<%BANNER%>
Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00407
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 05-03-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00407
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netMarine biologist and author Anne Rudloe died last week after a long battle with cancer. She and her husband, Jack, were frequent writing partners, as well as the guiding force behind Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea. Rudloe, who was 64, died Friday, April 27. She often wrote about the meaning of life as she found it in the natural world … those wild spaces untouched by human development. She was a Zen Buddhist and wrote a book in 2002 titled Butter” ies on a Sea Wind: Beginning ZenŽ … a memoir about taking life lessons learned at Buddhist retreats and putting them into practice in daily life. She was also the co-author, with Bruce Means and Ellie Whitney, of Priceless Florida: Natural Ecosystems and Native Species.Ž The book was written for a lay reader, and earned praise from noted biologist E.O. Wilson. The Rudloes published a fantasy book … which managed to be both spiritual and satire … called The Great AgreementŽ about a chicken who discovers what fate awaits chickens, and who then leads the overthrow of a chicken factory. The Rudloes also worked on numerous magazine articles together, mostly focusing on the sea, for publications ranging from National Geographic to Readers Digest to Sports Illustrated. While Jack Rudloe has often been involved in local politics … battling developers, tree-cutters and any threat to the marine environment … Anne tended to stay more in the background. Jack Rudloe recalled his wife tended to choose her battles … she was especially passionate about development on St. Joe Bay, a proposed development at Keaton Beach and clearcutting in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Continued on Page 2A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 17th Issue Thursday, May 3, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Summer Camps ................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 12B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 13B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 13B INDEX OBITUARIES Bradham Forbes Carraway Carolyn Knight Pelt William ‘Ron’ Smith Megan Crombie is a finalist for state Teacher of the YearAnne Rudloe succumbs to cancer MACYS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakullas Teacher of the Year Megan Crombie was named as one of “ ve “ nalists for state Teacher of the Year. On Friday, April 27, Macys presented her with a check for $5,000 and a gift card for $500, plus a check for Riversink Elementary for $1,000. See Anne Rudloe’s final blog entry, “Giving thanks for cancer,” on The Opinion Page, 4A.Anne Rudloe Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce detectives continue to investigate an unusual death reported Friday, April 27 in the Apalachicola National Forest, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. A U.S. Forest Service helicopter pilot observed smoke in the forest at 3:15 p.m. and contacted “ re“ ghters to contain the blaze. Shortly before 4:15 p.m., a severely burned body was observed near the vehicle and law enforcement was contacted. Fire“ ghters and law enforcement of“ cials arrived on the scene and found a badly burned vehicle and the remains of a male. Due to the condition of the body, the cause of death and the identity have not yet been determined. The “ re began as a half acre blaze before growing larger. Fire“ ghters got the blaze under control later during the day Friday. The vehicle, which was completely destroyed, was found at a remote location in the national forest about 10 miles north of Arran Road in Crawfordville. Detectives are creating a timeline of activities leading up to the “ re and are combining physical evidence from the scene to help them positively identify the body. The original case was investigated by Deputy Nick Gray, Detective Rob Giddens, Lt. Mike Kemp, Sgt. Fred Nichols, Captain Chris Savary, Lt. C.L. Morrison, Detective Lorne Whaley, Major Shepard Bruner and Undersheriff Maurice Langston of the WCSO, as well as the U.S. Forest Service, state Fire Marshal, Florida Forest Service and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement crime scene unit.Body found in forest; death is suspiciousSpecial to The NewsRiversink Elementary teacher Megan Crombie was surprised by a visit from Floridas Commissioner of Education Gerard Robinson last week for an announcement that she is one of “ ve “ nalists for the Macys/Florida Department of Education 2013 Teacher of the Year Award. A teacher is one of the most in” uential factors in a students academic accomplishments,Ž said Robinson. Each Teacher of the Year “ nalist re” ects the character, commitment and qualities that help students realize their potential and ensure they have every chance for success.Ž This isnt an individual award in my opinion,Ž Crombie said. When one of us is honored, it is because of the rich collaboration from teachers in my school and in Wakulla County. This is an amazing school system, and Im proud to be a part of it.Ž Crombie, a fourth-“ fth grade teacher at Riversink Elementary, received a $5,000 check from Macys and a $500 Macys gift card. The Macys Foundation also presented Riversink principal Jackie High with a $1,000 check to use at the school. During the surprise assembly on Friday, April 27, Crombie was shocked as the confetti canons “ red off. Students jumped out of their chairs with excitement as the school band played a celebratory song. This years “ ve “ nalists were chosen from more than 180,000 public school teachers throughout the state by a Department of Education-appointed selection committee representing teachers, principals, parents and the business community. Each finalist is selected on the basis of outstanding ability to teach and communicate knowledge of the subject taught, professional development, philosophy of teaching and outstanding school and community service. The winner must also show a superior capacity to inspire a love of learning in students of all backgrounds and abilities. Crombie holds a bachelors degree in elementary education, a masters degree in gifted education, has certi“ cation in Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum, is endorsed in English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and is a National Board certi“ ed teacher. This is her seventh year of teaching. She also teaches three of the “ ve college courses needed for the Gifted Endorsement to a cadre of elementary and middle school teachers after school hours. In addition, she has been the Riversink Yearbook sponsor since 2008 and has taken a leadership role in the Wakulla District Writing Committee. Continued on Page 2AThe state commissioner of education is on hand for the surprise announcement on Friday at RiversinkBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netLast week was National Crime Victims Rights Week and as part of the commemoration, Attorney General Pam Bondi held an awards ceremony for victim advocates on April 25. Crawfordville resident Barbara Strickland and her husband, Kenny, were invited to the ceremony and listened as a survivor who was a doctor told the crowd that people from all walks of life can be victims of domestic violence. Strickland knows how true that statement is. She lost her daughter, Leslie Drew, on Nov. 29, 2009, when she was only 29. Drew, a paraprofessional at Riversink Elementary School, was murdered by her boyfriend. He was working on his masters degree. She was going to leave him that night, Strickland said. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, one in every four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. And that doesnt includes the cases that arent reported, Strickland said. Since losing her daughter, Strickland has spoken at numerous meetings and events, telling her daughters story. Although it has been two years, Strickland said it is still a hard one to tell. She urged those close to someone who is in an abusive relationship to reach out and offer help.Continued on Page 3ALeslie Drew featured on victim services brochure Leslie DrewThe display for victims compensation at the Capitol. A victim of domestic violence, Drew was murdered by an abusive boyfriend in 2009. Her photos appear on new materials to help crime victims The Wakullanews Wakulla Schools Honor RollPages 4B-6B

PAGE 2

Continued from Page 1A Perhaps her biggest bene“ t to the community was putting a leash on me,Ž he said with a laugh. She often advised him on what battles were worth “ ghting and which werent, he said, and he recalled at least one in which he should have taken her advice. Jack recalled “ rst meeting Anne in 1969, when she was a customer of Gulf Specimens … ordering from him scallops with pea crabs, a small parasite that lives inside. Later, she went to graduate school at FSU but they didnt connect until a year later when Jack saw her standing in front of Crums Gulf station fueling an Oceanography vehicle and wearing a wet suit. Rudloe recalled with a chuckle that she looked vaguely femaleŽ in the get up, and he approached her. She told him, he recalled, that she was working on a study of seagrasses in St. Joe Bay but was having trouble identifying some of the sea squirts. He invited her to come to the lab to help her with identi“ cation. Instead of Come see my etchings, it was Come see my sea squirts,Ž Jack said. They were married in June 1973 at Otter Lake. Jack said he felt Anne was more deserving of academic success … She should have been more than an adjunct professorŽ at FSU, he said … but felt her career was hampered by his feud with the university. She was a passionate voice in her writing for the preservation of the environment, and wrote eloquently of those moments in the midst of nature … feelings of awe, of how those places that are still wild centered her, gave context and meaning to her life. She had practiced Buddhism for more than 20 years and, as of last year, had earned the status of a Zen teacher. Jack said she had a list of things she wanted to get done before her death. She did them all, he said, and then passed away. A memorial service is planned for Mothers Day, Sunday, May 13 at the Unitarian-Universalist Church in Tallahassee at 4 p.m. She is survived by her husband and their two children, Cypress and Sky. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Teacher of the Year Megan Crombie, center, with her combined fourth-“ fth grade class; her parents, Beth and Tim ODonnell, at left; and at right Riversink Elementary Principal Jackie High, Superintendent David Miller and Assistant Principal Melinda Young. Continued from Page 1A She has participated in extensive professional development in the areas of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) through summers at the National High Magnetic Laboratory Research Experience for Teachers and at the Phil Mickelson ExxonMobil Teachers Academy for Math and Science. In addition, she is an outreach sponsor for the FAMU/FSU College of Engineering when they have competitions through the American Society of Civil Engineers. Mrs. Crombies breadth of knowledge about STEM areas and her ability to inspire her fourth-fifth grade combination class of students to experiment, hypothesize, and understand how STEM areas affect everything is phenomenal,Ž said Wakulla Superintendent of Schools David Miller. Her focus is on student achievement and her love for her students is at the core of that desire to see them succeed.Ž Principal High agreed. While Mrs. Crombie is academically very strong, her true strength lies in the relationships she builds with her students, their families and her peers in the school,Ž said High. She makes learning exciting and fun.Ž Crombie and the other four “ nalists will now go on to another set of interviews with representatives from the Florida Department of Education and with Macys. The winner of the 2013 Macys/ Florida Department of Education Teacher of the Year award will be announced during a ceremony in Orlando on July 12. In addition to a $10,000 award funded by the Macys Foundation, the Teacher of the Year will receive awards from Macys including an all-expense paid trip for four to New York City to attend the Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade. The winner will also serve for one year as the Christa McAuliffe Ambassador for education, touring the state to spread the word about educational opportunities and challenges in the Sunshine State. To date, Macys and the Macys Foundation have contributed more than $2 million to teachers throughout the state. Crombie is married to Dave Crombie and is the daughter of Tim and Beth ODonnell, both Wakulla County educators.Megan Crombie is a “ nalist for state Teacher of the YearAnne Rudloe succumbs to cancer Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 18, Noon Publication Date: May 31 Remember This Years GraduateƒCongratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2012Sponsor Line........$20 Eighth Page...........$50 Quarter Page......$100.............................................................. $50 Half Page..............$200.............................................................. $75 Full Page...............$300............................................................. $125 Back Page.............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available The next generation of Spirit Filled Ministers Special Singing Nightly Come and enjoy old fashioned preachingMay 7, 2012 May 11, 2012Where: Panacea Full Gospel AssemblyMay 7th Brother Scott Shiver from East Point, FL May 8th thru May 11th, Brother David Bane from Zirconia, NCPANACEA FULL GOSPELASSEMBLY Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Advertise your waytoSuccess! Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising. –Mark Twain Statewide Advertising Refreshing Rates atCall now to start growing your business 866.742.1373www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A She gave a presentation to the attorney generals of“ ce in December and shared photos of her daughter, as well as one of Drews daughter, Leila, standing next to her mothers grave. Strickland is raising Leila, who is now 5 years old. The photo of Leila is moving and Strickland said they didnt intend to capture that moment, but were simply taking a picture of Leila. After speaking with Bondi, Strickland was asked if the Division of Victim Services could use those photos of Drew and Leila for their national brochure. Strickland agreed. Its an honor,Ž Strickland said. There are four images of Leila and Drew on the front of the brochure. Next to the photos of Drew and Drew and Leila, is the word, before.Ž The photo of Leila next to the grave has the word, after.Ž The photos are also on the Crime Victims Memorial Wall on display on the second ” oor rotunda of the Capitol. The wall is dedicated to those lost to crime. Strickland said the Division of Victims Services is a great program that many people dont even know exists. The division offers numerous bene“ ts to victims of a crime, including wage loss, loss of support, disability allowance, funeral and burial expenses, treatment expenses, prescription, eyeglasses, dentures or prosthetic devices needed as a result of the crime, mental health counseling, property loss reimbursement and domestic violence relocation. The toll-free number for victim services information and referral line is 1-800-2266667 or visit my” oridalegal. com.Leslie Drew featured on victim services brochureBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakulanews.netThere are numerous infrastructure problems located within Wakulla Gardens, including unpaved and poor roadways, stormwater drainage problems and lack of access to sewer and water. The cost to fund these improvements is astronomical and the Wakulla County Commission has been trying to “ nd ways to pay for these improvements. One option is a voluntary assessment, or MSBU, charged to residents in the area. The commission is exploring this idea which would start with a ballot survey sent to residents asking if they would be willing to pay for these needed improvements to their neighborhood. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said the ballot would have a laundry list of items and would ask if residents would be interested in paying for any of them. No dollar amount would be included. If a majority of property owners indicate support for the voluntary assessment, the county would “ gure out what each property owner would pay for the improvements. Once costs are established, another ballot would be sent out with the proposed assessment included. The results of the second survey will help the commission decide if it wants to move forward with the assessment. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he would like a dollar amount included in the first ballot, even if it was just a ballpark “ gure. Encinosa said the county may run into issues if the numbers are not exact. Brock said he wanted to make sure the survey was user-friendly and included a timeline and funding options, as well as an explanation that if the assessment doesnt happen, the county doesnt anticipate these improvements happening in the next 10 years. County Administrator David Edwards said they are looking at ways to fund these projects, as well as determining the value of the area. The commission agreed to table the item until costs could be added to the ballot.Survey to look at voluntary charge for Wakulla GardensBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt has been over a year since Wakulla County chose to outsource all of its housing programs. Meridian Community Services Group has been administering the Housing Choice Voucher Program (Section 8) and the State Housing Initiative Partnership program. At the April 16 County Commission meeting, Ersone McDaniels with Meridian Community Services gave a status report of those programs. When Meridian took over these two programs, they encountered numerous problems, McDaniels said. For the past seven years, the countys Section 8 program has been in troubled status as declared by the U.S. Housing and Urban Development. Section 8 is intended to assist very low and low income residents with rental assistance. In 2012, the county had a little more than $1 million available. McDaniels said $52,000 is spent a month. The county is supposed to be leasing about 250 units at approximately $352 a month. But Meridian is leasing 119 units at an average of $595 a month. Because it is not meeting the requirements, Wakulla County did not do well on several indicators of the Section Eight Management Assessment Program. McDaniels said they are working on correcting that issue and added that there was a need for a reasonable rent study. Each year, HUD evaluates each program based on 15 pre-determined indicators. According to McDaniels, when Section 8 was administered by the county, they paid mortgages for at least two homeowners, which was never authorized. McDaniels said Meridian has also established a “ ling system and is working on correcting payment standards. Meridian has also created a utility study for the county and re-certi“ ed all clients. We have cracked down,Ž McDaniels said. He added that there was some misuse of program activity, which is also being corrected. The Section 8 waiting list will be done May 1. The county had 200 people on the waiting list and it hadnt been purged or updated since 2008, which is supposed to be done every two to three years. As far as SHIP, there are also a number of issues. The county paid rent for several different clients on a continual basis, which the county was never supposed to do. McDaniels said he is speaking with the Florida Housing Corporation to try and clean up those issues. There were 70 to 75 clients whose rent was paid for three or four months. McDaniels said the amended strategy was approved by the county commission, but it was never sent to the state. However, it was implemented by the housing department. We are working to resolve the issue,Ž McDaniels said. The state placed a hold on SHIP funds because of the issues, but has since released $549,000 of those funds. Applications will be accepted from May 9-11 for rehabilitation and down payment assistance. Out of those funds, $199,000 must be spent by June 30. The other two housing programs, Weatherization Assistance Program and Low Income Housing Energy Assistance program, are being administered by Capital Area Community Action Agency.COUNTY COMMISSIONMeridian working to improve housing programs Special to The News Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners staff will speak at the Senior Citizens Center on May 4 to offer information to senior citizens about the Solid Waste and Fire Hardship Assistance Programs. Wakulla County staff will speak at the Senior Citizens Center, 33 Michael Drive, on Friday, May 4, at 10 a.m. The Hardship Assistance Program was created to assist residential property owners with the nancial burden imposed by the Solid Waste and Fire Services Assessments. In order to apply for hardship assistance, citizens must complete the application and file with the County Administrator's Of ce before June 1. The program was enacted by the commission to provide assistance to low income individuals and families. Senior citizens who live on a xed income are one group the Board has sought to offer some nancial relief. "The Hardship Assistance Program was designed by the Board to capture the lower income families living on the fringe nancially and, if one year is an indication, the program has been successful," said Deputy County Administrator Tim Barden. Staff reached out to the Senior Citizens Center to present the required documentation and answer any questions they may have regarding the Hardship Program. "This is another step taken to provide our citizens with the opportunity to be informed in their county government," said County Administrator David Edwards. For more information contact Jessica Welch, public information director, at (850) 926-0919 ext. County staff to speak on Hardship AssistanceSpecial to The NewsElected officials from five Gulf States met on April 19, in Biloxi, Miss., to discuss the Restore Act. The Restore Act is a bill based on the fundamental principal that fines assessed to BP and the other responsible parties due to the massive and tragic DeepWater Horizon Oil Spill in 2010 should be directed to the region immediately impacted by this horri“ c event. Wakulla Commission Chairman Alan Brock attended the meeting. As local elected of“ cials weve joined together to make sure that our coastal communities have a unified voice,Ž Brock said. Together we are making a difference, with a stronger voice from all our effected states.Ž The elected of“ cials met just one day before the two year anniversary of the oil spill showing that while the visible signs of this devastation have gone there is still much healing and recovery going on within these communities. The meeting was a follow-up to a meeting that took place in Washington, D.C. to lobby Congress to pass the Restore Act. Elected officials have broken down state and county lines to join together to ensure that their communities and thereby the entire Gulf Coast Region can fully recover and rebuild their economies following the oil spill. Also in attendance at the meeting was County Administrator David Edwards. After two years,Ž he said, it is time to make this right. On behalf of Wakulla County, we thank Representative Steve Sutherland and Senator Bill Nelson for their support of the Restore Act.ŽCounty o cials meet on Restore Act FROM WAKULLA GARDENS FACEBOOKFlooding in Wakulla Gardens in January 2010. Elected o cials from “ ve Gulf states discuss passage of a federal bill to “ ne BP for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill two years ago David Edwards Meridian took over two of the countys troubled programs … Section 8 and SHIP. A report says the group is trying to resolve problemsCity of Sopchoppy For more information, contact City Clerk, Jackie Lawhon or Deputy Clerk Linda Langston at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL or phone 962-4611.MAY 3, 10, 17, 2012CITY ELECTION NOTICECity of Sopchoppy The City Commission of the City of Sopchoppy gives notice of its intent to consider the adoption of the following Ordinance: The Codication of the Ordinances of the City of Sopchoppy will eliminate provisions from the City's Ordinances that are inconstant with state or federal law and will provide a more user friendly format for those wishing to review the ordinances. A public hearings on the proposal Ordinance will be held on Monday, May 14, 2012, at 6:30 p.m., or as soon as can be heard in the City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. A copy of the Ordinance may be obtained and persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or by writing to the City of Sopchoppy, P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or by phone at 850-962-4611. Colleen Skipper, Mayor Attest: Jackie Lawhon, Municipal Clerk Publication Date: February 2, 2012City of Sopchoppy, Florida NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF ORDINANCEMAY 3, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on May 9, 2012, at 5:30pm MAY 3, 2012 Watch out for manatees

PAGE 4

Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Body found in Apalachicola National Forest; death appears suspicious • Softball: Lady War Eagles can’t catch Arnold, fall 6-3 in playoffs • Sheriff’s Report for April 19 • Baseball: War Eagles fall to Suwannee in district playoffs • Rona Lavon Hawkins Jr. obituary • Proposed septic tank revisions moving forward • CHAT’s Pamper Your Pooch€ thewakullanews.com Follow us onBy ANNE RUDLOE My eyes blinked open as consciousness returned after the colonoscopy. Before I could say anything, the doctor leaned over my shoulder and said in an urgent voice, You have cancer!Ž Geez, what kind of a bedside manner is that?Ž I thought in a fuzzy blur. A few hours before, when I had arrived at the clinic for a routine screening, I had felt “ ne. It was just the last step in a series of routine checkups. But youll be OK,Ž he added. Its small, we think we caught it before it spread beyond the gut.Ž But it had spread. And after surgery to remove the tumor and a series of lymph nodes, I spent weeks recovering under huge old trees next to the Gulf of Mexico in the company of fall wild” owers and butter” ies. Morning sunlight glittered on the bay and gilded the pine needles overhead. I was swept not with fear but with gratitude for all the wonderful things of life and with the absolute conviction that, if death came, nothing would be lost. Later, my husband and I made a trip to the Mof“ tt Cancer Center in Tampa. On the way, we canoed the Weeki Wachee River, a gorgeous spring run with crystal clear water, underwater emerald meadows, schools of “ sh darting past us, manatees and eagles. The healing that came from being there was palpable, even as it had been under the pines at home. There was joy to be a part of a system that creates such beauty even though death is part of it. Halfway through the chemotherapy, I ended up in and out of the hospital over 25 days, really sick. I never felt as if I were in any serious danger, given that medical support was available, but a lot of friends who saw me were convinced that I was on the brink of death and the doctors didnt say that it was out of the question. Neighbors came to visit and they always wanted to pray. I welcomed the kindness even if the language was not the same as I was used to in my own religious practice. This culminated in the appearance in my front yard one Sunday afternoon after I got out of the hospital of about 20 members of a little lay led church. Everybody gathered around my husband and me, but in the little village of Panacea, where neighbors still know each other, it was well known that neither my husband nor I was an orthodox believer. They were a little uncertain about how to begin with a couple of lost souls, one of whom might be facing an early death. So I began by thanking them for their care and all the covered dinners and they began to share the value of their faith. I found that I truly agreed with everything that was said, with the exception that theirs was the only way. Then I said that the most mistaken thing anybody can say in this situation is Why me?Ž because sooner or later we must all face this sort of trouble and eventually we will all die of something. Rather, I said, a health crisis is a wonderful teacher if we can let go of anger and fear and open up to what it has to teach. The preacher immediately added, We should give thanks for cancer because it brings us closer to God and that is the most important thing in life.Ž He then turned and looked at the other members of his congregation. Nodding at individuals one by one, he said, And you should give thanks for the breast cancer,Ž and you, nodding to another, mental illness, and you,Ž nodding to another, should give thanks for that shooting,  and you, nodding to another, for the heart attack.Ž Everyone he pointed to agreed. So, was he right? Should we not only be brave but even thankful if we get cancer? I re” ected on my own case and realized that the preacher was right. In addition to the wisdom of the river, the forest and the sea, heres what I am thankful for. To fully know what it is to be human, it is just as important to go through the hard times of old age, loss of social roles, illness and approaching death as it is to go through the pleasant phases of youth. The hard parts can provide insight and wisdom as nothing else can. Cancer means one must really live in the present rather than being lost in the past or in fearful or desire ridden fantasies in the future. It makes all the difference in the world in experiencing life as the gift that it is. I experienced the impermanence and fragility of the rational, intellectual, analytical mind. It slowly disappeared when I got really sick, and it slowly reappeared as I got better. By shutting down the egocentric mind, the body actually makes it easier to face the “ nal decline. I no longer take positive things for granted or get all upset about the stresses of daily life. Mortality and the impermanence of an individual lifetime become very real rather than an intellectual philosophy, but it is a wonderful aspect of reality. Birth and death endlessly produce unique new minds and consciousness, new insights and talents. If Mozart had never died, Stravinsky could never have appeared. It is possible to let go of fear and to perceive the brilliance of the process and to know that death is part of a vaster and extraordinary reality. I have met some extraordinary people among those who treat cancer patients, doctors who are humble and compassionate, (I guess it is hard to be arrogant when you lose so many patients) and nurses who keep what could be a grim setting cheerful and upbeat, giving their patients the courage to get through it all. I have “ nally been able to really drop the ego-based worries of career and finances and replace them with things I really want to do. That consciousness can survive the death of the brain is no longer strictly a matter of faith. There is a growing amount of rational evidence that points in that direction, enough to provide hope if not certainty. If so, then death might not mean giving up the beauty of life. It might only mean a better view of the larger wonders of the universe. So I have learned to give thanks for all the tough lessons that teach us what we would never learn voluntarily. When we stop whining, when we realize that this too is part of the experience of living a full life … then, when a major disease comes, we can truly give thanks for it. Its an intense and rich way to live, like having a challenging teacher always in your face, forcing you to live at your highest level of insight, ability, and courage. Reinhold Niebuhr, a Protestant theologian, said, Nothing worth doing is completed in our lifetime, therefore we must be saved by hope. Nothing true or beautiful or good makes complete sense in any immediate context of history, therefore we must be saved by faith. Nothing we do, however virtuous, can be accomplished alone. Therefore we are saved by love.Ž This is what Ive learned so far.Anne Rudloe of Panacea was a marine biologist, writer and operated Gulf Specimen Marine Lab with her family. This was her last blog entry before her death on Friday, April 27.Editor, The News: I was pleased to see the photo of Jessica Beatty of Florida Wild Mammal with Doofy, the pelican (Wakulla Wildlife FestivalŽ photos, April 26). The last time I toured her wonderful facility, Doofy had me in stitches. He kept taking the mops and brooms away from the caretakers and trying to clean his own pen! Im glad to see hes doing well. Chris is a blessing to this community. Donna Bass CrawfordvilleGiving thanks for cancerGood to see a picture of Doofy the pelicanEditor, The News: OK, I checked my facts and I was partly wrong with the letter I sent to The Wakulla News (County vehicles used for personal trips?,Ž Letters, April 12, which prompted a response from Heide Taylor, Check your facts before sending a letter,Ž April 19). Doing the little bit of research that Heide Taylor suggested I do, I was able to ascertain that the Board of County Commissioners controls the purse strings for Animal Control. However, if you look at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce website, you will “ nd that under Community ServicesŽ the Animal Shelter pops up and under the Fire and RescueŽ page, Animal Control also pops up. Regardless of whose department the vehicle we saw up in Leon County on a Sunday morning being used out of Wakulla County, I would still like to know … why is a county vehicle being used for personal use? Plain and simply, why? As for the COAST Charter School bus that I see constantly being used after school hours … yes, it is a non-profit organization, However, it is funded by the State of Florida per child who attends. Also, they do “ ll their tanks at Wakulla School District fuel pumps at Wakulla High School and at the elementary-middle schools on Spring Creek Highway and they are serviced by mechanics at the bus garage. As to who pays the bills, I could not find that in county records. However, this charter school is funded by the State of Florida and their bills are paid by taxpayers. Again I would ask, why is a county or state vehicle being used for personal use? Now I will address the reason for stirring the pot.Ž First, this county has the problems it has because seldom is someone held accountable for their actions. Second, as far as how and when I choose to worship Christ is my business, not yours. I have spent the majority of my life knowing that Jesus Christ died for my sins and is my Lord and Savior. Lastly, I am a serviceconnected totally and permanently disabled veteran of the U.S. Air Force. I was not drafted back in 1972. I proudly volunteered for military service as four generations of Pierottis had before me and two of my children are now doing. To finish my stirring of the pot,Ž read the U.S. Constitution some time … especially the part about Freedom of Speech. Again, John Pierotti CrawfordvilleAfter checking facts, I was partly wrongREADERS WRITE:By MARJ LAW There has been a lot of discussion lately about the Stand Your GroundŽ law. According to the Department of Agriculture, you have a right to use deadly force if someone is putting you in fear of your life or in fear of someone elses life, or if you are afraid of grievous bodily harm. You dont have to run away. Clear as mud, isnt it? What makes you fear for your life? Im 5 feet, 4 inches and used to weigh 113 pounds. (Im not saying, now.) On the subway, if a big man grabbed me with his arm around my neck, and said he was going to kill me, Id be afraid. Id be very afraid. If my hand was on a gun, well, that would meet the stand your ground rule in my book. However if I were a strong 250-pound man and 6 feet, three inches tall, the bad guy might have to reach up to put his arm around my neck. Id probably shift my weight, turn and knock him out. Stand your ground means different things to me than it would to a big, strong man, or a strong and trained woman. It used to be, before the stand your ground law, you had to get yourself out of the situation that put you in fear. But now, if youre in your car or your house, the presumption is that you are in fear of your life if someone breaks in. I know of one young man who was far from civilization when his airboat died. He trudged through the woods. He walked and walked. He was tired, cold, hungry and scared. He came across a house that appeared to be vacant. He broke a window to get in out of the cold. A few days later, after he had found his way home, he returned to the house and repaired the window. Now, if the house had not been vacant, the owner could have used deadly force to shoot the intruder. What would you have done, if you had a handgun in your possession? If you possess a handgun, this is something you need to have straight in your mind. A couple weeks ago, I was alone in the house at night. Something big and heavy thumped near a window outside. It was very frightening. I grabbed my loaded .38. I tiptoed around the house turning on every outside light, but stayed away from windows. Then I went in a room where I could see anyone coming to the doorway and I waited. And waited. Nothing happened. I left the exterior lights on all night and never heard another sound. Sometimes standing your ground is having a plan. Its being prepared. Its using safe thinking “ rst and deadly force last.Marj Law is a former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and has become an avid gun enthusiast in her retirement.Home on the RangeStand Your Ground is clear as mud By FAITH HUGHES, DVM Before I started volunteering at the CHAT Pet Adoption Center, I had never heard of a medical foster. Sometimes, a CHAT homeless pet may need a little extra care because of an injury or illness. Their condition is not usually lifethreatening or contagious, but that pet needs a little more attention than can be given at the CHAT facility. This is when a medical foster parent helps out. We need medical fosters for a variety of reasons. Debbie Casto takes in the tiny kittens and raises them until they are old enough to return to CHAT. The Martini family in Tallahassee recently took in a greyhound with a broken toe. Lori Strickland and her family always have one or two dogs in medical foster. I work closely with the people who foster my CHAT heartworm treatments. When CHAT is able, we take the heartworm dogs from Animal Control and treat them for heartworms. Heide Clifton usually purchases the medications needed. Recently, Charlie and Cheryl Creel fostered Duke, a yellow Labrador, during his treatment and eventually adopted him. Jo Ann Palmer fostered a chocolate Labrador named Pal who needed a lot of medical care. Teddy, a Standard Poodle, was fostered and adopted by Major Larry Massa. Another recent medical foster that is close to my heart is Gizmo, fostered by Shirley Yates. Hes so special that hell get his own Tail Waggers article soon. Being a medical foster doesnt mean that you have adopted the pet, it only means that you care for them at your home until they are ready to be adopted. Once the pet is released from medical care, it can be returned to the CHAT facility or stay in your home as a regular foster until someone is interested in adopting it. CHAT provides all the medications, treatments, and food for the medical fosters. The foster parent is responsible for giving the pet any medications and transporting the pet to CHAT or a local veterinary of“ ce as needed for treatments. If you are interested in becoming a foster or medical foster, contact Ava Woodall (foster director) or Tammy Vernon (shelter director) at CHAT, 926-0890, or me at 926-7153. CHAT of Wakulla, 1 Oak St., Crawfordville, FL 850-926-0890Dr. Faith Hughes is a veteranarian in Crawfordville and a CHAT volunteer.Tail Wagger ank you, CHAT medical fosters

PAGE 5

Special to The NewsThe 38th Annual Blue Crab Festival will be held May 5 in Panacea. Held annually at Woolley Park on scenic Dickerson Bay, the quaint festival originated in 1975 to promote the crab industry in Wakulla County. Thirty-eight years later, the festival has grown in size and tradition. The festival kicks off each year with a parade down U.S. 98 starting at 10 a.m. After the parade, the gates open to Woolley Park where the old, young and young-at-heart can enjoy a days full of waterfront fun. Park Admission is $3 per person. Children 12 and younger get in free. Throughout the event there will be live music, dance performances by cloggers, and historic demonstrations. A long-time tradition of the festival is the Crab Pickin Contest. Watch entrants pick their way through a basket of Blue Crabs to weigh-inŽ the delicious meat for a prize. Its always exciting to watch the Mullet Toss, where contestants throw a real mullet in a distance-toss competition. Make sure to bring an appetite to the festival, as vendors will be cooking up boiled crabs, fried shrimp, hushpuppies and other mouth watering treats throughout the day. Take a stroll through the park to visit the many arts and crafts on display, where souvenirs and gifts can be purchased. And while there, dont forget to buy your 2012 Blue Crab Festival T-shirt or cookbook.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 5A  Tip A Cop will be held at Posey’s in PanaceaMembers of the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce staff will take part in a Tip A Cop fundraiser on Friday, May 4 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Posey’s Restaurant in Panacea. The event is a fundraiser for the Wakulla County Special Olympics. Sheriff’s office staff will be serving customers during lunch and dinner and tips and donations received during the fundraiser will be given to the Wakulla Special Olympics program. Money raised through Special Olympic fundraisers helps the athletes offset the cost of attending regional and state competitions. The state competition will be held at the ESPN Wide World of Sports complex at Walt Disney World in Orlando May 18 and May 19. The events include bocce, cycling, soccer, tennis, track and eld and volleyball. Historical Society will hear ‘Journey Stories’ on May 8The Wakulla County Historical Society meets at the Wakulla County Public Library on Tuesday, May 8, at 7 p.m. The Wakulla County Historical Society will hear from Florida Folk Festival performers Joan and Amy Alderman from Blountstown. Always entertaining, these colorful ladies proudly show off their Florida Panhandle roots with their collection of tales and tunes called “Journey Stories,” these are tales of how we, and our ancestors, came to America, and are a central element of our personal heritage. You will also learn how we can become a part of the “Journey Stories” exhibit, sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. This meeting will be the last monthly meeting until September. The Wakulla Museum at 24 High Drive (behind the Wakulla County Courthouse) is open every Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There is presently a display of quilts by the local Wakulla County Quilters group accompanied by displays of cooking, sewing and weaving artifacts representing lifestyles of the last century. A collection of model antique cars, shared by Jim Calhoun, is a favorite conversation item for those who visit the museum. Looking at the models brings many memories to those who recall good times in particular cars! Come visit, share memories and check out the books and gift items the museum has for sale.  Brian Parsons Memorial Soccer Game set for May 12The Brian Parson’s Memorial Alumni Soccer Game will be held on Saturday, May 12, at 11 a.m. at Wakulla High School and all former girls and boys soccer players are invited to come play. There will be food and beverages for sale. The Brian Parsons Scholarship awards $1,000 to a current soccer player to aid in paying for college. Anyone who would like to make a donation, please send donations to Wakulla High School, Attn: Melisa Taylor, 3237 Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville FL 32327. Checks can be made payable to the Brian Parsons Scholarship Fund.  Langston reunion to be held May 19The 13th family reunion for the descendants and relatives of Bill and Sally Roberts Langston will be held May 19, at 11:30 a.m. at the Fort Braden Community Center, 16387 Blountstown Highway, in Tallahassee. Fortress will be in concert and share its ministry with those attending. Family members are asked to bring covered dishes plus beverages. Contact Carol Langston (850) 421-1157 or (850) 524-1661 for questions or further information.  Project Graduation to be held on May 31The Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce, along with Wakulla Public Safety, are once again spearheading and preparing for the 29th Annual Project Graduation in late May. This year the event will be held Thursday, May 31 from 2 p.m. until approximately midnight at Wakulla Springs State Park. During the program, students will have exclusive use of the lodge, the swimming area, boat rides, a bon re, food and entertainment in a controlled, supervised and fun environment. This year, expenses could total more than $13,000, said Crum, saying the sheriff’s of ce is seeking contributions to offset the cost. The WCSO is accepting contributions by mail to Project Graduation, c/o Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce, 15 Oak Street, Crawfordville FL 32327. Students will be asked to sign a pledge not to drink on graduation night and transportation will be available to Wakulla Springs for those students who don’t have their own transportation.– Staff ReportsBriefsBrook Sessions will headline the entertainment at the Blue Crab Festival. Here shes seen performing at a recent From the Heart show.Blue Crab Festival is Saturday10 a.m. … Coastal Optimist Club Parade 11 a.m. … Opening ceremonies 11:15 a.m. … Chief and Mark 12:15 p.m. … Mullet Toss 1 p.m. … Mountain Dew Cloggers 2 p.m. … Crab Pickin Contest 2:30 p.m. … Rick Edminson 3:30 p.m. … Mountain Dew Cloggers 4:30 p.m. … Brook SessionsDOMINIC GHEESLING Blue Crab ScheduleSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Democratic Executive Committee announced that statewide county caucuses will be held on Saturday, May 5, at the Wakulla County Library from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The “ rst-ever statewide caucuses will kick off the delegate selection process, which will determine who will be part of the Florida delegation that will attend the national convention in Charlotte, N.C. Florida Democrats are looking forward to the National Convention this summer and are energized heading into 2012,Ž said Florida Democratic Party Executive Director Scott Arceneaux. The county caucuses are an exciting chance for Democrats to get involved and help rally support for President Obama. Whether youve volunteered in the past or are brand new to the party, we urge you to join us on Saturday, May 5 and we hope to see you in Charlotte this summer.Ž After being selected at the county level, delegates will proceed to the partys statewide convention where they will take part in the “ nal phase of the delegate selection process in Tampa, on June 1-3. Those selected at the state convention will attend the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte this summer. All registered Democratic voters are invited to attend the county caucuses to cast a ballot for their countys delegates to the State Convention. Any Democrat interested in running as a candidate for delegate to the State Convention was required to “ le the state convention delegate “ ling form with their county Democratic Executive Committee leadership by April 27. The “ ling form is available at www.” adems.com/ timetoshine. This year, Florida will send its largest delegation ever to the National Convention with 300 delegates and 23 alternates. A majority of the delegates (184) will be elected at the Congressional District level. Democrats to hold “ rst-ever county caucusesSpecial to The NewsThe Genealogy Group of the Wakulla County Historical Society will meet on Thursday, May 3 at the Wakulla County Public Library at 6:30 p.m. At that meeting, Alisha Morgan will speak. She is a personal historian and the owner of Paperclipped Memories. Her company helps preserve life stories in beautiful, customized books. Morganwill be talking about the importance of recording our personal history. She is also going to have a drawing for a copy of her book. Genealogy group will meet on May 3 the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Mike HarveyApril 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI really appreciate this program. We eat at all the restaurants participating. It is a Great Deal to Win!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winn er!One Meal fr om Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIRSALO N FREE HAIRCUT FEATHER LOCKS are here!!FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALON Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. THG-12901 Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint pain € Arthritis pain € Muscle pain € Back pain

PAGE 6

Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY SERVICES8:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study(One block So. of Courthouse)850-926-7896 office www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Anne Rudloe, a pioneering marine biologist, environmental activist, educator, author, dedicated wife, mother and Zen meditation practitioner, peacefully left her body Friday, surrounded by close family in their home in Panacea. Survivors include her husband, Jack Rudloe, and her sons, Sky and Cypress Rudloe. Born in Troy, Ohio, she received a bachelors degree from Mary Washington College in Virginia in 1969. She attended FSUs graduate program in marine biology under Professor William F. Herrnkind, receiving both her masters degree in 1972 and PhD, in 1978. She was respected for her extant research of horseshoe crabs, sea turtles, electric rays and mysid shrimp. Jack and Anne shared their lives for 42 years, in which they raised a family and transformed a commercial operation into the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, an aquarium and environmental education center in Panacea. For decades, she led the “ ght to keep St. Joe Bay from the talons of developers, halt the clear-cutting of pine eco-systems in St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, preserve many local natural eco-systems and also encouraged the state, while inspiring the public, to protect and manage public lands in sustainable ways, including Wakulla Springs, Fiddlers Point and Cape San Blas. She published three books: Butter” ies on the Sea WindŽ (2002), Priceless FloridaŽ as co-author (2004), The Endless Quest for Pink GoldŽ with Jack Rudloe (2010), and Zen in a Wild CountryŽ (2012). Her journals, correspondence, scienti“ c papers are archived at University of Florida, Gainesville, Smathers Libraries Special Collections. Her 26-year dedication to Zen meditation practice was a constant presence in her research, teaching, writing, activism and the way she lived her life. She received INGA to teach as a JDPSN (Jido Pope Sanim) as a senior teacher of a full range of techniques and style in the Kwan Um School of Zen. She was the Abbot at the Cypress Tree Zen Center in Tallahassee. She published innumerable articles in scienti“ c and popular magazines and journals and was a notable and frequent guest on NPR. Her most recent blog can be viewed at http://rudloeanne.wordpress.com. A memorial service will be held on May 13 at the Unitarian-Universalist Church of Tallahassee, 2810 N. Meridian Road in Tallahassee at 4 p.m. In lieu of ” owers, the family requests that donations be made to Anne Rudloe Memorial Fund at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, P.O. Box 237, Panacea FL 32346 or Big Bend Hospice at bigbendhospice.org. The Rudloe Family would like to express their gratitude for the outpouring of love and support. Pioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide National Day of Prayer Service on Thursday, May 3, the designated National Day of Prayer. This will be the 61st annual observance. Hundreds of events are planned across the United States to focus our citizens attention for the need of prayer for our nation, state, and local communities. This years theme is Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord.Ž Pioneer Baptist Church of Crawfordville will host its annual community wide National Day of Prayer this Thursday at 7 p.m. The public is invited to worship together. Pioneer Baptist Church is located four miles east of Crawfordville just north of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road and the Spring Creek Highway intersection. The Churchs address is 486 Beechwood Drive. Call 878-5224 for additional information. We hope you will accept this invitation to worship with us.Church BriefsPioneer to host National Day of PrayerCarolyn Knight Pelt, 83, went home to be with her Lord on Monday, April 30, in Tallahassee. Funeral services will be Friday, May 4, at Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee St., in Crawfordville at 10 a.m. The family will receive friends Thursday, May 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the church. In lieu of ” owers, contributions may be made to the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. She was a native of Donaldsonville, Ga., and had lived most of her life in Crawfordville. She was a lifetime member of Crawfordville United Methodist Church where she generously supported its ministries. She was a loving and kind person giving freely to anyone in need. She had many friends and always looked forward to enjoying the Friday music at the Senior Center where most of the musicians were dear to her. Survivors include two sons, H. Wayne Pelt (Holly) and G. Richard Pelt (Cindy) of Crawfordville; two daughters, Rena Crum (Gary) of Crawfordville and Diane Miller of Tallahassee; one sister, Patty Albright (Dawson) of Tallassee, Ala.; “ ve grandchildren, Michael, Lori, Rebecca, Robin and Dustin and six great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, the Rev. Harry Pelt; sister, Catherine Alley; a brother, Lamar Knight; and a grandson, Kelly. Beggs Funeral Home Apalachee Chapel in Tallahassee is in charge of the arrangements.Bradham Forbes Carraway Carolyn Knight Pelt Anne Rudloe William ‘Ron’ Smith Carolyn Knight PeltWilliam RonŽ Smith, 58, a lifelong resident of Perry, died April 26 at his home. He was a member of the Wakulla Free Riders and loved to ride motorcycles and took many road trips with friends. A Celebration of his lifeŽ ride will be held Sunday, May 6, leaving Ouzts Too in Newport at 8:30 a.m. If any questions, call Bob Porter, (850) 528-6829. Survivors include his sister, Melinda Washko (Paul) and niece, Summer, of Hammock; two daughters, Emily Rouse of Perry and Amber Scott of Bokeelia; and three grandchildren. He was predeceased by his parents, Tom and Betty Smith.William ‘Ron’ SmithBradham Forbes Carraway, 54, passed away on April 26, in Gainesville. He was born in Tallahassee, and was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. He worked for the City of Tallahassee. He was a member of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. He was an avid hunter and “ sherman, loved golf and working in his garden. He loved spending time with his family. The service was held Tuesday, May 1, at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church with burial at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. The family received friends on Monday, April 30, at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church in Sopchoppy. Survivors include his wife, Sharon Nelson Carraway of Sopchoppy; two sons, Daniel James Carraway of Ft. Lee, Va., and Julian Nelson Carraway of Sopchoppy; two daughters, Samantha L. Snodgrass (Allen) of Tallahassee and Stephanie Stevens (Juan) of Chipley; three brothers, Ausley Burl Carraway Jr. (Ann) of Seneca, S.C., George Warrington Carraway (Jill) of Louisville, Ky., and Joseph David Carraway (Charlie) of Sopchoppy; six sisters, Frances Carraway Roberts (Randolph), Bettye Carraway Roberts (Edwin), all of Tallahassee, Jessie Carraway McMillan of Gulf Breeze, Sandra Carraway Crum (Bobby) of Mexico Beach, Carolyn Carraway Suiter (Galen) of Montgomery, Ala., and Susan Carraway Limbaugh (Gary) of Crawfordville; and two grandchildren, Noah and Norah Stevens. He is predeceased by his parents, Ausley Burl Carraway and Faye Forbes Carraway; a son, Seth A. Carraway; and a brother, Ott Carraway. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Bradham Forbes Carraway Anne Rudloe Letters of thanksThe family of Kenneth Attridge would like to thank all our friends and neighbors for their prayers, love, food, calls and cards following the loss of our loved one. Peg Attridge & Family The family of Delpha Porter would like to thank all those who brought us food, ” owers, etc. in our time of loss. From all her children

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 7Ahappenings in our communityCommunitySpecial to The NewsThe Juvenile (Type One) Diabetes Walk took place at Tallahassee Community College on April 14. It was a huge success due to the efforts of the local chapter leaders, Chris Kimmons and Angie Dunlap. The walk brought in more than $40,000 in donations that will go towards research for a cure. Sydney Andrews had the biggest team and won a basket full of goodies including a red JDRF blanket she loves. Sydney and her family would like to thank the many friends and family that generously donated their love, time and money to help “ nd a cure. A special thanks to the teachers who were at the walk, including her teacher Mrs. Rhiana Tucker. Andrews wins prize for largest team at diabetes walk SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSidney Andrews and her team Adam Johnson and Chelsea Lackey Chelsea Lackey of Crawfordville and Adam Johnson of Midland City, Ala., announce their engagement. The bride-elect is the daughter of Andy and Donna Lackey of Crawfordville. The groom-elect is the son of Jack and Kathy Johnson of Midland City, Ala. The wedding is planned for July 7 at 5 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church in Crawfordville.Happy “ rst birthday, JoshuaJoshua Michael Trint Deitz Jr. celebrated his first birthday on April 23. He is the son of Casey Wallin and Trint Deitz, both of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are Debra Wallin of Crawfordville and Max Wallin of Freeport, Fla. His paternal grandparents are Priscilla Deitz of Crawfordville and Steven R. Deitz of North Carolina. Joshua Deitz Jr.Johnson to marry LackeyLadies circle donates to Senior Citizens Center Women with the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Ladies Circle present a $500 donation to the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center. Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULLSURVICEHAIRSALONHair Place That 850-926-6020We Have Gift Certi“catesBooking NOWProm updo’s starting at$65OOPS !Wel com eMavis 274-0700Miranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. PREPAID MONTHLY PLANS Modern Communications nationwide pre-paid cellular pagep l us U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT $4000 PERMO.DATACHARGESMAYAPPLY Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991850.224.4960www.fsucu.org LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? happy birthdayAlvin and Gloria Sharp would like to wish their son Danny E. Sharp a Happy Birthday. On May 2, Danny turned 36 years old and celebrated with family. CLASSIFIEDS As Low As $10 Per Week! Call 877-676-1403

PAGE 8

Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolStudents get training at career center Special to The NewsTwelve Wakulla High School AVID students spent a recent Saturday receiving instruction from the Career Center at Florida State University. Ninth grader Lauren Dunlap liked what she learned about career opportunities, I know where to go to learn about job options and to practice for interviews. I loved this trip because it was educational, interactive, and interesting.Ž Through a partnership with AVID and CROP, the students learned more about professional attire for interviews, business etiquette, and dining etiquette. Students were able to practice interview questions and situational professional practices with chaperones Nancy Floyd Richardson and Melinda House. Freshman Carson Strickland said it gave her a good image of what to wear to look professional and appropriate. Junior Danielle Gray agreed, What they showed us has already come in handy. Its very important to watch how you present yourself to other people.Ž Afterward, students toured the career center, learned more about the research, resume, and interview services available, and ate lunch at Z. Bardhis. Sophomores Holli Lucas and Diwata Thomas had a lot of praise for the restaurant, especially the chef who greeted the students personally and welcomed them to the restaurant. AVID, which stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination, is an internationally successful collegepreparation program. Students take the AVID elective class to support their enrollment in rigorous honors, advanced placement, and college dual-enrollment classes. Wakulla County students have been in the program for three years, and AVID has been partnering with FSU CROP, the College Reach-Out Program, for the past year. CROP has been providing college tutors once a week after school, as well as weekend events to help students choose the correct college and learn more about “ nancial aid. Superintendent David Miller advocated for Wakulla County school system to be one of Floridas “ rst rural districts chosen for The Florida Partnership with the College Board Grant, which has allowed middle and high school teachers and administrators to better prepare all students for college success. AVID is a part of that grant program. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla High School AVID students receive training for job interviews at FSUs career center. Summer prep course available to freshmen Special to The NewsThere are limited spaces for incoming freshmen to Wakulla High School to attend a High School Prep Summer course. First time ninth graders can earn a half credit in reading that will count towards their 24 required credits for graduation. They will also learn their way around WHS. They will work on reading skills that will help with science, social studies, math, English, and all subjects, plus learn study skills that will help them get through their ninth grade. Transportation is provided and lunch is available for free through the Summer Feeding program. The two sessions of the nine-day course are Session 1 … June 11 through June 25 with no Fridays; Session 2 … June 26 through July 12 with no Fridays and July 4 and 5 off. Students must commit to all nine days. For more information, contact Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell at 926-0065 or mary.odonnell@ wcsb.us. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARY KATHERINE WESTMARK Dustin Grubbs, Jason Westmark, Austin Franklin, Mason McCord, Sarah Smith, Scott Joyner, Dr. Jacquelyn McMillan and Sherri Kraeft Special to The News The Wakulla County 4-H Program held their annual county level Tropicana Public Speaking Competition on Thursday, April 26 at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce in Crawfordville. Nine students participated in the contest. Four of the second place winners also presented their speeches, although not as competitors. Wakulla County 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft and several volunteers worked together to organize this years event. The competition was broken down into two divisions based on grade level. The fourth and “ fth grade combined contestants were Sarah Smith from COAST Charter School; Jason Westmark from Medart Elementary School; Austin Franklin from Riversink Elementary School; Mason McCord from Shadeville Elementary School; and Zoe Doler from Wakulla Christian School. COAST Charter School second place winner Madison Fountain delivered her speech and second place winner Bethany Thomas from Wakulla Christian School presented her speech as non-competitors. The sixth grade contestants were Bryanah Kilpatrick from COAST Charter School; Madisen Rudd from Riversprings Middle School; Mia Frick from Wakulla Christian School; and Gage Fenner from Wakulla Middle School. Wakulla Christian School second place winner Brianne Camp gave her speech entitled and second place winner Jillian Richardson from Wakulla Middle School presented her speech as non-competitors. The county level fourth and “ fth grade combined winners were: First Place, Jason Westmark; Second Place, Austin Franklin; Third Place, Mason McCord, and Honorable Mention, Sarah Smith. The sixth grade winners were: First Place, Gage Fenner; Second Place, Madisen Rudd; Third Place, Mia Frick; and Honorable Mention, Bryanah Kilpatrick. Each winner received a plaque, and all participants received certificates. The “ rst place winners won a $215 scholarship towards any 4-H camp offered this coming summer. First place winners will move on to the District Level Competition in Tallahassee on May 10. The Wakulla County 4-H program would like to thank the event judges, Dustin Grubbs of Centennial Bank, Dr. Jacquelyn McMillan of Capital City Youth Services and Scott Joyner, director of the Wakulla county Public Library for their time and participation. For more information, contact Sherri Kraeft at sjkraeft@u” .edu or 926-3931 or visit www.wakulla.ifas. u” .edu.Westmark and Fenner win Tropicana Public Speaking Competition Sherri Kraeft, Dustin Grubbs, Gage Fenner, Madisen Rudd, Mia Frick, Bryanah Kilpatrick Dr. Jacquelyn McMillan and Scott Joyner Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555 The college of choice! Invest in yourself today EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT THE RISING COST OF COLLEGEƒ at TCC, tuition is signicantly lower than most other universities and colleges 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla War Eagles baseball team worked hard and played an exciting game, but came away with a loss against Suwannee High on Thursday, April 26, in the “ rst round of district playoffs. The War Eagles were ahead for four innings, until Suwannee tied it in the sixth and then pushed ahead by one run to end the game, 4-3 in the seventh. In the second inning, senior Conner Smith hit a long ” y ball that just barely stayed in the park for a double, and sophomore Bryan Nichols brought him home with a strong hit to right “ eld. In the third inning, Nichols helped add two more runs with a powerhouse swing that drove in junior Dalton Dugger and Smith. DeQuan Simmons, a junior, also scored a run, soaring across home in a close play and tumbling in to the catcher before claiming the plate. Junior Jake Walker pitched well against the Bulldogs, with senior Jordan Montague taking over in the top of the seventh and holding the Bulldogs at their one run lead. War Eagles Head Coach Mike Gauger said the Bulldogs came wellprepared and were well-coached. Suwannee Coach Ronnie Gray said, Were sure well see Wakulla again in the “ nals „ its a great team and a classy organization.Ž The War Eagles will play West Florida Tech on Wednesday, May 2, at 7 p.m. central time in Pensacola. By PAUL HOOVER WHS Track Coach At the FHSAA 2-A State Finals Track Meet, held last Saturday at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, local tracksters were two for two in placing in the top eight in their events and reaching the podium at the most prestigious high school meet held each year. Wakulla High School runners Madison Harris and Stanley Linton once again proved that they are among the best track runners in the state. Sophomore Harris, running in her second consecutive state “ nals 800 meter run, improved on her sixth place “ nish from last year by running a stellar race to “ nish in third place. Senior Linton, running in his “ rst “ nals 3200-meter run, continued his string of top-” ight performances by placing seventh overall, securing his place on the podium. In the 800-meters “ nal, Harris ran aggressively from the beginning in a field that included four runners who had run sub-2:17 this year for the distance. She fought to maintain contact with the American Heritage runner who was ranked No. 1 coming into the meet. The “ rst place runner was able to separate herself from the pack somewhat in the second 400 meters, which left Harris and three or four other runners to “ ght it out for the remaining slots. Harris continued to run strong and push the pace in second place with another American Heritage runner in tow. Those two hit the “ nal 200 meters locked in an absolute duel, with neither willing to concede. They continued this duel until literally the “ nal step in the race, when the AH runner managed to outlean Harris, crossing the line in 2:16.59 with Harris finishing in third place in 2:16.80 … just .21 of a second behind. The boys 3200 meter run promised to be extremely competitive, as the top 12 runners were all seeded within a few seconds of each other and that is how the race unfolded. The whole pack of runners stayed together through the “ rst half of the race, with Linton boxed in much of the time in the large pack. The pack started to break up somewhat in the next 800 meters, with Linton still struggling to get free and trying to get into his rhythm. With about 600 meters to go, the runners really began to establish their position and Linton found himself in a “ ght with four or “ ve other runners to determine their positions on the podium. Linton continued to “ ght until the very end, where he was able to hold his position and “ nished in 9:5657, in seventh place. These kids did something special today,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. To take two athletes to State and get to see both of them standing on the podium doesnt happen very often. I absolutely couldnt be prouder of them. SOFTBALLLady War Eagles can’t catch ArnoldBASEBALLWar Eagles fall to Suwannee in playoffsBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsFour errors in the sixth inning by the Wakulla Lady War Eagles put the Panama City-Arnold Marlins ahead for a 6-3 win in the quarter“ nal regionals on Wednesday, April 25. In the “ fth, both teams were tied two-two but some well-played line drives and base-stealing ended the sixth inning with the Marlins ahead by three runs. In the seventh, the Marlins added another with a home run. Fighting to the end, Wakulla grabbed one more run with a double, hit by freshman Kayla Hussey that drove home junior Kelbi Davis for the “ nal run of the game. With seven under-classmen on the 12-player team, Head Coach Tom Graham sees major potential for the War Eagles next year. If our girls can work hard in travel ball and come back strong, I know well make good things happen.Ž Graham also credited the graduating seniors for their skill this season. They gave so much effort to the program „ their leadership was big,Ž he said. DISTRICT CHAMPIONS A week earlier, the Lady War Eagles clenched the District title on a gamewinning ” yball catch by senior Sloan Barwick on Tuesday, April 17. After having been defeated by Suwannee County twice this season, Wakulla sailed to an easy 63 victory over the Bulldogs for the championship. Defensively, it all came together tonight,Ž said Wakulla Head Coach Tom Graham said after the game. The War Eagles held a lead throughout the game, scoring a run in the “ fth inning, and two more in the seventh. Playing somebody the third time is rough,Ž said Suwannee Head Coach Tommy Chambers. And when you get behind a good team, theyll just take a hold and get stronger.Ž Before that game, the Lady War Eagles drubbed Rickards 11-1 in the District semi-“ nals at 5 p.m., setting up the “ nal against Suwannee for the district title. Graham attributed the win to teamwork and a lot of effort put forth by the girls. Taylor Hussey ended the game as the relief pitcher coming in after Michael Cooper who wowed the crowd with two impressive change-ups in the second inning. Kenzie Lee had two strong hits at the top of the “ fth and seventh and made it to third base on a bunt in the “ rst inning, driving home three runs. Second base player Cami Eaton also had a strong showing at the game, catching a grounder and a line-drive in the second inning and catching a ” y in the fourth inning. With Wakulla in the “ eld, at the bottom of the fourth, Courtney Flowers delivered the ball to “ rst base player Sloan Barwick to tag out the Suwannee runner. Flowers repeated the move in the “ fth inning and caught a pop ” y in the same inning.TRACKHarris and Linton shine at state meetBy LISA KINARDSpecial to The NewsWakulla Babe Ruth League almost had their “ rst full week of baseball. Mondays game between the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans and the Badcock Furniture Rays was postponed due to FCAT testing. But things heated up on Tuesday with the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws taking on the Ameris Bank Sluggers. The nail-biter came down to the last at-bat with the Sluggers holding off the Outlaws for a 3-2 win. For the Outlaws; Greyson Rudd, Chase Forester, Skyler Talavera, Lucas Briggs and James Calhoun each had a hit. Pitcher Nick Lentz had seven strikeouts, and Skyler Talavera and Chase Forester also pitched. The Sluggers pitched Michael McGlamry and Jake Bryan … who had a single and double. Dylan Casseaux also had a hit. In the last inning, the Outlaws were down by one with runners on second and third and two outs, but Sluggers second baseman Josh Conway leaped to make a thrilling catch to end the game. € Thursdays action saw the Badcock Furniture Rays win over the Ameris Bank Sluggers with a “ nal score of 10-4. Shane Davis pitched “ ve innings, giving up only four runs. The Sluggers threw Caleb Langston and Tyler Teegan. At the plate for the Rays, Aaron Price and Jaren Lawhon each went 2 for 2 while Clayton Burroughs hit 2 for 3. Hits for Sluggers included Michael McGlamry (double), Dylan Causseaux, Jake Bryan (double), Josh Conway and Thomas Davis € On Friday, The Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws came back strong with a win over the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans, 10-0. For the Outlaws, Greyson Rudd, Lucas Briggs and Brandon Bennett combined to hold the Titans to only two hits. The Outlaws had eight hits including two apiece from James Calhoun, Skyler Talavera and Brandon Bennett Lucas Briggs and CJ Langston also contributed hits. For the Titans, AC Ginn, RJ Kinard, Jackson Montgomery and John Weber shared the pitching duties. Weber and Sebastian Brahier each had hits. Timely hitting when there were two outs won the game for the Outlaws. This weeks games: € Thursday, May 3 Titans vs. Sluggers. € Friday, May 4 Rays vs. Sluggers.BABE RUTH BASEBALLSluggers hold o Outlaws for 3-2 winFOOTBALLNigel Bradham drafted by NFLStaff reportWakulla and FSU grad Nigel Bradham was selected in the fourth round of the NFL draft by the Buffalo Bills. Bradham, a linebacker, lead the Seminoles in tackles each of the last three seasons. Bradham returned to Wakulla High School last year to take part in a presentation by the Seminole Boosters of a check for scholarships for Wakulla players to attend FSU. Nigel Bradham Road trip! MAY7-13TPC SAWGRASS PONTE VEDRA BEACH, FL Create your PLAYERS story on and off the course and experience all the First Coast has to offer. Getaway packages start at $99 To book your trip, visit theplayerschampionshiptravel.com or visitjacksonville.com/golf San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. •Interior Remodeling •Doors •Floors •Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling •Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS Subscribe to The Wakulla News 1-877-401-6408

PAGE 10

Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsSpecial to The NewsThere were 340 anglers registered in the fourth annual Panacea Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament held last weekend at Rock Landing Dock. Of those 340 fishermen, there were 46 in youth, 17 in kayak and 276 in recreational divisions. In addition, they also had: €$2500 King“ sh Jackpot winner was Joe Carter “ shing aboard She Likes it Rough.Ž € $1500 Trout Jackpot winner was Steve Tucker “ shing aboard G3. The lucky youth angler who won the G3 boat/Yamaha Outboard/ Trailer package was Phan Lewis. The lucky lady angler who won the Lady Angler Basket was Dana Whitt. The lucky winner of the Kayak was Travis Lackey. The very lucky person with the winning raf” e ticket for the Skeeter Bay Boat/Yamaha Outboard/ Trailer package was Jay Westmark. The tournament drew almost 100 more anglers this year and hundreds of spectators came out to the weigh-in. One of the highlights of the weigh-in was the 88.25-pound amberjack caught by Justin Tucker.Well, the Rock the Dock Tournament could not have asked for a better weekend for “ shing. The weather was absolutely beautiful both days and from what I heard a lot of nice “ sh were caught including an 88-pound amberjack which was the big fish of the tournament. I believe they had more than 300 entered and more than 50 kids “ shing. This is really turning out to be a well-received tournament. Jay Westmark walked away with a new Skeeter Bay Boat and to my knowledge doesnt even “ sh. The Kevins Red/Trout Shootout will be this weekend. It was scheduled for earlier in April but was canceled due to small craft advisories. The Big Bend Saltwater Class will be in June over Fathers Day Weekend so mark your calendars for that date and keep your “ ngers crossed for good weather. Bucky over at Shell Island Fish Camp said they had a big group down from Macon this past weekend and lots of trout, reds and Spanish were brought in. Most were caught on the West Flats out of St. Marks using the Gulp under a ” oat or live shrimp. Bucky said he went East of the lighthouse Sunday afternoon and throwing a pink and white Gulp jerk bait hooked a huge trout, which he couldnt get in the net. He said the water where he was “ shing was extremely clear and he said he saw a lot of big trout in three to four feet of water. Capt. Randy Peart has been “ shing out of the Econ“ na and catching plenty of “ sh. He said most of his better trout are coming from eight to nine feet of water and he is catching plenty of big rock bass and Spanish as well. Plenty of reds are along the shoreline and around the creek mouths. Mike Pearson and a buddy from Tifton went out on Friday and “ shed the stake line on the West Flats and caught their limit of trout and quite a few Spanish. They used the salt and pepper Gulp under a Cajun Thunder and on a straight jig bounced on the bottom. I “ shed with David, Dennis and Hank Longmire from Lady Lake for three days and we caught lots of trout and plenty of Spanish using live shrimp on the bottom and under the Cajun Thunder. Last week I canceled three trips due to the weather forecast. They revised the Saturday forecast and the people I was taking called and said they still wanted to come. They have fished with me for years and I told them we would give it a try. As it turned out, we had a great day. The wind blew pretty hard all day but we managed to catch 20 trout and two big reds right before the lightning started. We got in just as the heavy rains came and I was glad they had called to say they still wanted to give it a try. The Organization of Artificial Reefs is going to be enlarging the St. Marks Reef which is in about 20 feet of water and about “ ve miles off the Lighthouse. That should make for some really good “ shing for trout, grouper, rockbass and sheepshead. I wish they would put about eight or 10 shallow water reefs in Apalachee Bay and it would make for some great “ shing spots. Fishing around St. George is still good for trout in the Bay and plenty of pompano are being caught in the cut and on the East End of St. George. I have been hearing some reports of scallops being seen and if we dont get much rain between now and July 1 we should have another good season for scallops. Remember to know your limits and leave a ” oat plan with someone. Good luck and good “ shing!Weather was perfect this weekend From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Hundreds turn out for Rock the Dock in Panacea GLENN HORTON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA large group of manatees congregating on the St. Marks River last week.Manatees are back on the St. Marks, Wakulla riversStaff reportBoaters should be aware that manatees are back in local waters … and apparently in large numbers. Local “ sherman Glenn Horton reported that he saw a large pod of manatees on the St. Marks River on Thursday, April 26. Horton said he saw 18 adult manatees and several babies in the creek between the fuel dock and the Purdom Power Plant on the St. Marks River. Its not necessarily unusual to see manatees there, but Horton noted that it seems early in season … especially to see a pod that large. In this weeks Coast Guard Auxiliary report on Page 11A, its reported that approximately 10 manatees were swimming around and under the dock at Shell Island Fish Camp on the Wakulla River on Saturday, April 28. Keep an eye out for the manatees. The catch of the day was this 88-pound amberjack A young angler with a red“ sh.PHOTOS BY JIMMIE SMITH More photos online at thewakullanews.net IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 27 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-1226 o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle FRAN KLINWA KU LLA JE FFE RS ON & TA YLO R GAG GROUPER 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Per fect W eat her fo r Out door Se ati ng Ove rlooki ng Bea uti ful Dicker son Ba y!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com DUBREJA PLAZA94 COTTONWOOD STREET, CRAWFORDVILLEFL o o Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing g litzNc lip CALL 850926-TRIM( 8746 )Mother’s Day SpecialFREEhaircut with a color service

PAGE 11

This past weekend, I was called out of town for a meeting. While I am away, I cant help but think about what to write for the column. This week, I owe Norma Hill a debt of gratitude for putting together the article. Norma wrote: Some things in life go as expected. Others dont. Of the group planning to participate in a safety patrol leaving out of Shell Island Fish Camp on Saturday, only three of the original five scheduled members were actually able to participate. Unexpected events in the lives of two crew members demanded their time be spent elsewhere that day. Fortunately, two other crew members were available for and excited to be a part of an early morning patrol. With the minor adjustments, all was good. The day started quite early with most of us rolling out of bed around 4 a.m. The plan was to complete an ATON (Aids to Navigation) mission by getting away from the dock while it was still dark. One of the requirements for becoming quali“ ed as a crew member for the Auxiliary is that you must participate in speci“ c patrols, such as a patrol at night, a towing mission and an ATON. Member Terry Hoxworth has been going on several patrols as a trainee since joining Flotilla 12 in February of 2010 and is about ready to take the quali“ cation exam to become a crew member. This was his expected ATON patrol. We all arrived at Shell Island Fish Camp by 6 a.m. ready to get underway. The boat was “ lled with gas and ready to go. Unfortunately, we also discovered that there was an unexpected heavy fog in the area. Coxswain Mark Rosen quickly informed us that we might as well sit back and relax for awhile, as we would not be leaving the dock until the fog had lifted. The extra time at the dock provided us with an opportunity to chat with others planning to spend time on the water during the day. Many were hoping to catch a few “ sh. Some simply wanted to enjoy some sun while on their boats. One 4-year-old boy was quite excited to be going “ shing with his dad and grandpa while his mom and nana stayed home or went shopping. He proudly showed the anchor on the navy blue life jacket that he was wearing. Finally Mark decided the fog had cleared enough so that we could get underway. After completing our pre-underway check, we carefully pulled away from the dock. Helmsman Bill Wannall slowly motored along while crew Phil Hill and trainee Terri Hoxworth maintained a bow watch and I maintained a stern watch. It soon became apparent that, though the fog had seemed less back at the Fish Camp, there was still worse than expected visibility where we now were. Mark asked Bill to locate in a safe area and lower the anchor so that we could wait a bit longer before traveling the rest of the way out of the channel. This delay provided for an opportunity to refresh our minds about boating in areas with decreased visibility. We made certain that the boat was lighted appropriately so others could see us and sounded our horn at intervals (every two minutes per Navigation Rules) so that others could hear us. We also maintained our vigilance using our eyes, as well as ears. What we noticed were several boats heading out with no running lights and without sound signals. This could quickly become a very dangerous situation in our narrow and shallow channel. As the fog continued to clear, I was able to snap a few beautiful photos of the awakening day. Soon enough we were on our way for the continuation of our safety patrol. The weather was absolutely beautiful for being on the water. We saw folks “ shing, kayaking, and just enjoying the day. We enjoyed our brunch at Riverside Caf while listening to Mark, also the Member Training Of“ cer for our Flotilla who is forever “ nding teachable moments, as he discussed various scenarios and asked our thoughts on how to handle them safely. We watched dolphins as they danced in the water. Eventually we were heading back toward Shell Island Fish Camp to end our patrol. Bill had just commented what a great day it had been. Suddenly Phil, who was on bow watch, noticed something that didnt seem quite right on a boat near us. He noti“ ed Mark and Bill, and we went to investigate. What we found was a boat with four people on board whose motor was not working. They were drifting toward the shallows. We ended up towing them to safety. Im sure this was not the way they had expected to spend their afternoon, but they did express their appreciation for the assistance. Once back at the Fish Camp, we had yet one more unexpected surprise … approximately 10 manatees were swimming around and under the dock. What a “ ne day it was! As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Knowing your navigation rules is important to being prepared and safe when out on the water. Rule 19 covers fog and we will talk more about it in the near future. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Bill Wannall on the radio.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Terry Hoxworth and Mark RosenThe Research Cruise. For eight years I sponsored a summer cruise aboard my 46-foot sailboat, the S/V Olapa. Students would register for a class at FSU called Applications of Diving to Research. But these cruises began many years earlier with Joe Barber, our marine lab boat captain, who took my classes down to the Florida Keys and the Bahamas on self-directed research. I designed a class where students designed underwater research that with the help of their classmates, they would conduct on intense weekend projects. They would take us anywhere they could on their very limited budgets. Good people like Barber, Bobby Millender, Mr. Oaks, George Fischer, Jim Dunbar, Robert Warner and many others always had ways and means. In the end, I attended more than 300 such projects before retiring in 2004. So here is how it worked. Each year (since 1980), a department would provide limited funds and a teaching assistant to support my class in Applications of Diving to Research. Dedicated students from many disciplines would apply and be selected based upon their need to know. Many were early graduate students. We warned them the class was both brutal as in time consuming and fun in that we were in the “ eld. To pass the class, each student had to select a topic, design and test a hypothesis, build a research team and conduct a pilot study lasting at least one day. Concept, cruise plan, budgets, reports and ultimately a grant proposal was required (which generated a grade). Each student selected a date and worked with others to make that project a success. Some failed, some made it and some excelled, as you might have expected. But as long as their reports documented their journey, they passed the class. Imagine anthropology, biology, oceanography, criminology, art, chemistry and engineering students working together in the same class, bound together by a common research site (underwater). The revelations between disciplines were common, their terms were different, but their descriptions were similar and their tools could be shared. The relationship between two objects is called provenance by the anthropologist, interpersonal distance by the biologist and relational evidence in criminology. Team building over a semester was an awesome experience for the students and for me to witness. In one class, during a swim down the Ichnetucknee River, an anthropologist saw an ivory tip protruding from the bank. We reported it to Dr. Jim Dunbar (a frequent sponsor) at the Florida Archives, and were invited by him to excavate the site. The anthropology student took on the project and built his team which included an engineer and photographer. The entire excavation was video documented. The engineer designed a device that successfully removed a full mammoth tusk from the site … undamaged … back to the states preservation lab in Tallahassee. Dunbar said it was a “ rst! George Fischer sponsored students on numerous surveys of national park forts up and down the Gulf and East Coasts, exciting opportunities in search of lost historic boats or relics thrown from defenders walls. I became a sponsor in 1995 when I began summer research on diseases in marine organisms along the Florida Keys with Dr. Rob Werner, the university veterinarian. Students had to learn how to run the boat, conduct their research, and of course, be safe while living a” oat with like-minded colleagues. We made stops to survey marine organisms on the reef every eight nautical miles from Miami to west of the Dry Tortugas in a three-week period. The fourth week was make up should we have bad weather or breakdowns along the way. In future columns, I will share these cruises with you. The true heroes are the creative students and sponsors that became my inspiration. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday y Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed May 9, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 12:44 AM 3.5 ft. 1:42 AM 3.6 ft. 2:35 AM 3.6 ft. 3:24 AM 3.5 ft. 4:11 AM 3.4 ft. 4:58 AM 3.1 ft. 5:44 AM High 0.9 ft. 6:34 AM 1.0 ft. 7:19 AM 1.2 ft. 8:00 AM 1.3 ft. 8:39 AM 1.4 ft. 9:17 AM 1.5 ft. 9:54 AM 1.6 ft. 10:34 AM Low 3.7 ft. 12:48 PM 3.9 ft. 1:23 PM 4.1 ft. 1:59 PM 4.2 ft. 2:35 PM 4.3 ft. 3:13 PM 4.2 ft. 3:51 PM 4.0 ft. 4:31 PM High -0.1 ft. 7:22 PM -0.6 ft. 8:10 PM -0.9 ft. 8:56 PM -1.0 ft. 9:43 PM -1.0 ft. 10:29 PM -0.8 ft. 11:16 PM Low Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed May 9, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 12:41 AM 3.6 ft. 1:39 AM 3.7 ft. 2:32 AM 3.7 ft. 3:21 AM 3.6 ft. 4:08 AM 3.4 ft. 4:55 AM 3.2 ft. 5:41 AM High 0.9 ft. 6:31 AM 1.1 ft. 7:16 AM 1.2 ft. 7:57 AM 1.4 ft. 8:36 AM 1.5 ft. 9:14 AM 1.6 ft. 9:51 AM 1.7 ft. 10:31 AM Low 3.7 ft. 12:45 PM 4.0 ft. 1:20 PM 4.2 ft. 1:56 PM 4.3 ft. 2:32 PM 4.4 ft. 3:10 PM 4.3 ft. 3:48 PM 4.1 ft. 4:28 PM High -0.2 ft. 7:19 PM -0.6 ft. 8:07 PM -1.0 ft. 8:53 PM -1.1 ft. 9:40 PM -1.1 ft. 10:26 PM -0.8 ft. 11:13 PM Low Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed Ma y 9, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 1:20 AM 3.3 ft. 2:18 AM 3.4 ft. 3:11 AM 3.4 ft. 4:00 AM 3.3 ft. 4:47 AM 3.1 ft. 5:34 AM High 0.8 ft. 7:38 AM 0.9 ft. 8:23 AM 1.0 ft. 9:04 AM 1.2 ft. 9:43 AM 1.3 ft. 10:21 AM 1.4 ft. 10:58 AM -0.7 ft. 12:20 AM Low 3.4 ft. 1:24 PM 3.6 ft. 1:59 PM 3.8 ft. 2:35 PM 3.9 ft. 3:11 PM 4.0 ft. 3:49 PM 3.9 ft. 4:27 PM 2.9 ft. 6:20 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:26 PM -0.5 ft. 9:14 PM -0.8 ft. 10:00 PM -1.0 ft. 10:47 PM -0.9 ft. 11:33 PM 1.5 ft. 11:38 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:07 PM High Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed May 9, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:36 AM 2.6 ft. 1:34 AM 2.7 ft. 2:27 AM 2.7 ft. 3:16 AM 2.7 ft. 4:03 AM 2.5 ft. 4:50 AM 2.4 ft. 5:36 AM High 0.6 ft. 6:45 AM 0.7 ft. 7:30 AM 0.8 ft. 8:11 AM 0.9 ft. 8:50 AM 1.0 ft. 9:28 AM 1.1 ft. 10:05 AM 1.2 ft. 10:45 AM Low 2.8 ft. 12:40 PM 2.9 ft. 1:15 PM 3.1 ft. 1:51 PM 3.2 ft. 2:27 PM 3.2 ft. 3:05 PM 3.2 ft. 3:43 PM 3.0 ft. 4:23 PM High -0.1 ft. 7:33 PM -0.4 ft. 8:21 PM -0.7 ft. 9:07 PM -0.8 ft. 9:54 PM -0.7 ft. 10:40 PM -0.6 ft. 11:27 PM Low Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed May 9, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 12:28 AM 2.7 ft. 1:26 AM 2.8 ft. 2:19 AM 2.8 ft. 3:08 AM 2.8 ft. 3:55 AM 2.6 ft. 4:42 AM 2.5 ft. 5:28 AM High 0.8 ft. 6:13 AM 1.0 ft. 6:58 AM 1.1 ft. 7:39 AM 1.3 ft. 8:18 AM 1.4 ft. 8:56 AM 1.5 ft. 9:33 AM 1.6 ft. 10:13 AM Low 2.9 ft. 12:32 PM 3.0 ft. 1:07 PM 3.2 ft. 1:43 PM 3.3 ft. 2:19 PM 3.3 ft. 2:57 PM 3.3 ft. 3:35 PM 3.1 ft. 4:15 PM High -0.1 ft. 7:01 PM -0.6 ft. 7:49 PM -0.9 ft. 8:35 PM -1.0 ft. 9:22 PM -1.0 ft. 10:08 PM -0.7 ft. 10:55 PM -0.4 ft. 11:44 PM Low Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed Ma y 9, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 12:53 AM 2.4 ft. 2:10 AM 2.6 ft. 3:19 AM 2.6 ft. 4:22 AM 2.6 ft. 5:20 AM 2.6 ft. 6:16 AM 2.5 ft. 7:08 AM High 1.1 ft. 5:44 AM 1.3 ft. 6:31 AM 1.5 ft. 7:13 AM 1.7 ft. 7:53 AM 1.8 ft. 8:32 AM 1.8 ft. 9:13 AM 1.8 ft. 10:03 AM Low 2.6 ft. 12:00 PM 2.8 ft. 12:27 PM 2.9 ft. 12:58 PM 3.1 ft. 1:33 PM 3.1 ft. 2:13 PM 3.1 ft. 2:58 PM 3.0 ft. 3:48 PM High 0.1 ft. 6:41 PM -0.2 ft. 7:28 PM -0.5 ft. 8:15 PM -0.6 ft. 9:04 PM -0.6 ft. 9:54 PM -0.5 ft. 10:46 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 3 May 9First May 28 Full May 5 Last May 12 New May 20Major Times 11:12 AM 1:12 PM 11:40 PM 1:40 AM Minor Times 4:43 AM 5:43 AM 5:47 PM 6:47 PM Major Times --:---:-12:08 PM 2:08 PM Minor Times 5:25 AM 6:25 AM 6:56 PM 7:56 PM Major Times 12:37 AM 2:37 AM 1:06 PM 3:06 PM Minor Times 6:10 AM 7:10 AM 8:06 PM 9:06 PM Major Times 1:37 AM 3:37 AM 2:08 PM 4:08 PM Minor Times 7:02 AM 8:02 AM 9:16 PM 10:16 PM Major Times 2:40 AM 4:40 AM 3:11 PM 5:11 PM Minor Times 7:59 AM 8:59 AM 10:23 PM 11:23 PM Major Times 3:43 AM 5:43 AM 4:14 PM 6:14 PM Minor Times 9:01 AM 10:01 AM 11:24 PM 12:24 AM Major Times 4:45 AM 6:45 AM 5:14 PM 7:14 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:06 AM 11:06 AM Good Better Best Best++ Better Good Average6:52 am 8:16 pm 5:47 pm 4:44 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:51 am 8:17 pm 6:56 pm 5:25 am 6:50 am 8:17 pm 8:07 pm 6:11 am 6:49 am 8:18 pm 9:17 pm 7:03 am 6:48 am 8:18 pm 10:24 pm 8:00 am 6:48 am 8:19 pm 11:24 pm 9:02 am 6:47 am 8:20 pm --:-10:07 am78% 85% 93% 99% 91% 83% 76% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt took less than 10 minutes of deliberation for a jury to “ nd a Panacea tattoo artist not guilty of selling drugs. In a trial on Wednesday, April 25, David King was found not guilty of two felonies … sale of a controlled substance and delivery of a controlled substance. Assistant State Attorney John Wilson prosecuted the King case, which alleged King sold hydrocodone to a con“ dential informant who went into Kings tattoo parlor in July of last year. The state presented the informant and a tape recording of the alleged drug buy. The evidence is clear,Ž Wilson told the jury in his closing. Defense attorney Steven Glazer attacked the prosecutions case as anything but clear: the informant had a long criminal record … a 10-time loser,Ž in Glazers words in his closing statement to the jury. Plus, Kings voice was never heard on the tape. Glazer also attacked the reliability of the undercover operation … noting that the informants girlfriend went on the controlled buy with him, but she was never searched before or after the operation, nor was the car that the informant and his girlfriend drove to the tattoo shop. After the controlled buy, law enforcement conducted a search of the shop … but no drugs were found, nor was the marked money used by the informant. After the trial, Glazer said hes been practicing law for 24 years and had as many as 150 trials and never had a jury return a verdict so quickly. He timed it at nine and a half minutes. John Adams said the jury system is the heart and lungs of our liberty,Ž Glazer said, and I truly believe it.Ž Senior Circuit Judge William Gary presided over the trial. King still faces charges that he killed and ate a Panacea neighbors Vietnamese pot-bellied pig. Parts of the butchered animal were allegedly found in Kings freezer. € In another court matter, Judge Gary reduced the bond for a man charged with swindling people around the world out of nearly $80,000 to ship yachts. After a hearing on April 23, Gary reduced bond for James OConnor, who lives in Nevada, to $40,000 from the original $450,000. At the hearing, Assistant State Attorney Lorena Vollrath-Bueno painted a portrait of OConnor as man who created numerous shell companies in an effort to rip off potential shipping customers. In April 2011, OConnor was hired by Brett Shields of Shields Marina to ship a boat a customer had purchased to Australia. After paying more than $10,000 to OConnors All Flags International, the boat arrived in Brisbane in June … but the shipping company refused to release the boat, saying it had not received payment from All Flags. Shields paid again for the shipping, and the boat owner paid for other additional charges. Shields also found “ ve other people who claim they had been swindled by OConnor in similar shipping deals. At the hearing two weeks ago, OConnors wife said that she sold her silver to pay for plane tickets for the couple to travel to Wakulla County so her husband could answer to the criminal charges. She also said some of the money had gone to make restitution to Shields. She also testified that she and her husband had applied for a mortgage on their home to pay restitution to other people who claimed her husband owed them money. OConnor was represented at the bond hearing by Crawfordville attorneys Lynn Alan Thompson and David Kemp. In one contentious matter, the state claimed that OConnor should be found in contempt of court and held without bail for failing to appear at a court hearing in March. OConnor had waived formal extradition from Nevada and agreed to appear in Wakulla when required. OConnors wife testi“ ed that she and her husband had been in contact with Thompson and Kemp, who told them the case didnt appear on the March felony docket. Bueno called Thompson to the stand at one point, asking him questions about whether OConnor should have appeared in March … because thats when the Nevada extradition papers said he should appear. Thompson responded that the papers also said he should appear in court in Nevada on the charges. Judge Gary noted confusion on dates in the court documents and refused to “ nd OConnor in contempt. He reduced the bond but required OConnor, who is English, to surrender his passport and forbade any international travel while the case is pending. Bueno gave special praise to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and Detective Matt Helm for investigating the complex case. The prosecutor noted it was rare that a small department would be willing to undertake a case that includes victims from around the world. Alleged victims in the case include people in Singapore, Malaysia and Dubai.Court shorts James OConnorSpecial to The NewsThree Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce law enforcement of“ cers took part in Drug Take Back Day Saturday, April 28 in Crawfordville, Panacea and Wakulla Station. Lt. Brent Sanders manned a collection site in Panacea while Sgt. Danny Harrell was in Wakulla Station, and Lt. Sherrell Morrison was at the Wakulla County Health Department. During the four-hour collection period, the three law enforcement of“ cers collected 25.5 pounds of unwanted medications. While the Drug Take Back event is held several times a year in Crawfordville, Wakulla Station and Panacea, unwanted medications may be disposed of 24 hours a day in the secure disposal bin in the sheriffs of“ ce lobby.reportsLaw Enforcement and Courts David King after his arrest last yearO cers participate in Drug Take Back Day Lt. Sanders, Lt. Morrison, Sgt. Harrell Go to AnyGivenTimeJax.com to enter to win a vacation in sunny Jacksonville! SO MUCH TO DO, ANY GIVEN TIME. Conventional/FHA/VA* Lot Loans | Refinancing Adjustable & Fixed Rate USDA Rural Housing* Affordable Housing Construction/Perm. Financing Whether youre buying your first home or just need room to grow, our customized approach to mortgage lending can get you moving. Call us today or apply online at www.ccbg.com DENNIS NIELSEN 850.509.4836 Moving in the right direction. MEMBER FDIC All products are subject to credit and property approval. Program terms and conditions subject to change without notice. Not a ll products are available in all markets or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. *Loans are not made or originated by the FHA, VA, HUD or any other governmental entity. Scan this code with your smartphone to view current rates and calculate monthly payments.Requires mobile scanner app. 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327www.thewakullanews.comToll Free Phone877401-6408 Special Offer Purchase 1 year for $31 ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover r r s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________ Phone____________ e-mail_______________________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 5/18/2012Get 5 Additional Weeks FREE*With this coupon is offering 5 Weeks FREEwith the purchase of 1 years subscription for $31* WINDOWSBestWindow...Best Price...Best Choice! 1” Double Pane InsulatedGlass $179*Any size Installed of TALLAHASSEE COME VISITUS AT GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL850-519-5056www.abcwintallahassee.com

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 13ASheri s ReportOn April 20, a 12-year-old Medart Elementary School student was allegedly found in possession of marijuana at school. The female “ fth grader was suspended from school for 10 days and will not be allowed to attend the “ fth grade trip. The students parents were noti“ ed and the marijuana was seized. It weighed less than one ounce. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: € On April 18, Thomas Varnum of Crawfordville reported the theft of an Ereader and charger, valued at $175. The property was removed from the victims home. The E-Reader was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. € On April 18, Rebecca Bar“ eld of Panacea reported the theft of medication from her home. A suspect has been identi“ ed. The medication is valued at $60. € On April 18, Erica Morse of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary of an item belonging to a juvenile. The juvenile victim left an electronic device in a vehicle at Winn-Dixie and returned to the car to “ nd the item gone. The device is valued at $150. € On April 18, Dorcus Allen of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The complainant received tax information in the mail from another individual in South Florida. Deputy Ian Dohme discovered that the victim lives in Hillsborough County and attempted to contact her about the incident. The mailing contained personal information from a Hillsborough woman. € On April 18, Stephanie Hunt of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim was at Winn-Dixie when she accidentally left her purse in a cart in the cart return in the parking lot. The victim returned 10 minutes later and discovered the purse was missing. The purse and contents are valued at $682. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On April 19, Brian Dickinson of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le his tax return when he discovered that someone had already used his Social Security number. € On April 19, Amy Rosier of Crawfordville reported a structure “ re on Mill Creek Road. A faulty bathroom fan caught “ re and burned the light “ xture. Wakulla “ re“ ghters arrived on the scene and extinguished the “ re. The preliminary damage report was estimated at $3,000. The “ re was ruled an accident. € On April 19, Clayton Bozeman of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A telephone account was opened in the name of the victims business without his knowledge. Five phone numbers were opened in the account, all in Texas, as well as iPhone and iPad phone lines. The transactions totaled $2,083. € On April 20, Theodore Lowrie of Sopchoppy reported the loss of a canopy tent, valued at $225. The tent was set up at the Worm Gruntin Festival. The tent was left at the location in Sopchoppy at the end of the festival and was gone when the owner returned to pick it up. € On April 21, Michael Riggins of St. Augustine reported a traf“ c crash at Running Deer Lane. The vehicle struck a deer, but there were no injuries. € On April 22, Admiral Barwick of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. Someone added syrup to the fuel line of the victims boat. € On April 22, Benjamin Powell of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Someone stole the victims kayak from his Wakulla River dock. The kayak was valued at $400. € On April 23, CSI Rae Eddens and Capt. Randall Taylor conducted the regularly scheduled emptying of the WCSO Prescription Drug Collection drop box in the lobby. The contents of the drop box were bagged and weighed in the medical unit of the WCSO Jail. The drugs weighed 18 pounds and were turned over to CSI Eddens for destruction. € On April 20, Michelle Dawson of Crawfordville reported the theft of four gasoline cans from her home. The cans contained gas and are valued at $80. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On April 21, Nathaniel Brook Harris, 26, Christopher Tyler Muse, 19, and Joshua Allen Stratton, 28, all of Crawfordville, were observed by Sgt. Jeremy Johnston at a vacant lot on Riverside Drive in St. Marks. All three subjects were in possession of beer and Stratton was urinating in public. Sgt. Johnston and Deputy Billy Metcalf allegedly observed marijuana at the scene and the three suspects were all issued notices to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Harris had 6.4 grams of marijuana, Stratton had 3.0 grams and Muse had .08 grams. € On April 21, Marilyn J. Garner of Tallahassee reported a traf“ c crash at 525 Crawfordville Highway. Garner was northbound on U.S. Highway 319 when a deer ran out in front of her vehicle. The vehicle struck the deer and created $6,000 worth of damages, but there were no injuries. € On April 21, David Sapp of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Numerous unauthorized charges were discovered on the victims bank account over a “ ve day period. A total of 12 transactions were discovered with a value of $1,104. € On April 21, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after an asset protection employee allegedly observed Krystal N. Emmett, 25, of Crawfordville taking $25 worth of shoes and hair gel from the store without paying for the items. Emmett was issued a notice to appear in court for retail theft. € On April 21, Gloria Guindon of Panacea reported the theft of a personal watercraft from her home. The craft was taken from the victims dock on the Ochlockonee River and is valued at $3,000. The equipment was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. Later, the property was recovered in Franklin County near Walker Bridge. A “ sherman spotted the property ” oating in the marsh grass. It was determined that the watercraft had broken away from the dock and was not stolen. The property was returned to the owner. Detective Lorne Whaley and Deputy Scott Powell investigated along with Franklin County Deputy Quinnaland Rhodes. € On April 21, deputies received five animal complaints during the shift related to large bears. All of the animals were in highly populated areas of Crawfordville. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission were noti“ ed of all of the sightings. € On April 24, Shannon Lewis of Panacea reported a burglary in Crawfordville. Someone removed a trolling motor from storage at a relatives home. The motor is valued at $320. Persons of interest were identi“ ed. € On April 23, Amber Smith of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Furniture, jewelry and currency, valued at $425, were stolen from the home. € On April 23, Francis Dinardi of Panacea reported a residential burglary. A window was broken at a home the victim uses for storage. Two televisions were stolen. They are valued at $300. € On April 23, Crystal Parsons of Crawfordville was cleaning family property when she discovered a head stone on the property. The 75-pound granite stone had the name of a deceased person, who lived from 1888 to 1969, according to the stone. CSI Rae Eddens was called to the site and removed the stone. A suspect has been identi“ ed. The investigation continues. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. € On April 23, Sonya Miller of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was observed and $6,000 worth of household goods was stolen. Deputy Ian Dohme and CSI Rae Eddens investigated. € On April 23, Mary Roberts of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and $3,600 worth of property was stolen from the home. Damage to the home and contents was estimated at $5,000. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and CSI Rae Eddens investigated. € On April 23, Lori Bromley of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $760 worth of property. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On April 23, Barry Seaman of Crawfordville reported the theft of $58 worth of currency from his home. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On April 24, Detective Nick Boutwell investigated a report of a stolen “ rearm in Crawfordville. Detectives Lorne Whaley and Derek Lawhon joined Boutwell and interviewed a suspect north of Crawfordville. A .22 caliber rifle was recovered and two suspects have been identi“ ed. Boutwell also contacted a Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce detective who was investigating the case in Tallahassee and the investigation continues. € On April 25, Charles Smith of Sopchoppy reported a burglary at his camping area in Sopchoppy. A water pump, copper wire and a sink, valued at $235, were stolen from the site. € On April 25, Merritt Taylor of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim stated that a suspect, who has been identi“ ed, has been using his personal information without authorization. Taylor discovered that he owed $1,148 to an electrical provider outside of his home community. € On April 25, Jessica Raines of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the victims residence and removed a television, valued at more than $1,000. The victim is still conducting a property inventory to determine if anything else was taken. € On April 25, Krystal Nicole Emmett, 25, of Crawfordville was arrested for retail theft at Walgreens. Store employees allegedly observed the suspect opening merchandise and leaving empty packaging on the shelves. The suspect was also allegedly observed putting an item in her purse. She attempted to put some items back on store shelves and leave the store before she was detained. € On April 25, Junell Davis of Crawfordville recovered a set of keys in the area of Shadeville Highway and Kirkland Drive in Crawfordville. The keys included a vehicle key fob. Davis spotted the keys on the side of the highway. The owner is unknown and the keys have been turned over to the WCSO Property Division. € On April 25, Melanie Courson Roberts of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered that her credit card was compromised. The victim used the card while traveling and discovered the card was compromised in the same city in which she was traveling and used the card. € On April 26, a retail theft was reported at WalMart. Candise Ray Whiddon, 27, of Apalachicola was allegedly observed taking clothing and putting the items in her purse. She was stopped after reportedly attempting to flee to her vehicle. The clothing was valued at $87 and she was issued a notice to appear in court. She was also issued a trespass warning for Wal-Mart. € On April 25, Shalonda Antill of Crawfordville was traveling northbound on U.S. Highway 319 when she was stopped by construction workers. Jean Hindle of Crawfordville was traveling behind Antill and failed to stop her vehicle and struck Antill. There were no injuries. Hindle was issued a traf“ c citation for careless driving. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 806 calls for service during the past week. Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recently recognized Jean and Finley McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay with a plaque designating them with a Lifetime Honorary Membership in the Florida Sheriffs Association. The McMillans have contributed to the Florida Sheriffs Association Youth Ranch for more than 25 years and they took advantage of the opportunity to eat lunch and share memories with Sheriff Crum. I wanted to thank the McMillans for their continued longtime support of a very worthy cause that helps Florida youths be productive citizens, including some residents from right here in Wakulla County,Ž said Crum. WCSOMcMillans recognizedJean and Finley McMillan with Sheriff Crum CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEƒEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized FirmYARD SALEFRI. & SAT.MAY 4 & 5 8AM 2PMM i n i -Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS! BIGMAY DAYS L.P.T.( 850 ) 528-4985PROFESSIONAL POOL MAINTENANCE poolproblems?atthelowestratesweoffermaintenanceandservice!Servicing Swimming Pools and Spas for over 10 yearsTitus Langston850528-4985Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR

PAGE 14

Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comStephen C. Smith Regatta at Shell Point SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS DENISE FOLH SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStaff reportHundreds of people turned out for the annual Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta at Shell Point Beach over the weekend. The event is a fundraiser for the Leon County Unit of the American Cancer Society, which serves Leon, Wakulla and other counties in the Big Bend. Windsur“ ng, sailboarding and sailboat races were held on Saturday and Sunday, April 28-29. 38thAnnual Entertainment Line-Up www.bluecr abfest.com 850-984-CR AB Thanks to our Sponsors! Thanks to our Sponsors! May 5, 2012 W oolley P ark on Beautiful Dic k e r son BayArts & Crafts • Entertainment Crab Picking Contest • Kids Activities Fresh Local Seafood Gulf Specimen Mobile Marine Lab 10:00 amCoastal Optimist Club Parade11:00 amOpening Ceremonies/Announcements11:15amChief and Mark 12:15 pmMullet Toss 1:00 pmMountain Dew Cloggers 2:00pmCrab Pickin’ Contest 2:30pmRick Edminson 3:30 pmMountain Dew Cloggers 4:30 pmBrook Sessions 6:00 pmPark Closes Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011…2012.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, May 11 Friday, May 25 Friday, June 8 Friday, June 22 Friday, July 13 Friday, July 27 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA PLEASE RECYCLE

PAGE 15

By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentThe Chamber has “ nalized its list of nominees for our eighth Annual Business Excellence Awards. Eighty-nine businesses had the honor of being nominated for consideration to win in the following categories: Start…up Business, Business of the Year, Non…Pro“ t Organization and Environmental Stewardship of the Year award. In addition to these categories, we have added a new award for the Member of the Year. This can be the owner or an employee of any Chamber member business. I still remember how excited I was when Capital City Bank won Business of the Year, and I proudly displayed our award and sign. It could be your turn this year! Please make plans to attend the Business Excellence Awards banquet, sponsored by CenturyLink and Waste Pro, on May 17 at the Senior Center. The social hour will start at 6:30 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. Our guest speaker is Herb Donaldson, Healing Arts of Wakulla County president and artistic director of Palaver Tree Theatre Company. We encourage you to join us in support of the Chamber as we announce and recognize all the 2012 winners of these important and prestigious awards. Call Petra at the Chamber Office, 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@ embargmail.com to reserve your seats. LOW COUNTRY BOIL We thoroughly enjoyed the second Annual Low Country Boil, and thank all of our sponsors for their generous support, making this a very successful event. The dance floor was packed all night, so I assume everyone had a wonderful time. I would also like to congratulate our special events committee on a job well done! Planning for next year is already under way. ADVOCATE FOR BUSINESS I would like recognize several individuals who have spent countless hours working with our county on Wakulla 2020: John Shuff, past chamber president, and Kevin Vaughn, EDC chair, have been appointed by the Chamber to be our voice. We appreciate all the time and effort you both are putting forward on this very important issue. Chuck Robinson is our new chair for Commerce and Government and will be updating our membership on issues affecting our business community. We appreciate his passion and dedication to the Chamber. EDUCATION Continuing with our pledge to help our members through ongoing education and workshops, we have teamed up with WorkforcePlus and again bring to you the quarterly Brown Bag Lunch Series, beginning with employee retention in April. This workshop explored why employees leave, how to improve the hiring process, and identi“ ed good hiring tips. Conflict Management and Creating Culture of Team Success will be topics coming up in July and October. Special to The NewsNew business models in Wakulla County are always interesting, and even better to visit. Our April Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce mixer featured a growing recreational center that specializes in underwater activities, or diving simply said. More than 40 people attended the April 19 mixer at Wakulla Diving Center on 2784 Coastal Highway in Medart. Guests enjoyed great conversation, a view of the toys of the future, and spiced with smoked amberjack, shrimp, smoked turkey and ceviche (made with grouper and snapper) along with a variety of fruits and veggies. Wakulla Diving Center is currently made up of four activities, offered for viewing at the social in a tour. Everyone thinks Wakulla Diving is just a store that sells diving equipment, but that is just the front room. The store is divided into two sections, recreational on the right as you come in the front door and technical on the left. Have you ever seen so many masks in one place? One wall is stacked with many spaceage rebreathers! In the back room on the right is the repair facility where Travis Kersting “ xes almost everything diving. On the other side of the room, training is conducted from basic scuba through rebreather and cave. Both activities are carried into the back through the steel “ re doors into a dive locker on the left and a state of the art blending and hydrostatic test station. Wakulla Diving blends any breathing gas and stores 80,000 cubic feet of it in a tank farm. Their mid-building drive-thru “ ll station is a unique safety feature. Research and development is the fourth leg of the center, with a focus on design, prototype production and repair of the next generation of diving technology. This activity alone may dwarf the rest of the centers activities in the years to come. Wakulla Chamber members were treated to lively discussions regarding the future of diving in Wakulla County, thanks to Dr. Bill Huth, Jack Rudloe, Sue Damon, the Rev. John Spicer and Gregg Stanton. Stanton announced the National Speleological Society-Cave Diving Section plans to hold their annual meetings (300-plus attendance) in 2013 at Wakulla High School. Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from HONOR ROLLS for the third nine weeks Pages 4B-6B SUMMER CAMPS Special pull-out section Pages 7B-10B Courts exed, drug tests hexedWeekly Roundup, Page 12B Presidents message Wakulla Diving Center hosts mixer PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENChamber members mingle and chat at the mixer at Wakulla Diving Center in Medart. Wakulla Diving owner Gregg Stanton gives guests a tour of the shops work area.Business Excellence Awards are May 17 Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook L o o k i n g f o r Looking for t h e l a t e s t the latest L o c a l N e w s ? Local News? LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww .the wakullane ws.com JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 16

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Alisha Morgan, a personal historian and the owner of Paperclipped Memories will speak. Her company helps people preserve their life stories in books. Friday, May 4  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, May 5  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at the Sunset Restaurant in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812, Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at (850) 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol. com. Bring buttons to the meeting for free appraisals. Sunday, May 6  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  FLAG, Freedom and Liberty Advocacy Group, will meet at 4 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. They will be discussing the 2012 national election. Orders for shirts for the parade will also be taken. Email ag1776news@gmail.com for more information. Monday, May 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, May 8  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at the library at 7 p.m. The program will be presented by Florida Folk Festival performers, Joan and Amy Alderman from Blountstown. They will show off their Florida Panhandle roots with their collection of tales and tunes called “Journey Stories.” Wednesday, May 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, May 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Special EventsThursday, May 3 THIRD ANNUAL RONALD REAGAN BLUE JEANS AND BLACK TIE AFFAIR will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood beginning at 6 p.m. with social hour, followed by dinner and program at 7 p.m. The speaker will be bestselling author Peter Schweizer, of “Throw Them All Out: How Politicians and Their Friends Get Rich off Insider Stock Tips, Land Deals, and Cronyism That Would Send the Rest of Us to Prison.” Tickets are $35 each or $50 for two. Purchase tickets at www. wakullarepublicans.com. Friday, May 4  FACING LIBERTY photo exhibit will be held at GSigns, across from courthouse, at 6 p.m. The photos are of Wakulla’s African-American population from the early ‘70s to as far back as the 1800s. Exhibit includes schools, churches, along with the community at work and at play.  TIP A COP FUNDRAISER will be held at Posey’s Restaurant in Panacea from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. Members of the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce will be serving customers and tips received will be given to the Wakulla Special Olympics program.  INFORMATION ON THE COUNTY’S HARDSHIP ASSISTANCE for re and solid waste assessments will be presented at the Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive, at 10 a.m. by county staff. For more information, contact Jessica Welch at (850) 926-0919. Citizens must complete the application for assistance before June 1. Saturday, May 5  PANACEA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held at Woolley Park starting at 10 a.m. with a parade down U.S. Highway 98 and will last until 6 p.m. There will be live music, dance performances by cloggers and historic demonstrations. There will also be the Crab Pickin’ Contest and the Mullet Toss, where contestants throw a real mullet in a distancetoss competition.  SHOWING OF “ROOTS,” episodes 1 and 2 at 1 p.m. at the library. Alex Haley’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “Roots” tells a story for all Americans and remains an engrossing entertainment more than 30 years later.  DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS will be held at the library from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The rst ever statewide caucuses will kick-off the delegate selection process, which will determine who will be part of the Florida delegation that will attend the national convention in Charlotte, N.C.  REBECCA ZAPEN will perform at Posh in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. with jazz guitarist and composer, LaRue Nickelson. Zapen is a classically trained violinist, whose original music is a blend of swing, classical, klezmer, country folk, rock, jazz and cabaret. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Sunday, May 6  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Michael Keys, wildlife biologist, at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge at 2 p.m. He will present “Lightning, Longleaf and a Formerly Common Woodpecker.” Seating is limited so come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Thursday, May 10  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wakulla Family Medicine from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Donors get a free T-shirt. Friday, May 11  SPEAKING FREELY, a panel discussion on the history of May 20, Emancipation Proclamation, and what it means to experience freedom in Wakulla County, along with a few invited guests, will be held at 7 p.m. at the library. Saturday, May 12  SHOWING OF “ROOTS” Episodes 3 and 4 will be held at 1 p.m. at the library.  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet for a eld trip to Ron Eudy’s house to see his train display, from 10 a.m. to noon. His house is located at 29 Sarah Court, Crawfordville. For directions or to RSVP, call Carrie Stevens at 274-9474 or emaiil carriejstevens@comcast.net. Children should wear the proper clothes for outside. Tuesday, May 15  HABITAT FOR HUMANITY QUALIFYING MEETING will be held at Ameris Bank in Wakulla at 6:30 p.m. Enter through the back door. Bring paperwork verifying income, savings and expenses, along with a driver’s license and Social Security card. Questions, call Peggy Mackin at 9264544 or Linda Boles at 926-6222. Thursday, May 17  BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS BANQUET will be held by the chamber at 6:30 p.m. at the Senior Center. The guest speaker will be Herb Donaldson, artistic director for the Palaver Tree Theater Co. and president of Healing Arts of Wakulla County. Dinner will be served. RSVP by May 14 at 3 p.m. Call 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@ embarqmail.com. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Reagan Blue Jeans and Black Tie Affair at 6 p.m. at Bistro at Wildwood. Tip A Cop fundraiser at Posey’s from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. Panacea Blue Crab Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Woolley Park. First Sunday at the Refuge at 2 p.m. in Nature’s Classroom. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorLibrary Volunteer Nationally RecognizedThe library held their fourth annual Volunteer Appreciation Event on Friday, April 27 during which library volunteers from the past year were honored for their service. Our volunteers give over 2,000 hours of service to the library each year. According to national volunteer data, volunteer time saves the community an average of $21.79 per hour; this means that more than $43,000 of service is given to Wakulla County by our library volunteers each year. Our speaker was Mary Register who is a volunteer services consultant, from Volunteer Florida. With Marys help we were able to present to Gloria Hatton the Presidents Call to Service Award. This is a lifetime achievement award given to those volunteers that have performed at least 4,000 hours of community service. She received a certi“ cate and a pin, along with a letter from President Obama. She has been volunteering at the library since 1995 coming in each Friday without fail to help us process books and other materials for our collection. Her joyful attitude makes her an essential part of the WCPL family. Along with this esteemed honor, the library has named its Library Volunteer of the Year award after Gloria and a plaque will hang in the library with new winners being added each year. This years winner is Cecile DeGrove. Cecile has been working with us on the technical side of the library helping us clean out old records, and prepare for our transition to our new automation service. She gave nearly 200 hours of her own time to the library last year and were more than happy to make her the inaugural winner of the Gloria Hatton Library Volunteer of the Year award. The food and door prizes for the event were provided by local businesses. Food: El Jalisco, Krispy Krunchy Chicken, Lindys Fried Chicken, Ming Tree Garden, Stone Creek Pizza, Talk O the Town Deli, Wal-Mart and Winn-Dixie. Door prizes were donated by Ace Hardware, Advanced Auto Parts, Angelos Restaurant, Gulf Coast Lumber, Hardees, Huddle House, Panhandle Pizza, Pizza Hut and Shear Expressions. Thank you to all. All credit for putting this event together must be given to our volunteer coordinator, Pam Mueller. Pam, who is also the president of Volunteer Wakulla, makes volunteerism her focus in life and actually was a volunteer at WCPL before being hired six years ago. Anyone who is interested in having a great time while working with great people and helping out YOUR library please contact Pam. Pictures of the dinner are posted on the librarys Facebook page. Lastly wed like to thank all library volunteers, past and present for their dedicated service to the Wakulla County Public Library. Without their help we would not be able to provide the level of service that the residents have come to expect from the library.Friday Night MovieThis Friday, May 4, were showing a feel good “ lm starring Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah. This PG-13 (for some language) film tells the story of a small town choir who tries to win a national competition against all odds. To do this the new choir director (Latifah) must learn to cooperate with the choirs longtime benefactor (Parton). Both have different ideas on how the choir should be run and their issues are compounded by budget cuts threatening to shut down the choir, and by the fact that Partons grandson and Latifahs daughter begin to fall in love. Filled with laughs, poignancy and great music, this “ lm full of Joyful NoiseŽ should lift the spirits. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing and Capital City Bank will once again be offering popcorn and water for small donations to the library. Special showings of Roots all month long at WCPLWCPL, in association with the Wakulla County Christian Coalition, Greater Mount Trail Primitive Baptist Church and the Palaver Tree Theater Company, is proud to offer special showings of the seminal miniseries Roots, two parts each Saturday in May at 1 p.m. This month long program is part of the many events honoring May 20, Emancipation Day during the month of May. For additional information please contact Herb Donaldson at palavertreetheater@gmail. com. Library News...Government MeetingsMonday, May 7  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, May 9  WAKULLA COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, May 10  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. at city hall.

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 3B S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight on Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Business: Wakulla Woodworks Inc. Owners: John & Sue AndersonTell us about your business: In 1975, Sue and I moved here from Birmingham, Ala. I thought I had a job lined up but it fell through. (Recession of 75.) I had a few tools stored in my brother-in-laws garage and he wanted his space back. My brother-in-law found me a job building 10 doghouses … that was the beginning of Wakulla Woodworks. In March, we celebrated 37 years. At one time or another during these 37 years all family members have contributed to the success of the company, especially my son, Chris. I built the last two mullet wind vanes, patterned after G.W. Tullys original, that have graced the top of the old courthouse. Wakulla Woodworks was originally located behind Roy Rehwinkels General Store which was demolished and is now a law of“ ce. What services, products do you offer? We make custom all wood cabinets and millwork. We also make custom wood and vinyl interior and exterior shutters. What sets your business apart from the competition? All products are custom made to the speci“ cation of each individual customer. What should the community/ customer expect when they visit your business? Friendly, personalized service, sample products. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 1980. Why did you join the Chamber? To support the business community of Wakulla County. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? Discounts from other Chamber members, business information, event information. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Support the local economy; keep our taxes in Wakulla County. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? By phone, listed below, email jonhenry48@yahoo.com. Additional comments i.e. community involvement: Donated products and services to the Old Courthouse. Wakulla Woodworks is located at 544 Rehwinkel Road in Crawfordville. Phone number is (850) 926-7051 and cell is (850) 528-1869. FirstBank Senior Products Division…Florida recently opened with its headquarters in Wakulla County and run by Michael J. Weltman MBA, SRES, CSA. Senior Products Division focuses primarily on reverse mortgages. FirstBank has of“ ces in Sebring, Tampa, St. Petersburg, and is headquartered in Wakulla. New of“ ces are slated to open this year in Ocala, Orlando, Gainesville and Jacksonville. FirstBank is the largest privately held bank in Tennessee, created by the merger of Farmers State Bank (est. 1906) and First National Bank of Lexington. With Mortgage Headquarters in Birmingham, Ala., and Banking Operations primarily in Tennessee, FirstBank has more than 500 employees, 46 banking locations and $2 billion in total assets. FirstBank is now offering Senior Products in 41 States and Weltman was tasked to run the Florida Division. Weltman has been in mortgages, real estate, insurance and “ nancial planning for 11 years in Wakulla. He and his wife, Michelle, live on the Wakulla River with their rescue dogs. Weltman can be reached at (850) 556-6694 and (877) 608-9088, and online at www.myretirementmortgage. com, mweltman@“ rstbankonline.com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFirstBank Senior Products Division opens in WakullaNetworking luncheon held at Spring CreekBy PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberA record 58 members and guests packed the house for our monthly networking luncheon at Spring Creek Restaurant on Wednesday, April 25. To make it easier on the busy wait staff, the menu was laid out with each place-setting so guests could make their choice of salad, fried or grilled shrimp, tomato pie with grilled shrimp, or chicken breast with fries or cheese grits. It takes a while to accommodate this many people so Mary switched her agenda around a bit, beginning with the announcement and introduction of FSM Associates. Frank Messersmith, a lobbyist, joined the Chamber in March, and works in Government Affairs, representing clients like the Sheriffs in the State, just to name one group. Aprils new members announced were € Wakulla Pawn and Curio Shop; € MEA Fitness Inc. d/b/a Anytime Fitness, represented by Rainbow Internationals rep Cyndy Murphy. Anytime Fitness changed hands recently, and a ribbon cutting will be held May 18. Special offers will be available for students and teachers. An open house will be held on May 18 and 19. € Ron Piasecki, a longtime resident of Wakulla County, now retired, joined as an individual member. € Sue Damon of Damon Marketing shared that she joined the Chamber to meet new people. She is self-employed, works in marketing and represents associations in the Southeast U.S., the Caribbean, Mexico and elsewhere. € Freebeau Swindle, our newest member, representing Crownmoldingman.com, is what you would call a handyman, and has been doing a lot of work in Shell Point and St. Marks recently. If you need some remodeling done, your wooden fence or doors repaired or want to spruce up a room with crown molding, give him a call. At this point, smells from the kitchen started filling the dining room, and it was heavenly. Sharol Brown introduced her guest and administrative assistant Deana Wilson. Courtney Peacock introduced her co-workers Kelli Kirkland, and Bree Lovel, wife of our host Clay, and guest Donna Savary, owner of Savary Virtual Online School. The jackpot of $58 was won by Cyndy Murphy who donated the money back to the Chamber to add to our table and chairs fund. Thank you, Cyndy! Many thanks to our members for bringing 19 raf” e items: Rainbow International, Marianne and Lionel Dazevedo, Susan Schatzman, The Wakulla News, Cook Insurance, Wakulla County Farm Bureau, Crownmoulding. com, Ed Gardner, O.D., Keith Key Heating & Air, and TOSPT (Tallahassee Orthopedics Sports Physical Therapy). Our host, Clay Lovel, announced that Spring Creek Restaurant now has a mobile food kitchen in Crawfordville, open Tuesday through Friday. It is located between Burger King and 3Y Outdoor Equipment. Some upcoming events: Cyndy Murphy announced that she will be holding a continuing education class for Insurance Professionals in Tallahassee on May 10. To “ nd out more email Cyndy (cyndy.murphy@ mail.rainbowintl.com). Susan Schatzman shared two events held by Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County; the applicants meeting to qualify for a no interest home, built by Habitat, is set for May 15 at 6:30 p.m. at Ameris Bank. This is the 11th home built for families in Wakulla. A motorcycle run fundraiser will be held June 2, and starts at Capital City Harley-Davidson, moving into Wakulla County with stops at Poseys Dockside, Ouzts Too, St. Marks River Cantina and Skybox. Michael Weltman reminded us of his speaking engagement on April 27 at the Senior Center to talk about FirstBanks Reverse Mortgage Program. Petra Shuff announced the Chambers Business Excellence Awards Banquet will be held May 17, and invited everyone to attend the presentation ceremony in honor of our local business community. Remember, our networking luncheons are always held on the fourth Wednesday each month, from noon to 1:15 p.m. In May, Kast Net will be catering our lunch at the Wakulla Extension Of“ ce. Hope to see you there! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHarvest rift Store opens in CrawfordvilleHarvest Thrift Store is a ministry of Harvest Fellowship Church. It was a desire of our church to make ourselves more available to the community by turning itself inside out. The Harvest Thrift Store is the “ rst of many marketplace ministriesŽ that we will be operating in order to meet the needs of our residents. The store has been opened since October 2011 and is located in the North Pointe Center, 1596 Crawfordville Highway. Building 2 Suite A. The store resells clothes, various knick-knacks and some furniture that the community so graciously donates. Most all of our clothes, shoes, purses and ties are only $1. All donations are tax deductible. Store hours are Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Harvest Fellowship Church also administers the Gaballi food program where customers can save 30 to 70 percent on groceries. Go online to gaballi.com and use harvestfellowship as the reference ID or just come by the store. The church also operates the Harvest Hawaiian Ice Shack, which serves sno-cones, hamburgers, fries and other food items at very reasonable prices for events and parties. For more information about any of these ministries visit our website at www.harvest“ .org. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSClay Lovel, above, checks on Chamber guests at the networking luncheon held at Spring Creek Restaurant on Wednesday, April 25. Below, Chamber members chat at lunch.Chamber ChatterBrown Bag Lunch Series – Con ict Management: July 18, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The workshop identi es the causes and con ict and how to handle it in a sensible, fair and ef cient manner. It’s not a question of “if” con ict happens but rather “when” it occurs. This workshop is free of charge. Seating is limited, RSVP to Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Upcoming event: Business Excellence Banquet and Awards Presentation will be held Thursday, May 17 at the Senior Center. RSVP to Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Upcoming luncheon: Our May luncheon will be hosted by the Wakulla Extension Of ce, and catered by Kast Net Catering on Wednesday, May 25. New members:  Wakulla Pawn and Curio Shop, Inc. – specializing in loans and unique gifts.  Ron Piasecki, individual member.  Damon Marketing – Specializing in marketing.  MEA Fitness LLC – d/b/a Anytime Fitness – specializing in 24 hour tness and workouts.  Crownmoldingman.com – specializing in remodeling, door, wooden fence and home repair.Continued from Page 1BIn addition, WorkforcePlus will be offering Microsoft Word and Excel classes in June. All of the above are available to all businesses, free of charge. All you have to do is register. Several businesses have also taken advantage of our popular Ed2go online classes. Taking one of these classes just about pays for your annual membership investment. For more information, or to suggest additional topics, please contact the Chamber of“ ce. Membership: Despite current times, businesses understand how vital the support of our local Chamber is in advocating for a strong business community, and we continue to attract new members. We do understand, however, that times are tough and if you are a current member and your dues have not been paid, please be sure to contact us to discuss options for payment. The Chambers existence is based solely on dues from our businesses and individual supporters. Thank you for your continued involvement and support of your local Chamber. Yours in Service, Amy Geiger, PresidentAmy Geiger is the president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce.Geiger: Business Excellence Awards are May 17

PAGE 18

Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com COAST CHARTER SCHOOL E Honor RollKindergarten BASTIAN LILLIAN COOK FRANCES HILBERT ELLIYAH MILLER KURTIS PFEIFER TAYLORA Honor RollSecond grade CLEWIS GABRIEL Third grade GLASS JEREMIAH HILBERT ETHANSKALAK-YOUNG CHRISTIASMITH GLEN WARREN TAYLOR Fifth grade SMITH SARAH Sixth grade HIGBEE MEGANE/S Honor RollKindergarten DURDEN JAYDEN MOREFIELD ROY TURNER ZEPHANA/B Honor RollFirst grade ANFINSON DESTIN BUTLER ORLA FOUNTAIN ROSALIE SANDOW MICAH SANDOW SHANNON THORNTON NANCY Second grade BARNES DANIEL LEVINGSTON KERI Third grade BENTLEY SAMANTHA ODOM ERICA Fourth grade FOUNTAIN MADISON HOWELL DESSA-RAE LEVINGSTON KACI SCARBOROUGH CAITLIN TURNER ZACHARIAH Fifth grade GILSON ARIANNA PAFFORD TAYLOR VARGAS KATARINA WOODS JORDAN Seventh grade ABRAHAM LILIANA HILL KENDRA VARGAS CHRISTIAN Eighth grade LLOYD ANNA LLOYD LYDIAMEDART ELEMENTARY SCHOOL E Honor RollKindergarten AYOTTE MATTHEW BOYD MANDALYN BRADLEY KAYLEA CARRAWAY RILEY CRIPE ALANAH CRUM RYLEE DAVIS EMILY DYKES EMMA EDDINS ANGELINA ESTES NATHAN GODBOLT ALYCIA JOHNSON EMILY LAWHON PARKER LOVEL MARY MCMILLAN LILY REED ZHANIYA SMITH SHELDON TILLMAN JORDYN VANMUNSTER THERESA VAUSE ASHLYN WHITLOCK CASEY WINSTON DESTINYA Honor Roll First grade ABRAHAM SCARLETT ALLEN ZACHARIAH ANTILL TYSON BARNES BREANA BLAKE XAVIER DUDASH SYDNEY GAVIN SHAMYHIA GIDDENS EMILY HAMEL MATTHEW HARRELL LAYLA HODGES MEMPHIS JACOB KATHLEEN LAWHON AVA LOGAN ADEN LOPEZ JODI MANNING KANIA MATLOCK ANNIKA MORRISON COLT NICHOLS BRITTON PUTNAM-PORTER HELEN RARDIN KAYLEE RYE ADA SPLITT TEONA ZELRICK AIDEN Second grade BENNETT MEAGAN BRANTLEY TAYLOR BRETT GAGE BUCHLEITNER ANDREW BUCKLAND TABOR DEAN NAVI DUDASH ACOB GLOVER ISAIAH JACOBS GABRIELLA JALBERT XANDER LE DOLAN NICHOLS CAMERON NICHOLS LILY PARRISH STEVEN PATTON LUKE PAUL TRISTAN PITMAN KYLEE POOL COURTNEY POWELL CHARITY ROBERTS ELLA RODDENBERRY BROOKE TALLMAN-NEEL LESLIE TUCKER KANOA WILLIAMS DALTON WILSON ISAIAH Third grade BARWICK ELIZABETH EZELL HANNAH FORSTER NATHANIEL GALLOWAY DARA GRAY PEYTON HERO ANTONIO HOBBY SADIE JONES MOLLY LARISCY BLAZE LAWHON GRACIE NEAL FRANK WALLACE MICHAEL WARBURTON DANA ZELRICK CONNOR Fourth grade ALLEN GRACE BRATCHER FARRAH BUDA BRYCE CORRIGAN MIKAYLA FEWELL PAYTON JOHNSON FREDRICK MATLOCK ERIK MELTON KAITLYN SARVIS MADISON SAVARY MADELINE TEATE ALVIANNA VEARIL BRAYDEN Fifth grade CLARK JENNA CLARK ZACHARY COLLINS MELANIE DAVIS CASSIDY GREEN SALLY HARRINGTON SHEA HOOVER HARRISON HUGHES ELIZABETH LARISCY AMANDA LAWHON HUNTER MATHIS MOLLY NELSON ANDREW NIX ARIEL REED MADISON ROWAN TAYLOR SANDERS DYLAN SMITH TAYLOR TIMMONS NICOLAS WESTMARK JASONE/S Honor RollKindergarten BARNIDGE JUSTIN BURGESS QUINLAN COETZEE JACK CORE GRACIE FORT ABIGAIL FRANK DAVID FRANK DESTINY GAVIN ROBERT GIDDENS JACKSON GLOVER JEREMIAH HARDEN WILLIAM HARRIS EDWARD HENDERSON TIMOTHY HURLEY RACHEL HUTTON CALEB JAMES KELWIN JIMENEZ MIA JONES KOLBIE LANGFORD JACOB LANGSTON JACOB LASHLEY GLENN LAUGHTER JAYMYE LE NEVAN LEWIS LILIANA MCMILLAN BENJAMIN MILLER MIKAELAMURRAY-NAZWORTH JOSHUANAGY SCOTT NIX REID PARMARTER LOGAN PEEBLES BRADEN PRITCHARD WYATT RICKS III TERRY SADLER DAYTON SANDERS KAYLEE SHAW JESSE STOKES WILLIAM STUBBS MAVERICK TAYLOR MERRITT TOTH COLLIN TOWNSEND GAGE TUCKER KANE WARD JALYNN WILSON BRADY WOOD HEAVENA/B Honor RollFirst grade BARTON JAMIE BARWICK JESSICA BRATCHER PAXTON BURLISON HANNAH CARTER JUSTIN CHAIRES ELIZABETH CLARK ETHAN CMEHIL STEVEN CRABTREE JAVID CRUM REMINGTON DIAMOND TRAFTON GREEN KEON HALLUM-KINSEY TROY HAMILTON PAYTON HARRELL CHASSIDY JONES LOGAN KINCAID-REEVES CHLOE LANGSTON AMELIA LYDA ETHAN MCKAYE RONALD MELTON ZOEY NICHOLS ALEXANDER OWENS LANDON ROBINSON JORDAN ROBINSON TAJ-ALI RODDENBERRY JAKE SANDERS SAM SMITH JAYDE TAFF HAYLEE WOOD CHASE Second grade BURNS JALYNN CHAFIN LILA CHANCY ANNABELL CROW SEBASTIAN DALTON JERREL GALLOWAY EMERIE GODWIN ANTHONY HOBBY KYRA HOGAN ABIGAIL JIMENEZ JUAN LANE RYAN LAWHON BRAYDEN NICHOLS CAITLIN PAIANO BRYNNA PARKER BRENDAN PETRANDIS SAVANNAH POPE DYLAN PPOOL MORGAN ROBISON LEVI RUSSELL SANDRA SADLER JENNIFER SANDERS AVERY SAPP BENJAMIN SHEPHERD MACKENZIE SMITH KYLIE SORRELL WILLIAM THOMAS JARVIS TOTH KATIA VALENTINE GAIA WELLS TYLER WHITED CHAD WILSON JENNA WIMBERLY TYLER Third grade ALLEN BROOKE BODIFORD HUNTER BOWELL SAGE BREWER ETHAN BROWN JEREMIAH BRUNERLOGAN BURDETTE MICHAEL CARR-MCFADDEN TOBY CARRAWAY ADISON CASH CARSON CLUSSMAN TERRA CUMBIE LEE DAVIS GALEN DAVIS JONATHAN DULL ANSLEY DUTROW OLIVIA FAIRCHILD CHARLES GLOVER HANNAH GODINES ENRIQUE GREENE DESMOND HARDEN VALERIE HARRIS OLIVIA HARRISON DRAKE HAWKINS ASHLEA MCCULLEY TREVOR MCMILLAN FINLEY MCMULLEN BILLY MORRISON SARAH NELSON ELLIE PARRAMORE ASHLEY POSEY HUNTER SANDERS CHARLEY SANDERS HALEY STRICKLAND BAILEY VEARIL KALEB WOOD CHANCE Fourth grade ALLEN HANNAH ANDERSON OLIVIA ASHLEY AYDEN BORCHARDT BRANDON BRANTLEY DAVID CARRAWAY MORGAN DEHART TABITHA DELVALLE SHELBY HARVEY ANTHONY HENDERSON KATELYN HODGE BRODY HUTTO OLIVIA HUTTON BRITNEY INGRAM ZACHARY JACOB EDWIN JALBERT PHOENIX LENTNER CIERRA LEWIS MICHAL METCALF LUKUS MILLENDER JORDYN MYERS ALEXANDER NICHOLS COLTON OAKS LYRIC PARKER JACK PEARSON KARAH PIGOTT KORI POWELL ANGELINA RARDIN JACOB RODDENBERRY TAYLOR RUDD MAEGAN SANDERS ALYSSA THOMAS MALAYSIA TOMAINI AMADEO WALKER LOGAN WATSON GARRETT WILES JACK WILSON NOAH Fifth grade ABRAHAM ZACHARY BARWICK TRISTAN BROWN JAMES CLOUD DANIEL DELVALLE DANIEL GREY CARLAYNA HICKS JAZONTE JONES CHANCELOR KEITH GABRIEL LANGSTON ALYSSA LAWHON JONAH LAWHON TRENTON LEWIS ZEB MATTHEWS JOANN MCCRELESS SKYLAR MISPEL MAXWELL NIX ZOE ODOM JACOB PAUL WHITNEY PORTER BOBBY RODDENBERRY JARED SANDERS GENNIE WALLACE SETH WHALEY COLBY WHITEHEAD MATTHEW WILLIAMS ASHTONRIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL A Honor RollSixth grade ALLEN NADIA ANDREWS KAYLEIGH BLANKENSHIP CHYANNE BRANCH LOGAN COLVIN SYDNEY EIMILLER KAITLYN FIELDS JAZMINE FOUNTAIN SUSANNAH GAY MAASA HOOKER SYLVIA HOSKINS MIRIAM MCGLAMRY KATHRYN MUSGROVE SKYLER POTTER IANRICHARDSON ALEXANDERROSSETTI KAYLA RUDD MADISEN RUSSELL ANNEMARIE STRICKLAND ABIGAIL SYKES MADISEN TEW BRYLEE TURNER LANDON WEBER JARED WHITING DANIELLE WIEDEMAN CALEB Seventh grade BEARD KELSEY BENNETT PEYTON BOWYER MATTHEW BREEDEN NOAH BREEDEN NORA HARPER KAYSHA HICKS MACLELLAN HUGHES EMMA JENSEN MATHILDA KING MICHAEL MERCER SHALEIGH METCALF MASON MEYERS KAYLEE NG MARLON PARIS JASON PEACOCK ADRIAN RUDD PRECISION SAMLAL KAVITA STEVENS BRANDI STRINGER DORI SULLIVAN SKYLER Eighth grade AHRENDT JOHN ARRINGTON HARLEY COX REBECCA ECK KATHRYN GUNNARSSON MATTIAS HART HANNAH LENK SHELBY LILLEY REBECCA PARMER MARIA SUTTON ELIZABETH A/B Honor Roll Sixth grade BALL STEPHANIE BODDYE ASHTON BROWN JAVARI BUSSEY CHAYTON BYRUM BLAKE CACCIATORE ALYSSA CARNES MARIAH CARTER CALEB CHANDLER AUSTIN COX CARAH CROMARTIE LESSIE DALTON HUNTERDEARRIGUNAGA MADISONFAGAN BAILEY FRANKLIN KARNECEA GARNER AUGUST HAIRE AMANDA HAY JAMES HOWARD BRANDON HOWELL BAYLEY HUGHES LYNDAMARIE HUGHES OLIVIA HUMES TARIQUE JEFFERSON JAYDA LANIER MICAH LANIER ZOE LAWHON EASTON LONG-WILDE MICHAEL MARSHALL TAYLOR MATHIS MYLA MAXEY JOHNNIE MCCARL MAX MCREYNOLDS JAMES MORALES KYLE ONTIVEROS KAITLYN PAFFORD MICAH PERRY MARY REYES ROSARIO ROATH HALEY RUSSELL JACKSON SCOTT CHEYENNE SCOTT CONNOR SMITH KAYLEE SPELL TAYLOR STALVEY MORGAN STEWART VICTORIA STRICKLAND HANNAH SYMONS RYAN WILLIAMS JKAYLA Seventh grade ANDERSON ABEON BEATTY ALEXANDER BENNETT HALEY BRIGGS LUCASBRIGHAM CHASON EMMACAPLE ISAIAH COLE BRYCE COOK MATTHEW CURTIS DEVIN CUTCHEN CHLOE ESTES JACOB GLISSON NICHOLAS GODDEN DYLAN GUNNARSSON NATASHA HARVEY MEAGAN JEFFERSON ALAUNDRE LAWRENCE EMILY MAINER RICKILEE MARLOW JONATHAN MARTIN HALEIGH MCELROY MEREDITH MCIVER ALYSSA MITCHELL ADRIANNA MORRIS ADRIAN MULLENS ELIJAH MULLENS NOAH OWEN MICHAEL PEARSON PAIGE PETERS AMBER PICHARD BRIANNA RICHARDSON KELSEY ROBINSON COLE SCOTT SAGE SMITH HANNAH STARLING TAYLOR STRICKLAND HARLEY SYKES BREANA TABB ABIGAIL TALAVERA SKYLER THIGPEN SARAH THOMAS SHENIKA TOLAR MCKENZIE TRUSSELL JORDAN VAUSE CAJAH WHITE VICTORIA Eighth grade ALFORD COURTNEY BEAL SARANNE BRAHIER SEBASTIAN BURTON SHELEEN CASON COURTNEY CAUSSEAUX WILLIAM COLLINS SARAH CRAWFORD GARRETT DOUIN KURSTIN EDMONDS HALEIGH FRANKLIN HERBERT GARNER SEBASTIEN GAY KARENA GRIMES KAITLYN HATCH LAUREN ISMAN NOAH KENT JORDAN LENTZ NICHOLAS MCCULLEY DALTON MCGLAMRY MICHAEL MCHONE BRITTANY MCKOWN ERIKA PANZARINO KAITLYN PRESTON HARLEY QUITALEG JENNIFER REVELS MICHAEL REYES YESENIA RUDD CARLY RUDD WILLIAM SAMLAL NICHOLAS STATEN SENTWALI STRICKLAND JOSHUA SULLIVAN BAILEE WAITES STEVEN WARD CHRISTOPHER WEBER JOHN WEDDLE ABIGALE WHEELER JAMIE WILD DAVID YU JUVEN ZDRAZIL MATTHEWRIVERSINK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL E Honor RollKindergarten GAUGER ABBOTT GRIMES ROBERT HARRIS HELEN JONES PRESLEY LEE TRISTON LLOYD SARA MCCLINTOCK HALLIE MILLER JACKSON OSTBERG MARY PETERSON JOSLYN STRINGER SHELLEY TAYLOR EMILY TEW AMELIAA Honor Roll First grade BARBARINO KYLE DODSON ADALYNN HARRISON MAKAYLA HOXWORTH MAKAYLA LAWHON LAKE MARR DAVID MCKENZIE GARRETT MORGAN CHASE PASCOE KAYDEE POLLOCK PARKER SANDBERG HAILEY SMITH LAINEY VAUGHN BENJAMIN WESTER LAINA Second grade CORDELL GRACE DUTTON GABRIEL FRANCIS HANNAH FULGHUM BELLA GAYNOR MARGARET GRAY LAURAL HENRY AMAYIA INDIHAR AUSTIN JOHNS XANDER KIRKLAND HAYLEE ROBERTS BROOKE RODDENBERRY LIA VICE ISSABELLA WILLIAMS ELLIANA WINGERT NOVALEE Third grade CARTER CHASE CROCKETT MACKENZIE DIETRICH GILLIAN HOPSON LUKE LEWIS JAMILYNN WEST JAMES WILDERMAN BREANNA Fourth grade BARCELO ISABELLA BROOME LUKE FAIRCLOTH KATIE GRAY ABIGAIL GREEN OLIVER HAMBRICK SAMANTHA MORGAN TRAVIS PRESTON ASHIERA RALEY BRITTNEY RICHARDSON COLBYRODDENBERRY MAKENNASANDBERG RILEY SLOAN AARON STRINGER JACOB THOMPSON CALYNNE Fifth gradeALMANZOR GISELLE ANNEDAMRON JULIAN MARTIN CAITLYN MASON JORDAN SHIELDS ADAM THOMPSON ARTHUR WARD CLAYTON E/S Honor Roll Kindergarten AINSWORTH VIOLET ALVAREZ ISABELLA ARIES TANNER ATKINS MAKINNA AVERA DALTON BARNES KONNER BLINK GABRIELLE BOWYER JUSTIN BROGDON TRENTON BUNCH ROBERT CHESHIRE ELLIOTT CONCEPCION VICTORIA DAVIS RYLEIGH DIXON TAVARRIOUS DONALDSON KEIRA DOUGLAS JUSTICE HARTSFIELD CONNOR HICKS WYATT IRWIN KRISTINA JACKSON CALEB JEFFERSON ERIC JEFFERSON MILAN KIRKLAND KRISTEN KLEES HADEN MARSHALL JAMES MATHEWS NATALIE MCELWAIN CONNOR MCMAHAN ERIC NOLAND MAXWELL OSBORN CALEB PAUL BRIANNA PETERS GAGE PIPPIN KOHLSON POLAND KAILEY RAGIN ZEKIE SAMPSON PAYTON SCOTT SHATARA Wakulla County Students Achieve Honor Roll

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 5BSKIPPER HARLEY STEWART MADALYN TYRE NATALIE WESTER DONALD WESTER MAGGIE WILDERMAN ABIGAIL WOOLEY JOSEPHA/B Honor RollFirst grade ALBRITTON JASMINE CARR WILLIAM CREEL ROBERTDEPROSPERO JOHNATHANDICKEY JAMAR DUNN KOLBY GILES TRACE GOWDY GABRIEL GREEN ANNA KIMBERL DONALD KINSEY RILEY MITCHELL GUNNAR NEAL ETHAN NEWBERN JACOB PARKER JACOB RHINEHART BRENT SAGALA ANN MAREE SAMMONS KIMBERLY SEALY ADAM SMITH TRINITY THOMAS JASHAWN VAUTIER GABRIELLE WRIGHT DEAN Second grade ALVAREZ DOMINIC BEAUCHAMP ELIJAH BLANKENSHIP SHELBI BRAINARD CADENCE BRAMBLETT LOGAN BRANNAN EMOREE CALLAGHAN MARK CARMICHAEL SPENCER CHAVEZ DAVID CORBETT WILLIAM DAVENPORT PEYTON EDENFIELD TYLER GEORGE JACQUELINE HINDLE KASEY JONES JUSTUS LLOYD EMMA LOPEZ MELISSA MOTES CHANCE MULLINAX CAROLINE NG MATTHEW NUTTING ALLIE PELL WILLIAM ROBERTS JARRETT ROSENBERG PENELOPE SPRAKER HEATHER STRICKLAND ETHAN Third grade AINSWORTH TRISTAN ANNAND AIDAN BLANKEN ANDREW COOKSEY TANASHA CORDLE BRYCE DICKEY JORDAN EVANS MADISON GAVIN JAICEE GRUBBS LANEY HART ETHAN HEARNS JAYVEN HUDSON ALEXIS JERNIGAN SYDNEY KAMAL ZAKARIA KELLY JASE KINSEY AARON LAWHON FISHER MCCLINTOCK ADEN MCELREE SYDNEY MCKENZIE KAYLA METCALF CADE MULLINAX WILLIAM ODOM MASON PELL JOHN PERDUE MICAH PETERSON HAYES PIGOTT CHEYENNE POSEY COLE PULLAM MACKENZIE ROBINSON MAURJEA SMITH TYLER STEWART ASPEN THOMPSON ASHLYNNE TYRE ROBERT UNDERWOOD HAILEY VAUGHN EMMA WEAVER JACE WESSINGER CARTER Fourth gradeFUNDERBURKE ALEXANDERGURR MICHAELA HALL MADISON HANEY CONNIE HARTSFIELD DAVID JACKSON JORDAN JONES DERISHA KRAUSE COURTNEY LEWIS LEAH MERRITT DENYM NEWSOME JAMES PAFFORD SAVANNAH POSEY CHRISTOPHER POSEY KEVIN RAY TRISTAN REED BAILEE ROBERTS KYLA RUSHINAL TANAR SAMPSON JAMES SCHULTZ EMILY SIMPSON TANNER SMIROLDO BRANDON SUDERMAN JACOB SYMONS REID TUCKER TESSA WEST LOUIS Fifth grade ANDERSON THOMAS ANNAND ANDREW AVERA ABIGAIL BARTLOW MAURA BENNETT CAMERON BLACKMON CODY CYR FAITH EVERHEART JESSICA FRANCK DYLAN GREEN ASHLYN GRIFFITH VICTORIA HILL DAKODA HOBBS EMILY HOWARD NKRUMAH JOHNSON CAROLINE KINSEY STEVEN LEHRMANN DEVIN LEONARD ANGEL PAFFORD TANNER PERDUE NOAH RAYBOUN FAITH RICH DASHA ROBERTS BRITNEY SMITH ALYSSA SMITH SHELBY STEWART BROOKE TAYLOR HALEY THOMAS MANDALYN WALKER CELESTIA WILLIAMS REKENYA WILLIAMSON LAYLASECOND CHANCE SCHOOLA/B Honor Roll Seventh grade ARMSTRONG RICHARD Ninth grade LAIRD JOHN 11th grade COSHATTSHAWN HALL TAYLOR MCKENZIE KRISTI 12th grade VERNON MARIAHCRAWFORDVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLE Honor Roll Kindergarten ALFORD NOAH BLOUNT SAMUEL BROWN AUSTIN BROXTON GARRET BRUCE GABY BRUMBY CHASON BUTLER SHELBY CHRISTIAN ANDON ELLSWORTH JACOB GEHRKE GWENDELYN GUMPHREY GEORGIA HARVEY CARLEE HATFIELD JORDYN HOLT CECILLEE HOOVER ABBI KOLLING-BARNETT ZOEY LANE JOSEPH LOGAN MARIAH MILAM BRIANNA MILLENDER DUSTIN MODZELEWSKI ROWAN NAZWORTH JESSE PIERCE BENJAMIN POLLARD KARISROSENBERGER NICHOLASSCOTT ALYSSA SMITH LAYLA SORENSEN ADONYAH SPARBY JACOB TAFF ISABELLA TIDWELL KAYLA VELTKAMP GABRIELLE VENTRY DAVID WALKER AMELIA WHITE RACHEL WICKHAM IAN WILLIS KATHERINE WINKLER ASHLEY YORK SARAH A Honor Roll First grade ANDREWS SYDNEY ANZALONE JOSEPH BUTLER DANIEL CORBET PENELOPE DAVIS JALEESAH DAVIS RILEY DUNCAN JABRYAH EBRIGHT DELL ELKINS RAVEN GILLIAM HARLEIGH GRAHAM BRYSON HARRELL KYLA HARVEY KALI HURST NATALIE JEDZINIAK LILY MARINI COLBY MASSEY LILY MILLER ISABELLE MOCK TRISTA MOODY DAWN PEACOCK BETHANY PICHARD EMILY PICHARD HANNAH SORENSEN SEQUOYAH STEPHENS COLLIER TILLMAN CORY TURNER WILLIAM VENTURI EMMA WELLMAN ALEXIS Second grade ALFORD CLARA BERRYMAN ALYSA CLARK MACKENZIE COPELAND MADISON CORE NAILAH CROSBY SELINA EBRIGHT BENJAMIN FORBES PEYTON GUNNARSSON ANNIKA KANITZ ETHAN MCNAIR CIERRA SHERMAN SAMANTHA STOLK LILY VARNES MACIE WHALEY NATALIE Third grade BARKSDALE ADEN CRUM AMBER GRAUSE SYDNEY HARVEY MARINA JORDAN WESLEY SORENSEN ISAIAH TILLMAN CALEB WALKER KRISTEN WHITE MELODY WILLIAMSON DYLAN Fourth grade BRUCE GRACIE BRUCE WILSON BUTLER SAIRA HARDEN ALEXANDRA HENDERSON KALEB KAUFMANN GAVIN LINVILLE CAITLYNN SIMONS LILLY SMITH BRYAN THOMAS EMILY Fifth grade ARCHIE ADAIJA BRADFORD CHAIM DARNELL ELEANOR DIEHL ELIAS FIELDER MIKAELA HUTTO KATIE JOINER FAITH KILPATRICK CARLOS LASSITER JADA OSTEEN VANCE TAYLOR KENDALL E/S Honor Roll Kindergarten ANZALONE JOHN BARKSDALE OWEN BISHOP ISAIAH BRAVERMAN NATHAN BRINSON SAMRON CARR ADEN CARRANZA LAELAH CHESTER MADISON CHRISTENSEN CARTER COOK LAURYN COUNCIL MASON CRUM JOSHUA DEBAUFER FREDRICK DIEHL WYATT DONAWAY SAM DUNLAP AYLA ELMORE SHAKAIYAH ESTES STEPHEN FARMER JACEY GALAN DESTINY GRAY FALLON HARPER DEVON HARVEY OWEN HINTSON RASHYLA HOWELL KEYONI HUTCHINSON AUBREY JABLOW SAMUEL JACKSON TUCKER JESSUP ROBERT KELLY BRADLEY KENNEDY DAVID KING JACKSON LANIER JULIAN LEE GAVIN LEE REBECCALEVERING MIRANDA ZACHARYMCNAIR CHRISTOPHER MILLER DYLAN OLDS EJAVIA OWENS KATIE PAGEL KAYLA RAWLS JACOB RAY ZACKARY REVELL HUNTER RISELLI GIORGI ROBERTS RYLAN ROBINSON JERIAH SHIVER MATTHEW SWAIN BRADY TAFF BAYLEE WICKHAM KYARA WILLIAMS AIDEN WINKLER KAYLEY A/B Honor Roll First grade BABCOCK ROBERT BARWICK TRISTA BICKFORD EMILY BROWN ISAIAH CARLSON SARAH COLEMAN RILEY FINCH SHEYENNE GOOD TAYLOR HARDEN LUCAS HARRIS NATHANIEL HENDERSON EMMA HENING COLEMAN HUNTSBERGER ANDREW JEFFERSON BRIANNA JOHNSON ZACHARY JOYNER RONNIE KENERSON DANDRE LINVILLE CHASE MCKAY ALLEN MCNALLY ASHTON MCWHITE JALIERE OTTOMEYER ASHLYN PANZARINO FRANCIS PELT JACOB REVELL SAMANTHA SAULTER ANNA SCHISSLER MAKENNA SHEPPARD CAMERON SIMONS TUCKER TINDALE MICHAEL TOMLINSON DAWSON VAUSE DYLAN WALKER CODY WARREN ROBIN WRIGHT KADYN YON JAYDEN Second grade ATKINS ETHAN BABCOCK MATTHEW BAZE CARSON BELDIN BRENDEN BUTLER TAMIRABUTLER-MOORE BRIYAUNCARDOZA JACOB CASON MATHEW CODDINGTON MACY COOK BRANDON COUNCIL JUSTIN CRUM JACOB DAUGHTRY JOHN DAVIS TYLEREDMONDSON AUBRIANAFARMER CAMDEN FIELDER JOSHUA GRAHAM KAYLEE HAMILTON AUSTIN HAMPTON WYETT HARRELL SCHELBY HATFIELD ABIGAIL HAYES NAKYRAH HILL ERIN HINEMAN SPENCER JACOBS SKYLAR JERNIGAN ALIA JOHNS MATTHEW JONES AZIAHLEVERING MIRANDA JOSEPHMANN RILEY NEAL AALIYAH NEWELL KAITLYN PARSONS JADYN PAYNTER KOBE PETERSEN LUCAS POLLARD ISAAC RANDOLPH KYLE REEVES HAYDEN REI BREEANA REVELL KAYLEIGH ROBENHORST LUKE RODRIGUEZ IDALIA ROGERS HEVYN TAYLOR PAYTON TEUTON TREY VARNUM WADE WEST BLAKE WHITAKER JAMARIN WHITAKER KAMARI WILLIS AUBREY Third grade BARRETT TAYLOR BOGATAJ DOMINIC BUTLER GABRIELLA CAMARENA AUSTIN CLARK TRAVIS CUSHARD KEIRA DUNLAP HAYLEY ELKINS VICTORIA FAIRCLOTH EMILY FLETCHER TRYSTON FREEMAN RACHEL GAFFNEY SEBASTIAN GANEY MELODY GOWDY DALTON HAZEN JAMES HOOKER DAWSON JACKSON AUDRIAUNA JOINER JOHN JONES AUTUMN JONES JARRETT KILPATRICK JUSTIN LEE CAMERON MELTON ASHANTI MERRICK JACKSON MESSER JADA MESSIER BENJAMIN MILLENDER CAITLIN NAVA SALAZAR YAREYDI NEEL ZACHARY OSTEEN JACKSON PEDLER ANNAMARIE REVELL AUSTIN SAULTER TYLER SELPH SAVANNAH SIMS ANYYSATHOMPSON AVEYOUNNATUCKER AIDAN WILLIS MADISON YORK JOSEPH Fourth grade BAIRD JACOB BROWN SAVANNAH BRYAN HANNAH CASON CAITLYN DANG ALANDEMONTMOLLIN BRANDYFRANK MICHAEL GOODWIN CAMERON GUNNARSSON KATARINA HARPER GEORGE HARRELL MICHAEL HARVEY GARRETT HAY ALYSSA JEDZINIAK CRYSTAL KENYON CHANDLER KENYON LILLIAN LOGAN SETH MANN ZACHARY MEYER ANIA PEARSON AUTUMN REEVES BLAKE REGISTER HUNTER ROGERS JASON RUETH TYLER VARGAS DOMINIC WICKHAM RAUL Fifth grade AHRENS SAVANNAH ANDREWS GRACE AVILES JOY BEAULIEU GABRIELLE CORDOBA HAYLEIGH DEMPSEY HANNAH GARBARINO ANNA GEHRKE STEVEN HAMMELMAN WALKER HARVEY JONAH HARVEY ZACHARRIYA HATCHER TAYLOR HERRON COURTNEY HOANG HUNG HOOKER HALEY HURST AMANDA JEFFERSON JAQUESHA JONES CODY NEWSOME SARAH OWENS CHARLES PICARD ADAM POSEY CODIE PRESTIA ANNALISA PRICE JUSTIN REEVES HUNTER RENTZ SYDNEY SLAYTON ANNABELLE SMID TALIA SPEIGNER BRIAN TAYLOR EMMA WINDSOR ZACKARYWAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL A Honor Roll Ninth grade ALVAREZ HEATHERANDERSON STROMAN ANDREAANDREWS SIERRAUNNAATKINSON WILLIAM BROWN HALEY CAPPS HOLLI CARR ASHLEY COVINO JOSEPH EDGE BRIAN EIMILLER KRISTEN FERGUSON KATHERINE FIELDER REBEKAH PANDOLFI ASHLEY PATTERSON TAMETRIA PETRANDIS MARINA PIOTROWSKI JAMES ROTH MITCHELL SCHNEIDER JOSHUA SORRELL ALBREY WIEDEMAN LYDIA 10th grade GENTRY MELISSA HANSEN MATTHEW HARRIS MADISON HART ARIEN KELLEY MARLEE MATHIS SARA METCALF ALLISON NOLAND TIFFANY SCHUBERT ALYSSA SMITH AARON TORRES ANNALISE WESTMARK EMILYWIEDEMAN MARGARET11th grade BARNES JEFFERY BATTLE JACK BONTS BLAKE BROWN CALEB CHUNN JONATHAN CRUM NATALIE HARRIS SAVANNA HEROLD BRITTANY KOCHER BRENT LOWE CASEY PHILLIPS MATTHEW THIGPEN KAYLYN TIDWELL GRACE WALKER JACOB WALLACE DYLANWESTERFIELD MIKAYLA12th grade ATKINSON CORA BARWICK SLOAN BURNSED JENNIFER CLARK ERICA CLINE KEITH EATON CAMIELLE EDWARDS ELIZABETH EGLER SHANNON FINN SARITA FLOWERS BEVERLY GALLAMORE KRISTINEGIMELLO-VENTURI CAROLINEHAMEL SARAH MARTIN SAMANTHA MATHERS INA MAXWELL JAMES ROZANSKI KYLE STAHR TIFFANY VISE MOLLY A/B Honor Roll Ninth grade ABRAHAM KATELYNALMANZOR CHRISHNIKAALSUP SHELBY BEATY KEEFER BRANCH TAYLOR BROADWAY LILIANA BROOKS JOSIE CALLAGHAN ALIYA CARNEY DYJUANCARPENTER SAMANTHACASEY MARINA CLARK CHLOE COTES ALEXANDRA CUTCHEN CADE DAVIS JAMES DIXON KERI DODSON RYAN EVANS CHRISTINA GEIGER BRANDON GRIFFIN DEVIN GRIMES ASHLEY GURR SAMANTHA HAIRE JUSTIN HAWKINS SHELBY HUNTER ZACHARY HURST HUNTER JAMES KASEY JEZIORSKI MICAHLYN JOSE DEVON KELLY MORGAN LEE KENZIE LEWIS COURTNEY MILLER KINSEY MILLER MATTHEW OCHAT CODY PETERS CHRISTOPHER PLASAY THOMAS PLOUFFE JACOB POPPELL AUSTIN POST BROOKE REVELL BRAXTON ROZAR HARRISON SANDERS CIARA SICKLER ELION SMALL GREGORY STANDLEY MACKENZIE STEVENS ASHLEY TWIST CODY WEBB JAKE WEIRBACK REBECCA WESSEL ADAM WEST BENJAMIN WHITE TOMMY WORRILL MATTHEW 10th grade ALLEN CHRISTOPHER ATKINSON AUDREY BROWN CHRISTEN BURSE IAN BYRD ETHAN CHESHIRE ASHLEY COOPER WHITNEY DAMON DAVID DEAL RICHARD DUTTON ALEXANDER EVANS JUSTINE FURNISH SHANA GREGORY MICHAEL GUBALA BRIANNA GUNN THOMAS HAMILTON SAVANAH HARRELL SHELBYHOLLETT MAXAMILLIONHUTCHINS GABRIEL INLOW SAMMIE KEATON KAEDRETIS KELLEY LOGAN KENT ALISHA KESTEL REGINA KYLE WESLEY LOUDNER BRANDON MARTINEZ JACOB MATHERS CARY MCCULLERS DANIEL MCFALLS DORAN MINISTERIO NATALIE PARIS CHRISTOPHER PAYNE MAKAYLA PLAGGE ALEYDA POITEVINT DAKOTA POTTER ISAAC POTTER TAMIA RODDENBERRY BROOK RUDD EDWARD RUDD EMILY SAPP KAILEY SMALL JOSHUA TOWNSEND ALANAWERTENBERGER LAURAWILLIAMS TABITHA WILSON CHARITY WISE JESSICA WOOD SHANNAN YOUNG CHIONE ZDRAZIL ZACHARY 11th gradeAPPLEGATE CHRISTOPHERARELLANO CHELSI ARNOLDY MIRANDA BAZE PAYTON BEAL SAVANNAH CARRIER TYLER CARROLL CHELSEA CAUSSEAUX JACK CHAMPANY MADELINE CHEW KRISTIN COLE JOHN COULLIETTE STEVIE CURRY TYQUISHA DIX-KESSLER RACHEL EVANS BRITTANY GRAY RAYCHEL GRIMMETT SHANTE HANCOCK SASHIA HARRELL ERICA HARRIS KAYLA HUNTER JAKE HURST HALEY LANIER HANNAH LEWIS ALEXANDER MALIK ZACHARY MAULDIN COURTNEY PARKER LAURYL PATEL SAHIL RANDOLPH DEJAH RAY MEGANRODDENBERRY JORDANRUSS SYDNEY SANDBERG ASHLYNE SARVIS MICHAEL SHIVER SHELBY SIMMONS KIERSTEN SIMPSON OLIVIA STRICKLAND JULIA TILLMAN TYLHER TROMBINI JESSICA WEBSTER JANAY WILLIAMS SELINA 12th grade ABBOTT CODY ABSHIRE MARIAN ADKISON MARY BASS CAITLIN BERT JESSICA BOSTIC CAITLINBROWN-NELSON DANIELLEBUCKRIDGE LACEY BURNS KENDALIN BURSE DANIEL CARTER CEDAR CASH CODY CLIFTON TYLER CMEHIL STEPHANIE COLLINS ALEXIS CRUM DILLION CURTIS COLIN DYCUS CARISSA FERGUSON MEAGAN FLETCHER AUSTIN GAVIN JAMALHonor Roll for the third nine weeks (contd)

PAGE 20

Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comGLAVEY SARA HANSEN JUSTIN HAWKINS JOSHUA HINSEY WILLIAM HODGES KRISTIE KELLY MARCUS LINTON STANLEY LOVETT JAMES MAUNEY HOPE MCCULLERS ALINA MCKENZIE SHANE METZLER BRIAN PANDOLFI NICOLE PARRISH SHELBY REGISTER JESSICA ROBERTS ASHLEY SHAPIRO KAIYA STAHR JOSHUA WALKER NICHOLAS WEAVER ALLISON WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL A Honor Roll Sixth grade ANDERSON THOMAS BAKER BEAU BARWICK MICHAELBISSONNETTE DESTYNEBOONE ZACHARY CALDWELL SAVANNAH CUSHARD NATHAN DAVIS ALLYSON DAVIS EBONE DIEHL RIAN DISMUKE JACOB FENNER GAGE FOX AIDAN GODWIN JAYLIN GOLDIN STEPHEN HAMEL CHRISTIAN HARVEY JESELLA HARVEY WYNTER JONES MEAGAN LLOYD SCOTT LOGAN CALEB MCFALLS SYDNEY MOODY YULIA PATEL RIDDHI PEEBLES DYLAN PFISTER TARYN POTTER MIRACLE RICHARDSON JILLIAN SELLERS KEARSTON SELLERS KENDRICK SHIRAH JASMINE SMITH REBECCA SULLIVAN JAMES TAFF ERA TAYLOR JOSHUA WALKER ANDREW WELLS LINDSEY WHEATCRAFT HANNAH WILLIAMS TAYLOR Seventh grade ATKINS DYLAN BUCKLAND VERONICA CREECH WALKER EVANS KATELIN GEHRKE MADELYN GRAY SHAWNA HALEY KAITLYN HARRIS DALLAS HOANG NHI HOGAN AUSTIN HOWARD DEZZALINE LAWHON JAREN MCKENZIE HANNAH METCALF MADISON OLDS EMONTE PARKER MITCHELL PRESTIA JULIANA REED JALECIA RHODES AVA RICHARDSON DANNA RIGDON HARLEYRODDENBERRY SAMUELTHOMAS WILLIAM UNSELL TIA WOODWARD KALYNN Eighth gradeANACAN-CARTER MARCBARNES NICHOLE CARRIER RILEY EDGE SCOTT EVANSHINE JACOB HALL KENNEDY KEITH CONNOR KELLY MAYA LANGSTON KACIE LEWIS CONSTANCE PICARD NICHOLAS ROBERTS BRIELLE RUDD KAYLA RUSSELL SARAH MARIE SARVIS MEGHAN STEVENS CALYN STEWART AISLINN A/B. Honor Roll Sixth grade ARMSTEAD TAIJAHRA ARNOLD ALEXANDRA BARWICK GRACIE BOYD GABRIELLE BRADLEY MADELINE BROWN RONALD BUCKLAND ALYSSA CARLTON HAYDEN CASEY JAMES COUNCIL MADISON CRADDUCK ZAKARY DAVIS SARAH DELBEATO TAYLOR DUNCAN HUNTER ENGLISH ELIZABETH FLEMING RUSSELL GALLOWAY ANTWAIN GOWDY WESLEY GREENE CEPHUS GREENE TYRONE GREGORY OSTIN HARRELL TRINITEE HEWETT THOMAS HODGES SERA HODGES TONIA JOHNSTON MASON JOLLY BRYCE KELLEY REBECCAKLEINPETER MACKENZIELILLARD JACOB LORD BRADLEY LOVEL MARGARET MCKNIGHT HEIDI MCMILLAN EMILY MCWHITE TRAVORIS MORRISON JEANIE NEVELS HUNTER NEWTON AMBER NICHOLS BRIANNA NICHOLS BROOKE PARKER KEONI PAYNE LAURA PICARD SAMUEL PITTS HANNAH PORTER DAVID POSEY ROYCE REED DAKOTA ROBERTS BEELER ROSIER JAMECIA RUSS BRAYDEN SCHMIDT BREEZE SHEFFIELD KAITLYN SIMS CALLIE SMITH ALEXANDRA SUMNER BAILEY TETTEY MIQUELATHOMAS CHRISTOPHERTILLMAN CODY TILLMAN OLIVIA TIMMONS TALYSSA VAZQUEZ MIGUEL WATSON DELLA WEEKS SHELBY WEST AMANDA WESTON SKYLAR WHALEY DONOVAN Seventh grade APPLEBY VIRGINIA ARNOLD TOBIAS AVILES JASMINE BENTLEY CASSANDRA BOYETT ASHTON BROWN ALLISON BULL HUNTER CARLSON LAURA CASEY CHRISTOPHER CLARK MORGAN COLLINS MEGAN CRUM ASHLYNN DARNELL AMANDA DEAN TRENTON FOGLEMAN ZACHARY GALLADAY KELSEY GOATES BREANNAHAMPTON CHRISTOPHERHUTTO ANDI INGRAM CAROLYN JOHNSTON ALLIE JOHNSTON DIXIE JONES CHEYENNE LANGSTON KALEB LAWHORN DALTON MARTIN LOCHLAN MASSEY EZRA MATHERS KEELY MCCALL DILLON MCCANN EMILY METCALF JOHN METCALF RUBY MILLERSHIP MADISEN MYERS JONATHAN PAUL ZHANE POPE RICHARD ROBISON ZACHARY SANDERS BOBBI SANDERS DALTON SANTANA AICKA STEVENS DYLAN STOKLEY ALYSSA SULLIVAN KYMBERLI TERRY MORGANTOMLINSON MICHAELATRICE AUBREY TUCKER TATUM WARBURTON ALLEN WISHART DESERA Eighth grade ALLEN BROOKE ANTILL WILLIAM BLACKWOOD COLTON BRAYMAN DEVIN BROWN ALEXIS BRYAN JACOB CLARK TAYLOR COOLEY LINDSEY CORNIELS JACOB DAVIS IAN DAWKINS JELISA DODSON ADAM DODSON CASEY DOYLE CASSIE EDWARDS SARAH ESKELUND MELANIE FOSS JAIDEN GASPERI JESSICA GRIFFIN LEON GUARINO EVANHARTSFIELD CHEYENNEHENDERSON NATALIE HOPE BRITTANY HUTTO JACOB INGRAM FAITH LAIRD ASHLEY LARSEN ZACHARY LAWHON TAYLOR LEE JOHN MCKNIGHT HANNAH MOODY ALISA NEAMAND SARA NEWSOME EMILY PAYNE MATT PIGOTT CHASON ROMANUS ANTHONYSCARBOROUGH CAITLINSMYTHE ALBERT ST. MARTIN MATTHEW SULLIVAN KATHERINE TAYLOR KAYLEE TEEGEN JOHN WHITFIELD CONNOR YATES BREANNA YOUNG BRANDON SHADEVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL E Honor Roll Kindergarten BOYKIN TYLER BRALEY MICAH BROCK SPENCER BROWN LAKIJAH CALLAGHAN SADIE DANIELS TRAVIS FRINGER HAYDEN GRAY JULIET HOSKINS ANDRISS HURLEY MICHAEL JOHNSON MARY JONES RYVERS KIESER ELLI KIRKLAND NOAH LAWRENCE KARLEE LI JOY METCALF MADDEN MORSE SARAH PEACOCK HAYDEN PERRY HALEY RODGERS EVA SHARP EMILY THORNE TAYLOR A Honor Roll First grade BROCK LAUREN BRUCE HALEY BUSHEE AUBREE CALLAGHAN JADEN CIERPIK ZACHARY DEASON FISHER DUBOIS AVA DUCHARME SHELBIE ESTES JACE FONDO EMILY FRUGGIERO CORTLYND HILL PEYTON KENNEDY CHASE LAMB DESTINY LAWHON SHELBY LEVERETT COURTNEY MONROE DEANDRE MOORE PHILIP OAKS MACKENZIE PEARSON EMILY PERRY ISABELLA PUCCI JACOB PUCCI NICHOLAS SEXTON RUBY SMITH LEANA TAYLOR LEGION THAXTON JAMESVAN DER MERWE DEHAHNWEBB LEVI WIEDEMAN JOSEPH Second grade ALBERT DEANA BARLAR RANDAL BENDECK BAILEE BROWN DEVONTE CHIPPS SARA DENSON ALAINA EDDY CHRISTINA FONDO JEWELL HAMMOND JACOB HARPER MOLLY HUG ALEXIA MARLOW CHRISLYNN PATTERSON XAVIER PEACOCK ANNAPIOTROWSKI SAMANTHAPRETTI EMMA RILEY MONICA RIPLEY LINKIN WOLF BLAKE Third gradeMARTINDALE MAKENNAMCDONALD SIANNA PATTERSON KAYLA VOYLES KAREN Fourth grade ALLBRITTON WILLIAM BRACCI ANALISE DAVIS JAYLEE HILL ZOIE LANGLEY TRENTEN LOURCEY ANDREW MCCORD MASON ROBERTS WILLIAM RUDD JAMES THOMPSON MICHAEL WIEDEMAN DANIEL Fifth gradeCALLAGHAN MAKENNACAUSSEAUX HAYDENCHRISTENSEN BRITTNEYFAGAN MORGAN HICKS OGAN HILL HUNTER HUG AARON HUGHES ABIGAIL JOSE GABRIAL LEDBETTER HARLEY LENK HAYDEN LOPEZ JULIANNANICHOLSON SHAWNTIAPARMER MAGNOLIA POOLE BRIANNA ROWLS DEMARCUS STEPHENS NOLYN VAN DER MERWE ALEX WHEELER SYDNEY ZACHRY CARMEN E/S Honor Roll KindergartenACOSTA-ROSE SAVANNABAGGETT KATELYN BODIE DAWSON BRINKLEY JANIA BROWN DESTINY CAQUIMBO ADLEIGH CARTER ADDISON CARTER SYDNE CHAMBERS SARA CHIPPS CAIDEN CLARK DAVID COLLINS JOHN CONLEY SARAHBETHCREATH-PAPESH ALYSSACRUTCHER MICHAEL DAVIS GABRIEL DOUGLAS ANNA EDDY JOSHUA EGLTON ANTONIO EVERSOLE JADEN FANT GARY FANT JUSTIN FINCH TAYLON FOWLER AIYANA GAVIN KIRSTEN GEIGER MICHAEL HALE IONA HALL PRESTON HAMLIN HALEY HATCHER MARKLON HAWTHORNE SHEMAR HENDERSON JAYLA HORGER ALEXA HUGHES JOHN JENNINGS NICHOLAS JOHNSON MARQUEZ JOINER JUSTIN JONES EVAN KENDRICK LYNLEY LALONDE HUNTER LAMB JACE LEON DEVIN LEONARD KACYN MATHIS DAMIAN MCCORD ANDREW MCCULLOUGH SCOTT MCDONALD MAHALA MELTON SHANEKA MILLENDER BROOKE MORSE KADEN MORSE ZACHARY PATTERSON CHAD PEARCE LILLIAN POLLOCK BROOKLYN PUNAUSUIA LYLA RAY LANDON REYNOLDS IAN ROBERTS DEVONTAE ROBERTSON RAVEN ROSS JAVON SADBERRY JOSEPH SALAS MICAH SASSER MEGHANN SEYMOUR JOSEPH SHARP WHITNEY SOULE ROBERT SPIVEY ALEESA STANDLEY BEAU STIBER LOGAN STREATER JOURDYN THOMAS ELICIA TIMMONS KARL WEBSTER JTERRIUS WEEKS JOSHUA WEEKS MEREDITH A/B Honor Roll First grade BEARD BETHANEY BREEDEN EMMA BROWN CONNOR BROWN TAYLOR CARNLINE EUGENE CARTER HEAVEN COOK SADIE COSHATT NATHAN COX CALE FULLWOOD EMILY GOODWIN LILY GRUBBS AUSTIN GRUBBS WAYLON GURR JACOB HARRELL TORI HARRIS JARED HARRISON CAMERON HERNANDEZ ALEX JACKSON TYTIONE KEMP JAYDEN MARTIN BRADLEY MATHIS HOLLIEMENDENHALL HEAVEN-LEIGHMERCER AVA MORSE JAMES MOSELEY PAYTON PAGE BENJAMIN PEO ANGEL POLOUS DALE REINKE BRIANA RILEY ANGEL RUDD JACOB SEYMOUR JAXON SMITH JACOB SMITH KAILEE SPENCE ABIAGAIL STALLING EMILY THOMAS AUBREY TIMMONS MAKINA TUTEN KEIRA VIGIL STEPHANIE WILLIAMS BRIANNA YOUNG CONNOR Second grade ADAMS KAYLA ALLEN CONNOR ALLEN SHAREE BECKMAN WILLIAM BISSONNETTE ZION BRATTAIN WILLIAM BROWN WILLIAM CARR ANTHONY CAUSSEAUX STEPHEN CHRISTOPHER AIDAN COLEMAN DYLAN CRAWFORD RYAN DEAN BREANNA DEROCHE DERRIN FRANKLIN NEHEMIAH GRIMES CAMRYN HARRIS KARSON HARTWEIN STEPHEN HICKS BRYCE HUBMANN CALINGTON KEEFER KYLER KILPATRICK BRIANNA LARUE PARRIS LAWRENCE KAYLIN LEBLANC EMILY MARIN ASHLEY MEYER ZAYDA NEEL CLAY NORDLOF ANNIKA OSBORN JOSHUA PAARLBERG CASEY PASCHAL AUSTIN PATTERSON RAYMOND POLLOCK JOSEPH PRETTI MADELINE RAKER WYATT REDFERN CONNOR SICKLES DAKOTA SILCOX TRISTAN SIMS TRINITY SPELL MADISON STEFFEN ALLISON TILLMAN TAYLOR TODD HANNAH VAUGHAN CHRISTALYN VAUSE REMIE WARD JESSE WILLIAMS MASON WILLIAMS TEANNA WILSON DEVON YOUNG ANSLEY Third grade ALTEMEIER STEVEN ANDERSON WILLIAM BAGGETT AUSTIN BILODEAU RIANNA BISHOP WALTERBLOODWORTH LILLIANABROWN EMILEE BURCH HALIE CHADWELL KELLY CHAMBERS DANIEL CLEMONS CAILEIGH COKER BELLAH COLE SIMON COLLINS CAROLINE DANNER JONVIAY DUBOIS COLE DYKES LOGAN GRAVES RAYMOND GRIFFIN MICHAEL HANES ALAURA HARRIS JARREN HERNANDEZ GEORGE HERNANDEZ IZABEL HICKEY EVREN JOHNSON LAUREN JONES KEIRA KILGORE PAUL LANGSTON KOLTEN LEAMON VICTOR LEE KAYLA MERCER SHERIDAN PAGE DANIEL PAUGH GARRETT PILGRIM ALEXANDER POLOUS RAYMOND REVELS SYDNEY ROBINSON MIKIYA SANFORD KAYLA SHARP LIAM SICKLES JAYLA SMITH OAKLEY SPENCE MICAIAH THAXTON LORA WATSON KYLE WILLIAMS TERRELL Fourth grade ALVAREZ SHYTIRA BECKMAN EMMABISSONNETTE CHEYENNEBROOKSHIRE CASSANDRA CARNLINE MICHAEL CASTILLO DANIEL CHANCELLOR ALIVIA CLARK WILLIAM COOK JOSHUA FLOYD KYLE GOUDE BRIANNA HARRELL LEVI HART TREVOR HOWARD MADISON HUGHES TREMAINE HUNT AUSTIN JENSEN CHRISTOPHER JOINER SHELBY KELLY ASHELY LEBLANC ALLYSON LORENZINI DESTINY MAJORS REANNAH MALIK IRENE MCIVER DYLAN METCALF MARGARET OWEN MATTHEW PADGETT SUMMER REVELS CHRISTOPHERRICHARDSON ELIZABETHSALAS MADISON SASSER SETH SIZEMORE EMMA SMITH DAISY STONE TAYLOR STRICKLAND MADISON TABB COLBY TULLY LOGAN VICE ABIGAIL WALKER IAN WEEKLEY BREEANNA WILLIAMS NOAH WILLIAMS SARAH Fifth grade ALLBRITTON JACKSON ALLEN DYLAN BERUBE HUNTER BLAKE ELISHA BLASDEL JASMINE BOOKOUT MEGHANN BUSEN HUNTER BUSSEY CAYLIE CARPENTER REBECCA COKER COLBY DAVIS CLYDE DEAN NATHAN DEROCHE DEVIN GLOVER CODY GRAY TARA GREENE JAKE HAMILTON ISAAC HARPER CALEB HARRELL HUNTER HATCH VICTORIA HILLMON TORI HOSTETTER ABBY HUGHES AERIAL HUNTER BRANDON HUNTER CAITLYN KELLOGG KAYLEIGH LEWIS HUNTER MAXWELL NYJA MCKOWN NATHAN MEYER DALLAS MORSE KYAH MURRAY MALIK PERRY SHAWN PILGRIM DESTANI PULLEY CAROL REDFERN HUNTER ROSIER CHEYANNA SHIRAH EMILY SMITH LAUREN TUMBLESON CHARITY WINFIELD CHACE ZDRAZIL DANIELHonor Roll for the third nine weeks (contd) Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Piney Grove Preserve located in Virginia.

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 7B

PAGE 22

Don’t let fees stop you. If tuition assistance is needed, call 926 3526 for an application which will be reviewed by a select few Coalition leaders to determine eligibility. Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBefore and After School Summer Program Arts, crafts, eld trips, "Gulf World," swimming, movies, bowling, skating, and so much more! Age: Pre-K through 5th grade June 4 August 10 Monday through Friday 6:30 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Children meet daily at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Debbie 926-7145 ext. 222; Pat 926-7145 ext. 230 $125/week or $25/day plus activity fees. Drop-ins welcome. Camp Catch-A-Dream Horseback riding Lessons [regular & therapeutic] plus trail rides. Will learn basic horse-manship skills, balance, following directions, working through fears, & con dence building. Age: Starting at age 7 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy $35 per Lesson or per hour, Scholarships may be available through WCCY, Camp Catch-A-Dream Anger Management & Family functioning Classes Will learn responsibility, respect and a better way to communicate. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505, 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy $15 per 1.5 hr session 10 sessions, Family rates upon request, Scholarships may be available through WCCY. Camp Catch-A-Dream Equine Assisted Growth & Learning Will learn responsibility, respect and communication skills. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp 962-9999, 778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy Rates for groups or individuals, Scholarships may be available through WCCY Camp Indian Springs, Capital Region YMCA, Traditional day / overnight summer camp programs where we encourage kids to build friendships face to face, get outdoors and appreciate our natural surroundings while learn good decision making skills based on the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility., All one week sessions. Age: Overnight Camp: 8 16; Day Camp: 5 12 Sessions start June 3 and run through August 4. Jim Bentley jbentley@capitalregionymca.org or www. campindiansprings.org 926-3361; fax: 926-3624 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville Overnight Camp: $480 per week Day Camp: $140 per week, Scholarships available. Gamerz Paradise Sign up for our Summer Camp! Video games, pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment. Age: 5 and up Daily, weekly and monthly rates available. Call 850-926-9100 theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com Gamerz Paradise, 635 Wakulla Arran Rd., Crawfordville Gena Davis, Instructor Swimming lessons. Day or evening classes. Beginning end of May offering sessions throughout the summer. All ages. 926-7685 or 510-2326. Happytime Instructional Daycare Center Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs SUMMER CHILDCARE Includes a wide variety of eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children. We enjoy skating, swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Locally Owned and Operated by Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available. Call today for our very affordable pricing 926-5226 Crawfordville Hwy. North International Gold Gymnastics IGG A fun- lled themed week full of gymnastics, eld trips, crafts, movies, games, indoor and outdoor play. Lunch to be brought from home. Snacks are provided. Age: 5 12 Hours : 7am-6pm, Carol McAliley or Stephanie Burton at 926-4431 Email: go-iggc@hotmail.com, 54 Feli Way, Crawfordville Weekly rates: full day campers $145; half day campers $75; drop in campers $35/day, 10% discount for second child. Providence Christian Academy Individualized instruction in algebra, geometry, physical science, chemistry, physics, trigonometry, calculus, Spanish, and phonics courses. Grades K 12 Call today to schedule an appointment. 926-2456; 926-1326; 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville Ribits ARTtastic Summer Camp Adventure 2012 ART and FUN Pottery (clay between their ngers), Ceramics: sponge, splatter, bubble, toothbrush, brushes, yarn, stamps, stickers and other painting techniques, add mixed media and a few surprises, makes Ribits the best camp for the kids this summer. Ages: 5 and up June 4-8 11-15, 25-29, July 9-13, 16-20, 30-August 3, August 6-10 Time: 8:30 5:30 (early drop off and late pick upon request) 9:00 2pm ($175 for the half day) Cost: $225 for full day; $175 for half day Deposit: $100 Daily snacks included and lunch (Pizza) on Friday. Savary Academy Summer program to make up a class or recover credits for graduation. Grades 7 12 Ongoing Classes on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 9 a.m. 3 p.m. 926-9977 www.savaryacademy.com Savary Academy, 70-A Feli Way, Crawfordville, FL The Learning Curve SUMMER LEARNING CAMPS (For Students Entering) K 1st: ABCs and 123s; 1st 3rd: It All Adds Up (Addition/Subtraction Skills); 3rd 5th: Multiply Your Fun (Multiplication/Division Skills); 3rd 5th: Fun with Fractions; 4th 6th: Writing Right (Improving Writing Skills); 6th-7th: Solution Skills (Middle School Math Skills); 6th 8th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful Middle School Student); Grades 1 5 JUMP START (Individual grade level intro to next year); Grades: 1-3; 4-6; 7-8 Let's Speak Spanish (Conversational Spanish); 9th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful High School Student); 8th 9th: Intro to Algebra 1; 9th 10th: Intro to Geometry; Writing the AP History Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Writing the AP English Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Intro to AP Stats (Mastering the Graphing Calculator); GET ME TO COLLEGE WORKSHOPS (What Every Parent and Student Should Know about College Admissions and Financial Aid) 9TH 11TH 12TH FOR PARENTS: How do I do this New Math? (Instruction for parents to aid their children with next year's homework; classes for speci c grade levels) Call Melisa Taylor to Register at 926-2179 or visit www. tlctutoring.wordpress.com for summer schedules and pricing. The Learning Curve, 3119-B Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Tiger Rock Martial Arts Elite Martial Arts training Our youth will enhance their life skills and receive coaching that keeps them focused on goal setting, self-discipline and con dence. Sign your child up today! The focus is rewarding. The energy is radiating. All ages. 926-3777 www.crawfordvilletkd.com www.tigerrockmartialarts.com Crawfordville Tae Kwon Do 27 Azalea Drive, Suite A & B Crawfordville (Behind CVS) 5 Weeks of training for only $99 Wakulla Christian SchoolAcademic and Personal Enrichment Camp Activities include computers, cooking, dance, foreign language, martial arts, archery, piano, violin, guitar, music, photography, sports, woodworking, robotics, arts and crafts, gardening, special guests, eld trips and more. Ongoing Age: 3 14 Monday Friday 7 a.m. 6 p.m. Call 926-5583 or email wakullachristian@yahoo.comSUMMER OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH It’s time to relax and have some needed downtime. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is proud to sponsor this Summer OP PS section. Recognizing that young people seek to nd their place in the wider world through many ways and means, the community hopes the following Summer OPPS hit the intended mark with many Wakulla youth. Positive youth development refers to activities and programs that nurture young people and help them build on their strength s. Positive youth development is not about xing kids’ problems. Rather, it helps young people nd positive things to say yes to. Positive youth development happens anytime an individual or a program teaches young people skills, connects adults and young people in a meaningful way, involves young people in the life of the community, and gives them a sense of belonging and accomplishment. In Wakulla there are many places that young people can nd this kind of nurturing. Wakulla has its own unique network of people, groups, churches, clubs, teachers, businesses, and agencies that help young people grow into competent adult s. The nurturers might be piano teachers, soccer coaches, neighbors, Big Brother and Sisters, YMCA, church youth group leaders or grandparents… this seci on of the paper is intended to help you decide how to spend a bit of your time this summer.All Summer LongJune 4 June 8 Wakulla County 4-H Bachelor/Bachelorette Camp Attend this day camp and learn about budgeting, nancial management, how to take care of a baby, food preparation skills and clothing care. Hands-on learning experiences will be incorporated throughout. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 5 8 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 11 June 15 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology(Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5)Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Camp Cherry Lake This year camp will feature traditional activities including swimming, canoeing, kayaking, camp crafts, camp re, water games and archery. Not to be missed are the ever-popular marshmallow paint wars and dance! Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 11 15 (residential), Camp Cherry Lake, Madison, FL Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce 926-3931 $220.00 per week June 18 June 22 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Michelle Snow School of Music Summer Vocal Workshop In this camp, young people will learn the basics of producing and performing in a vocal production with choreography. Participants will get musical education as well as the opportunity to participate in all aspects of a small musical production. (Limited openings) June 18-22. Performance evening of Friday, June 22. 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Michelle Snow (850)926-7627 Jmcsnow5649@centurylink. net, 3102 Coastal Highway, Medart $125/week per child Wakulla County 4-H Project Runway Wakulla Participants will learn to put the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Repair philosophy into practice as they "re-build" a piece of clothing that has been overlooked in the closet or has been purchased from a re-use store. Participants will unleash their creativity as they re-create a clothing item of their choice through this artistic expression class. Boys and Girls are both encouraged to attend. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 19 22 (Tues Fri) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 25 June 29 Wakulla County 4-H Sew Fun and Quilting Campers will learn the basics of sewing, quilting and other fabric crafts such as pin making, weaving and other needlecrafts. The diligent camper will be able to complete a lap-sized quilt and one simple item of clothing by the end of the week. June 26 29 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $80.00/weekJuneMay 12 Wakulla Health Care Task Force Free Sports Physicals, Free physical examinations for student athletes, summer campers, and Special Olympians, Middle and high school students 9am 1 pm Students from WMS 9 a.m.; RMS 10 a.m.; WHS 11 a.m. Free Tallahassee Memorial Family Medicine Of ce 15 Council Moore Road (off Crawfordville Hwy south of the courthouse) Tanya English 926-0065 X 253 Tanya.English@wcsb.us or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com WORKFORCE plus Get Connected, Stay Connected 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo Are you 16 -21 and ready to take the next step in your journey? Perhaps you are interested in a nding a job. Do you want to know more about joining the military or going to college? Maybe you would like to know more about the resources available in Wakulla County. Whatever your needs may be, make plans today to attend the WORKFORCE plus "Get Connected, Stay Connected" 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo and meet employers (who are hiring!), college and military recruiters and local community representatives. 11:00 am 1:00 pm TCC Wakulla Center 5 Crescent Way Crawfordville, FloridaMayMay 19 Wakulla County Sheriff's Of ce Fishing tournament Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 Wakulla County Coalition for Youth

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 9B (850) 926-3777 www. crawfordvilletkd .com www.tigerrockmartialarts.com ELITE MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING 5 Weeks of Training FIVE$99.00 WEEKS To be the best,We TRAIN with the best! Join Tiger-Rock Martial Arts. Every Revolution Starts With Evolution. Need to make up a class or recover credits for graduation? Make Your Summer Count! You DO NOT need to be enrolled in Savary Academy during the regular school year to take advantage of the Summer Program.Wakulla County students now have a choice … But space is limited and the deadline for enrollment is approaching quickly.Classes on Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday from 9am-3pm Grades 7-12Let us help you focus on the future today! www.savaryacademy.com “Jet Cadets... ying high for Christ!”Providence Christian AcademyAMinistry of Central Baptist ChurchGrades K-12 Enroll Today!Call today to schedule an appointment.(850) 926-2456, 926-1326, or 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327Providence Christian Academy grades K-12 with small pupil-to-staff ratio fully-funded scholarships July 9 July 13 Mission San Luis A Child’s Life (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Imagine you were born 350 years ago. What was life like for the young residents of the mission? Learn to dress, play, and live like a colonist through role-playing, studying site artifacts, and using period toys and games. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 8 – 11 (older students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 16 July 20 Mission San Luis New World Apprentice (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Join our bustling village as a living history interpreter and participate in a variety of apprenticeships. Enlist as a soldier, blacksmith, potter, and more! All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Survival 101: Cooking, Camping and Water Exploration Campers will learn how to shoot a bow and arrow, track game, build a camp re and cook a meal using a solar oven. We will learn how to nd safe drinking water as well as camp out overnight. Campers will also have the ability to sh and learn about the heritage of survival in Wakulla County throughout the years. (Tuesday – Friday) 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week July 23 July 27 Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 22 – 25 (younger students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla, Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 29 – August 3 Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Sheriff’s Youth Ranch Activities will include arts and crafts, sports, water safety, archery, nature hikes, bicycling, games, camp re activities and more. Applications available at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Deadline is May 31 Sponsorships FREE. 6 boys, 6 girls child age 10 -15, Caruth Camp in Levy County. Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 July 30 August 3 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. SwimmingGena DavisRed Cross Certi“ed teacher for over 20 years926-7685 510-2326 Private Pool All Ages-Day or Evening Classes -Starts End of May Sessions through Summer -Sessions are 2 weeks $50 per Person -Private Pool All AgesLesson’s Instructor: Resident Camp: 8-16 • Day Camp 5-12Resident Camp begins on June 3, We offer 9-one week sessions starting on Sunday at 2pm and ending on Saturday at 9am Day Camp begins on June 4th, We offer 11 one week sessions. Each day begins at 8 am with an early drop off option of 7am and the day ends at 5pm with a late pick up option until 6pm. Resident Camp Fees: Y Member $408 per session Non-Member $480 per session a Camp Fees: Y member $123, Non-Member $140 Camp Indian Springs encourages building relationships face to face, teaching kids to make good decisions and getting outside to enjoy a healthier lifestyle in our beautiful natural setting of Wakulla County. The YMCA promotes the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility in all of its traditional camp activities like canoeing, archery, nature survival, sports and our non-traditional activities likefilm making, horseback riding, low ropes challenge course and our skatepark. If you have any questions please contact our Camp Registrar, 850-926-3361 or camp@capitalregionymca.org. You can also contact the Camp Director Jim Bentley atjbentley@capitalregionymca.org. theTMYMCA JulyAugust 6 August 10 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm.August Team Wakulla Wrestling ClubPRESENTSElementary / Middle Wrestling CampHigh / Middle School Wrestling Camp June 4th through 7th at RMS Gym $150Instruction by Darton College Head Coach Mike Miller REGUL AR CLUBPRA C TIC E(open to ever yone 4 years an d old er)Tuesdays and Thursd ays 5:30p m-7:0 0pm June 11th through 15th at RMS Gym A Free Press Your Key To Freedom

PAGE 24

Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHow to choose the right summer campSpecial to The NewsAttending summer camp has been a tradition in the United States for more than 150 years. Statistics indicate that around 30 million American kids attend summer camp each year. There are many bene“ ts to summer camp. Camp enables children to stay engaged during the summer when there may be limited interaction with school friends. It also gives parents both a safe and viable daycare solution during the summer. Summer camp pulls together children from different neighborhoods, social classes and backgrounds, which can make it a good place to meet new people … some of whom may become lifelong friends. Camps also provide a variety of activities that can challenge children to try new things that go beyond their comfort zones. Some children are very receptive to the idea of attending summer camp. Others need a little coaxing. But summer camp should never be forced on a child who does not want to go. In such instances, consider local daytime programs that may “ ll the void instead of programs that require being away from home. Once the decision for summer camp is made, there are some questions to answer. € What are your “ nances like? Do you have a budget for summer camp? € What size camp do you desire? € Should the camp be co-ed or single sex? € How far do you want your child to travel for summer camp? What are the options in your area? € Are there any camps that have been recommended by friends or family members? € What kinds of activities do your children enjoy? These types of questions will help you narrow down your options. Then you can visit and interview camps to find one that is the best “ t. When visiting camps, go armed with a checklist of questions. Some of these can include: € What is the philosophy of the camp? € Can you explain a typical day? € What are the types of activities and facilities offered? € What is the camper-tocounselor ratio? € What is the camps drug/alcohol policy? € Does the camp have insurance and security personnel? € What percentage of staff return each year? How are staff selected and trained? € What kind of health care is provided? € Can you tell me about the policy on phone calls and family visits? € What do you do in the event of emergencies? Dont wait too long to research and sign up for camps because many fill up quite early or have an extensive waiting list. Summer camp is a fun way that millions of children spend their summers each year. Special to The NewsNot every family can afford summer camp or chooses to have their children attend. But faced with two long months of vacation from school, what options are there for keeping children occupied during the lazy days of summer? A top-run, private, sleepaway camp can cost around $10,000 for the season. In todays tight economic climate, many families are choosing to scale back expenses, and that includes pricey summer camp. However, just because cost is a factor, it doesnt mean that children cant attend camp this season. Parents simply need to do their research or come up with other creative alternatives. First, investigate the opportunities in your area. Summer camp doesnt have to mean eight weeks of recreation in the middle of the wilderness. There may be locally run businesses that also offer summer programs. Some alternatives to summer campCamp for your kids could be as simple as neighborhood parents rotating supervision of vacationing children. ActivitiesInclude: Computers,Cooking,Dance, ForeignLanguage,MartialArts, Archery,Piano,Violin,Guitar, Music,Photography,Sports, Woodworking,Robotics,Arts& Crafts,Gardening,Special Guests,FieldTripsandMore! WakullaChristianSchool 1391CrawfordvilleHwy,Crawfordville,FL32327 1mile southofS.R.267(BloxhamCutoff) wakullachristian@yahoo.comMonday-Friday 7:00am to 6:00pm Ages3 thru 14 June 4 -August 10, 2012 facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fi MON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!SIGN UP NOW FOR OUR SUMMER CAMP!Video games, Pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment SUMMER CHILDCAREIncludes a wide variety of “eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children We enjoy skating, Swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Call today for our very affordable pricing. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available.HAPPY TIMEInstructional Child Care CenterEstablished 1983HAPPY TIMELocally Owned and Operated By Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs 926-5226CRAWFORDVILLEHWY.NORTH The Wakulla Before and A er School Summer ProgramPre-K 5th gradeAS AS PS SMovies • Bowling • Ska ng and So Much More!P A A June 4 August 10 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. $125 / week or $25 / dayPlus Acty ees.hldren meet at he akulla ounty Senor ens enter For the Summer ~ Drop-Ins Welcomeo resere a spot please contact amp oordn ators ee 26-145 et. 222 or Pat 26145 et.230 LIMITED SPACESAVAILABLE!Join us June 1st through August 10th for a summer full of Fun!! 850-962-1033 Kamp ENROLL TODAY!

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 11B Jokes and Riddles A: The roller ghoster!Q: What’s a ghost’s favorite carnival ride? Q: How do you make a hamburger stand smile?A: Pickle it gently! COLORING PICTURE Carnivals have loads of tasty food to try. Fill in the blanks to name some of the foods found at a carnival.Answers: 1) Corndogs, 2) Funnel Cakes, 3) Popcorn, 4) Lemon Shakeups, 5) Cotton Candy, 6) Snow Cones, 7) Brats Name That Food Name That Food 1 C O __ N D __ G __2 F U __ N N E L C A __ E S3 __ O __ C O R __4 L E __ O N S __ A __ E U P S5 C O __ __ O N C A __ D Y6 S __ O W __ O N E S7 B R __ T __ List 10 words that rhyme with “fun.” 1. ____________ 2. _____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ____________ 6. ____________ 7. ____________ 8. ____________ 9. ___________ 10. ___________What Rhymes with…Some answers: bun, done, gun, none, pun, run, shun, stun, sun, ton 1) The Tilt-a-Whirl makes some riders dizzy. Fact or Fiction? 2) The Zipper moves up and down like a roller coaster. Fact or Fiction? 3) The Scrambler makes riders feel like they are going to crash into each other. Fact or Fiction? 4) The Octopus may also be called the Spider. Fact or Fiction? 5) It can be hard to find your way out of the Farmhouse with its funny mirrors and stuff. Fact or Fiction? 6) The carousel is filled with large wooden fish that move up and down on poles for kids to ride on. Fact or Fiction? 7) Another name for the bumper cars is the dodgem cars. Fact or Fiction? 8) The Wave Swinger takes riders high into the air. Fact or Fiction? 9) The Fun Slide is much smaller than a regular slide. Fact or Fiction? 10) The Rock-O-Plane is like the Ferris wheel but with seats in cages. Fact or Fiction?Carnival Ride Carnivals have many rides from Ferris wheels to roller coasters. Here are some questions about carnival rides. How many can you answer correctly?Answers: 1) Fact, 2) False, the Zipper spins round and round, 3) Fact, 4) Fact, 5) Fiction, the Funhouse, not the Farmhouse, can be hard to find your way out of, 6) Fiction, most carousels have animals other than fish, 7) Fact, 8) Fact, 9) Fiction, the Fun Slide is much bigger, 10) Fact Fact or Fiction? C h a ll e n g e This page sponsored in part by: Unlike amusement parks, carnivals come and go. The rides, the food stands, the games—all are made so they can be set up and taken down quickly. Carnivals started after the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893. Otto Schmitt had been a showman at the fair and decided to hire some of the acts for his own carnival touring company. Schmitt’s carnival was a lot of fun, but he didn’t manage his money well and his company soon went out of business. Some of the people from Schmitt’s company decided to put on their own carnivals, and by 1937, there were over 300 carnivals touring around the country. Today, carnivals continue, with tours in the North during the summer and tours in the South during the winter. From Town to Town

PAGE 26

Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 27 … Gov. Rick Scott and the courts took center stage this week, as the chief executive vetoed a controversial tuition bill while judges struck down a state-employee drug testing plan and approved Senate redistricting maps and a possible expansion of slot machines. The actions came as Scott approved another ” urry of bills, including measures dealing with youth athletes, disabled parking, recycled metals and water storage, as well as a slew of local bills affecting different parts of the state. SCOTT VETOES TUITION CARTE BLANCHE Ending weeks of speculation, Scott drove a spike into efforts by the University of Florida and Florida State University to leapfrog a legislative cap on tuition increases in an effort, university of“ cials pledged, to join the ranks of the nations top public colleges. Instead, Scott said that the states pre-eminent research universities need to “ rst do their homework and provide a systemic, methodical work plan before hell give the authority to raise tuition above a 15 percent cap. While this decision has not been easy, I do not feel that I can sign this bill into law without a more detailed plan to ensure the increased tuition requirements on Florida students will provide the return they and other Floridians need on their additional investment,Ž Scott wrote in a letter announcing the veto of HB 7129. While the measure would have initially allowed only UF and FSU to offer plans for raising tuition beyond the 15 percent annual increase allowed by state law, eventually any institution that met 11 of 14 standards enumerated in the law could submit proposals to do so. The Board of Governors would still have to approve the plans. University officials expressed frustration with the decision, especially at a time when state funds for higher education have been dwindling and Florida students continue to pay some of the lowest tuition rates in the country. HIGH COURT APPROVES SENATE MAPS AND UPHOLDS SLOTS The second time was the charm for Republicanled efforts to redraw political boundaries for the 40-member state Senate, as the Florida Supreme Court upheld a second draft of new maps over the objections of two justices who said the proposal, in one instance, dilutes the clout of black voters. The courts ruling removes the chance that justices would draw the map themselves as part of the states once-a-decade redistricting process. Earlier this year, the court struck down the “ rst attempt to draw Senate lines but allowed the House map to stand. Three justices who helped form the 5-2 majority scrapping the first Senate plan -Justices Barbara Pariente, R. Fred Lewis and Jorge Labarga -fully supported the latest decision. Chief Justice Charles Canady and Justice Ricky Polston, who approved of the earlier Senate version, supported the majority in result only. In a partial dissent, Justices James E.C. Perry and Peggy Quince, the courts two black members, criticized their colleagues for allowing Northeast Florida districts to stand while splitting in two a largely black area of Daytona Beach. This ruling sends a signal that it is permissible under the provisions of our constitution to divide and conquer a racial or language minority group before they are able to reach a majority voting bloc,Ž Perry wrote in an opinion joined by Quince. There are still hurdles. Portions of maps for the House, Senate and the states congressional delegation still have to be approved by the U.S. Justice Department under the Voting Rights Act because of a history of racial or language discrimination in “ ve Florida counties. The maps could also be challenged in court under the Voting Rights Act, something Cuban-American lawmakers have suggested is likely because of the lack of a fourth strongly Hispanic Senate district in Miami-Dade County. SLOTS In another ruling Friday, the high court upheld a lower-court ruling that says lawmakers can allow slot machines at pari-mutuel facilities in various parts of the state. Justices declined to take up a challenge to a 1st District Court of Appeal ruling that stems from a plan by Hialeah Park horse track in Miami-Dade County to add potentially lucrative slot machines. But the lower-court ruling has rami“ cations across the state. Voters in Gadsden, Washington and Hamilton counties in recent months have approved referendums to allow slot machines. Attorney General Pam Bondi has issued an opinion arguing the referendums are not legitimate. DRUG TEST GETS FEDERAL SNUB A Miami federal judge ruled this week that random drug testing for tens of thousands of state workers is unconstitutional, a blow to Gov. Rick Scott who has called the process a common senseŽ approach to addressing drug use in the workplace. The ink had barely dried on U.S. District Judge Ursula Ungaros ruling when the governor announced he would appeal to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. ŽAs I have repeatedly explained, I believe that drug testing state employees is a common-sense means of ensuring a safe, ef“ cient and productive workforce, Scott said in a statement. That is why so many private employers drug test and why the public and Floridas taxpayers overwhelmingly support this policy.Ž Scott issued the executive order last year to require drug testing at agencies under his control. But the order was placed on hold because of a legal challenge “ led by the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. Ungaros 37-page ruling found that Scotts order violates the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects against unreasonable searches. The judge also wrote that Scott did not justify a need for the tests. CITIZENS BOARD DELAYS RATE HIKE CHAT A proposal to raise rates for future Citizens Property Insurance Corp policyholders was shot down this week by the companys board of governors, which decided instead to take a step back and explore options to depopulate the state-backed insurer without causing too much pain. The board is in the untenable position of being required by law to bolster the financial stability of the fund, which now holds nearly 1.5 million policies for some of the riskiest properties in the states, while not raising the ire of powerful political groups and coastal lawmakers who count many Citizens customers as constituents. Following debate and public testimony, Citizens board of governors, meeting in Tampa, directed staff to work up a package of proposed rates for 2013 that includes allowing the statebacked insurer to charge new customer premiums that more closely meet actuarially sound rates. The board had initially been slated to vote on a proposal to allow the company after Jan. 1 to charge rates for new customers that were more than 10 percent higher than existing rates in some cases. Under whatever scenario the company moves forward, existing policyholders will continue to be protected by a 10 percent cap on annual premium increases. CIRCUIT JUDGE SIDES WITH ONLINE TRAVEL COMPANIES Backers of online-travel companies declared victory this week after Leon Circuit Judge James Shelfer sided with the industry in a long-running legal battle about whether companies such as Expedia and Orbitz owe disputed county hotel taxes. In a much watched case in travel circles, Shelfer found the online-travel companies were not obligated to collect and pass along the money. The case is over,  said Orbitz lead attorney Beth Herrington, who argued on behalf of the industry. The core question in the case comes down to this: Should county tourist-development taxes apply to the total cost of a customers bill when booking through an online-travel company? Or only to the portion that goes for the room rental? The industry and its supporters argue that trying to impose the tax on online-travel company fees would amount to a services tax, which is not allowed in Florida. But counties say the tax should apply to the total price that travelers pay for rooms and that the onlinetravel companies are involved in renting rooms. The counties that have been involved in the lawsuit are Alachua, Charlotte, Escambia, Flagler, Hillsborough, Lee, Leon, Manatee, Nassau, Okaloosa, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, St. Johns, Seminole, Wakulla and Walton. They plan to appeal. STORY OF THE WEEK: The Florida Supreme Court upholds the state Senate seats. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Florida leaders appear to have a hard time understanding that the government cant search people just because a politician thinks it will be popular.Ž … Howard Simon, executive director of ACLU of Florida, on a federal judges ruling striking Floridas employee drug testing program.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Courts exed, drug tests hexed At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary..........36 classrooms/newspapers.........$576/yr Medart Elementary...................33 classrooms/newspapers.........$528/yr Riversink Elementary................20 classrooms/newspapers.........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary..............40 classrooms/newspapers.........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School........10 classrooms/newspapers.........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name_________________________________ Address_______________________________ City_______________________State____Zip_________ Phone______________Email_______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ

PAGE 27

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 13B Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA FROM HOME 6-8 weeks. Accredited. Get a Diploma. Get a Job! FREE Brochure. 800-264-8330 Benjamin Franklin High School. www.dipolmafr om home.com Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)742-1373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay 2Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com General Help Potential to Generate $4000. to $20,000. or more a month with this activity No selling. Experience financial & time freedom. Call 352-445-1385 Financial Fr eedomW ay.info. Wakulla County Transportation is looking to hire a driverwith a valid drivers license and a good driving record. Requirements are to pass DOT physical, finger printing with back ground check, drug test. Salary and hours will be discussed and you must be flexible to the hours and days Apply at the Wakulla County Senior Center 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 and ask for Nell Rozar or Call (850) 926-7145 Ext 2 General Help WANTEDLOVING, DEPENDABLETEACHER6:30am to 9:30am & 3:30pm to 6:30pm please send resume Attn: Teacher position busybeelearning 32327@yahoo.com Part-time Help P AR T TIME PERSON W/COMPUTER & WORD PROCESSING SKILLS IN MED AR T salary negotiable please call (850)570-5712 or (850)926-3808 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline .com Can You Dig It?We will train, certify and provide lifetime assistant landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator 866-362-6497 Business Opportunities PERSON TO WORK AND POSSIBL Y INVEST as part owner in start-up Kayak, Canoe, Paddleboard, dealership and eco-tourism business in Crawfordville area pls call (850)570-5712 or (850) 926-3808 Garage/ Yard Sales CrawfordvilleSat, May 5, 8am to 1pm Hshld items, childrens clothes, dinnerware, chairs, lots more 711 Spring CreekHwy CRAWFORDVILLESat. May 5th 8a-3p Multi-Family Sale Furniture, clothing, toys, prom dresses and Much More! 42 &140 Jean Drive Near Wakulla Middle School PanaceaThur Fri Sat 9a-4p tools, househlod furniture clothes & more! 280 Tower RD (850) 528-3335 Mobile Homes For Rent CONVENIENT LOCATION3/2 large corner lot wooded buffer, porches, CHA, appls include washer & dryer $700/mo+ security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 dwmh, $750 + SEC. on Happy Time Dr. (850) 591-3600 CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA on 5 acres (48 Willie Jenkins Rd.), NE Wakulla County. $800/month. Call 850-510-6200. CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $675 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-524-4090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the water with dock. Light and bright furnished or not. $950 + utilities 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $800, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 443-3300 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 926-3832 CRAWFORDVILLESmall 2/1,$ $600 /mo+ $500 dep. minimum 6 months lease, no pets applications/ refers required (850) 524-3164 Waterfront Rentals UNFURNISHED FOR RENT OR SALE at beautiful Shell Point Beach, 1 bdrm, 1 ba Waterfront Home, Lg Great Room w/fireplace, screen porch, sunset view over water, $700 pr mnth. pls call (850)570-5712 or (850) 926-3808 Vacation Rentals ALLIGATOR POINT2/Bedroom, 2/Bath 1,200 sf, Gulf Front, Vacation Rental 3 blks to white sandy beach, 75ft. to Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful Sunsets $1,000. Wk. (904)687-3397 Real Estate For Sale MUST SELL!Cozy brick home over half acre. Inside Capital Circle, 319 South. Moving and leaving all appliances and lots of furniture. Call (850) 459-5902. Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 5201-0503 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant toSection 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of : Hunter-Turner Arts & Entertainment located at 37 Summerwind Cir W, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in the County of Wakulla intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 24th day of April, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices Amelia Rose, owner May 3, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5202-0503 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned,desiring to engage in business under the ficititious name of: Cave Connections located at 2017 Bloxhom Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, Florida 32327 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 24th day of April 2012. /s/ Steve Cushman, owner Fictitious Name Notices May 3, 2012 5205-0503 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Ficititious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Tony Chandler Tile located at 819 Rehinkel Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 26th day of April, 2012. /s/ Anthony J. Chandler, owner May 3, 2012 5206-0510 TWN Vs. Johnson Lawrence E, Case No. 65-2009-CA-000394 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000394 GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. LAWRENCE E.. JOHNSON A/K/A LAWRENCE EDWARD JOHNSON, et al Defendants RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion To Cancel And Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated April 19, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65 2009 CA 000394 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, is Plaintiff, andLAWRENCE E.. JOHNSON,A/K/A LAWRENCE EDWARD JOHNSON, et al are Defendants, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 7th day of JUNE, 2012, the folForeclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices A-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you”LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 0538 87408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONSRE-ROOFINGREPAIRSRESIDENTIALCOMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFINGCO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403 HURLEY’S ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF • RE-ROOFING • SHINGLES • METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES MAY DAYS BIG YARD SALE! MAY 4 &NO EARL Y BIRDSNO EARL Y BIRDS

PAGE 28

Page 14B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com lowing described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 7, BLOCK B, WAKULLA FOREST, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 54, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER WITH 1998HOMES OF LEGEND DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME VIN# THL2407AAL AND THL 2407BAL. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 24th day of April, 2012. PHELAN HALLINAN PLC,888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By:/s/Drew T. Melville, Esq,Attorney for Plaintiff Owei Z. Belleh, Esq., Florida Bar No. 617598 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 Joshua I. Goldman, Esq., Florida Bar No. 689361 Drew T. Melville, Esq., Florida Bar No. 34986 Annabella Barboza, Esq., Florida Bar No. 040627 Hope Touchton, Esq., Florida Bar No. 60043 Susan Falardeau, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0059948 Bradford Willard, Esq., Florida Bar No. 62827 David A. Cramer, Esq., Florida Bar No. 64780 Jonathan L. Blackmore, Esq., Florida Bar No. 67902 Joy Kohl, Esq., Florida Bar No. 69406 Erik DeLEtoile, Esq., Florida Bar No. 71675 Betzy Falgas, Esq., Florida Bar No. 76882 Aaron Hines, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81690 Jherna A. Shahani, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81994 Jenine R. Davey, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0089325 Ashland Roberts, Esq., Florida Bar No. 89578 Geoffrey Cowen, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91377 Heather Griffiths, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0091444 Andrew Wilson, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0092155 Cynthia Hatch, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91460 GMAC MORTGAGE LLC. c/o Phelan Hallinan PLCAttorneys for Plaintiff 888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact:Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 3 and May 10, 2012 5206-0510 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5195-0510 TWN v. Nichols, Sheila Lynn Case No# 2011-CA-000224 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2011-CA-000224 HARRISON FINANCE COMPANY, INC., Plaintiff, v. SHEILA LYNN NICHOLS; RANDALL NICHOLS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHEILA NICHOLS; TENANTS OR UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY THROUGH OR UNDER ANY DEFENDANTS NAMED HEREIN, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F .S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 a.m. oclock on May 24, 2012, the following described property: L OT 14, LAKE ELLEN SHORES, PHASE ONE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 57, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (A.P.N. 24-4S-02W-164-02077-A14) 5196-0510 vs. Johnson, Brian, Case No# 65-2010-CA-000427 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2010-CA-000427, Division GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC. Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN LESLIE JOHNSON, FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION THE FARM HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 18, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 23, BLOCK HŽ THE FARM, PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 93 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 103 FARRIER LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on May 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated:April 19, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Brent X.Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk May 3 & 10, 2012 5196-0510 5197-0510 vs. Marcionette, Kenneth, Case No.65-2009-CA-000403 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2009-CA-000403, Division JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH C. MARCIONETTE JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; SWEETWATER RIDGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 18, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 14 BLOCK A, SWEETWATER RIDGE SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 63, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 167 SWEETWATER CIR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on May 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated:April 19, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Brent X.Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk May 3 & 10, 2012 5197-0510 5198-0510 vs. Guy, Tracey, T. Guy Case No # 65-2011-CA-000227 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2011-CA-000227, Division BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.. Plaintiff, vs. TRACEY T. GUY, CENTENNIAL BANK F/K/A WAKULLA BANK, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 18, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 28, OF PANACEA SHORES, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 115 MASHES SANDS ROAD, PANACEA, FL 32346 including 5199-0510 vs. Collins Tony L. Case No. #65-2011-CA-000028 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2011-CA-000028, Division GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC. Plaintiff, vs. TONY L. COLLINS, DANA J. COLLINS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 18, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SYFRETTE CREEK ROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT WAY FOR A DISTANCE OF 1624.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 87 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 693.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT : THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 312.68 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP: THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 701.55 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SYFRETTE CREEK ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 01 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 313.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. and commonly known as: 293 SYFRETTE CREEK RD, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on May 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated:April 19, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Brent X.Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk May 3 & 10, 2012 5199-0510 5200-0510 Vs. Elliott, Randy T. Case No. # 11-283-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-283-CA COLONY BANK WILCOX A/K/A COLONY BANK Plaintiff, vs. RANDY T. ELLIOTT A/K/A R.T. ELLIOTT, PARADISE VILLAGE OF SHELL POINT HOMES ASSOCIATION INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment ofReplevin and Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in Case No. 11-283-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which COLONY BANK WILCOX A/K/A COLONY BANK is the Plaintiff and RANDY T. ELLIOTT A/K/A R.T. ELLIOTT and PARADISE VILLAGE OF SHELL POINT HOMES ASSOCIATION, INC, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the first floor front lobby of the Courthouse in Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on May 24, 2012, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: LOT 50, PARADISE VILLAGE OF SHELL POINT, UNIT 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13 and 14, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: April 18, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) BY: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 3 & 10, 2012 5200-0510 5204-0524 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 12-111-DR, Division In the Adoption of Petitioner and Elijah Dale Holman & Simon Ellis Holman Respondent NOTICE OF ACTON FOR ADOPTION TO: Brian Dale Reed c/o The Red Lobster, 435 Shawnee Mall Drive, Shawnee, OK YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for adoption has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Attorney Steven P. Glazer whose address is 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on or before June 01, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: April 26, 2012 (COURT SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit court By: /s/ Irvene Kimbrel, Deputy Clerk Published four times (4) times in the Wakulla News May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 5204-0524 I Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on May 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated:April 19, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Brent X.Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk May 3 & 10, 2012 5196-0510 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 MAY 5 9AM EST --F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTION Tractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU426610% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646 TO VIEW PARTIAL LIST OF PHOTOS VISIT www.auctionzip.comNOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Downtown Storage Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, May 12, 2012, at 9:00 a.m. at 57 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL, of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Lynn Tate, Wendy Kenon and Timothy White Before the sale date of May 12, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at Downtown Storage Center, 57 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL. May 3, 8, 2012 We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd.Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA house $700 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property!We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! ANew Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. Available ASAP. 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $900 Mo. Available May 1. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 26-D Guinevere 3BR/2BA for $850 Mo. with $950 Deposit. Small pets ok with fee of $20020 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets WelcomesCarla HunterCall Carla Todayƒ 850-445-6550carla@bluewaterrealtrygroup.comRealtorSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403

PAGE 29

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 – Page 15B ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: April 18, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) CER TIFICA TE OF SER VICE I CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S. Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on April 19, 2012, to each of the following: Henry L. Miller, Jr., Attorney for Harrison Finance Company, Inc., Mathews Law Firm, P. A., 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; Tina Blackmon, Branch Manager, Harrison Finance Company, Inc., 5032 Capital Circle, SW, Suite 7, Tallahassee, Florida 32305; and Sheila Lynn Nichols, 9829 Watermill Circle, Apartment B, Boynton Beach, Florida 33437-2879. By: /s/ Glenda Porter, DC, Court Clerk Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 3 & 10, 2012 5195-0510 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5188-0503 Vs. Llewllyn Patrick Mcewan Case No. 65-2010-CA-000083 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000083 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LLEWLLYN PATRICK MCEWAN A/K/A LLEWELLYN PATRICK MCEWAN,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000083 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and LLEWLLYN PATRICK MCEWAN A/K/A LLEWELLYN PATRICK MCEWAN; CAROL NELSON MCEWAN A/K/A CAROL MCEWAN; RIVER WALK ESTATES HOMES ASSOCIATION, INC,; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at lobby OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 A.M, on the 24th of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, BLOCK D, RIVER WALK ESTATES, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THERE OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 4 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A RIVER DRIVE, PANACEA, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this court on April 16, 2012. Brent X Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act-Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 26 and May 3, 2012 5188-0503 5190-0503 TWN Vs. Fleming, Dian D, Case No. 65-2008 CA 000256 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2008 CA 000256 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5 Plaintiff, vs. DIAN D. FLEMING, et al Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65 2008 CA 000256 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5, is Plaintiff, and DIAN D. FLEMING, et al are Defendants, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 24th day of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT NUMBER 13, IN BLOCK AŽ, UNIT THREE(3) OF SHELL POINT BEACH, A SUBDIVISION IN LOT 121 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 58 OF PLAT BOOK NUMBER 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19thday of April, 2012. PHELAN HALLINAN PLC,888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By:/s/Betzy Falgas,Attorney for Plaintiff Owei Z. Belleh, Esq., Florida Bar No. 617598 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 Joshua I. Goldman, Esq., Florida Bar No. 689361 Drew T. Melville, Esq., Florida Bar No. 34986 Annabella Barboza, Esq., Florida Bar No. 040627 Hope Touchton, Esq., Florida Bar No. 60043 Susan Falardeau, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0059948 Bradford Willard, Esq., Florida Bar No. 62827 David A. Cramer, Esq., Florida Bar No. 64780 Jonathan L. Blackmore, Esq., Florida Bar No. 67902 Joy Kohl, Esq., Florida Bar No. 69406 Erik DeLEtoile, Esq., Florida Bar No. 71675 Betzy Falgas, Esq., Florida Bar No. 76882 Aaron Hines, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81690 Jherna A. Shahani, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81994 Jenine R. Davey, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0089325 Ashland Roberts, Esq., Florida Bar No. 89578 Geoffrey Cowen, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91377 5192-0510 vs. Johnson, Josette E. Case No. 2011-CA-000266 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO. 2011-CA-000266 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE 5193-0510 TWN Vs. Taff, Clayton P Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2009-CA-000432 BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff, -vs.Clayton P. Taff, Jr.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 16, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000432 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P., Plaintiff and Clayton P. Taff, Jr. are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M. on May 24, 2012. the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 30, OF PANACEA SHORES, UNIT 4, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 34, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. GLORIA R. HAYWARD, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888, (813)880-8800 May 5 & May 12, 2012. 09-149518 FC01 5194-0510 TWN v. Shivers, James Calvin, Case No# 2011-CA-000223 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2011-CA-000224 SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, v. JAMES CALVIN SHIVERS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES CALVIN SHIVERS; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F .S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 a.m. oclock on May 31, 2012, the following described property: TRACTS 91 AND 92, OF GOLDEN GATE FOREST, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 3 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1996 GRAND MANOR DOUBLEWIDE HOME WITH SERIAL NUMBERS GAGMTD1654A AND GAGMTD1654B (A.P.N. 07-38-01W-115-04314-091) ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: April 19, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By;/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) CER TIFICA TE OF SER VICE I CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S. Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on April 19, 2012, to each of the following: Henry L. Miller, Jr., Attorney for Harrison Finance Company, Inc., Mathews Law Firm, P. A., 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; Tina Blackmon, Branch Manager, Harrison Finance Company, Inc., 5032 Capital Circle, SW, Suite 7, Tallahassee, Florida 32305; and Sheila Lynn Nichols, 9829 Watermill Circle, Apartment B, Boynton Beach, Florida 33437-2879. By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Court Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 3 & 10, 2012 5194-0510 CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-ABC1 Plaintiff, vs. JOSETTE E. JOHNSON; JOHN A. JOHNSON, JR A/K/A JOHN A. JOHNSON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. / NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Please publish in THE WAKULLA NEWS) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated 18th April, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA-000266, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-ABC1 is Plaintiff and JOSETTE E. JOHNSON; JOHN A. JOHNSON, JR A/K/A JOHN A. JOHNSON; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 31st day of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: WOODVILLE SOUTH, UNIT II, (UNRECORDED) LOT 17 COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK AŽ OF WOODVILLE SOUTH, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEROF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 700.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 875.25 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 183.49 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES WEST 877.67 FEET TO THE CENTERPOINT OF A CENTERLINE HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS, THENCE RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 315.00FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC AND UTILITY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18th day of April, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A.,8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000,Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486,Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380,File No. 11-05061 BOA Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 3 & 12, 2012 5192-0510 Heather Griffiths, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0091444 Andrew Wilson, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0092155 Cynthia Hatch, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91460 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5 c/o Phelan Hallinan PLCAttorneys for Plaintiff 888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact:Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 26 and May 3, 2012 5190-0503 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5189-0503TWN Blount, Jeffrey Allan Case No. 12-30-CP Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12-30-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JEFFREY ALLAN BLOUNT, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JEFFREY ALLAN BLOUNT, deceased, Case Number 12-30-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE TO THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 26, 2012. Personal Representative /s/WILLIAM BRYANT BLOUNT 218 S.W. Whitewood Drive, Port St. Lucie, FL 34953 Attorney for the Personal Representative /s/MARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.949884 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, FL 32326 April 26 & May 3, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Payments must be made before Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 2:00p.m. The owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or by paying in person at the warehouse. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News April 26 & May 3, 2012 5191-0503 5191-0503 (5 /12 Sale-ABC Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act. Florida Statutes, Chapeter 83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, May 12, Self Storage Notices 2012, at 2PM, at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini Warehouse containing personal property of: FINAL NOTICE DARRELL N. HODGE CLA Y BROGDON NORMAN BUTCH MCCALISTER LAMAR HIERS Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Brain Teaser 1 14 17 25 34 37 41 44 57 61 64 2 20 26 50 3 27 51 4 28 45 48 21 23 46 5 15 18 38 42 58 62 65 6 35 52 7 29 53 8 30 49 9 24 47 22 39 43 10 16 19 40 54 59 63 66 11 31 36 55 12 32 56 13 33 60ACROSS1.Watercolor 5.Crosswise, nautically 10.Findabominable 14.Consider,with "over" 15."__Remember" ("Fantasticks" song) 16. Galbraith'ssubj. 17.__colada 18.Attachwitha rope 19.Cattlezapper 20.Essential constituent 23.Makehaste 24.Mauna__ 25.PartofMLK 29.Criticalevaluation 34. Greetthedawn 35.Slaughterin baseball 36."Well,__-di-dah!" 37.Employer'soffering 41.Chang'stwin 42.Dele'sopposite 43.Paveover 44.Denizenofhell 47.Electronicmusic pion eerEdgard 48. Granolamorsel 49.Long.crosser 50.Destinationof somemail 57. Givestwo thumbs downto 58.Preferredstrategy 59.LiketheNegev 61.Westernmost Aleutian 62.Moth-__(timeworn) 63.Plain-__ (unadorned) 64. Quickly,when doubled 65.Alltuckeredout 66.BitofpondscumDOWN1.Fuseunit 2.Wordsfromawag 3.Forearmbone 4.Controversial orchardspray 5.Arriveat 6.Picklingneed 7.Tookaganderat 8.Restingon 9.Louvrehighlight 10.Jazzlover,inold slang 11.Farmunit 12.G imletor screwdriver 13.Dropthecurtainon 21.Fence'ssupplier 22.Bacillusshape 25.Silentsactress Normand 26. "There__atheists ..." 27.Teethers'aids 28.PhilosopherLao-__ 29.Photographer Adams 30.EgyptianChristian 31.Makejubilant 32.Epictales 33.Lastwordina sentry'squestion 35.Idesrebuke 38.Carbon14and uranium235 39. "USENOHOOKS" stencilsite 40.Plunkorplopleadin 45.50-50chance 46.Rodethebench 47.Availabletorent 49.Dirty__(potential embarrassment) 50.Troddentrack 51.Notdeceivedby 52.Openinginsome paja mas 53.Itmaybe tempted 54.Mexicali'slocale, forshort 55.Viva-voce 56.PED__ 57.Candidate'sfundraiser:Abbr. 60.Narcorg. American Prole Hometown Content 4/8/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 2 3 45167 8749 3 76 98 145 6 847 97132 594 200 9 HtCtt 716 9284 3 5 294351687 583674192 435 287916 679513824 128469753 361 842579 947135268 852796341 A M P M A B E L P A C Q U I P A R E N O P A T H U L N A R I N G S O N T O A L A R T S E T O S S U P T H I E F S A T A T T A I N I S O T O P E S B R I N E E T T U F L A P E Y E D A N S E L F A T E A T O P C O P T L I N E N M O N A L I S A V A C A N T R O D C R A T E H E P C A T K E R B A J A A C R E E L A T E O R A L T O O L S A G A S X I N G E N D T H E R E D E A Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

PAGE 30

Page 16B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy WORKFORCE PLUSSpecial to The NewsI live on 18 acres in Wakulla County,Ž Charles McCool said. And it is paradise.Ž Wakulla residents would agree with his sentiment. The natural beauty of the area is a source of both pride and joy for those fortunate enough to live in the area, and was certainly a comfort for McCool, who was laid off in October. I was working at the Department of Financial Services as the chief of the Bureau of Publications and Records,Ž McCool said. And the administration decided they wanted to downsize. So I was laid off.Ž Despite his newly unemployed status, McCool felt relaxed about his situation. I was peaceful and not worried about the outcome,Ž McCool said. I had a lot of faith in the outcome because I had a lot of faith.Ž In addition to his faith, McCool had preparation on his side. While layoffs are an unwelcome event, they do not always come by surprise. McCool predicted his layoff a few months in advance and was able to prepare emotionally for a career transition. You need to listen to whats going on in your workplace,Ž McCool said. At the time, even though the legislation-mandated layoffs had already occurred and the Legislature was out, McCool said, I just had this feeling from just listening to what was happening in the organization.Ž His employer informed him of his position termination soon afterwards. In the meantime, McCool became more involved in his church, spent time with his family and strove to secure his next position. I had a lot of support from the great folks down at the Wakulla County Workforce Plus,Ž McCool said. They helped me in my job search, kept me up to speed and provided a lot of support and assistance.Ž McCool was unemployed for four months before he secured a position as an auditor in the Inspector Generals of“ ce. A key mark of his job hunt was con“ dence. I have a certain level of confidence from my experience,Ž McCool said, referring to, among other things, his robust resume of 20 years as city manager of various municipalities. And since Ive been ” exible in my career, making the transition to another type of work area is a challenge but I have con“ dence to attain it.Ž That confidence was spurred in part by the staff at Workforce Plus. Everybody there did a great job,Ž McCool said. They were confidence builders.Ž At the end of the day, that confidence and his faith saw him through his career transition. I knew God would take care and I just had to be careful to listen to what he was telling me.Ž McCool said. I listened to what he wanted to tell me, and thats when I got the job.ŽWorkforce Plus is proud to bring you a series of stories straight from the community. In partnership with The Wakulla News, well showcase one of our own every six weeks whose journey in their career will serve to inspire and encourage. Real Stories, Real People: A special series from Workforce PlusCharles McCool had faith in his career journey Charles McCool didnt let his layoff upset him.WORKFORCE PLUSTreasury announces increase in small business lendingSpecial to The NewsWASHINGTON … The U.S. Department of the Treasury recently released a report showing that Florida banks have increased their small business lending by $211.1 million since receiving capital through Small Business Lending Fund (SBLF). The SBLF, which was established as part of the Small Business Jobs Act that President Obama signed into law, encourages community banks to increase their lending to small businesses to help them grow and create new jobs. Treasury invested more than $4 billion in 332 institutions, located in over 3,000 communities in 48 states, through the SBLF. Nationwide, institutions participating in the SBLF signi“ cantly increased small business lending in the last quarter of 2011 by $1.3 billion over the prior quarter „ for a total of $4.8 billion over their baseline. This report shows that the Small Business Lending Fund is having a powerful impact,Ž said Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Neal Wolin. The program is helping spark new lending to local entrepreneurs looking to invest in their businesses and create new jobs.Ž Small businesses play a critical role in the U.S. economy and are central to growth and job creation. Small businesses employ roughly one-half of all Americans and account for about 60 percent of gross job creation. But small business owners faced disproportionate challenges in the aftermath of the recession and credit crisis, including difficulty accessing capital. We add an important bene“t to our free debit cards. Instant. The bene“t of our free instant-issue debit card is that you can get it today and use it today. Its that easy. And with Centennial Bank, you can also use any ATM in the country, free*. Any ATM at all. Just a few more ways we offer banking that comes to you.*Some restrictions may apply. See bank for details. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUNCH PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS



PAGE 1

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netMarine biologist and author Anne Rudloe died last week after a long battle with cancer. She and her husband, Jack, were frequent writing partners, as well as the guiding force behind Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea. Rudloe, who was 64, died Friday, April 27. She often wrote about the meaning of life as she found it in the natural world those wild spaces untouched by human development. She was a Zen Buddhist and wrote a book in 2002 titled Butter ies on a Sea Wind: Beginning Zen a memoir about taking life lessons learned at Buddhist retreats and putting them into practice in daily life. She was also the co-author, with Bruce Means and Ellie Whitney, of Priceless Florida: Natural Ecosystems and Native Species. The book was written for a lay reader, and earned praise from noted biologist E.O. Wilson. The Rudloes published a fantasy book which managed to be both spiritual and satire called The Great Agreement about a chicken who discovers what fate awaits chickens, and who then leads the overthrow of a chicken factory. The Rudloes also worked on numerous magazine articles together, mostly focusing on the sea, for publications ranging from National Geographic to Readers Digest to Sports Illustrated. While Jack Rudloe has often been involved in local politics battling developers, tree-cutters and any threat to the marine environment Anne tended to stay more in the background. Jack Rudloe recalled his wife tended to choose her battles she was especially passionate about development on St. Joe Bay, a proposed development at Keaton Beach and clearcutting in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Continued on Page 2A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 17th Issue Thursday, May 3, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Summer Camps ................................................................Page 7B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 12B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 13B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 13BINDEX OBITUARIESBradham Forbes Carraway Carolyn Knight Pelt William Ron Smith Megan Crombie is a finalist for state Teacher of the YearAnne Rudloe succumbs to cancer MACYS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakullas Teacher of the Year Megan Crombie was named as one of ve nalists for state Teacher of the Year. On Friday, April 27, Macys presented her with a check for $5,000 and a gift card for $500, plus a check for Riversink Elementary for $1,000. See Anne Rudloes final blog entry, Giving thanks for cancer, on The Opinion Page, 4A.Anne Rudloe Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce detectives continue to investigate an unusual death reported Friday, April 27 in the Apalachicola National Forest, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. A U.S. Forest Service helicopter pilot observed smoke in the forest at 3:15 p.m. and contacted re ghters to contain the blaze. Shortly before 4:15 p.m., a severely burned body was observed near the vehicle and law enforcement was contacted. Fire ghters and law enforcement of cials arrived on the scene and found a badly burned vehicle and the remains of a male. Due to the condition of the body, the cause of death and the identity have not yet been determined. The re began as a half acre blaze before growing larger. Fire ghters got the blaze under control later during the day Friday. The vehicle, which was completely destroyed, was found at a remote location in the national forest about 10 miles north of Arran Road in Crawfordville. Detectives are creating a timeline of activities leading up to the re and are combining physical evidence from the scene to help them positively identify the body. The original case was investigated by Deputy Nick Gray, Detective Rob Giddens, Lt. Mike Kemp, Sgt. Fred Nichols, Captain Chris Savary, Lt. C.L. Morrison, Detective Lorne Whaley, Major Shepard Bruner and Undersheriff Maurice Langston of the WCSO, as well as the U.S. Forest Service, state Fire Marshal, Florida Forest Service and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement crime scene unit.Body found in forest; death is suspiciousSpecial to The NewsRiversink Elementary teacher Megan Crombie was surprised by a visit from Floridas Commissioner of Education Gerard Robinson last week for an announcement that she is one of ve nalists for the Macys/Florida Department of Education 2013 Teacher of the Year Award. A teacher is one of the most in uential factors in a students academic accomplishments, said Robinson. Each Teacher of the Year nalist re- ects the character, commitment and qualities that help students realize their potential and ensure they have every chance for success. This isnt an individual award in my opinion, Crombie said. When one of us is honored, it is because of the rich collaboration from teachers in my school and in Wakulla County. This is an amazing school system, and Im proud to be a part of it. Crombie, a fourth- fth grade teacher at Riversink Elementary, received a $5,000 check from Macys and a $500 Macys gift card. The Macys Foundation also presented Riversink principal Jackie High with a $1,000 check to use at the school. During the surprise assembly on Friday, April 27, Crombie was shocked as the confetti canons red off. Students jumped out of their chairs with excitement as the school band played a celebratory song. This years ve nalists were chosen from more than 180,000 public school teachers throughout the state by a Department of Education-appointed selection committee representing teachers, principals, parents and the business community. Each finalist is selected on the basis of outstanding ability to teach and communicate knowledge of the subject taught, professional development, philosophy of teaching and outstanding school and community service. The winner must also show a superior capacity to inspire a love of learning in students of all backgrounds and abilities. Crombie holds a bachelors degree in elementary education, a masters degree in gifted education, has certi cation in Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum, is endorsed in English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and is a National Board certi ed teacher. This is her seventh year of teaching. She also teaches three of the ve college courses needed for the Gifted Endorsement to a cadre of elementary and middle school teachers after school hours. In addition, she has been the Riversink Yearbook sponsor since 2008 and has taken a leadership role in the Wakulla District Writing Committee. Continued on Page 2AThe state commissioner of education is on hand for the surprise announcement on Friday at RiversinkBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netLast week was National Crime Victims Rights Week and as part of the commemoration, Attorney General Pam Bondi held an awards ceremony for victim advocates on April 25. Crawfordville resident Barbara Strickland and her husband, Kenny, were invited to the ceremony and listened as a survivor who was a doctor told the crowd that people from all walks of life can be victims of domestic violence. Strickland knows how true that statement is. She lost her daughter, Leslie Drew, on Nov. 29, 2009, when she was only 29. Drew, a paraprofessional at Riversink Elementary School, was murdered by her boyfriend. He was working on his masters degree. She was going to leave him that night, Strickland said. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, one in every four women will experience domestic violence in her lifetime. And that doesnt includes the cases that arent reported, Strickland said. Since losing her daughter, Strickland has spoken at numerous meetings and events, telling her daughters story. Although it has been two years, Strickland said it is still a hard one to tell. She urged those close to someone who is in an abusive relationship to reach out and offer help.Continued on Page 3ALeslie Drew featured on victim services brochure Leslie DrewThe display for victims compensation at the Capitol. A victim of domestic violence, Drew was murdered by an abusive boyfriend in 2009. Her photos appear on new materials to help crime victimsThe Wakullanews Wakulla Schools Honor RollPages 4B-6B

PAGE 2

Continued from Page 1A Perhaps her biggest bene t to the community was putting a leash on me, he said with a laugh. She often advised him on what battles were worth ghting and which werent, he said, and he recalled at least one in which he should have taken her advice. Jack recalled rst meeting Anne in 1969, when she was a customer of Gulf Specimens ordering from him scallops with pea crabs, a small parasite that lives inside. Later, she went to graduate school at FSU but they didnt connect until a year later when Jack saw her standing in front of Crums Gulf station fueling an Oceanography vehicle and wearing a wet suit. Rudloe recalled with a chuckle that she looked vaguely female in the get up, and he approached her. She told him, he recalled, that she was working on a study of seagrasses in St. Joe Bay but was having trouble identifying some of the sea squirts. He invited her to come to the lab to help her with identi cation. Instead of Come see my etchings, it was Come see my sea squirts, Jack said. They were married in June 1973 at Otter Lake. Jack said he felt Anne was more deserving of academic success She should have been more than an adjunct professor at FSU, he said but felt her career was hampered by his feud with the university. She was a passionate voice in her writing for the preservation of the environment, and wrote eloquently of those moments in the midst of nature feelings of awe, of how those places that are still wild centered her, gave context and meaning to her life. She had practiced Buddhism for more than 20 years and, as of last year, had earned the status of a Zen teacher. Jack said she had a list of things she wanted to get done before her death. She did them all, he said, and then passed away. A memorial service is planned for Mothers Day, Sunday, May 13 at the Unitarian-Universalist Church in Tallahassee at 4 p.m. She is survived by her husband and their two children, Cypress and Sky. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Teacher of the Year Megan Crombie, center, with her combined fourth- fth grade class; her parents, Beth and Tim ODonnell, at left; and at right Riversink Elementary Principal Jackie High, Superintendent David Miller and Assistant Principal Melinda Young. Continued from Page 1A She has participated in extensive professional development in the areas of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) through summers at the National High Magnetic Laboratory Research Experience for Teachers and at the Phil Mickelson ExxonMobil Teachers Academy for Math and Science. In addition, she is an outreach sponsor for the FAMU/FSU College of Engineering when they have competitions through the American Society of Civil Engineers. Mrs. Crombies breadth of knowledge about STEM areas and her ability to inspire her fourth-fifth grade combination class of students to experiment, hypothesize, and understand how STEM areas affect everything is phenomenal, said Wakulla Superintendent of Schools David Miller. Her focus is on student achievement and her love for her students is at the core of that desire to see them succeed. Principal High agreed. While Mrs. Crombie is academically very strong, her true strength lies in the relationships she builds with her students, their families and her peers in the school, said High. She makes learning exciting and fun. Crombie and the other four nalists will now go on to another set of interviews with representatives from the Florida Department of Education and with Macys. The winner of the 2013 Macys/ Florida Department of Education Teacher of the Year award will be announced during a ceremony in Orlando on July 12. In addition to a $10,000 award funded by the Macys Foundation, the Teacher of the Year will receive awards from Macys including an all-expense paid trip for four to New York City to attend the Macys Thanksgiving Day Parade. The winner will also serve for one year as the Christa McAuliffe Ambassador for education, touring the state to spread the word about educational opportunities and challenges in the Sunshine State. To date, Macys and the Macys Foundation have contributed more than $2 million to teachers throughout the state. Crombie is married to Dave Crombie and is the daughter of Tim and Beth ODonnell, both Wakulla County educators.Megan Crombie is a nalist for state Teacher of the YearAnne Rudloe succumbs to cancer Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 18, Noon Publication Date: May 31 Remember This Years GraduateCongratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2012Sponsor Line........$20 Eighth Page...........$50 Quarter Page......$100.............................................................. $50 Half Page..............$200.............................................................. $75 Full Page...............$300............................................................. $125 Back Page.............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available The next generation of Spirit Filled Ministers Special Singing Nightly Come and enjoy old fashioned preachingMay 7, 2012 May 11, 2012Where: Panacea Full Gospel AssemblyMay 7th Brother Scott Shiver from East Point, FL May 8th thru May 11th, Brother David Bane from Zirconia, NCPANACEA FULL GOSPELASSEMBLY Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate r i s Crawfordville (850) 926-2700 Also Now Open in Tallahassee Advertise your waytoSuccess! Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising. Mark Twain Statewide Advertising Refreshing Rates atCall now to start growing your business 866.742.1373www.facebook.com/AdNetFlorida

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A She gave a presentation to the attorney generals of- ce in December and shared photos of her daughter, as well as one of Drews daughter, Leila, standing next to her mothers grave. Strickland is raising Leila, who is now 5 years old. The photo of Leila is moving and Strickland said they didnt intend to capture that moment, but were simply taking a picture of Leila. After speaking with Bondi, Strickland was asked if the Division of Victim Services could use those photos of Drew and Leila for their national brochure. Strickland agreed. Its an honor, Strickland said. There are four images of Leila and Drew on the front of the brochure. Next to the photos of Drew and Drew and Leila, is the word, before. The photo of Leila next to the grave has the word, after. The photos are also on the Crime Victims Memorial Wall on display on the second oor rotunda of the Capitol. The wall is dedicated to those lost to crime. Strickland said the Division of Victims Services is a great program that many people dont even know exists. The division offers numerous bene ts to victims of a crime, including wage loss, loss of support, disability allowance, funeral and burial expenses, treatment expenses, prescription, eyeglasses, dentures or prosthetic devices needed as a result of the crime, mental health counseling, property loss reimbursement and domestic violence relocation. The toll-free number for victim services information and referral line is 1-800-2266667 or visit my oridalegal. com.Leslie Drew featured on victim services brochureBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakulanews.netThere are numerous infrastructure problems located within Wakulla Gardens, including unpaved and poor roadways, stormwater drainage problems and lack of access to sewer and water. The cost to fund these improvements is astronomical and the Wakulla County Commission has been trying to nd ways to pay for these improvements. One option is a voluntary assessment, or MSBU, charged to residents in the area. The commission is exploring this idea which would start with a ballot survey sent to residents asking if they would be willing to pay for these needed improvements to their neighborhood. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said the ballot would have a laundry list of items and would ask if residents would be interested in paying for any of them. No dollar amount would be included. If a majority of property owners indicate support for the voluntary assessment, the county would gure out what each property owner would pay for the improvements. Once costs are established, another ballot would be sent out with the proposed assessment included. The results of the second survey will help the commission decide if it wants to move forward with the assessment. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he would like a dollar amount included in the first ballot, even if it was just a ballpark gure. Encinosa said the county may run into issues if the numbers are not exact. Brock said he wanted to make sure the survey was user-friendly and included a timeline and funding options, as well as an explanation that if the assessment doesnt happen, the county doesnt anticipate these improvements happening in the next 10 years. County Administrator David Edwards said they are looking at ways to fund these projects, as well as determining the value of the area. The commission agreed to table the item until costs could be added to the ballot.Survey to look at voluntary charge for Wakulla GardensBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt has been over a year since Wakulla County chose to outsource all of its housing programs. Meridian Community Services Group has been administering the Housing Choice Voucher Program (Section 8) and the State Housing Initiative Partnership program. At the April 16 County Commission meeting, Ersone McDaniels with Meridian Community Services gave a status report of those programs. When Meridian took over these two programs, they encountered numerous problems, McDaniels said. For the past seven years, the countys Section 8 program has been in troubled status as declared by the U.S. Housing and Urban Development. Section 8 is intended to assist very low and low income residents with rental assistance. In 2012, the county had a little more than $1 million available. McDaniels said $52,000 is spent a month. The county is supposed to be leasing about 250 units at approximately $352 a month. But Meridian is leasing 119 units at an average of $595 a month. Because it is not meeting the requirements, Wakulla County did not do well on several indicators of the Section Eight Management Assessment Program. McDaniels said they are working on correcting that issue and added that there was a need for a reasonable rent study. Each year, HUD evaluates each program based on 15 pre-determined indicators. According to McDaniels, when Section 8 was administered by the county, they paid mortgages for at least two homeowners, which was never authorized. McDaniels said Meridian has also established a ling system and is working on correcting payment standards. Meridian has also created a utility study for the county and re-certi ed all clients. We have cracked down, McDaniels said. He added that there was some misuse of program activity, which is also being corrected. The Section 8 waiting list will be done May 1. The county had 200 people on the waiting list and it hadnt been purged or updated since 2008, which is supposed to be done every two to three years. As far as SHIP, there are also a number of issues. The county paid rent for several different clients on a continual basis, which the county was never supposed to do. McDaniels said he is speaking with the Florida Housing Corporation to try and clean up those issues. There were 70 to 75 clients whose rent was paid for three or four months. McDaniels said the amended strategy was approved by the county commission, but it was never sent to the state. However, it was implemented by the housing department. We are working to resolve the issue, McDaniels said. The state placed a hold on SHIP funds because of the issues, but has since released $549,000 of those funds. Applications will be accepted from May 9-11 for rehabilitation and down payment assistance. Out of those funds, $199,000 must be spent by June 30. The other two housing programs, Weatherization Assistance Program and Low Income Housing Energy Assistance program, are being administered by Capital Area Community Action Agency.COUNTY COMMISSIONMeridian working to improve housing programs Special to The News Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners staff will speak at the Senior Citizens Center on May 4 to offer information to senior citizens about the Solid Waste and Fire Hardship Assistance Programs. Wakulla County staff will speak at the Senior Citizens Center, 33 Michael Drive, on Friday, May 4, at 10 a.m. The Hardship Assistance Program was created to assist residential property owners with the nancial burden imposed by the Solid Waste and Fire Services Assessments. In order to apply for hardship assistance, citizens must complete the application and file with the County Administrators Of ce before June 1. The program was enacted by the commission to provide assistance to low income individuals and families. Senior citizens who live on a xed income are one group the Board has sought to offer some nancial relief. The Hardship Assistance Program was designed by the Board to capture the lower income families living on the fringe nancially and, if one year is an indication, the program has been successful, said Deputy County Administrator Tim Barden. Staff reached out to the Senior Citizens Center to present the required documentation and answer any questions they may have regarding the Hardship Program. This is another step taken to provide our citizens with the opportunity to be informed in their county government, said County Administrator David Edwards. For more information contact Jessica Welch, public information director, at (850) 926-0919 ext. County staff to speak on Hardship AssistanceSpecial to The NewsElected officials from five Gulf States met on April 19, in Biloxi, Miss., to discuss the Restore Act. The Restore Act is a bill based on the fundamental principal that fines assessed to BP and the other responsible parties due to the massive and tragic DeepWater Horizon Oil Spill in 2010 should be directed to the region immediately impacted by this horri c event. Wakulla Commission Chairman Alan Brock attended the meeting. As local elected of cials weve joined together to make sure that our coastal communities have a unified voice, Brock said. Together we are making a difference, with a stronger voice from all our effected states. The elected of cials met just one day before the two year anniversary of the oil spill showing that while the visible signs of this devastation have gone there is still much healing and recovery going on within these communities. The meeting was a follow-up to a meeting that took place in Washington, D.C. to lobby Congress to pass the Restore Act. Elected officials have broken down state and county lines to join together to ensure that their communities and thereby the entire Gulf Coast Region can fully recover and rebuild their economies following the oil spill. Also in attendance at the meeting was County Administrator David Edwards. After two years, he said, it is time to make this right. On behalf of Wakulla County, we thank Representative Steve Sutherland and Senator Bill Nelson for their support of the Restore Act.County o cials meet on Restore Act FROM WAKULLA GARDENS FACEBOOKFlooding in Wakulla Gardens in January 2010. Elected o cials from ve Gulf states discuss passage of a federal bill to ne BP for the Deepwater Horizon oil spill two years ago David Edwards Meridian took over two of the countys troubled programs Section 8 and SHIP. A report says the group is trying to resolve problemsCity of Sopchoppy For more information, contact City Clerk, Jackie Lawhon or Deputy Clerk Linda Langston at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL or phone 962-4611.MAY 3, 10, 17, 2012CITY ELECTION NOTICECity of Sopchoppy The City Commission of the City of Sopchoppy gives notice of its intent to consider the adoption of the following Ordinance: The Codication of the Ordinances of the City of Sopchoppy will eliminate provisions from the Citys Ordinances that are inconstant with state or federal law and will provide a more user friendly format for those wishing to review the ordinances. A public hearings on the proposal Ordinance will be held on Monday, May 14, 2012, at 6:30 p.m., or as soon as can be heard in the City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. A copy of the Ordinance may be obtained and persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or by writing to the City of Sopchoppy, P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or by phone at 850-962-4611. Colleen Skipper, Mayor Attest: Jackie Lawhon, Municipal Clerk Publication Date: February 2, 2012City of Sopchoppy, Florida NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF ORDINANCEMAY 3, 2012NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on May 9, 2012, at 5:30pm MAY 3, 2012 Watch out for manatees

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Body found in Apalachicola National Forest; death appears suspicious Softball: Lady War Eagles cant catch Arnold, fall 6-3 in playoffs Sheriffs Report for April 19 Baseball: War Eagles fall to Suwannee in district playoffs Rona Lavon Hawkins Jr. obituary Proposed septic tank revisions moving forward CHATs Pamper Your Pooch thewakullanews.com Follow us onBy ANNE RUDLOE My eyes blinked open as consciousness returned after the colonoscopy. Before I could say anything, the doctor leaned over my shoulder and said in an urgent voice, You have cancer! Geez, what kind of a bedside manner is that? I thought in a fuzzy blur. A few hours before, when I had arrived at the clinic for a routine screening, I had felt ne. It was just the last step in a series of routine checkups. But youll be OK, he added. Its small, we think we caught it before it spread beyond the gut. But it had spread. And after surgery to remove the tumor and a series of lymph nodes, I spent weeks recovering under huge old trees next to the Gulf of Mexico in the company of fall wild owers and butter- ies. Morning sunlight glittered on the bay and gilded the pine needles overhead. I was swept not with fear but with gratitude for all the wonderful things of life and with the absolute conviction that, if death came, nothing would be lost. Later, my husband and I made a trip to the Mof tt Cancer Center in Tampa. On the way, we canoed the Weeki Wachee River, a gorgeous spring run with crystal clear water, underwater emerald meadows, schools of sh darting past us, manatees and eagles. The healing that came from being there was palpable, even as it had been under the pines at home. There was joy to be a part of a system that creates such beauty even though death is part of it. Halfway through the chemotherapy, I ended up in and out of the hospital over 25 days, really sick. I never felt as if I were in any serious danger, given that medical support was available, but a lot of friends who saw me were convinced that I was on the brink of death and the doctors didnt say that it was out of the question. Neighbors came to visit and they always wanted to pray. I welcomed the kindness even if the language was not the same as I was used to in my own religious practice. This culminated in the appearance in my front yard one Sunday afternoon after I got out of the hospital of about 20 members of a little lay led church. Everybody gathered around my husband and me, but in the little village of Panacea, where neighbors still know each other, it was well known that neither my husband nor I was an orthodox believer. They were a little uncertain about how to begin with a couple of lost souls, one of whom might be facing an early death. So I began by thanking them for their care and all the covered dinners and they began to share the value of their faith. I found that I truly agreed with everything that was said, with the exception that theirs was the only way. Then I said that the most mistaken thing anybody can say in this situation is Why me? because sooner or later we must all face this sort of trouble and eventually we will all die of something. Rather, I said, a health crisis is a wonderful teacher if we can let go of anger and fear and open up to what it has to teach. The preacher immediately added, We should give thanks for cancer because it brings us closer to God and that is the most important thing in life. He then turned and looked at the other members of his congregation. Nodding at individuals one by one, he said, And you should give thanks for the breast cancer, and you, nodding to another, mental illness, and you, nodding to another, should give thanks for that shooting, and you, nodding to another, for the heart attack. Everyone he pointed to agreed. So, was he right? Should we not only be brave but even thankful if we get cancer? I re ected on my own case and realized that the preacher was right. In addition to the wisdom of the river, the forest and the sea, heres what I am thankful for. To fully know what it is to be human, it is just as important to go through the hard times of old age, loss of social roles, illness and approaching death as it is to go through the pleasant phases of youth. The hard parts can provide insight and wisdom as nothing else can. Cancer means one must really live in the present rather than being lost in the past or in fearful or desire ridden fantasies in the future. It makes all the difference in the world in experiencing life as the gift that it is. I experienced the impermanence and fragility of the rational, intellectual, analytical mind. It slowly disappeared when I got really sick, and it slowly reappeared as I got better. By shutting down the egocentric mind, the body actually makes it easier to face the nal decline. I no longer take positive things for granted or get all upset about the stresses of daily life. Mortality and the impermanence of an individual lifetime become very real rather than an intellectual philosophy, but it is a wonderful aspect of reality. Birth and death endlessly produce unique new minds and consciousness, new insights and talents. If Mozart had never died, Stravinsky could never have appeared. It is possible to let go of fear and to perceive the brilliance of the process and to know that death is part of a vaster and extraordinary reality. I have met some extraordinary people among those who treat cancer patients, doctors who are humble and compassionate, (I guess it is hard to be arrogant when you lose so many patients) and nurses who keep what could be a grim setting cheerful and upbeat, giving their patients the courage to get through it all. I have nally been able to really drop the ego-based worries of career and finances and replace them with things I really want to do. That consciousness can survive the death of the brain is no longer strictly a matter of faith. There is a growing amount of rational evidence that points in that direction, enough to provide hope if not certainty. If so, then death might not mean giving up the beauty of life. It might only mean a better view of the larger wonders of the universe. So I have learned to give thanks for all the tough lessons that teach us what we would never learn voluntarily. When we stop whining, when we realize that this too is part of the experience of living a full life then, when a major disease comes, we can truly give thanks for it. Its an intense and rich way to live, like having a challenging teacher always in your face, forcing you to live at your highest level of insight, ability, and courage. Reinhold Niebuhr, a Protestant theologian, said, Nothing worth doing is completed in our lifetime, therefore we must be saved by hope. Nothing true or beautiful or good makes complete sense in any immediate context of history, therefore we must be saved by faith. Nothing we do, however virtuous, can be accomplished alone. Therefore we are saved by love. This is what Ive learned so far.Anne Rudloe of Panacea was a marine biologist, writer and operated Gulf Specimen Marine Lab with her family. This was her last blog entry before her death on Friday, April 27.Editor, The News: I was pleased to see the photo of Jessica Beatty of Florida Wild Mammal with Doofy, the pelican (Wakulla Wildlife Festival photos, April 26). The last time I toured her wonderful facility, Doofy had me in stitches. He kept taking the mops and brooms away from the caretakers and trying to clean his own pen! Im glad to see hes doing well. Chris is a blessing to this community. Donna Bass CrawfordvilleGiving thanks for cancerGood to see a picture of Doofy the pelicanEditor, The News: OK, I checked my facts and I was partly wrong with the letter I sent to The Wakulla News (County vehicles used for personal trips?, Letters, April 12, which prompted a response from Heide Taylor, Check your facts before sending a letter, April 19). Doing the little bit of research that Heide Taylor suggested I do, I was able to ascertain that the Board of County Commissioners controls the purse strings for Animal Control. However, if you look at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce website, you will nd that under Community Services the Animal Shelter pops up and under the Fire and Rescue page, Animal Control also pops up. Regardless of whose department the vehicle we saw up in Leon County on a Sunday morning being used out of Wakulla County, I would still like to know why is a county vehicle being used for personal use? Plain and simply, why? As for the COAST Charter School bus that I see constantly being used after school hours yes, it is a non-profit organization, However, it is funded by the State of Florida per child who attends. Also, they do ll their tanks at Wakulla School District fuel pumps at Wakulla High School and at the elementary-middle schools on Spring Creek Highway and they are serviced by mechanics at the bus garage. As to who pays the bills, I could not find that in county records. However, this charter school is funded by the State of Florida and their bills are paid by taxpayers. Again I would ask, why is a county or state vehicle being used for personal use? Now I will address the reason for stirring the pot. First, this county has the problems it has because seldom is someone held accountable for their actions. Second, as far as how and when I choose to worship Christ is my business, not yours. I have spent the majority of my life knowing that Jesus Christ died for my sins and is my Lord and Savior. Lastly, I am a serviceconnected totally and permanently disabled veteran of the U.S. Air Force. I was not drafted back in 1972. I proudly volunteered for military service as four generations of Pierottis had before me and two of my children are now doing. To finish my stirring of the pot, read the U.S. Constitution some time especially the part about Freedom of Speech. Again, John Pierotti CrawfordvilleAfter checking facts, I was partly wrongREADERS WRITE:By MARJ LAW There has been a lot of discussion lately about the Stand Your Ground law. According to the Department of Agriculture, you have a right to use deadly force if someone is putting you in fear of your life or in fear of someone elses life, or if you are afraid of grievous bodily harm. You dont have to run away. Clear as mud, isnt it? What makes you fear for your life? Im 5 feet, 4 inches and used to weigh 113 pounds. (Im not saying, now.) On the subway, if a big man grabbed me with his arm around my neck, and said he was going to kill me, Id be afraid. Id be very afraid. If my hand was on a gun, well, that would meet the stand your ground rule in my book. However if I were a strong 250-pound man and 6 feet, three inches tall, the bad guy might have to reach up to put his arm around my neck. Id probably shift my weight, turn and knock him out. Stand your ground means different things to me than it would to a big, strong man, or a strong and trained woman. It used to be, before the stand your ground law, you had to get yourself out of the situation that put you in fear. But now, if youre in your car or your house, the presumption is that you are in fear of your life if someone breaks in. I know of one young man who was far from civilization when his airboat died. He trudged through the woods. He walked and walked. He was tired, cold, hungry and scared. He came across a house that appeared to be vacant. He broke a window to get in out of the cold. A few days later, after he had found his way home, he returned to the house and repaired the window. Now, if the house had not been vacant, the owner could have used deadly force to shoot the intruder. What would you have done, if you had a handgun in your possession? If you possess a handgun, this is something you need to have straight in your mind. A couple weeks ago, I was alone in the house at night. Something big and heavy thumped near a window outside. It was very frightening. I grabbed my loaded .38. I tiptoed around the house turning on every outside light, but stayed away from windows. Then I went in a room where I could see anyone coming to the doorway and I waited. And waited. Nothing happened. I left the exterior lights on all night and never heard another sound. Sometimes standing your ground is having a plan. Its being prepared. Its using safe thinking rst and deadly force last.Marj Law is a former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and has become an avid gun enthusiast in her retirement.Home on the RangeStand Your Ground is clear as mud By FAITH HUGHES, DVM Before I started volunteering at the CHAT Pet Adoption Center, I had never heard of a medical foster. Sometimes, a CHAT homeless pet may need a little extra care because of an injury or illness. Their condition is not usually lifethreatening or contagious, but that pet needs a little more attention than can be given at the CHAT facility. This is when a medical foster parent helps out. We need medical fosters for a variety of reasons. Debbie Casto takes in the tiny kittens and raises them until they are old enough to return to CHAT. The Martini family in Tallahassee recently took in a greyhound with a broken toe. Lori Strickland and her family always have one or two dogs in medical foster. I work closely with the people who foster my CHAT heartworm treatments. When CHAT is able, we take the heartworm dogs from Animal Control and treat them for heartworms. Heide Clifton usually purchases the medications needed. Recently, Charlie and Cheryl Creel fostered Duke, a yellow Labrador, during his treatment and eventually adopted him. Jo Ann Palmer fostered a chocolate Labrador named Pal who needed a lot of medical care. Teddy, a Standard Poodle, was fostered and adopted by Major Larry Massa. Another recent medical foster that is close to my heart is Gizmo, fostered by Shirley Yates. Hes so special that hell get his own Tail Waggers article soon. Being a medical foster doesnt mean that you have adopted the pet, it only means that you care for them at your home until they are ready to be adopted. Once the pet is released from medical care, it can be returned to the CHAT facility or stay in your home as a regular foster until someone is interested in adopting it. CHAT provides all the medications, treatments, and food for the medical fosters. The foster parent is responsible for giving the pet any medications and transporting the pet to CHAT or a local veterinary of ce as needed for treatments. If you are interested in becoming a foster or medical foster, contact Ava Woodall (foster director) or Tammy Vernon (shelter director) at CHAT, 926-0890, or me at 926-7153. CHAT of Wakulla, 1 Oak St., Crawfordville, FL 850-926-0890Dr. Faith Hughes is a veteranarian in Crawfordville and a CHAT volunteer.Tail Wagger ank you, CHAT medical fosters

PAGE 5

Special to The NewsThe 38th Annual Blue Crab Festival will be held May 5 in Panacea. Held annually at Woolley Park on scenic Dickerson Bay, the quaint festival originated in 1975 to promote the crab industry in Wakulla County. Thirty-eight years later, the festival has grown in size and tradition. The festival kicks off each year with a parade down U.S. 98 starting at 10 a.m. After the parade, the gates open to Woolley Park where the old, young and young-at-heart can enjoy a days full of waterfront fun. Park Admission is $3 per person. Children 12 and younger get in free. Throughout the event there will be live music, dance performances by cloggers, and historic demonstrations. A long-time tradition of the festival is the Crab Pickin Contest. Watch entrants pick their way through a basket of Blue Crabs to weigh-in the delicious meat for a prize. Its always exciting to watch the Mullet Toss, where contestants throw a real mullet in a distance-toss competition. Make sure to bring an appetite to the festival, as vendors will be cooking up boiled crabs, fried shrimp, hushpuppies and other mouth watering treats throughout the day. Take a stroll through the park to visit the many arts and crafts on display, where souvenirs and gifts can be purchased. And while there, dont forget to buy your 2012 Blue Crab Festival T-shirt or cookbook.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 5A Tip A Cop will be held at Poseys in PanaceaMembers of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce staff will take part in a Tip A Cop fundraiser on Friday, May 4 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Poseys Restaurant in Panacea. The event is a fundraiser for the Wakulla County Special Olympics. Sheriffs office staff will be serving customers during lunch and dinner and tips and donations received during the fundraiser will be given to the Wakulla Special Olympics program. Money raised through Special Olympic fundraisers helps the athletes offset the cost of attending regional and state competitions. The state competition will be held at the ESPN Wide World of Sports complex at Walt Disney World in Orlando May 18 and May 19. The events include bocce, cycling, soccer, tennis, track and eld and volleyball. Historical Society will hear Journey Stories on May 8The Wakulla County Historical Society meets at the Wakulla County Public Library on Tuesday, May 8, at 7 p.m. The Wakulla County Historical Society will hear from Florida Folk Festival performers Joan and Amy Alderman from Blountstown. Always entertaining, these colorful ladies proudly show off their Florida Panhandle roots with their collection of tales and tunes called Journey Stories, these are tales of how we, and our ancestors, came to America, and are a central element of our personal heritage. You will also learn how we can become a part of the Journey Stories exhibit, sponsored by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. This meeting will be the last monthly meeting until September. The Wakulla Museum at 24 High Drive (behind the Wakulla County Courthouse) is open every Thursday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There is presently a display of quilts by the local Wakulla County Quilters group accompanied by displays of cooking, sewing and weaving artifacts representing lifestyles of the last century. A collection of model antique cars, shared by Jim Calhoun, is a favorite conversation item for those who visit the museum. Looking at the models brings many memories to those who recall good times in particular cars! Come visit, share memories and check out the books and gift items the museum has for sale. Brian Parsons Memorial Soccer Game set for May 12The Brian Parsons Memorial Alumni Soccer Game will be held on Saturday, May 12, at 11 a.m. at Wakulla High School and all former girls and boys soccer players are invited to come play. There will be food and beverages for sale. The Brian Parsons Scholarship awards $1,000 to a current soccer player to aid in paying for college. Anyone who would like to make a donation, please send donations to Wakulla High School, Attn: Melisa Taylor, 3237 Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville FL 32327. Checks can be made payable to the Brian Parsons Scholarship Fund. Langston reunion to be held May 19The 13th family reunion for the descendants and relatives of Bill and Sally Roberts Langston will be held May 19, at 11:30 a.m. at the Fort Braden Community Center, 16387 Blountstown Highway, in Tallahassee. Fortress will be in concert and share its ministry with those attending. Family members are asked to bring covered dishes plus beverages. Contact Carol Langston (850) 421-1157 or (850) 524-1661 for questions or further information. Project Graduation to be held on May 31The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, along with Wakulla Public Safety, are once again spearheading and preparing for the 29th Annual Project Graduation in late May. This year the event will be held Thursday, May 31 from 2 p.m. until approximately midnight at Wakulla Springs State Park. During the program, students will have exclusive use of the lodge, the swimming area, boat rides, a bon re, food and entertainment in a controlled, supervised and fun environment. This year, expenses could total more than $13,000, said Crum, saying the sheriffs of ce is seeking contributions to offset the cost. The WCSO is accepting contributions by mail to Project Graduation, c/o Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, 15 Oak Street, Crawfordville FL 32327. Students will be asked to sign a pledge not to drink on graduation night and transportation will be available to Wakulla Springs for those students who dont have their own transportation. Staff ReportsBriefsBrook Sessions will headline the entertainment at the Blue Crab Festival. Here shes seen performing at a recent From the Heart show.Blue Crab Festival is Saturday10 a.m. Coastal Optimist Club Parade 11 a.m. Opening ceremonies 11:15 a.m. Chief and Mark 12:15 p.m. Mullet Toss 1 p.m. Mountain Dew Cloggers 2 p.m. Crab Pickin Contest 2:30 p.m. Rick Edminson 3:30 p.m. Mountain Dew Cloggers 4:30 p.m. Brook SessionsDOMINIC GHEESLING Blue Crab ScheduleSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Democratic Executive Committee announced that statewide county caucuses will be held on Saturday, May 5, at the Wakulla County Library from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The rst-ever statewide caucuses will kick off the delegate selection process, which will determine who will be part of the Florida delegation that will attend the national convention in Charlotte, N.C. Florida Democrats are looking forward to the National Convention this summer and are energized heading into 2012, said Florida Democratic Party Executive Director Scott Arceneaux. The county caucuses are an exciting chance for Democrats to get involved and help rally support for President Obama. Whether youve volunteered in the past or are brand new to the party, we urge you to join us on Saturday, May 5 and we hope to see you in Charlotte this summer. After being selected at the county level, delegates will proceed to the partys statewide convention where they will take part in the nal phase of the delegate selection process in Tampa, on June 1-3. Those selected at the state convention will attend the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte this summer. All registered Democratic voters are invited to attend the county caucuses to cast a ballot for their countys delegates to the State Convention. Any Democrat interested in running as a candidate for delegate to the State Convention was required to le the state convention delegate ling form with their county Democratic Executive Committee leadership by April 27. The ling form is available at www. adems.com/ timetoshine. This year, Florida will send its largest delegation ever to the National Convention with 300 delegates and 23 alternates. A majority of the delegates (184) will be elected at the Congressional District level. Democrats to hold rst-ever county caucusesSpecial to The NewsThe Genealogy Group of the Wakulla County Historical Society will meet on Thursday, May 3 at the Wakulla County Public Library at 6:30 p.m. At that meeting, Alisha Morgan will speak. She is a personal historian and the owner of Paperclipped Memories. Her company helps preserve life stories in beautiful, customized books. Morganwill be talking about the importance of recording our personal history. She is also going to have a drawing for a copy of her book. Genealogy group will meet on May 3 the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringMike HarveyApril 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromI really appreciate this program. We eat at all the restaurants participating. It is a Great Deal to Win! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal fr om Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlorank You So Much! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) 10AM (TUE-FRI) HAIRSALO N FREE HAIRCUT FEATHER LOCKS are here!!FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALON Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. THG-12901Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint pain Arthritis pain Muscle pain Back pain

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY SERVICES8:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study(One block So. of Courthouse)850-926-7896 office www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Anne Rudloe, a pioneering marine biologist, environmental activist, educator, author, dedicated wife, mother and Zen meditation practitioner, peacefully left her body Friday, surrounded by close family in their home in Panacea. Survivors include her husband, Jack Rudloe, and her sons, Sky and Cypress Rudloe. Born in Troy, Ohio, she received a bachelors degree from Mary Washington College in Virginia in 1969. She attended FSUs graduate program in marine biology under Professor William F. Herrnkind, receiving both her masters degree in 1972 and PhD, in 1978. She was respected for her extant research of horseshoe crabs, sea turtles, electric rays and mysid shrimp. Jack and Anne shared their lives for 42 years, in which they raised a family and transformed a commercial operation into the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, an aquarium and environmental education center in Panacea. For decades, she led the ght to keep St. Joe Bay from the talons of developers, halt the clear-cutting of pine eco-systems in St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, preserve many local natural eco-systems and also encouraged the state, while inspiring the public, to protect and manage public lands in sustainable ways, including Wakulla Springs, Fiddlers Point and Cape San Blas. She published three books: Butter- ies on the Sea Wind (2002), Priceless Florida as co-author (2004), The Endless Quest for Pink Gold with Jack Rudloe (2010), and Zen in a Wild Country (2012). Her journals, correspondence, scienti c papers are archived at University of Florida, Gainesville, Smathers Libraries Special Collections. Her 26-year dedication to Zen meditation practice was a constant presence in her research, teaching, writing, activism and the way she lived her life. She received INGA to teach as a JDPSN (Jido Pope Sanim) as a senior teacher of a full range of techniques and style in the Kwan Um School of Zen. She was the Abbot at the Cypress Tree Zen Center in Tallahassee. She published innumerable articles in scienti c and popular magazines and journals and was a notable and frequent guest on NPR. Her most recent blog can be viewed at http://rudloeanne.wordpress.com. A memorial service will be held on May 13 at the Unitarian-Universalist Church of Tallahassee, 2810 N. Meridian Road in Tallahassee at 4 p.m. In lieu of owers, the family requests that donations be made to Anne Rudloe Memorial Fund at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, P.O. Box 237, Panacea FL 32346 or Big Bend Hospice at bigbendhospice.org. The Rudloe Family would like to express their gratitude for the outpouring of love and support. Pioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide National Day of Prayer Service on Thursday, May 3, the designated National Day of Prayer. This will be the 61st annual observance. Hundreds of events are planned across the United States to focus our citizens attention for the need of prayer for our nation, state, and local communities. This years theme is Blessed is the nation whose God is the Lord. Pioneer Baptist Church of Crawfordville will host its annual community wide National Day of Prayer this Thursday at 7 p.m. The public is invited to worship together. Pioneer Baptist Church is located four miles east of Crawfordville just north of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road and the Spring Creek Highway intersection. The Churchs address is 486 Beechwood Drive. Call 878-5224 for additional information. We hope you will accept this invitation to worship with us.Church BriefsPioneer to host National Day of PrayerCarolyn Knight Pelt, 83, went home to be with her Lord on Monday, April 30, in Tallahassee. Funeral services will be Friday, May 4, at Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee St., in Crawfordville at 10 a.m. The family will receive friends Thursday, May 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the church. In lieu of owers, contributions may be made to the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. She was a native of Donaldsonville, Ga., and had lived most of her life in Crawfordville. She was a lifetime member of Crawfordville United Methodist Church where she generously supported its ministries. She was a loving and kind person giving freely to anyone in need. She had many friends and always looked forward to enjoying the Friday music at the Senior Center where most of the musicians were dear to her. Survivors include two sons, H. Wayne Pelt (Holly) and G. Richard Pelt (Cindy) of Crawfordville; two daughters, Rena Crum (Gary) of Crawfordville and Diane Miller of Tallahassee; one sister, Patty Albright (Dawson) of Tallassee, Ala.; ve grandchildren, Michael, Lori, Rebecca, Robin and Dustin and six great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, the Rev. Harry Pelt; sister, Catherine Alley; a brother, Lamar Knight; and a grandson, Kelly. Beggs Funeral Home Apalachee Chapel in Tallahassee is in charge of the arrangements.Bradham Forbes Carraway Carolyn Knight Pelt Anne Rudloe William Ron Smith Carolyn Knight PeltWilliam Ron Smith, 58, a lifelong resident of Perry, died April 26 at his home. He was a member of the Wakulla Free Riders and loved to ride motorcycles and took many road trips with friends. A Celebration of his life ride will be held Sunday, May 6, leaving Ouzts Too in Newport at 8:30 a.m. If any questions, call Bob Porter, (850) 528-6829. Survivors include his sister, Melinda Washko (Paul) and niece, Summer, of Hammock; two daughters, Emily Rouse of Perry and Amber Scott of Bokeelia; and three grandchildren. He was predeceased by his parents, Tom and Betty Smith.William Ron SmithBradham Forbes Carraway, 54, passed away on April 26, in Gainesville. He was born in Tallahassee, and was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. He worked for the City of Tallahassee. He was a member of Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. He was an avid hunter and sherman, loved golf and working in his garden. He loved spending time with his family. The service was held Tuesday, May 1, at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church with burial at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. The family received friends on Monday, April 30, at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church in Sopchoppy. Survivors include his wife, Sharon Nelson Carraway of Sopchoppy; two sons, Daniel James Carraway of Ft. Lee, Va., and Julian Nelson Carraway of Sopchoppy; two daughters, Samantha L. Snodgrass (Allen) of Tallahassee and Stephanie Stevens (Juan) of Chipley; three brothers, Ausley Burl Carraway Jr. (Ann) of Seneca, S.C., George Warrington Carraway (Jill) of Louisville, Ky., and Joseph David Carraway (Charlie) of Sopchoppy; six sisters, Frances Carraway Roberts (Randolph), Bettye Carraway Roberts (Edwin), all of Tallahassee, Jessie Carraway McMillan of Gulf Breeze, Sandra Carraway Crum (Bobby) of Mexico Beach, Carolyn Carraway Suiter (Galen) of Montgomery, Ala., and Susan Carraway Limbaugh (Gary) of Crawfordville; and two grandchildren, Noah and Norah Stevens. He is predeceased by his parents, Ausley Burl Carraway and Faye Forbes Carraway; a son, Seth A. Carraway; and a brother, Ott Carraway. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Bradham Forbes Carraway Anne Rudloe Letters of thanksThe family of Kenneth Attridge would like to thank all our friends and neighbors for their prayers, love, food, calls and cards following the loss of our loved one. Peg Attridge & Family The family of Delpha Porter would like to thank all those who brought us food, owers, etc. in our time of loss. From all her children

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 7Ahappenings in our communityCommunitySpecial to The NewsThe Juvenile (Type One) Diabetes Walk took place at Tallahassee Community College on April 14. It was a huge success due to the efforts of the local chapter leaders, Chris Kimmons and Angie Dunlap. The walk brought in more than $40,000 in donations that will go towards research for a cure. Sydney Andrews had the biggest team and won a basket full of goodies including a red JDRF blanket she loves. Sydney and her family would like to thank the many friends and family that generously donated their love, time and money to help nd a cure. A special thanks to the teachers who were at the walk, including her teacher Mrs. Rhiana Tucker. Andrews wins prize for largest team at diabetes walk SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSidney Andrews and her team Adam Johnson and Chelsea Lackey Chelsea Lackey of Crawfordville and Adam Johnson of Midland City, Ala., announce their engagement. The bride-elect is the daughter of Andy and Donna Lackey of Crawfordville. The groom-elect is the son of Jack and Kathy Johnson of Midland City, Ala. The wedding is planned for July 7 at 5 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church in Crawfordville.Happy rst birthday, JoshuaJoshua Michael Trint Deitz Jr. celebrated his first birthday on April 23. He is the son of Casey Wallin and Trint Deitz, both of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are Debra Wallin of Crawfordville and Max Wallin of Freeport, Fla. His paternal grandparents are Priscilla Deitz of Crawfordville and Steven R. Deitz of North Carolina. Joshua Deitz Jr.Johnson to marry LackeyLadies circle donates to Senior Citizens Center Women with the St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Ladies Circle present a $500 donation to the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center. Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Styles for Men, Women & ChildrenFULLSURVICEHAIRSALONHair Place That 850-926-6020We Have Gift CerticatesBooking NOWProm updos starting at$65OOPS !Wel com eMavis 274-0700Miranda545-2905Robyn926-6020Linda294-2085 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. PREPAID MONTHLY PLANS Modern Communicationsnationwide pre-paid cellular pagep l us U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT$4000 PERMO.DATACHARGESMAYAPPLY Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991850.224.4960www.fsucu.org LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926 or 510HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? happy birthdayAlvin and Gloria Sharp would like to wish their son Danny E. Sharp a Happy Birthday. On May 2, Danny turned 36 years old and celebrated with family. CLASSIFIEDS As Low As $10 Per Week! Call 877-676-1403

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolStudents get training at career center Special to The NewsTwelve Wakulla High School AVID students spent a recent Saturday receiving instruction from the Career Center at Florida State University. Ninth grader Lauren Dunlap liked what she learned about career opportunities, I know where to go to learn about job options and to practice for interviews. I loved this trip because it was educational, interactive, and interesting. Through a partnership with AVID and CROP, the students learned more about professional attire for interviews, business etiquette, and dining etiquette. Students were able to practice interview questions and situational professional practices with chaperones Nancy Floyd Richardson and Melinda House. Freshman Carson Strickland said it gave her a good image of what to wear to look professional and appropriate. Junior Danielle Gray agreed, What they showed us has already come in handy. Its very important to watch how you present yourself to other people. Afterward, students toured the career center, learned more about the research, resume, and interview services available, and ate lunch at Z. Bardhis. Sophomores Holli Lucas and Diwata Thomas had a lot of praise for the restaurant, especially the chef who greeted the students personally and welcomed them to the restaurant. AVID, which stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination, is an internationally successful collegepreparation program. Students take the AVID elective class to support their enrollment in rigorous honors, advanced placement, and college dual-enrollment classes. Wakulla County students have been in the program for three years, and AVID has been partnering with FSU CROP, the College Reach-Out Program, for the past year. CROP has been providing college tutors once a week after school, as well as weekend events to help students choose the correct college and learn more about nancial aid. Superintendent David Miller advocated for Wakulla County school system to be one of Floridas rst rural districts chosen for The Florida Partnership with the College Board Grant, which has allowed middle and high school teachers and administrators to better prepare all students for college success. AVID is a part of that grant program. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla High School AVID students receive training for job interviews at FSUs career center. Summer prep course available to freshmen Special to The NewsThere are limited spaces for incoming freshmen to Wakulla High School to attend a High School Prep Summer course. First time ninth graders can earn a half credit in reading that will count towards their 24 required credits for graduation. They will also learn their way around WHS. They will work on reading skills that will help with science, social studies, math, English, and all subjects, plus learn study skills that will help them get through their ninth grade. Transportation is provided and lunch is available for free through the Summer Feeding program. The two sessions of the nine-day course are Session 1 June 11 through June 25 with no Fridays; Session 2 June 26 through July 12 with no Fridays and July 4 and 5 off. Students must commit to all nine days. For more information, contact Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell at 926-0065 or mary.odonnell@ wcsb.us. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARY KATHERINE WESTMARK Dustin Grubbs, Jason Westmark, Austin Franklin, Mason McCord, Sarah Smith, Scott Joyner, Dr. Jacquelyn McMillan and Sherri Kraeft Special to The News The Wakulla County 4-H Program held their annual county level Tropicana Public Speaking Competition on Thursday, April 26 at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce in Crawfordville. Nine students participated in the contest. Four of the second place winners also presented their speeches, although not as competitors. Wakulla County 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft and several volunteers worked together to organize this years event. The competition was broken down into two divisions based on grade level. The fourth and fth grade combined contestants were Sarah Smith from COAST Charter School; Jason Westmark from Medart Elementary School; Austin Franklin from Riversink Elementary School; Mason McCord from Shadeville Elementary School; and Zoe Doler from Wakulla Christian School. COAST Charter School second place winner Madison Fountain delivered her speech and second place winner Bethany Thomas from Wakulla Christian School presented her speech as non-competitors. The sixth grade contestants were Bryanah Kilpatrick from COAST Charter School; Madisen Rudd from Riversprings Middle School; Mia Frick from Wakulla Christian School; and Gage Fenner from Wakulla Middle School. Wakulla Christian School second place winner Brianne Camp gave her speech entitled and second place winner Jillian Richardson from Wakulla Middle School presented her speech as non-competitors. The county level fourth and fth grade combined winners were: First Place, Jason Westmark; Second Place, Austin Franklin; Third Place, Mason McCord, and Honorable Mention, Sarah Smith. The sixth grade winners were: First Place, Gage Fenner; Second Place, Madisen Rudd; Third Place, Mia Frick; and Honorable Mention, Bryanah Kilpatrick. Each winner received a plaque, and all participants received certificates. The rst place winners won a $215 scholarship towards any 4-H camp offered this coming summer. First place winners will move on to the District Level Competition in Tallahassee on May 10. The Wakulla County 4-H program would like to thank the event judges, Dustin Grubbs of Centennial Bank, Dr. Jacquelyn McMillan of Capital City Youth Services and Scott Joyner, director of the Wakulla county Public Library for their time and participation. For more information, contact Sherri Kraeft at sjkraeft@u .edu or 926-3931 or visit www.wakulla.ifas. u .edu.Westmark and Fenner win Tropicana Public Speaking Competition Sherri Kraeft, Dustin Grubbs, Gage Fenner, Madisen Rudd, Mia Frick, Bryanah Kilpatrick Dr. Jacquelyn McMillan and Scott Joyner Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555The college of choice! Invest in yourself today EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT THE RISING COST OF COLLEGEat TCC, tuition is signicantly lower than most other universities and colleges 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla War Eagles baseball team worked hard and played an exciting game, but came away with a loss against Suwannee High on Thursday, April 26, in the rst round of district playoffs. The War Eagles were ahead for four innings, until Suwannee tied it in the sixth and then pushed ahead by one run to end the game, 4-3 in the seventh. In the second inning, senior Conner Smith hit a long y ball that just barely stayed in the park for a double, and sophomore Bryan Nichols brought him home with a strong hit to right eld. In the third inning, Nichols helped add two more runs with a powerhouse swing that drove in junior Dalton Dugger and Smith. DeQuan Simmons, a junior, also scored a run, soaring across home in a close play and tumbling in to the catcher before claiming the plate. Junior Jake Walker pitched well against the Bulldogs, with senior Jordan Montague taking over in the top of the seventh and holding the Bulldogs at their one run lead. War Eagles Head Coach Mike Gauger said the Bulldogs came wellprepared and were well-coached. Suwannee Coach Ronnie Gray said, Were sure well see Wakulla again in the nals its a great team and a classy organization. The War Eagles will play West Florida Tech on Wednesday, May 2, at 7 p.m. central time in Pensacola. By PAUL HOOVER WHS Track Coach At the FHSAA 2-A State Finals Track Meet, held last Saturday at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, local tracksters were two for two in placing in the top eight in their events and reaching the podium at the most prestigious high school meet held each year. Wakulla High School runners Madison Harris and Stanley Linton once again proved that they are among the best track runners in the state. Sophomore Harris, running in her second consecutive state nals 800 meter run, improved on her sixth place nish from last year by running a stellar race to nish in third place. Senior Linton, running in his rst nals 3200-meter run, continued his string of top- ight performances by placing seventh overall, securing his place on the podium. In the 800-meters nal, Harris ran aggressively from the beginning in a field that included four runners who had run sub-2:17 this year for the distance. She fought to maintain contact with the American Heritage runner who was ranked No. 1 coming into the meet. The rst place runner was able to separate herself from the pack somewhat in the second 400 meters, which left Harris and three or four other runners to ght it out for the remaining slots. Harris continued to run strong and push the pace in second place with another American Heritage runner in tow. Those two hit the nal 200 meters locked in an absolute duel, with neither willing to concede. They continued this duel until literally the nal step in the race, when the AH runner managed to outlean Harris, crossing the line in 2:16.59 with Harris finishing in third place in 2:16.80 just .21 of a second behind. The boys 3200 meter run promised to be extremely competitive, as the top 12 runners were all seeded within a few seconds of each other and that is how the race unfolded. The whole pack of runners stayed together through the rst half of the race, with Linton boxed in much of the time in the large pack. The pack started to break up somewhat in the next 800 meters, with Linton still struggling to get free and trying to get into his rhythm. With about 600 meters to go, the runners really began to establish their position and Linton found himself in a ght with four or ve other runners to determine their positions on the podium. Linton continued to ght until the very end, where he was able to hold his position and nished in 9:5657, in seventh place. These kids did something special today, said Coach Paul Hoover. To take two athletes to State and get to see both of them standing on the podium doesnt happen very often. I absolutely couldnt be prouder of them. SOFTBALLLady War Eagles cant catch ArnoldBASEBALLWar Eagles fall to Suwannee in playoffsBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsFour errors in the sixth inning by the Wakulla Lady War Eagles put the Panama City-Arnold Marlins ahead for a 6-3 win in the quarter- nal regionals on Wednesday, April 25. In the fth, both teams were tied two-two but some well-played line drives and base-stealing ended the sixth inning with the Marlins ahead by three runs. In the seventh, the Marlins added another with a home run. Fighting to the end, Wakulla grabbed one more run with a double, hit by freshman Kayla Hussey that drove home junior Kelbi Davis for the nal run of the game. With seven under-classmen on the 12-player team, Head Coach Tom Graham sees major potential for the War Eagles next year. If our girls can work hard in travel ball and come back strong, I know well make good things happen. Graham also credited the graduating seniors for their skill this season. They gave so much effort to the program their leadership was big, he said. DISTRICT CHAMPIONS A week earlier, the Lady War Eagles clenched the District title on a gamewinning yball catch by senior Sloan Barwick on Tuesday, April 17. After having been defeated by Suwannee County twice this season, Wakulla sailed to an easy 63 victory over the Bulldogs for the championship. Defensively, it all came together tonight, said Wakulla Head Coach Tom Graham said after the game. The War Eagles held a lead throughout the game, scoring a run in the fth inning, and two more in the seventh. Playing somebody the third time is rough, said Suwannee Head Coach Tommy Chambers. And when you get behind a good team, theyll just take a hold and get stronger. Before that game, the Lady War Eagles drubbed Rickards 11-1 in the District semi- nals at 5 p.m., setting up the nal against Suwannee for the district title. Graham attributed the win to teamwork and a lot of effort put forth by the girls. Taylor Hussey ended the game as the relief pitcher coming in after Michael Cooper, who wowed the crowd with two impressive change-ups in the second inning. Kenzie Lee had two strong hits at the top of the fth and seventh and made it to third base on a bunt in the rst inning, driving home three runs. Second base player Cami Eaton also had a strong showing at the game, catching a grounder and a line-drive in the second inning and catching a y in the fourth inning. With Wakulla in the eld, at the bottom of the fourth, Courtney Flowers delivered the ball to rst base player Sloan Barwick to tag out the Suwannee runner. Flowers repeated the move in the fth inning and caught a pop y in the same inning.TRACKHarris and Linton shine at state meetBy LISA KINARDSpecial to The NewsWakulla Babe Ruth League almost had their rst full week of baseball. Mondays game between the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans and the Badcock Furniture Rays was postponed due to FCAT testing. But things heated up on Tuesday with the Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws taking on the Ameris Bank Sluggers. The nail-biter came down to the last at-bat with the Sluggers holding off the Outlaws for a 3-2 win. For the Outlaws; Greyson Rudd, Chase Forester, Skyler Talavera, Lucas Briggs and James Calhoun each had a hit. Pitcher Nick Lentz had seven strikeouts, and Skyler Talavera and Chase Forester also pitched. The Sluggers pitched Michael McGlamry and Jake Bryan who had a single and double. Dylan Casseaux also had a hit. In the last inning, the Outlaws were down by one with runners on second and third and two outs, but Sluggers second baseman Josh Conway leaped to make a thrilling catch to end the game. Thursdays action saw the Badcock Furniture Rays win over the Ameris Bank Sluggers with a nal score of 10-4. Shane Davis pitched ve innings, giving up only four runs. The Sluggers threw Caleb Langston and Tyler Teegan. At the plate for the Rays, Aaron Price and Jaren Lawhon each went 2 for 2 while Clayton Burroughs hit 2 for 3. Hits for Sluggers included Michael McGlamry (double), Dylan Causseaux, Jake Bryan (double), Josh Conway and Thomas Davis. On Friday, The Harrison Bail Bonds Outlaws came back strong with a win over the Tallahassee Surgical Associates Titans, 10-0. For the Outlaws, Greyson Rudd, Lucas Briggs and Brandon Bennett combined to hold the Titans to only two hits. The Outlaws had eight hits including two apiece from James Calhoun, Skyler Talavera and Brandon Bennett. Lucas Briggs and CJ Langston also contributed hits. For the Titans, AC Ginn, RJ Kinard, Jackson Montgomery and John Weber shar ed the pitching duties. Weber and Sebastian Brahier each had hits. Timely hitting when there were two outs won the game for the Outlaws. This weeks games: Thursday, May 3 Titans vs. Sluggers. Friday, May 4 Rays vs. Sluggers.BABE RUTH BASEBALLSluggers hold o Outlaws for 3-2 winFOOTBALLNigel Bradham drafted by NFLStaff reportWakulla and FSU grad Nigel Bradham was selected in the fourth round of the NFL draft by the Buffalo Bills. Bradham, a linebacker, lead the Seminoles in tackles each of the last three seasons. Bradham returned to Wakulla High School last year to take part in a presentation by the Seminole Boosters of a check for scholarships for Wakulla players to attend FSU. Nigel Bradham Road trip! MAY7-13TPC SAWGRASS PONTE VEDRA BEACH, FL Create your PLAYERS story on and off the course and experience all the First Coast has to offer. Getaway packages start at $99 To book your trip, visit theplayerschampionshiptravel.com or visitjacksonville.com/golf San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS Subscribe to The Wakulla News 1-877-401-6408

PAGE 10

Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsSpecial to The NewsThere were 340 anglers registered in the fourth annual Panacea Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament held last weekend at Rock Landing Dock. Of those 340 fishermen, there were 46 in youth, 17 in kayak and 276 in recreational divisions. In addition, they also had: $2500 King sh Jackpot winner was Joe Carter shing aboard She Likes it Rough. $1500 Trout Jackpot winner was Steve Tucker shing aboard G3. The lucky youth angler who won the G3 boat/Yamaha Outboard/ Trailer package was Phan Lewis. The lucky lady angler who won the Lady Angler Basket was Dana Whitt. The lucky winner of the Kayak was Travis Lackey. The very lucky person with the winning raf e ticket for the Skeeter Bay Boat/Yamaha Outboard/ Trailer package was Jay Westmark. The tournament drew almost 100 more anglers this year and hundreds of spectators came out to the weigh-in. One of the highlights of the weigh-in was the 88.25-pound amberjack caught by Justin Tucker.Well, the Rock the Dock Tournament could not have asked for a better weekend for shing. The weather was absolutely beautiful both days and from what I heard a lot of nice sh were caught including an 88-pound amberjack which was the big fish of the tournament. I believe they had more than 300 entered and more than 50 kids shing. This is really turning out to be a well-received tournament. Jay Westmark walked away with a new Skeeter Bay Boat and to my knowledge doesnt even sh. The Kevins Red/Trout Shootout will be this weekend. It was scheduled for earlier in April but was canceled due to small craft advisories. The Big Bend Saltwater Class will be in June over Fathers Day Weekend so mark your calendars for that date and keep your ngers crossed for good weather. Bucky over at Shell Island Fish Camp said they had a big group down from Macon this past weekend and lots of trout, reds and Spanish were brought in. Most were caught on the West Flats out of St. Marks using the Gulp under a oat or live shrimp. Bucky said he went East of the lighthouse Sunday afternoon and throwing a pink and white Gulp jerk bait hooked a huge trout, which he couldnt get in the net. He said the water where he was shing was extremely clear and he said he saw a lot of big trout in three to four feet of water. Capt. Randy Peart has been shing out of the Econ na and catching plenty of sh. He said most of his better trout are coming from eight to nine feet of water and he is catching plenty of big rock bass and Spanish as well. Plenty of reds are along the shoreline and around the creek mouths. Mike Pearson and a buddy from Tifton went out on Friday and shed the stake line on the West Flats and caught their limit of trout and quite a few Spanish. They used the salt and pepper Gulp under a Cajun Thunder and on a straight jig bounced on the bottom. I shed with David, Dennis and Hank Longmire from Lady Lake for three days and we caught lots of trout and plenty of Spanish using live shrimp on the bottom and under the Cajun Thunder. Last week I canceled three trips due to the weather forecast. They revised the Saturday forecast and the people I was taking called and said they still wanted to come. They have fished with me for years and I told them we would give it a try. As it turned out, we had a great day. The wind blew pretty hard all day but we managed to catch 20 trout and two big reds right before the lightning started. We got in just as the heavy rains came and I was glad they had called to say they still wanted to give it a try. The Organization of Artificial Reefs is going to be enlarging the St. Marks Reef which is in about 20 feet of water and about ve miles off the Lighthouse. That should make for some really good shing for trout, grouper, rockbass and sheepshead. I wish they would put about eight or 10 shallow water reefs in Apalachee Bay and it would make for some great shing spots. Fishing around St. George is still good for trout in the Bay and plenty of pompano are being caught in the cut and on the East End of St. George. I have been hearing some reports of scallops being seen and if we dont get much rain between now and July 1 we should have another good season for scallops. Remember to know your limits and leave a oat plan with someone. Good luck and good shing!Weather was perfect this weekend From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Hundreds turn out for Rock the Dock in Panacea GLENN HORTON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA large group of manatees congregating on the St. Marks River last week.Manatees are back on the St. Marks, Wakulla riversStaff reportBoaters should be aware that manatees are back in local waters and apparently in large numbers. Local sherman Glenn Horton reported that he saw a large pod of manatees on the St. Marks River on Thursday, April 26. Horton said he saw 18 adult manatees and several babies in the creek between the fuel dock and the Purdom Power Plant on the St. Marks River. Its not necessarily unusual to see manatees there, but Horton noted that it seems early in season especially to see a pod that large. In this weeks Coast Guard Auxiliary report on Page 11A, its reported that approximately 10 manatees were swimming around and under the dock at Shell Island Fish Camp on the Wakulla River on Saturday, April 28. Keep an eye out for the manatees. The catch of the day was this 88-pound amberjack A young angler with a red sh.PHOTOS BY JIMMIE SMITHMore photos online at thewakullanews.net IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 27 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle FRAN KLINWA KU LLA JE FFE RS ON & TA YLO R GAG GROUPER 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Per fect W eat her fo r Out door Se ati ng Ove rlooki ng Bea uti ful Dicker son Ba y!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com DUBREJA PLAZA94 COTTONWOOD STREET, CRAWFORDVILLEFL o o Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing glitzNc lip CALL 850926-TRIM( 8746 )Mothers Day SpecialFREEhaircut with a color service

PAGE 11

This past weekend, I was called out of town for a meeting. While I am away, I cant help but think about what to write for the column. This week, I owe Norma Hill a debt of gratitude for putting together the article. Norma wrote: Some things in life go as expected. Others dont. Of the group planning to participate in a safety patrol leaving out of Shell Island Fish Camp on Saturday, only three of the original five scheduled members were actually able to participate. Unexpected events in the lives of two crew members demanded their time be spent elsewhere that day. Fortunately, two other crew members were available for and excited to be a part of an early morning patrol. With the minor adjustments, all was good. The day started quite early with most of us rolling out of bed around 4 a.m. The plan was to complete an ATON (Aids to Navigation) mission by getting away from the dock while it was still dark. One of the requirements for becoming quali- ed as a crew member for the Auxiliary is that you must participate in speci c patrols, such as a patrol at night, a towing mission and an ATON. Member Terry Hoxworth has been going on several patrols as a trainee since joining Flotilla 12 in February of 2010 and is about ready to take the quali cation exam to become a crew member. This was his expected ATON patrol. We all arrived at Shell Island Fish Camp by 6 a.m. ready to get underway. The boat was lled with gas and ready to go. Unfortunately, we also discovered that there was an unexpected heavy fog in the area. Coxswain Mark Rosen quickly informed us that we might as well sit back and relax for awhile, as we would not be leaving the dock until the fog had lifted. The extra time at the dock provided us with an opportunity to chat with others planning to spend time on the water during the day. Many were hoping to catch a few sh. Some simply wanted to enjoy some sun while on their boats. One 4-year-old boy was quite excited to be going shing with his dad and grandpa while his mom and nana stayed home or went shopping. He proudly showed the anchor on the navy blue life jacket that he was wearing. Finally Mark decided the fog had cleared enough so that we could get underway. After completing our pre-underway check, we carefully pulled away from the dock. Helmsman Bill Wannall slowly motored along while crew Phil Hill and trainee Terri Hoxworth maintained a bow watch and I maintained a stern watch. It soon became apparent that, though the fog had seemed less back at the Fish Camp, there was still worse than expected visibility where we now were. Mark asked Bill to locate in a safe area and lower the anchor so that we could wait a bit longer before traveling the rest of the way out of the channel. This delay provided for an opportunity to refresh our minds about boating in areas with decreased visibility. We made certain that the boat was lighted appropriately so others could see us and sounded our horn at intervals (every two minutes per Navigation Rules) so that others could hear us. We also maintained our vigilance using our eyes, as well as ears. What we noticed were several boats heading out with no running lights and without sound signals. This could quickly become a very dangerous situation in our narrow and shallow channel. As the fog continued to clear, I was able to snap a few beautiful photos of the awakening day. Soon enough we were on our way for the continuation of our safety patrol. The weather was absolutely beautiful for being on the water. We saw folks shing, kayaking, and just enjoying the day. We enjoyed our brunch at Riverside Caf while listening to Mark, also the Member Training Of- cer for our Flotilla who is forever nding teachable moments, as he discussed various scenarios and asked our thoughts on how to handle them safely. We watched dolphins as they danced in the water. Eventually we were heading back toward Shell Island Fish Camp to end our patrol. Bill had just commented what a great day it had been. Suddenly Phil, who was on bow watch, noticed something that didnt seem quite right on a boat near us. He noti ed Mark and Bill, and we went to investigate. What we found was a boat with four people on board whose motor was not working. They were drifting toward the shallows. We ended up towing them to safety. Im sure this was not the way they had expected to spend their afternoon, but they did express their appreciation for the assistance. Once back at the Fish Camp, we had yet one more unexpected surprise approximately 10 manatees were swimming around and under the dock. What a ne day it was! As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Knowing your navigation rules is important to being prepared and safe when out on the water. Rule 19 covers fog and we will talk more about it in the near future. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Bill Wannall on the radio.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Terry Hoxworth and Mark RosenThe Research Cruise. For eight years I sponsored a summer cruise aboard my 46-foot sailboat, the S/V Olapa. Students would register for a class at FSU called Applications of Diving to Research. But these cruises began many years earlier with Joe Barber, our marine lab boat captain, who took my classes down to the Florida Keys and the Bahamas on self-directed research. I designed a class where students designed underwater research that with the help of their classmates, they would conduct on intense weekend projects. They would take us anywhere they could on their very limited budgets. Good people like Barber, Bobby Millender, Mr. Oaks, George Fischer, Jim Dunbar, Robert Warner and many others always had ways and means. In the end, I attended more than 300 such projects before retiring in 2004. So here is how it worked. Each year (since 1980), a department would provide limited funds and a teaching assistant to support my class in Applications of Diving to Research. Dedicated students from many disciplines would apply and be selected based upon their need to know. Many were early graduate students. We warned them the class was both brutal as in time consuming and fun in that we were in the eld. To pass the class, each student had to select a topic, design and test a hypothesis, build a research team and conduct a pilot study lasting at least one day. Concept, cruise plan, budgets, reports and ultimately a grant proposal was required (which generated a grade). Each student selected a date and worked with others to make that project a success. Some failed, some made it and some excelled, as you might have expected. But as long as their reports documented their journey, they passed the class. Imagine anthropology, biology, oceanography, criminology, art, chemistry and engineering students working together in the same class, bound together by a common research site (underwater). The revelations between disciplines were common, their terms were different, but their descriptions were similar and their tools could be shared. The relationship between two objects is called provenance by the anthropologist, interpersonal distance by the biologist and relational evidence in criminology. Team building over a semester was an awesome experience for the students and for me to witness. In one class, during a swim down the Ichnetucknee River, an anthropologist saw an ivory tip protruding from the bank. We reported it to Dr. Jim Dunbar (a frequent sponsor) at the Florida Archives, and were invited by him to excavate the site. The anthropology student took on the project and built his team which included an engineer and photographer. The entire excavation was video documented. The engineer designed a device that successfully removed a full mammoth tusk from the site undamaged back to the states preservation lab in Tallahassee. Dunbar said it was a rst! George Fischer sponsored students on numerous surveys of national park forts up and down the Gulf and East Coasts, exciting opportunities in search of lost historic boats or relics thrown from defenders walls. I became a sponsor in 1995 when I began summer research on diseases in marine organisms along the Florida Keys with Dr. Rob Werner, the university veterinarian. Students had to learn how to run the boat, conduct their research, and of course, be safe while living a oat with like-minded colleagues. We made stops to survey marine organisms on the reef every eight nautical miles from Miami to west of the Dry Tortugas in a three-week period. The fourth week was make up should we have bad weather or breakdowns along the way. In future columns, I will share these cruises with you. The true heroes are the creative students and sponsors that became my inspiration. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday y Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed May 9, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 12:44 AM 3.5 ft. 1:42 AM 3.6 ft. 2:35 AM 3.6 ft. 3:24 AM 3.5 ft. 4:11 AM 3.4 ft. 4:58 AM 3.1 ft. 5:44 AM High 0.9 ft. 6:34 AM 1.0 ft. 7:19 AM 1.2 ft. 8:00 AM 1.3 ft. 8:39 AM 1.4 ft. 9:17 AM 1.5 ft. 9:54 AM 1.6 ft. 10:34 AM Low 3.7 ft. 12:48 PM 3.9 ft. 1:23 PM 4.1 ft. 1:59 PM 4.2 ft. 2:35 PM 4.3 ft. 3:13 PM 4.2 ft. 3:51 PM 4.0 ft. 4:31 PM High -0.1 ft. 7:22 PM -0.6 ft. 8:10 PM -0.9 ft. 8:56 PM -1.0 ft. 9:43 PM -1.0 ft. 10:29 PM -0.8 ft. 11:16 PM Low Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed May 9, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 12:41 AM 3.6 ft. 1:39 AM 3.7 ft. 2:32 AM 3.7 ft. 3:21 AM 3.6 ft. 4:08 AM 3.4 ft. 4:55 AM 3.2 ft. 5:41 AM High 0.9 ft. 6:31 AM 1.1 ft. 7:16 AM 1.2 ft. 7:57 AM 1.4 ft. 8:36 AM 1.5 ft. 9:14 AM 1.6 ft. 9:51 AM 1.7 ft. 10:31 AM Low 3.7 ft. 12:45 PM 4.0 ft. 1:20 PM 4.2 ft. 1:56 PM 4.3 ft. 2:32 PM 4.4 ft. 3:10 PM 4.3 ft. 3:48 PM 4.1 ft. 4:28 PM High -0.2 ft. 7:19 PM -0.6 ft. 8:07 PM -1.0 ft. 8:53 PM -1.1 ft. 9:40 PM -1.1 ft. 10:26 PM -0.8 ft. 11:13 PM Low Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed Ma y 9, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 1:20 AM 3.3 ft. 2:18 AM 3.4 ft. 3:11 AM 3.4 ft. 4:00 AM 3.3 ft. 4:47 AM 3.1 ft. 5:34 AM High 0.8 ft. 7:38 AM 0.9 ft. 8:23 AM 1.0 ft. 9:04 AM 1.2 ft. 9:43 AM 1.3 ft. 10:21 AM 1.4 ft. 10:58 AM -0.7 ft. 12:20 AM Low 3.4 ft. 1:24 PM 3.6 ft. 1:59 PM 3.8 ft. 2:35 PM 3.9 ft. 3:11 PM 4.0 ft. 3:49 PM 3.9 ft. 4:27 PM 2.9 ft. 6:20 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:26 PM -0.5 ft. 9:14 PM -0.8 ft. 10:00 PM -1.0 ft. 10:47 PM -0.9 ft. 11:33 PM 1.5 ft. 11:38 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:07 PM High Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed May 9, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:36 AM 2.6 ft. 1:34 AM 2.7 ft. 2:27 AM 2.7 ft. 3:16 AM 2.7 ft. 4:03 AM 2.5 ft. 4:50 AM 2.4 ft. 5:36 AM High 0.6 ft. 6:45 AM 0.7 ft. 7:30 AM 0.8 ft. 8:11 AM 0.9 ft. 8:50 AM 1.0 ft. 9:28 AM 1.1 ft. 10:05 AM 1.2 ft. 10:45 AM Low 2.8 ft. 12:40 PM 2.9 ft. 1:15 PM 3.1 ft. 1:51 PM 3.2 ft. 2:27 PM 3.2 ft. 3:05 PM 3.2 ft. 3:43 PM 3.0 ft. 4:23 PM High -0.1 ft. 7:33 PM -0.4 ft. 8:21 PM -0.7 ft. 9:07 PM -0.8 ft. 9:54 PM -0.7 ft. 10:40 PM -0.6 ft. 11:27 PM Low Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed May 9, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 12:28 AM 2.7 ft. 1:26 AM 2.8 ft. 2:19 AM 2.8 ft. 3:08 AM 2.8 ft. 3:55 AM 2.6 ft. 4:42 AM 2.5 ft. 5:28 AM High 0.8 ft. 6:13 AM 1.0 ft. 6:58 AM 1.1 ft. 7:39 AM 1.3 ft. 8:18 AM 1.4 ft. 8:56 AM 1.5 ft. 9:33 AM 1.6 ft. 10:13 AM Low 2.9 ft. 12:32 PM 3.0 ft. 1:07 PM 3.2 ft. 1:43 PM 3.3 ft. 2:19 PM 3.3 ft. 2:57 PM 3.3 ft. 3:35 PM 3.1 ft. 4:15 PM High -0.1 ft. 7:01 PM -0.6 ft. 7:49 PM -0.9 ft. 8:35 PM -1.0 ft. 9:22 PM -1.0 ft. 10:08 PM -0.7 ft. 10:55 PM -0.4 ft. 11:44 PM Low Thu May 3, 12 Fri May 4, 12 Sat May 5, 12 Sun May 6, 12 Mon May 7, 12 Tue May 8, 12 Wed Ma y 9, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 12:53 AM 2.4 ft. 2:10 AM 2.6 ft. 3:19 AM 2.6 ft. 4:22 AM 2.6 ft. 5:20 AM 2.6 ft. 6:16 AM 2.5 ft. 7:08 AM High 1.1 ft. 5:44 AM 1.3 ft. 6:31 AM 1.5 ft. 7:13 AM 1.7 ft. 7:53 AM 1.8 ft. 8:32 AM 1.8 ft. 9:13 AM 1.8 ft. 10:03 AM Low 2.6 ft. 12:00 PM 2.8 ft. 12:27 PM 2.9 ft. 12:58 PM 3.1 ft. 1:33 PM 3.1 ft. 2:13 PM 3.1 ft. 2:58 PM 3.0 ft. 3:48 PM High 0.1 ft. 6:41 PM -0.2 ft. 7:28 PM -0.5 ft. 8:15 PM -0.6 ft. 9:04 PM -0.6 ft. 9:54 PM -0.5 ft. 10:46 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 3 May 9First May 28 Full May 5 Last May 12 New May 20Major Times 11:12 AM 1:12 PM 11:40 PM 1:40 AM Minor Times 4:43 AM 5:43 AM 5:47 PM 6:47 PM Major Times --:---:-12:08 PM 2:08 PM Minor Times 5:25 AM 6:25 AM 6:56 PM 7:56 PM Major Times 12:37 AM 2:37 AM 1:06 PM 3:06 PM Minor Times 6:10 AM 7:10 AM 8:06 PM 9:06 PM Major Times 1:37 AM 3:37 AM 2:08 PM 4:08 PM Minor Times 7:02 AM 8:02 AM 9:16 PM 10:16 PM Major Times 2:40 AM 4:40 AM 3:11 PM 5:11 PM Minor Times 7:59 AM 8:59 AM 10:23 PM 11:23 PM Major Times 3:43 AM 5:43 AM 4:14 PM 6:14 PM Minor Times 9:01 AM 10:01 AM 11:24 PM 12:24 AM Major Times 4:45 AM 6:45 AM 5:14 PM 7:14 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:06 AM 11:06 AM Good Better Best Best++ Better Good Average6:52 am 8:16 pm 5:47 pm 4:44 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:51 am 8:17 pm 6:56 pm 5:25 am 6:50 am 8:17 pm 8:07 pm 6:11 am 6:49 am 8:18 pm 9:17 pm 7:03 am 6:48 am 8:18 pm 10:24 pm 8:00 am 6:48 am 8:19 pm 11:24 pm 9:02 am 6:47 am 8:20 pm --:-10:07 am78% 85% 93% 99% 91% 83% 76% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org

PAGE 12

Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt took less than 10 minutes of deliberation for a jury to nd a Panacea tattoo artist not guilty of selling drugs. In a trial on Wednesday, April 25, David King was found not guilty of two felonies sale of a controlled substance and delivery of a controlled substance. Assistant State Attorney John Wilson prosecuted the King case, which alleged King sold hydrocodone to a con dential informant who went into Kings tattoo parlor in July of last year. The state presented the informant and a tape recording of the alleged drug buy. The evidence is clear, Wilson told the jury in his closing. Defense attorney Steven Glazer attacked the prosecutions case as anything but clear: the informant had a long criminal record a 0-time loser, in Glazers words in his closing statement to the jury. Plus, Kings voice was never heard on the tape. Glazer also attacked the reliability of the undercover operation noting that the informants girlfriend went on the controlled buy with him, but she was never searched before or after the operation, nor was the car that the informant and his girlfriend drove to the tattoo shop. After the controlled buy, law enforcement conducted a search of the shop but no drugs were found, nor was the marked money used by the informant. After the trial, Glazer said hes been practicing law for 24 years and had as many as 150 trials and never had a jury return a verdict so quickly. He timed it at nine and a half minutes. John Adams said the jury system is the heart and lungs of our liberty, Glazer said, and I truly believe it. Senior Circuit Judge William Gary presided over the trial. King still faces charges that he killed and ate a Panacea neighbors Vietnamese pot-bellied pig. Parts of the butchered animal were allegedly found in Kings freezer. In another court matter, Judge Gary reduced the bond for a man charged with swindling people around the world out of nearly $80,000 to ship yachts. After a hearing on April 23, Gary reduced bond for James OConnor, who lives in Nevada, to $40,000 from the original $450,000. At the hearing, Assistant State Attorney Lorena Vollrath-Bueno painted a portrait of OConnor as man who created numerous shell companies in an effort to rip off potential shipping customers. In April 2011, OConnor was hired by Brett Shields of Shields Marina to ship a boat a customer had purchased to Australia. After paying more than $10,000 to OConnors All Flags International, the boat arrived in Brisbane in June but the shipping company refused to release the boat, saying it had not received payment from All Flags. Shields paid again for the shipping, and the boat owner paid for other additional charges. Shields also found ve other people who claim they had been swindled by OConnor in similar shipping deals. At the hearing two weeks ago, OConnors wife said that she sold her silver to pay for plane tickets for the couple to travel to Wakulla County so her husband could answer to the criminal charges. She also said some of the money had gone to make restitution to Shields. She also testified that she and her husband had applied for a mortgage on their home to pay restitution to other people who claimed her husband owed them money. OConnor was represented at the bond hearing by Crawfordville attorneys Lynn Alan Thompson and David Kemp. In one contentious matter, the state claimed that OConnor should be found in contempt of court and held without bail for failing to appear at a court hearing in March. OConnor had waived formal extradition from Nevada and agreed to appear in Wakulla when required. OConnors wife testi ed that she and her husband had been in contact with Thompson and Kemp, who told them the case didnt appear on the March felony docket. Bueno called Thompson to the stand at one point, asking him questions about whether OConnor should have appeared in March because thats when the Nevada extradition papers said he should appear. Thompson responded that the papers also said he should appear in court in Nevada on the charges. Judge Gary noted confusion on dates in the court documents and refused to nd OConnor in contempt. He reduced the bond but required OConnor, who is English, to surrender his passport and forbade any international travel while the case is pending. Bueno gave special praise to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and Detective Matt Helm for investigating the complex case. The prosecutor noted it was rare that a small department would be willing to undertake a case that includes victims from around the world. Alleged victims in the case include people in Singapore, Malaysia and Dubai.Court shorts James OConnorSpecial to The NewsThree Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce law enforcement of cers took part in Drug Take Back Day Saturday, April 28 in Crawfordville, Panacea and Wakulla Station. Lt. Brent Sanders manned a collection site in Panacea while Sgt. Danny Harrell was in Wakulla Station, and Lt. Sherrell Morrison was at the Wakulla County Health Department. During the four-hour collection period, the three law enforcement of cers collected 25.5 pounds of unwanted medications. While the Drug Take Back event is held several times a year in Crawfordville, Wakulla Station and Panacea, unwanted medications may be disposed of 24 hours a day in the secure disposal bin in the sheriffs of ce lobby.reportsLaw Enforcement and Courts David King after his arrest last yearO cers participate in Drug Take Back Day Lt. Sanders, Lt. Morrison, Sgt. Harrell Go to AnyGivenTimeJax.com to enter to win a vacation in sunny Jacksonville! SO MUCH TO DO, ANY GIVEN TIME. Conventional/FHA/VA* Lot Loans | Refinancing Adjustable & Fixed Rate USDA Rural Housing* Affordable Housing Construction/Perm. Financing Whether youre buying your first home or just need room to grow, our customized approach to mortgage lending can get you moving. Call us today or apply online at www.ccbg.com. DENNIS NIELSEN 850.509.4836 Moving in the right direction.MEMBER FDIC All products are subject to credit and property approval. Program terms and conditions subject to change without notice. Not all products are available in all markets or for all amounts. Other restrictions and limitations may apply. *Loans are not made or originated by the FHA, VA, HUD or any other governmental entity. Scan this code with your smartphone to view current rates and calculate monthly payments.Requires mobile scanner app. 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327www.thewakullanews.comToll Free Phone877401-6408 Special OfferPurchase 1 year for $31 ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover rr s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________ Phone____________ e-mail_______________________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 5/18/2012Get 5 Additional Weeks FREE*With this coupon is offering 5 Weeks FREEwith the purchase of 1 years subscription for $31* WINDOWSBestWindow...Best Price...Best Choice! 1 Double Pane InsulatedGlass $179*Any size Installed of TALLAHASSEE COME VISITUS AT GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL850-519-5056www.abcwintallahassee.com

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 13ASheri s ReportOn April 20, a 12-year-old Medart Elementary School student was allegedly found in possession of marijuana at school. The female fth grader was suspended from school for 10 days and will not be allowed to attend the fth grade trip. The students parents were noti ed and the marijuana was seized. It weighed less than one ounce. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: On April 18, Thomas Varnum of Crawfordville reported the theft of an Ereader and charger, valued at $175. The property was removed from the victims home. The E-Reader was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. On April 18, Rebecca Bar eld of Panacea reported the theft of medication from her home. A suspect has been identi ed. The medication is valued at $60. On April 18, Erica Morse of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary of an item belonging to a juvenile. The juvenile victim left an electronic device in a vehicle at Winn-Dixie and returned to the car to nd the item gone. The device is valued at $150. On April 18, Dorcus Allen of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The complainant received tax information in the mail from another individual in South Florida. Deputy Ian Dohme discovered that the victim lives in Hillsborough County and attempted to contact her about the incident. The mailing contained personal information from a Hillsborough woman. On April 18, Stephanie Hunt of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim was at Winn-Dixie when she accidentally left her purse in a cart in the cart return in the parking lot. The victim returned 10 minutes later and discovered the purse was missing. The purse and contents are valued at $682. A suspect has been identi ed. On April 19, Brian Dickinson of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim attempted to le his tax return when he discovered that someone had already used his Social Security number. On April 19, Amy Rosier of Crawfordville reported a structure re on Mill Creek Road. A faulty bathroom fan caught re and burned the light xture. Wakulla re ghters arrived on the scene and extinguished the re. The preliminary damage report was estimated at $3,000. The re was ruled an accident. On April 19, Clayton Bozeman of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A telephone account was opened in the name of the victims business without his knowledge. Five phone numbers were opened in the account, all in Texas, as well as iPhone and iPad phone lines. The transactions totaled $2,083. On April 20, Theodore Lowrie of Sopchoppy reported the loss of a canopy tent, valued at $225. The tent was set up at the Worm Gruntin Festival. The tent was left at the location in Sopchoppy at the end of the festival and was gone when the owner returned to pick it up. On April 21, Michael Riggins of St. Augustine reported a traf c crash at Running Deer Lane. The vehicle struck a deer, but there were no injuries. On April 22, Admiral Barwick of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. Someone added syrup to the fuel line of the victims boat. On April 22, Benjamin Powell of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Someone stole the victims kayak from his Wakulla River dock. The kayak was valued at $400. On April 23, CSI Rae Eddens and Capt. Randall Taylor conducted the regularly scheduled emptying of the WCSO Prescription Drug Collection drop box in the lobby. The contents of the drop box were bagged and weighed in the medical unit of the WCSO Jail. The drugs weighed 18 pounds and were turned over to CSI Eddens for destruction. On April 20, Michelle Dawson of Crawfordville reported the theft of four gasoline cans from her home. The cans contained gas and are valued at $80. A suspect has been identi ed. On April 21, Nathaniel Brook Harris, 26, Christopher Tyler Muse, 19, and Joshua Allen Stratton, 28, all of Crawfordville, were observed by Sgt. Jeremy Johnston at a vacant lot on Riverside Drive in St. Marks. All three subjects were in possession of beer and Stratton was urinating in public. Sgt. Johnston and Deputy Billy Metcalf allegedly observed marijuana at the scene and the three suspects were all issued notices to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Harris had 6.4 grams of marijuana, Stratton had 3.0 grams and Muse had .08 grams. On April 21, Marilyn J. Garner of Tallahassee reported a traf c crash at 525 Crawfordville Highway. Garner was northbound on U.S. Highway 319 when a deer ran out in front of her vehicle. The vehicle struck the deer and created $6,000 worth of damages, but there were no injuries. On April 21, David Sapp of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Numerous unauthorized charges were discovered on the victims bank account over a ve day period. A total of 12 transactions were discovered with a value of $1,104. On April 21, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after an asset protection employee allegedly observed Krystal N. Emmett, 25, of Crawfordville taking $25 worth of shoes and hair gel from the store without paying for the items. Emmett was issued a notice to appear in court for retail theft. On April 21, Gloria Guindon of Panacea reported the theft of a personal watercraft from her home. The craft was taken from the victims dock on the Ochlockonee River and is valued at $3,000. The equipment was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. Later, the property was recovered in Franklin County near Walker Bridge. A sherman spotted the property oating in the marsh grass. It was determined that the watercraft had broken away from the dock and was not stolen. The property was returned to the owner. Detective Lorne Whaley and Deputy Scott Powell investigated along with Franklin County Deputy Quinnaland Rhodes. On April 21, deputies received five animal complaints during the shift related to large bears. All of the animals were in highly populated areas of Crawfordville. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission were noti ed of all of the sightings. On April 24, Shannon Lewis of Panacea reported a burglary in Crawfordville. Someone removed a trolling motor from storage at a relatives home. The motor is valued at $320. Persons of interest were identi ed. On April 23, Amber Smith of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Furniture, jewelry and currency, valued at $425, were stolen from the home. On April 23, Francis Dinardi of Panacea reported a r esidential burglary. A window was broken at a home the victim uses for storage. Two televisions were stolen. They are valued at $300. On April 23, Crystal Parsons of Crawfordville was cleaning family property when she discovered a head stone on the property. The 75-pound granite stone had the name of a deceased person, who lived from 1888 to 1969, according to the stone. CSI Rae Eddens was called to the site and removed the stone. A suspect has been identi ed. The investigation continues. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. On April 23, Sonya Miller of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was observed and $6,000 worth of household goods was stolen. Deputy Ian Dohme and CSI Rae Eddens investigated. On April 23, Mary Roberts of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and $3,600 worth of property was stolen from the home. Damage to the home and contents was estimated at $5,000. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and CSI Rae Eddens investigated. On April 23, Lori Bromley of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $760 worth of property. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On April 23, Barry Seaman of Crawfordville reported the theft of $58 worth of currency from his home. A suspect has been identi ed. On April 24, Detective Nick Boutwell investigated a report of a stolen rearm in Crawfordville. Detectives Lorne Whaley and Derek Lawhon joined Boutwell and interviewed a suspect north of Crawfordville. A .22 caliber rifle was recovered and two suspects have been identi ed. Boutwell also contacted a Leon County Sheriffs Of ce detective who was investigating the case in Tallahassee and the investigation continues. On April 25, Charles Smith of Sopchoppy reported a burglary at his camping area in Sopchoppy. A water pump, copper wire and a sink, valued at $235, were stolen from the site. On April 25, Merritt Taylor of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim stated that a suspect, who has been identi ed, has been using his personal information without authorization. Taylor discovered that he owed $1,148 to an electrical provider outside of his home community. On April 25, Jessica Raines of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the victims residence and removed a television, valued at more than $1,000. The victim is still conducting a property inventory to determine if anything else was taken. On April 25, Krystal Nicole Emmett, 25, of Crawfordville was arrested for retail theft at Walgreens. Store employees allegedly observed the suspect opening merchandise and leaving empty packaging on the shelves. The suspect was also allegedly observed putting an item in her purse. She attempted to put some items back on store shelves and leave the store before she was detained. On April 25, Junell Davis of Crawfordville recovered a set of keys in the area of Shadeville Highway and Kirkland Drive in Crawfordville. The keys included a vehicle key fob. Davis spotted the keys on the side of the highway. The owner is unknown and the keys have been turned over to the WCSO Property Division. On April 25, Melanie Courson Roberts of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered that her credit card was compromised. The victim used the card while traveling and discovered the card was compromised in the same city in which she was traveling and used the card. On April 26, a retail theft was reported at WalMart. Candise Ray Whiddon, 27, of Apalachicola was allegedly observed taking clothing and putting the items in her purse. She was stopped after reportedly attempting to flee to her vehicle. The clothing was valued at $87 and she was issued a notice to appear in court. She was also issued a trespass warning for Wal-Mart. On April 25, Shalonda Antill of Crawfordville was traveling northbound on U.S. Highway 319 when she was stopped by construction workers. Jean Hindle of Crawfordville was traveling behind Antill and failed to stop her vehicle and struck Antill. There were no injuries. Hindle was issued a traf c citation for careless driving. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 806 calls for service during the past week. Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recently recognized Jean and Finley McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay with a plaque designating them with a Lifetime Honorary Membership in the Florida Sheriffs Association. The McMillans have contributed to the Florida Sheriffs Association Youth Ranch for more than 25 years and they took advantage of the opportunity to eat lunch and share memories with Sheriff Crum. I wanted to thank the McMillans for their continued longtime support of a very worthy cause that helps Florida youths be productive citizens, including some residents from right here in Wakulla County, said Crum. WCSOMcMillans recognizedJean and Finley McMillan with Sheriff Crum CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized FirmYARD SALEFRI. & SAT.MAY 4 & 5 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS! BIGMAY DAYS L.P.T.( 850 ) 528-4985PROFESSIONAL POOL MAINTENANCEpoolproblems?atthelowestratesweoffermaintenanceandservice!Servicing Swimming Pools and Spas for over 10 yearsTitus Langston850528-4985Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR

PAGE 14

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comStephen C. Smith Regatta at Shell Point SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS DENISE FOLH SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStaff reportHundreds of people turned out for the annual Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta at Shell Point Beach over the weekend. The event is a fundraiser for the Leon County Unit of the American Cancer Society, which serves Leon, Wakulla and other counties in the Big Bend. Windsur ng, sailboarding and sailboat races were held on Saturday and Sunday, April 28-29. 38thAnnual Entertainment Line-Up www.bluecr abfest.com850-984-CR ABThanks to our Sponsors! Thanks to our Sponsors! May 5, 2012 W oolley P ark on Beautiful Dic k e r son BayArts & Crafts Entertainment Crab Picking Contest Kids Activities Fresh Local Seafood Gulf Specimen Mobile Marine Lab10:00 amCoastal Optimist Club Parade11:00 amOpening Ceremonies/Announcements11:15amChief and Mark 12:15 pmMullet Toss 1:00 pmMountain Dew Cloggers 2:00pmCrab Pickin Contest 2:30pmRick Edminson 3:30 pmMountain Dew Cloggers 4:30 pmBrook Sessions 6:00 pmPark Closes Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-89 43) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, May 11 F riday, May 25 Friday, June 8 Friday, June 22 Friday, July 13 Friday, July 27 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA PLEASE RECYCLE

PAGE 15

By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentThe Chamber has nalized its list of nominees for our eighth Annual Business Excellence Awards. Eighty-nine businesses had the honor of being nominated for consideration to win in the following categories: Startup Business, Business of the Year, NonPro t Organization and Environmental Stewardship of the Year award. In addition to these categories, we have added a new award for the Member of the Year. This can be the owner or an employee of any Chamber member business. I still remember how excited I was when Capital City Bank won Business of the Year, and I proudly displayed our award and sign. It could be your turn this year! Please make plans to attend the Business Excellence Awards banquet, sponsored by CenturyLink and Waste Pro, on May 17 at the Senior Center. The social hour will start at 6:30 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m. Our guest speaker is Herb Donaldson, Healing Arts of Wakulla County president and artistic director of Palaver Tree Theatre Company. We encourage you to join us in support of the Chamber as we announce and recognize all the 2012 winners of these important and prestigious awards. Call Petra at the Chamber Office, 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@ embargmail.com to reserve your seats. LOW COUNTRY BOIL We thoroughly enjoyed the second Annual Low Country Boil, and thank all of our sponsors for their generous support, making this a very successful event. The dance floor was packed all night, so I assume everyone had a wonderful time. I would also like to congratulate our special events committee on a job well done! Planning for next year is already under way. ADVOCATE FOR BUSINESS I would like recognize several individuals who have spent countless hours working with our county on Wakulla 2020: John Shuff, past chamber president, and Kevin Vaughn, EDC chair, have been appointed by the Chamber to be our voice. We appreciate all the time and effort you both are putting forward on this very important issue. Chuck Robinson is our new chair for Commerce and Government and will be updating our membership on issues affecting our business community. We appreciate his passion and dedication to the Chamber. EDUCATION Continuing with our pledge to help our members through ongoing education and workshops, we have teamed up with WorkforcePlus and again bring to you the quarterly Brown Bag Lunch Series, beginning with employee retention in April. This workshop explored why employees leave, how to improve the hiring process, and identi ed good hiring tips. Conflict Management and Creating Culture of Team Success will be topics coming up in July and October. Special to The NewsNew business models in Wakulla County are always interesting, and even better to visit. Our April Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce mixer featured a growing recreational center that specializes in underwater activities, or diving simply said. More than 40 people attended the April 19 mixer at Wakulla Diving Center on 2784 Coastal Highway in Medart. Guests enjoyed great conversation, a view of the toys of the future, and spiced with smoked amberjack, shrimp, smoked turkey and ceviche (made with grouper and snapper) along with a variety of fruits and veggies. Wakulla Diving Center is currently made up of four activities, offered for viewing at the social in a tour. Everyone thinks Wakulla Diving is just a store that sells diving equipment, but that is just the front room. The store is divided into two sections, recreational on the right as you come in the front door and technical on the left. Have you ever seen so many masks in one place? One wall is stacked with many spaceage rebreathers! In the back room on the right is the repair facility where Travis Kersting xes almost everything diving. On the other side of the room, training is conducted from basic scuba through rebreather and cave. Both activities are carried into the back through the steel re doors into a dive locker on the left and a state of the art blending and hydrostatic test station. Wakulla Diving blends any breathing gas and stores 80,000 cubic feet of it in a tank farm. Their mid-building drive-thru ll station is a unique safety feature. Research and development is the fourth leg of the center, with a focus on design, prototype production and repair of the next generation of diving technology. This activity alone may dwarf the rest of the centers activities in the years to come. Wakulla Chamber members were treated to lively discussions regarding the future of diving in Wakulla County, thanks to Dr. Bill Huth, Jack Rudloe, Sue Damon, the Rev. John Spicer and Gregg Stanton. Stanton announced the National Speleological Society-Cave Diving Section plans to hold their annual meetings (300-plus attendance) in 2013 at Wakulla High School. Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Taking Care of Business Taking Care of Business Business News from Business News from HONOR ROLLS for the third nine weeksPages 4B-6BSUMMER CAMPS Special pull-out sectionPages 7B-10BCourts exed, drug tests hexedWeekly Roundup, Page 12B Presidents message Wakulla Diving Center hosts mixer PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENChamber members mingle and chat at the mixer at Wakulla Diving Center in Medart. Wakulla Diving owner Gregg Stanton gives guests a tour of the shops work area.Business Excellence Awards are May 17 Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww .the wakullane ws.com JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 16

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Alisha Morgan, a personal historian and the owner of Paperclipped Memories will speak. Her company helps people preserve their life stories in books. Friday, May 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, May 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at the Sunset Restaurant in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812, Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at (850) 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol. com. Bring buttons to the meeting for free appraisals. Sunday, May 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. FLAG, Freedom and Liberty Advocacy Group, will meet at 4 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. They will be discussing the 2012 national election. Orders for shirts for the parade will also be taken. Email ag1776news@gmail.com for more information. Monday, May 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, May 8 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at the library at 7 p.m. The program will be presented by Florida Folk Festival performers, Joan and Amy Alderman from Blountstown. They will show off their Florida Panhandle roots with their collection of tales and tunes called Journey Stories. Wednesday, May 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p .m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, May 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Special EventsThursday, May 3 THIRD ANNUAL RONALD REAGAN BLUE JEANS AND BLACK TIE AFFAIR will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood beginning at 6 p.m. with social hour, followed by dinner and program at 7 p.m. The speaker will be bestselling author Peter Schweizer, of Throw Them All Out: How Politicians and Their Friends Get Rich off Insider Stock Tips, Land Deals, and Cronyism That Would Send the Rest of Us to Prison. Tickets are $35 each or $50 for two. Purchase tickets at www. wakullarepublicans.com. Friday, May 4 FACING LIBERTY photo exhibit will be held at GSigns, across from courthouse, at 6 p.m. The photos are of Wakullas African-American population from the early s to as far back as the 1800s. Exhibit includes schools, churches, along with the community at work and at play. TIP A COP FUNDRAISER will be held at Poseys Restaurant in Panacea from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. Members of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will be serving customers and tips received will be given to the Wakulla Special Olympics program. INFORMATION ON THE COUNTYS HARDSHIP ASSISTANCE for re and solid waste assessments will be presented at the Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive, at 10 a.m. by county staff. For more information, contact Jessica Welch at (850) 926-0919. Citizens must complete the application for assistance before June 1. Saturday, May 5 PANACEA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held at Woolley Park starting at 10 a.m. with a parade down U.S. Highway 98 and will last until 6 p.m. There will be live music, dance performances by cloggers and historic demonstrations. There will also be the Crab Pickin Contest and the Mullet Toss, where contestants throw a real mullet in a distancetoss competition. SHOWING OF ROOTS, episodes 1 and 2 at 1 p.m. at the library. Alex Haleys Pulitzer Prize-winning Roots tells a story for all Americans and remains an engrossing entertainment more than 30 years later. DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS will be held at the library from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The rst ever statewide caucuses will kick-off the delegate selection process, which will determine who will be part of the Florida delegation that will attend the national convention in Charlotte, N.C. REBECCA ZAPEN will perform at Posh in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. with jazz guitarist and composer, LaRue Nickelson. Zapen is a classically trained violinist, whose original music is a blend of swing, classical, klezmer, country folk, rock, jazz and cabaret. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Sunday, May 6 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Michael Keys, wildlife biologist, at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge at 2 p.m. He will present Lightning, Longleaf and a Formerly Common Woodpecker. Seating is limited so come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Thursday, May 10 BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wakulla Family Medicine from 11:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Donors get a free T-shirt. Friday, May 11 SPEAKING FREELY, a panel discussion on the history of May 20, Emancipation Proclamation, and what it means to experience freedom in Wakulla County, along with a few invited guests, will be held at 7 p.m. at the library. Saturday, May 12 SHOWING OF ROOTS Episodes 3 and 4 will be held at 1 p.m. at the library. TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet for a eld trip to Ron Eudys house to see his train display, from 10 a.m. to noon. His house is located at 29 Sarah Court, Crawfordville. For directions or to RSVP, call Carrie Stevens at 274-9474 or emaiil carriejstevens@comcast.net. Children should wear the proper clothes for outside. Tuesday, May 15 HABITAT FOR HUMANITY QUALIFYING MEETING will be held at Ameris Bank in Wakulla at 6:30 p.m. Enter through the back door. Bring paperwork verifying income, savings and expenses, along with a drivers license and Social Security card. Questions, call Peggy Mackin at 9264544 or Linda Boles at 926-6222. Thursday, May 17 BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS BANQUET will be held by the chamber at 6:30 p.m. at the Senior Center. The guest speaker will be Herb Donaldson, artistic director for the Palaver Tree Theater Co. and president of Healing Arts of Wakulla County. Dinner will be served. RSVP by May 14 at 3 p.m. Call 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@ embarqmail.com. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Reagan Blue Jeans and Black Tie Affair at 6 p.m. at Bistro at Wildwood. Tip A Cop fundraiser at Poseys from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 to 9 p.m. Panacea Blue Crab Festival from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Woolley Park. First Sunday at the Refuge at 2 p.m. in Natures Classroom. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.comBy SCOTT JOYNERWCPL DirectorLibrary Volunteer Nationally RecognizedThe library held their fourth annual Volunteer Appreciation Event on Friday, April 27 during which library volunteers from the past year were honored for their service. Our volunteers give over 2,000 hours of service to the library each year. According to national volunteer data, volunteer time saves the community an average of $21.79 per hour; this means that more than $43,000 of service is given to Wakulla County by our library volunteers each year. Our speaker was Mary Register who is a volunteer services consultant, from Volunteer Florida. With Marys help we were able to present to Gloria Hatton the Presidents Call to Service Award. This is a lifetime achievement award given to those volunteers that have performed at least 4,000 hours of community service. She received a certi cate and a pin, along with a letter from President Obama. She has been volunteering at the library since 1995 coming in each Friday without fail to help us process books and other materials for our collection. Her joyful attitude makes her an essential part of the WCPL family. Along with this esteemed honor, the library has named its Library Volunteer of the Year award after Gloria and a plaque will hang in the library with new winners being added each year. This years winner is Cecile DeGrove. Cecile has been working with us on the technical side of the library helping us clean out old records, and prepare for our transition to our new automation service. She gave nearly 200 hours of her own time to the library last year and were more than happy to make her the inaugural winner of the Gloria Hatton Library Volunteer of the Year award. The food and door prizes for the event were provided by local businesses. Food: El Jalisco, Krispy Krunchy Chicken, Lindys Fried Chicken, Ming Tree Garden, Stone Creek Pizza, Talk O the Town Deli, Wal-Mart and Winn-Dixie. Door prizes were donated by Ace Hardware, Advanced Auto Parts, Angelos Restaurant, Gulf Coast Lumber, Hardees, Huddle House, Panhandle Pizza, Pizza Hut and Shear Expressions. Thank you to all. All credit for putting this event together must be given to our volunteer coordinator, Pam Mueller. Pam, who is also the president of Volunteer Wakulla, makes volunteerism her focus in life and actually was a volunteer at WCPL before being hired six years ago. Anyone who is interested in having a great time while working with great people and helping out YOUR library please contact Pam. Pictures of the dinner are posted on the librarys Facebook page. Lastly wed like to thank all library volunteers, past and present for their dedicated service to the Wakulla County Public Library. Without their help we would not be able to provide the level of service that the residents have come to expect from the library.Friday Night MovieThis Friday, May 4, were showing a feel good lm starring Dolly Parton and Queen Latifah. This PG-13 (for some language) film tells the story of a small town choir who tries to win a national competition against all odds. To do this the new choir director (Latifah) must learn to cooperate with the choirs longtime benefactor (Parton). Both have different ideas on how the choir should be run and their issues are compounded by budget cuts threatening to shut down the choir, and by the fact that Partons grandson and Latifahs daughter begin to fall in love. Filled with laughs, poignancy and great music, this lm full of Joyful Noise should lift the spirits. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing and Capital City Bank will once again be offering popcorn and water for small donations to the library. Special showings of Roots all month long at WCPLWCPL, in association with the Wakulla County Christian Coalition, Greater Mount Trail Primitive Baptist Church and the Palaver Tree Theater Company, is proud to offer special showings of the seminal miniseries Roots, two parts each Saturday in May at 1 p.m. This month long program is part of the many events honoring May 20, Emancipation Day during the month of May. For additional information please contact Herb Donaldson at palavertreetheater@gmail. com. Library News...Government MeetingsMonday, May 7 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, May 9 WAKULLA COUNTY CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, May 10 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. at city hall.

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 3B Spotlight on Business Spotlight on Business Business News from Business News from Business: Wakulla Woodworks Inc. Owners: John & Sue AndersonTell us about your business: In 1975, Sue and I moved here from Birmingham, Ala. I thought I had a job lined up but it fell through. (Recession of .) I had a few tools stored in my brother-in-laws garage and he wanted his space back. My brother-in-law found me a job building 10 doghouses that was the beginning of Wakulla Woodworks. In March, we celebrated 37 years. At one time or another during these 37 years all family members have contributed to the success of the company, especially my son, Chris. I built the last two mullet wind vanes, patterned after G.W. Tullys original, that have graced the top of the old courthouse. Wakulla Woodworks was originally located behind Roy Rehwinkels General Store which was demolished and is now a law of ce. What services, products do you offer? We make custom all wood cabinets and millwork. We also make custom wood and vinyl interior and exterior shutters. What sets your business apart from the competition? All products are custom made to the speci cation of each individual customer. What should the community/ customer expect when they visit your business? Friendly, personalized service, sample products. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 1980. Why did you join the Chamber? To support the business community of Wakulla County. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? Discounts from other Chamber members, business information, event information. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Support the local economy; keep our taxes in Wakulla County. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? By phone, listed below, email jonhenry48@yahoo.com. Additional comments i.e. community involvement: Donated products and services to the Old Courthouse. Wakulla Woodworks is located at 544 Rehwinkel Road in Crawfordville. Phone number is (850) 926-7051 and cell is (850) 528-1869. FirstBank Senior Products DivisionFlorida recently opened with its headquarters in Wakulla County and run by Michael J. Weltman MBA, SRES, CSA. Senior Products Division focuses primarily on reverse mortgages. FirstBank has of ces in Sebring, Tampa, St. Petersburg, and is headquartered in Wakulla. New of ces are slated to open this year in Ocala, Orlando, Gainesville and Jacksonville. FirstBank is the largest privately held bank in Tennessee, created by the merger of Farmers State Bank (est. 1906) and First National Bank of Lexington. With Mortgage Headquarters in Birmingham, Ala., and Banking Operations primarily in Tennessee, FirstBank has more than 500 employees, 46 banking locations and $2 billion in total assets. FirstBank is now offering Senior Products in 41 States and Weltman was tasked to run the Florida Division. Weltman has been in mortgages, real estate, insurance and nancial planning for 11 years in Wakulla. He and his wife, Michelle, live on the Wakulla River with their rescue dogs. Weltman can be reached at (850) 556-6694 and (877) 608-9088, and online at www.myretirementmortgage. com, mweltman@ rstbankonline.com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFirstBank Senior Products Division opens in WakullaNetworking luncheon held at Spring CreekBy PETRA SHUFFof the ChamberA record 58 members and guests packed the house for our monthly networking luncheon at Spring Creek Restaurant on Wednesday, April 25. To make it easier on the busy wait staff, the menu was laid out with each place-setting so guests could make their choice of salad, fried or grilled shrimp, tomato pie with grilled shrimp, or chicken breast with fries or cheese grits. It takes a while to accommodate this many people so Mary switched her agenda around a bit, beginning with the announcement and introduction of FSM Associates. Frank Messersmith, a lobbyist, joined the Chamber in March, and works in Government Affairs, representing clients like the Sheriffs in the State, just to name one group. Aprils new members announced were Wakulla Pawn and Curio Shop; MEA Fitness Inc. d/b/a Anytime Fitness, represented by Rainbow Internationals rep Cyndy Murphy. Anytime Fitness changed hands recently, and a ribbon cutting will be held May 18. Special offers will be available for students and teachers. An open house will be held on May 18 and 19. Ron Piasecki, a longtime resident of Wakulla County, now retired, joined as an individual member. Sue Damon of Damon Marketing shared that she joined the Chamber to meet new people. She is self-employed, works in marketing and represents associations in the Southeast U.S., the Caribbean, Mexico and elsewhere. Freebeau Swindle, our newest member, representing Crownmoldingman.com, is what you would call a handyman, and has been doing a lot of work in Shell Point and St. Marks recently. If you need some remodeling done, your wooden fence or doors repaired or want to spruce up a room with crown molding, give him a call. At this point, smells from the kitchen started filling the dining room, and it was heavenly. Sharol Brown introduced her guest and administrative assistant Deana Wilson. Courtney Peacock introduced her co-workers Kelli Kirkland, and Bree Lovel, wife of our host Clay, and guest Donna Savary, owner of Savary Virtual Online School. The jackpot of $58 was won by Cyndy Murphy who donated the money back to the Chamber to add to our table and chairs fund. Thank you, Cyndy! Many thanks to our members for bringing 19 raf e items: Rainbow International, Marianne and Lionel Dazevedo, Susan Schatzman, The Wakulla News, Cook Insurance, Wakulla County Farm Bureau, Crownmoulding. com, Ed Gardner, O.D., Keith Key Heating & Air, and TOSPT (Tallahassee Orthopedics Sports Physical Therapy). Our host, Clay Lovel, announced that Spring Creek Restaurant now has a mobile food kitchen in Crawfordville, open Tuesday through Friday. It is located between Burger King and 3Y Outdoor Equipment. Some upcoming events: Cyndy Murphy announced that she will be holding a continuing education class for Insurance Professionals in Tallahassee on May 10. To nd out more email Cyndy (cyndy.murphy@ mail.rainbowintl.com). Susan Schatzman shared two events held by Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County; the applicants meeting to qualify for a no interest home, built by Habitat, is set for May 15 at 6:30 p.m. at Ameris Bank. This is the 11th home built for families in Wakulla. A motorcycle run fundraiser will be held June 2, and starts at Capital City Harley-Davidson, moving into Wakulla County with stops at Poseys Dockside, Ouzts Too, St. Marks River Cantina and Skybox. Michael Weltman reminded us of his speaking engagement on April 27 at the Senior Center to talk about FirstBanks Reverse Mortgage Program. Petra Shuff announced the Chambers Business Excellence Awards Banquet will be held May 17, and invited everyone to attend the presentation ceremony in honor of our local business community. Remember, our networking luncheons are always held on the fourth Wednesday each month, from noon to 1:15 p.m. In May, Kast Net will be catering our lunch at the Wakulla Extension Of ce. Hope to see you there! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHarvest rift Store opens in CrawfordvilleHarvest Thrift Store is a ministry of Harvest Fellowship Church. It was a desire of our church to make ourselves more available to the community by turning itself inside out. The Harvest Thrift Store is the rst of many marketplace ministries that we will be operating in order to meet the needs of our residents. The store has been opened since October 2011 and is located in the North Pointe Center, 1596 Crawfordville Highway. Building 2 Suite A. The store resells clothes, various knick-knacks and some furniture that the community so graciously donates. Most all of our clothes, shoes, purses and ties are only $1. All donations are tax deductible. Store hours are Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Harvest Fellowship Church also administers the Gaballi food program where customers can save 30 to 70 percent on groceries. Go online to gaballi.com and use harvestfellowship as the reference ID or just come by the store. The church also operates the Harvest Hawaiian Ice Shack, which serves sno-cones, hamburgers, fries and other food items at very reasonable prices for events and parties. For more information about any of these ministries visit our website at www.harvest .org. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSClay Lovel, above, checks on Chamber guests at the networking luncheon held at Spring Creek Restaurant on Wednesday, April 25. Below, Chamber members chat at lunch.Chamber ChatterBrown Bag Lunch Series Con ict Management: July 18, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The workshop identi es the causes and con ict and how to handle it in a sensible, fair and ef cient manner. Its not a question of if con ict happens but rather when it occurs. This workshop is free of charge. Seating is limited, RSVP to Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Upcoming event: Business Excellence Banquet and Awards Presentation will be held Thursday, May 17 at the Senior Center. RSVP to Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Upcoming luncheon: Our May luncheon will be hosted by the Wakulla Extension Of ce, and catered by Kast Net Catering on Wednesday, May 25. New members: Wakulla Pawn and Curio Shop, Inc. specializing in loans and unique gifts. Ron Piasecki, individual member. Damon Marketing Specializing in marketing. MEA Fitness LLC d/b/a Anytime Fitness specializing in 24 hour tness and workouts. Crownmoldingman.com specializing in remodeling, door, wooden fence and home repair.Continued from Page 1BIn addition, WorkforcePlus will be offering Microsoft Word and Excel classes in June. All of the above are available to all businesses, free of charge. All you have to do is register. Several businesses have also taken advantage of our popular Ed2go online classes. Taking one of these classes just about pays for your annual membership investment. For more information, or to suggest additional topics, please contact the Chamber of ce. Membership: Despite current times, businesses understand how vital the support of our local Chamber is in advocating for a strong business community, and we continue to attract new members. We do understand, however, that times are tough and if you are a current member and your dues have not been paid, please be sure to contact us to discuss options for payment. The Chambers existence is based solely on dues from our businesses and individual supporters. Thank you for your continued involvement and support of your local Chamber. Yours in Service, Amy Geiger, PresidentAmy Geiger is the president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce.Geiger: Business Excellence Awards are May 17

PAGE 18

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com COAST CHARTER SCHOOL E Honor RollKindergarten BASTIAN LILLIAN COOK FRANCES HILBERT ELLIYAH MILLER KURTIS PFEIFER TAYLORA Honor RollSecond grade CLEWIS GABRIEL Third grade GLASS JEREMIAH HILBERT ETHANSKALAK-YOUNG CHRISTIASMITH GLEN WARREN TAYLOR Fifth grade SMITH SARAH Sixth grade HIGBEE MEGANE/S Honor RollKindergarten DURDEN JAYDEN MOREFIELD ROY TURNER ZEPHANA/B Honor RollFirst grade ANFINSON DESTIN BUTLER ORLA FOUNTAIN ROSALIE SANDOW MICAH SANDOW SHANNON THORNTON NANCY Second grade BARNES DANIEL LEVINGSTON KERI Third grade BENTLEY SAMANTHA ODOM ERICA Fourth grade FOUNTAIN MADISON HOWELL DESSA-RAE LEVINGSTON KACI SCARBOROUGH CAITLIN TURNER ZACHARIAH Fifth grade GILSON ARIANNA PAFFORD TAYLOR VARGAS KATARINA WOODS JORDAN Seventh grade ABRAHAM LILIANA HILL KENDRA VARGAS CHRISTIAN Eighth grade LLOYD ANNA LLOYD LYDIAMEDART ELEMENTARY SCHOOL E Honor RollKindergarten AYOTTE MATTHEW BOYD MANDALYN BRADLEY KAYLEA CARRAWAY RILEY CRIPE ALANAH CRUM RYLEE DAVIS EMILY DYKES EMMA EDDINS ANGELINA ESTES NATHAN GODBOLT ALYCIA JOHNSON EMILY LAWHON PARKER LOVEL MARY MCMILLAN LILY REED ZHANIYA SMITH SHELDON TILLMAN JORDYN VANMUNSTER THERESA VAUSE ASHLYN WHITLOCK CASEY WINSTON DESTINYA Honor Roll First grade ABRAHAM SCARLETT ALLEN ZACHARIAH ANTILL TYSON BARNES BREANA BLAKE XAVIER DUDASH SYDNEY GAVIN SHAMYHIA GIDDENS EMILY HAMEL MATTHEW HARRELL LAYLA HODGES MEMPHIS JACOB KATHLEEN LAWHON AVA LOGAN ADEN LOPEZ JODI MANNING KANIA MATLOCK ANNIKA MORRISON COLT NICHOLS BRITTON PUTNAM-PORTER HELEN RARDIN KAYLEE RYE ADA SPLITT TEONA ZELRICK AIDEN Second grade BENNETT MEAGAN BRANTLEY TAYLOR BRETT GAGE BUCHLEITNER ANDREW BUCKLAND TABOR DEAN NAVI DUDASH ACOB GLOVER ISAIAH JACOBS GABRIELLA JALBERT XANDER LE DOLAN NICHOLS CAMERON NICHOLS LILY PARRISH STEVEN PATTON LUKE PAUL TRISTAN PITMAN KYLEE POOL COURTNEY POWELL CHARITY ROBERTS ELLA RODDENBERRY BROOKE TALLMAN-NEEL LESLIE TUCKER KANOA WILLIAMS DALTON WILSON ISAIAH Third grade BARWICK ELIZABETH EZELL HANNAH FORSTER NATHANIEL GALLOWAY DARA GRAY PEYTON HERO ANTONIO HOBBY SADIE JONES MOLLY LARISCY BLAZE LAWHON GRACIE NEAL FRANK WALLACE MICHAEL WARBURTON DANA ZELRICK CONNOR Fourth grade ALLEN GRACE BRATCHER FARRAH BUDA BRYCE CORRIGAN MIKAYLA FEWELL PAYTON JOHNSON FREDRICK MATLOCK ERIK MELTON KAITLYN SARVIS MADISON SAVARY MADELINE TEATE ALVIANNA VEARIL BRAYDEN Fifth grade CLARK JENNA CLARK ZACHARY COLLINS MELANIE DAVIS CASSIDY GREEN SALLY HARRINGTON SHEA HOOVER HARRISON HUGHES ELIZABETH LARISCY AMANDA LAWHON HUNTER MATHIS MOLLY NELSON ANDREW NIX ARIEL REED MADISON ROWAN TAYLOR SANDERS DYLAN SMITH TAYLOR TIMMONS NICOLAS WESTMARK JASONE/S Honor RollKindergarten BARNIDGE JUSTIN BURGESS QUINLAN COETZEE JACK CORE GRACIE FORT ABIGAIL FRANK DAVID FRANK DESTINY GAVIN ROBERT GIDDENS JACKSON GLOVER JEREMIAH HARDEN WILLIAM HARRIS EDWARD HENDERSON TIMOTHY HURLEY RACHEL HUTTON CALEB JAMES KELWIN JIMENEZ MIA JONES KOLBIE LANGFORD JACOB LANGSTON JACOB LASHLEY GLENN LAUGHTER JAYMYE LE NEVAN LEWIS LILIANA MCMILLAN BENJAMIN MILLER MIKAELAMURRAY-NAZWORTH JOSHUANAGY SCOTT NIX REID PARMARTER LOGAN PEEBLES BRADEN PRITCHARD WYATT RICKS III TERRY SADLER DAYTON SANDERS KAYLEE SHAW JESSE STOKES WILLIAM STUBBS MAVERICK TAYLOR MERRITT TOTH COLLIN TOWNSEND GAGE TUCKER KANE WARD JALYNN WILSON BRADY WOOD HEAVENA/B Honor RollFirst grade BARTON JAMIE BARWICK JESSICA BRATCHER PAXTON BURLISON HANNAH CARTER JUSTIN CHAIRES ELIZABETH CLARK ETHAN CMEHIL STEVEN CRABTREE JAVID CRUM REMINGTON DIAMOND TRAFTON GREEN KEON HALLUM-KINSEY TROY HAMILTON PAYTON HARRELL CHASSIDY JONES LOGAN KINCAID-REEVES CHLOE LANGSTON AMELIA LYDA ETHAN MCKAYE RONALD MELTON ZOEY NICHOLS ALEXANDER OWENS LANDON ROBINSON JORDAN ROBINSON TAJ-ALI RODDENBERRY JAKE SANDERS SAM SMITH JAYDE TAFF HAYLEE WOOD CHASE Second grade BURNS JALYNN CHAFIN LILA CHANCY ANNABELL CROW SEBASTIAN DALTON JERREL GALLOWAY EMERIE GODWIN ANTHONY HOBBY KYRA HOGAN ABIGAIL JIMENEZ JUAN LANE RYAN LAWHON BRAYDEN NICHOLS CAITLIN PAIANO BRYNNA PARKER BRENDAN PETRANDIS SAVANNAH POPE DYLAN PPOOL MORGAN ROBISON LEVI RUSSELL SANDRA SADLER JENNIFER SANDERS AVERY SAPP BENJAMIN SHEPHERD MACKENZIE SMITH KYLIE SORRELL WILLIAM THOMAS JARVIS TOTH KATIA VALENTINE GAIA WELLS TYLER WHITED CHAD WILSON JENNA WIMBERLY TYLER Third grade ALLEN BROOKE BODIFORD HUNTER BOWELL SAGE BREWER ETHAN BROWN JEREMIAH BRUNERLOGAN BURDETTE MICHAEL CARR-MCFADDEN TOBY CARRAWAY ADISON CASH CARSON CLUSSMAN TERRA CUMBIE LEE DAVIS GALEN DAVIS JONATHAN DULL ANSLEY DUTROW OLIVIA FAIRCHILD CHARLES GLOVER HANNAH GODINES ENRIQUE GREENE DESMOND HARDEN VALERIE HARRIS OLIVIA HARRISON DRAKE HAWKINS ASHLEA MCCULLEY TREVOR MCMILLAN FINLEY MCMULLEN BILLY MORRISON SARAH NELSON ELLIE PARRAMORE ASHLEY POSEY HUNTER SANDERS CHARLEY SANDERS HALEY STRICKLAND BAILEY VEARIL KALEB WOOD CHANCE Fourth grade ALLEN HANNAH ANDERSON OLIVIA ASHLEY AYDEN BORCHARDT BRANDON BRANTLEY DAVID CARRAWAY MORGAN DEHART TABITHA DELVALLE SHELBY HARVEY ANTHONY HENDERSON KATELYN HODGE BRODY HUTTO OLIVIA HUTTON BRITNEY INGRAM ZACHARY JACOB EDWIN JALBERT PHOENIX LENTNER CIERRA LEWIS MICHAL METCALF LUKUS MILLENDER JORDYN MYERS ALEXANDER NICHOLS COLTON OAKS LYRIC PARKER JACK PEARSON KARAH PIGOTT KORI POWELL ANGELINA RARDIN JACOB RODDENBERRY TAYLOR RUDD MAEGAN SANDERS ALYSSA THOMAS MALAYSIA TOMAINI AMADEO WALKER LOGAN WATSON GARRETT WILES JACK WILSON NOAH Fifth grade ABRAHAM ZACHARY BARWICK TRISTAN BROWN JAMES CLOUD DANIEL DELVALLE DANIEL GREY CARLAYNA HICKS JAZONTE JONES CHANCELOR KEITH GABRIEL LANGSTON ALYSSA LAWHON JONAH LAWHON TRENTON LEWIS ZEB MATTHEWS JOANN MCCRELESS SKYLAR MISPEL MAXWELL NIX ZOE ODOM JACOB PAUL WHITNEY PORTER BOBBY RODDENBERRY JARED SANDERS GENNIE WALLACE SETH WHALEY COLBY WHITEHEAD MATTHEW WILLIAMS ASHTONRIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL A Honor RollSixth grade ALLEN NADIA ANDREWS KAYLEIGH BLANKENSHIP CHYANNE BRANCH LOGAN COLVIN SYDNEY EIMILLER KAITLYN FIELDS JAZMINE FOUNTAIN SUSANNAH GAY MAASA HOOKER SYLVIA HOSKINS MIRIAM MCGLAMRY KATHRYN MUSGROVE SKYLER POTTER IANRICHARDSON ALEXANDERROSSETTI KAYLA RUDD MADISEN RUSSELL ANNEMARIE STRICKLAND ABIGAIL SYKES MADISEN TEW BRYLEE TURNER LANDON WEBER JARED WHITING DANIELLE WIEDEMAN CALEB Seventh grade BEARD KELSEY BENNETT PEYTON BOWYER MATTHEW BREEDEN NOAH BREEDEN NORA HARPER KAYSHA HICKS MACLELLAN HUGHES EMMA JENSEN MATHILDA KING MICHAEL MERCER SHALEIGH METCALF MASON MEYERS KAYLEE NG MARLON PARIS JASON PEACOCK ADRIAN RUDD PRECISION SAMLAL KAVITA STEVENS BRANDI STRINGER DORI SULLIVAN SKYLER Eighth grade AHRENDT JOHN ARRINGTON HARLEY COX REBECCA ECK KATHRYN GUNNARSSON MATTIAS HART HANNAH LENK SHELBY LILLEY REBECCA PARMER MARIA SUTTON ELIZABETH A/B Honor Roll Sixth grade BALL STEPHANIE BODDYE ASHTON BROWN JAVARI BUSSEY CHAYTON BYRUM BLAKE CACCIATORE ALYSSA CARNES MARIAH CARTER CALEB CHANDLER AUSTIN COX CARAH CROMARTIE LESSIE DALTON HUNTERDEARRIGUNAGA MADISONFAGAN BAILEY FRANKLIN KARNECEA GARNER AUGUST HAIRE AMANDA HAY JAMES HOWARD BRANDON HOWELL BAYLEY HUGHES LYNDAMARIE HUGHES OLIVIA HUMES TARIQUE JEFFERSON JAYDA LANIER MICAH LANIER ZOE LAWHON EASTON LONG-WILDE MICHAEL MARSHALL TAYLOR MATHIS MYLA MAXEY JOHNNIE MCCARL MAX MCREYNOLDS JAMES MORALES KYLE ONTIVEROS KAITLYN PAFFORD MICAH PERRY MARY REYES ROSARIO ROATH HALEY RUSSELL JACKSON SCOTT CHEYENNE SCOTT CONNOR SMITH KAYLEE SPELL TAYLOR STALVEY MORGAN STEWART VICTORIA STRICKLAND HANNAH SYMONS RYAN WILLIAMS JKAYLA Seventh grade ANDERSON ABEON BEATTY ALEXANDER BENNETT HALEY BRIGGS LUCASBRIGHAM CHASON EMMACAPLE ISAIAH COLE BRYCE COOK MATTHEW CURTIS DEVIN CUTCHEN CHLOE ESTES JACOB GLISSON NICHOLAS GODDEN DYLAN GUNNARSSON NATASHA HARVEY MEAGAN JEFFERSON ALAUNDRE LAWRENCE EMILY MAINER RICKILEE MARLOW JONATHAN MARTIN HALEIGH MCELROY MEREDITH MCIVER ALYSSA MITCHELL ADRIANNA MORRIS ADRIAN MULLENS ELIJAH MULLENS NOAH OWEN MICHAEL PEARSON PAIGE PETERS AMBER PICHARD BRIANNA RICHARDSON KELSEY ROBINSON COLE SCOTT SAGE SMITH HANNAH STARLING TAYLOR STRICKLAND HARLEY SYKES BREANA TABB ABIGAIL TALAVERA SKYLER THIGPEN SARAH THOMAS SHENIKA TOLAR MCKENZIE TRUSSELL JORDAN VAUSE CAJAH WHITE VICTORIA Eighth grade ALFORD COURTNEY BEAL SARANNE BRAHIER SEBASTIAN BURTON SHELEEN CASON COURTNEY CAUSSEAUX WILLIAM COLLINS SARAH CRAWFORD GARRETT DOUIN KURSTIN EDMONDS HALEIGH FRANKLIN HERBERT GARNER SEBASTIEN GAY KARENA GRIMES KAITLYN HATCH LAUREN ISMAN NOAH KENT JORDAN LENTZ NICHOLAS MCCULLEY DALTON MCGLAMRY MICHAEL MCHONE BRITTANY MCKOWN ERIKA PANZARINO KAITLYN PRESTON HARLEY QUITALEG JENNIFER REVELS MICHAEL REYES YESENIA RUDD CARLY RUDD WILLIAM SAMLAL NICHOLAS STATEN SENTWALI STRICKLAND JOSHUA SULLIVAN BAILEE WAITES STEVEN WARD CHRISTOPHER WEBER JOHN WEDDLE ABIGALE WHEELER JAMIE WILD DAVID YU JUVEN ZDRAZIL MATTHEWRIVERSINK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL E Honor RollKindergarten GAUGER ABBOTT GRIMES ROBERT HARRIS HELEN JONES PRESLEY LEE TRISTON LLOYD SARA MCCLINTOCK HALLIE MILLER JACKSON OSTBERG MARY PETERSON JOSLYN STRINGER SHELLEY TAYLOR EMILY TEW AMELIAA Honor Roll First grade BARBARINO KYLE DODSON ADALYNN HARRISON MAKAYLA HOXWORTH MAKAYLA LAWHON LAKE MARR DAVID MCKENZIE GARRETT MORGAN CHASE PASCOE KAYDEE POLLOCK PARKER SANDBERG HAILEY SMITH LAINEY VAUGHN BENJAMIN WESTER LAINA Second grade CORDELL GRACE DUTTON GABRIEL FRANCIS HANNAH FULGHUM BELLA GAYNOR MARGARET GRAY LAURAL HENRY AMAYIA INDIHAR AUSTIN JOHNS XANDER KIRKLAND HAYLEE ROBERTS BROOKE RODDENBERRY LIA VICE ISSABELLA WILLIAMS ELLIANA WINGERT NOVALEE Third grade CARTER CHASE CROCKETT MACKENZIE DIETRICH GILLIAN HOPSON LUKE LEWIS JAMILYNN WEST JAMES WILDERMAN BREANNA Fourth grade BARCELO ISABELLA BROOME LUKE FAIRCLOTH KATIE GRAY ABIGAIL GREEN OLIVER HAMBRICK SAMANTHA MORGAN TRAVIS PRESTON ASHIERA RALEY BRITTNEY RICHARDSON COLBYRODDENBERRY MAKENNASANDBERG RILEY SLOAN AARON STRINGER JACOB THOMPSON CALYNNE Fifth gradeALMANZOR GISELLE ANNEDAMRON JULIAN MARTIN CAITLYN MASON JORDAN SHIELDS ADAM THOMPSON ARTHUR WARD CLAYTON E/S Honor Roll Kindergarten AINSWORTH VIOLET ALVAREZ ISABELLA ARIES TANNER ATKINS MAKINNA AVERA DALTON BARNES KONNER BLINK GABRIELLE BOWYER JUSTIN BROGDON TRENTON BUNCH ROBERT CHESHIRE ELLIOTT CONCEPCION VICTORIA DAVIS RYLEIGH DIXON TAVARRIOUS DONALDSON KEIRA DOUGLAS JUSTICE HARTSFIELD CONNOR HICKS WYATT IRWIN KRISTINA JACKSON CALEB JEFFERSON ERIC JEFFERSON MILAN KIRKLAND KRISTEN KLEES HADEN MARSHALL JAMES MATHEWS NATALIE MCELWAIN CONNOR MCMAHAN ERIC NOLAND MAXWELL OSBORN CALEB PAUL BRIANNA PETERS GAGE PIPPIN KOHLSON POLAND KAILEY RAGIN ZEKIE SAMPSON PAYTON SCOTT SHATARA Wakulla County Students Achieve Honor Roll

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 5BSKIPPER HARLEY STEWART MADALYN TYRE NATALIE WESTER DONALD WESTER MAGGIE WILDERMAN ABIGAIL WOOLEY JOSEPHA/B Honor RollFirst grade ALBRITTON JASMINE CARR WILLIAM CREEL ROBERTDEPROSPERO JOHNATHANDICKEY JAMAR DUNN KOLBY GILES TRACE GOWDY GABRIEL GREEN ANNA KIMBERL DONALD KINSEY RILEY MITCHELL GUNNAR NEAL ETHAN NEWBERN JACOB PARKER JACOB RHINEHART BRENT SAGALA ANN MAREE SAMMONS KIMBERLY SEALY ADAM SMITH TRINITY THOMAS JASHAWN VAUTIER GABRIELLE WRIGHT DEAN Second grade ALVAREZ DOMINIC BEAUCHAMP ELIJAH BLANKENSHIP SHELBI BRAINARD CADENCE BRAMBLETT LOGAN BRANNAN EMOREE CALLAGHAN MARK CARMICHAEL SPENCER CHAVEZ DAVID CORBETT WILLIAM DAVENPORT PEYTON EDENFIELD TYLER GEORGE JACQUELINE HINDLE KASEY JONES JUSTUS LLOYD EMMA LOPEZ MELISSA MOTES CHANCE MULLINAX CAROLINE NG MATTHEW NUTTING ALLIE PELL WILLIAM ROBERTS JARRETT ROSENBERG PENELOPE SPRAKER HEATHER STRICKLAND ETHAN Third grade AINSWORTH TRISTAN ANNAND AIDAN BLANKEN ANDREW COOKSEY TANASHA CORDLE BRYCE DICKEY JORDAN EVANS MADISON GAVIN JAICEE GRUBBS LANEY HART ETHAN HEARNS JAYVEN HUDSON ALEXIS JERNIGAN SYDNEY KAMAL ZAKARIA KELLY JASE KINSEY AARON LAWHON FISHER MCCLINTOCK ADEN MCELREE SYDNEY MCKENZIE KAYLA METCALF CADE MULLINAX WILLIAM ODOM MASON PELL JOHN PERDUE MICAH PETERSON HAYES PIGOTT CHEYENNE POSEY COLE PULLAM MACKENZIE ROBINSON MAURJEA SMITH TYLER STEWART ASPEN THOMPSON ASHLYNNE TYRE ROBERT UNDERWOOD HAILEY VAUGHN EMMA WEAVER JACE WESSINGER CARTER Fourth gradeFUNDERBURKE ALEXANDERGURR MICHAELA HALL MADISON HANEY CONNIE HARTSFIELD DAVID JACKSON JORDAN JONES DERISHA KRAUSE COURTNEY LEWIS LEAH MERRITT DENYM NEWSOME JAMES PAFFORD SAVANNAH POSEY CHRISTOPHER POSEY KEVIN RAY TRISTAN REED BAILEE ROBERTS KYLA RUSHINAL TANAR SAMPSON JAMES SCHULTZ EMILY SIMPSON TANNER SMIROLDO BRANDON SUDERMAN JACOB SYMONS REID TUCKER TESSA WEST LOUIS Fifth grade ANDERSON THOMAS ANNAND ANDREW AVERA ABIGAIL BARTLOW MAURA BENNETT CAMERON BLACKMON CODY CYR FAITH EVERHEART JESSICA FRANCK DYLAN GREEN ASHLYN GRIFFITH VICTORIA HILL DAKODA HOBBS EMILY HOWARD NKRUMAH JOHNSON CAROLINE KINSEY STEVEN LEHRMANN DEVIN LEONARD ANGEL PAFFORD TANNER PERDUE NOAH RAYBOUN FAITH RICH DASHA ROBERTS BRITNEY SMITH ALYSSA SMITH SHELBY STEWART BROOKE TAYLOR HALEY THOMAS MANDALYN WALKER CELESTIA WILLIAMS REKENYA WILLIAMSON LAYLASECOND CHANCE SCHOOLA/B Honor Roll Seventh grade ARMSTRONG RICHARD Ninth grade LAIRD JOHN 11th grade COSHATTSHAWN HALL TAYLOR MCKENZIE KRISTI 12th grade VERNON MARIAHCRAWFORDVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLE Honor Roll Kindergarten ALFORD NOAH BLOUNT SAMUEL BROWN AUSTIN BROXTON GARRET BRUCE GABY BRUMBY CHASON BUTLER SHELBY CHRISTIAN ANDON ELLSWORTH JACOB GEHRKE GWENDELYN GUMPHREY GEORGIA HARVEY CARLEE HATFIELD JORDYN HOLT CECILLEE HOOVER ABBI KOLLING-BARNETT ZOEY LANE JOSEPH LOGAN MARIAH MILAM BRIANNA MILLENDER DUSTIN MODZELEWSKI ROWAN NAZWORTH JESSE PIERCE BENJAMIN POLLARD KARISROSENBERGER NICHOLASSCOTT ALYSSA SMITH LAYLA SORENSEN ADONYAH SPARBY JACOB TAFF ISABELLA TIDWELL KAYLA VELTKAMP GABRIELLE VENTRY DAVID WALKER AMELIA WHITE RACHEL WICKHAM IAN WILLIS KATHERINE WINKLER ASHLEY YORK SARAH A Honor Roll First grade ANDREWS SYDNEY ANZALONE JOSEPH BUTLER DANIEL CORBET PENELOPE DAVIS JALEESAH DAVIS RILEY DUNCAN JABRYAH EBRIGHT DELL ELKINS RAVEN GILLIAM HARLEIGH GRAHAM BRYSON HARRELL KYLA HARVEY KALI HURST NATALIE JEDZINIAK LILY MARINI COLBY MASSEY LILY MILLER ISABELLE MOCK TRISTA MOODY DAWN PEACOCK BETHANY PICHARD EMILY PICHARD HANNAH SORENSEN SEQUOYAH STEPHENS COLLIER TILLMAN CORY TURNER WILLIAM VENTURI EMMA WELLMAN ALEXIS Second grade ALFORD CLARA BERRYMAN ALYSA CLARK MACKENZIE COPELAND MADISON CORE NAILAH CROSBY SELINA EBRIGHT BENJAMIN FORBES PEYTON GUNNARSSON ANNIKA KANITZ ETHAN MCNAIR CIERRA SHERMAN SAMANTHA STOLK LILY VARNES MACIE WHALEY NATALIE Third grade BARKSDALE ADEN CRUM AMBER GRAUSE SYDNEY HARVEY MARINA JORDAN WESLEY SORENSEN ISAIAH TILLMAN CALEB WALKER KRISTEN WHITE MELODY WILLIAMSON DYLAN Fourth grade BRUCE GRACIE BRUCE WILSON BUTLER SAIRA HARDEN ALEXANDRA HENDERSON KALEB KAUFMANN GAVIN LINVILLE CAITLYNN SIMONS LILLY SMITH BRYAN THOMAS EMILY Fifth grade ARCHIE ADAIJA BRADFORD CHAIM DARNELL ELEANOR DIEHL ELIAS FIELDER MIKAELA HUTTO KATIE JOINER FAITH KILPATRICK CARLOS LASSITER JADA OSTEEN VANCE TAYLOR KENDALL E/S Honor Roll Kindergarten ANZALONE JOHN BARKSDALE OWEN BISHOP ISAIAH BRAVERMAN NATHAN BRINSON SAMRON CARR ADEN CARRANZA LAELAH CHESTER MADISON CHRISTENSEN CARTER COOK LAURYN COUNCIL MASON CRUM JOSHUA DEBAUFER FREDRICK DIEHL WYATT DONAWAY SAM DUNLAP AYLA ELMORE SHAKAIYAH ESTES STEPHEN FARMER JACEY GALAN DESTINY GRAY FALLON HARPER DEVON HARVEY OWEN HINTSON RASHYLA HOWELL KEYONI HUTCHINSON AUBREY JABLOW SAMUEL JACKSON TUCKER JESSUP ROBERT KELLY BRADLEY KENNEDY DAVID KING JACKSON LANIER JULIAN LEE GAVIN LEE REBECCALEVERING MIRANDA ZACHARYMCNAIR CHRISTOPHER MILLER DYLAN OLDS EJAVIA OWENS KATIE PAGEL KAYLA RAWLS JACOB RAY ZACKARY REVELL HUNTER RISELLI GIORGI ROBERTS RYLAN ROBINSON JERIAH SHIVER MATTHEW SWAIN BRADY TAFF BAYLEE WICKHAM KYARA WILLIAMS AIDEN WINKLER KAYLEY A/B Honor Roll First grade BABCOCK ROBERT BARWICK TRISTA BICKFORD EMILY BROWN ISAIAH CARLSON SARAH COLEMAN RILEY FINCH SHEYENNE GOOD TAYLOR HARDEN LUCAS HARRIS NATHANIEL HENDERSON EMMA HENING COLEMAN HUNTSBERGER ANDREW JEFFERSON BRIANNA JOHNSON ZACHARY JOYNER RONNIE KENERSON DANDRE LINVILLE CHASE MCKAY ALLEN MCNALLY ASHTON MCWHITE JALIERE OTTOMEYER ASHLYN PANZARINO FRANCIS PELT JACOB REVELL SAMANTHA SAULTER ANNA SCHISSLER MAKENNA SHEPPARD CAMERON SIMONS TUCKER TINDALE MICHAEL TOMLINSON DAWSON VAUSE DYLAN WALKER CODY WARREN ROBIN WRIGHT KADYN YON JAYDEN Second grade ATKINS ETHAN BABCOCK MATTHEW BAZE CARSON BELDIN BRENDEN BUTLER TAMIRABUTLER-MOORE BRIYAUNCARDOZA JACOB CASON MATHEW CODDINGTON MACY COOK BRANDON COUNCIL JUSTIN CRUM JACOB DAUGHTRY JOHN DAVIS TYLEREDMONDSON AUBRIANAFARMER CAMDEN FIELDER JOSHUA GRAHAM KAYLEE HAMILTON AUSTIN HAMPTON WYETT HARRELL SCHELBY HATFIELD ABIGAIL HAYES NAKYRAH HILL ERIN HINEMAN SPENCER JACOBS SKYLAR JERNIGAN ALIA JOHNS MATTHEW JONES AZIAHLEVERING MIRANDA JOSEPHMANN RILEY NEAL AALIYAH NEWELL KAITLYN PARSONS JADYN PAYNTER KOBE PETERSEN LUCAS POLLARD ISAAC RANDOLPH KYLE REEVES HAYDEN REI BREEANA REVELL KAYLEIGH ROBENHORST LUKE RODRIGUEZ IDALIA ROGERS HEVYN TAYLOR PAYTON TEUTON TREY VARNUM WADE WEST BLAKE WHITAKER JAMARIN WHITAKER KAMARI WILLIS AUBREY Third grade BARRETT TAYLOR BOGATAJ DOMINIC BUTLER GABRIELLA CAMARENA AUSTIN CLARK TRAVIS CUSHARD KEIRA DUNLAP HAYLEY ELKINS VICTORIA FAIRCLOTH EMILY FLETCHER TRYSTON FREEMAN RACHEL GAFFNEY SEBASTIAN GANEY MELODY GOWDY DALTON HAZEN JAMES HOOKER DAWSON JACKSON AUDRIAUNA JOINER JOHN JONES AUTUMN JONES JARRETT KILPATRICK JUSTIN LEE CAMERON MELTON ASHANTI MERRICK JACKSON MESSER JADA MESSIER BENJAMIN MILLENDER CAITLIN NAVA SALAZAR YAREYDI NEEL ZACHARY OSTEEN JACKSON PEDLER ANNAMARIE REVELL AUSTIN SAULTER TYLER SELPH SAVANNAH SIMS ANYYSATHOMPSON AVEYOUNNATUCKER AIDAN WILLIS MADISON YORK JOSEPH Fourth grade BAIRD JACOB BROWN SAVANNAH BRYAN HANNAH CASON CAITLYN DANG ALANDEMONTMOLLIN BRANDYFRANK MICHAEL GOODWIN CAMERON GUNNARSSON KATARINA HARPER GEORGE HARRELL MICHAEL HARVEY GARRETT HAY ALYSSA JEDZINIAK CRYSTAL KENYON CHANDLER KENYON LILLIAN LOGAN SETH MANN ZACHARY MEYER ANIA PEARSON AUTUMN REEVES BLAKE REGISTER HUNTER ROGERS JASON RUETH TYLER VARGAS DOMINIC WICKHAM RAUL Fifth grade AHRENS SAVANNAH ANDREWS GRACE AVILES JOY BEAULIEU GABRIELLE CORDOBA HAYLEIGH DEMPSEY HANNAH GARBARINO ANNA GEHRKE STEVEN HAMMELMAN WALKER HARVEY JONAH HARVEY ZACHARRIYA HATCHER TAYLOR HERRON COURTNEY HOANG HUNG HOOKER HALEY HURST AMANDA JEFFERSON JAQUESHA JONES CODY NEWSOME SARAH OWENS CHARLES PICARD ADAM POSEY CODIE PRESTIA ANNALISA PRICE JUSTIN REEVES HUNTER RENTZ SYDNEY SLAYTON ANNABELLE SMID TALIA SPEIGNER BRIAN TAYLOR EMMA WINDSOR ZACKARYWAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL A Honor Roll Ninth grade ALVAREZ HEATHERANDERSON STROMAN ANDREAANDREWS SIERRAUNNAATKINSON WILLIAM BROWN HALEY CAPPS HOLLI CARR ASHLEY COVINO JOSEPH EDGE BRIAN EIMILLER KRISTEN FERGUSON KATHERINE FIELDER REBEKAH PANDOLFI ASHLEY PATTERSON TAMETRIA PETRANDIS MARINA PIOTROWSKI JAMES ROTH MITCHELL SCHNEIDER JOSHUA SORRELL ALBREY WIEDEMAN LYDIA 10th grade GENTRY MELISSA HANSEN MATTHEW HARRIS MADISON HART ARIEN KELLEY MARLEE MATHIS SARA METCALF ALLISON NOLAND TIFFANY SCHUBERT ALYSSA SMITH AARON TORRES ANNALISE WESTMARK EMILYWIEDEMAN MARGARET11th grade BARNES JEFFERY BATTLE JACK BONTS BLAKE BROWN CALEB CHUNN JONATHAN CRUM NATALIE HARRIS SAVANNA HEROLD BRITTANY KOCHER BRENT LOWE CASEY PHILLIPS MATTHEW THIGPEN KAYLYN TIDWELL GRACE WALKER JACOB WALLACE DYLANWESTERFIELD MIKAYLA12th grade ATKINSON CORA BARWICK SLOAN BURNSED JENNIFER CLARK ERICA CLINE KEITH EATON CAMIELLE EDWARDS ELIZABETH EGLER SHANNON FINN SARITA FLOWERS BEVERLY GALLAMORE KRISTINEGIMELLO-VENTURI CAROLINEHAMEL SARAH MARTIN SAMANTHA MATHERS INA MAXWELL JAMES ROZANSKI KYLE STAHR TIFFANY VISE MOLLY A/B Honor Roll Ninth grade ABRAHAM KATELYNALMANZOR CHRISHNIKAALSUP SHELBY BEATY KEEFER BRANCH TAYLOR BROADWAY LILIANA BROOKS JOSIE CALLAGHAN ALIYA CARNEY DYJUANCARPENTER SAMANTHACASEY MARINA CLARK CHLOE COTES ALEXANDRA CUTCHEN CADE DAVIS JAMES DIXON KERI DODSON RYAN EVANS CHRISTINA GEIGER BRANDON GRIFFIN DEVIN GRIMES ASHLEY GURR SAMANTHA HAIRE JUSTIN HAWKINS SHELBY HUNTER ZACHARY HURST HUNTER JAMES KASEY JEZIORSKI MICAHLYN JOSE DEVON KELLY MORGAN LEE KENZIE LEWIS COURTNEY MILLER KINSEY MILLER MATTHEW OCHAT CODY PETERS CHRISTOPHER PLASAY THOMAS PLOUFFE JACOB POPPELL AUSTIN POST BROOKE REVELL BRAXTON ROZAR HARRISON SANDERS CIARA SICKLER ELION SMALL GREGORY STANDLEY MACKENZIE STEVENS ASHLEY TWIST CODY WEBB JAKE WEIRBACK REBECCA WESSEL ADAM WEST BENJAMIN WHITE TOMMY WORRILL MATTHEW 10th grade ALLEN CHRISTOPHER ATKINSON AUDREY BROWN CHRISTEN BURSE IAN BYRD ETHAN CHESHIRE ASHLEY COOPER WHITNEY DAMON DAVID DEAL RICHARD DUTTON ALEXANDER EVANS JUSTINE FURNISH SHANA GREGORY MICHAEL GUBALA BRIANNA GUNN THOMAS HAMILTON SAVANAH HARRELL SHELBYHOLLETT MAXAMILLIONHUTCHINS GABRIEL INLOW SAMMIE KEATON KAEDRETIS KELLEY LOGAN KENT ALISHA KESTEL REGINA KYLE WESLEY LOUDNER BRANDON MARTINEZ JACOB MATHERS CARY MCCULLERS DANIEL MCFALLS DORAN MINISTERIO NATALIE PARIS CHRISTOPHER PAYNE MAKAYLA PLAGGE ALEYDA POITEVINT DAKOTA POTTER ISAAC POTTER TAMIA RODDENBERRY BROOK RUDD EDWARD RUDD EMILY SAPP KAILEY SMALL JOSHUA TOWNSEND ALANAWERTENBERGER LAURAWILLIAMS TABITHA WILSON CHARITY WISE JESSICA WOOD SHANNAN YOUNG CHIONE ZDRAZIL ZACHARY 11th gradeAPPLEGATE CHRISTOPHERARELLANO CHELSI ARNOLDY MIRANDA BAZE PAYTON BEAL SAVANNAH CARRIER TYLER CARROLL CHELSEA CAUSSEAUX JACK CHAMPANY MADELINE CHEW KRISTIN COLE JOHN COULLIETTE STEVIE CURRY TYQUISHA DIX-KESSLER RACHEL EVANS BRITTANY GRAY RAYCHEL GRIMMETT SHANTE HANCOCK SASHIA HARRELL ERICA HARRIS KAYLA HUNTER JAKE HURST HALEY LANIER HANNAH LEWIS ALEXANDER MALIK ZACHARY MAULDIN COURTNEY PARKER LAURYL PATEL SAHIL RANDOLPH DEJAH RAY MEGANRODDENBERRY JORDANRUSS SYDNEY SANDBERG ASHLYNE SARVIS MICHAEL SHIVER SHELBY SIMMONS KIERSTEN SIMPSON OLIVIA STRICKLAND JULIA TILLMAN TYLHER TROMBINI JESSICA WEBSTER JANAY WILLIAMS SELINA 12th grade ABBOTT CODY ABSHIRE MARIAN ADKISON MARY BASS CAITLIN BERT JESSICA BOSTIC CAITLINBROWN-NELSON DANIELLEBUCKRIDGE LACEY BURNS KENDALIN BURSE DANIEL CARTER CEDAR CASH CODY CLIFTON TYLER CMEHIL STEPHANIE COLLINS ALEXIS CRUM DILLION CURTIS COLIN DYCUS CARISSA FERGUSON MEAGAN FLETCHER AUSTIN GAVIN JAMALHonor Roll for the third nine weeks (contd)

PAGE 20

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comGLAVEY SARA HANSEN JUSTIN HAWKINS JOSHUA HINSEY WILLIAM HODGES KRISTIE KELLY MARCUS LINTON STANLEY LOVETT JAMES MAUNEY HOPE MCCULLERS ALINA MCKENZIE SHANE METZLER BRIAN PANDOLFI NICOLE PARRISH SHELBY REGISTER JESSICA ROBERTS ASHLEY SHAPIRO KAIYA STAHR JOSHUA WALKER NICHOLAS WEAVER ALLISON WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL A Honor Roll Sixth grade ANDERSON THOMAS BAKER BEAU BARWICK MICHAELBISSONNETTE DESTYNEBOONE ZACHARY CALDWELL SAVANNAH CUSHARD NATHAN DAVIS ALLYSON DAVIS EBONE DIEHL RIAN DISMUKE JACOB FENNER GAGE FOX AIDAN GODWIN JAYLIN GOLDIN STEPHEN HAMEL CHRISTIAN HARVEY JESELLA HARVEY WYNTER JONES MEAGAN LLOYD SCOTT LOGAN CALEB MCFALLS SYDNEY MOODY YULIA PATEL RIDDHI PEEBLES DYLAN PFISTER TARYN POTTER MIRACLE RICHARDSON JILLIAN SELLERS KEARSTON SELLERS KENDRICK SHIRAH JASMINE SMITH REBECCA SULLIVAN JAMES TAFF ERA TAYLOR JOSHUA WALKER ANDREW WELLS LINDSEY WHEATCRAFT HANNAH WILLIAMS TAYLOR Seventh grade ATKINS DYLAN BUCKLAND VERONICA CREECH WALKER EVANS KATELIN GEHRKE MADELYN GRAY SHAWNA HALEY KAITLYN HARRIS DALLAS HOANG NHI HOGAN AUSTIN HOWARD DEZZALINE LAWHON JAREN MCKENZIE HANNAH METCALF MADISON OLDS EMONTE PARKER MITCHELL PRESTIA JULIANA REED JALECIA RHODES AVA RICHARDSON DANNA RIGDON HARLEYRODDENBERRY SAMUELTHOMAS WILLIAM UNSELL TIA WOODWARD KALYNN Eighth gradeANACAN-CARTER MARCBARNES NICHOLE CARRIER RILEY EDGE SCOTT EVANSHINE JACOB HALL KENNEDY KEITH CONNOR KELLY MAYA LANGSTON KACIE LEWIS CONSTANCE PICARD NICHOLAS ROBERTS BRIELLE RUDD KAYLA RUSSELL SARAH MARIE SARVIS MEGHAN STEVENS CALYN STEWART AISLINN A/B. Honor Roll Sixth grade ARMSTEAD TAIJAHRA ARNOLD ALEXANDRA BARWICK GRACIE BOYD GABRIELLE BRADLEY MADELINE BROWN RONALD BUCKLAND ALYSSA CARLTON HAYDEN CASEY JAMES COUNCIL MADISON CRADDUCK ZAKARY DAVIS SARAH DELBEATO TAYLOR DUNCAN HUNTER ENGLISH ELIZABETH FLEMING RUSSELL GALLOWAY ANTWAIN GOWDY WESLEY GREENE CEPHUS GREENE TYRONE GREGORY OSTIN HARRELL TRINITEE HEWETT THOMAS HODGES SERA HODGES TONIA JOHNSTON MASON JOLLY BRYCE KELLEY REBECCAKLEINPETER MACKENZIELILLARD JACOB LORD BRADLEY LOVEL MARGARET MCKNIGHT HEIDI MCMILLAN EMILY MCWHITE TRAVORIS MORRISON JEANIE NEVELS HUNTER NEWTON AMBER NICHOLS BRIANNA NICHOLS BROOKE PARKER KEONI PAYNE LAURA PICARD SAMUEL PITTS HANNAH PORTER DAVID POSEY ROYCE REED DAKOTA ROBERTS BEELER ROSIER JAMECIA RUSS BRAYDEN SCHMIDT BREEZE SHEFFIELD KAITLYN SIMS CALLIE SMITH ALEXANDRA SUMNER BAILEY TETTEY MIQUELATHOMAS CHRISTOPHERTILLMAN CODY TILLMAN OLIVIA TIMMONS TALYSSA VAZQUEZ MIGUEL WATSON DELLA WEEKS SHELBY WEST AMANDA WESTON SKYLAR WHALEY DONOVAN Seventh grade APPLEBY VIRGINIA ARNOLD TOBIAS AVILES JASMINE BENTLEY CASSANDRA BOYETT ASHTON BROWN ALLISON BULL HUNTER CARLSON LAURA CASEY CHRISTOPHER CLARK MORGAN COLLINS MEGAN CRUM ASHLYNN DARNELL AMANDA DEAN TRENTON FOGLEMAN ZACHARY GALLADAY KELSEY GOATES BREANNAHAMPTON CHRISTOPHERHUTTO ANDI INGRAM CAROLYN JOHNSTON ALLIE JOHNSTON DIXIE JONES CHEYENNE LANGSTON KALEB LAWHORN DALTON MARTIN LOCHLAN MASSEY EZRA MATHERS KEELY MCCALL DILLON MCCANN EMILY METCALF JOHN METCALF RUBY MILLERSHIP MADISEN MYERS JONATHAN PAUL ZHANE POPE RICHARD ROBISON ZACHARY SANDERS BOBBI SANDERS DALTON SANTANA AICKA STEVENS DYLAN STOKLEY ALYSSA SULLIVAN KYMBERLI TERRY MORGANTOMLINSON MICHAELATRICE AUBREY TUCKER TATUM WARBURTON ALLEN WISHART DESERA Eighth grade ALLEN BROOKE ANTILL WILLIAM BLACKWOOD COLTON BRAYMAN DEVIN BROWN ALEXIS BRYAN JACOB CLARK TAYLOR COOLEY LINDSEY CORNIELS JACOB DAVIS IAN DAWKINS JELISA DODSON ADAM DODSON CASEY DOYLE CASSIE EDWARDS SARAH ESKELUND MELANIE FOSS JAIDEN GASPERI JESSICA GRIFFIN LEON GUARINO EVANHARTSFIELD CHEYENNEHENDERSON NATALIE HOPE BRITTANY HUTTO JACOB INGRAM FAITH LAIRD ASHLEY LARSEN ZACHARY LAWHON TAYLOR LEE JOHN MCKNIGHT HANNAH MOODY ALISA NEAMAND SARA NEWSOME EMILY PAYNE MATT PIGOTT CHASON ROMANUS ANTHONYSCARBOROUGH CAITLINSMYTHE ALBERT ST. MARTIN MATTHEW SULLIVAN KATHERINE TAYLOR KAYLEE TEEGEN JOHN WHITFIELD CONNOR YATES BREANNA YOUNG BRANDON SHADEVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL E Honor Roll Kindergarten BOYKIN TYLER BRALEY MICAH BROCK SPENCER BROWN LAKIJAH CALLAGHAN SADIE DANIELS TRAVIS FRINGER HAYDEN GRAY JULIET HOSKINS ANDRISS HURLEY MICHAEL JOHNSON MARY JONES RYVERS KIESER ELLI KIRKLAND NOAH LAWRENCE KARLEE LI JOY METCALF MADDEN MORSE SARAH PEACOCK HAYDEN PERRY HALEY RODGERS EVA SHARP EMILY THORNE TAYLOR A Honor Roll First grade BROCK LAUREN BRUCE HALEY BUSHEE AUBREE CALLAGHAN JADEN CIERPIK ZACHARY DEASON FISHER DUBOIS AVA DUCHARME SHELBIE ESTES JACE FONDO EMILY FRUGGIERO CORTLYND HILL PEYTON KENNEDY CHASE LAMB DESTINY LAWHON SHELBY LEVERETT COURTNEY MONROE DEANDRE MOORE PHILIP OAKS MACKENZIE PEARSON EMILY PERRY ISABELLA PUCCI JACOB PUCCI NICHOLAS SEXTON RUBY SMITH LEANA TAYLOR LEGION THAXTON JAMESVAN DER MERWE DEHAHNWEBB LEVI WIEDEMAN JOSEPH Second grade ALBERT DEANA BARLAR RANDAL BENDECK BAILEE BROWN DEVONTE CHIPPS SARA DENSON ALAINA EDDY CHRISTINA FONDO JEWELL HAMMOND JACOB HARPER MOLLY HUG ALEXIA MARLOW CHRISLYNN PATTERSON XAVIER PEACOCK ANNAPIOTROWSKI SAMANTHAPRETTI EMMA RILEY MONICA RIPLEY LINKIN WOLF BLAKE Third gradeMARTINDALE MAKENNAMCDONALD SIANNA PATTERSON KAYLA VOYLES KAREN Fourth grade ALLBRITTON WILLIAM BRACCI ANALISE DAVIS JAYLEE HILL ZOIE LANGLEY TRENTEN LOURCEY ANDREW MCCORD MASON ROBERTS WILLIAM RUDD JAMES THOMPSON MICHAEL WIEDEMAN DANIEL Fifth gradeCALLAGHAN MAKENNACAUSSEAUX HAYDENCHRISTENSEN BRITTNEYFAGAN MORGAN HICKS OGAN HILL HUNTER HUG AARON HUGHES ABIGAIL JOSE GABRIAL LEDBETTER HARLEY LENK HAYDEN LOPEZ JULIANNANICHOLSON SHAWNTIAPARMER MAGNOLIA POOLE BRIANNA ROWLS DEMARCUS STEPHENS NOLYN VAN DER MERWE ALEX WHEELER SYDNEY ZACHRY CARMEN E/S Honor Roll KindergartenACOSTA-ROSE SAVANNABAGGETT KATELYN BODIE DAWSON BRINKLEY JANIA BROWN DESTINY CAQUIMBO ADLEIGH CARTER ADDISON CARTER SYDNE CHAMBERS SARA CHIPPS CAIDEN CLARK DAVID COLLINS JOHN CONLEY SARAHBETHCREATH-PAPESH ALYSSACRUTCHER MICHAEL DAVIS GABRIEL DOUGLAS ANNA EDDY JOSHUA EGLTON ANTONIO EVERSOLE JADEN FANT GARY FANT JUSTIN FINCH TAYLON FOWLER AIYANA GAVIN KIRSTEN GEIGER MICHAEL HALE IONA HALL PRESTON HAMLIN HALEY HATCHER MARKLON HAWTHORNE SHEMAR HENDERSON JAYLA HORGER ALEXA HUGHES JOHN JENNINGS NICHOLAS JOHNSON MARQUEZ JOINER JUSTIN JONES EVAN KENDRICK LYNLEY LALONDE HUNTER LAMB JACE LEON DEVIN LEONARD KACYN MATHIS DAMIAN MCCORD ANDREW MCCULLOUGH SCOTT MCDONALD MAHALA MELTON SHANEKA MILLENDER BROOKE MORSE KADEN MORSE ZACHARY PATTERSON CHAD PEARCE LILLIAN POLLOCK BROOKLYN PUNAUSUIA LYLA RAY LANDON REYNOLDS IAN ROBERTS DEVONTAE ROBERTSON RAVEN ROSS JAVON SADBERRY JOSEPH SALAS MICAH SASSER MEGHANN SEYMOUR JOSEPH SHARP WHITNEY SOULE ROBERT SPIVEY ALEESA STANDLEY BEAU STIBER LOGAN STREATER JOURDYN THOMAS ELICIA TIMMONS KARL WEBSTER JTERRIUS WEEKS JOSHUA WEEKS MEREDITH A/B Honor Roll First grade BEARD BETHANEY BREEDEN EMMA BROWN CONNOR BROWN TAYLOR CARNLINE EUGENE CARTER HEAVEN COOK SADIE COSHATT NATHAN COX CALE FULLWOOD EMILY GOODWIN LILY GRUBBS AUSTIN GRUBBS WAYLON GURR JACOB HARRELL TORI HARRIS JARED HARRISON CAMERON HERNANDEZ ALEX JACKSON TYTIONE KEMP JAYDEN MARTIN BRADLEY MATHIS HOLLIEMENDENHALL HEAVEN-LEIGHMERCER AVA MORSE JAMES MOSELEY PAYTON PAGE BENJAMIN PEO ANGEL POLOUS DALE REINKE BRIANA RILEY ANGEL RUDD JACOB SEYMOUR JAXON SMITH JACOB SMITH KAILEE SPENCE ABIAGAIL STALLING EMILY THOMAS AUBREY TIMMONS MAKINA TUTEN KEIRA VIGIL STEPHANIE WILLIAMS BRIANNA YOUNG CONNOR Second grade ADAMS KAYLA ALLEN CONNOR ALLEN SHAREE BECKMAN WILLIAM BISSONNETTE ZION BRATTAIN WILLIAM BROWN WILLIAM CARR ANTHONY CAUSSEAUX STEPHEN CHRISTOPHER AIDAN COLEMAN DYLAN CRAWFORD RYAN DEAN BREANNA DEROCHE DERRIN FRANKLIN NEHEMIAH GRIMES CAMRYN HARRIS KARSON HARTWEIN STEPHEN HICKS BRYCE HUBMANN CALINGTON KEEFER KYLER KILPATRICK BRIANNA LARUE PARRIS LAWRENCE KAYLIN LEBLANC EMILY MARIN ASHLEY MEYER ZAYDA NEEL CLAY NORDLOF ANNIKA OSBORN JOSHUA PAARLBERG CASEY PASCHAL AUSTIN PATTERSON RAYMOND POLLOCK JOSEPH PRETTI MADELINE RAKER WYATT REDFERN CONNOR SICKLES DAKOTA SILCOX TRISTAN SIMS TRINITY SPELL MADISON STEFFEN ALLISON TILLMAN TAYLOR TODD HANNAH VAUGHAN CHRISTALYN VAUSE REMIE WARD JESSE WILLIAMS MASON WILLIAMS TEANNA WILSON DEVON YOUNG ANSLEY Third grade ALTEMEIER STEVEN ANDERSON WILLIAM BAGGETT AUSTIN BILODEAU RIANNA BISHOP WALTERBLOODWORTH LILLIANABROWN EMILEE BURCH HALIE CHADWELL KELLY CHAMBERS DANIEL CLEMONS CAILEIGH COKER BELLAH COLE SIMON COLLINS CAROLINE DANNER JONVIAY DUBOIS COLE DYKES LOGAN GRAVES RAYMOND GRIFFIN MICHAEL HANES ALAURA HARRIS JARREN HERNANDEZ GEORGE HERNANDEZ IZABEL HICKEY EVREN JOHNSON LAUREN JONES KEIRA KILGORE PAUL LANGSTON KOLTEN LEAMON VICTOR LEE KAYLA MERCER SHERIDAN PAGE DANIEL PAUGH GARRETT PILGRIM ALEXANDER POLOUS RAYMOND REVELS SYDNEY ROBINSON MIKIYA SANFORD KAYLA SHARP LIAM SICKLES JAYLA SMITH OAKLEY SPENCE MICAIAH THAXTON LORA WATSON KYLE WILLIAMS TERRELL Fourth grade ALVAREZ SHYTIRA BECKMAN EMMABISSONNETTE CHEYENNEBROOKSHIRE CASSANDRA CARNLINE MICHAEL CASTILLO DANIEL CHANCELLOR ALIVIA CLARK WILLIAM COOK JOSHUA FLOYD KYLE GOUDE BRIANNA HARRELL LEVI HART TREVOR HOWARD MADISON HUGHES TREMAINE HUNT AUSTIN JENSEN CHRISTOPHER JOINER SHELBY KELLY ASHELY LEBLANC ALLYSON LORENZINI DESTINY MAJORS REANNAH MALIK IRENE MCIVER DYLAN METCALF MARGARET OWEN MATTHEW PADGETT SUMMER REVELS CHRISTOPHERRICHARDSON ELIZABETHSALAS MADISON SASSER SETH SIZEMORE EMMA SMITH DAISY STONE TAYLOR STRICKLAND MADISON TABB COLBY TULLY LOGAN VICE ABIGAIL WALKER IAN WEEKLEY BREEANNA WILLIAMS NOAH WILLIAMS SARAH Fifth grade ALLBRITTON JACKSON ALLEN DYLAN BERUBE HUNTER BLAKE ELISHA BLASDEL JASMINE BOOKOUT MEGHANN BUSEN HUNTER BUSSEY CAYLIE CARPENTER REBECCA COKER COLBY DAVIS CLYDE DEAN NATHAN DEROCHE DEVIN GLOVER CODY GRAY TARA GREENE JAKE HAMILTON ISAAC HARPER CALEB HARRELL HUNTER HATCH VICTORIA HILLMON TORI HOSTETTER ABBY HUGHES AERIAL HUNTER BRANDON HUNTER CAITLYN KELLOGG KAYLEIGH LEWIS HUNTER MAXWELL NYJA MCKOWN NATHAN MEYER DALLAS MORSE KYAH MURRAY MALIK PERRY SHAWN PILGRIM DESTANI PULLEY CAROL REDFERN HUNTER ROSIER CHEYANNA SHIRAH EMILY SMITH LAUREN TUMBLESON CHARITY WINFIELD CHACE ZDRAZIL DANIELHonor Roll for the third nine weeks (contd) Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Piney Grove Preserve located in Virginia.

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 7B

PAGE 22

Dont let fees stop you. If tuition assistance is needed, call 926 3526 for an application which will be reviewed by a select few Coalition leaders to determine eligibility. Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBefore and After School Summer Program Arts, crafts, eld trips, Gulf World, swimming, movies, bowling, skating, and so much more! Age: Pre-K through 5th grade June 4 August 10 Monday through Friday 6:30 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Children meet daily at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Debbie 926-7145 ext. 222; Pat 926-7145 ext. 230 $125/week or $25/day plus activity fees. Drop-ins welcome. Camp Catch-A-Dream Horseback riding Lessons [regular & therapeutic] plus trail rides. Will learn basic horse-manship skills, balance, following directions, working through fears, & con dence building. Age: Starting at age 7 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy $35 per Lesson or per hour, Scholarships may be available through WCCY, Camp Catch-A-Dream Anger Management & Family functioning Classes Will learn responsibility, respect and a better way to communicate. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505, 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy $15 per 1.5 hr session 10 sessions, Family rates upon request, Scholarships may be available through WCCY. Camp Catch-A-Dream Equine Assisted Growth & Learning Will learn responsibility, respect and communication skills. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp 962-9999, 778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy Rates for groups or individuals, Scholarships may be available through WCCY Camp Indian Springs, Capital Region YMCA, Traditional day / overnight summer camp programs where we encourage kids to build friendships face to face, get outdoors and appreciate our natural surroundings while learn good decision making skills based on the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility., All one week sessions. Age: Overnight Camp: 8 16; Day Camp: 5 12 Sessions start June 3 and run through August 4. Jim Bentley jbentley@capitalregionymca.org or www. campindiansprings.org 926-3361; fax: 926-3624 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville Overnight Camp: $480 per week Day Camp: $140 per week, Scholarships available. Gamerz Paradise Sign up for our Summer Camp! Video games, pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment. Age: 5 and up Daily, weekly and monthly rates available. Call 850-926-9100 theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com Gamerz Paradise, 635 Wakulla Arran Rd., Crawfordville Gena Davis, Instructor Swimming lessons. Day or evening classes. Beginning end of May offering sessions throughout the summer. All ages. 926-7685 or 510-2326. Happytime Instructional Daycare Center Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs SUMMER CHILDCARE Includes a wide variety of eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children. We enjoy skating, swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Locally Owned and Operated by Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available. Call today for our very affordable pricing 926-5226 Crawfordville Hwy. North International Gold Gymnastics IGG A funlled themed week full of gymnastics, eld trips, crafts, movies, games, indoor and outdoor play. Lunch to be brought from home. Snacks are provided. Age: 5 12 Hours : 7am-6pm, Carol McAliley or Stephanie Burton at 926-4431 Email: go-iggc@hotmail.com, 54 Feli Way, Crawfordville Weekly rates: full day campers $145; half day campers $75; drop in campers $35/day, 10% discount for second child. Providence Christian Academy Individualized instruction in algebra, geometry, physical science, chemistry, physics, trigonometry, calculus, Spanish, and phonics courses. Grades K 12 Call today to schedule an appointment. 926-2456; 926-1326; 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville Ribits ARTtastic Summer Camp Adventure 2012 ART and FUN Pottery (clay between their ngers), Ceramics: sponge, splatter, bubble, toothbrush, brushes, yarn, stamps, stickers and other painting techniques, add mixed media and a few surprises, makes Ribits the best camp for the kids this summer. Ages: 5 and up June 4-8 11-15, 25-29, July 9-13, 16-20, 30-August 3, August 6-10 Time: 8:30 5:30 (early drop off and late pick upon request) 9:00 2pm ($175 for the half day) Cost: $225 for full day; $175 for half day Deposit: $100 Daily snacks included and lunch (Pizza) on Friday. Savary Academy Summer program to make up a class or recover credits for graduation. Grades 7 12 Ongoing Classes on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 9 a.m. 3 p.m. 926-9977 www.savaryacademy.com Savary Academy, 70-A Feli Way, Crawfordville, FL The Learning Curve SUMMER LEARNING CAMPS (For Students Entering) K 1st: ABCs and 123s; 1st 3rd: It All Adds Up (Addition/Subtraction Skills); 3rd 5th: Multiply Your Fun (Multiplication/Division Skills); 3rd 5th: Fun with Fractions; 4th 6th: Writing Right (Improving Writing Skills); 6th-7th: Solution Skills (Middle School Math Skills); 6th 8th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful Middle School Student); Grades 1 5 JUMP START (Individual grade level intro to next year); Grades: 1-3; 4-6; 7-8 Lets Speak Spanish (Conversational Spanish); 9th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful High School Student); 8th 9th: Intro to Algebra 1; 9th 10th: Intro to Geometry; Writing the AP History Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Writing the AP English Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Intro to AP Stats (Mastering the Graphing Calculator); GET ME TO COLLEGE WORKSHOPS (What Every Parent and Student Should Know about College Admissions and Financial Aid) 9TH 11TH 12TH FOR PARENTS: How do I do this New Math? (Instruction for parents to aid their children with next years homework; classes for speci c grade levels) Call Melisa Taylor to Register at 926-2179 or visit www. tlctutoring.wordpress.com for summer schedules and pricing. The Learning Curve, 3119-B Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Tiger Rock Martial Arts Elite Martial Arts training Our youth will enhance their life skills and receive coaching that keeps them focused on goal setting, self-discipline and con dence. Sign your child up today! The focus is rewarding. The energy is radiating. All ages. 926-3777 www.crawfordvilletkd.com www.tigerrockmartialarts.com Crawfordville Tae Kwon Do 27 Azalea Drive, Suite A & B Crawfordville (Behind CVS) 5 Weeks of training for only $99 Wakulla Christian School Academic and Personal Enrichment Camp Acti vities include computers, cooking, dance, foreign language, martial arts, archery, piano, violin, guitar, music, photography, sports, woodworking, robotics, arts and crafts, gardening, special guests, eld trips and more. Ongoing Age: 3 14 Monday Friday 7 a.m. 6 p.m. Call 926-5583 or email wakullachristian@yahoo.comSUMMER OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH Its time to relax and have some needed downtime. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is proud to sponsor this Summer OPPS section. Recognizing that young people seek to nd their place in the wider world through many ways and means, the community hopes the following Summer OPPS hit the intended mark with many Wakulla youth. Positive youth development refers to activities and programs that nurture young people and help them build on their strength s. Positive youth development is not about xing kids problems. Rather, it helps young people nd positive things to say yes to. Positive youth development happens anytime an individual or a program teaches young people skills, connects adults and young people in a meaningful way, involves young people in the life of the community, and gives them a sense of belonging and accomplishment. In Wakulla there are many places that young people can nd this kind of nurturing. Wakulla has its own unique network of people, groups, churches, clubs, teachers, businesses, and agencies that help young people grow into competent adults. The nurturers might be piano teachers, soccer coaches, neighbors, Big Brother and Sisters, YMCA, church youth group leaders or grandparents this seci on of the paper is intended to help you decide how to spend a bit of your time this summer.All Summer LongJune 4 June 8 Wakulla County 4-H Bachelor/Bachelorette Camp Attend this day camp and learn about budgeting, nancial management, how to take care of a baby, food preparation skills and clothing care. Hands-on learning experiences will be incorporated throughout. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 5 8 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 11 June 15 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology(Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5)Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Camp Cherry Lake This year camp will feature traditional activities including swimming, canoeing, kayaking, camp crafts, camp re, water games and archery. Not to be missed are the ever-popular marshmallow paint wars and dance! Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 11 15 (residential), Camp Cherry Lake, Madison, FL Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce 926-3931 $220.00 per week June 18 June 22 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Michelle Snow School of Music Summer Vocal Workshop In this camp, young people will learn the basics of producing and performing in a vocal production with choreography. Participants will get musical education as well as the opportunity to participate in all aspects of a small musical production. (Limited openings) June 18-22. Performance evening of Friday, June 22. 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Michelle Snow (850)926-7627 Jmcsnow5649@centurylink. net, 3102 Coastal Highway, Medart $125/week per child Wakulla County 4-H Project Runway Wakulla Participants will learn to put the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Repair philosophy into practice as they re-build a piece of clothing that has been overlooked in the closet or has been purchased from a re-use store. Participants will unleash their creativity as they re-create a clothing item of their choice through this artistic expression class. Boys and Girls are both encouraged to attend. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 19 22 (Tues Fri) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 25 June 29 Wakulla County 4-H Sew Fun and Quilting Campers will learn the basics of sewing, quilting and other fabric crafts such as pin making, weaving and other needlecrafts. The diligent camper will be able to complete a lap-sized quilt and one simple item of clothing by the end of the week. June 26 29 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $80.00/weekJuneMay 12 Wakulla Health Care Task Force Free Sports Physicals, Free physical examinations for student athletes, summer campers, and Special Olympians, Middle and high school students 9am 1 pm Students from WMS 9 a.m.; RMS 10 a.m.; WHS 11 a.m. Free Tallahassee Memorial Family Medicine Of ce 15 Council Moore Road (off Crawfordville Hwy south of the courthouse) Tanya English 926-0065 X 253 Tanya.English@wcsb.us or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com WORKFORCE plus Get Connected, Stay Connected 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo Are you 16 -21 and ready to take the next step in your journey? Perhaps you are interested in a nding a job. Do you want to know more about joining the military or going to college? Maybe you would like to know more about the resources available in Wakulla County. Whatever your needs may be, make plans today to attend the WORKFORCE plus Get Connected, Stay Connected 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo and meet employers (who are hiring!), college and military recruiters and local community representatives. 11:00 am 1:00 pm TCC Wakulla Center 5 Crescent Way Crawfordville, FloridaMayMay 19 Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Fishing tournament Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 Wakulla County Coalition for Youth

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 9B (850) 926-3777 www. crawfordvilletkd .comwww.tigerrockmartialarts.com ELITE MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING 5 Weeks of Training FIVE$99.00WEEKS To be the best,We TRAIN with the best! Join Tiger-Rock Martial Arts.Every Revolution Starts With Evolution. Need to make up a class or recover credits for graduation? Make Your Summer Count! You DO NOT need to be enrolled in Savary Academy during the regular school year to take advantage of the Summer Program.Wakulla County students now have a choice But space is limited and the deadline for enrollment is approaching quickly.Classes on Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday from 9am-3pm Grades 7-12Let us help you focus on the future today! www.savaryacademy.com Jet Cadets... ying high for Christ!Providence Christian AcademyAMinistry of Central Baptist ChurchGrades K-12 Enroll Today!Call today to schedule an appointment.(850) 926-2456, 926-1326, or 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327Providence Christian Academy grades K-12 with small pupil-to-staff ratio fully-funded scholarships July 9 July 13 Mission San Luis A Childs Life (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Imagine you were born 350 years ago. What was life like for the young residents of the mission? Learn to dress, play, and live like a colonist through role-playing, studying site artifacts, and using period toys and games. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 8 11 (older students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 16 July 20 Mission San Luis New World Apprentice (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Join our bustling village as a living history interpreter and participate in a variety of apprenticeships. Enlist as a soldier, blacksmith, potter, and more! All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Survival 101: Cooking, Camping and Water Exploration Campers will learn how to shoot a bow and arrow, track game, build a camp re and cook a meal using a solar oven. We will learn how to nd safe drinking water as well as camp out overnight. Campers will also have the ability to sh and learn about the heritage of survival in Wakulla County throughout the years. (Tuesday Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m., Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week July 23 July 27 Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 22 25 (younger students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla, Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 29 August 3 Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Sheriffs Youth Ranch Activities will include arts and crafts, sports, water safety, archery, nature hikes, bicycling, games, camp re activities and more. Applications available at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Deadline is May 31 Sponsorships FREE. 6 boys, 6 girls child age 10 -15, Caruth Camp in Levy County. Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 July 30 August 3 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. SwimmingGena DavisRed Cross Certied teacher for over 20 years926-7685 510-2326 Private Pool All Ages-Day or Evening Classes -Starts End of May Sessions through Summer -Sessions are 2 weeks $50 per Person -Private Pool All AgesLessons Instructor: Resident Camp: 8-16 Day Camp 5-12Resident Camp begins on June 3, We offer 9-one week sessions starting on Sunday at 2pm and ending on Saturday at 9am Day Camp begins on June 4th, We offer 11 one week sessions. Each day begins at 8 am with an early drop off option of 7am and the day ends at 5pm with a late pick up option until 6pm. Resident Camp Fees: Y Member $408 per session Non-Member $480 per session a Camp Fees: Y member $123, Non-Member $140 Camp Indian Springs encourages building relationships face to face, teaching kids to make good decisions and getting outside to enjoy a healthier lifestyle in our beautiful natural setting of Wakulla County. The YMCA promotes the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility in all of its traditional camp activities like canoeing, archery, nature survival, sports and our non-traditional activities likefilm making, horseback riding, low ropes challenge course and our skatepark. If you have any questions please contact our Camp Registrar, 850-926-336 1 or camp@capitalregionymca.org. You can also contact the Camp Director Jim Bentley atjbentley@capitalregionymca.org. theTMYMCAJulyAugust 6 August 10 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm.August Team Wakulla Wrestling ClubPRESENTSElementary / Middle Wrestling CampHigh / Middle School Wrestling Camp June 4th through 7th at RMS Gym $150Instruction by Darton College Head Coach Mike Miller REGUL AR CLUBPRA C TIC E(open to ever yone 4 years an d old er)Tuesdays and Thursd ays 5:30p m-7:0 0pm June 11th through 15th at RMS Gym A Free Press Your Key To Freedom

PAGE 24

Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHow to choose the right summer campSpecial to The NewsAttending summer camp has been a tradition in the United States for more than 150 years. Statistics indicate that around 30 million American kids attend summer camp each year. There are many bene ts to summer camp. Camp enables children to stay engaged during the summer when there may be limited interaction with school friends. It also gives parents both a safe and viable daycare solution during the summer. Summer camp pulls together children from different neighborhoods, social classes and backgrounds, which can make it a good place to meet new people some of whom may become lifelong friends. Camps also provide a variety of activities that can challenge children to try new things that go beyond their comfort zones. Some children are very receptive to the idea of attending summer camp. Others need a little coaxing. But summer camp should never be forced on a child who does not want to go. In such instances, consider local daytime programs that may ll the void instead of programs that require being away from home. Once the decision for summer camp is made, there are some questions to answer. What are your nances like? Do you have a budget for summer camp? What size camp do you desire? Should the camp be co-ed or single sex? How far do you want your child to travel for summer camp? What are the options in your area? Are there any camps that have been recommended by friends or family members? What kinds of activities do your children enjoy? These types of questions will help you narrow down your options. Then you can visit and interview camps to find one that is the best t. When visiting camps, go armed with a checklist of questions. Some of these can include: What is the philosophy of the camp? Can you explain a typical day? What are the types of activities and facilities offered? What is the camper-tocounselor ratio? What is the camps drug/alcohol policy? Does the camp have insurance and security personnel? What percentage of staff return each year? How are staff selected and trained? What kind of health care is provided? Can you tell me about the policy on phone calls and family visits? What do you do in the event of emergencies? Dont wait too long to research and sign up for camps because many fill up quite early or have an extensive waiting list. Summer camp is a fun way that millions of children spend their summers each year. Special to The NewsNot every family can afford summer camp or chooses to have their children attend. But faced with two long months of vacation from school, what options are there for keeping children occupied during the lazy days of summer? A top-run, private, sleepaway camp can cost around $10,000 for the season. In todays tight economic climate, many families are choosing to scale back expenses, and that includes pricey summer camp. However, just because cost is a factor, it doesnt mean that children cant attend camp this season. Parents simply need to do their research or come up with other creative alternatives. First, investigate the opportunities in your area. Summer camp doesnt have to mean eight weeks of recreation in the middle of the wilderness. There may be locally run businesses that also offer summer programs. Some alternatives to summer campCamp for your kids could be as simple as neighborhood parents rotating supervision of vacationing children. ActivitiesInclude: Computers,Cooking,Dance, ForeignLanguage,MartialArts, Archery,Piano,Violin,Guitar, Music,Photography,Sports, Woodworking,Robotics,Arts& Crafts,Gardening,Special Guests,FieldTripsandMore! WakullaChristianSchool 1391CrawfordvilleHwy,Crawfordville,FL32327 1mile southofS.R.267(BloxhamCutoff) wakullachristian@yahoo.comMonday-Friday 7:00am to 6:00pm Ages3 thru 14 June 4 -August 10, 2012 facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fi MON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!SIGN UP NOW FOR OUR SUMMER CAMP!Video games, Pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment SUMMER CHILDCAREIncludes a wide variety of eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children We enjoy skating, Swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Call today for our very affordable pricing. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available.HAPPY TIMEInstructional Child Care CenterEstablished 1983HAPPY TIMELocally Owned and Operated By Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs 926-5226CRAWFORDVILLEHWY.NORTH The Wakulla Before and A er School Summer ProgramPre-K 5th gradeAS AS PS SMovies Bowling Ska ng and So Much More!P A A June 4 August 10 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. $125 / week or $25 / dayPlus Acty ees.hldren meet at he akulla ounty Senor ens enter For the Summer ~ Drop-Ins Welcomeo resere a spot please contact amp oordn ators ee et. 222 or Pat et.230 LIMITED SPACESAVAILABLE!Join us June 1st through August 10th for a summer full of Fun!! 850-962-1033Kamp ENROLL TODAY!

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 11B Jokes and RiddlesA: The roller ghoster!Q: Whats a ghosts favorite carnival ride? Q: How do you make a hamburger stand smile?A: Pickle it gently! COLORING PICTURE Carnivals have loads of tasty food to try. Fill in the blanks to name some of the foods found at a carnival.Answers: 1) Corndogs, 2) Funnel Cakes, 3) Popcorn, 4) Lemon Shakeups, 5) Cotton Candy, 6) Snow Cones, 7) Brats Name That Food Name That Food 1 C O __ N D __ G __2 F U __ N N E L C A __ E S3 __ O __ C O R __4 L E __ O N S __ A __ E U P S5 C O __ __ O N C A __ D Y6 S __ O W __ O N E S7 B R __ T __ List 10 words that rhyme with fun. 1. ____________ 2. _____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ____________ 6. ____________ 7. ____________ 8. ____________ 9. ___________ 10. ___________What Rhymes withSome answers: bun, done, gun, none, pun, run, shun, stun, sun, ton 1) The Tilt-a-Whirl makes some riders dizzy. Fact or Fiction? 2) The Zipper moves up and down like a roller coaster. Fact or Fiction? 3) The Scrambler makes riders feel like they are going to crash into each other. Fact or Fiction? 4) The Octopus may also be called the Spider. Fact or Fiction? 5) It can be hard to find your way out of the Farmhouse with its funny mirrors and stuff. Fact or Fiction? 6) The carousel is filled with large wooden fish that move up and down on poles for kids to ride on. Fact or Fiction? 7) Another name for the bumper cars is the dodgem cars. Fact or Fiction? 8) The Wave Swinger takes riders high into the air. Fact or Fiction? 9) The Fun Slide is much smaller than a regular slide. Fact or Fiction? 10) The Rock-O-Plane is like the Ferris wheel but with seats in cages. Fact or Fiction?Carnival RideCarnivals have many rides from Ferris wheels to roller coasters. Here are some questions about carnival rides. How many can you answer correctly?Answers: 1) Fact, 2) False, the Zipper spins round and round, 3) Fact, 4) Fact, 5) Fiction, the Funhouse, not the Farmhouse, can be hard to find your way out of, 6) Fiction, most carousels have animals other than fish, 7) Fact, 8) Fact, 9) Fiction, the Fun Slide is much bigger, 10) Fact Fact or Fiction? C h a ll e n g e This page sponsored in part by: Unlike amusement parks, carnivals come and go. The rides, the food stands, the gamesall are made so they can be set up and taken down quickly. Carnivals started after the Chicago Worlds Fair in 1893. Otto Schmitt had been a showman at the fair and decided to hire some of the acts for his own carnival touring company. Schmitts carnival was a lot of fun, but he didnt manage his money well and his company soon went out of business. Some of the people from Schmitts company decided to put on their own carnivals, and by 1937, there were over 300 carnivals touring around the country. Today, carnivals continue, with tours in the North during the summer and tours in the South during the winter. From Town to Town

PAGE 26

Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 27 Gov. Rick Scott and the courts took center stage this week, as the chief executive vetoed a controversial tuition bill while judges struck down a state-employee drug testing plan and approved Senate redistricting maps and a possible expansion of slot machines. The actions came as Scott approved another urry of bills, including measures dealing with youth athletes, disabled parking, recycled metals and water storage, as well as a slew of local bills affecting different parts of the state. SCOTT VETOES TUITION CARTE BLANCHE Ending weeks of speculation, Scott drove a spike into efforts by the University of Florida and Florida State University to leapfrog a legislative cap on tuition increases in an effort, university of cials pledged, to join the ranks of the nations top public colleges. Instead, Scott said that the states pre-eminent research universities need to rst do their homework and provide a systemic, methodical work plan before hell give the authority to raise tuition above a 15 percent cap. While this decision has not been easy, I do not feel that I can sign this bill into law without a more detailed plan to ensure the increased tuition requirements on Florida students will provide the return they and other Floridians need on their additional investment, Scott wrote in a letter announcing the veto of HB 7129. While the measure would have initially allowed only UF and FSU to offer plans for raising tuition beyond the 15 percent annual increase allowed by state law, eventually any institution that met 11 of 14 standards enumerated in the law could submit proposals to do so. The Board of Governors would still have to approve the plans. University officials expressed frustration with the decision, especially at a time when state funds for higher education have been dwindling and Florida students continue to pay some of the lowest tuition rates in the country. HIGH COURT APPROVES SENATE MAPS AND UPHOLDS SLOTS The second time was the charm for Republicanled efforts to redraw political boundaries for the 40-member state Senate, as the Florida Supreme Court upheld a second draft of new maps over the objections of two justices who said the proposal, in one instance, dilutes the clout of black voters. The courts ruling removes the chance that justices would draw the map themselves as part of the states once-a-decade redistricting process. Earlier this year, the court struck down the rst attempt to draw Senate lines but allowed the House map to stand. Three justices who helped form the 5-2 majority scrapping the first Senate plan -Justices Barbara Pariente, R. Fred Lewis and Jorge Labarga -fully supported the latest decision. Chief Justice Charles Canady and Justice Ricky Polston, who approved of the earlier Senate version, supported the majority in result only. In a partial dissent, Justices James E.C. Perry and Peggy Quince, the courts two black members, criticized their colleagues for allowing Northeast Florida districts to stand while splitting in two a largely black area of Daytona Beach. This ruling sends a signal that it is permissible under the provisions of our constitution to divide and conquer a racial or language minority group before they are able to reach a majority voting bloc, Perry wrote in an opinion joined by Quince. There are still hurdles. Portions of maps for the House, Senate and the states congressional delegation still have to be approved by the U.S. Justice Department under the Voting Rights Act because of a history of racial or language discrimination in ve Florida counties. The maps could also be challenged in court under the Voting Rights Act, something Cuban-American lawmakers have suggested is likely because of the lack of a fourth strongly Hispanic Senate district in Miami-Dade County. SLOTS In another ruling Friday, the high court upheld a lower-court ruling that says lawmakers can allow slot machines at pari-mutuel facilities in various parts of the state. Justices declined to take up a challenge to a 1st District Court of Appeal ruling that stems from a plan by Hialeah Park horse track in Miami-Dade County to add potentially lucrative slot machines. But the lower-court ruling has rami cations across the state. Voters in Gadsden, Washington and Hamilton counties in recent months have approved referendums to allow slot machines. Attorney General Pam Bondi has issued an opinion arguing the referendums are not legitimate. DRUG TEST GETS FEDERAL SNUB A Miami federal judge ruled this week that random drug testing for tens of thousands of state workers is unconstitutional, a blow to Gov. Rick Scott who has called the process a common sense approach to addressing drug use in the workplace. The ink had barely dried on U.S. District Judge Ursula Ungaros ruling when the governor announced he would appeal to the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. As I have repeatedly explained, I believe that drug testing state employees is a common-sense means of ensuring a safe, ef cient and productive workforce, Scott said in a statement. That is why so many private employers drug test and why the public and Floridas taxpayers overwhelmingly support this policy. Scott issued the executive order last year to require drug testing at agencies under his control. But the order was placed on hold because of a legal challenge led by the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida and the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. Ungaros 37-page ruling found that Scotts order violates the Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which protects against unreasonable searches. The judge also wrote that Scott did not justify a need for the tests. CITIZENS BOARD DELAYS RATE HIKE CHAT A proposal to raise rates for future Citizens Property Insurance Corp policyholders was shot down this week by the companys board of governors, which decided instead to take a step back and explore options to depopulate the state-backed insurer without causing too much pain. The board is in the untenable position of being required by law to bolster the financial stability of the fund, which now holds nearly 1.5 million policies for some of the riskiest properties in the states, while not raising the ire of powerful political groups and coastal lawmakers who count many Citizens customers as constituents. Following debate and public testimony, Citizens board of governors, meeting in Tampa, directed staff to work up a package of proposed rates for 2013 that includes allowing the statebacked insurer to charge new customer premiums that more closely meet actuarially sound rates. The board had initially been slated to vote on a proposal to allow the company after Jan. 1 to charge rates for new customers that were more than 10 percent higher than existing rates in some cases. Under whatever scenario the company moves forward, existing policyholders will continue to be protected by a 10 percent cap on annual premium increases. CIRCUIT JUDGE SIDES WITH ONLINE TRAVEL COMPANIES Backers of online-travel companies declared victory this week after Leon Circuit Judge James Shelfer sided with the industry in a long-running legal battle about whether companies such as Expedia and Orbitz owe disputed county hotel taxes. In a much watched case in travel circles, Shelfer found the online-travel companies were not obligated to collect and pass along the money. The case is over, said Orbitz lead attorney Beth Her rington, who argued on behalf of the industry. The core question in the case comes down to this: Should county tourist-development taxes apply to the total cost of a customers bill when booking through an online-travel company? Or only to the portion that goes for the room rental? The industry and its supporters argue that trying to impose the tax on online-travel company fees would amount to a services tax, which is not allowed in Florida. But counties say the tax should apply to the total price that travelers pay for rooms and that the onlinetravel companies are involved in renting rooms. The counties that have been involved in the lawsuit are Alachua, Charlotte, Escambia, Flagler, Hillsborough, Lee, Leon, Manatee, Nassau, Okaloosa, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, St. Johns, Seminole, Wakulla and Walton. They plan to appeal. STORY OF THE WEEK: The Florida Supreme Court upholds the state Senate seats. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Florida leaders appear to have a hard time understanding that the government cant search people just because a politician thinks it will be popular. Howard Simon, executive director of ACLU of Florida, on a federal judges ruling striking Floridas employee drug testing program.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Courts exed, drug tests hexed At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary..........36 classrooms/newspapers.........$576/yr Medart Elementary...................33 classrooms/newspapers.........$528/yr Riversink Elementary................20 classrooms/newspapers.........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary..............40 classrooms/newspapers.........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School........10 classrooms/newspapers.........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name_________________________________ Address_______________________________ City_______________________State____Zip_________ Phone______________Email_______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of

PAGE 27

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 13B Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA FROM HOME 6-8 weeks. Accredited. Get a Diploma. Get a Job! FREE Brochure. 800-264-8330 Benjamin Franklin High School. www.dipolmafr om home.com Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)742-1373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay 2Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com General Help Potential to Generate $4000. to $20,000. or more a month with this activity No selling. Experience financial & time freedom. Call 352-445-1385 Financial Fr eedomW ay.info. Wakulla County Transportation is looking to hire a driverwith a valid drivers license and a good driving record. Requirements are to pass DOT physical, finger printing with back ground check, drug test. Salary and hours will be discussed and you must be flexible to the hours and days Apply at the Wakulla County Senior Center 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 and ask for Nell Rozar or Call (850) 926-7145 Ext 2 General Help WANTEDLOVING, DEPENDABLETEACHER6:30am to 9:30am & 3:30pm to 6:30pm please send resume Attn: Teacher position busybeelearning 32327@yahoo.com Part-time Help P AR T TIME PERSON W/COMPUTER & WORD PROCESSING SKILLS IN MED AR T salary negotiable please call (850)570-5712 or (850)926-3808 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline .com Can You Dig It?We will train, certify and provide lifetime assistant landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator 866-362-6497 Business Opportunities PERSON TO WORK AND POSSIBL Y INVEST as part owner in start-up Kayak, Canoe, Paddleboard, dealership and eco-tourism business in Crawfordville area pls call (850)570-5712 or (850) 926-3808 Garage/ Yard Sales CrawfordvilleSat, May 5, 8am to 1pm Hshld items, childrens clothes, dinnerware, chairs, lots more 711 Spring CreekHwy CRAWFORDVILLESat. May 5th 8a-3p Multi-Family Sale Furniture, clothing, toys, prom dresses and Much More! 42 &140 Jean Drive Near Wakulla Middle School PanaceaThur Fri Sat 9a-4p tools, househlod furniture clothes & more! 280 Tower RD (850) 528-3335 Mobile Homes For Rent CONVENIENT LOCATION3/2 large corner lot wooded buffer, porches, CHA, appls include washer & dryer $700/mo+ security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 dwmh, $750 + SEC. on Happy Time Dr. (850) 591-3600 CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA on 5 acres (48 Willie Jenkins Rd.), NE Wakulla County. $800/month. Call 850-510-6200. CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $675 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $575 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-524-4090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Rental Houses OYSTER BAY2/1 on the water with dock. Light and bright furnished or not. $950 + utilities 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $800, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 443-3300 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 926-3832 CRAWFORDVILLESmall 2/1,$ $600 /mo+ $500 dep. minimum 6 months lease, no pets applications/ refers required (850) 524-3164 Waterfront Rentals UNFURNISHED FOR RENT OR SALE at beautiful Shell Point Beach, 1 bdrm, 1 ba Waterfront Home, Lg Great Room w/fireplace, screen porch, sunset view over water, $700 pr mnth. pls call (850)570-5712 or (850) 926-3808 Vacation Rentals ALLIGATOR POINT2/Bedroom, 2/Bath, 1,200 sf, Gulf Front, Vacation Rental 3 blks to white sandy beach, 75ft. to Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful Sunsets $1,000. Wk. (904)687-3397 Real Estate For Sale MUST SELL!Cozy brick home over half acre. Inside Capital Circle, 319 South. Moving and leaving all appliances and lots of furniture. Call (850) 459-5902. Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 5201-0503 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant toSection 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of : Hunter-Turner Arts & Entertainment located at 37 Summerwind Cir W, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in the County of Wakulla intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 24th day of April, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices Amelia Rose, owner May 3, 2012 Fictitious Name Notices 5202-0503 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the undersigned,desiring to engage in business under the ficititious name of: Cave Connections located at 2017 Bloxhom Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, Florida 32327 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 24th day of April 2012. /s/ Steve Cushman, owner Fictitious Name Notices May 3, 2012 5205-0503 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Ficititious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Tony Chandler Tile located at 819 Rehinkel Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 26th day of April, 2012. /s/ Anthony J. Chandler, owner May 3, 2012 5206-0510 TWN Vs. Johnson Lawrence E, Case No. 65-2009-CA-000394 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000394 GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. LAWRENCE E.. JOHNSON A/K/A LAWRENCE EDWARD JOHNSON, et al Defendants RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion To Cancel And Reschedule Foreclosure Sale dated April 19, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65 2009 CA 000394 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, is Plaintiff, andLAWRENCE E.. JOHNSON,A/K/A LAWRENCE EDWARD JOHNSON, et al are Defendants, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 7th day of JUNE, 2012, the folForeclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices A-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED CCC 0538 87408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONSRE-ROOFINGREPAIRSRESIDENTIALCOMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFINGCO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403 HURLEYS ROOF Construction, Inc.Roof Inspection Repair CleaningNEW ROOF RE-ROOFING SHINGLES METAL850-544-1217FREE ESTIMATES MAY DAYS BIG YARD SALE! MAY 4 &NO EARL Y BIRDSNO EARLY BIRDS

PAGE 28

Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comlowing described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 7, BLOCK B, WAKULLA FOREST, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 54, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, TOGETHER WITH 1998HOMES OF LEGEND DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME VIN# THL2407AAL AND THL 2407BAL. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 24th day of April, 2012. PHELAN HALLINAN PLC,888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By:/s/Drew T. Melville, Esq,Attorney for Plaintiff Owei Z. Belleh, Esq., Florida Bar No. 617598 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 Joshua I. Goldman, Esq., Florida Bar No. 689361 Drew T. Melville, Esq., Florida Bar No. 34986 Annabella Barboza, Esq., Florida Bar No. 040627 Hope Touchton, Esq., Florida Bar No. 60043 Susan Falardeau, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0059948 Bradford Willard, Esq., Florida Bar No. 62827 David A. Cramer, Esq., Florida Bar No. 64780 Jonathan L. Blackmore, Esq., Florida Bar No. 67902 Joy Kohl, Esq., Florida Bar No. 69406 Erik DeLEtoile, Esq., Florida Bar No. 71675 Betzy Falgas, Esq., Florida Bar No. 76882 Aaron Hines, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81690 Jherna A. Shahani, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81994 Jenine R. Davey, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0089325 Ashland Roberts, Esq., Florida Bar No. 89578 Geoffrey Cowen, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91377 Heather Griffiths, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0091444 Andrew Wilson, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0092155 Cynthia Hatch, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91460 GMAC MORTGAGE LLC. c/o Phelan Hallinan PLCAttorneys for Plaintiff 888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact:Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 3 and May 10, 2012 5206-0510 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5195-0510 TWN v. Nichols, Sheila Lynn Case No# 2011-CA-000224 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2011-CA-000224 HARRISON FINANCE COMPANY, INC., Plaintiff, v. SHEILA LYNN NICHOLS; RANDALL NICHOLS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHEILA NICHOLS; TENANTS OR UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY THROUGH OR UNDER ANY DEFENDANTS NAMED HEREIN, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F .S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 a.m. oclock on May 24, 2012, the following described property: LOT 14, LAKE ELLEN SHORES, PHASE ONE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 57, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (A.P.N. 24-4S-02W-164-02077-A14) 5196-0510 vs. Johnson, Brian, Case No# 65-2010-CA-000427 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2010-CA-000427, Division GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC. Plaintiff, vs. BRIAN LESLIE JOHNSON, FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION THE FARM HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 18, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 23, BLOCK H THE FARM, PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 93 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 103 FARRIER LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on May 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated:April 19, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Brent X.Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk May 3 & 10, 2012 5196-0510 5197-0510 vs. Marcionette, Kenneth, Case No.65-2009-CA-000403 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2009-CA-000403, Division JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH C. MARCIONETTE JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.; SWEETWATER RIDGE PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 18, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 14 BLOCK A, SWEETWATER RIDGE SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 63, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 167 SWEETWATER CIR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on May 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated:April 19, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Brent X.Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk May 3 & 10, 2012 5197-0510 5198-0510 vs. Guy, Tracey, T. Guy Case No # 65-2011-CA-000227 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2011-CA-000227, Division BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.. Plaintiff, vs. TRACEY T. GUY, CENTENNIAL BANK F/K/A WAKULLA BANK, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 18, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 28, OF PANACEA SHORES, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 115 MASHES SANDS ROAD, PANACEA, FL 32346 including 5199-0510 vs. Collins Tony L. Case No. #65-2011-CA-000028 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2011-CA-000028, Division GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC. Plaintiff, vs. TONY L. COLLINS, DANA J. COLLINS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on April 18, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SYFRETTE CREEK ROAD; THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT WAY FOR A DISTANCE OF 1624.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 87 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 693.59 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT : THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 312.68 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP: THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 701.55 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SYFRETTE CREEK ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 01 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 313.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. and commonly known as: 293 SYFRETTE CREEK RD, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on May 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated:April 19, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Brent X.Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk May 3 & 10, 2012 5199-0510 5200-0510 Vs. Elliott, Randy T. Case No. # 11-283-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-283-CA COLONY BANK WILCOX A/K/A COLONY BANK Plaintiff, vs. RANDY T. ELLIOTT A/K/A R.T. ELLIOTT, PARADISE VILLAGE OF SHELL POINT HOMES ASSOCIATION INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment ofReplevin and Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in Case No. 11-283-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which COLONY BANK WILCOX A/K/A COLONY BANK is the Plaintiff and RANDY T. ELLIOTT A/K/A R.T. ELLIOTT and PARADISE VILLAGE OF SHELL POINT HOMES ASSOCIATION, INC, are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the first floor front lobby of the Courthouse in Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on May 24, 2012, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Replevin and Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: LOT 50, PARADISE VILLAGE OF SHELL POINT, UNIT 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 13 and 14, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: April 18, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) BY: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 3 & 10, 2012 5200-0510 5204-0524 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No: 12-111-DR, Division In the Adoption of Petitioner and Elijah Dale Holman & Simon Ellis Holman Respondent NOTICE OF ACTON FOR ADOPTION TO: Brian Dale Reed c/o The Red Lobster, 435 Shawnee Mall Drive, Shawnee, OK YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for adoption has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Attorney Steven P. Glazer, whose address is 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on or before June 01, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: April 26, 2012 (COURT SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit court By: /s/ Irvene Kimbrel, Deputy Clerk Published four times (4) times in the Wakulla News May 3, 10, 17, 24, 2012 5204-0524 I Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on May 24, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated:April 19, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Brent X.Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk May 3 & 10, 2012 5196-0510 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 MAY 5 9AM EST--F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTIONTractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU426610% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646 TO VIEW PARTIAL LIST OF PHOTOS VISIT www.auctionzip.comNOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Downtown Storage Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, May 12, 2012, at 9:00 a.m. at 57 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL, of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Lynn Tate, Wendy Kenon and Timothy White Before the sale date of May 12, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at Downtown Storage Center, 57 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL. May 3, 8, 2012 We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd.Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/2BA house $700 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property!We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!ANew Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. Available ASAP. 110 Whiddon Lake Rd. 3BR/2BA $900 Mo. Available May 1. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 26-D Guinevere 3BR/2BA for $850 Mo. with $950 Deposit. Small pets ok with fee of $20020 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets WelcomesCarla HunterCall Carla Today 850-445-6550carla@bluewaterrealtrygroup.comRealtorSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403

PAGE 29

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 Page 15BANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: April 18, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) CER TIFICA TE OF SER VICE I CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S. Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on April 19, 2012, to each of the following: Henry L. Miller, Jr., Attorney for Harrison Finance Company, Inc., Mathews Law Firm, P. A., 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; Tina Blackmon, Branch Manager, Harrison Finance Company, Inc., 5032 Capital Circle, SW, Suite 7, Tallahassee, Florida 32305; and Sheila Lynn Nichols, 9829 Watermill Circle, Apartment B, Boynton Beach, Florida 33437-2879. By: /s/ Glenda Porter, DC, Court Clerk Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 3 & 10, 2012 5195-0510 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5188-0503 Vs. Llewllyn Patrick Mcewan Case No. 65-2010-CA-000083 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000083 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LLEWLLYN PATRICK MCEWAN A/K/A LLEWELLYN PATRICK MCEWAN,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000083 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and LLEWLLYN PATRICK MCEWAN A/K/A LLEWELLYN PATRICK MCEWAN; CAROL NELSON MCEWAN A/K/A CAROL MCEWAN; RIVER WALK ESTATES HOMES ASSOCIATION, INC,; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at lobby OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 A.M, on the 24th of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, BLOCK D, RIVER WALK ESTATES, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THERE OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 4 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A RIVER DRIVE, PANACEA, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this court on April 16, 2012. Brent X Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act-Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 26 and May 3, 2012 5188-0503 5190-0503 TWN Vs. Fleming, Dian D, Case No. 65-2008 CA 000256 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2008 CA 000256 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5 Plaintiff, vs. DIAN D. FLEMING, et al Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65 2008 CA 000256 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5, is Plaintiff, and DIAN D. FLEMING, et al are Defendants, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 24th day of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT NUMBER 13, IN BLOCK A, UNIT THREE(3) OF SHELL POINT BEACH, A SUBDIVISION IN LOT 121 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 58 OF PLAT BOOK NUMBER 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19thday of April, 2012. PHELAN HALLINAN PLC,888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By:/s/Betzy Falgas,Attorney for Plaintiff Owei Z. Belleh, Esq., Florida Bar No. 617598 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 Joshua I. Goldman, Esq., Florida Bar No. 689361 Drew T. Melville, Esq., Florida Bar No. 34986 Annabella Barboza, Esq., Florida Bar No. 040627 Hope Touchton, Esq., Florida Bar No. 60043 Susan Falardeau, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0059948 Bradford Willard, Esq., Florida Bar No. 62827 David A. Cramer, Esq., Florida Bar No. 64780 Jonathan L. Blackmore, Esq., Florida Bar No. 67902 Joy Kohl, Esq., Florida Bar No. 69406 Erik DeLEtoile, Esq., Florida Bar No. 71675 Betzy Falgas, Esq., Florida Bar No. 76882 Aaron Hines, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81690 Jherna A. Shahani, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81994 Jenine R. Davey, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0089325 Ashland Roberts, Esq., Florida Bar No. 89578 Geoffrey Cowen, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91377 5192-0510 vs. Johnson, Josette E. Case No. 2011-CA-000266 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA,CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO. 2011-CA-000266 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE 5193-0510 TWN Vs. Taff, Clayton P Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2009-CA-000432 BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff, -vs.Clayton P. Taff, Jr.; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 16, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000432 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P., Plaintiff and Clayton P. Taff, Jr. are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M. on May 24, 2012. the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 30, OF PANACEA SHORES, UNIT 4, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 34, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. GLORIA R. HAYWARD, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd. Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813)880-8888, (813)880-8800 May 5 & May 12, 2012. 09-149518 FC01 5194-0510 TWN v. Shivers, James Calvin, Case No# 2011-CA-000223 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2011-CA-000224 SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, v. JAMES CALVIN SHIVERS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAMES CALVIN SHIVERS; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F .S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 a.m. oclock on May 31, 2012, the following described property: TRACTS 91 AND 92, OF GOLDEN GATE FOREST, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 3 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1996 GRAND MANOR DOUBLEWIDE HOME WITH SERIAL NUMBERS GAGMTD1654A AND GAGMTD1654B (A.P.N. 07-38-01W-115-04314-091) ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: April 19, 2012 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By;/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) CER TIFICA TE OF SER VICE I CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Sale under F.S. Chapter 45 has been furnished by United States Mail on April 19, 2012, to each of the following: Henry L. Miller, Jr., Attorney for Harrison Finance Company, Inc., Mathews Law Firm, P. A., 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303; Tina Blackmon, Branch Manager, Harrison Finance Company, Inc., 5032 Capital Circle, SW, Suite 7, Tallahassee, Florida 32305; and Sheila Lynn Nichols, 9829 Watermill Circle, Apartment B, Boynton Beach, Florida 33437-2879. By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Court Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News May 3 & 10, 2012 5194-0510 CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-ABC1 Plaintiff, vs. JOSETTE E. JOHNSON; JOHN A. JOHNSON, JR A/K/A JOHN A. JOHNSON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. / NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Please publish in THE WAKULLA NEWS) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated 18th April, 2012, and entered in Case No. 2011-CA-000266, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS, INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-ABC1 is Plaintiff and JOSETTE E. JOHNSON; JOHN A. JOHNSON, JR A/K/A JOHN A. JOHNSON; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, at 11:00 a.m., on the 31st day of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: WOODVILLE SOUTH, UNIT II, (UNRECORDED) LOT 17 COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK A OF WOODVILLE SOUTH, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEROF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 31, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 700.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 875.25 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 75 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 183.49 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES WEST 877.67 FEET TO THE CENTERPOINT OF A CENTERLINE HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS, THENCE RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 315.00FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC AND UTILITY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18th day of April, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A.,8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000,Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486,Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380,File No. 11-05061 BOA Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News May 3 & 12, 2012 5192-0510 Heather Griffiths, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0091444 Andrew Wilson, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0092155 Cynthia Hatch, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91460 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5 c/o Phelan Hallinan PLCAttorneys for Plaintiff 888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact:Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 26 and May 3, 2012 5190-0503 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5189-0503TWN Blount, Jeffrey Allan Case No. 12-30-CP Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12-30-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JEFFREY ALLAN BLOUNT, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JEFFREY ALLAN BLOUNT, deceased, Case Number 12-30-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE TO THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 26, 2012. Personal Representative /s/WILLIAM BRYANT BLOUNT 218 S.W. Whitewood Drive, Port St. Lucie, FL 34953 Attorney for the Personal Representative /s/MARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.949884 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, FL 32326 April 26 & May 3, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Payments must be made before Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 2:00p.m. The owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or by paying in person at the warehouse. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News April 26 & May 3, 2012 5191-0503 5191-0503 (5 /12 Sale-ABC Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act. Florida Statutes, Chapeter 83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, May 12, Self Storage Notices 2012, at 2PM, at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini Warehouse containing personal property of: FINAL NOTICE DARRELL N. HODGE CLA Y BROGDON NORMAN BUTCH MCCALISTER LAMAR HIERS Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Brain Teaser 1 14 17 25 34 37 41 44 57 61 64 2 20 26 50 3 27 51 4 28 45 48 21 23 46 5 15 18 38 42 58 62 65 6 35 52 7 29 53 8 30 49 9 24 47 22 39 43 10 16 19 40 54 59 63 66 11 31 36 55 12 32 56 13 33 60ACROSS1.Watercolor 5.Crosswise, nautically 10.Findabominable 14.Consider,with "over" 15."__Remember" ("Fantasticks" song) 16. Galbraith'ssubj. 17.__colada 18.Attachwitha rope 19.Cattlezapper 20.Essential constituent 23.Makehaste 24.Mauna__ 25.PartofMLK 29.Criticalevaluation 34. Greetthedawn 35.Slaughterin baseball 36."Well,__-di-dah!" 37.Employer'soffering 41.Chang'stwin 42.Dele'sopposite 43.Paveover 44.Denizenofhell 47.Electronicmusic pion eerEdgard 48. Granolamorsel 49.Long.crosser 50.Destinationof somemail 57. Givestwo thumbs downto 58.Preferredstrategy 59.LiketheNegev 61.Westernmost Aleutian 62.Moth-__(timeworn) 63.Plain-__ (unadorned) 64. Quickly,when doubled 65.Alltuckeredout 66.BitofpondscumDOWN1.Fuseunit 2.Wordsfromawag 3.Forearmbone 4.Controversial orchardspray 5.Arriveat 6.Picklingneed 7.Tookaganderat 8.Restingon 9.Louvrehighlight 10.Jazzlover,inold slang 11.Farmunit 12.G imletor screwdriver 13.Dropthecurtainon 21.Fence'ssupplier 22.Bacillusshape 25.Silentsactress Normand 26. "There__atheists ..." 27.Teethers'aids 28.PhilosopherLao-__ 29.Photographer Adams 30.EgyptianChristian 31.Makejubilant 32.Epictales 33.Lastwordina sentry'squestion 35.Idesrebuke 38.Carbon14and uranium235 39. "USENOHOOKS" stencilsite 40.Plunkorplopleadin 45.50-50chance 46.Rodethebench 47.Availabletorent 49.Dirty__(potential embarrassment) 50.Troddentrack 51.Notdeceivedby 52.Openinginsome paja mas 53.Itmaybe tempted 54.Mexicali'slocale, forshort 55.Viva-voce 56.PED__ 57.Candidate'sfundraiser:Abbr. 60.Narcorg.American Prole Hometown Content 4/8/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 2 3 45167 8749 3 76 98 145 6 847 97132 594 00 9 HtCtt 716 9284 3 5 294351687 583674192 435 287916 679513824 128469753 361 842579 947135268 852796341 A M P M A B E L P A C Q U I P A R E N O P A T H U L N A R I N G S O N T O A L A R T S E T O S S U P T H I E F S A T A T T A I N I S O T O P E S B R I N E E T T U F L A P E Y E D A N S E L F A T E A T O P C O P T L I N E N M O N A L I S A V A C A N T R O D C R A T E H E P C A T K E R B A J A A C R E E L A T E O R A L T O O L S A G A S X I N G E N D T H E R E D E A Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

PAGE 30

Page 16B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 3, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy WORKFORCE PLUSSpecial to The NewsI live on 18 acres in Wakulla County, Charles McCool said. And it is paradise. Wakulla residents would agree with his sentiment. The natural beauty of the area is a source of both pride and joy for those fortunate enough to live in the area, and was certainly a comfort for McCool, who was laid off in October. I was working at the Department of Financial Services as the chief of the Bureau of Publications and Records, McCool said. And the administration decided they wanted to downsize. So I was laid off. Despite his newly unemployed status, McCool felt relaxed about his situation. I was peaceful and not worried about the outcome, McCool said. I had a lot of faith in the outcome because I had a lot of faith. In addition to his faith, McCool had preparation on his side. While layoffs are an unwelcome event, they do not always come by surprise. McCool predicted his layoff a few months in advance and was able to prepare emotionally for a career transition. You need to listen to whats going on in your workplace, McCool said. At the time, even though the legislation-mandated layoffs had already occurred and the Legislature was out, McCool said, I just had this feeling from just listening to what was happening in the organization. His employer informed him of his position termination soon afterwards. In the meantime, McCool became more involved in his church, spent time with his family and strove to secure his next position. I had a lot of support from the great folks down at the Wakulla County Workforce Plus, McCool said. They helped me in my job search, kept me up to speed and provided a lot of support and assistance. McCool was unemployed for four months before he secured a position as an auditor in the Inspector Generals of ce. A key mark of his job hunt was con dence. I have a certain level of confidence from my experience, McCool said, referring to, among other things, his robust resume of 20 years as city manager of various municipalities. And since Ive been exible in my career, making the transition to another type of work area is a challenge but I have con dence to attain it. That confidence was spurred in part by the staff at Workforce Plus. Everybody there did a great job, McCool said. They were confidence builders. At the end of the day, that confidence and his faith saw him through his career transition. I knew God would take care and I just had to be careful to listen to what he was telling me. McCool said. I listened to what he wanted to tell me, and thats when I got the job.Workforce Plus is proud to bring you a series of stories straight from the community. In partnership with The Wakulla News, well showcase one of our own every six weeks whose journey in their career will serve to inspire and encourage. Real Stories, Real People: A special series from Workforce PlusCharles McCool had faith in his career journey Charles McCool didnt let his layoff upset him.WORKFORCE PLUSTreasury announces increase in small business lendingSpecial to The NewsWASHINGTON The U.S. Department of the Treasury recently released a report showing that Florida banks have increased their small business lending by $211.1 million since receiving capital through Small Business Lending Fund (SBLF). The SBLF, which was established as part of the Small Business Jobs Act that President Obama signed into law, encourages community banks to increase their lending to small businesses to help them grow and create new jobs. Treasury invested more than $4 billion in 332 institutions, located in over 3,000 communities in 48 states, through the SBLF. Nationwide, institutions participating in the SBLF signi cantly increased small business lending in the last quarter of 2011 by $1.3 billion over the prior quarter for a total of $4.8 billion over their baseline. This report shows that the Small Business Lending Fund is having a powerful impact, said Deputy Secretary of the Treasury Neal Wolin. The program is helping spark new lending to local entrepreneurs looking to invest in their businesses and create new jobs. Small businesses play a critical role in the U.S. economy and are central to growth and job creation. Small businesses employ roughly one-half of all Americans and account for about 60 percent of gross job creation. But small business owners faced disproportionate challenges in the aftermath of the recession and credit crisis, including difficulty accessing capital. We add an important benet to our free debit cards. Instant. The benet of our free instant-issue debit card is that you can get it today and use it today. Its that easy. And with Centennial Bank, you can also use any ATM in the country, free*. Any ATM at all. Just a few more ways we offer banking that comes to you.*Some restrictions may apply. See bank for details. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUNCH PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS