. Amin was born in Basingstoke, England, but raised in Tallahassee where he graduated from Leon High School. He graduated from Florida State with a Bachelor of Science in biology. He graduated from Nova Southeastern University College of Optometry with a doctor of optometry. His specialties are ocular disease diagnosis and management and contact lenses. Dr. Amin volunteered for Unite for Sight, a nonpro t organization, in 2006. He has traveled to India to provide eye care for multiple underserved rural communities. Dr. Amin currently resides in Tallahassee and enjoys Florida State athletics and golf. Southeast Eye Specialist is located at 2140 Crawfordville Highway. They are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Their number is 9269213.Special to The NewsExplore the vast range of creative possibilities and technological processes of modern photography through Diversity and Creativity: Photography in the 21st Century, an exhibition opened May 11 at the Gadsden Arts Center. This show, guest-curated by photographer Jessie Lovano-Kerr, features new work by accomplished photographers Edward Babcock, Robert Constand, Barbara Aleene Edwards, Bill Humphries, Jim Miller, David Moynahan and Stewart Nelson. Audiowood, a new sculpture by Joel Scilley, will be exhibited alongside the photography in the main gallery, presenting works that combine audio technology with traditional woodcraft to create functional works of art. Scilley is a designer, carpenter and woodworker who recently relocated his Audiowood Studio to Grand Ridge. He has lived or studied in Pittsburgh, New York, California and Europe, and his work has been featured in the New York Times and Wired magazine. In the Zoe Golloway Exhibit Hall, painters Randy and Debra Brienen will share Town and Country, an exhibit of new acrylic paintings featuring Gadsden County scenes. Randy is a formally trained artist who paints in a contemporary style, while Debra is a self-taught artist who prefers realism. The Gadsden Arts Center will also present all new works of art in a wide range of mediums by 47 Artists Guild Members, works of art from students at R.F. Munroe Day School and Shanks Middle School, works by student Kaia Miller and new selections from the GAC Vernacular Art Collection. These exhibitions opened May 11 at the Gadsden Arts Center and continue through July 28. Everyone is welcome join us to celebrate our regions artistic talent. For more information, visit the website at www.gadsdenarts.org. The Gadsden Arts Center is located on Quincys historic Courthouse Square at 13 N. Madison St. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $1 (members and children admitted free). Amenities include six gallery spaces, the museum gift shop, and the Mainstreet Caf, open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Catering services and guided tours are available by calling (850) 8754866. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSome of the artwork on display at the Gadsden Art Center this month through July 28.Gadsden Arts exhibits feature photography and audiowood sculptures SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHaydee Jackley of Ribits Ceramic Studio is a member of HAWC.HAWC looks at ways to use arts to promote health Dr. Sagar Amin joins South East Eye Specialists Dr. Sagar Amin, O.D. Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 18, Noon Publication Date: May 31 Remember This Years Graduate Congratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2012Sponsor Line ........$20 Eighth Page ...........$50 Quarter Page ......$100 .............................................................. $50 Half Page ..............$200 .............................................................. $75 Full Page ...............$300 ............................................................. $125 Back Page .............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons ............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available WINDOWSBest Window...Best Price...Best Choice! 1 Double Pane Insulated Glass $179*Any size Installed of TALLAHASSEE COME VISIT US AT GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL850-519-5056www.abcwintallahassee.com Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 5BJam 4 Camp is held April 28By SHERRI KRAEFTUF/IFAS Wakulla County 4-H AgentWakulla County 4-H hosted its second annual Jam 4 Camp Fundraiser on April 28 in Hudson Park. As the ve invited bands played everything from gospel to punk to bluegrass, parents and kids enjoyed the vendor booths and activities. While the primary purpose for the event is to raise scholarship money for kids to be able to attend 4-H Summer camps, it is also an opportunity for the community to learn more about our local 4-H programs throughout the year. Thanks to the continued support and enthusiasm of our current 4-H volunteers, sponsors, parents and members, we were able to raise over $4,000 this year. In addition to the band competition, members conducted a silent auction and signed up for all ve camp offerings this summer. The Jam 4 Camp champ this year was Backlash, which raised $158 in scholarship donations. There are lots of exciting things to do in 4-H this summer including sewing and quilting camp, home economics in Bachelor/ Bachelorette Camp, refashioning clothing and accessories in Project Runway and of course, the traditional residential camping experience at Camp Cherry Lake. Throughout the year and especially in the camping programs, youth develop life skills in areas like leadership, independence, selfreliance, teamwork, decision making and critical thinking. If your child has not yet signed up and is interested in a quality, fun educational experience, please contact the Extension Of ce at 9263931 or come by and pick up a camp application. Scholarship awards will be given as funds are available and the deadline to apply for all scholarships is May 25, 2012. Camp and scholarship information are also available at our website http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu/4-h/4-hyouth-development/campcherry-lake. We would like to thank the following donors, sponsors, volunteers and vendors for their time and support: Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Coca-Cola of Tallahassee, Wakulla Mens Club, Lube X-pert, Jared Miller, Donnie Sparkman, Roxana Lamothe, Mrs. Alice Veasman, Talquin Electric, The Wakulla News, Harbor Point Realty, Iris Annes, Purple Martin Nurseries, Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, Best Western Crawfordville, Salty Creations, Daves Bootleg Honey, Wakulla Christian School, Wakulla Senior Center, Scrabbled Creations, Artistic Creations, Fun Inflatables, Rod and Rocks, Buckhorn Masonic Lodge, Skye Creations, 2-11 Big Bend, Big Bend Area Health Education Center (Big Bend AHEC), Capital City Bank, SWAT, Mikes Seafood, Wakulla.com, Ashleys Feed, Carries Cove Louise Kreuger, Cypress Run Farms, Best Western Crawfordville, Designs by Susan at Menagerie, Auto Trim Designs, Michelle McKenzie, Peggy Mackin, Dave Seal, Jo Ann Palmer, Woody Palmer, Esther Harrison, Sue Sullivan, Mimi DeArruginaga, Alison Bussey, Stacy Harvey, Lori Gilbertson, Shelley Swenson, Alan Brock, Mischa Steurer, Judy Paris, Norma Parramore, Priscilla Weaver, Kourtney Meadowcroft, Mary Katherine Westmark, Pat Harvey, Debbie Madden, Andrea Carter, Herb Donaldson, Tonya Hobby, Calandra Portalatin and Laurie Westbrook. For information regarding any of the programs offered by Wakulla County 4-H, please contact Sherri Kraeft, 4-H Agent at sjkraeft@u edu. 4-H is a community of young people across America who are learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. 4-H is open to all youth between the ages of 5-18 regardless of gender, race, creed, color, religion, or disability. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS4-H agent Sherri Kraeft with 4-H supporters and Jam 4 Camp champs Backlash. Coon Bottom Creek Band performing bluegrass music for the crowd. Kathy Asbell of Refuge House with a informational table at the event. Audience members set up to listen to bands perform at Jam 4 Camp. A moonwalk at Jam 4 Camp. A vendor at Jam 4 Camp. Singer and ddle player Chelsea Dix Kessler of Coon Bottom performing on the Jam 4 Camp stage.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 11 The Florida Supreme Court took center stage this week as it reversed itself and approved term limits for local of cials while hearing arguments in a handful of cases that will affect homeowners, legal immigrants and potential deportees. Gearing up for November, state election of cials estimate that as many as 180,000 ineligible voters may be on the states voter rolls. The November hazing death of Florida A&M University drum major Robert Champion prompted Floridas university system chancellor to urge FAMU trustees not to strike up the band quite yet as the university continues to battle fallout from the tragedy, which also forced the retirement of the Marching 100 director, Julian White. Meanwhile, Gov. Rick Scotts popularity rises with the economy as at least one poll released this week show that more Floridians think he is doing a good job. The down side is that a larger share continue to think he is not. HIGH COURT IN HIGH GEAR The Florida Supreme Court had a busy week that included a full docket of closely watched cases and at least one decision that will have election implications in the fall. The states highest court backed away from an earlier ruling to decide voters in charter counties can impose term limits if they want on local of cials. The immediate cases involved the ability of voters in Broward and Sarasota Counties to place term limits on county commissioners. While upholding the term limits Broward and Sarasota county residents placed on their commissioners, the court also retreated from a 2002 ruling that blocked term limits for other of ces, such as clerks of court. The rulings are expected to have a broader impact on other elections in 10 charter counties, which are allowed more leeway in their election procedures. Charters in at least 10 counties Broward, Brevard, Clay, Duval, Hillsborough, Orange, Palm Beach, Polk, Sarasota and Volusia include term limits for commissioners, according to a court ling by the Florida Association of Counties. More than 80 percent of Broward voters in 2000 approved limiting county commissioners to three consecutive four-year terms, but resident William Telli later led a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the limits. In 2002, justices ruled 4-3 that term limits could not be imposed on some county of ces that are outlined in the constitution --clerk of court, sheriff, tax collector, property appraiser and elections supervisor. The court this week receded from that opinion. The court said then that term limits were a form of disqualifying candidates that was not allowed in the constitution. Two current justices, R. Fred Lewis and Barbara Pariente, were in the majority in 2002. FORECLOSURES The courts oral argument docket was jammed with high pro le cases this week including a case to determine whether lenders caught forging documents can escape scrutiny by simply dismissing the foreclosure case. The decision could reopen thousands of cases in which mortgage holders and their law rms allegedly falsified documents to speed up foreclosures. It could also serve as a template for actions in other states where courts play an integral role in the foreclosure process. Roman Pino purchased a home in 2006. Two years later he fell behind in his payments and the bank began foreclosure proceedings. During the proceedings, Pinos attorney discovered that the law rm handling the lenders case had backdated documents and forged signatures. When it became known, the bank dropped the foreclosure case and then re- led it with the appropriate paperwork. Pinos trial attorney argued that the second lawsuit should be dropped as a sanction for producing fraudulent documents in the rst trial. Both the trial court and Fourth District Court of the Appeal rejected the appeal. The implications are huge and justices appeared wary of making a decision that would revisit thousands of claims made since the housing bubble burst in 2008. Following a 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision in a Kentucky case, the high court also took up a trio of cases addressing how much attorneys must advise clients who are not U.S. citizens that their decision on how to plead could have them deported. The cases come two years after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Padilla v. Kentucky that attorneys must advise non-citizen clients about the deportation risks of a guilty plea. The ruling has sparked a urry of cases from defendants who are not U.S. citizens and whose cases were decided before Padilla or while the Kentucky case was working its way through the court. Nearly 50 Florida cases have already been led. VOTING RANKS DRAW QUESTIONS State election officials say as many as 180,000 ineligible voters may be on the state rolls as attention again turns to voter fraud in a critical swing state. When matching voter rolls against newly available citizenship data from the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, election of cials found that number of possible matches, and began further investigating each one to see if they were likely to be wrongly registered to vote. Of cials reported earlier this week that they had forwarded the rst batch of those names, about 2,600 to local supervisors of elections for further review and for each voter to be noti ed that they were on a list of people suspected of being illegally registered. Some Democrats and voting rights groups have criticized the new effort to find suspected ineligible voters. An ACLU of cial said this week that state of cials were looking for cover while trying to disenfranchise voters. Many of those identi ed so far have been in South Flor ida. Local media in Miami reported this week that the supervisor in MiamiDade County had been sent about 2,000 of the 2,600 initially identi ed suspect voters. Sen. Nan Rich, the outgoing leader of Democrats in the Senate and a candidate for governor, said as much energy should be spent on making it easier for voters to cast ballots. I certainly support an initiative that would remove people from the voter rolls that are not eligible to vote, Rich said. But weve had so much effort to suppress the vote. It would be nice if we put this much effort into making sure those who are eligible to vote can vote. FAMU Chancellor Frank Brogan called on Florida A&M University to continue the suspension of its Marching 100 band, saying that the band should remain idle until investigations into hazing and other matters are resolved. Brogans announcement came the same day that long-time director Julian White announced his retirement. White, 71, had been on administrative leave since Champions death. Both announcements came after revelations earlier in the week that nearly a quarter of the marching band arent even FAMU students, an apparent breach of university policy that could potentially lead to sanctions by governing bodies. Champion, 26, was allegedly beaten to death in a ritual hazing on board a charter bus during a band trip to Orlando in November. His death prompted university of cials to suspend activities of the vaunted marching band while the investigation continued. In a letter to the board of trustees, FAMU President James Ammons suggested he was considering allowing the band to resume its activities. The band has been inactive since shortly after Champions death. Brogan said he supports the university, but at the same time, our concerns continue to mount regarding the ever-increasing body of issues that harm the institution, its students and, therefore, our State University System as a whole. SCOTT POPULARITY UP IN POLL A Suffolk University/ WSVN-Miami poll released this week shows the governors favorability rating climbing seven percentage points since the last poll in January. The survey of likely voters showed 42 percent approved of Scotts job as governor, while 44 percent disapproved -in late January, the survey found 35 percent approval and 45 percent disapproval. STORY OF THE WEEK: Florida Supreme Court upholds term limits for local of cials. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Reinstating the band prior to these issues being resolved would sidestep efforts underway, which could impact the bands long-term survival. Florida Chancellor Frank Brogan in a letter to FAMU Board of Trustees urging them keep the Marching 100 suspended until an investigation in the death of drum major Robert Champion and nancial inconsistencies with the band are resolved.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)High court is in high gear Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Go to AnyGivenTimeJax.com to enter to win a vacation in sunny Jacksonville! SO MUCH TO DO, ANY GIVEN TIME. 13 Months For only $31Call 1-877-401-6408Price good for in county subscriptions only. Offer available until 5/31/2012 is offering Remember those who died for our freedom on Memorial Day. Remember those who died for our freedom on Memorial Day. May 28, 2012 May 28, 2012Subscription Special

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Jokes and RiddlesA: It was too heavy for him to carry.Question: Why did the cowboy ride his horse?Question: Whats the hardest thing about learning to ride a horse?A: The ground! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 7B This page sponsored in part by: COLORING PICTURE If you have ever been to a rodeo, you might have seen a rodeo clown or two. Most work in teams, and along with entertaining the crowd between events, they may also have to protect fallen bull riders. Whether they get bucked off or jump off, bull riders need someone to distract the bull as they make their way out of the ring. With their bright clothes and protective gear underneath, rodeo clowns do just that. Rodeo clowns shout, wave their hat, run all over and do whatever it takes to get the bull to look at them instead of the rider. Should the rider get caught up in the straps on the bull, rodeo clowns must work hard to free them. Being a rodeo clown can be a dangerous job.Clownin Around Can Be Serious Work Rodeos have several events to compete in. Fill in the blanks to name some of the events found at a rodeo.Answers: 1) Calf Roping, 2) Bronc Riding, 3) Barrel Racing, 4) Breakaway Roping, 5) Goat Tying, 6) Team Roping, 7) Steer Wrestling Name That Event Name That EventC __ L F R O __ I N __ B R __ N C R __ D __ N G B A __ __ E L R A __ I N __ B R __ __ K A W A Y R O __ I __ G G __ __ T T Y I N __ T __ __ M R __ P I N G S T __ __ R W R __ S T __ I N G 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 List 10 words that rhyme with rope. 1. ____________ 2. _____________ 3. _____________ 4. ____________ 5. _____________ 6. _____________ 7. ___________ 8. _____________ 9. ____________ 10. ____________Some answers: cope, hope, lope, mope, nope, pope, scope, soap, slope, taupe What Rhymes with1) Rodeo comes from the Spanish word meaning round up. Fact or Fiction? 2) Most rodeos allow only men over the age of 50 to compete. Fact or Fiction? 3) All rodeos are held outside. Fact or Fiction? 4) Some rodeos are so big they are shown on TV. Fact or Fiction? 5) Some rodeos crown a rodeo queen. Fact or Fiction? 6) Most rodeos start off with the Grand Entry, or introduction of competitors, officials, sponsors, the queen and her court, and more. Fact or Fiction? 7) During the Grand Entry, the American anthem, America the Beautiful, is usually performed. Fact or Fiction? 8) Rodeo competitions are divided into two groups: timed and rough stock. Fact or Fiction? 9) Some rodeos have competitions for kids. Fact or Fiction? 10) Some rodeos have live music at intermission. Fact or Fiction?Facto or Fiction?Rodeo ChallengeRodeos are exciting and usually keep people watching from start to finish. Here are some questions about rodeos. How many can you answer correctly?

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Lost Beagle, Male Name Cash 8 yrs. old, house dog missing since 12th Wakulla Gardens Area Health problems (850) 926-5205 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Found Found at the Blue Crab Festival last weekend: a pair of ladys reading or prescription glasses. If yours, please call 926-7102. Announcements ADVERTISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS!! Call now to grow your business. Get your classified ad in 119 newspapers with one order. Advertising Networks of Florida. 866-742-1373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Become a driver for Schneider National! Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in just 3 weeks 888-368-1964 Drivers Regional Refrigerated& Dry Van Freight. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com General Help Potential to Generate $4000. to $20,000. or more a month with this activity No selling. Experience financial & time freedom. Call 352-445-1385 Financial Fr eedomW ay.info. Career Opportunities A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401k, 2 Mo. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782www.me ltontruck.com/ drive Auctions AUCTION CALL CENTER CLOSING Computers, furniture, generator + MORE! bid online thru May 15th www.one mor e time.u s Live Auction May 18th at 10am 6671 Caroline St Milton FL; 18% BP live. Gaddis & Associates 850-227-8280 1 More Auction Services, 407-466-2270 www.one mor e time.u s Fritz Real Estate and Auctions Lic. Real Estate Broker 800-422-9155 AU2871-AB2650 Garage/ Yard Sales PANACEA Thur. Fri. & Sat. 9a-4pHUGE ESTATE SALE Tools, Toys, Household and much much more.280 Tower Road Garage/ Yard Sales NedartSat, May 19th 8am to 1pm, 5 miles south on Hwy 319, at the old Dinglers Barber Shop Household items, wichker furn,a clown collection inc. Emmett Kelley Jr., also Vintageitems and much more SHELL POINTSat, May 19th 8amto 4pm Asstd furn. inc. queen sofa sleeper, glassware, dishes, punch bowl, printer, ladies clothing, and many hshld items left on Royster Drive off Shell Point Rd. Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA on 5 acres (48 Willie Jenkins Rd.), NE Wakulla County. $800/month. Call 850-510-6200. CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $675 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-524-4090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Sopchoppy RiverCharming, Partially furnished 2-story loft on private pond. Custom features, 1.5BA, walk-in-closet, W/D, D/W, TV w/ satellite. Very private. Available June 1st. $650/month. 850-962-2849. Efficiencies/ Cottages Furnished Cottage 1/1 over looking lake $600/ incls electric water /garbage, call evenings (850) 962-2520 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the water with dock. Light and bright furnished or not. $950 + utilities 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEShell Point Rental 2/2 Town home on Canal, with office or 3rd BR Loft, enjoy your private boat slip and community pool $1,300 mo. 850-509-2667 or 850 -926-7158 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA, All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 926-3832 CRAWFORDVILLESmall 2/1,$ $600 /mo+ $500 dep. minimum 6 months lease, no pets applications/ refers required (850) 524-3164 CRAWFORDVILLE very nice, 3bdr/2 ba in Magnolia Gardens 42 Ted Lott Lane $850pr mth, $850 sec no pets, call Gene @ 850-510-6446 Mysterious Waters2BR/2BA, W/Dappls, wood-detail, vaulted ceiling, large -porch, covered parking, short walk to Wakulla River, community park, boat-ramp, dock $875/mo.incl water & garbage 850-926-6289. Waterfront Rentals PanacaFishermans Retreat Lovely small cottage the water off Mashes Sands Rd $500/mo. Pets Welcome call Lisa (850) 510-2647 SHELL POINTFOR RENT OR SALE 30 Janet Drive, Paradise V illage Shell Point Beach newly renovated, 3bdr, 2ba, granite kitchen, tile bath, wood floors, wkshop, canal, dock. Gated Community w/pool & lawncare. $1200. pr mnth (850) 926-5930 Auctions Estates ORLANDO AUCTIONSNo Minimums, No Reserves! Inventory of Cabinet Manuf. Facility, May 16, Bankruptcy & Consignment Auctions, May 19. Ewald Auction Rlty AB2473/AU1340 10% BP 407-275-6853 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 850-926-3546 FUNDRAISER YARD SALE / BAKE SALE Lots of Great Items! FINANCIAL ADVISORGulf, Wakulla Counties and surrounding communities. Ideal candidates must have excellent sales skills, demonstrates leadership skills and have a high degree of personal integrity. This individual will sell investment products and services through Invest Financial Corp., a registered Broker/Dealer, member FINRA and SIPC. Series 7 and 66 licenses and life, health and variable annuities licenses are required. Associates or Bachelors degree in business or nance from an accredited college. Relevant experience may substitute for the education requirement. We offer a competitive salary, promote family values, but most of all, provide our associates with a stimulating, pleasant and fun place to build a career. For consideration please visit: www.ccbg.com Requisition #623 EOE/Drug-Free Workplace A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 ALERT MECHANICAL SERVICEAir Conditioning & Heating SALES and SERVICERA0028165510-1432we sell and service most makes and models Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE S S S S S S Licensed & InsuredGreen Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax Services LLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 HURLEYS ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF RE-ROOFING SHINGLES METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMP OUTS & REPAIRS SEPTIC TANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMIT ASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Flo lo wer we Beds Sp Sp rin rin kle kle r Systems & Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053887408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONS RE-ROOFING REPAIRS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $475mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $450mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 9B RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. Available ASAP. 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $1,000 Mo. Available May 1. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com V V 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. 5203-0517 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, May 21, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 May 17, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5217-0524 vs. Leslie, Shannon K. Case No. 65-2011-CA-000149 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000149, DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. : SHANNON K LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY POPPELL A/K/A SHANNON LARSON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000149 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the 5218-0524 vs. Stephens, Barbara Case No.65-2011-CA-000041 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000190, DIVISION: BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. : BARBARA STEPHENS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000190 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is the Plaintiff and BARBARA STEPHENS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INCORPORATED AS NOMINEE FOR BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP; TENANT #1, N/K/A ANTHONY STEPHENS are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22, A DIS TANCE OF 248.77 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 61, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1673.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 689.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 311.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 138 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 0 SECONDS WEST 317.88 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 138 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUT H 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SEC ONDS WEST 135.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 317.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER OVER AND ACROSS THE FOLLWOING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO WIT: A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY LYING 30.00 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED CENTERLINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 22, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 22, A DISTANCE OF 248.77 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 61, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 2389.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID CENTERLINE, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 547.98 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 50.00 FEET TO THE CENTERPOINT OF A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS AND THE TERMINATION POINT OF SAID CENTERLINE. A/K/A 44 ANCHORS WAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of CIrcuit Court at (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5218-0524 5219-0524 Vs. Small Lorie Ann, 65-2011-CA-000186 Notice of Sale 5220-0524 Vs. Reed, Venesha Case No. 65-2011-CA 000150 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000150 US BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. VENESHA REED; CLARENCE REED A/K/A: UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VENESHA REED; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 8, BLOCK K, HUDSON HEIGHTS, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 43 DOGWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2096 at public sale on June 14, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 2nd day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. May 17, 24, 2012 5220-0524. 5221-0524 TWN Vs. Potter, Timothy A. Case No. 11-CA-354-FC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-CA-354-FC, UCN: 652011CA000354XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. TIMOTHY A. POTTER et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-CA-354 FC. UCN: 652011CA000354XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A is the Plaintiff and TIMOTHY A. POTTER; DARDRA REVELL POTTER F/K/A DARDRA B. REVELL; UNKNOWN TENANT NOO.1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT TO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at Wakulla County Florida, at 11:00a.m on the 14th dayof June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 19, WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT 3, PAGE 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida on. May 3, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5221-0524 5223-0524 Vs. Kilbourn, Rodney P. Case No. 2011-CA-000364 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.2011-CA-000364 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. RODNEY P. KILBOURN, Defendant, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-364-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and RODNEY P. KILBOURN, is the Defendant, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on June, 14, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBITS A and B Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 3rd day of May, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 34, A DISTANCE OF 2650.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 858.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 327.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 309.73 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 156.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261)THENCE RUN NORTH 89 5224-0524 TWN Vs. Cope, Yolanda Case No. 11-330 FC Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-330-FC, UCN:652011CA000330XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-OC8, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OC8 Plaintiff vs. YOLANDA COPE; et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ANDRE HARVEY Last Known Address 49 SHOEMAKER CT CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 29, BRIDLEGATE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 57, OF THE PUBLIC OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days fr om first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED ON March 5, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5224-0524 1183-113683WVA 5225-0524 vs. Stalvey, William Keith Case No. 2011 000254CA PUBLIC NOTICE May 14, 2012IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 2011000254CA Sunshine Savings Bank f/k/a Sunshine State Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. William Keith Stalvey, Cothee Ann Tomaini, Erin Capital Management, LLC and Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA ST A TUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 30, 2012, in Case Number 2011 000254 CA, of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which Sunshine Savings Bank f/k/a Sunshine State Credit Union is the Plaintiff, and William Keith Stalvey, Cothee Ann Tomaini, Erin Capital Management, LLC and Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327-3136 at 11:00 A.M. on May 31, 2012 the following-described property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure: Lot 57, Block A, Magnolia Ridge North, a subdivision as per map of plat thereof re corded in Plat Book 3, Pages 55 and 56 of the Public Records of Wakulla County Notice is also given pursuant to 45.031(2)(f), Florida Statutes, that any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED: May 1, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter as Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, May 17 & 24, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DEGREES 36 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 125.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261) THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 156.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 125.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A 15.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS/EGRESS EASEMENT LYING OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 7.5 FEET THEREOF AND BEING PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 174, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. EXHIBIT B Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, 2650.93 feet to a found 4x4 concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road S-299 and said POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way run South 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds East112.89 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 29 minutes 30 seconds West 183.71 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 34 seconds West 101.83 feet to the Southerly right-of-way of said State Road S-299, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East along said right-of-way 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.45 acres, more or less. The above legal description being more recently surveyed by Thurman Roddenberry and Associates, Inc., dated April 26, 2006, under job no. 90-132, and described as follows: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 34, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 89 degrees 25 minutes 03 seconds East along the North boundary of said Section 34, a distance of 2650.93 feet to the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of said Section 34, thence run South 00 degrees 37 minutes 04 seconds East 858.48 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Curtis Mill Road (State Road S-299) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 12 seconds East 112.70 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 89 degrees 27 minutes 49 seconds West 183.76 feet to a concrete monument(marked#4261), thence run North 00 degrees 18 minutes 00 seconds West 101.74 feet to a nail and cap (marked #7160) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said Curtis Mill Road, thence run North 86 degrees 03 minutes 00 seconds East 184.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 0.45 acres, more or less. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5223-0524 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000186 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. LORIE ANN SMALL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LORIE ANN SMALL; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; CAPITAL ONE (USA), N.A.; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 2, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 56, BLOCK 16, WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA a/k/a 42 RENEGADE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2708 at public sale on June 14, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 3rd day of May, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. May 17 and 24, 2012. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 1 00006-MHO P-0001000 $566.69 TURNER ELIJAH PO BOX 1655 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 2 00040-000 P-0003800 $3,669.76 ANGELOS SEAFOOD RESTAURANT H/O ANGELO E PETRANDIS P O BOX 159 PANACEA, FL 32346 3 00045-025 P-0004100 $1,576.75 ATTACK ONE FIRE MANAGEMENT SERVICE 342 GUY STRICKLAND RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 4 00054-040 P-0005000 $550.75 BARINEAU LARSON HOLDINGS, INC D/B/A WAKULLA LUMBER & TRUSSES PO BOX 640 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 5 00080-021 P-0005900 $1,382.74 BEN WITHERS INC P O BOX 908 PANACEA, FL 32346 6 00090-000 P-0007400 $315.08 BROOKS WELDING & MACHINE SHOP INC C/O BERNARD BROOKS PO BOX 82 PANACEA, FL 32346 7 00146-500 P-0009300 $2,227.74 CAUSSEAUXS TRACTOR WORKS JOE EARL CAUSSEAUX 140 SANDERS CEMETRY SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 8 00149-100 P-0010500 $184.63 CORBINS TRACTOR SERVICE 149 RIO PAZ TRACE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 9 00396-000 P-0021500 $174.72 GLENDAS COUNTRY STORE 282 PIXIE CIRCLE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 10 00790-000 P-0033100 $678.70 M & L PLUMBING, INC. 4417 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 11 00851-000 P-0034100 $1,915.31 M T S DIRECTIONAL BORING INC 172 SWEETWATER CIR CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 12 00908-000 P-0036200 $268.92 OCHLOCKONEE BAY REALTY TIMOTHY R JORDAN P O BOX 556 PANACEA, FL 32346-0556 13 00915-005 P-0036700 $109.14 OUZTS TOO 7968 COASTAL HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 14 00980-000 P-0039200 $411.74 POSEYS SEAFOOD & CRABSHELL INC P O BOX 294 PANACEA, FL 32346 15 00990-001 P-0040000 $1,865.40 LAND OF WAKULLA INC P O BOX 1137 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 16 01026-000 P-0041400 $407.60 NORTH FLORIDA TITLE SERVICES D/B/A RESEARCH EXPRESS 457 HUNTERS TRACE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-1641 17 01150-007 P-0045400 $926.72 SPECIALTY METAL FABRICATIONS INC 1884 WOODVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 18 01247-002 P-0048200 $1,341.85 SUNSHINE CAR CARE, LLC # 206 C/O DAN HINCHEE 2235 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 19 01260-000 P-0048300 $86.39 SWEET MAGNOLIA INN BED & BREAFAST PO BOX 13463 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32317 20 01275-704 P-0048500 $87.08 TALLAHASSEE TURF 2582 SURF RD PANACEA, FL 32346 21 01384-000 P-0051100 $454.69 W L ROBERTS INC P O BOX 730 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 22 01407-000 P-0052400 $669.69 WAKULLA COLLISION CENTER INC 2170 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 23 01410-003 P-0053000 $9.63 WAKULLA BANK WINN-DIXIE BRANCH C/O WALTER DODSON P O BOX 610 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 24 01482-561 P-0054900 $251.92 WESTERN FINANCE & LEASING, INC 503 HIGHWAY 2 W DEVILS LAKE, ND 58301 25 01627-000 P-0058100 $3,891.15 SUMMITT OUTDOOR ADVERTISING 313 WILLIAMS ST STE 9 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 26 01638-000 P-0058800 $39.59 WILDWOOD RESORT, INC. PO BOX 40 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 27 01638-001 P-0058900 $4,240.51 WILDWOOD GOLF OPERATIONS, LLC 3870 COASTAL HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 28 01638-002 P-0059000 $6,485.74 WILDWOOD OPERATIONS. LLC 3896 COASTAL HIGHWAY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 29 01663-000 P-0060700 $3,305.94 PICHARD BROTHERS LAND CLEARING 117 PROVO PLACE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 30 01714-000 P-0064100 $1,893.56 T & T LAND SERVICES INC 53 FISHING POOL STREET PANACEA, FL 32346 31 01727-000 P-0064900 $3,207.84 ENVISION CREDIT UNION WAL-MART CRAWFORDVILLE PO BOX 5198 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32314-5198 32 01762-000 P-0067500 $194.73 SOUTHERN TRADITION BUILDERS, INC 111 BELLE FORBES LANE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 33 01764-000 P-0067600 $194.73 SOUTHERN HOMES PROPERTY & DEVELOPMENT, INC 3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY SUITE B6 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 34 01770-000 P-0068100 $1,225.00 NATS FOOD MART, INC DBA: BIG TOP SUPERMARKET #2 P.O. BOX 1043 PANACEA, FL 32346 35 01792-000 P-0069900 $1,665.85 WAKULLA EQUIPMENT RENTAL, INC 1709C CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 36 01829-000 P-0073300 $991.92 RUMMYS LLC 2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 37 01856-000 P-0075200 $3,117.75 GULF COAST ICE DIST. LLC 3919 CHAIRES CROSSR0AD ATTN: ED RICORD TALLAHASSEE, FL 32317 38 01861-000 P-0075700 $437.44 STEDEBANI ENTERPRISE CO, INC. 1239 COASTAL HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 39 01862-000 P-0075800 $2,302.11 BEST VALUE TIRE & AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALTIES, LLC 2106 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 NOTICE OF DELINQUENT TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES FOR 2011AS PROVIDED BY CHAPTER 197.016, ACTS OF 1972, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES ASSESSED FOR 2011 ARE NOW DELINQUENT AND BEGINNING WITH APRIL 1, SUCH TAXES ARE DRAWING INTEREST OF 1-1/2% PER MONTH, PLUS THE PROPORTIONATE COST OF PUBLISHING THIS NOTICE. UNLESS THE AMOUNT SET OPPOSITE EACH NAME BELOW, WHICH INCLUDES THE COST OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND PENALTIES, ARE PAID BY THE LAST DAY OF MAY 2012, WARRANTS WILL BE ISSUED HEREON DIRECTING LEVY UPON AND SEIZURE OF THE TANGIBLE PERSONALPROPERTY OF THE TAXPAYERS. MAY 17, 2012 Plaintiff and SHANNON K LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY LESLIE A/K/A SHANNON KAY POPPEL A/K/A SHANNON LARSON;JARED R LARSON A/K/A JARED RAY LARSON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 6th day of September, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA: THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING: THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINN ING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 327.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 665.14 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 327.17 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 664.69 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING;CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH ACCESS EASEMENT MORE PARTICULARY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: A 15 FOOT WIDE ACCESS EASEMENT LYING 15 FEET EAST OF THE FOLLOWING DE SCRIBED LINE: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 50, OF THE HARSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA: THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 1311.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 664.69 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINING CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 236.33 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A 60 FOOT ROADWAY SAID POINT BEING THE POINT OF TERMINUS. A/K/A 80 TANGLEWOOD ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk ** See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accomodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court (850) 926-0905 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5216-0524 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5204-0524 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 12-111-DR, Division In the Adoption of Petitioner and Elijah Dale Holman & Simon Ellis Holman Respondent NOTICE OF ACTON FOR ADOPTION TO: Brian Dale Reed c/o The Red Lobster, 435 Shawnee Mall Drive, Shawnee, OK YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for adoption has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Attorney Steven P. Glazer, whose address is 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on or before June 01, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address 5208-0517 Vs.Darnell, Gordon T. Case No. 2011-CA-377 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011-3CA-377 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100 Jacksonville, Florida 32256 Plaintiff, v. GORDON T. DARNELL, MARY H. DARNELL, LAWRENCE ALLEN MYERS, LYNN BROTHERS MARINA, FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION, and CAPITAL CITY BANK, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 12 IN BLOCK 20 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT III, AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 43 OF PLAT BOOK NO. ONE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING SHOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT NO. 13 IN BLOCK 20 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, SECTION 3 AS SHOWN BY A PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 43, PLAT BOOK 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING SHOWN AND DESIGNATED AS LOT 44 IN BLOCK 20 OF WAKULLA GARDENS, SECTION 3 AS SHOWN BY A PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 43, PLAT BOOK 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. LOT 45, BLOCK 20, UNIT 3 OF WAKULLA GARDENS AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY DATED JULY 17, 2007 PREPAREDBY EDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., JOB #07-207 AS FOLLOWS: LOT 12, 13, 44, AND 45, BLOCK 20, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT THREE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999 OMNI MOBILE HOME, ID# 067877AB. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the W akulla County Court house, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy, Crawfor dville, Florida 32327 at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 31st day of May, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.,Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 10 & May 17, 2012 5208-0517 5212-0517 TWN Vs. West, Roy D. Case No. 12-10 PC Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 12-10-FC, UCN: 652012CA000010XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. ROY D. WEST; et al,. Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DOROTHY M. GORDON Last Known Address 33 CARD LN CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Current Residence is Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 99 OF THE REFUGE AT PANACEA, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 18-22, OF THE PUBLIC OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on SMITH, HIATT & DIAZ, P.A.., Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL 33339-1438, (954) 564-0071, within 30 days fr om first date of publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED ON February 10, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis As Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 10 & 17, 2012 5212-0517 1183-114254WVA 5213-0531 vs. Roddenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count I and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count II of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime), at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Pr operty THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER AND THE EAST HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4 OF NE 1/4 & E 1/2 OF SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4) OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAVING AND EXCEPTING THEREFROM AS EASEMENT FOR ROADWAY OVER AND ACCROSS THE NORTH 6 FEET OF SAID PROPERTY. Personal Property Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. 5214-0531 vs. Rodenberry James T. Case No. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO. 4:11-cv-369-RH-WCS CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff vs. JAMES T. RODDENBERRY d/b/a THE JAMES T. RODDENBERRY LAND COMPANY; JAMES T. RODDENBERRY, individually;KIMBERLY S. RODDENBERRY; and HAMAKNOCKERS LTD. CO., Defendants. 5215-0524 vs. Vowell, Weldon C. Case No.65-2011-CA-000041 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000041, DIVISION: JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. : THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST WELDON C. VOWEL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL,SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000041 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JAMES B NUTTER & COMPANY is the Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/AWELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C VOWELL, SR, DECEASED; JANICE A. MONTALTO, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR., DECEASED; WELDON C. VOWELL JR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR.., DECEASED; JANICE A. MONTALTO, AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTA TE OF WELDON C. VOWELL A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL, SR. A/K/A WELDON CHALMER VOWELL A/K/A WELDON C. VOWELL SR., DECEASED; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S)WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLIAM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS;UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; THE SKETCHLEY LAW FIRM PA; TENANT#1 N/K/A JANE DOE are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3, BLOCK C, HIGHWOODS PLACE, PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 66 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2000 GENE MOBILE HOME, VIN NO. GMHGA1379925361A AND GMGHA1379925361B, TITLE NOS. 81599283 AND 81598714. A/K/A 20 RIDGEWAY COURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2484 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5215-0524 5216-0524 vs. Cannon V. Gordon Case No. 65-2011-CA-000269 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000269, DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. : GORDON V. CANNON A/K/A GORDON VICTOR CANNON et, al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated May 02, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP is thePlaintiff and GORDON V. CANNON A/K/A CORDON VICTOR CANNON; LELIA BETH CANNON; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 14th day of June, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS NUMBER 107,108, AND 109, BLOCK 22 OF THE EAST ADDITION TO TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY FLORIDA, AS SHOWN BY THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SAID LAND ALSO DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; LOTS NO. 107,108 AND 109 OF THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY FLORIDA, EASTSIDE OR ADDITION AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF RECORD ON PAGE 641 OF DEED BOOK 2 OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 154 WINTER STREET, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. (SEAL) WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on May 2nd, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act. Any persons with adisability requiring reasonable accomodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 17 & 24, 2012 5216-0524 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and by virtue of a Final Judgment of Foreclosure Under Count III and Partial Final Judgment as to Liability Under Count IV of Plaintiffs Amended Complaint rendered in the above-styled case on March 7, 2012, by the United States District Court For The Northern District Of Florida, in favor of the Plaintiff, the undersigned, appointed in said decree, will on the 15th day of June 2012 at 12:00 p.m. (Easter n T ime) at the main foyer in the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest bidder, the following described property, situated, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida: PARCEL #1 COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND THENCE RUN WEST 641.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 803.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319 AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 104.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 412.07 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 105.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 416.75 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. BEING THAT SAME PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL. RECORDS BOOK 23, PAGE 533 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL #3 COMMENCE AT A LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF AN UNNUMBERED LOT LYING NORTH OF LOT 89 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 387.72 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 111.76 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 420.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES13 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNCIL MOORE ROAD 60.21 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID COUNCIL MOORE ROAD RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT 551.90 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 167.45 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 650.12 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY 319, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCAVE TO THE WESTERLY, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A RADIUS OF 1942.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 11 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 205.21 FEET (CHORD BEING NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 235.07 FEET) TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING A POINT OF TANGENCY, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 142.64 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 416.73 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 320.85 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 53.82 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN NORTH 76 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 1706.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID LOT 77 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY 687.92 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF LOT 77, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 77 A DISTANCE OF 1763.34 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475), THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 380.12 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #6475) SAID POINT BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT 191.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 60.00 FOOT WIDE UTILITY AND ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS A PORTION OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 317, PAGE 416 OF THE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Personal Pr operty Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and further improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estates described above(all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and all water rights associated with the Property, however established. For additional information concerning the above property contact: STEPHEN A. PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an inter est in the surplus fr om the sale, if any, other than the pr operty owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshall, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010,Count III Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24 & 31, 2012 5214-0531 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices PITRE, ESQUIRE, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200. All sales are subject to confirmation of the court. Method of payment is by postal money order or certified check made payable to the U.S. Marshal Service. Ten (10) Percent of High/Acceptable bid in certified check or cashiers check (NO CASH) will be accepted with the balance due within 48 hours. No cash will be accepted. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the Clerk of the Court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire, Post Office Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591-3010 or (850) 434-9200 not later than seven days prior to the sale to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. Ed Spooner, United States Marshal, Northern District of Florida By: /s/Ed Spooner, US Marshals Service Dated: May 4th, 2012 Stephen A. Pitre, Esquire,Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 13010,Pensacola, FL 32591-3010 Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News May 10, 17, 24, & 31, 2012 5213-0531#1 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 Page 11B 5207-0517 Vs. Tillman, Robert Case No. 2010-210 CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2010-210 CA AMERICAN BANKING COMPANY D/B/A AMERIS BANK 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100, Jacksonville, Florida, 32256 Plaintiff, v. ROBERT SHANNON TILLMAN, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 8, BLOCK C, AMELIAWOOD SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION OF A PART OF LOT 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 6 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 31st day of May, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: April 26, 2012 (COURT SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit court By: /s/ Irvene Kimbrel, Deputy Clerk Published four times (4) times in the Wakulla News May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 5204-0524I Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5209-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 002 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SEAN HILLIER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2535 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-115-000-11897-000 LOT 115 HS P 20-1-M-25D A PARCEL OF LAND IN THE SW 1/4 OF HS 115 OR 611 P 246 Name in which assessed SHEPARD FAMILY TRUST said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 5210-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 003 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES, LLC the holder of the 5211-0531 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CASPIAN I LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2570 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-121-351-11968-A01 THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT 2 BLOCK A LOT 1 OR 722 P305 Name in which assessed RWC INVESTMENTS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, ESQ.Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 2878 Remington Green CircleTallahassee, Florida 32308 Counsel for Plaintiff Robert S. Tillman,33 Equine Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32317 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 10 & 17, 2012 5207-0517 following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 710 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 12-6S-02W 000-03873-000 12-6S-2W P-8-M-55 A PARCEL OF LAND W OF US 98 IN SECTION 12 OR 12P 6 & 7 and OR 74 P 219 Name in which assessed TERRY C NELSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of June, 2012, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 25 day of April, 2012. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By:Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 10,17, 24 & 31, 2012 5209-0531 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 25 36 40 43 46 54 62 66 69 2 20 26 55 3 27 56 4 23 41 57 5 37 50 21 28 47 63 67 70 6 15 18 29 44 51 7 30 48 58 8 24 38 59 9 31 42 52 22 39 53 64 68 71 10 16 19 32 49 11 33 45 60 12 34 61 13 35 65 ACROSS 1. Instruments struck with mallets 6. "Guarding __" (MacLaine movie) 10. Pork serving 14. The Who's "Tommy," for one 15. The Beehive State 16. Follow a trail 17. Purge, Pied Piperstyle 18. __ fide 19. Spheroid hairdo 20. 1976 Sean Connery film 23. Gorcey or Durocher 24. Jiffy 25. Cartoon skunk Le Pew 28. Diarist Anas 31. Garlicky seafood dish 36. Wolfed down 37. High points 39. Organizer's organization 40. 1968 Richard Burton film 43. Part of the giblets 44. Russell who played Braddock 45 Artist Gerard __ Borch 46. Pleasant to look at 48. __-Wan Kenobi 49. It's right in an atlas 50. "__ you nuts?" 52. Figs. 54. 1984 Matt Dillon film 62. Go hither and yon 63. Mischievous spirit 64. Periodicals, for short 66. "__ from Muskogee" 67. Some sibs 68. One of the Bronts 69. Cry out loud 70. Bront's Jane 71. Lavisher of attentionDOWN1. Word on a penny 2. Abbr. on a phone 3. Rex's detective 4. '40s pinup Betty 5. "Socrate" composer Erik 6. Oompah sounder 7. Thames town 8. Makes smoother 9. Brin gs dishonor to 10. Burn the surface of 11. LP player 12. Cajun veggie 13. Hacienda hand 21. Present time 22. Point a finger at 25. Ratchet mates 26. Code of conduct 27. Royal pain 29. Apple model 30. United __ College Fund 32. Trinidad/Tobago divider 33. Sporty Mazda 34. Pumice openings 35. Chemically nonreactive 37. Obsolescent roof topper 38. Messy eater, e.g. 41. Toon Chihuahua 42. "Dallas" family name 47. Swimmer Buster 49. Word preceding dog or Pie 51. Atlanta university 53. Moved like the Blob 54. Where Paris took Helen 55. __ up (falsify) 56. Villain's work 57. Have a hunch 58. Stereotypical lab assistant 59. Big letters on Wall St. 60. Monogram part: Abbr. 61. Strike out 65. Neighbor of Turk.American Prole Hometown Content 4/22/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 23 4 516 3782 825 2973 894 7 591 568 2379 00 9 HometownContent 618 2935 4 7 972541836 453786912 167 832459 249165783 385974261 736 459128 591628374 824317695 G O D P A W L S T R O Y O P E R E T H I C H O K E N E R O P E E V E E V I L G R A B L E R E N F E E L S A T I E A E R I A L N O N C E C R A B B E T U B A I M A C E M O R Y E T O N N E G R O I G O R S A N D S S L O B N Y S E S H A M E S E W I N G A C C U S E O O Z E D C H A R A N D E S K I M O H I F I M I A T A I N I T O K R A P O R E S D E L E P E O N I N E R T S Y R

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 17, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comRiversink, Medart students unveil murals at marine lab Special to The NewsGovernment entities are some of the largest employers in nearly every county in Florida, according to a new analysis released today by Florida TaxWatch, the nonpartisan, nonpro t research institution headquartered in Tallahassee. The Briefing surveys the signi cance of publicsector employment in Florida counties by examining the 10 largest employers per county, and nds that public employers are the top employer (by number of employees) in 51 of the 67 counties in Florida, and one of the top ve employers in every single county in the state. Additionally, the analysis nds that 57 counties have at least three public entities in the top 10, and ve counties have at least six public entities in their top ten. This analysis shows that public entities are a major employer in nearly every county in Florida, said Dominic M. Calabro, President and CEO of Florida TaxWatch. Often, we think of counties with large public institutions such as prisons, military bases, and universities as the main government-supported parts of the state, but as this research shows, a signi cant amount of the public entities in the list of top 10 employers are local government entities that touch Floridians each and every day. The Briefing includes a county-by-county breakdown of public employers, ranked by number of employees, and an additional graphic showing statewide views of the results. Florida TaxWatch is a statewide, nonpartisan, nonpro t research institute. Its mission is to provide high quality, independent research and education on government revenues, expenditures, taxation, public policies and programs. Visit the website at www. FloridaTaxWatch.org.Taxwatch: Public entities are signi cant employer Students and art teachers from all contributing schools in front of the mural wall displaying the murals painted by Koenig Brothers Design, Franklin Middle School, and SAIL High School. Riversink art teacher Jennifer Brooks with art students who helped with Riversinks conservation themed mural. Medart Elementary art teacher Diane Perez with students in the art club who contributed to Medarts peaceful manatee mural. By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar eld@thewakullanews.netOn Saturday, April 21, students and art teachers gathered at the Florida State University Coastal and Marine Laboratory at Turkey Point for the unveiling of six murals, ve of which were painted by students from area schools. Working under the theme Conservation: Taking Care of the River, Bay and Gulf, students, guided by their art teachers, painted the murals to boost awareness of the need to protect our local waterways. Participating schools were Franklin County Middle School, Wakullas Medart Elementary and Riversink Elementary schools, Tallahassees Alfred B. Maclay School and SAIL High School. Koenig Brothers Design also contributed to the project with the sixth mural. To see more pictures of the mural wall, see this story at thewakullanews.com. LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deli of the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida