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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00406
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 04-26-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00406
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County has decided to join the Florida Association of Counties potential lawsuit against the controversial House Bill 5301. The new law deals with state Medicaid billing and changes the way each countys contribution is collected. We need to “ ght it,Ž said County Commissioner Mike Stewart at the April 16 county commission meeting. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said FAC is mounting a challenge to the constitutionality of the law, as well as its legality. The bill was approved and signed by Gov. Rick Scott on March 29. Numerous counties urged him to veto the bill, including Wakulla County. The law will require each county to pay its share of disputed Medicaid bills going back 12 years to May 1 of this year. For past due billings, each county must pay 85 percent of the amount due over the next “ ve years. Encinosa said the Agency for Health Care Administration, which is in charge of billing, must have the local amounts certi“ ed by Aug. 1. Representatives with AHCA met with the county earlier this month and said the county owed $52,000. The county pointed out that because of double billing, it has overpaid and is due $95,000. Once the amounts are certi“ ed, the county will have a chance to challenge them. This will be the last time the county will be able to dispute those amounts. Going forward, the state will withhold a portion of the countys revenue sharing and one-cent sales tax distributions. Instead of receiving a bill, the county will receive a statement of what was taken out. They can milk us dry,Ž Stewart said. There will be no veri“ cation of where someone lives, Stewart said. If it says Wakulla County, we have to pay it,Ž Stewart said. County Administrator David Edwards said the county will not pay it, it will simply be taken. Previously, AHCA provided counties with a monthly bill listing Medicaid residents for which the county is responsible for paying. Counties were able to review the information to verify the individuals county of residence and determine whether the bill was accurate. If it was correct, the bill was paid. If it was incorrect and the person was not a county resident, the amount of the bill was denied and sent back to AHCA. The other commissioners agreed to pay the $1,000 to join the suit to be “ led by FAC. FACs board of directors decided to purse legal action on April 12 and will “ le their suit in the 2nd Judicial Court in Leon County. Bay, Bradford, Broward, Charlotte, Escambia, Flagler, Franklin, Hamilton, Highlands, Hillsborough, Lee, Leon, Levy, Manatee, Martin, MiamiDade, Monroe, Nassau, Osceola, Pasco, Polk, St. Johns, St. Lucie, Seminole, Suwannee and now Wakulla have already voted to join with the suit. HB 5301 has made this multi-million dollar accounting mess the law of the land … a reality we are forced to confront in the courtroom on behalf of Floridas communities and taxpayers,Ž said Chris Holley, executive director of the FAC. The suit is expected to be “ led by the end of the month. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 16th Issue Thursday, April 26, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews CANDIDATE CONTRIBUTIONS AND EXPENDITURES W a k u l l a C o u n t y Wakulla County S e n i o r C i t i z e n s Senior Citizens C e l e b r a t e L i f e Celebrate Life See Page 1BThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Summer Camps ................................................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 11 B INDEX OBITUARIES Mary M. Moore-Gearhart Rona Lavon Hawkins Jr. Catherine Rosier Murray Delpha Syvelle Robison Porter Thelma Louise Sanders Brinson Richard Taylor Sr. Tommy Baldwin Waller By BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent Wakulla County School District ranks third in the state on Basic Return on Investment indicators according to the latest information published in the Center for American Progress Return on Investment Report. This report is a study of the ef“ ciency of the nations public education system, attempting to evaluate almost every major school district in the country. The study looks at student achievement scores in conjunction with the amount spent per student, among other indicators. To remain an Academically High Performing District as designated by the Florida Department of Education while still keeping a watchful eye on the taxpayers dollars is always a challenge,Ž said Wakulla Superintendent of Schools David Miller. We want the best education possible for our children without putting an undue “ nancial burden on the citizens of Wakulla County in these tough economic times,Ž he said. To be ranked third in the state on Basic ROI indicators is one sign that we are succeeding.Ž Basic ROI indicators of student achievement in conjunction with per pupil spending put Wakulla with more than 5,000 students behind only Brevard County with more than 74,000 students and Seminole County with more than 65,000 students. All of the other high ranking Basic ROI districts were much larger than Wakulla as well. The Center for American Progress does state in a disclaimer that the connection between spending and educational achievement is complex, and that the data cant capture everything that goes into creating an effective school system. Because there is no uniform national achievement test taken by all students, states cannot be compared with each other. The student achievement indicators are different for each state. Wakulla County School District was fourth in the state and 56th in the world to earn districtwide, “ ve year accreditation in 2007 and earned it again in 2011,Ž Miller said. The accreditation team was composed of educators from outside the U.S. and Florida, as well as some from Florida. The excellent “ nal accreditation report was yet another indication that our school district strives to provide our students with a world class education.ŽWakulla joins Medicaid lawsuitLocal schools rank third in return on investmentCounty Commissioner Lynn Artz announces she will not seek re-election for the District 5 seat. See her column on The Opinion Page, 4A. Proposed septic tank revisions moving forwardBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Commission has decided to move forward with the possibility of revising its current septic tank requirements. Under the revisions, performancebased systems would not be required throughout the entire county. The nitrogen reducing systems would be required to be installed for new development located within Bloxham Cutoff at the county line traveling east to Crawfordville Highway; from Crawfordville Highway south to East Ivan Road; East Ivan Road south to Wakulla Arran Road; Wakulla Arran Road west to Cajer Posey Road; Cajer Posey Road south to Shadeville Highway; Shadeville Highway east to Woodville Highway; Woodville Highway north to the county line; from the county line back to the beginning point at Bloxham Cutoff. This board is ready to retreat in a major way,Ž said Commissioner Lynn Artz, who has been very vocal about protecting Wakullas waterbodies. The systems would also be required if they are installed within 150 feet of the high water level of any surface water, wet sink, swallet or within 300 feet of a first or second magnitude spring, as well as those properties where the total acreage is less than 5 acres. Previously included in the revisions was a threshold for the dollar amount of repairs allowed before one must upgrade to a performance based system. At the April 16 county commission meeting, Commissioner Randy Merritt, who proposed the revisions, said he wanted to remove the threshold and allow an unlimited amount of repairs and modifications. Merritt said he wanted to follow with the states de“ nition for repair. County Health Department Administrator Padraic Juarez said the state allows any system to be repaired if its failing. In 2006, the county commission at the time decided to require performance based systems county-wide for new development and replacement or repairs of existing systems. Artz said the goal was to eventually convert all septic systems. They would either connect to sewer or be upgraded. Were basically doing nothing in the Wakulla Springs protection zone,Ž Artz said of the revisions. Also included in the revisions is decreasing the nitrogen reducing levels from 90 percent to 50 percent, which is in line with federal standards. Previously, Juarez said most of the systems in the county do not reduce the nitrogen levels by 90 percent. There were a few that did obtain 90 percent, he said, but most were reaching the national average of 50 percent. Commissioner Jerry Moore said most of the problem is coming from the north. Artz said, Everyone is contributing to the problem.Ž Continued on Page 12ACHAT’s Pamper Your PoochMore events from this weekend: NAMI Derby, Page 2A  Relay for Life, Page 2A  Wakulla Wildlife Festival, Page 14ASee Pages 5B-6B Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment held its fundraiser, Pamper Your Pooch, at Hudson Park this past Saturday, April 21. Volunteers with CHAT bathed, dried, groomed, trimmed nails and gave the dogs some much deserved attention and pampering. Pet owners could also get their dogs micro-chipped at the event. Cricket, at right, was not a fan of the bath and needed some attention from Suzanne Paterson to calm her nerves. Crickets owner, Tammie Nason, said she always puts up a good “ ght. CHAT volunteers, below, bath dogs during the fundraiser.Photos by JENNIFER JENSEN

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By LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsWith a blast from the bugle, the 2nd annual NAMI Wakulla Triple Crown Derby was underway. Bedecked in large, bright hats and sipping on alcohol-free mint juleps (sold for $1 to bene“ t the cause) guests sat on bleachers in the raincooled sun at the Wakulla County Livestock Pavilion, watching horses race to skirt the single barrel at the end of the course. Perhaps because of the recent rain, two horses seemed especially energetic: The No. 8 horse, given the NAMI nickname of DenialŽ jockeyed by Sam Dunway, ran off the track for a bit, seeming to head back to the horse trailers. Another horse, No. 11, nicknamed DepressionŽ and jockeyed by Jim Porter, certainly seemed unhappy for a moment, pushing Porter off in the “ nal stretch of the Public AwarenessŽ race. Placing “ rst overall in the Derby, was StigmaŽ a quarter-horse jockeyed by Sonya Cutchin and sponsored by County Commissioner Alan Brock. Cutchin has ridden horses all her life. Horses are therapeuticŽ she said, adding: Im excited to help NAMI, they do a lot of good things.Ž Cutchin, who won the Bolt of Lightning AwardŽ for placing “ rst, sat with horse buddy Cassie Scott, jockey of Baker Act,Ž a horse sponsored by Sheriff Donnie Crum. Scott accepted the Pure Gold AwardŽ given to the sponsoring team that raised the most money, on behalf of Crum. Its important to promote that there are resources and help available,Ž Scott said of the event. Rita Odom, mother of Chris Odom, jockey of the horse Panic Attack,Ž seemed to see a relationship between the event and the NAMI mission. It teaches responsibility but it is the two of you [horse and rider] … youre not just on your own.Ž Besides the races, guests were invited to admire hats decorated for the event by the Hillier family, while enjoying a barbecue dinner and awards ceremony. By LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsThe sweetest stars ever to grace the track at Wakulla High School werent sprinting for a fast finish or perfecting their running strides through practice, but walked the track with slow deliberation and open hearts this past Friday, April 20, holding candles high in the night air. In the Wakulla County Relay for Life, cancer survivors and their caretakers teamed with local citizens and activists who have seen the ravages of cancer in the people around them and came out to walk around the track in teams sponsored by local individuals, businesses, schools and civic organizations. Its hard to “ nd someone not touched by cancer,Ž said Cori Revell, a co-chair with the event. One such family, deeply touched by cancer, was the family of Charles BuddyŽ Updegraff, who passed away in February after a 10month struggle with melanoma. Updegraff worked for more than 20 years as a mail carrier in the area, and was an active member of Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Each year he came out to show his support in the “ ght against cancer … signing up to walk in the relay in the early hours of the morning to let others rest. He was the one walking in the middle of the night, when no one else wanted to,Ž his wife Barbara remembered. His daughter Mary, planned to take his place this year as the 4oclock walker.Ž Mary credited the familys deep religious faith as being a source of strength, saying: Its easier when you know youll see him again.Ž Relay for Life, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, takes place across the country, with each community dedicating 18 hours to holding the Relay. The idea is that cancer never sleeps,Ž Revell explained. Many relay teams choose to spend the night, pitching tents in the center of the track “ eld and building small campfires around which they roasted marshmallows and talked late in to the night. Around one of these “ res sat Alena Burley and Jennifer Siniscalchi, two teachers from Riversink Elementary, representing the school in the relay. Both planned to spend the night and were proud of the schools commitment to the cause. Riversink Elementary has already raised more than $1,500 with fundraisers like Hat DayŽ where, for 25 cents, a child was allowed to wear a hat to school. I just think every person can make a difference,Ž said Siniscalchi. Her favorite part of the relay evening was the Survivor Walk, held at 6 p.m., in which cancer survivors walked a lap around the track together, cheered on by Relay supporters. You see people really think about everything theyve been through,Ž she said. The Wakulla County Relay for Life is an annual event and was chaired this year by Kristin Dow. To learn more about Wakulla Countys Chapter of the Relay for Life event, and to track fundraising, visit relayforlife.org/wakulla” Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comNAMI Derby is held Saturday LUCY CARTERSonya Cutchin, who won “ rst place, and Cassie Scott enjoying the winners table.Relay for Life helps raise money for cancer research PHOTOS BY LUCY CARTERRiversink teachers Alena Burley and Jennifer Siniscalchi roast marshmallows by their booth. Luminaria line the track at Relay for Life. Wakulla County Third Annual Ronald Reagan Wakulla County Third Annual Ronald Reagan Affair Affair BLU E JEANS BLU E JEANSBlack Tie Black Tie& &May 3rd, 2012 at 6 pm at The Bistro at Wildwood 3896 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, Florida May 3rd, 2012 at 6 pm at The Bistro at Wildwood 3896 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, FloridaPaid for and approved by the Wakulla County Republican Executive Commiee. Not in support of any candidate. Featuring Key Note Speaker Peter Schweizer Author of Reagans WarThe epic story of his forty year struggle against and “nal triumph over communism Featuring Key Note Speaker Peter Schweizer Author of Reagans WarThe epic story of his forty year struggle against and “nal triumph over communism$35 for individual $50 for two dinner tickets $35 for individual $50 for two dinner ticketsSpo nsorshi ps Available Spons ors hips Availablewww.wakullarepublicans.com www.wakullarepublicans.com Ariel McKenzieFrom mom, dad, sister, grandma, grandpa and J.J.Happy Birthday on April 27! Second AnnualTriple Crown Derby Thank You NAMI Wakulla would like to take this opportunity to express thanks to all the people who contributed and par cipated in making the 2012 NAMI Wakulla Second Annual Triple Crown Derby a success on April 21, at the Livestock Pavilion Special Thanks to: The Wakulla County Horseman’s Associa on, who worked up a sweat on Friday to make the race track perfect, also for providing the horses and jockeys for our event.Master of Derby Ceremonies: Merl Robb Music Provided by: Michelle Snow Invoca on: Rev. Bert Matlock Servers: Judge Jill Walker, Claudia Glover, Marian Revell, Brenda Hu o Chicken prepared and Cooked by: D.R. (Peewee) Vause Hats/Props Creators: Terry Hillier, Sara Hillier, Carly Hillier Flagbearers: Wakulla County Horseman’s Associa on Community Leaders: Call to Post:David Miller, Wakulla County Superintendant of SchoolsDonnie Crum, Wakulla County Sheri – Jockey Cassi Sco – “Pure Gold” Award Brent Thurmond, Wakulla County Clerk of Courts -Jockey Erica Odom Buddy Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elec ons– Jockey Todd Porter Donnie Sparkman, Wakulla County Property Appraiser – Jockey Emma Donaldson Alan Brock, Wakulla County Commissioner – Jockey Sonya Cutchin – “Bolt of Lightning” Award Randy Merri Wakulla County Commissioner – Jockey Bailey Russom Mike Stewart, Wakulla County Commissioner – Jockey Chris Odom Jerry Evans, Wakulla County School Board – Jockey Dennis Taylor Mike Sco Wakulla County School Board – Jockey Michelle Churchard Ray Gray, Wakulla County School Board – Jockey Charlie Odom Greg Thomas, Wakulla County School Board – Jockey Erika Wilson Chuck Shields, Mayor, City of St. Marks – Jockey Jim Porter Colleen Skipper, Mayor, City of Sopchoppy – Jockey Sam Dunaway Judge Jill Walker for volunteering her me and serving Derby Sponsors: Dr. Andrea Plagge The Wakulla News Wakulla Area Times Wakulla.com Centennial Bank Air Con of Wakulla, LLC Mack’s Country Meats Kelly Sheet Metal, Inc. Flowers Bakery Company Ashley Feed & Seed Revel’s Meats ACE Hardware/Woodville Walmart Winn Dixie Crawfordville McDonalds Apalachee Center, Inc. Rick Melton Enterprises Mary Ellen Davis, A orney at Law NAMI Wakulla believes it is our volunteers who break down the s gma of mental illness in our county and makes possible our support programs for people diagnosed with mental illness, their friends and family.NAMI Wakulla is an a liate of the Na onal Alliance on Mental Illness CRAFTS • FOOD • RAFFLEat theSaturday, April 28 9AM-3PM YOUAREINVITED TOA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAt the recent St. Marks City Commission meeting, the commission approved being the sponsor of a permit for a 10-year extension to reopen the St. Marks Reef, an arti“ cial reef 5 miles out from the St. Marks Lighthouse. The Organization for Arti“ cial Reefs and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are trying to enhance the reef, increasing it from 17.3 acres to 42. The reef will be made out of concrete and steel, said Tony Murray, board member of OAR. The economic enhancement brought to the community can turn into a lot of different aspects,Ž Murray said. The reef will create additional “ shing grounds for the area. The artificial reef was placed in 1964 and 1965 and has developed a lot since then, Murray said. The reef is also outside of the original permitted location. So this reauthorization would also increase the area to include where the reef is currently located and where the permit said it should be. Even with the possible liability issues, the city agreed to sponsor the permit. When the reef was added in the 1960s, the city was also the sponsor. City Attorney Ron Mowrey said there are potential third party liabilities. Once the reef is placed, the city becomes responsible for it. Keith Millie, with FWC, said they recommend municipalities be the sponsor for the benefit of having general council oversight. He added that the liability issues typically lie with the transfer and placement of the reef, which could be placed with the construction company. Murray said OAR would make sure the placement is correct and there are no issues during construction. A post construction dive would be done to ensure the right material is placed and that it is in the right location, he said. Murray said he is unsure how much the permit will cost, but anticipated around $710. Billy Bishop, with the St. Marks Waterfronts Florida Partnership, said they would chip in a portion. There is a 500-pound minimum and it isnt expected there will be any movement once it is placed. Commissioner Allen Hobbs said if there is a storm large enough to move the arti“ cial reef, the city isnt going to be worrying about the reef. Columbus took a chance and he discovered America,Ž Hobbs said. I think we should do it.Ž Commissioner Phil Cantner agreed and said the benefits will far outweigh any possible chance of problems. The commission voted four to zero to approve the sponsorship of the permit. In another matter, Mowrey brought up the St. Marks Re“ nery site and said members of his law “ rm have been examining the citys deed on the site to determine exactly how much property the city owns. According to Mowrey, the city is the clear owner of the 55-acre tract where the tanks and buildings sit. With three other tracts, it was unclear. For one of the tracts, the deed came from Seminole Refinery and was transferred to the St. Marks Refinery, but it turned out Seminole Refinery never actually owned the land. Another piece was also not owned by the city and should never have been included in the deed, Mowrey said. Mowrey said he will work on correcting those issues. CITY OF ST. MARKSCity sponsors permit for arti“ cial reef NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING APRIL 26, 2012The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, May 14, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 4, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM and Monday, July 16, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS APRIL 26, 2012The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners propose to consider the following applications and/or adopt by ordinance. A Public Hearing is scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, May 14, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 4, 2012, and Monday July 16, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING APRIL 26, 2012The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, May 14, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 4, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing on May 21, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any nonEnglish speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.APRIL 26, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing Before the Planning Commission on May 14, 2012 at 7:00p.m. and the Board of County Commissioners on May 21, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any nonEnglish speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.APRIL 26, 2012

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Kimball Thomas will run for Superintendent of Schools • Children raise funds for hospital • Sheriff’s Report for April 19 • Brinson Richard Taylor Sr. obituary • Studio 88 wins big at competition • Balloon release marks celebration • Worm Gruntin’ Festival is Saturday • David Miller announces retirement€ thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:By LYNN ARTZ County commissioner I will not seek a second term in 2012. Though I would love to continue to serve the citizens of Wakulla County, I must take a break to focus on my family. I hope to return in four years. I have been struggling with this decision since last fall. There is so much more that I wanted to accomplish. I feel regret about not being able to continue my work with energy ef“ ciency and conservation, smart growth and environmental protection. As the economy picks up and the pace of development begins to accelerate, we need to take a different approach to the land use decisions we make or our problems with sprawl, traf“ c congestion and infrastructure de“ cits will only get worse. Though I wish that I had been able to accomplish more, Im proud of what Ive been able to achieve despite tough economic times, vacant staff positions, administrative turmoil and turnover and an increasingly conservative Board. I am particularly proud of my success in the grants arena. I wrote the only ARRA job-creation grant that Wakulla County received, a tree-planting grant designed to support employment for nurseries, arborists and landscaping companies. I wrote other successful grants to assist with Wakulla Gardens, the Crawfordville Town Plan and the Wild” ower Project along 98. I am also proud of my work on behalf of youth and with regard to the Community Center. I am grateful to the many people who have helped and supported my work and I am sorry to disappoint the people who have been urging or expecting me to run for re-election in November. To lessen my guilt about stepping down, I have been trying without success to recruit a like-minded person to run in my place.Lynn Artz is the county commissioner for District 5, Sopchoppy.In the April 12 edition, the story Concealed weapons approach 1 million in FloridaŽ by the News Service of Florida incorrectly referred to Trayvon Martin shooter George Zimmerman as a convicted felon.Ž Zimmerman had been arrested in 2005 and charged with resisting arrest. But after Zimmerman completed a pretrial diversion program, the charges were dropped. He had a domestic violence injunction issued against him in 2005, but wasnt charged or convicted of any crime. The News Service regrets the error.CorrectionArtz: I wont seek re-election anks for support of Worm Gruntin 5KEditor, The News: The 12th annual Worm Gruntin Festival was held this past weekend … as always on the second Saturday in April. (Mark your calendars for next year!) This years festival had the return of the 5K Race and we had an unbelievable turnout. We had a total of 111 runners ranging from 8-year-old Molly Jones to 80-year-old Larry Luchi. Our goal was to have 100 runners and we exceeded that number very unexpectedly. Consequently, we are already preparing for the 2013 Worm Gruntin 5K race and would like to invite all of our runners to plan to participate and help us meet our goal of 150-plus runners next year. This years race went very well with all runners “ nishing the race and with no accidents. Unfortunately, only 50 percent of our awards arrived for recognizing the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place runners … and we offer sincere apologies to our runners for this mishap. For our 2013 race, the “ nish line will be the same as this years starting line to allow all of our runners and spectators to remain in downtown Sopchoppy and enjoy the runners crossing the “ nish line. A very special thank you to all of the following: Our sponsors were Brooks Concrete and Backwoods Bistro. Thank you for funding a greater portion of the race expenses. Our refreshments were donated by Winn-Dixie, and the runners thoroughly enjoyed the cases of oranges, bananas and apples at the end of the race. Wal-Mart and Walgreens donated bottled water for rehydrating our runners. We appreciate each and every one of our supporters and donors. We would also like to thank our many volunteers who showed up at 7:30 a.m. to help register runners, hand out T-shirts, set up our race equipment, organize our runners, tabulate results and hand out awards. Congratulations to all of our runners and thank you for supporting our 2012 Worm Gruntin 5K Race. We hope to see you back next year … with a friend … for a bigger and better race! Susan Brooks Shearer smbshearer@aol.comTax Collectors o ce provides great serviceEditor, The News: I would like to thank Laura Rogers at the Wakulla County Tax Collectors Of“ ce for going above and beyond duty on April 17. I was injured and needed a quick form “ lled out. I arrived at the tax of“ ce two minutes before 5 p.m. expecting to be asked to come back tomorrow. I was on crutches and Laura came out to my car, found out what I needed and took care of it. This re” ects highly on her of“ ce. John Knoblauch Crawfordville Editor, The News: In response to the Quote of the weekŽ (Weekly Roundup, Travyon Martin case draws nation in,Ž April 19) about Congressman Wests comment on Democrats who are Communists, this is what he meant. You can debate the differences between Marxism, Communism and Socialism. The Socialist Party of America announced in their Oct. 2009 newsletter that 70 Congressional Democrats currently belonged to their caucus. Eleven belonged to the Judiciary Committee, including Chairman John Conyers. If you go on the internet you can link to this report at many sources. While some in the media try to ridicule Col. West, he is only being honest. I wish young people today had more historical knowledge of what the Iron Curtain and Socialism have actually been like to live under. Jeannie Beck Panacea Editor, The News: Thirty young artists participated in the Aspiring Artists competition held as part of the Wildlife Festival held this past weekend at Wakulla Springs State Park. With the guidance of “ ve art teachers, these Wakulla students showed off their developing skills. This years winners were: Elementary Category First Place: Daniel Weideman, fourth grade, Shadeville; Second Place: Jailyn Lamb, fourth grade, Shadeville; Third Place: Anna Thomas, fourth grade, Shadeville; Middle School Category First Place: Meghan Sarvis, eighth grade, Wakulla Middle; Second Place: Blake Berson, eighth grade, Wakulla Middle; Third Place: Lilianna Abraham, seventh grade, COAST Charter School. High School Category First Place: Hannah Noegel, Wakulla High; Second Place: Carissa Dyous, Wakulla High; Third Place: Kiersten Simmons, Wakulla High. GRAND PRIZE WINNER was Meghan Sarvis of Wakulla Middle. Congratulations to all these students. Each school was limited to six entries. There were also entries from six kindergarten students from Crawfordville Elementary. Their entries of manatees were particularly appropriate for the theme Water for WildlifeŽ and were absolutely delightful. Soon they will learn the art skills to win prizes. As a community we bene“ t from knowing that Wakulla County, not only has many professional artists displaying their inspirational works at the festival, but due to the guidance of devoted art teachers, we have many aspiring, young artists too. Thanks to the judges, the students and especially the art teachers. Elinor Elfner eelfner@comcast.net Editor, The News: I wish to commend Dolly Mitchell and her co workers at Wakulla County Parks and Recreation for the organized way in which they run things. On a sunny April 14 morning, I went out to see my grandsons play their last T-ball games and get their trophies. While I was on the “ eld, a parent walked up to me out of nowhere and said is this your check? I said, no, and he said, Well, its someones close by.Ž He handed it to me and walked off. I looked down and didnt recognize the name but it had pizza/trophiesŽ in the forŽ line of the check in the amount of $13 so I knew it was something having to do with the days events. Unfortunately, it had nothing in the pay to the orderŽ line. In this economy, I know some parent was probably searching frantically for the money to pay for their childs pizza and trophy because I knew how it was when I was raising my two. I called Dolly Mitchell, who was working on a Saturday, and within minutes she called back that the parent was on the orange team.Ž Now how organized was that? Well, there were two orange teams and one with the smaller kids was about to wrap up their party and leave so I went there “ rst. Nope,Ž said the coach. They didnt even have pizza. So off to the second orange team who my grandsons team just happened to be playing. So, yep, the “ rst parent was right it was someone close by. After the game I asked the coach and he knew which parent it was right away. I walked over to her and sure enough she gave me a big smile and thanked me for “ nding the check in Wakulla fashion. During all this I managed to watch both games and take some awesome memory pics with my grandsons Hunter and Jamie and see some folks I hadnt seen in quite a while. I wish to commend Wakulla County parents, coaches and rec park staff (you all know who you are) for their dedication during this and all sporting events so that our kids (and grandkids) have a decent place to grow up in and explore their abilities. Thank you too to many volunteers and staff. This is a much-needed vital program in the community and you dont get paid near what you are worth and all of you (especially Dolly Mitchell) need a raise. Keep up the great work! Respectfully, Kimberly Rose Wheatley (Yes, I am still around!) kimsold@earthlink.net By PADRAIC JUAREZMosquito Control DirectorOur mosquito control division is facing a severely reduced budget for the 2012 mosquito season. This reduction has caused us to come up with some creative solutions. Our mission of protecting the public from illness that can result from mosquito bites is still the basis for all that we do. In previous years that has meant that we would provide spray to individual homes as frequently as requested, put out larvacide to areas near populated areas, and by providing education on how individuals can protect themselves from mosquitoes. Our revised business plan will mean that we will concentrate on education and applying larvacide. We will still spray for adult mosquitoes at large gatherings of people, but we will no longer be providing individual home sprayings over and over through the season. If your organization is having an outdoor event and would like us to apply adulticide spray, please contact our of“ ce. We will also provide this service to individual homes twice over the months of May to October. (We are out there already spraying, and applying larvacide. The public just needs to call for that larvacide to be applied.) If your home has low areas that hold water for several days we will come out and apply larvacide to those areas upon request. Please read our suggestions below and watch throughout the summer for other tips on how to best protect yourself and family from mosquito bites. By following the FIVE Ds below everyone can help reduce the mosquito population near their homes and businesses: € DRAIN. Small amounts of standing water can breed hundreds of mosquitoes! This includes ” ower pots, animal water bowls and buckets, bird baths, boats, trash cans, barbecue grills, wheelbarrows, tires, kiddie pools, and clogged rain gutters. € DRESS. Some disease carrying mosquitoes bite during the day so, even though its hot, cover your skin when you will be outside especially at: € DAWN and DUSK. Most mosquitoes swarm at these times so be sure to cover up! € DEET. Sprays with up to 30 percent of this compound are found to be the most effective for the longest period. Children under 2 months old should not use DEET, but mosquito nets can be draped over strollers if you will have your infant outside. Permethrin products can be applied to clothing but not skin, again do not use on infants. Products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus provides long lasting protection at about the same rate as a DEET concentration of about 20 percent if you are concerned about chemical compounds. This should not be applied to children under 3 years. We need YOUR help! Please use the above preventative measures to help us reduce the risk of diseases carried by mosquitoes such as West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis. One bite from an infected mosquito can transmit these diseases. If you will be having an outdoor event and feel the area needs to be sprayed for mosquito protection, you must call the Environmental Health Unit at the Health Department at (850) 926-0401 ext. 241 to request spraying. Foggers can be purchased at local hardware stores and can be used successfully with a lower concentration of the same chemical used by the spray trucks. Be sure to follow instructions carefully.Padraic Juarez is administrator of the Wakulla County Health Department.Basis for Congressman Wests comment Dolly Mitchell does a great job at rec park Aspiring Artists competition results Mosquito Control is available

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 5A  Friends of the Library will meet on ThursdayEveryone is welcome to come to the next Friends of the Library meeting on Thursday, April 26, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the library main meeting room. We are beginning the planning for our Second Annual Silent Auction to be held in September and want everyone’s input. League of Women Voters will hold its meeting on ThursdayThe League of Women Voters of Wakulla,will have their monthly meeting on Thursday, April 26, at the library at 7 p.m. With a statewide launch planned for October, the League of Women Voters of Florida’s message is “Ready, Set, Vote, Florida!” “We’re charged with informing and educating Wakulla voters about issues and changes in the 2012 voting law,” said Mary Cortese, League president. “We are continuing our ‘Fair Voting 2012’ project with this meeting. We will have citizens’ views and observations of prior elections and we encourage all citizens to share their experiences with us at this meeting, as we are trying to identify problems that hopefully can be avoided this election.” “As a League we want to ensure fair voting in our county,” said Cortese. “Recent voting changes in state law make it more challenging to vote, so we want to do several things: encourage voters to register, update their registrations if necessary, encourage people to vote early and to avoid the problems of prior elections.” Taking the first step, the Florida League is working on an aggressive statewide awareness campaign to encourage all Florida voters to update their registration this year. “The 2012 election is important for Wakulla voters. We will be electing new constitutional officers, three county commissioners, as well as school board members, and most likely will have a half-cent sales tax referendum. That’s why information, education, a fair and transparent election process is critical.”  Two blood drives will be held locallySoutheastern Community Blood Center is reporting that it is currently very low in all negative blood types and in O positive blood. Several blood drives have been scheduled in the area, including:  Thursday, April 26, at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  Monday, April 30, at Centennial Bank from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Intermittent lane closures on U.S. 319 in CrawfordvilleMotorists traveling U.S. Highway 319 between Wakulla-Arran Road and Bloxham Cutoff in Wakulla County can expect intermittent nighttime lane closures Sunday, April 22, through Friday, April 27, from 6:30 p.m. until 6 a.m. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL. – Staff ReportsWILLIAM SNOWDENCub Scouts visit The Wakulla News of“ ce and pose with reporter Jennifer Jensen.By DENISE FOLH of The Wakulla NewsA group of Cub Scouts from Tiger Den No. 5 visited The Wakulla News on Tuesday, April 17. The scouts toured the of“ ce and were introduced to The News staff and learned about how the newspaper is written and produced. News receptionist Denise Folh guided the scouts through the facility and answered their questions. One cub scout asked, Why do we need a newspaper?Ž The question was answered that its necessary to keep everyone well informed with important events in our community. Another cub scout said that his grandfather sits on his chair and puts his eyeglasses on and reads the paper for hours. The scouts received reporter notebooks and newspapers to mark their tour. The scouts met editor William Snowden and reporter Jennifer Jensen, graphic artist Eric Stanton and advertising representative Lynda Kinsey.Cub Scouts visit News officeBriefs Special to The NewsJoin us for the 39th annual Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta this weekend. Activities include sailboat and windsurfer races, the Parrothead Poker Run and a boat auction. The regatta draws more than 200 registered participants and hundreds more spectators from all over the southeast. There are races for boats of all sizes from yachts longer than 20 feet to catamarans and windsurfers. Dermatology Advanced Care will provide free skin cancer screenings on the beach before the races begin on Saturday and Bagel Bagel will provide a continental breakfast. All proceeds support the regional chapter of the American Cancer Society to provide patient care and educational programs about cancer. On Saturday, April 28, the Skippers Meeting is at 10:30 a.m. The races begin at noon at Shell Point Beach. The regatta is in honor of Stephen Smith, a local sailor who died from a rare form of leukemia at the age of 29. Last year, the Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta Foundation was able to donate $18,000 to the local American Cancer Society branch. Special thanks to the Shell Point Sailboard Club, the American Cancer Society, the Apalachee Bay Yacht Club and numerous businesses and individuals for making this event possible.Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta is this weekend e annual regatta will benefit the American Cancer SocietyFair set for mobile food vendorsSpecial to The NewsThe Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) is calling for mobile food vendors to register for its second Mobile Food Vendor Fair. The Department will hold the event on May 15, from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. at its Tallahassee headquarters at the Northwood Centre, 1940 North Monroe Street. There are more than 60 mobile food vendors and hot dog carts licensed in Leon and Wakulla counties, and all have been invited to participate. DBPR licenses and regulates all food service establishments in the state, including mobile food vendors and hot dog carts. The fair is part of a continued initiative for the Department to encourage business development, especially for small business owners and entrepreneurs. The event is open to the public. Last December, DBPR hosted eight vendors and more than 300 people at its “ rst ever Mobile Food Vendor Fair. Vendors will be required to check-in with the Department in advance and undergo a full inspection from the Departments Division of Hotels and Restaurants. More information on the Mobile Food Vendor Fair can be found at www.my” oridalicense.com/ dbpr/FoodFair5_15_12.html. The Department of Business and Professional Regulations mission is to license ef“ ciently and regulate fairly. The Department licenses and regulates more than one million businesses and professionals ranging from hotels and restaurants, real estate agents and accountants to veterinarians, contractors and cosmetologists. For more information, please visit www.MyFloridaLicense.com.Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351 Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 For more information on this event, please contact Sherri Kraeft at the Wakulla County 4-H Extension Ofce at (850) 926-3931 or sjkraeft@u.edu GIANTYARD SALE50+ FAMILIES SATURDAY, April 28 8 am 2 pm CHRIST CHURCH ANGLICANHwy. 98 East of Wakulla High School FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALONTake advantage of Spring/ Summer RatesAsk for our monthly specials! FEATHER LOCKS are here!! 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) We offer ”exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT HAIRSALO N Book Your Prom AppointmentNOW!10% OFFW/THIS ADEXP. 5/22/12

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesMary M. Moore-Gearhart Rona Lavon Hawkins Jr. Catherine Rosier Murray Delpha Syvelle Robison Porter Thelma Louise Sanders Brinson Richard Taylor Sr. Tommy Baldwin WallerChurch BriefsBrinson Richard Taylor Sr., 66, of Panacea, died Friday, April 20, at his home. Funeral Services were held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, April 24, in the Chapel of the Carson McLane Funeral Home of Valdosta, Ga. The burial followed in the Salem Cemetery. The family received friends on Tuesday from 9 a.m. until service time. Carson McLane Funeral Home of Valdosta is in charge of arrangements. Condolences to the family may be conveyed online at www.mclanecares.com. The Reeves Family gospel singing group will perform at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church, 165 Friendship Church Road, on Saturday, April 28, at 6 p.m. The performance is free, and everyone is welcome.The Reeves Family at FriendshipBuckhorn NewsBy ETHEL SKIPPER Thought for the week: We grow in our life for Christ through prayer. If we believe that Gods primary desire for us is a vibrant, intimate relationship with Him, and if we understand prayer as the means by which we communicate with Him, then prayer becomes about so much more than meeting an obligation. The Fifth Sunday Union meeting of the Church of Christ will be held at Skipper Temple, 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy. Everyone is welcome. The Primitive Baptist Union meeting will be held at Zion Hill Primitive Baptist Church April 27 through 29. Host Pastor is Elder Ervin Donaldson. Everyone is welcome. A memorial service for Catherine Rosier Murray will be held at Macedonia Church of Christ Written In Heaven, 1408 Sopchoppy Highway in Sopchoppy, on Saturday, April 28, at 11 a.m. To celebrate the National Day of Prayer on May 3, the Florida United Methodist Childrens Home will host an 11 a.m. ecumenical prayer service followed by a picnic lunch and a prayer walk over the property that will be developed into the Madison Youth Ranch in Pinetta. If you would like to caravan to the event with members of the Wakulla United Methodist Church, Wakulla Station, please call the church of“ ce at (850) 421-5741. Faith Holiness House of Prayer will host a Fifth Sunday Sing featuring the Drummonds ministering in song on Sunday, April 29, at 6 p.m. The church is located at 726 Woodville Highway, Crawfordville. For more information, call Pastor Cris Dudley at 421-1324 or Assistant Pastor Glinda Raker at 363-3294.National Day of Prayer travel Fifth Sunday features the DrummondsPioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide Open Microphone Gospel SingŽ on Friday, April 27, at 7 p.m. Anyone who enjoys singing or playing gospel music is invited to participate. Others who enjoy listening are encouraged to attend and have a blessed night of worship through music. There is no charge for the concert. Pioneer Baptist Church, 486 Beech-wood Drive, is located four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the Dr. MLK Jr. Memorial Road and the Spring Creek Highway int ersec-tion. Please call Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-5224 for more information. We hope to see you.Gospel sing at Pioneer BaptistRona Lavon Hawkins Jr., 28, of Sopchoppy, died Tuesday, April 17, in Carrabelle from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. He was a chef and an entrepreneur. His service was held Wednesday, April 25, at 11 a.m. at River of Life Church in Crawfordville, with burial at Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church #1 in Crawfordville. The family received friends on Tuesday, April 24, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Richardsons Family Funeral Care of Tallahassee Survivors include a daughter, Arianna LaNya Hawkins; his mother, Mayor Colleen Skipper (Tony) of Sopchoppy; sister, Elizabeth Clary of Quincy; nephew and niece, Gary Jr. and HeLyy; paternal grandparents, Weldon and Bonnie Hawkins; maternal grandparents, Deacon Willie and Pastor Ethel Skipper; uncles and aunts, Willie Skipper Jr., Carlton Hawkins, Chinesta Smith (Rodney), Glenda Simmons (Archie), Charlene Green (Leston), Beverly Jefferson (Donald) and Lisa Mitchell; and a host of great uncles and aunts, cousins and friends including his favorite dog T-Rex.Ž He was predeceased by his father, Rona Lavon Hawkins Sr.; grandmother, Willie Mae Mills Webster; great-aunt, Julie Mills; and brother-in-law, the Rev. Gary E. Clary Sr. Richardsons Family Funeral Care of Tallahassee (850) 576-4144 was in charge of the arrangements.Rona Lavon Hawkins Jr. Brinson Richard Taylor Sr.A memorial service for Catherine Rosier Murray will be held at Macedonia Church of Christ Written In Heaven, 1408 Sopchoppy Highway, in Sopchoppy, on Saturday, April 28, at 11 a.m. She was a graduate of Florida A&M University and was a middle school mathematics teacher at Pierce Middle School. Survivors include her husband, Norman; son, Girardeau; daughter, Ashley; siblings, Richard Mills, Ezella Rosier, Frances Strokes, Grace Williams, Jollivet Holmes, Kenneth Rosier (Yolanda), Patrick Rosier (Teresa) and mother-in-law, Mrs. Gloria White; aunts, Ethel Skipper (Willie), Alberta Hines (Isaiah), Callie Gavin (Wender) and Ruth Easter; uncles, Joseph Rosier (Mary) and Meriddie Rosier (Bobbery); and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. She was predeceased by her daughter Jasmine in 1988. Delpha Syvelle Robison Porter, 81, of Panacea, passed away on Monday, April 23. She was born in Ivan to Shirley and Mary Spears Robison. She was a member of the Panacea Full Gospel Assembly Church. She enjoyed attending church, singing and spending time with family and friends. Survivors include her sons, William Wright Porter, William Jackson Porter and Samuel Porter, all of Panacea; daughters, Shirley (Roy) West and Darlene (Rod) Thieme of Crawfordville, Minnie Robison, Essie (Dale) Long and Dorlene Porter, all of Panacea, and Cynthia (Robert) Dickey, Polly (Chris) Brown and Dellie Lively all of Tallahassee; 19 grandchildren, 32 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Steven Jackson Porter; and her daughter: Sheila Porter. Funeral services were held on Sunday, April 19 at 3 p.m. at the Crawfordville First Baptist Church with the Rev. B.B. Barwick and the Rev. Bruce Taylor of“ ciating. Interment will follow at Bonnett Pond Cemetery in Medart. The family will receive friends Saturday, April 28, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Crawfordville First Baptist Church. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850559-3380). Please sign the online guestbook at www. forbesfuneralhome.net. Delpha Syvelle Robison Porter Catherine Rosier Murray Obituaries continue on Page 12A

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunityBy MICHELLE KIRBY2nd vice president of UDCWith the end of another school year in sight, high school seniors and current college co-eds are looking for “ nancial resources for next year. The United Daughters of the Confederacy offers scholarships to descendants of Confederate veterans who gave service during the Civil War. Interested applicants should contact Michelle Kirby at rdonmcleodudc@gmail. com. The state division and local chapter deadlines are June 15. Visit http://rdonmcleod. wordpress.com for more information. Kinley Faith Pitman celebrated her “ rst birthday on April 22. She is the daughter of Page and Dana Pitman of Crawfordville. Her paternal grandparents are the late Eugene and Bettye Pitman. Her maternal grandparents are Allen and Susan Dees and the late Tony Bramblett and Judy all of Crawfordville. Happy “ rst birthdayThe Sopchoppy High School class of 1962 are front row: Annette Porter Strickland, Bessie Nell Thomas GIlbert, Louise Willis Thomas, Donna Gail Sanders Dees, Carolyn Sue Roberts Greener, Marvis Thomas. Back row: Steve Stephens Jr., Morris Metcalf, Leonard Crum, Pat Cassidy( English Teacher), Pleasant Vause, Ronnie Gray, Murray McLaughlin, Jerome Colvin, Walt Dickson. Those classmates who were unable to attend are Mildred Dalton Chandler, Linda Porter Hutton, Dorothy Anderson Gray, Clyde Nichols, Fred Davis, Wayne Richardson, Hayden Gray, Melvin Harrell and the late Franklin Jones.Sopchoppy High class of 62 celebrates reunion SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Brittany L. Harrell and Tyler F. ScottScott to wed Harrell Brittany Leigh Harrell of Thomasville, Ga., and Tyler Freeman Scott of Crawfordville announce their engagement. Harrell is the daughter of Mike and Katrina Harrell of Thomasville, Ga. She is a 2005 graduate of Brookwood School and a graduate of Southwest Georgia Technical College where she received an associates degree in early childhood education. She is employed by the City of Thomasville. Scott is the son of Larry and Rosalyn Scott of Crawfordville. He is a 2005 graduate of Wakulla High School and a graduate of Florida State University where he received a bachelors degree in biochemistry with a minor in biological science. He is employed by Florida State University and assists with research in the area of neuroscience. A wedding is planned at The Retreat at Bradleys Pond on May 11.Michelle Kirby wins state recognition from DARSpecial to The NewsOne of Wakulla Countys own recently won state recognition from the Daughters of the American Revolution. Michelle McMillan Kirby, daughter of Finley and Jean McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay, entered her shell crochet baby afghan in DARs annual American Heritage competition. Kirby was recently presented her certi“ cate by her Chapter Regent, Kay Hollis, also of Wakulla County. Her entry is moving on to the regional level. If it places nationally, her blanket will be on display at the National DAR headquarters in Washington, D.C., during their Continental Congress week in July. If I win, I surely want to go to D.C. for this,Ž said Kirby. It will also give me a chance to visit and work in the Children of the American Revolution museum also located at DAR headquarters.Ž Kirby is also af“ liated with C.A.R. serving as Floridas current Senior State Curator. The blanket is an intended gift for a colleague who recently delivered her “ rst baby girl. Kirby is a writer, staff development and technology consultant and also currently work as a reading coach and teacher at Rickards High School in Tallahassee. She is active in Crawfordvilles R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469, United Daughters of the Confederacy, where she serves as 2nd vice president in charge of coordinating scholarships and as recorder of Military Service Awards. She also serves on the Poppy Committee of her American Legion Auxilliary Unit 13 in Tallahassee. She lives in Tallahassee with her husband Paul and son Andy. Michelle Kirby Kinley F. Pitman Seth and Ashley Hodge of Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughter, Brenley Nicole Hodge, born on March 13. She weighed 5 pounds, 9 ounces and was 18-inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Keith and Mary Wallace of Crawfordville. Her paternal grandparents are Richie and Renae Hodge of Crawfordville. She has an older brother Brody Hodge who is 10 years old.Hodges welcome a baby girlScholarships are available from United DaughtersCarraway graduates from Army basic combat training Special to The NewsArmy Pvt. Daniel J. Carraway has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C During the nine weeks of training, he studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical “ tness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, “ eld tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic “ rst aid, foot marches, and “ eld training exercises. Carraway is the son of Sharon and Brad Carraway of Sopchoppy. He is a 2009 graduate of Wakulla High School.Email your community news to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net. Announcements are published as space becomes available and edited for style, length and clarity.Taking a Break „ Hope to Return WANTEDCounty Commission Candidate for District 5 (Medart, Sopchoppy, Smith Creek) to replace Commissioner Lynn Artz Preferred Quali“cations Community Oriented Sel”ess … seeks no personal gain Cares about all residents An advocate for children and youth Protects our Environment Recognizes that 96% of Wakullas residents want to protect our natural environment Understands that our Countys economic future depends on preserving our precious natural assets and our uniqueness Appreciates that we are temporary stewards for a brief moment in time Works to prevent tragedies of the commonsŽ Advocates Smart Growth Recognizes that most of Wakullas residents want clustered development, not sprawl Knows that clustered development is more ef“cient and less costly for local governments Advocates for development within Crawfordville, Panacea, Sopchoppy, & St. Marks Supports the Crawfordville Town Plan Promotes Sustainability Embraces the new energy economy Recognizes the savings potential of energy ef“ciency and conservation Advocates for 21st century infrastructure Anticipates the future demand for green jobs Future Oriented, even Visionary Takes a long-term view Seeks successful models from other communities Avoids the mistakes of other communities Has a clear, comprehensive, and viable future vision for Wakulla County RationalDecision Maker Respects science, education, experience, and experts Thoroughly studies an issue Carefully weighs the pros and cons Makes evidence-based decisions Civil Colleague Kind, polite, courteous, and collegial Respectful of people with different views Positive, creative, seeks solutions, initiates Knows that being critical is easy … the challenge is to offer a better alternative Has the courage to stand up for what is right Diversity Increases diversity on the Commission Helps the Commission look like the electorate If the above describes you, Wakulla County needs you. Please commit to taking your turn for the bene“t of all. Then RUN to the Supervisor of Elections Of“ce to obtain campaign information and meet important deadlines. Please also contact me [926-8756(h), 320-2158(c), lynn_artz@hotmail.com] for campaign advice and assistance. From the desk of Lyn n Art z . .Dear Frien ds & Ne igh bors, Alt hou gh I w oul d love to continue to work o n you r be hal f f or fou r mo re yea rs, sa dly I m ust step d own fr om the Co unt y Co mmiss ion du e to fam ily conce rns I h ope to ret urn to the Commiss ion in fou r yea rs. In the me antime f or the sa ke of Wakull a Co unt y’s f utu re, I a sk tha t yo u he lp wit h va lue s s imi lar to yours and mi ne. (See ad to rig ht. ) I w ill conti nue to volunt ee r an d h elp wit h com mun ity pr oje cts and a cti vities as m y tim e allows. I e nco ura ge you to bec ome mor e i nfo rme d a nd eng age d with yo ur local gov ern ment. Do ing so is vit all y im por tant fo r you r fu tur e and t he fut ure of o ur Cou nty War m r ega rds and b est wi shes, Lyn n WINDOWSBestWindow...Best Price...Best Choice! 1” Double Pane InsulatedGlass $179*Any size Installed of TALLAHASSEE COME VISITUS AT GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL850-519-5056www.abcwintallahassee.com

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com education news from local schoolsSchoolEmployee and Teacher of the Month are named for April Wakulla County student Julianna Lopez recently won second place in the Leon Wakulla Retired Educators Association essay contest. She is a fifth grader at Shadeville Elementary School. Members of the association presented Lopez with $50 and a plaque for her efforts on April 3. Special to The NewsWakulla County School District students just received word that they placed sixth in the state for the number of minutes read during the Florida Department of Education sponsored Million Minute Marathon held during Januarys Celebrate Literacy Week. The annual celebration focuses on building excitement and motivation for reading. Wakulla students clocked more than 200,000 minutes of reading for the contest. Recognizing the foundational importance of reading in a students education, Superintendent David Miller said, Our students and teachers are to be commended for making such a great effort to spotlight the importance of literacy by participating to such an extent.Ž The Wakulla Million Minute Marathon was organized and supported by reading coaches, administrators and teachers. Class time was given to allow students to focus on reading beyond their usual reading lessons. Media specialists spotlighted books throughout the week, and school news shows featured teachers and students favorite books. Celebrate Literacy Week in Wakulla County public schools included other activities as well. Business leaders read in classrooms, and FSU athletes visited Wakulla High School to encourage students to read. A highlight of the week was the WHS visit by local author Rhett DeVane. In response to the recognition, Wakulla Middle School Principal Mike Barwick said, We are all about reading.Ž Special to The NewsThe April Teacher of the Month is Riversink Elementary Schools Bryan Roddenberry and the April Employee of the Month is Transportation Department employee Hiram Carter. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the dependability and dedication these employees bring to the District, as well as the positive attitude they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Roddenberry has been coaching public school students in elementary physical education for almost 20 years. Fortunately, in 2007, he was hired at Riversink to speci“ cally share his knowledge and enthusiasm with the Otters. He has also coached for the Parks and Recreation Department for 15 years. Roddenberry has a bachelors and masters degree from Florida State University and is a National Board Certi“ ed Teacher. He grew up in South Florida graduating from Coral Springs High School. When asked what he enjoys most about his job at Riversink, Roddenberry said, The staff I work with at Riversink has the most positive attitude I have ever been around in my career.Ž Principal Jackie High said, Bryan is a joy. He is fun and playful while remaining professional at all times. He has established an outstanding PE program and pick up routine at our school. He is dependable and dedicated and we appreciate him. Bryan Roddenberry plays a key role in the success of Riversink Elementary School.Ž The April Employee of the Month is Carter. Carter has been a school bus driver for the district since January 2007. Prior to that time he worked for the state in the Information Systems Department. A 1959 graduate of Crawfordville High School, Carter said he enjoys interacting with co-workers and students. He said, Each day offers something new and different. This job has taught me how fortunate I am to be involved with a great school system, transporting wonderful and delightful students.Ž Transportation Coordinator Pat Jones said, Mr. Carter is dedicated to the safety of Wakulla students and it shows in the smooth and ef“ cient running of his bus routes. He has a great cando attitude at all times. Mr. Carter possesses the knowledge, patience, natural talent and experience necessary to make our students feel safe. His contributions to the success of the transportation department are an asset.Ž Bryan Roddenberry Hiram Carter SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLinda Davis, Juliannas “ fth grade teacher, Julianna Lopez and DeeAnn Hughes, assistant principal of Shadeville Elementary School. Lopez wins second place in contest Wakulla places sixth in reading contestWHS graduates attend Model UN conferenceSixteen students from Tallahassee Community College recently attended the National Model United Nations (NMUN) conference in New York City. The students, representing the United Nations delegation from Ireland, earned a Distinguished Delegation Award, one of the highest level awards given at the conference. Three Wakulla High School graduates were on the team, Kyle Patterson, Katie Lily and Christian Wilkes. All three participated in Model UN at Wakulla High School. Over 5,800 students from 44 countries convened in New York to participate in the simulation April 1 … 8.-Courtesy of TCC

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsA game winning ” y-ball catch by senior Sloan Barwick clenched the District title for Wakullas Lady War Eagles varsity softball team on Tuesday, April 17 against Suwannee High School. After having been defeated by Suwannee twice this season, Wakulla sailed to an easy 6-3 victory over the Bulldogs for the championship. Defensively, it all came together tonight,Ž said Wakulla Head Coach Tom Graham. The top of the “ rst inning saw the Lady War Eagles ahead with three runs, even with star Suwannee pitcher Tinsley Smith on the mound. The War Eagles kept the lead throughout the game, scoring a run in the “ fth inning, and two more in the seventh. The Bulldogs scored runs in the fourth and the “ fth innings, and a “ nal run in the 7th, but were unable to catch up. Playing somebody the third time is rough,Ž said Suwannee Head Coach Tommy Chambers. And when you get behind a good team, theyll just take a hold and get stronger.Ž Before that game, the Lady War Eagles drubbed Rickards 11-1 in the District semi-“ nals at 5 p.m., setting up the “ nal against Suwannee for the district title. Graham attributed the win to teamwork and a lot of effort put forth by the girls. Taylor Hussey ended the game as the relief pitcher coming in after Michael Cooper, who wowed the crowd with two impressive change-ups in the second inning. Kenzie Lee had two strong hits at the top of the “ fth and seventh and made it to third base on a bunt in the “ rst inning, driving home three runs. Second baseman Cami Eaton also had a strong showing at the game, catching a grounder and a linedrive in the second inning and catching a ” y in the fourth inning. With Wakulla in the “ eld, at the bottom of the fourth, Courtney Flowers delivered the ball to first baseman Sloan Barwick to tag out Suwannee High number 11, Haejin Choe. Flowers repeated the move in the “ fth inning and caught a pop ” y in the same inning. The Lady War Eagles will play the “ rst round of regionals at home on Wednesday, April 25, at 7 p.m. The Lady War Eagles made it to regionals last year and this year will be playing Panama City-Arnold or West Florida Tech to advance to the next round.SOFTBALLLady War Eagles are district champs LUCY CARTER/Special to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles celebrate the district title.TRACKBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach The Wakulla High School track athletes and relay teams who qualified in Districts, traveled to Jacksonville on Thursday, April 19, to compete in the 2A Region 1 “ nals. The local runners had a good meet with two athletes bringing home individual Regional Titles. Last years Regional 800 Meter Champion, sophomore Madison (Madi) Harris, running in that event, took the lead from the starting gun, pushed the pace and was never seriously challenged. She won the event in the excellent time of 2:18.29, almost 5 seconds ahead of the second place “ nisher and became a twotime Regional Champion. For the boys, senior Stanley Linton continued to prove that he is one of the best middle distance runners in the state. Running in the 3200-meter run, he ran a very controlled race for the “ rst 1600 meters (metric mile), running comfortably in 5-6th place. Then he began to push the pace and took over the lead of the pack of “ ve pursuing the Bishop Kenny runner who had opened what appeared to be an insurmountable lead. Over the next four laps, the chase pack remained almost 100 meters behind the lead runner. In the last 400 meters, Linton and the chase pack started to close the gap, but coming off the last curve, the Bishop Kenny runner still looked to have the race won. However, approximately 50 meters from the “ nish, he tied up and Linton and the chase group blew by him. From then on it was a battle of wills and toughness to see which of the three runners left in the pursuing pack would cross the “ nish line “ rst. Linton proved that he wanted it the most and held his slim lead, winning the race by .29 of a second, for his “ rst Regional Title. Harris and Lintons performances made WHS history as this is the “ rst time that the local team has had two regional winners in the same year and the “ rst time both a boy and girl won Regional titles in the same year. Overall, the other WHS runners had a very good meet. The opening running event was the girls 4x800 relay and the local team of Cora Atkinson, Emily McCullers, Norma Woodcock and Lydia Wiedeman ran a solid race, finishing in seventh place in 10:34.04, only about 3 seconds off the school record. The boys 4x800 relay team of David Sloan, Mitchell Atkinson, Gabe Hutchins and J.P. Piotrowski followed them and ran well to place 11th in 9:09.94. In the girls 1600 meters, sophomore Marty Wiedeman ran aggressively with the leaders through three laps, but faded a little in the 4th one to finish in 7th place in the very good time of 5:42.24. Freshman Lili Broadway also ran a solid 1600 meters to “ nish in 6:06.99, in 14th place. In the girls open 800 meters, freshman Lydia Wiedeman served notice that she will be a factor for the next three years by “ nishing in 10th place in 2:31.51. Senior Cora Atkinson and freshman Kasey James were the local entrants in the “ nal individual event of the evening, the 3200 meter run. Atkinson, one of the best and most consistent runners on the team, ran solidly once again, placing 7th in the good time of 12:23.97. James, running in her “ rst high school Regionals, ran well, “ nishing in 13:15.85 and placing 13th. In the last event, the WHS girls 4x400 meter relay team of Alina McCullers, Emily McCullers, Norma Woodcock and Madison Harris challenged the best teams thet region had to offer. The “ rst three legs for the local team all ran well and were in 7th place, approximately 5 seconds behind the 6th place team from Rickards High School when Harris took the baton. At Districts last week Harris started the “ nal leg 7 seconds behind the same Rickards team and came within a few hundredths of a second of catching their anchor runner. Harris again set off in pursuit of the Rickards anchor leg and this time she was able to close the gap and nipped the girl at the tape and the local team “ nished in 6th place, .02 of a second ahead of the Rickards team. The WHS team “ nished in the excellent time of 4:13.42, which is a new school record for the event. Overall, the girls team had their best showing ever at Regionals, finishing in 12th place out of 29 teams. The boys “ nished in 20th place. We really did have a good meet,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. As recently as two years ago, our main goal was simply to qualify for Regionals. Now we expect to be competitive at the meet and we de“ nitely were.ŽHarris repeats; Linton wins PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStanley Linton, top, crosses the “ nish line; Madi Harris, above, in the lead, was never seriously challenged.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Red Sox 12u travel baseball team, coached by Keith Anderson and Mike Barwick, went undefeated in the recent Blue Devil Classic Tournament in Tifton, Ga., earning the coveted championship trophy on Saturday, April 21. The one-day tournament, despite the looming weather forecast throughout the day, belonged to the Red Sox as they remained steady and focused each game. Great defense, hitting and pitching, not to mention three homers, all contributed to the tournament win. It was the tournament of 2012 for the Red Sox. Standing: Coach Anderson, Jared Weber, Tyler Olah, Bradley Lord, Hunter Greene, Hayden Carlton, and Coach Barwick; kneeling: Bailey Fagan, Carson Dykes, Jacob Dismuke, Thomas Anderson and Will Barwick. BASEBALLRed Sox 12u win Blue Devil Classic all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comOutdoors SportsBy MICHAEL BRIGGSSpecial to The NewsWakulla Babe Ruth opened this weekend with renditions of our National Anthem by Marc Carters mom, Angel, and Katherine Martinez. The fundraiser was a lot of fun and very successful, with the Home Run Derby won by Aaron Price, Golden Arm won by Josh Conway and Fastest Base Runner won by Michael McGlamry. Parents, friends and relatives really stepped up by donating $1,500 on a stormy day for lunch organized by Suzanne Kilgore and Maria Lentz. Business support was strong as well from team sponsors Harrison Bail Bonds, Ameris Bank, Badcock Furniture and Tallahassee Surgical Associates. League sponsors are High Quality Heating & Air and Hamrick Insurance. GAME SUMMARIES Thursday: Outlaws vs. Rays 4-1. Outlaws pitchers were Chase Forester, Skyler Talavera and Lucas Briggs. Greysen Rudd opened the Babe Ruth season with a lead-off double. Hits for the Outlaws were by Greysen, Chase, Nick Lentz, and Lucas. Rays pitchers were Shane Davis, Aaron Price, Nolan Terry and Clayton Burroughs. Rays hitters were Shane, Brice Brooks, Clayton, and Aaron had a pair. Friday: Sluggers vs. Titans in a victory for the Sluggers, 15-3. Sluggers pitchers were Caleb Langston, Marc Carter and Tyler Teegan. Sluggers spread the hitting out with Michael McGalmry, Caleb, Jake Bryan, Marc Carter had two hits, Dylan Causseaux, Josh Conway, Gabe Barwick, Tyler and Daniel Lamarche. Titans worked out the bullpen with Jordan Vaughan, John Weber, RJ Kinard, Jackson Montgomery, Zach Norman, and Aaron Ginn. Titans hitters were Zach, John Weber with 2 hits, and Jackson. Sluggers and Outlaws tied 2-2 in game 3, the Saturday morning opener. Sluggers pitchers were Jake and Tyler. Sluggers hitters were a pair by Michael and a double by Tyler. Outlaws pitchers were Greysen and Nick. Outlaws hitters were Greysen, Chase, Nick, Brandon Bennett, Skyler with a double, and James Calhoun. Game 4 Rays and Titans was postponed due to the storm, and Game 5, same teams, was postponed due to FCAT. These games will be made up during the season. All in all, a very successful opening. Thanks to the players, coaching, umpiring (Jim Posey and crew), parents, friends, local businesses, the Rec park, Wakulla Babe Ruth Board members and many answered prayers. Remember to check out the Wakulla Babe Ruth Facebook page for pictures and status updates.BASEBALLBabe Ruth opener is held PHOTOS BY LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Sluggers remove their caps for the games opening ceremonies. Homerun Derby winner Aaron Price of the RaysSpecial to The NewsThe Panacea Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament will be held Saturday and Sunday, April 28 and 29. The event was founded in 2009 to bene“ t the Panacea Coastal Community and to promote the excellent “ shing and boating opportunities in and around Panacea. This family-oriented event has raised money for improvements to the Panacea Coastal Community, including the restoration of the Rock Landing Dock and Boat Ramp. Registration and the Captains Party/Meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Friday, April 27, next to the Rock Landing Marina. Attendance is mandatory for all participating anglers and the event is open to the public. Dinner will be provided by Poseys Up the Creek restaurant for all registered participants, with additional food and beverage available for purchase. Entertainment will be provided by Locomotive. Weigh-ins for the twoday “ shing event will be held Saturday, April 28, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, April 29, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The tournament will feature a purse of nearly $20,000 in cash and prizes. Also included will be a 12-foot G-3 jonboat, Yamaha motor, Minn Kota Trolling Motor, Hummingbird Fish Finder and Road King 12foot trailer, to be awarded to one of the Youth Division competitors. Also one lucky angler in the Kayak division can win a 14-foot Red“ sh Heritage Angler Kayak donated by T-n-T Hide-A-Way Canoe Rental. Lady anglers can register to win a prize package worth over $500. In addition to the Youth division, the event features Recreational and Kayak Divisions, each with individual prizes. Skeeter Demo Rides will be offered on Friday from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday at noon to be eligible to win a free tarpon “ shing vacation for two. Also, take a Dodge demo ride to be eligible to win a free rod and reel. Vendors will be set up on both days. The tournament will include family-oriented activities, vendors and music on Saturday and Sunday during the “ nal weigh-ins. For more information and registration please visit the website, www. panacearockthedock.com or on Facebook, or contact Mark Mitchell at (850) 508-3379. Rock the Dock is this weekend in Panacea e Captains Meeting is Friday night next to Rock Landing Marina at 6 p.m. € e weigh-in is Saturday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. MAY 19th, 2012 Heaviest FIVE fishTROUT stringer. Big Fish is the longest Redfish orTrout*Cash Prizes are based on # of participant entries.Tournament Directors: Lee Rutledge (850) 251-2536Brings you the Rock Landing Marina Panacea, FL Rock Landing Marina Panacea, FL 1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place Big Fish 1st Place 2nd Place 3 r d Place Big Fish $1000 $500 $250 $150 Proceeds to benefit:ENT RY FEE ONL Y $50PER ANGL ERKID S $ 25The Tallahassee Professional Firefighters Foundation(Including the NORTH FLORIDA CHILDREN’S BURN CAMP)&local heroes competing in the State Police and Fire Olympics1800411 PAIN 72 4 6MEDICAL and LAWYER REFERAL SERVICE LIVE MUSIC by L.P.T.( 850 ) 528-4985PROFESSIONAL POOL MAINTENANCE poolproblems?atthelowestratesweoffermaintenanceandservice!Servicing Swimming Pools and Spas for over 10 yearsTitus Langston850528-4985Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured Patriots Day Cajun Cookout April 28Featuring Jambalaya and all the “xings.$10 a plate to bene“t The Three Soldiers Detail, South in Apalachicola.Program begins at 11 a.m. lunch is served at NoonTickets available at The Wakulla Chamber of Commercewww.threeservicemenstatuesouth.org www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD What a welcome break we had from the typical April weather this weekend with a cooler than average weekend. After a good soaking to wash away dust and grime, there was nothing to complain about. Saturday was the annual Apalachicola Antique and Classic Boat show. Larry Kolk has entered his handbuilt wooden vessel for several years. The Georgiana invokes the style of the classic lifeboats used by the Coast Guard in its early years. As one of our long-time members, Larry always goes above and beyond to showcase our efforts as well as his beautiful vessel. Next weekend, members will once again head over to the more western reaches of our Area of Responsibility for the 22nd Annual Carrabelle Riverfront Festival. This year we are honored to be a part of the festivities along with the Governor Stone, an historic, two-masted wooden sailing vessel from 1877. This annual event is not only exciting to be a part of, but also a great opportunity to remind residents and visitors about our presence in the area. We have several active Flotilla members in the St. George, Apalachicola, Carrabelle area and they are working hard to provide safe boating information and re-establish the auxiliarys presence in the area. Please stop by our booth by the Seahawk to “ nd out about what we are up to and how you can be a part of increasing safe boating. As I continue to bring you parts of the Navigation Rules that mostly pertain to our area, here are a few more de“ nitions that are used throughout the rules: € The term vessel restricted in her ability to maneuverŽ means a vessel that due to the works she is engaged, cannot move out of the way of another vessel. This can include vessels like a buoy tender, dredgers in the channels, pilot boats or other vessels transferring people or cargo while both vessels are underway, vessels assisting in towing aircrafts, and vessels towing cargo that severely limits her ability to maneuver. € The next term, a vessel constrained by her draftŽ means a vessel powered by an engine or motor, that is restricted in her ability to move from her course due to the depth of the water and the depth needed to ensure she does not damage her hull or run aground. Draft is the distance from where the hull meets the water to the lowest point on the boat. € When a vessel is said to be underway,Ž that means that she is not anchored, moored to a shoreline/buoy or aground on an oyster bed or sand bar. That means a vessel that is drifting, is a vessel underway. € LengthŽ means the greatest distance from bow to stern, her overall length. € BreadthŽ is the greatest distance from the port (left) to starboard (right) sides of the vessel, her width. Vessels shall be deemed to be in sight of one another only when one can be seen visually from the other. This does not include using radar or other navigational equipment. The term restricted visibilityŽ means any condition in which the ability to see is restricted by fog, mist, falling snow, heavy rainstorms, sandstorms or any other similar causes. For us, this is often fog and rain. Afternoon pop up showers and morning/evening fog can come without warning and be very dangerous. We have lost boaters in years past to fog when they became disoriented. I will continue to put relevant navigation rules in the article when there is space. Soon our forgotten coast will not be so forgotten as summer vacationers and locals head out to enjoy the beauty of our coast. Knowing your navigation rules is important to being prepared and safe when out on the water. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! A practical comparison. Monday, Travis and I went for a typical dive. We drove 100 miles to Jackson County to their Meritts Mill Pond, to a cave called Jackson Blue. There we paid for the privilege to dive their cave system, a dive to a depth of 95 feet and a penetration of 2,500 feet one-way, or 5,000 feet roundtrip taking us 141 minutes, including decompression. I make these dives on the average of once a week, exercise for my good health and mental improvement, not unlike a brisk stroll in the park. I dive a Closed Circuit Rebreather (CCR), while Travis dives Open Circuit (OC). Our very different con“ guration on todays dive is called mixed team diving and is common these days. The opposing philosophy believes both divers must dive exactly the same con“ guration, and preferably OC. On our way home this evening we began to compare the challenges we each faced with our different technology and realized this would make a great topic for this column. To safely complete this dive, Travis consumed 230 cubic feet of breathing gas over the 141 minutes. He breathed Nitrox 32 percent to minimize decompression stress and 100 percent oxygen above 20 feet to reduce decompression time. For safety reasons he carried 80 cubic feet of gas as a bail-out option, should his primary gases fail, since he could not rely upon my rebreather as a reserve supply. He also used two-thirds of his primary breathing gas keeping the rest, or 160 cubic feet, for emergencies. If you add this all up he carried 510 cubic feet of breathing gas to safely complete this dive. That volume of gas translated into seven diving cylinders. Had he consolidated his cylinders better, he might have been able to get the number down to six or even “ ve cylinders, but not today. Each cylinder has a regulator and harness totaling $4,000 for the lot. The gas cost $65 but the gas used was about $25 as there was ample reserve. We both wore dry suits to keep warm in the 67-degree water, carried very bright lamps rendering the cave spectacularly beautiful, computers for safe decompression and reels to help map our exit and carried matching back up supplies each costing the same at about $6,000. I made this same trip breathing from a CCR, recirculating the gas, and adding consumed oxygen. I took two 20 cubic foot cylinders attached to my CCR, one with 100 percent oxygen and one with air (21 percent). I used one-third of the oxygen and 1/10th of the air during the 141 minute dive. I also carried one 80 cf cylinder of Nitrox 32 percent as bailout and consumed about 10 percent as make-up gas. I left a 30 cf cylinder of 100 percent oxygen at 20 feet as a precaution, which I did not use. My gas taken cost $15. I also used one-“ fth of my Carbon Dioxide “ lter (called the scrubber) at a cost of $5, so round out my gasses taken at $20 for the 141 minute dive. My rebreather cost $8,000 to purchase, about twice that of Travis OC rig. Both systems require about the same investment in yearly maintenance assuming Travis, as a reg tech, services his own equipment. Assuming both rigs last as long, when will our investment equal each other? Call me at (850) 545-9198 if you can “ gure it out! One thing we did agree upon after the dive: I was much more relaxed not hauling so many cylinders as Travis. My footprint (as they call it) weighed 100 pounds while his weighed 225 pounds. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday py Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed May 2, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 6:23 AM High 1.5 ft. 11:23 AM 0.1 ft. 12:27 AM 0.3 ft. 1:20 AM 0.5 ft. 2:26 AM 0.6 ft. 3:38 AM 0.7 ft. 4:46 AM 0.7 ft. 5:44 AM Low 3.6 ft. 5:03 PM 2.8 ft. 7:18 AM 2.8 ft. 8:25 AM 2.8 ft. 9:38 AM 3.0 ft. 10:41 AM 3.2 ft. 11:30 AM 3.4 ft. 12:11 PM High 1.7 ft. 12:12 PM 1.8 ft. 1:20 PM 1.8 ft. 2:50 PM 1.5 ft. 4:21 PM 1.0 ft. 5:33 PM 0.4 ft. 6:31 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:46 PM 3.1 ft. 6:44 PM 2.9 ft. 8:14 PM 2.8 ft. 10:05 PM 3.0 ft. 11:36 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed May 2, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 6:20 AM High 1.6 ft. 11:20 AM 0.1 ft. 12:24 AM 0.3 ft. 1:17 AM 0.5 ft. 2:23 AM 0.6 ft. 3:35 AM 0.7 ft. 4:43 AM 0.8 ft. 5:41 AM Low 3.6 ft. 5:00 PM 2.9 ft. 7:15 AM 2.8 ft. 8:22 AM 2.9 ft. 9:35 AM 3.0 ft. 10:38 AM 3.3 ft. 11:27 AM 3.5 ft. 12:08 PM High 1.8 ft. 12:09 PM 2.0 ft. 1:17 PM 1.9 ft. 2:47 PM 1.6 ft. 4:18 PM 1.1 ft. 5:30 PM 0.4 ft. 6:28 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:43 PM 3.2 ft. 6:41 PM 2.9 ft. 8:11 PM 2.9 ft. 10:02 PM 3.1 ft. 11:33 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed Ma y 2, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 12:12 AM High -0.0 ft. 12:48 AM 0.1 ft. 1:31 AM 0.3 ft. 2:24 AM 0.4 ft. 3:30 AM 0.5 ft. 4:42 AM 0.6 ft. 5:50 AM 0.7 ft. 6:48 AM Low 2.7 ft. 6:59 AM 2.6 ft. 7:54 AM 2.6 ft. 9:01 AM 2.6 ft. 10:14 AM 2.8 ft. 11:17 AM 3.0 ft. 12:06 PM 3.2 ft. 12:47 PM High 1.4 ft. 12:27 PM 1.5 ft. 1:16 PM 1.6 ft. 2:24 PM 1.6 ft. 3:54 PM 1.3 ft. 5:25 PM 0.9 ft. 6:37 PM 0.4 ft. 7:35 PM Low 3.3 ft. 5:39 PM 3.1 ft. 6:22 PM 2.9 ft. 7:20 PM 2.7 ft. 8:50 PM 2.6 ft. 10:41 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed May 2, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 6:15 AM High 1.1 ft. 11:34 AM 0.1 ft. 12:38 AM 0.2 ft. 1:31 AM 0.3 ft. 2:37 AM 0.4 ft. 3:49 AM 0.5 ft. 4:57 AM 0.5 ft. 5:55 AM Low 2.7 ft. 4:55 PM 2.1 ft. 7:10 AM 2.1 ft. 8:17 AM 2.1 ft. 9:30 AM 2.2 ft. 10:33 AM 2.4 ft. 11:22 AM 2.6 ft. 12:03 PM High 1.2 ft. 12:23 PM 1.3 ft. 1:31 PM 1.3 ft. 3:01 PM 1.1 ft. 4:32 PM 0.7 ft. 5:44 PM 0.3 ft. 6:42 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:38 PM 2.3 ft. 6:36 PM 2.1 ft. 8:06 PM 2.1 ft. 9:57 PM 2.3 ft. 11:28 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed May 2, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 6:07 AM High 1.5 ft. 11:02 AM 0.1 ft. 12:06 AM 0.3 ft. 12:59 AM 0.4 ft. 2:05 AM 0.6 ft. 3:17 AM 0.6 ft. 4:25 AM 0.7 ft. 5:23 AM Low 2.8 ft. 4:47 PM 2.2 ft. 7:02 AM 2.1 ft. 8:09 AM 2.2 ft. 9:22 AM 2.3 ft. 10:25 AM 2.5 ft. 11:14 AM 2.7 ft. 11:55 AM High 1.6 ft. 11:51 AM 1.8 ft. 12:59 PM 1.7 ft. 2:29 PM 1.4 ft. 4:00 PM 1.0 ft. 5:12 PM 0.4 ft. 6:10 PM Low 2.6 ft. 5:30 PM 2.4 ft. 6:28 PM 2.2 ft. 7:58 PM 2.2 ft. 9:49 PM 2.4 ft. 11:20 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed Ma y 2, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 7:41 AM 2.4 ft. 8:31 AM High 1.6 ft. 10:53 AM 1.6 ft. 11:57 AM 0.1 ft. 12:48 AM 0.3 ft. 1:50 AM 0.4 ft. 2:55 AM 0.6 ft. 3:56 AM 0.8 ft. 4:53 AM Low 2.7 ft. 4:39 PM 2.6 ft. 5:32 PM 2.4 ft. 9:19 AM 2.4 ft. 10:01 AM 2.4 ft. 10:37 AM 2.5 ft. 11:07 AM 2.5 ft. 11:34 AM High 0.0 ft. 11:53 PM 1.6 ft. 1:21 PM 1.4 ft. 2:50 PM 1.1 ft. 4:04 PM 0.8 ft. 5:03 PM 0.4 ft. 5:54 PM Low 2.4 ft. 6:38 PM 2.2 ft. 8:04 PM 2.1 ft. 9:44 PM 2.2 ft. 11:24 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 26 May 2First April 28 Full May 5 Last May 12 New May 20Major Times 5:26 AM 7:26 AM 5:51 PM 7:51 PM Minor Times 12:06 AM 1:06 AM 10:45 AM 11:45 AM Major Times 6:15 AM 8:15 AM 6:40 PM 8:40 PM Minor Times 12:51 AM 1:51 AM 11:40 AM 12:40 PM Major Times 7:04 AM 9:04 AM 7:28 PM 9:28 PM Minor Times 1:34 AM 2:34 AM 12:36 PM 1:36 PM Major Times 7:53 AM 9:53 AM 8:17 PM 10:17 PM Minor Times 2:13 AM 3:13 AM 1:35 PM 2:35 PM Major Times 8:41 AM 10:41 AM 9:05 PM 11:05 PM Minor Times 2:51 AM 3:51 AM 2:34 PM 3:34 PM Major Times 9:30 AM 11:30 AM 9:55 PM 11:55 PM Minor Times 3:28 AM 4:28 AM 3:37 PM 4:37 PM Major Times 10:20 AM 12:20 PM 10:46 PM 12:46 AM Minor Times 4:05 AM 5:05 AM 4:40 PM 5:40 PM Average Average Average Average+ Average+ Average Average6:58 am 8:11 pm 10:46 am 12:07 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:57 am 8:12 pm 11:41 am 12:52 am 6:56 am 8:13 pm 12:38 pm 1:34 am 6:55 am 8:13 pm 1:36 pm 2:14 am 6:54 am 8:14 pm 2:36 pm 2:52 am 6:53 am 8:15 pm 3:37 pm 3:28 am 6:52 am 8:15 pm 4:41 pm 4:05 am30% 36% 43% 49% 56% 63% 70% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. 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PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThelma Louise Sanders, 78, of Hosford, passed away on Monday, April 23, in Tallahassee. She was born in Greensboro, to Kinch and Della (Durden) Arnold. She and her husband, Eric T. Sanders, who she married April 3, 1953, lived in various parts of the United States as his job required at the time, but returned home to Liberty County after the birth of their daughter, Joy. From that time, Louise was a homemaker and also worked for several years as a teachers aide at Hosford School. She was a member of Corinth Baptist Church of Hosford. She was one of the happiest people on the planet, and always had a ready smile for everyone she met. The care and well-being of her family was always her No. 1 priority and she enjoyed cooking, baking and sewing for them. She loved music and singing and her family was used to her singing from the time she woke in the morning until she retired at night. She had many health issues over the past few years, some of which cost her her legs, but even through all of that she never lost her smile. She lived the last three years at Blountstown Health and Rehabilitation where she was a social butter” yŽ wheeling around in her motorized wheelchair visiting with other friends both old and new. Even after the loss of her legs, she stated many times that she didnt know the purpose that God had for her without her legs, but if she could be an example to someone else that you should never give up or feel sorry for yourself, then she would be the example that God wanted her to be. Funeral services were held Wednesday, April 25, at 3 p.m. at Corinth Baptist Church in Hosford with Kyle Peddie and the Honorable Ken Hosford of“ ciating. Interment will follow in Hosford Cemetery. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, April 24, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Corinth Baptist Church. Survivors include her daughter, Joy Sanders Harts“ eld of Crawfordville; two step-daughters, Glyndell Perri of Tallahassee and Jackie Hallman and her husband, Doug of Graceville; four grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; and four great-great-grandchildren; a brother, Thomas Eustas Arnold of Telogia; two sisters, Elma Arnold Kent of Branford and Sarah Arnold BoogieŽ Sauls and her husband, Bobby of Abbeville, Ala. She will be missed by a large family of cousins and a host of nieces and nephews who were all a very special part of her life; and also a very special friend, Marion Mercer who was like a sister to her. She will be greatly missed, but we know that we will walk with her again on golden streets one day. Adams Funeral Home in Bristol is in charge of the arrangements. (850-674-5449) Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com. Mary M. Moore-Gearhart, 93, of Crawfordville, passed away on Thursday, April 19. She was born in Crawfordville to the May Wright and Rosa Nell Lawhon Moore. She retired twice from the Department of Labor with a total of 47 years of service to the State of Florida, was a member of the Crawfordville First Baptist Church and was a 60 year cancer survivor. Funeral services were held 11 a.m. on Monday, April 23, at the Crawfordville First Baptist Church with the Rev. Dave Fell and the Rev. William BillŽ Payne of“ ciating. The family received friends one hour prior to the service at the church. Interment followed at the Crawfordville Cemetery. Memorial donations can be made to Big Bend Hospice of Tallahassee. Survivors include her son, Kenneth KentŽ Gearhart Jr.; a daughter, Rosemary Gearhart (Bruce) Reed; two grandchildren, Dennie Connell and Wayne Connell Jr.; a loving nephew, Walter Page; four nieces, Ouida Sites, Michelle Lee, Nell McPherson, and Gretchen Martin; and four great-grandchildren, Kristin, DJ, Blake and Kayla. She was predeceased by her husband, Kenneth Gearhart Sr.; a brother, George Moore; and sisters, Rosa Mae Duggar and Eva M. Page. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850559-3380). Please sign the online guestbook at www. forbesfuneralhome.net. Tommy Baldwin Waller, 65, died on April 13 at his residence, surrounded by his family. He was born Aug. 30, 1946, in Tallahassee. His professional career consisted of 30 years with the Brinks Company, starting at the bottom and working his way to assistant manager before retiring. He met many people along the way and would always lend a helping hand in many different ways, never expecting anything in return, just respect. A graveside service will be held Thursday, April 19, at 11 a.m. at Oakland Cemetery in Tallahassee. Survivors include two sons, Tom Jr. and Carl; and three daughters, Linda Louise, Elizabeth (and husband Kenny) and Kala (and husband Jeff); the mother of his children and best friend, Ruth Brumbley; a brother, Ray (wife Lynn) of Colorado; and two sisters, Betty and Mary Lou. He will be missed by nine grandchildren; and numerous friends and family members. He was predeceased by his parents, Carl Ray Baldwin and Helen Waller Baldwin. He lost his parents at a very young age and was then adopted by his grandparents, Otway Waddell Waller and Lillian Waller, whom he loved, admired and had a great respect for. Bevis Funeral Home, (850)385-2193, www.bevisfh. com, is in charge of the arrangements.Tommy Baldwin Waller Mary M. Moore-Gearhart Thelma Louise SandersObituariesContinued from Page 6A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt took a jury only a few minutes to return a not guilty verdict against Brian Gilpin, 28, who was charged with being at the wheel of a crash that turned deadly back in January 2009. Wakulla “ re“ ghter Richard Rhea died at the scene, electrocuted by downed powerlines caused by the crash. The jury was not told about Rheas death at Gilpins one-day trial, held Thursday, April 19, on a misdemeanor charge of DUI causing serious bodily injury. The serious bodily injury was another passenger in the vehicle, Luis Rodriguez, who spent a week in the hospital with broken ribs and a broken collarbone. According to testimony at the trial, Gilpin and Rodriguez were drinking, went to a Crawfordville bar and drank some more, and then left in Rodriguez truck. Lt. Mike Kemp of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce was following the car down U.S. Highway 319 onto Lower Bridge Road, now known as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Drive, where the truck reached speeds of 80 miles an hour and missed the curve near the land“ ll, sailing into a power pole. Kemp said he saw Gilpin ejected, and Gilpin was in the bed of the truck as he approached, warning him not to move because of the downed powerlines. Rodriguez was in the passenger seat. Rodriguez testi“ ed that he was drunk and threw up at the bar and asked Gilpin to drive that night. The next thing he remembered was being in the hospital. Much was made of the apparent discrepancy between Kemps account, claiming the truck did not roll, and Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Chuck Cooks traf“ c report that said the truck rolled. Defense attorney Steven Glazer mounted a defense that it wasnt Gilpin who was driving, and presented a traf“ c reconstruction specialist, Liu Wang, who testi“ ed that from the biomechanics of the crash … whether it rolled or not … Rodriguez was most likely the driver. The credibility of Wang was attacked by Assistant State Attorney Louise Wilhite-St. Laurent, who argued in closing that, basically, Wang contended Rodriguez was driving because thats what she was paid to do. The states own expert, Investigator Joe Giangrosso of Tallahassee Police Department, said it was dif“ cult to determine who was driving without being able to look at the truck for evidence of impact and force. The truck was placed in a tow yard, but apparently removed in the nearly three years the case was pending. Gilpin did not take the stand to testify at his trial. He was also hospitalized after the crash, and a blood draw at the time showed Gilpin had a blood alcohol level of .139. The legal limit is .08. Friends dont let friends drive drunk,Ž Glazer said in his closing, contending that Rodriguez would never have allowed a man who was .13 to drive.Ž The jury has again spoken the truth,Ž Glazer said, when asked for a comment after the not guilty verdict. Gilpin still faces a misdemeanor charge of driving with a suspended license, which is set for May. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker presided over the trial.Man found not guilty of DUI in crash where re ghter was killedContinued from Page 1A Chairman Alan Brock said he agrees that the studies are proving that a majority of the pollution of Wakulla Springs is coming from the north, however, he felt the county should still have those protections. The City of Tallahassee could weaken its protections if it sees Wakulla County doing nothing, he said. Merritt said, I think we are doing our part and Tallahassee is doing their part.Ž Artz disagreed. It seems to me its very short-sighted and its not addressing the real problemŽ … which she said is the “ nancial burden placed on residents. She said she would like to focus on “ nding a solution to help with costs instead of decreasing protection. She also suggested offering incentives for people who voluntarily upgrade. We have a pollution problem now,Ž Artz said. She was concerned about the possible long term effects these revisions might have, such as turning Wakulla Springs into the black lagoon. Merritt said, I think Wakulla Springs will be beautiful 500 years from now.Ž The commission voted four to one, with Artz opposing, to schedule the public hearings to consider transmittal of the text amendment of the Comprehensive Plan.Proposed septic tank revisions going forward HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ƒONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EARƒ OOPS!The Girls from Evolution Day Spa Hair Salon~ Robyn ~ Miranda ~ Linda ~HAVEMOVEDANDARENOW OPENAT THEIR NEW LOCATIONHair Place That850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA 294-2085 LINDA 545-2905 MIRANDA

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn April 10, Eddie Harts“ eld of Panacea reported a grand theft. An outboard motor and generator was reported missing from a Crawfordville property. The missing property is valued at $700 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On April 10, Teresa Murray of St. Marks reported the theft of a bicycle. The bike is valued at $175 and was taken from the victims home. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On April 11, Gina Vericker of Crawfordville reported the theft of her wallet and a wallet owned by a relative. The items were taken from her home. The value of the wallets and contents were $250 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On April 11, Ross Mathews of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash. The victims vehicle was parked on the Crawfordville Highway when it was struck by an unknown vehicle. Mathews vehicle suffered damage to the right rear portion. The victim was away from the vehicle when it was struck. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On April 11, Shawna Katlyn Lytle, 19, of Crawfordville was traveling eastbound on Taff Drive when a Honda 50cc dirt bike, operated by Howard Walter Kolb, 48, of Crawfordville, failed to yield at the intersection with a dirt service road that enters the ACE Hardware property. Kolb suffered injuries to his arms and was treated by Wakulla EMS personnel. The Lytle vehicle suffered damage to the right front portion. Kolb received a traf“ c citation. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On April 11, Joseph Dean Hicks, 29 of Panacea was charged with resisting an of“ cer without violence after Deputies Will Hudson and Sean Wheeler attempted to serve warrants on him. The two deputies approached the suspect at a Crawfordville residence and Hicks reportedly ran back into the house and allegedly jumped out a window. After a foot pursuit into a wooded area, Hicks was taken into custody with the deployment of a Taser. Hicks was arrested on outstanding warrants for violation of probation and felony battery. € On April 10, Deputy Vicki Mitchell worked a minor traffic accident involving a vehicle and a bear. The small bear suffered an injury to its leg and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission was contacted to care for the bear off Springhill Road. € On April 11, Brittany Rayburn of Murphy Oil reported a vehicle accident involving one of the gas pumps. Damage to the pump was estimated at $10. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On April 12, Thomas White of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le his taxes but discovered that someone had already used his Social Security number. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On April 12, Donald T. Krasczyk, 62, of Crawfordville and Natacha Michelle Allen, 38, of Crawfordville, were involved in a traf“ c crash. Krasczyk was traveling northbound on Cajer Posey Road and Allen was eastbound on Highway 61. Krasczyk entered the intersection into the path of Allen, whose car struck Krasczyks at the rear passenger door. Allen and a male passenger were transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital with minor injuries and Krasczyk was issued a traf“ c citation for careless driving. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. € On April 12, Yadira Salazar-Ramirez of Crawfordville reported a brush “ re on Hickory Road. The Wakulla Fire Department put out the “ re which started when burning leaves caught a neighboring fence on “ re. Arrangements were made to replace the fence. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. € On April 12, Mildred Pigott of Crawfordville reported a traffic crash at Walgreens in Crawfordville. Pigott attempted to back out of a parking spot, but the vehicle was in drive and jumped the curb and struck a cinderblock pillar. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $4,500. There were no injuries. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On April 12, deputies and “ re“ ghters responded to a mobile home “ re at 2852 Shadeville Highway. The property owner, Karen S. Thompson, of Crawfordville, allowed individuals to collect scrap metal from the abandoned structure. The “ re was investigated by the state Fire Marshals office and the blaze was determined to have started from an acetylene cutting torch used in collecting scrap metal. The “ re was ruled an accident. Deputy Scott Powell, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Detective Matt Helms investigated. € On April 13, Public Service Of“ cer Mitch Hampton of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at the clubhouse at the Gardens of Saralan in Crawfordville. Hampton was conducting a security check when he observed damage to the window screen and a smashed ceramic pedestal in the middle of the room. Damage was estimated at $60. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On April 13, Darrell Taylor of Crawfordville reported a marine burglary in Sopchoppy. A steering wheel and hydraulic equipment, valued at $2,000, were reported missing. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. € On April 13, Isaac Thomas of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A neighbor heard the victims alarm system and contacted law enforcement. A door window was smashed and the door was standing open. Damage to the home was estimated at $300 and a jewelry box was stolen from inside. Deputy Mike Crum and Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. € On April 14, a 17-yearold female was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment during a Party Patrol in Panacea. Lt. Jimmy Sessor and Detective Nick Boutwell found the juvenile behind a closed Panacea area business. The female was issued a Juvenile Civil Citation and 24 hours of community service and the teenagers mother responded to pick her up. The marijuana weighed 4.4 grams and drug paraphernalia was also seized. € On April 14, Marc Hooker of Crawfordville recovered a wallet owned by Robert Jorge Rodriguez of Cooper City. The wallet was found in the middle of U.S. Highway 319 near Winn-Dixie. It contained personal items and cash. Attempts to locate the owner have been unsuccessful and the wallet was turned over to the Evidence Division. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On April 14, Chris Barwick of Panacea reported a missing handgun. The gun is valued at $100. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On April 14, Stacia Conner of Amazing Mail Solutions reported a fraud as someone posing as Western Union created two transactions valued at $917. Conner became suspicious and contacted law enforcement. It has not been determined if the business has suffered any “ nancial loss. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On April 14, a structure “ re was reported at 30 Richardson Road in Crawfordville. The home is owned by Randall Franklin of Tallahassee. The home was fully engulfed in ” ames when Deputy Ian Dohme responded. Wakulla Fire“ ghters worked several hours to put the blaze out at the unoccupied home. The state Fire Marshal and Detective Josh Langston responded to the scene. The investigation continues, but the house was a total loss. € On April 15, Jason Walker of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A shotgun, valued at $300, was reported missing. Deputy Mike Crum and Deputy Clint Beam also investigated other cases with similar backgrounds including the theft of a firearm and a GPS. Charles King of Crawfordville reported a ” ashlight and GPS theft. The items were taken from his vehicle and are valued at $230. A “ rearm was taken from a vehicle owned by Kenneth Adams of Crawfordville. It is valued at $250. Detectives Nick Boutwell and Derek Lawhon also investigated. € On April 15, Nancy Speigner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le her tax return but discovered that someone already used her Social Security number. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On April 15, Sgt. Mike Helms reported someone removing the trailer receiver and two inch ball on the back of his patrol vehicle. The property is valued at $50. € On April 16, Neil Watts of Wakulla ESG reported a criminal mischief. Someone broke a window of a countyowned mower-tractor by throwing a rock through it. The tractor was located at U.S. Highway 98 and Jack Crum Road. Damage was estimated at $250. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On April 16, a 17year-old female driver was southbound on DonaldsonWilliams Road in Crawfordville when she became distracted and struck a tree on the right side of the dirt road. There were no injuries. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On April 17, Dennis Loney of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a ” atbed trailer. The trailer was valued at $1,200 and was stored on his property. The trailer was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € On April 17, Frederick Matuschak of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his metal fence. Damage was estimated at $50 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On April 17, Olivia Langston of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to file her tax return when she discovered that someone was already using her Social Security number. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On April 17, Dale Hilbert of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of garden tiller, valued at $500. James Mathew Corbett, 49, of Crawfordville was supposed to repair the tiller for the victim, but allegedly failed to return the property. The property was located at a Woodville pawn shop and Corbett was charged with grand theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Will Hudson and Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On April 17, Carrie Riley of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of $1,300 worth of jewelry from her home. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On April 17, Jenifer Godwin of Panacea reported a criminal mischief to a Crawfordville home in which she is caretaker. Windows were discovered broken and damage was also observed to the interior. Damages were estimated at $1,940. Doors were damaged along with sheet rock and the bathroom. The home is owned by Citi Mortgage, Inc. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On April 17, Christopher Hargrave of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered that someone used his Social Security number to “ le a tax return. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € On April 18, Joyce Glow of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. A company sent the victim a letter stating that they would not send an electronics package to her without a payment of $1,618 being sent to them “ rst. Glow did not place any orders to the company. The shipping address for the product was Lansing, Mich. The company was contacted by Lt. Brad Taylor and reported that the transaction was stopped after being discovered as a fraud. € On April 18, Wendy Segree of Crawfordville reported a fraud as a check was cashed on her bank account without her authorization. The check was for $100. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On April 18, Deanna Strickland of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash and criminal mischief. The victim discovered damage to her vehicle and Deputy Mike Zimba estimated the damage at $1,000. It appeared the victims vehicle may have been struck by another vehicle. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,326 calls for service during the past week including 27 business and residential alarms; 13 assists to other agencies; 132 citizen contacts; 65 abandoned E-911 calls; 40 E-911 emergency calls; 14 frauds; 65 investigations; 20 noise/loud music complaints; 74 medical emergencies; 238 residential and business security checks; 38 special details; 18 suspicious people; 23 suspicious vehicles; 16 thefts; 11 traf“ c crashes with no injuries; 100 traffic enforcements; 89 traf“ c stops; 11 vehicle maintenances; 37 reckless vehicles; 15 wanted people and 22 watch orders.Sheri s Report Design Provided By http://www.panacearockthedock.com DUBREJA PLAZA94 COTTONWOOD STREET, CRAWFORDVILLEFL o o Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing g litzNc lip CALL850926-TRIM( 8746 )to Schedule Your Prom Makeover!Prom Day Make-Up $20 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla Wildlife Festival was held this past weekend at Wakulla Springs State Park and exhibitors, vendors and living history demonstrators “ lled the park. Those in attendance were able to learn how to make butter, spin yarn, make moonshine, spear points and blacksmith techniques. Music could be heard throughout the day, played by several different bands, including the Biscuit Boys, Pickin and Grinnin Band, Coon Bottom Creek and The Hot Pepper Steppers. Festival goers were also able to view and learn about replies and birds of prey at the shows held by the Center for Wildlife Education at Georgia Southern University. Jonathan Jackson, a student employee with the Center, invited participants to meet a 40-pound Columbian Red Tail Boa named Salvador. He told those in the crowd that the snake was 7 or 8 years old and could live to be 15 or 20 years old. Florida Wild Mammal Association also brought along animals for participants to meet, such as Doofy the pelican. The festival was the end of Wild About Wakulla Week, which celebrates Wakulla County and starts with the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival. Wakulla Wildlife Festival More photos online at thewakullanews.com SCENES FROM THE FESTIVAL: Clockwise from above, Steve Hein talks about the Peregrine Falcon during the bird of prey show; tractors on display; Jonathan Jackson shows off Salvador during the reptile show; exhibitors demonstrate the art of spinning; John Boy Watson of the Florida Artist Blacksmith Association makes an SŽ hook; and a pelican named Doofy being walked by Jessica Beatty with the Florida Wild Mammal Association. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN Up To 2012 Dodge Ram 2500 2012 Dodge Ram 3500 Caband Chassis $10,000 OFF MSRP Eric Lee 850-766-8530$10,000 off MSRP: Stk#12D113, 2012 Ram 2500 Laramie Longhorn Crew Cab Dealer retains all rebates and incentives

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Senior Center’s volunteer appreciation luncheon is heldStory, Page 3B CONTRIBUTIONS AND EXPENDITURES Pages 5B & 6B $70 billion budget approved with $143 million cutsWeekly Roundup, Page 11B Senior Center is a community e ortThe Wakulla County Senior Centers Board of Directors and staff including myself often hear compliments from our community about the quality of service provided to the senior citizens of Wakulla County. We all know that this center could not function without the support of our community. We try to let our community know how essential their support is for the seniors. I cant list everything that our community provides that enables the Senior Center to provide services but I want to list a few examples to let all of you know how important our community support is. Anonymous Donations: Im surprised how often donors bring a check to our of“ ce and ask not to be recognized or have their donation published. These donations normally are $50 or more. We do honor their request for anonymity. Churches: Some churches include the Senior Center in their budget and send a check monthly. Some send a check annually. Others send checks when they have available funds. Several churches hold their banquets and pastor appreciation dinners in the Senior Center. Rotary Club: Weekly, the Wakulla Rotary Club meets in the Senior Center. They choose to pay more for lunch than we initially offered because they wanted to support the center. They also make cash contributions from their fundraising activities. Wakulla Realtors: They hold their monthly breakfast meeting in the senior center. They show their support for the Senior Center even though the real estate market slump may impact them more than the average citizen. Chamber of Commerce: The Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce holds many social functions such as installation banquets and business recognition dinners. Forgotten Coast Kayak Anglers: This “ shing tournament reaches from Cape San Blas to Steinhatchee and is headquartered in Wakulla County. They provide all their proceeds to our Meals-on-Wheels program. These anglers are primarily from the southeastern states, with some from Canada and California and a few states in between. Our Tourist Development Council has chosen to not participate in this event. We host more than 125 visitors during this event. Many of them are staying in our hotels and parks for their “ rst time. Forgotten Coast Kayak Anglers was organized and is managed by a local resident who works for a national corporation and has to travel often. He recruits help from us and some of our local businesses. Our most recent tournament was April 13 and 14. Civic and Social Clubs: The Optimist Club holds their fashion show at the center. Several homeowners associations meet in the center. Several groups such as Crawfordville Young at Heart and the Sopchoppy Homemakers come in for lunch periodically. During this political season there will be forums held in the center. Gifts of Time and Energy: Each April we provide a Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon. Each year we recognize more than 150 volunteers that have helped serve the Senior Citizens over the last year. Their support is beyond measure. Others: I know I have missed some groups of donors. After our annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon we always learn that we have missed recognizing someone. At least Ive reached the age to have a legitimate excuse to forget someone. We have seen so many senior citizens that had given up on life but came to the Senior Center only to appease a friend and discover that they were alive and could enjoy each day. Many of you dont get the opportunity to see these wonderful events but its your gifts of time and resources that creates these opportunities. Again, I repeat, these are some of the reasons that Im so proud to live in Wakulla County. This is a wonderful place to live. R.H. CarterWakulla County Senior CenterSeniors enjoyed St. Patrick’s, crafts, music, programs on tortoises and recreation for adults with disabilitiesBy DIANE LANTER and TAMARA BYRNESof the Senior CenterThe Lion and the Lamb of March 2012 came with beautiful weather and a great St. Patricks Day celebration. We enjoyed an early spring and this month we are feeling the effects of an early summer too, lots of sun, birds, butter” ies and early blooming ” owers. The Iris Garden Club has been assisting the seniors in planting tomatoes and vegetables in our raised bed gardens. Tamara led a class on building a salad garden in a pot. We are all looking forward to a delicious harvest. Our herbs and native garden are thriving as well. We are trying to establish our blueberry patch and a fruit tree area but we still have a long way to go. Hardy citrus trees and tomato cages are on our wish list. If you have not had the chance to see our garden and vine covered pergola, please stop by and check it out. Our next gardening day is April 24 and we sure could use some helping hands to spread mulch donated by Brians Best for Less Tree Service. Thank you, Brian! Shelley Swenson from the county extension of“ ce helped us with a Tuesday craft class. We recycled upholstery fabric and discarded metal tape measures. They were turned into useful eyeglass and cell phone holders, as well as small coin purses. This was a fun project for all. Once again Sharon Fox entertained us with her lovely voice and her saxophones. Music is something that we all look forward to, and Sharon never disappoints us. We are very thankful to all the musicians who perform at the center. The FSU student nurses had a good time checking blood pressures for the seniors and we always look forward to their visits. The Florida Wildlife Commission presented a program on our local Gopher Tortoises. They brought two tortoises for the seniors to see and we learned a great deal from this program. We also learned that they are a protected species and if we encounter one on our property, we must not move them or try to capture them. The FWC has several programs that are bene“ cial and we appreciate the information. Lisa Evans from the Florida Disabled Outdoors Association gave a wonderful presentation on recreation for adults with disabilities. Some of the activities that are available to participants include bowling, hunting, horseback riding, kayaking, “ shing and football, but the possibilities are endless! Continued on Page 3B PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe FWC presented a program on gopher tortoises, above; dancing to the sounds of Pickin n Grinnin, below. LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS W a k u l l a C o u n t y S e n i o r C i t i z e n s C e l e b r a t e L i f e Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, April 26  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library.  LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Friday, April 27  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Ofce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 28  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. Sunday, April 29  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, April 30  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, May 1  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 2  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, May 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Special EventsThursday, April 26  LANDSCAPING WITH NATIVE PLANTS CLASS will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Learn how to choose native plants for ornamental use in your home and garden landscape. Topics covered in class will include how to select plants that meet your needs, water saving plants, the care and feeding of native ornamental plant and much more.  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 27  INFORMATION ON REVERSE MORTGAGES will be available from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. It will be hosted by FirstBANK Florida Senior Products Division Manager Michael J. Weltman and is intended for those almost 62 years old or older, who want to re nance their mortgage or want to buy a home, and those who need any services or companies and want the bill paid for with a Reverse Mortgage. For more information, call 556-6694.  GRANT PEEPLES will perform his original music at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Special guest, Chelsea Dix Kessler, will also be performing with Peeples on some songs. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Saturday, April 28  JAM 4 CAMP will be held by Wakulla County 4-H from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Hudson Park. This is the day to sign up for Camp Cherry Lake and day camps that will be offered through 4-H. There will be a free concert, as well as vendors. For more information, contact Sherri Kraeft at 926-3931 or sjkraeft@u .edu.  39TH ANNUAL STEPHEN C. SMITH MEMORIAL REGATTA will be held from 8:30 a.m. on Saturday to 4 p.m. on Sunday at Shell Point Beach. Races begin at noon on Saturday. There will be two days of racing, beach activities, sun, fun, food and the live auction on Sunday. The regatta bene ts the Leon County Unit of the American Cancer Society which serves Leon, Wakulla and other Big Bend counties. For more information visit www.smithregatta.com.  ROCK THE DOCK FISHING TOURNAMENT will be held Saturday and Sunday in Panacea. The Skeeter Rock the Dock Annual Fishing Tournament is scheduled for April 28-29. The captain’s meeting and dinner is scheduled for Friday, April 27. Win a 2012 Skeeter Zx20 Bay Boat, including an aluminum trailer, package valued at $35,000. Cost is $50 per person for recreational, $50 per person for kayak and $25 per person for youth. For more information, visit www.PanaceaRockTheDock.com or call 508-3379.  LAW ENFORCEMENT MOTORCYCLE CLUB POKER RUN will be held at the Capital Circle Harley Davidson in Tallahassee to bene t Wakulla County Special Olympics. Registration takes place from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. with the last bike out at 11 a.m. Cost is $15 per rider, $10 per passenger and $5 per additional hand. There will be prizes for the best hand, worst hand, as well as a 50/50 drawing and door prizes. Free T-shirts will be given to the rst 100 participants. Contact Mike Crews at 445-4381, Barry Henson at 509-9902 or George Williams at 556-5442.  FERALTONES will perform at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Comprised of Dave Leporati on mandolin, Kim Thomas on guitar, Bobby Cutts on harmonica and Adam Straubinger on ddle, all band members write music and sing. Their original music has evolved into a blend of old bluegrass, blues and country styles, with a twist. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10 Monday, April 30  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Centennial Bank from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, May 3 THIRD ANNUAL REAGAN DAY BLUE JEANS AND BLACK TIE AFFAIR will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood beginning at 6 p.m. with social hour, followed by dinner and the program at 7 p.m. The featured speaker will be best selling author Peter Schweizer, author of “Throw Them All Out: How Politicians and Their Friends Get Rich off Insider Stock Tips, Land Deals, and Cronyism That Would Send the Rest of Us to Prison.” Schweizer also wrote “Reagan’s War,” and his speech will be titled “The Reagan No One Knew.” Tickets are $35 for an individual and $50 for two tickets. Sponsorships are available for $500 and include a table for 8 and recognition during the program. Tickets are available for purchase at www.wakullarepublicans.com.Upcoming EventsFriday, May 4  FACING LIBERTY photo exhibit will be held at GSigns, across from courthouse, at 6 p.m. The photos are of Wakulla’s African-American population from the early ‘70s to as far back as the 1800s. Exhibit includes schools, churches, along with the community at work and at play. Saturday, May 5  PANACEA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held at Woolley Park starting at 10 a.m. with a parade down U.S. Highway 98 and will last until 6 p.m. Following the parade, gates will open at the park. There will be live music, dance performances by cloggers and historic demonstrations. A long-time tradition of the festival is the Crab Pickin’ Contest and the Mullet Toss, where contestants throw a real mullet in a distance-toss competition.  SHOWING OF “ROOTS”, episodes 1 and 2 at 1 p.m. at the library. Alex Haley’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “Roots” tells a story for all Americans and remains an engrossing entertainment more than 30 years later. Sunday, May 6  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Michael Keys, wildlife biologist, at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge at 2 p.m. He will present “Lightning, Longleaf and a Formerly Common Woodpecker.” The red-cockaded woodpecker is an excellent management indicator species re ecting the health of the re-dependent longleaf pine-grassland ecosystems to which it has evolved. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for more information. Friday, May 11  SPEAKING FREELY, a panel discussion on the history of May 20, Emancipation Proclamation, and what it means to experience freedom in Wakulla County, along with a few invited guests, will be held at 7 p.m. at the library. Saturday, May 12  SHOWING OF “ROOTS” Episodes 3 and 4 will be held at 1 p.m. at the library. Friday, May 18  IN BITS AND PIECES, a documentary night, will be held beginning at 5 p.m. at the library. “Crossing Over: How Roots Captivated An Entire Nation,” followed by “Shirley Chisholm ’72 : Go on the road with Shirley Chisholm as she embarks on a journey to become President of the United States,” and ending with “The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975: During the rise of The Black Power Movement, Swedish TV journalists documented an unfolding cultural revolution for their audiences back home.” Director Gran Hugo Olsson highlights key gures and events in a light completely different from that of the American media at the time. Saturday, May 19  MAY 20TH CELEBRATION will be held from noon to 4 p.m. at the grounds of the Old Buckhorn School, Mount Trial Church. Planting of the ‘May Pole’, cakewalks, three-legged races, music, food, softball games, free clothing giveaway, Buckhorn Cemetery tour, information on how to research your family tree and more.  WAKULLA SPRINGS 5K RUN AND 1-MILE FUN RUN will be held by the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park at Wakulla Springs State Park. This unique run winds through The Sanctuary, a wilderness area of Wakulla Springs State Park which is not open to the general public. Packet pickup and race day registration will begin at 7 a.m. The 1 Mile Fun Run will begin at 8 a.m., followed by the 5K run at 8:30 a.m. To access the Wakulla Springs 5K Run and 1 Mile Fun Run registration form, visit www.wakullasprings. org/projects.html. To register online, visit www.raceit.com. For more information, contact Trudy Thompson at (850) 962-2064. Sunday, May 20  BAT FEST 2012 will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 1 to 5 p.m. This is an opportunity for the public to connect with wildlife biologists from across the Southeast and learn about bats, bat biology and conservation. This event is free to the public and is presented by the Florida Bat Working Group in conjunction with the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network 2012 Bat Blitz. There will be an admission fee to access the park. There will be crafts, demonstrations, youth conservation talk, a guest speaker and more. Saturday, May 26  SHOWING OF “ROOTS” Episodes 5 and 6 at the library at 1 p.m. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Blood Drive at Wal-Mart from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Jam 4 Camp at Hudson Park from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta at Shell Point Beach starting at 8:30 a.m. Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament at Rock Landing in Panacea. ThursdaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Grant Peeples will perform at Posh Java on April 27 at 8 p.m. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 3BContinued from Page 1BLisa spoke of the Sportsability event at the Ochlockonee River State Park on April 14. For more information call the association at (850) 201-2944. Soon, Jessica Welch from the Of“ ce of Public Information will be here to explain about the county accepting applications for solid waste and “ re services hardship assistance program. Plan to attend if you have any questions concerning this situation. We will be having a Luau and also celebrating Mothers Day on Friday, May 11 … plan to come and join us. Also, if you have any questions concerning Social Security, a representative will be here on May 30 at 11:15 a.m. to answer any questions you may have. For more information, call 926-7145.Seniors celebrate PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENKeynote speaker Karen Henry of Covenant Hospice at the luncheon. Seated at the head table are Senior Center board members Peggy Mackin, Maurice Langston, Cheryll Olah, Senior Center Executive Director R.H. Carter and Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis. The Senior Center dining hall was packed for the volunteer appreciation luncheon. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe dining hall at the Senior Center was packed on Wednesday, April 18, for the centers annual volunteer appreciation luncheon. Keynote speaker Karen Henry of Covenant Hospice read a proclamation from President Obama praising the generous heartŽ of volunteers and promoting volunteerism. Henry recounted meeting the centers Executive Director R.H. Carter when she came to the county in 2010. His advice: You have to give back to the community you work in.Ž She said she took the advice to heart, and praised the philosophy. Carter recognized Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis. Wakulla Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, whos on the centers board, read off a list of the hundreds of volunteers who help with the numerous functions and programs provided there. Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis says a few words. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 23 … Preparing for Floridas shift to a statewide Medicaid managed-care system, 20 health companies and organizations are interested in competing for contracts to serve seniors who need long-term care. Potential bidders faced a deadline last week to submit non-binding letters of intent that signaled their interest in the long-term care program, as the state Agency for Health Care Administration gets ready to move forward with a lengthy contracting process. Those expressing interest ranged from major managed-care industry players, such as Humana and WellCare, to smaller regional organizations, such as Brevard Alzheimers Foundation Inc., and Miami Jewish Health Systems. The list of potential bidders only re” ects health plans interested in the long-term care portion of a statewide managed-care system. AHCA has not sought similar letters of intent for plans hoping to serve the broader Medicaid population, such as children and women. Nevertheless, the list of potential long-term care bidders is the “ rst of its kind since Florida lawmakers last year approved a plan to transform Medicaid. That plans remains subject to federal approval, but AHCA is preparing to start the contracting process. Under the system, the state would be divided into 11 regions, with managed-care plans competing for contracts in each region. Plans could win contracts in multiple regions. The list of potential long-term care bidders provides a glimpse of how different parts of the state could be served … and how companies and organizations view the markets. Seven health plans submitted letters indicating they are interested in competing in all regions. They are American Eldercare, Amerigroup, Humana, Simply Healthcare, Sunshine State Health Plan, UnitedHealthcare and WellCare. Those seven also are the only plans that indicated interest in competing in a massive region of 14 counties that spans from Holmes and Washington counties in the Panhandle to Madison and Taylor counties in the Big Bend. During the legislative deliberations last year, questions were raised about the number of health plans that would want to do business in such relatively rural areas. In the end, lawmakers decided that contracts would only be awarded to two plans in the 14-county region. Similarly, two plans would win contracts in another region of the western Panhandle. AHCA plans this summer to issue what is known as an invitation to negotiateŽ as a “ rst step in the process.Health plans line up for new Medicaid systemVolunteer luncheon CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEƒEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Flor i da Cert i “ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY Are you 62 or older, or will you be soon? Want to re nance at 2.99%-5.06% w/no payments? Want to Buy a Home? Remodel? Improve? Fix the Roof...? Lets have coffee and cake and talk about the HUD/FHA Govt. Insured Reverse Mortgage (FHA-255 Program) that is helping seniors pay for much needed services and retirement. (no income/credit needed) Meet us at the Wakulla Senior Center on Friday April 27 for two classes (45min. ea.) at 6:30 and 7:15 PM.Hosted by FirstBANK-Florida Senior Products Division Manager, Michael Weltman MBA, CSA, SRES 11 years in FHA Reverse, Financial ConsultantRSVP Bring a friend or two or call for info 850-556-6694Bankers, Credit Union Mgrs., Contractors, Remodelers, Home Renovation Companies, Pool Installers, Roofers, Insurance Agents, Realtors, Brokers, Builders, Home Care Agencies, Attorneys, CPA’s, Financial Planners, Seniors/Retirees, Mortgage Lenders, Residential Elevator Companies. ARE ALSO WELCOMED TO JOIN US! www.myret i rementmortgage.com Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DOUG HEINLEN Theyre at it again. Washington is talking about big changes to Social Security and Medicare. But just as in the past year and a half, the debate is going on mostly behind closed doors, and its mostly about numbers on charts and graphs. The discussion is missing a vitally important voice … yours. Thats why AARP has launched Youve Earned a Say, a national conversation to ensure you and millions of other Floridians will have your say on the future of Medicare and Social Security. In coming months, AARP Florida will sponsor more than 200 town halls, community conversations and other discussions, plus tele-Town Halls, bus tours and other events … all with the goal of giving you a chance to state your views and offer ideas about how to keep Social Security and Medicare strong for the long haul. Keep up to date about when events are happening in your community at www.aarp.org/fl or call 1-866-595-7678 for more information. Your voice matters, because Social Security and Medicare are the foundation of income and health security in retirement for most Floridians 50+. In Florida, nearly 3.7 million residents depend on Social Security bene“ ts to help pay the bills every month, and 3 million-plus count on Medicare to help them afford health care, including guaranteed coverage for doctors, hospitals and prescription drugs. The Medicare fund that pays hospital bills could face a shortfall after 2024. Social Security can pay all scheduled bene“ ts until about 2036, and about 75 percent afterward. AARP will provide information about the programs and the challenges they face, free of Washington spin and jargon. Our website www.earnedasay.org will give you straightforward information and enable you to share your ideas about how to strengthen these programs with Congress and the political candidates. You can also weigh in directly, right now, on what you think about Social Security and Medicare. Take AARPs survey on the future of Social Security and Medicare online at www. earnedasay.org Doug Heinlen is the state president of AARP Florida.Dear Savvy Senior, What can you tell me about life settlements? I have a life insurance policy that I really dont need any longer and Ive heard that selling it can produce a nice payout. Interested In Selling Dear Interested, If you dont need your life insurance policy any longer, are having a dif“ cult time keeping up with the premium payments or could just use the money, a life settlement is de“ nitely an option worth considering. How it Works A life settlement is the sale of an existing life insurance policy to a third party company for cash. Life settlements are typically best suited for people over age 65 who own a policy with a face value of $250,000 or more. Historically, if an owner of a life insurance policy decided they no longer needed it, they would either let the policy lapse or turn it in for a meager cash surrender value. But now, with the life settlement option, you can actually sell your policy for two to three times more than the cash surrender value would be, but less than its net death bene“ t. Once you sell it however, the life settlement company then becomes the new owner of the policy, pays the future premiums and collects the death bene“ t when you die. How much money you can expect to get with a life settlement will depend on your age, health and life expectancy, the type of insurance policy, the premium costs and the value of your policy. Most sellers generally get 20 to 30 percent of the death bene“ t. If youre interested in a life settlement here are some things you should know: Shop around: To ensure you get the best deal, get quotes from several brokers or life settlement providers. Also, “ nd out what fees youll be required to pay. To locate credible providers or brokers, the Life Insurance Settlement Association (LISA) provides a referral service at lisa.org. Tax implications: Life settlements are also taxable if the cash surrender value of the policy exceeds the premiums paid on it. This can be very complicated, so be sure to consult a tax advisor. Also, be aware that receiving money from a life settlement can affect eligibility for public assistance programs like Medicaid or food stamps. Be cautious: Life settlements are not regulated in every state so be careful who you deal with. Make sure the broker or life settlement “ rm you choose is either licensed in your state or is a member of LISA. Other Options If you dont like the idea of selling your life insurance policy but could use some extra cash, here are some other options your insurance agent can help you investigate: € Cash value withdraw: If you have any cash value in your policy, you can probably withdraw some of it to meet your immediate needs and keep your policy for your bene“ ciaries. € A loan: You may also be able to use your policy to secure a loan from the insurance company, as well as a bank, credit union or other lender. €Annuity 1035Ž conversion: Find out if youre able to convert the cash value of your policy into an immediate annuity, which will make regular payments to you for a set number of years or for the rest of your life. €Accelerated bene“ t: If youre terminally ill, some policies have an accelerated death bene“ t which pays some of the policys death bene“ t before you die. €Reduced premiums: If premium payments are your problem, your life insurer may be able to convert your policy to a paid-up policy, or lower your death bene“ t amount in order to reduce your premiums. Or, consider asking your bene“ ciaries to help pay the premiums. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy SeniorŽ book. By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior New ways to cash in on your life insurance policy AARP FLORIDAYou’ve earned a sayBattling the discomfort of chronic pain can be an enormous problem for people living with this ongoing health problem. Pain that is chronic can last anywhere from a few months to years and can range from intermittent discomfort like headaches to excruciating back pain. Recent research has linked chronic pain with powerful memories lodged in part of brain that specializes in emotional intelligence and learning. The memories aggravate that part of brain like a wound that wont heal. Stress is also a common underlying cause of pain that may develop as seemingly unrelated physical symptoms. Seeing the whole board for chronic pain suffers means being open and ready to evaluate your current health with a detectives gaze. Create a pain management plan: In addition to utilizing a traditional approach to pain management, you may want to include various therapies such as acupuncture, massage and other appropriate therapies. Look for clues: What time of day does the pain occur most often? Are there other patterns with your chronic pain? Do you eat well and exercise? Understand how these clues may fit into larger picture of your overall well being. While there may not be a de“ nitive cure for your pain, there are many effective and safe types of therapies designed to help you feel better. It may take some time and patience, but chronic pain can be conquered if you believe there is hope to start living the way you want again. Visit www.TheGoodNewsAboutAging.com for more articles and tips for healthy aging.GOOD NEWS ABOUT AGINGIts possible to conquer chronic pain D’Arcy Brazier • Owner Serving Wakulla & Surrounding Counties for over 35 years60 Holiday Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327 509–2148 FOREIGN CAR REPAIR DOWN HOME TOYOTA • HONDA Specializing In Specializing In NISSAN • SUBARU Lic # MV15601www.DownHomeForeignCarRepair.com TheNews Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408 Special Offer New Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County Only ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover r r s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Phone#_____________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 4/30/2012877-401-6408Get 10 Months for $20.12straight to your mailbox This is not a trick NO FOOLIN’ www.thewakullanews.com 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

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Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 18, Noon Publication Date: May 31 Remember This Years GraduateƒCongratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2012Sponsor Line........$20 Eighth Page...........$50 Quarter Page......$100.............................................................. $50 Half Page..............$200.............................................................. $75 Full Page...............$300............................................................. $125 Back Page.............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available For the period Jan. 1 to March 31. Sheriff CHARLIE CREEL: Contributions this period, $12,325; expenditures $5,809. Total contributions to date, $18,164; total expenditures, $10,228. Contributions: William Hampton, Crawfordville, $100; Judith Grass, Crawfordville, $100; Daniel Mosley, Crawfordville,$50; Marjorie Freeman, Crawfordville,$50; Nancy Speigner, Crawfordville, $40; John & Elnita Burke, Crawfordville, retired, $250; Danny Willis, Crawfordville, $10; Larry Roberts, Sopchoppy, $100; Frank & Linda Presnell, Crawfordville, $50; Walter Liddell, Tallahassee, $50; Richard Gowdi, Crawfordville, $50; Phillip & Paula Cooksey, Crawfordville, Kelly Sheet Metal, $300; Doyle Donnell, Crawfordville, $100; Richard Williford, Crawfordville, $200; Mary Esther Cortese, Crawfordville, $100; Ronald Isham, Crawfordville, $30; Jennings Knox, Tallahassee, contractor, $500; Scott Knox, Tallahassee, contractor, $250; Michael Scaringe, Tallahassee, contractor, $250; Mathers Process Service, Tallahassee, $250; Howard Hobby, Crawfordville, $50; Linda Hobby, Crawfordville, $50; Danny & Karla Dotson, Crawfordville, $50; Richard Ruryk, Crawfordville, $100; Emile Barnes Jr., Crawfordville, $25; Betty Barnes, Crawfordville, $25; Donald Hudgins, Crawfordville, $20; William Stephens Jr., Crawfordville, mechanic, $200; Malcolm Thomas, Crawfordville, $100; Faye Waller, Crawfordville, $50; Harry Eater, Crawfordville, $50; Richard Nicholson, Sopchoppy, $25; James Brock, Crawfordville, $50; Ronald Piasecki, Crawfordville, $100; Debra Soloman, Tallahassee, notary public, $500; GF McKenzie, Crawfordville, retired, $300; Ken Edmonds, Jacksonville, retired, $150; Martha Crisler, Tallahassee, accountant, $500; D.R. Vause, Tallahassee, Vause Mechanical owner, $500; Dalynda Vause, Tallahassee, substitute teacher, $500; Cheryl Mallow, Crawfordville, $25; Lynn Harvey Sapp, Sopchoppy, $150; Annie Shepard, Crawfordville, $25; William Anderson II, Mabelton, Ga., retired, $150; Judy Floyd, Tallahassee, $100; Kevin & Crystal Parson, Crawfordville, correctional of“ cer, $200; Kim Buckley, Tallahassee, $50; Ben Buckley, Tallahassee, $50; Theresa Hillier, Crawfordville, $50; Henry Vause, Crawfordville, $50; Gay Vause, Crawfordville, $50; Anihinga Marketing, Crawfordville, $25; Viking Interior Solutions, Panacea, $100; Tallahassee Construction Rental, Tallahassee, $300; Anthony Sanders, Tallahassee, $50; Shari Sanders, Tallahassee, $50; Lois Jacobs, Crawfordville, $100; Keith Vause, Tallahasssee, Vause Mechanical, $500; Frank Smith, Capital City Insulation owner, $300; Jeffrey & Cynthia Smith, Tallahassee, retired, $200; Edith Franzen, Panacea, $100; Claude & Susie Tooke, Crawfordville, retired & appraiser, $500; Julian Alford Jr., Tallahassee, $50; William & Bobbie Stephens, Sopchoppy, waterworks superintendent, $200; Joe Chancy, Lake City, $100; Malenie Williams, Louisville, Ky., $25; Steven Jones, Crawfordville, $50; Walter Blackstock, Lawrenceburg, Tenn., retired, $500; William Smith Jr., Tallahassee, banker, $250; Scott Falmien, Raleigh, N.C., $100; Ken Vassenderp, Tallahassee, attorney, $250; Gerlad Lucking, Crawfordville, $50; John Ryan, Crawfordville, $100; Anne Ahrendt, Crawfordville, $75; Roger & Shawna Norris, Crawfordville, $100; SNA Aviation II, Tallahassee, aircraft operations, $500; David & Valerie Lahart, Panacea, $100; David & Mary Bellamy, Tallahassee, doctor, $500; Tye Buckley, Tallahassee, $50; Chad Buckley, Tallahassee, $50; Clyde & Peggy Baker, Jacksonville, $100; Robert Kerns, Crawfordville, $25. Expenditures: Wakulla Rotary, booth for Valentines Day Festival, $10; Cheryl Creel, reimbursement for mail-outs, $397; Budget Printing, Tallahassee, rack cards, $317; Crawfordville Lions Club, booth for St. Patricks Day Festival, $10; Wakulla Christian Coalition, table and tickets at Christian Coalition dinner, $225; Wakulla Sign Company, Crawfordville, signs, $1,187; D.R. Vause, Tallahassee, food for campaign event, $653; Wakulla Sign Company, signs, $1,391; Budget Printing, bumper stickers, $382; Home Depot, Tallahassee, lumber, $717; Ace Hardware, Crawfordville, lumber, $98; Specialty Sportswear, Tallahassee, buttons, $419. T.W. MAURICE LANGSTON: Contributions this period, $7,405, $898 in-kind; expenditures, $20,705. Total contributions to date, $39,545; total expenditures, $26,197. Contributions: C.W. Parish General Agency, Bushnell, insurance, $250; Kenneth & Brenda Strickland, Fairfax, Va., $100; F.W. Carraway Jr., Tallahassee, retired, $250; Jerry & Wanda Causseaux, Tallahassee, $20; Sheriff David B. Shoar, St. Augustine, $100; Lee Fordham, Tallahassee, retired, $100; Neil & Nannette Watts, Sopchoppy, $50; A.J. Smith, Tallahassee, communications consultant, $500; ATN Inc., St. Marys, Ga., inmate telephone systems, $300; Terry & Diane Herring, Crawfordville, $100; Huston N. Joyner, Quincy, $75; Charles E. Johnson Jr., Tallahassee, $50; Mary Jo & Terry Godbold, Roswell, Ga., actuary, $250; Pamela C. Woodroffe, Decatur, Ga., $100; Ronald C. Mitchell, Crawfordville, $50; Homer G. Tedder d/b/a Forest Edge Enterprises, Tallahassee, $50; Alicia & Donnie Crum, Panacea, Wakulla County Sheriff, $150; Joe & Anna Bell Crutch“ eld, Crawfordville, $30; Robert M. Porter, Tallahassee, $100; Wakulla Station Mobile Home Community Joan Sharman, Crawfordville, $50; Charles M. Purvis, Ochlockonee Bay, architect, $250; Bellamys Outdoor Sports Inc., Crawfordville, recreational vehicle sales, $500; Jody Quick, Crawfordville, $10; Leona & George Strickland, Sopchoppy, $100; John & Ethel Jefferson, Crawfordville, $100; Russell Lee Perkins, Tallahassee, $100; William Ferguson, Tallahassee, CPA, $200; Roy McLeod, Sopchoppy, retired, $200; Sue & Larry Massa, Crawfordville, $100; Alicia & Donnie Crum, Panacea, Wakulla County Sheriff, $200; Enwood Ashmore, Havana, $100; Barry Broering, Crawfordville, $40; Leslie C. Herold, Crawfordville, FHP lieutenant, $200; Larry W. Lassiter, Crawfordville, vice-president MarPan, $250; Clear Cut Solutions LLC, Carrabelle, construction, $100; Keith Blackmar, Crawfordville, $50; S&R Acoustics, Crawfordville, construction, $100; Ralph Goodson, Sopchoppy, $50; Joyce Alexander, Crawfordville, $50; Wright Alexander, Crawfordville, $50; Guy Revell, Crawfordville, retired, $500; anonymous, $10; Lamar Cox, Tallahassee, $35; Marjorie Law, Crawfordville, $10; Betty Jane Evans, Crawfordville, $100; Crawfordville Lions Club, refund, $25; Jeff R. Schremser, Crawfordville, $100; John D. Rojas, Crawfordville, $100; James & Mary Jeanne Davis, Crawfordville, $100; William and Thelma Gaupin, Crawfordville, $50; James G. Keen, Tallahassee, consultant, $150; Helen K. Cleveland, Crawfordville, $100; R.T. Land, Tallahassee, $25; Randolph G. Lewis, Crawfordville, $30; James D. & Laure Boyd, Crawfordville, $50; Dr. Joseph A. Abal, Crawfordville, realtor and auctioneer, $100; Jon & Lois Petrie, Crawfordville, $200; Robert E. Giddens, Crawfordville, $25; Christopher & Joani Chase, Tallahassee, $100; Derek Lawhon, Crawfordville, $20; Hookin Transport Services Inc., Crawfordville, transport Fedex, $100; Alan Wade Vanlandinham, Quincy, $50; Lee Ann Allen, Crawfordville, in-kind eight bottles of glitter, $54; Fred Nichols, Sopchoppy, in-kind pressure-treated post, $293; Marjorie Law, in-kind ice cream, $50; Bryon & Linda Price, Crawfordville, in-kind food & drink, $150; Cale Langston, Crawfordville, inkind computer work, $350. Expenditures: Auto trim Design & Signs, Crawfordville, signs, banners, T-shirts and buttons (partial payment), $2,762; Wakulla Rotary Valentine Celebration, booth fee, $10; Judy Langston, Crawfordville, reimbursement for float supplies, $177; Wakulla Swine Show, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $100; Auto Trim Design, balance of payment, $2,718; Wakulla County Christian Coalition, banquet table and eight tickets, $225; Gulf Coast Lumber, Crawfordville, ” oat supplies, $166; Wakulla Ducks Unlimited, Crawfordville, Mallard sponsor, $750; Auto Trim Design, T-shirts, digital magnetics, $1,043; Mike Kemp, gas reimbursement for sign installation, $102; Judy Langston, reimbursement for float supplies, $348; Auto Trim Design, 4x4 signs, $1,157; Front Line Strategies, Tallahassee, cards, consulting fees for December-February, $3,693; Gene Lambert, Crawfordville, reimbursement for candy and ” oat supplies, $154; William T. Stokley, Panacea, reimbursement for personal gas to install signs, $44; Auto Trim Design, T-shirts, $866; Judy Langston, candy and canopy, $293; Lions Club, booth fee, $35; Auto Trim Design, T-shirts, digital magnetics, $882; Sams Club, Tallahassee, candy for parade, $103; EMRI Corporation, Brandon, webelect, net & map option, $421; Auto Trim Design, yard signs, $1,899; Mike Kemp, gas reimbursement, $155; Wakulla Middle School baseball, Crawfordville, advertisement at baseball “ eld, $185; PayPal, Omaha, Neb. transaction fee, $3.20; Auto Trim Design, 4x4 signs, $1,157; Citizens Supports Others Fund, Crawfordville, hole sponsorship, $200; Miss Wakulla County Pageant, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $50; Front Line Strategies, consulting services for March, $1,000. County Commission, District 1 ALAN BROCK: Contributions this period, $14, 484; expenditures, $6,794. Total contributions to date, $14,484; total expenditures, $6,794. Contributions: Crawfordville LLC. Tallahassee, $500; John Dailey, Tallahassee, consultant, $100; Albert Pasini, Crawfordville, executive, $100; Nancy Rubin, Tallahassee, teacher, $100; Natalie Kato, Orlando, legislative analyst, $50; Dirk Wiggins, Washington, D.C., consultant, $250; Lat Penland, Crawfordville, retired, $50; Joshua Hicks, Washington, D.C., non-pro“ t fundraiser, $75; Eric Jotkoff, Tampa, press secretary, $50; Nathaniel Forman, Fort Lauderdale, student, $100; William St. John Forma, Fort Lauderdale, student, $250; Jennifer Forman, Fort Lauderdale, homemaker, $250; H. Collins Forman, Fort Lauderdale, attorney, $250; M. Emma Brock, Crawfordville, paralegal, $25; Ralph Mills, Tallahassee, manager, $300; Rachel Pienta, Crawfordville, professor, $25; Neece Tire & Auto Service, Tallahassee, auto service, $200; Raquel Simon, Tallahassee program director, $50; Susan Shoemaker, Tallahassee, teacher, $50; Stephen Slepin, Tallahassee, attorney, $100; Leonard Bembry, Greenville, state representative, $100; Alma Gonzalez, Tallahassee, attorney, $25; Eden Rogers, Tallahassee, mother, $50; Ed Carter, Tallahassee, retired, $50; A.J. Smith, Tallahassee, law enforcement, $250; Chebon Marshall, Norman, Okla., consultant, $100; R. Jai Gillum, Tallahassee, non-pro“ t fundraiser, $250; Nancy Miller, Tallahassee, Tallahassee city commissioner, $100; Ralph Rish, Port St. Joe, engineeer, $500; Beth Ann Matuga, Tallahassee, consultant, $250; Bart Gunter, Tallahassee, insurance agent, $250; Debra Preble, Tallahassee, engineer, $500; Beth Labasky & Associates LLC, Tallahassee, consultant, $200; Center for Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy P.A., Tallahassee, medical, $200; Ajax Building Corporation, Midway, construction, $250; Preble-Rish Inc., Port St. Joe, engineers, $500; Hammond Design Group LLC, Tallahassee, architecture, $350; Edge Communications LLC, Miami, communications, $500; Louis Garcia, Tallahassee, Big Brothers Big Sisters CEO, $20; Douglas Martin, Tallahassee, government affairs, $100; Governance, Tallahassee, consulting, in-kind catering, $282; Kurt Spitzer, Panacea, environmental consultant, $40; Ben Sohl, Durham, N.H., staffer, $50; Diane Wilson, Panacea, retired, $100; Allison Stribling, Tallahassee, consultant, $150; Emily Beer, Alexandria, Va., consultant, $500; Rachel Pienta, Crawfordville, professor, $50; Lindsay Barrett, Statesville, N.C., senior organizer, $100; Waste Pro, Longwood, solid waste management, $500; Akerman Senterfitt, Orlando, law “ rm, $500; Bruce Platt, Tallahassee, attorney, $50; Laura Deeb, Beverly Hills, Calif., communications, $50; Bethany Mathers, Crawfordville, ESE program specialist, $50; Shelby Williams, Crawfordville, teacher, $25; M. Emma Brock, Crawfordville, paralegal, $25; Sarah Howell, Crawfordville, speech therapist, $50; Elena Myrhe, Crawfordville, designer, $100; Donald C. Henderson, Panacea, retired, $100; Joan Hendrix, Crawfordville, retired, $100; Walter Dickson, Panacea, developer, $50; G. Kevin Vaughn, Tallahassee, insurance agent, $250; Millie Bruce, Crawfordville, registered nurse, $50; Christina Marie Johnson, Crawfordville, homemaker, $75; Albert Pasini, Crawfordville, executive, $150; Edward Brock, Crawfordville, chemist, $50; Lionel Dazvedo, Crawfordville, realtor, $50; Maggie Gaby, Crawfordville, boss, $100; Amanda Weilbacker, Tallahassee, social worker, $25; Amanda Wade, Tallahassee, server, $20; Brad Smith, Tallahassee, sales, $20; Susan Pourciau, Crawfordville, executive director, $25; Sally Gandy, Panacea, retired, $25; David Roddenberry, Sopchoppy, author, $25; Chuck Hess, Crawfordville, professor, $100; Mike Carter, Crawfordville, retired, $50; Scott Gaby, Crawfordville, banker, in-kind catering $410; Jule Gaby, Crawfordville, nurse, in-kind rental $300; Kristen McMillan, Sopchoppy, photographer, in-kind photography $50; Herb Donaldson, Crawfordville, writer, $25; Jamie Hayes, St. Marks, teacher, $10; Bettie Glover, Crawfordville, retired, $5; Queen McRae, Crawfordville, retired, $2; Ted Gaupin, Crawfordville, Realtor, $20; Frank Carter, Tallahassee, retired, $50; Jina Malek, Crawfordville, state employee, $20; Joy Schneider, Crawfordville, consultant, $20; Allison Hudson, Crawfordville, senior management, $10; Laura Nicholson, Crawfordville, speech therapist, $10; Dustin Grubbs, Crawfordville, engineer, $20; Corinne Rubin, Tallahassee, legislative analyst, $260; Simeon Queen, Prairie, Texas, city councilman, $10; Crystal Gould, Washington, D.C., data analyst, $50; Jean Bell, Gainesville, medical transcriptionist, $500; West Flagler Associates LTD., Miami, entertainment, $500; Donna Beer, Farmersville, Texas, homemaker, $50; Governance, Tallahassee, consulting, $227; Governance Services LLC, Tallahassee, consulting, $500; www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 5BCampaign contributions and expendituresContinued on Page 6B

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comCampaign contributions and expendituresCathy Stevens, Bainbridge, Ga., special ed teacher, $25; Jason Icerman, Gainesville, engineer, $50; Charles Maddox, Tallahassee, executive, $500; Jim Kersh, Tallahassee, retired, $25; Richard Swanson, Chicago, corporate communications, $50; Murray McLaughlin, Crawfordville, retired, $50; Phillip Perry, Washington, D.C., senior associate, $100; Ben King, Tallahassee, consultant, $100; Arvil White, Tallahassee, planner, $100; Rick Minor, Tallahassee, chief of staff, $100; Kevin Cate, Tallahassee, consultant, $50; Julia Landry, Tallahassee, consultant, $50; Sara Jones, DeWitt, Mich., alumni relations, $50. Expenditures: Wakulla County Youth Fair Association, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $50; Kristen McMillan Photography, Sopchoppy, photography, $50; U.S. Postal Service, Crawfordville, post of“ ce box and stamps, $79; petty cash, $50; Amazing Mail Solutions, Crawfordville, copies, $28; rally. org, San Francisco, bank processing fee, $11.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; Civic Communications, Tallahassee, consulting, $200; Chamber of Commerce, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $250; Wakulla NJROTC, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $100; rally.org, bank processing fee, $3.37; Of“ ce Depot, Tallahassee, supplies, $54; Best Buy, Tallahassee, supplies, $68; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally. org, bank processing fee, $4.50; Delta Air Lines, travel, $543; rally.org, bank processing fee, $4.50; rally.org, bank processing fee, $1.12; Capital City Bank, Crawfordville, checks, $121; petty cash, $350; Sprint, Overland Park, Kan., telecommunications, $258; rally.org, bank processing fee,$2.25; Wakulla Discount Liquors, Panacea, cetering, $527; Crawfordville Elementary School, rally. org, bank processing fee, sponsorship, $125; Kristen McMillan Photography, photography, $100; Backwoods Bistro, Sopchoppy, catering, $1,700; Wal-Mart, Crawfordville, supplies, $66; Amazing Mail Solutions, Crawfordville, copies, $85; Wakulla Florist, Crawfordville, flowers, $85; WinnDixie, Crawfordville, supplies, $19; 101 Restaurant, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $108; Millers Ale House, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $169; Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $425; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally. org, bank processing fee, $22.50; rally.org, bank processing fee, .45; Sakura Sushi & Grill, Tallahasse, meal for volunteers, $51; Barnes & Noble, Tallahassee, thank you notes, $50; Miccosukee Root Cellar, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $83; Proof, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $16; 101 Restaurant, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $18.50; Wildwood Golf Course, Crawfordville, meal for volunteers, $99.18; Network of Young Professionals, tickets, $45; El Jalsico, Crawfordville, meal/meeting, $20; rally.org, bank processing fee, $1.12; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; Shell Oil, Crawfordville, fuel, $28.60; Stone Creek Pizza, Crawfordville, meal for volunteers, $17; rally.org, bank processing fee, $1.12; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; TGI Fridays, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $80; Siam Sushi, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $44; Wildwood Golf Course, meal/meeting, $13; Wakulla County Ducks Unlimited, Crawfordville, tickets, $150; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $4.50; rally.org, bank processing fee, $4.50; Starbucks, Tallahassee, coffee for volunteers, $30; Delta Air Lines, travel, $25; Pizza Hut, Atlanta, meal-travel, $6; Shell Oil, Crawfordville, fuel, $15; rally.org, bank processing fee, $4.50; rally. org, bank processing fee, $4.50; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; Park at 14th, Washington, D.C., meal-travel, $142; Legal Seafoods, Washington, D.C., meal-travel, $44. RALPH C. THOMAS JR.: Contributions, $1,125. Expenditures, $448. Contributions: Ralph C. Thomas Jr., Crawfordville, mortgage loan of“ cer, $1,000 loan; Garland Burdette, Crawfordville, $25; Ralph C. Thomas Jr., $100. Expenditures: Auto Trim Design, Crawfordville, signs, $243; Supervisor of Elections, petition validation, $19; Auto Trim Design, Crawfordville, signs, $22; Capital City Bank, Crawfordville, checks, $62; Wakulla Supports Others, golf tournament donation, $100. County Commission, District 3 HOWARD KESSLER: contributions this period. $13,560. Cash and checks $12,010, total in-kind $449. Total expenditures this reporting period $3,829.41. Contributions: Joyce Tarnow, Cross City, $50; Dot Skofronick, Tallahassee, $40; James Cavanagh, Tallahassee, $100; Rebecca Martin, Tallahassee, $100; Tom Chase, Tallahassee, $50; Ben Fusaro, Tallahassee, $150; Howard Kessler, in-kind printing supplies, $45; Ross Burnaman, Tallahassee, $50; Grayal Farr, Tallahassee, $50; Gary Whittenberger, Tallahassee, $35; Howard Pardue, Tallahassee, $20; Gertrude Deyle, Tallahassee, $50; Ron Saff, M.D., Tallahassee, $50; Merry Lynne Warfel, Tallahassee, $100; John Sojat, Tallahassee, $100; Ron Crowe, Monticello, $35; David Loper, Tallahassee, $150; Southern Realty, Pat Hamilton, St. Augustine, $100; Preston Robertson, Tallahassee, $25; Ovida Black, Talking Rock, Ga., $50; Jr. Prescott, Tallahassee, $250; Victor Lambou, Crawfordville, $250; William Anderson, Atlanta, Ga., $400; John Hedrick, Monticello, $100; Joe Lama, Tallahassee, $35; Randall Denker, Tallahassee, $20; Michael Sheridan, Tallahassee, $250; William Herrnkind, Tallahassee, $200; Theodore Simon, Sarasota, $100; John Whitton, Tallahassee, $100; Grady McKenzie, Crawfordville, $500; Anne Van Meter, Panacea, in-kind printing, $80.09; Geo Hydros, Reno, Nv., LLC, $200; Raymond Bellamy, Tallahassee, $300; Karen Johnson, Crawfordville, $25; Ordella Kerckhoff, Crawfordville, $25; Christine Summers, Hahira, Ga., $500; Ramona Colson, Panacea, $100; Jacqueline Green, Crawfordville, $50; Mary Cortese, Crawfordville, $50; James Brock, Crawfordville, $50; Hugh Taylor, Crawfordville, $50; Robert Lee Knight, Gainesville, $100; Steve Van Sciver, Tallahassee, $75; H. A. McDaniel, Tallahassee, $100; Angret Piasecki, Crawfordville, $200; Steve Fults, Panacea, $105; Bossie Hawkins, Tallahassee, $50; Steve Urse, Tallahassee, $50; William Pike,Tallahassee, $200; Don Axelrad, Tallahassee, $20; Rick Grant, Tallahassee, $50; Kathryn Wilson, Crawfordville, $20; Crystal Wakoa, Crawfordville, $100; Lat Penland, Crawfordville, $50; Patricia Sudduth, $150; Janet Siamis, Crawfordville, $200; Alice Veasman, Sopchoppy, $50; Debra Sparks, Crawfordville, $100; Helen McLaughlin, Crawfordville, $50; Mark Prance, Crawfordville, $50; Jack Joiner, Panacea, $50; Darlene Osterhoff, Crawfordville, $100; Jayne Parker, Crawfordville, $100; Karen Murrell, Crawfordville, $200; Judith Harriss, Sopchoppy, $25; John Potter, Crawfordville, $35; Robert Ross, Crawfordville, $35; Kay Kerns, Crawfordville, $25; Fay Dansby, Panacea, $35; Lois Isensee, Sopchoppy, $50; Donna Watkins, Crawfordville, $50; Annie mills, Crawfordville, $30; Forest Coxen, Panacea, $35; Norman James, Crawfordville, $50; Edward McIntyre, Crawfordville, $100; A Lee Cook, Crawfordville, $25; Alan Laner, Panacea, $60; Patti Calhoun, Crawfordville, $100; Kellie Keys, Crawfordville, $10; Howard Kessler, in-kind parade items, $20; Dave Roberts, Panacea, $50; Betty Faye Russell, Panacea, $100; Monte Dickey, Crawfordville, $50; Kenneth Voland, Crawfordville, $50; Capt. Ted Kiper, Crawfordville, $25; Bonnie Sturchio, Sopchoppy, $25; Diane Robida, Crawfordville, $100; Ray Bellamy, Tallahassee, $100; Jean Beck, Panacea, $20; Gail Hickman, Crawfordville, $100; Almeda Pettit, Tallahassee, $100; Trudy Thompson, Crawfordville, $50; Woodrow Lewis, Crawfordville, $100; Suzann Walton, Crawfordville, $50; Marcia Bjerragaard, Crawfordville, $50; James Gerus, Crawfordville, $100; Chris Parkinson, Sopchoppy, $200; Carmen Sturchio, Sopchoppy, $20; Judith Mulloy, Crawfordville, $20; James Kates, Crawfordville, $20; Richard Dubin, Panacea, $35; Larry Roberts, Sopchoppy, $200; Howard Kessler, in-kind business cards, $54; Scott Paterna, Crawfordville, $30; Elizabeth Davies, Panacea, $500; Sylvia Ann Dunaway, Crawfordville, $50; Kessler, Inc., Wayne, NJ, $200; James Muller, Tallahassee, $35; Laura Jones, Panacea, $50; Anne Ahrendt, Crawfordville, $50; Nancy Myers, Crawfordville, $200; Janice Williamson, Panacea, $50; Cathy Cameron, Crawfordville, $30; Mimi Jones, Tallahassee, $100; Douglas Gilbert, Crawfordville, $50; Eleanor Enge, Portage, Mi., $100; Sandy Cook, Crawfordville, $100; Jean Williams, Tallahassee, $100; George Harrison, Crawfordville, $20; H A McDaniel, Tallahassee, $25; Greg Gibson, Crawfordville, $50; Rita Powell, Crawfordville, $25; Karen Johnson, Crawfordville, $25; Jeri Lucking, Crawfordville, $50; Randy Smith, Crawfordville, $50; Eva Sanchez Thorpe, Sopchoppy, $50; Donald Allen, Crawfordville, $50; Mary Wade, Crawfordville, $50; Al Shylkofski, Crawfordville, $100; Christy Noftz, Crawfordville, $50; Rosalie Pace, Sopchoppy, $50; Marvin Norris, Crawfordville, $100; Leon Nettles, Crawfordville, $100; Daniel Corley, Sopchoppy, $100; Luther Council, Crawfordville, $30; Bonnie Mobley, Crawfordville, $30; Allen Hardesty, Crawfordville, $50; Jana Tollefsen, Panacea, $20; David Hove, Crawfordville, $20; Jack Joiner, Panacea, $10; Peggy Bump, Crawfordville, $20; Dick Bickford, Crawfordville, $20; Carmen Sturchio, Sopchoppy, $10; Grant Peeples, Crawfordville, in-kind music, $250. Expenditures: U. S. Post Of“ ce, postage, $88; Wakulla Co. Supervisor of Elections, voter information, $10; Wakulla Rotary Club, booth rent, $10; Wal-Mart, meeting supplies, $74.60; Vista Print, advertising material, $69.94; Piryx, online donation fee, $4.73; U. S. Post Of“ ce, postage, $90; U. S. Post Of“ ce, postage, $90; Piryx, online donation fee, $4.50; Staples, paper, $14.28; U. S. Post Of“ ce, postage, $32; Staples, ink/paper, $57.81; Crawfordville Lions Club, booth rent, $10; The Wakulla News, advertising, $1,710; Sams Club, party supplies, $95.70; Wal-Mart, party supplies, $34.94; WalMart, party, $14.71; Dollar Tree, party, $10.70, Stedebains, signs, $1,123.50; Piryx, online donation fee, $4.50; Supervisor of Elections, petition fee, $19.40; Dollar Tree, party supplies, $19.26; Wakulla Ag Center, rent, $105; Winn Dixie, party supplies, $37.75; Staples, printing, $98.09. MIKE STEWART: Total contributions this period $2,650. Cash and checks $2,050, loans, $600. Total expenditures this reporting period $2,445.58. Contributions: Mike Stewart, loan, $100; Mike Stewart, loan, $500; Peavy & Son, Havana, $500; Jennifer Forman, Fort Lauderdale, $350; H. Collins Forman Jr., Fort Lauderdale, $250; William St. John Forman, Fort Lauderdale, $250; Jason Wessinger Const., $200; Ted Gaupin, Crawfordville, $250; Thelma Gaupin, Crawfordville, $250. Expenditures: Supervisor of Elections, petition verification, $18.10; Auto Trim & Design, signs, $361; Auto Trim & Design, $673.03; Gulf Coast Lumber, lumber for signs, $54.57; Chamber of Commerce, low country boil dinner, $70; Gulf Coast Lumber, lumber for signs, $54.57; Auto Trim & Design, signs, $597.06; Auto Trim & Design, $617.12. County Commission, District 5 RICHARD HARDEN: Total contributions this reporting period $2,115. Cash and checks $1,885, loans, $10. Total expenditures this reporting period $1,742.37. Contributions: Robert Roddenberry, Sopchoppy, $250; Gerald Harden, Sopchoppy, $60; Ronald Kent Brown, Crawfordville, $200; Fred Nichols, Sopchoppy, $25; Patricia Lamon, Crawfordville, $100; Rebecca Harden, Sopchoppy, $300; W. Jackson Durward, II, St. Marks, $500; Larry and Teresa Harden, Sopchoppy, $150; Todd and Cheryl Andrews, $50; Garland and Brenda Burdette, Crawfordville, $25; Susie W. Harrison, Crawfordville, $75; Richard Chichetti, DMD, St. Marks, $150; Richard W. Harden, Sopchoppy, loan, $10. Expenditures: Auto Trim & Design, banner, $30; Auto Trim & Design, banner, $34.20; Auto Trim & Design, banner/business cards, $117.70; Supervisor of Elections, petitions, $18.80; Auto Trim & Design, rack cards, $220; Auto Trim & Design, rack cards/magnetic signs, $348.17; Supervisor of Elections, petitions, .50; Crawfordville Lions Club, booth, $10; Auto Trim & Design, 2-sided signs with stands, $963. JOHN SHUFF: Total contributions this reporting period $3,315.23. Cash and checks $1,315, loans, $2,000, total in-kind $600. Total expenditures this reporting period $162.23. Contributions: John and Petra Shuff, Crawfordville, loan, $200; Roan K. Vaning, Coral Gables, $80; Richard Greene, Palmetto, $80; Doug Gove, Tallahassee, $50; Heide Clifton, Crawfordville, $50; Lawrence Deddy, Coral Gables, $50; Anne Ahrendt, Crawfordville, $25; Diane Brooke, Jacksonville, $300; Mary Ellen Davis, Crawfordville, $100; Kevin Vaughn, Crawfordville, $250; David Pienta, Crawfordville, $500; Clint Weatherman, Havana, $120; Gregory Deddy, $50; John and Petra Shuff, Crawfordville, loan, $1,800; PayPal, .23; Bob Rogers, Davie, $80; Steve Reilly, $100; Bill Russell, Panacea, $100. Expenditures: Amazing Mail Solutions, Inc., $107; Deep South Signs, LLC, $55; PayPal, .23. Supervisor of Elections HENRY F. BUDDYŽ WELLS: Total contributions to date, $100; total expenditures, N/A. Contributions: Henry F. Wells, supervisor of elections, $100 loan. Tax Collector CHERYLL OLAH: Total contributions to date, $100; total expenditures, $18.20. Contributions: Cheryll Olah, tax collector, $100 loan. Expenditures: Supervisor of elections office to verify petition signatures, $18.20. School Board, District 4 GREGORY THOMAS : Total contributions, $100; total expenditures, none. Contributions: Gregory Thomas, state employee, $100 loan. Continued from Page 5B Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555 The college of choice! Invest in yours elf today Aordable tuition at TCC+higher wages for those with college degrees = A really smart investment HELP WANTEDWAKULLA URGENT CARE CRAWFORDVILLEemail resume/salary requirements to rachelbrown@wakullaurgentcare.com full time We offer Health, Vision, Dental, and Life insurance Paid Time Off Compensation depending on experience X-RAY TECHNOLOGISTS Certi ed by the ARRT, HIPPA Certi ed Maintain State License. Also, responsible for DEXA scans, Pulmonary Function Testing, Sleep Study and Overnight Pulse Ox Testing. This job requires a lot of PR work!! Prepare patients for radiologic procedures Collect and deliver data to Physician Responsible for operating X-ray Maintains quantity and quality control checks MEDICAL ASSISTANT Experience and Requirements: Must be Certi ed and/or Registered HIPPA certi ed CPR Certi ed At least 1 year experience working in a medical of ce Excellent oral and written communication skillsGreat Patient interactionFamiliar with front and back procedures Pro cient in venipuncture, urinalysis, EKG’s Exceptional Organizational Skills a mustTeam Player A Must Must have knowledge of anatomy & medical terminology.Must have knowledge of medications

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 7BBefore and After School Summer Program Arts, crafts, eld trips, "Gulf World," swimming, movies, bowling, skating, and so much more! Age: Pre-K through 5th grade June 4 August 10 Monday through Friday 6:30 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Children meet daily at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Debbie 926-7145 ext. 222; Pat 926-7145 ext. 230 $125/week or $25/day plus activity fees. Drop-ins welcome. Camp Catch-A-Dream Horseback riding Lessons [regular & therapeutic] plus trail rides. Will learn basic horse-manship skills, balance, following directions, working through fears, & con dence building. Age: Starting at age 7 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy $35 per Lesson or per hour, Scholarships may be available through WCCY, Camp Catch-A-Dream Anger Management & Family functioning Classes Will learn responsibility, respect and a better way to communicate. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505, 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy $15 per 1.5 hr session 10 sessions, Family rates upon request, Scholarships may be available through WCCY. Camp Catch-A-Dream Equine Assisted Growth & Learning Will learn responsibility, respect and communication skills. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp 962-9999, 778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy Rates for groups or individuals, Scholarships may be available through WCCY Camp Indian Springs, Capital Region YMCA, Traditional day / overnight summer camp programs where we encourage kids to build friendships face to face, get outdoors and appreciate our natural surroundings while learn good decision making skills based on the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility., All one week sessions. Age: Overnight Camp: 8 16; Day Camp: 5 12 Sessions start June 3 and run through August 4. Jim Bentley jbentley@capitalregionymca.org or www. campindiansprings.org 926-3361; fax: 926-3624 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville Overnight Camp: $480 per week Day Camp: $140 per week, Scholarships available. Gamerz Paradise Sign up for our Summer Camp! Video games, pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment. Age: 5 and up Daily, weekly and monthly rates available. Call 850-926-9100 theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com Gamerz Paradise, 635 Wakulla Arran Rd., Crawfordville Gena Davis, Instructor Swimming lessons. Day or evening classes. Beginning end of May offering sessions throughout the summer. All ages. 926-7685 or 510-2326. Happytime Instructional Daycare Center Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs SUMMER CHILDCARE Includes a wide variety of eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children. We enjoy skating, swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Locally Owned and Operated by Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available. Call today for our very affordable pricing 926-5226 Crawfordville Hwy. North International Gold Gymnastics IGG A fun- lled themed week full of gymnastics, eld trips, crafts, movies, games, indoor and outdoor play. Lunch to be brought from home. Snacks are provided. Age: 5 12 Hours : 7am-6pm, Carol McAliley or Stephanie Burton at 926-4431 Email: go-iggc@hotmail.com, 54 Feli Way, Crawfordville Weekly rates: full day campers $145; half day campers $75; drop in campers $35/day, 10% discount for second child. Providence Christian Academy Individualized instruction in algebra, geometry, physical science, chemistry, physics, trigonometry, calculus, Spanish, and phonics courses. Grades K 12 Call today to schedule an appointment. 926-2456; 926-1326; 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville Ribits ARTtastic Summer Camp Adventure 2012 ART and FUN Pottery (clay between their ngers), Ceramics: sponge, splatter, bubble, toothbrush, brushes, yarn, stamps, stickers and other painting techniques, add mixed media and a few surprises, makes Ribits the best camp for the kids this summer. Ages: 5 and up June 4-8 11-15, 25-29, July 9-13, 16-20, 30-August 3, August 6-10 Time: 8:30 5:30 (early drop off and late pick upon request) 9:00 2pm ($175 for the half day) Cost: $225 for full day; $175 for half day Deposit: $100 Daily snacks included and lunch (Pizza) on Friday. Savary Academy Summer program to make up a class or recover credits for graduation. Grades 7 12 Ongoing Classes on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 9 a.m. 3 p.m. 926-9977 www.savaryacademy.com Savary Academy, 70-A Feli Way, Crawfordville, FL The Learning Curve SUMMER LEARNING CAMPS (For Students Entering) K 1st: ABCs and 123s; 1st 3rd: It All Adds Up (Addition/Subtraction Skills); 3rd 5th: Multiply Your Fun (Multiplication/Division Skills); 3rd 5th: Fun with Fractions; 4th 6th: Writing Right (Improving Writing Skills); 6th-7th: Solution Skills (Middle School Math Skills); 6th 8th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful Middle School Student); Grades 1 5 JUMP START (Individual grade level intro to next year); Grades: 1-3; 4-6; 7-8 Let's Speak Spanish (Conversational Spanish); 9th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful High School Student); 8th 9th: Intro to Algebra 1; 9th 10th: Intro to Geometry; Writing the AP History Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Writing the AP English Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Intro to AP Stats (Mastering the Graphing Calculator); GET ME TO COLLEGE WORKSHOPS (What Every Parent and Student Should Know about College Admissions and Financial Aid) 9TH 11TH 12TH FOR PARENTS: How do I do this New Math? (Instruction for parents to aid their children with next year's homework; classes for speci c grade levels) Call Melisa Taylor to Register at 926-2179 or visit www. tlctutoring.wordpress.com for summer schedules and pricing. The Learning Curve, 3119-B Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Tiger Rock Martial Arts Elite Martial Arts training Our youth will enhance their life skills and receive coaching that keeps them focused on goal setting, self-discipline and con dence. Sign your child up today! The focus is rewarding. The energy is radiating. All ages. 926-3777 www.crawfordvilletkd.com www.tigerrockmartialarts.com Crawfordville Tae Kwon Do 27 Azalea Drive, Suite A & B Crawfordville (Behind CVS) 5 Weeks of training for only $99 Wakulla Christian SchoolAcademic and Personal Enrichment Camp Activities include computers, cooking, dance, foreign language, martial arts, archery, piano, violin, guitar, music, photography, sports, woodworking, robotics, arts and crafts, gardening, special guests, eld trips and more. Ongoing Age: 3 14 Monday Friday 7 a.m. 6 p.m. Call 926-5583 or email wakullachristian@yahoo.comSUMMER OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH It’s time to relax and have some needed downtime. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is proud to sponsor this Summer OP PS section. Recognizing that young people seek to nd their place in the wider world through many ways and means, the community hopes the following Summer OPPS hit the intended mark with many Wakulla youth. Positive youth development refers to activities and programs that nurture young people and help them build on their strength s. Positive youth development is not about xing kids’ problems. Rather, it helps young people nd positive things to say yes to. Positive youth development happens anytime an individual or a program teaches young people skills, connects adults and young people in a meaningful way, involves young people in the life of the community, and gives them a sense of belonging and accomplishment. In Wakulla there are many places that young people can nd this kind of nurturing. Wakulla has its own unique network of people, groups, churches, clubs, teachers, businesses, and agencies that help young people grow into competent adult s. The nurturers might be piano teachers, soccer coaches, neighbors, Big Brother and Sisters, YMCA, church youth group leaders or grandparents… this seci on of the paper is intended to help you decide how to spend a bit of your time this summer.All Summer LongJune 4 June 8 Wakulla County 4-H Bachelor/Bachelorette Camp Attend this day camp and learn about budgeting, nancial management, how to take care of a baby, food preparation skills and clothing care. Hands-on learning experiences will be incorporated throughout. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 5 8 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 11 June 15 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology(Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5)Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Camp Cherry Lake This year camp will feature traditional activities including swimming, canoeing, kayaking, camp crafts, camp re, water games and archery. Not to be missed are the ever-popular marshmallow paint wars and dance! Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 11 15 (residential), Camp Cherry Lake, Madison, FL Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce 926-3931 $220.00 per week June 18 June 22 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Michelle Snow School of Music Summer Vocal Workshop In this camp, young people will learn the basics of producing and performing in a vocal production with choreography. Participants will get musical education as well as the opportunity to participate in all aspects of a small musical production. (Limited openings) June 18-22. Performance evening of Friday, June 22. 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Michelle Snow (850)926-7627 Jmcsnow5649@centurylink. net, 3102 Coastal Highway, Medart $125/week per child Wakulla County 4-H Project Runway Wakulla Participants will learn to put the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Repair philosophy into practice as they "re-build" a piece of clothing that has been overlooked in the closet or has been purchased from a re-use store. Participants will unleash their creativity as they re-create a clothing item of their choice through this artistic expression class. Boys and Girls are both encouraged to attend. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 19 22 (Tues Fri) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 25 June 29 Wakulla County 4-H Sew Fun and Quilting Campers will learn the basics of sewing, quilting and other fabric crafts such as pin making, weaving and other needlecrafts. The diligent camper will be able to complete a lap-sized quilt and one simple item of clothing by the end of the week. June 26 29 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $80.00/weekJuneMay 12 Wakulla Health Care Task Force Free Sports Physicals, Free physical examinations for student athletes, summer campers, and Special Olympians, Middle and high school students 9am 1 pm Students from WMS 9 a.m.; RMS 10 a.m.; WHS 11 a.m. Free Wakulla High School Clinic on Coastal Hwy (98) Tanya English 926-0065 X 253 Tanya. English@wcsb.us or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com WORKFORCE plus Get Connected, Stay Connected 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo Are you 16 -21 and ready to take the next step in your journey? Perhaps you are interested in a nding a job. Do you want to know more about joining the military or going to college? Maybe you would like to know more about the resources available in Wakulla County. Whatever your needs may be, make plans today to attend the WORKFORCE plus "Get Connected, Stay Connected" 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo and meet employers (who are hiring!), college and military recruiters and local community representatives. 11:00 am 1:00 pm TCC Wakulla Center 5 Crescent Way Crawfordville, FloridaMayMay 19 Wakulla County Sheriff's Of ce Fishing tournament Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 Wakulla County Coalition for Youth

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comJuly 9 July 13 Mission San Luis A Child’s Life (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Imagine you were born 350 years ago. What was life like for the young residents of the mission? Learn to dress, play, and live like a colonist through role-playing, studying site artifacts, and using period toys and games. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 8 – 11 (older students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 16 July 20 Mission San Luis New World Apprentice (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Join our bustling village as a living history interpreter and participate in a variety of apprenticeships. Enlist as a soldier, blacksmith, potter, and more! All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Survival 101: Cooking, Camping and Water Exploration Campers will learn how to shoot a bow and arrow, track game, build a camp re and cook a meal using a solar oven. We will learn how to nd safe drinking water as well as camp out overnight. Campers will also have the ability to sh and learn about the heritage of survival in Wakulla County throughout the years. (Tuesday – Friday) 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week July 23 July 27 Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 22 – 25 (younger students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla, Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 29 – August 3 Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Sheriff’s Youth Ranch Activities will include arts and crafts, sports, water safety, archery, nature hikes, bicycling, games, camp re activities and more. Applications available at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Deadline is May 31 Sponsorships FREE. 6 boys, 6 girls child age 10 -15, Caruth Camp in Levy County. Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 July 30 August 3 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm.JulyAugust 6 August 10 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm.AugustSUMMER OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH, CONT. This page sponsored in part by: Have you ever heard of the Ringling Bros. & Barnum & Bailey Circus? It is a combination of circuses started long ago, including one run by P.T. Barnum. Barnum was known for finding great circus acts, including Jumbo the elephant. Barnum found Jumbo at the London Zoo where the elephant was famous for giving kids rides. In fact, when P.T. Barnum offered to buy Jumbo from the zoo, thousands of children wrote to Queen Victoria begging her not to let the sale take place. Barnum bought Jumbo for $10,000 and showed the elephant in his circus until it died in 1885. Jumbo’s story did not end there, however. Barnum made several donations to Tufts University, and in his honor, the University named Jumbo its mascot.One of Barnum’s Best Name That AnimalSome circus acts have animals in them. Fill in the blanks to name some of the animals found at a circus.Answers: 1) Lions, 2) Tigers, 3) Dogs, 4) Elephants, 5) Sea Lions, 6) Chimps, 7) Horses 1) L __ __ N S2) T I __ E R __3) D __ G __4) E __ E P H __ N __ S5) S __ A L I __ __ S6) __ __ I M P S7) H __ __ S E S L o o k i n g f o r Looking for t h e l a t e s t the latest L o c a l N e w s ? Local News? LOCAL NEWS The W akull a Newswww.the wakullanews.co m

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Lost Lost Dog St Teresa Beach Sat. April 14th, Female, Tri Color White chest, 30lbs, 18Ž, long ears and tail (850) 5086981 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfor dville. Short domestic female cat, grey & white last seen The Farm Subdivision (801) 5180385 Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)7421373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)3747294 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Sales Help HUGE OPPORTUNITYŽNew company coming to the area, looking for 3 Professional Sales people w/management skills.. Six figure Income.Call 410-2022324 Trades/ Skills Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay 2Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Class A FlatBed Drivers $$$Home every weekend, Run S.E. US Requires 1 YR OTR F.B. Exp. & pay UP TO .39/mile call 800-572-5489 x 227 SunBElt T ransport, LLC. DriversKnight has a steady & Refrigerated freight. Annual salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. Modern trucks! CDL-A, 3 months current OTR expereince 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Trades/ Skills EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS Earn 50-55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Vets welcome. Call: (843)266-3731 bulldoghiway.com EOE NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com General Help 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now!at Schneider National Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training! Job ready in 15 days! (888)3681964 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now!at Schneider National Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training! Job ready in 15 days! (888)3681964 WANTEDLOVING, DEPENDABLETEACHER6:30am to 9:30am & 3:30pm to 6:30pm please send resume Attn: Teacher position busybeelearning 32327@yahoo.com Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)3143769 Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline .com Can You Dig It?We will train, certify and provide lifetime assistant landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator 866-362-6497 Garage/ Yard Sales CrawfordvilleNear Sheriffs Dept. Sat 9a-? Everything must go.. 71 Oak St CRAWFORDVILLE Sat. April 28, 8a-2p Giant Yard Sale 50+ Families Christ Church AnglicanClothing, appliances, furniture, housewares, toys and much much more. Hwy 98 (E. of W akulla High) OCHLOCKONEE BAYGot Rained out will try this again Saturday, April 28th, 9AM-2PM at57 Wakulla Circle, Lots of good clean items Sat, April 28, 8 -2pm Hshold Items Food processor, Sofa w/matching chair, Lighted Oak China Hutch, Bakers Rack, Kimball Console Piano, Pecan finish-like new, all kinds of STUFFŽ 32 Nuthatch Trail in Song Bird Division Estate Sales ALLIGATOR PT Fri, Apr 27, Sat Apr 28, 9am to 1pm Second of Several antique gaming table, silver coins, sleeper couch, lift chair, Eng. Tea Cart, Recliners, jewelry, artist supplies, security safe, kitchen items, glassware, lamps Xmas items, and more than you can imagine! 658 PINE ST Mobile Homes For Rent CONVENIENT LOCATION3/2 large corner lot wooded buffer, porches, CHA, appls include washer & dryer $700/mo+ security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 2511253 CRAWFORDVILLE2/1, Singlewide, clean, new deck, 53 Cayuse Row $425. Mo. $425. Sec. References required (904) 5488342 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA on 5 acres (48 Willie Jenkins Rd.), NE Wakulla County. $800/month. Call 850-5106200. CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $595 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-5244090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $800, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 4433300 CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 9263832 Rent: Houses Unfurnished SHELL POINT BEACH30 Janet Drive Paradise Village Newly renovated 3BR/2BA DWMH, granite kitchen, tile baths, wood floors, washer/dryer, workshop, Canal, Dock, Davits, Gated Community with pool and lawn care $1,200 mo. + security (850) 9265930 Real Estate For Sale WOODVILLE3/2/1, Brick, 1/2 Acre Open kitchen, wood flooring, gas fireplace, huge Florida Room and Laundry room. 20x40 workshop Fenced yard, patio and pool $128,900 (850)9264090 Auctions Estates AUCTION NCTwo Mountain homes, acreage, www.swicegoodau ctions.com. Three bedroom english cottage. Two bedroom Retreat 16 acres, Little Switzerland, NCAL8805 NCRL195929, Swicegood Group 336-7514444 x 3 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953www. sunsetranches.com Recreation Vehicles BUY/ SELL AN RVONLINEBest Deals and Selections. Visit RVT. com Classifieds Thousands of RVs for Sale by Owner & Dealer Lisitings www. RVT.com call 888-2602043 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 5190-0506 TWN Vs. Fleming, Dian D, Case No. 65-2008 CA 000256 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2008 CA 000256 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5 Plaintiff, vs. DIAN D. FLEMING, et al Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65 2008 CA 000256 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5, is Plaintiff, and DIAN D. FLEMING, et al are Defendants, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 24th day of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT NUMBER 13, IN BLOCK AŽ, UNIT THREE(3) OF SHELL POINT BEACH, A SUBDIVISION IN LOT 121 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 58 OF PLAT BOOK NUMBER 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19thday of April, 2012. PHELAN HALLINAN PLC,888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By:/s/Betzy Falgas,Attorney for Plaintiff Owei Z. Belleh, Esq., Florida Bar No. 617598 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 Joshua I. Goldman, Esq., Florida Bar No. 689361 Drew T. Melville, Esq., Florida Bar No. 34986 Annabella Barboza, Esq., Florida Bar No. 040627 Hope Touchton, Esq., Florida Bar No. 60043 Susan Falardeau, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0059948 Bradford Willard, Esq., Florida Bar No. 62827 David A. Cramer, Esq., Florida Bar No. 64780 Jonathan L. Blackmore, Esq., Florida Bar No. 67902 Joy Kohl, Esq., Florida Bar No. 69406 Erik DeLEtoile, Esq., Florida Bar No. 71675 Betzy Falgas, Esq., Florida Bar No. 76882 Aaron Hines, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81690 Jherna A. Shahani, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81994 Jenine R. Davey, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0089325 Ashland Roberts, Esq., Florida Bar No. 89578 Geoffrey Cowen, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91377 Heather Griffiths, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0091444 Andrew Wilson, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0092155 Cynthia Hatch, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91460 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 9BA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #’s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Your Spanish Communicator• Document Translations (Spanish /English) • Conference Calls • Telephone Excellence Skills Training (English/Spanish) • Telephone outgoing voice recordingcall LKR COMMUNICATION & TRANSLATIONS, LLC for rates! 850-509-7129 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you”LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053 88 7408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONSRE-ROOFINGREPAIRSRESIDENTIALCOMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFINGCO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403 Please Recycle

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5 c/o Phelan Hallinan PLCAttorneys for Plaintiff 888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact:Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 26 and May 3, 2012 5190-0503 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5183-0426 vs. Marcia D. Jones, Case No. 65-2012-CA-000031 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000031 Division SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MARCIA J. JONES A/K/A MARCIA DENISE MITCHELL CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 2445 NW 41ST ST. MIAMI, FL 33142-4535 Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARCIA D. JONES A/K/A MARCIA DENISE MITCHELL CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 2445 NW 41ST ST. MIAMI, FL 33142-4535 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 20, BLOCK 3, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA commonly known as: 78 SPOKAN TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Lindsay Moczynski of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before May 19, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated:April 5, 2012. 5185-0426 Vs. Menjor Patrick, case no. 65-2012-CA-000036 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000036 DIVISION: SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC., Plaintiff, vs. PATRICK MENJOR A/K/A PATRICK J. MENJOR,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JOHN B. LEMON LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:: 51 VIOLET LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 5188-0503 Vs. Llewllyn Patrick Mcewan Case No. 65-2010-CA-000083 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000083 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LLEWLLYN PATRICK MCEWAN A/K/A LLEWELLYN PATRICK MCEWAN,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000083 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and LLEWLLYN PATRICK MCEWAN A/K/A LLEWELLYN PATRICK MCEWAN; CAROL NELSON MCEWAN A/K/A CAROL MCEWAN; RIVER WALK ESTATES HOMES ASSOCIATION, INC,; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at lobby OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 A.M, on the 24th of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, BLOCK D, RIVER WALK ESTATES, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THERE OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 4 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A RIVER DRIVE, PANACEA, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this court on April 16, 2012. Brent X Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act-Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 26 and May 3, 2012 5188-0503 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN AMINATA LEMON LAST KNOWN ADDRESS : 51VIOLET LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property inWAKULLA County, Florida: LOT 135, THE FLOWERS, PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 49-52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in The W akulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 9th day of April, 2012. Brent X Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act-Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 19 and 26, 2012 5185-0426 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. April 19 and 26, 2012 5183-0426 5189-0503TWN Blount, Jeffrey Allan Case No. 12-30-CP Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12-30-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JEFFREY ALLAN BLOUNT, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JEFFREY ALLAN BLOUNT, deceased, Case Number 12-30-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE TO THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 26, 2012. Personal Representative /s/WILLIAM BRYANT BLOUNT 218 S.W. Whitewood Drive, Port St. Lucie, FL 34953 Attorney for the Personal Representative /s/MARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.949884 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, FL 32326 April 26 & May 3, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5191-0503 (5 /12 Sale-ABC Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act. Florida Statutes, Chapeter 83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, May 12, Self Storage Notices 2012, at 2PM, at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini Warehouse containing personal property of: FINAL NOTICE DARRELL N. HODGE CLA Y BROGDON NORMAN BUTCH MCCALISTER LAMAR HIERS Payments must be made Self Storage Notices before Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 2:00p.m. The owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or by paying in person at the warehouse. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News April 26 & May 3, 2012 5191-0503 Self Storage Notices The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. The following Employees were recognized: Employee of the Month … Hiram Carter, Teacher of the Month … Bryan Roddenberry. Both employees were congratulate and presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. All Board Members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the agenda. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the following consent items: 1. Approved Minutes of the Meeting held on March 12, 2012. 2. Approved the following Employment of Personnel: New Hires: 12 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Richardson, DavidDO/MaintenanceTrade Specialist04/04/12-06/30/12 Williams, RoyTransportationMechanic04/05/12-06/30/12 9 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Williams, MaryWMSCustodian04/09/12-06/04/12 Transfers: 10 Month Employee Time Limited TL Part-time PT NamePositionProgramPosition ProgramTerm of Service FromFromToTo Nicholson, LauraT.L.Speech PathCESSpeechPathPre-K/WEC03/05/12-06/04/12 Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Barron, JohnWMSCustodian … Time Limited03/12/12-04/25/12 Brooks TerriRMSTeacher … Time Limited04/23/12-06/04/12 Sanders, KristinaPre-K/WECParaprofessional … Time Limited03/26/12-06/04/12 Thurmond, MeganDO/HRSecretary … Time Limited04/09/12-05/31/12 West, CaraRESParaprofessional … Time Limited03/26/12-06/04/12 3. Approved the following Letters of Retirement: Cynthia Shrestha/effective June 30, 2012 Pat Calhoun/effective June 4, 2012 Kelly Roberts/effective July 31, 2012 OQuinn Willis/effective August 2, 2012 David Willis/effective June 4, 2012 Norma Shotwell/effective June 4, 2012 Diane Perez/effective June 4, 2012 Hossein Achtchi/effective June 30, 2012 Patricia Coddington/effective June 4, 2012. 4. Approved the following Letters of Resignation: Sheila Vick/effective June 4, 2012 Jeff Dutrow/effective April 20, 2012 Mollie Walker/effective March 27, 2012 Darrell Lawhon/effective March 23, 2012 5. Approved the following requests for Leave of Absence: Mary Taff/effective March 1 … June 4, 2012 Dorothy Franklin/effective March 15 … June 30, 2012 Ronnie Pumphrey/effective April 3 … May 15, 2012 … approx. Lester Dunlap/effective March 12, June 30, 2012. 6. Approved Illness in the Line of Duty. (See Supplemental File #21) 7. Approved the Disposal of Equipment. (See Supplemental File #21) 8. Approved Budget Amendments #11/12 … 6 & 7. 9. Approved the March “nancial statement. 10. Approved the Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the school board member voting districts as advertised. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Cooperative Agreement with the National Park Service. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Energy Conservation Policy as submitted by Energy Education, Inc., for the Wakulla County School Board. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve an additional Utility Easement for Wakulla County for the Medart Elementary lift station. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve a Letter of Agreement between the National Literacy Project and the Wakulla County School Board. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the 2012-13 Project Lead the Way (PLTW) STEM Agreement. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the 2011-2012 Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Secondary Grant Amendment #2 request for Restored Continuing Resolution Funds. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the revised 2012 VPK, ESE, High School and Middle School Summer School Schedules. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the 2012-13 Adult Education and Family Literacy Adult General Education Grant. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Auditor Generals Report for the “scal year ending June 30, 2011. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. An executive session was held immediately after the board meeting to discuss issues pertaining to collective bargaining. Superintendent Miller, Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott, Mr. Thomas, Mrs. Wells, Mr. Beach, Mr. Pearce and Mrs. ODonnell were in attendance.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON APRIL 16, 2012APRIL 26, 2012 Trying to sell something?Call and enter aClassi ed Ad for Only $10 inTheWakulla news 877-676-1403YARD SALE!!!Fri., April 27 and Sat., April 28 from 8AM to 2PM, 238 Gertie Brown Road Sopchoppy.Former antique store owners need more living space. Some antiques, collectibles, housewares, Pats Fun Jewelry, quality pre-owned clothes. An eclectic bunch of goodies, just waiting on you! Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 MAY 5 9AM EST --F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTION Tractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU426610% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646 TO VIEW PARTIAL LIST OF PHOTOS VISIT www.auctionzip.com RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property!We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! ANew Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 26-D Guinevere 3BR/2BA for $850 Mo. with $950 Deposit. Small pets ok with deposit20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 – Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE, April 20 … Gov. Rick Scott signed a $70 billion budget this week as he touted new money for education, but wielded more than $142 million in vetoes for projects he said the cash strapped state cant afford. Facing a budget that had already been cut after successive years of tough economic times, the governors veto pen used less ink this time, as he marked out far less than the $600 million he axed a year ago. The courts were also busy this week as cases dealing with congressional and state Senate reapportionment wound their way through separate courts. The Florida Supreme Court took a look at revised maps for the state Senate while a few blocks away a circuit judge took arguments in a tussle over congressional districts drawn by the Republican-led Legislature. Meanwhile, the focus continued on the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin by a neighborhood watch volunteer back in February. A day before shooter George Zimmerman appeared on his own behalf, apologized to Martins family and was released on $150,000 bail, Scott introduced members of a committee set up to review Floridas controversial stand your groundŽ law and related issues dealing with race, guns and citizen protection. Serving as a backdrop, businesses and individuals observed a dubious anniversary as they marked two years since the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill shut down Floridas tourism and seafood industries. Whether coincidental or not, the company this week outlined a $7.8 billion class action settlement that comes in additional to nearly $6.3 billion already spent. BUDGET Scott kicked off the week by signing the states $70 billion budget. Meeting with elementary school students at Cunningham Creek Elementary School in St. Johns County, Scott used the occasion to tout a $1 billion increase in K12 funding, a boost that critics were quick to point does not make up for nearly $1.3 billion in cuts made last year to states public schools. This budget is an education budget,Ž Scott told a small crowd of squirming but quiet elementary students at the school. But attention turned to what the governor did not allow to remain in the states spending blueprint. From local museums and neighborhood development projects to bigger items, Scott downsized the budget. Among the vetoes was $2 million less for attorneys to represent low-income residents through foreclosure proceedings, domestic violence hearings and consumer fraud cases. Critics say the cuts to the states civil legal assistance program will mean a 25 percent reduction in the number of attorneys available for legal assistance on civil matters in the coming year. On the health care front, $38.2 million in vetoes hit the healthand human-services section of the budget, and some money for healthrelated projects also was eliminated from other parts of the spending plan. The vetoes were only a tiny fraction of the roughly $29.9 billion that the state expects to spend in 2012-13 on health and human-services programs, but still are expected to be felt by hospitals and others in health care. I focus on the hundreds and hundreds of projects and meritorious programs that were funded, said Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart and chairman of the Senate HHS budget committee. In a letter issued as part of the budget signing, Scott praised legislative decisions such as setting aside money for development of a new hospital-payment system in Medicaid and providing money for mental-health and substance-abuse programs. REDISTRICTING Democrats and three voting-rights organizations asked a Leon County circuit judge to throw out newlypassed congressional districts this week in a battle likely to make its way to the Florida Supreme Court, maybe further. In several hours of arguments before Circuit Court Judge Terry Lewis, the groups accused the Legislature of racial and political gerrymandering. The Legislatures lawyer countered that the Democrats objections would mean that black voters would be parceled out among districts that would subsequently elect white Democrats. The case marks the “ rst time that a court has reviewed the congressional plan under the anti-gerrymandering Fair Districts amendments, approved by voters in a November 2010 referendum. On Friday, the Florida Supreme got into action as it reviewed for the second time, maps outlining the states Senate districts. During testimony, the high court appeared to blunt arguments by Fair Districts that the revised plans still do not satisfy requirements under the act. A GOVERNOR WHO IS RICH VS. A DEMOCRAT WHO IS NAMED RICH? Senate Democratic Leader Nan Rich con“ rmed this week that shell run for governor in 2014, the “ rst to toss a hat in the ring to challenge the Republican governor. The Democrat from Weston, in Broward County, said comments she made to Broward Democrats on Tuesday evening werent intended as a formal announcement but con“ rmed shes in and formulating a strategic and financial plan.Ž Asked whether a liberal Jewish woman from South Florida can succeed in a statewide race, Rich said voters would have to decide that. BP SPILL SECOND ANNIVERSARY Meanwhile Floridians marked the second anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill this week as the oil company came to terms with parties in a class action lawsuit over the explosion and “ re that killed 11 and sent 4.9 million barrels of crude into the Gulf. Two years after the explosion, BP has paid nearly $2.7 billion in claims to Florida businesses and individuals for damages caused by the worst spill in U.S. history. Florida regions economically devastated by the spill that began April 20, 2010, have generally rebounded, as tourists have returned to the beaches. Along with payments to individuals and businesses totaling more than $6.3 billion to date, BP has spent millions more to reimburse local and state governments from Louisiana to Florida on an array of fronts from helping market Florida seafood to restoring sand dunes and building parks in the Pensacola area. But despite the dollars spent, critics say the longrange effects of the spill may take years to ascertain, while the issue slips from the collective memory of state and federal of“ cials charged with making sure BP pays to clean up the mess. STAND YOUR GROUND Gov. Rick Scott on Thursday named the members of a task force formed to look at the states self-defense law in the wake of Trayvon Martins shooting death on Feb. 26. Last month, as national outrage grew over the lack of an arrest in the case, Scott announced the task force and tapped Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll to chair it. But he said at the time he would not name the panel members or schedule their “ rst meeting until the criminal investigation was complete. Now, with special prosecutor Angela Coreys announcement last week that the acknowledged shooter, neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, would face second-degree murder charges, Scott said the task force will meet starting May 1. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Scott signs $70 billion budget, touts $1 billion for education. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Were not walking into this with any preconceived notions. We live in a state where the crime rate is at a 40-year low, and I want to keep it that way.Ž Gov. Rick Scott on naming a commission to examine the states stand your ground self defense law. WEEKLY ROUND-UP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Budget: $70 billion good, nearly $143 million badBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 34 37 42 46 52 61 65 68 2 27 53 3 28 54 4 24 50 62 18 21 43 55 5 15 35 38 47 6 29 48 63 66 69 7 30 44 56 8 25 39 57 22 40 51 9 16 19 36 49 10 26 41 45 64 67 70 11 23 31 58 12 32 59 13 33 60ACROSS1.Egotist'sconcern 5.Pullanall-nighter 9.Word accompanyinga poundinggavel 14.Itbeatsnothing 15.TurnerorCantrell 16.Wetbehindthe ears 17.Slips,spills,and such 19.Plumedwader 20.Petal-plucker's word 21.SDSmember,e.g. 23.Closedown 24.An Oscarismostly this 25.Black-borderedbio 27.Theymayneedle you 34.Essen'svalley 35.SingerZadora 36."Arenot!" response 37.ComposerSatie 38.Bitofparsley 41.Numberedwork 42.Try tobuyyour ownstuff,atan auction 44.CollegeWebsite su ffix 45.SouthSeasstaple 46.Hickok'slasthand 50.Icycoating 51.Susanof"L.A. Law" 52.Sine__non 55.Peppersfromthe air 58.__NOHOOKS 61. Quitter'scry 63.Criticalhurdles 65.Europeanviper 66.It'soff-limits 67.Pilots' guesstimates,for short 68.Punishesfor lateness,maybe 69.Bitofkindling 70.DropforthecountDOWN1.Workoutvenues 2.Apop 3.Cooties 4.Popularhappyhourday:Abbr. 5.Post-partychores 6.AuthorAyn 7.Naysayer 8.Army's mule,e.g. 9.Former Italiancoin denomination 10.Mol otovcocktail fuse 11.Calamitous 12.Alltiedup 13.Emeritus:Abbr. 18.Crashingbore 22.Egypt's__Simbel 24.__bath(hotspot) 26.TripperLeary 27.Containinggold 28.Scoldmildly 29.Barelybeat 30.Thoughtfulsoul 31.Mar.honoree 32.PromotesaCD, perhaps 33.Nogreatshakes 34.McEntireofcountry 39.Ox tail? 40.Poochwho'sa leader 43.Makersof hangman'sknots 47. Industrialtub 48.Wideofthemark 49.Taleofadventure 52.Campusarea, briefly 53.Presstheescape key,say 54.Electricalletters 56."Don'thave__, man!" 57.A rtist's"Done!" 58.AsheStadiuminits. 59.Collarstiffener 60.OldnameatUS pumps 62.Albaniancurrency unit 64.Comicsshriek American Prole Hometown Content 4/1/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 12 3 4 5 617 28 8 3962 39 79413 94 563 46719 200 9 HtCtt 128 7369 4 5 356419782 947258163 584 397621 631825497 279641538 713 984256 895162374 462573819 S P A S R E B A Q U A D E A C H A U R I C U N D O L I C E C H I D E A C D C F R I T U R K I S H L E K D R I P N O O S E R S C L E A N U P S V A T R A N D N I P E R R A N T A N T I C A R E R A C O W M A S C O T I D E F I N I A B U G U I D E D O G O N E L I R A G E S T R A G T I M O T H Y E E K D I R E S T P A T U S T A E V E N T O U R S S T A Y R E T D S O S O E S S O Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com 1-866-742-1373Get your business noticedOne Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Don’t make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.florida-classifieds.com Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant – AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco – Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans – Grilled Chicken Pita with side Talk o’ The Town Deli – Choice of Sandwich & DrinkHamaknockers – Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken Bouys By The Bay – Shrimp Basket & Drink Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. € 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m.1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99MixedTues. & urs. Kids EatFree on Wednesday12 & under 926-4329 mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Private Party Rooms Private Party Rooms Tuesday Nights Tuesday Nights $ 4 95 $ 4 95 Spaghetti with Meat Sauce Spaghetti with Meat Sauce OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Win ner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Win One Meal from Every Restaurant! E A T I N ’ p a t h … EATIN’ path… O F F OFF t h e the EATIN’ path…OFF the Winner Mike Harveydrawn from Myra Jean’s in Crawfordville 850926-4737 1 Block South of the Courthouse 850 926-4737 1 Block South of the Courthouse The Great BBQ Dis cou nt C ard! The Great BBQ Dis cou nt Card!Menu & Spe cials Menu & Spe cials Recharge Recharge Menu & Specials Menu & Specials The Great BBQ Discount Card! The Great BBQ Discount Card!Menu & Specials Menu & Specials Re-charge Re-charge Charge this card with $25 .00RECIEVE 27.50INVALUE!$50 .00REC IEV E $5 7.50IN VALUE!$10 0REC IEV E $1 20IN VALUE!Charge this card with $25 .00REC IEVE 27.50INVALUE!$50 .00REC IEV E $5 7.50IN VAL UE!$10 0REC IEV E $1 20IN VALUE! Its Like FREE Money! Its Like FREE Money!20 Dif fer ent Beers 20 Dif fer ent Beers Spe cia lty IPA Beers Spe cia lty IPA Beers SWEET SHOP COMING SOON SWEET SHOP COMING SOON 850-984-9994 SEAFOOD RESTAURANT & MORE 1349 B COASTAL HWY 98, PANACEA FL. 850-984-9994 12 PIECE SHRIMP BASKET ......... $ 7 99 LUNCH BUFFET ................... $ 10 00 MON. FRI. 11 2 TUES. & WED. BREAKFAST 6 10am Open Lunch & Dinner 7 Days A Week 11 9 11 10 on Weekends COME IN AND SEE US COME IN AND SEE US Family business re-openedBuoys by the Bay and Panacea’s Mineral SpringsTim G. Williams, Jr. and his wife, Kimberly, of Williams Seafood, Inc., are the owners of Panaceas Mineral Springs by the Bay, a fresh seafood market, and Buoys by the Bay, a restaurant serving fresh seafood. The Williams reopened Mineral Springs by the Bay in May of 2007. Once we moved from Tallahassee to Panacea and fell in love with the coast, my husband and I decided to reopen our family business.Ž As of this year our fresh and local seafood market has been in business for over 18 years. We catch a large portion of the product for our fresh seafood market and purchase other fresh catches from local “ shermen, oystermen and shrimpers.Ž In October 2011, the Williams purchased a seafood restaurant, Buoys by the Bay. Buoys offers fresh seafood straight from the seafood market, as well as stuffed bacon-wrapped shrimp, freshly smoked salmon, homemade deviled crab and smoked “ sh dips. Please come see us in Panacea and give our fresh seafood market a try and take home some local, fresh seafood for you and your family. If you dont want to cook, come see us at Buoys by the Bay, also located in Panacea, and let us do the cooking for you. On Saturday, May 5, come to the restaurant and hang with us for the Blue Crab Festival. Our son Casey and his band will be playing live and we will be cooking up live craw“ sh and live crabs prepared just for you.Ž If you have any questions or need additional information, call the Williamses at either location. Mineral Springs Seafood Market (850) 984-2248 or Buoys Seafood Restaurant (850) 984-9994. Just ask for Tim or Kim Williams. Mineral Springs by the Bay is located at 1612 Coastal Hwy. 98 in Panacea, and Buoys Seafood by the Bay is located at 1349-B Coastal Hwy. 98, also in Panacea. Tim and Kim Williams with best friend Capt. Joel Weir heading home with a fresh catch. JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County has decided to join the Florida Association of Counties potential lawsuit against the controversial House Bill 5301. The new law deals with state Medicaid billing and changes the way each countys contribution is collected. We need to ght it, said County Commissioner Mike Stewart at the April 16 county commission meeting. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said FAC is mounting a challenge to the constitutionality of the law, as well as its legality. The bill was approved and signed by Gov. Rick Scott on March 29. Numerous counties urged him to veto the bill, including Wakulla County. The law will require each county to pay its share of disputed Medicaid bills going back 12 years to May 1 of this year. For past due billings, each county must pay 85 percent of the amount due over the next ve years. Encinosa said the Agency for Health Care Administration, which is in charge of billing, must have the local amounts certi ed by Aug. 1. Representatives with AHCA met with the county earlier this month and said the county owed $52,000. The county pointed out that because of double billing, it has overpaid and is due $95,000. Once the amounts are certi ed, the county will have a chance to challenge them. This will be the last time the county will be able to dispute those amounts. Going forward, the state will withhold a portion of the countys revenue sharing and one-cent sales tax distributions. Instead of receiving a bill, the county will receive a statement of what was taken out. They can milk us dry, Stewart said. There will be no veri cation of where someone lives, Stewart said. If it says Wakulla County, we have to pay it, Stewart said. County Administrator David Edwards said the county will not pay it, it will simply be taken. Previously, AHCA provided counties with a monthly bill listing Medicaid residents for which the county is responsible for paying. Counties were able to review the information to verify the individuals county of residence and determine whether the bill was accurate. If it was correct, the bill was paid. If it was incorrect and the person was not a county resident, the amount of the bill was denied and sent back to AHCA. The other commissioners agreed to pay the $1,000 to join the suit to be led by FAC. FACs board of directors decided to purse legal action on April 12 and will le their suit in the 2nd Judicial Court in Leon County. Bay, Bradford, Broward, Charlotte, Escambia, Flagler, Franklin, Hamilton, Highlands, Hillsborough, Lee, Leon, Levy, Manatee, Martin, MiamiDade, Monroe, Nassau, Osceola, Pasco, Polk, St. Johns, St. Lucie, Seminole, Suwannee and now Wakulla have already voted to join with the suit. HB 5301 has made this multi-million dollar accounting mess the law of the land a reality we are forced to confront in the courtroom on behalf of Floridas communities and taxpayers, said Chris Holley, executive director of the FAC. The suit is expected to be led by the end of the month. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 16th Issue Thursday, April 26, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews CANDIDATE CONTRIBUTIONS AND EXPENDITURES Wakulla County Wakulla County Senior Citizens Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Celebrate LifeSee Page 1BThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Summer Camps ................................................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 11 B INDEX OBITUARIESMary M. Moore-Gearhart Rona Lavon Hawkins Jr. Catherine Rosier Murray Delpha Syvelle Robison Porter Thelma Louise Sanders Brinson Richard Taylor Sr. Tommy Baldwin Waller By BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent Wakulla County School District ranks third in the state on Basic Return on Investment indicators according to the latest information published in the Center for American Progress Return on Investment Report. This report is a study of the ef ciency of the nations public education system, attempting to evaluate almost every major school district in the country. The study looks at student achievement scores in conjunction with the amount spent per student, among other indicators. To remain an Academically High Performing District as designated by the Florida Department of Education while still keeping a watchful eye on the taxpayers dollars is always a challenge, said Wakulla Superintendent of Schools David Miller. We want the best education possible for our children without putting an undue nancial burden on the citizens of Wakulla County in these tough economic times, he said. To be ranked third in the state on Basic ROI indicators is one sign that we are succeeding. Basic ROI indicators of student achievement in conjunction with per pupil spending put Wakulla with more than 5,000 students behind only Brevard County with more than 74,000 students and Seminole County with more than 65,000 students. All of the other high ranking Basic ROI districts were much larger than Wakulla as well. The Center for American Progress does state in a disclaimer that the connection between spending and educational achievement is complex, and that the data cant capture everything that goes into creating an effective school system. Because there is no uniform national achievement test taken by all students, states cannot be compared with each other. The student achievement indicators are different for each state. Wakulla County School District was fourth in the state and 56th in the world to earn districtwide, ve year accreditation in 2007 and earned it again in 2011, Miller said. The accreditation team was composed of educators from outside the U.S. and Florida, as well as some from Florida. The excellent nal accreditation report was yet another indication that our school district strives to provide our students with a world class education.Wakulla joins Medicaid lawsuitLocal schools rank third in return on investmentCounty Commissioner Lynn Artz announces she will not seek re-election for the District 5 seat. See her column on The Opinion Page, 4A. Proposed septic tank revisions moving forwardBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Commission has decided to move forward with the possibility of revising its current septic tank requirements. Under the revisions, performancebased systems would not be required throughout the entire county. The nitrogen reducing systems would be required to be installed for new development located within Bloxham Cutoff at the county line traveling east to Crawfordville Highway; from Crawfordville Highway south to East Ivan Road; East Ivan Road south to Wakulla Arran Road; Wakulla Arran Road west to Cajer Posey Road; Cajer Posey Road south to Shadeville Highway; Shadeville Highway east to Woodville Highway; Woodville Highway north to the county line; from the county line back to the beginning point at Bloxham Cutoff. This board is ready to retreat in a major way, said Commissioner Lynn Artz, who has been very vocal about protecting Wakullas waterbodies. The systems would also be required if they are installed within 150 feet of the high water level of any surface water, wet sink, swallet or within 300 feet of a first or second magnitude spring, as well as those properties where the total acreage is less than 5 acres. Previously included in the revisions was a threshold for the dollar amount of repairs allowed before one must upgrade to a performance based system. At the April 16 county commission meeting, Commissioner Randy Merritt, who proposed the revisions, said he wanted to remove the threshold and allow an unlimited amount of repairs and modifications. Merritt said he wanted to follow with the states de nition for repair. County Health Department Administrator Padraic Juarez said the state allows any system to be repaired if its failing. In 2006, the county commission at the time decided to require performance based systems county-wide for new development and replacement or repairs of existing systems. Artz said the goal was to eventually convert all septic systems. They would either connect to sewer or be upgraded. Were basically doing nothing in the Wakulla Springs protection zone, Artz said of the revisions. Also included in the revisions is decreasing the nitrogen reducing levels from 90 percent to 50 percent, which is in line with federal standards. Previously, Juarez said most of the systems in the county do not reduce the nitrogen levels by 90 percent. There were a few that did obtain 90 percent, he said, but most were reaching the national average of 50 percent. Commissioner Jerry Moore said most of the problem is coming from the north. Artz said, Everyone is contributing to the problem. Continued on Page 12ACHATs Pamper Your PoochMore events from this weekend: NAMI Derby, Page 2A Relay for Life, Page 2A Wakulla Wildlife Festival, Page 14ASee Pages 5B-6B Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment held its fundraiser, Pamper Your Pooch, at Hudson Park this past Saturday, April 21. Volunteers with CHAT bathed, dried, groomed, trimmed nails and gave the dogs some much deserved attention and pampering. Pet owners could also get their dogs micro-chipped at the event. Cricket, at right, was not a fan of the bath and needed some attention from Suzanne Paterson to calm her nerves. Crickets owner, Tammie Nason, said she always puts up a good ght. CHAT volunteers, below, bath dogs during the fundraiser.Photos by JENNIFER JENSEN

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By LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsWith a blast from the bugle, the 2nd annual NAMI Wakulla Triple Crown Derby was underway. Bedecked in large, bright hats and sipping on alcohol-free mint juleps (sold for $1 to bene t the cause) guests sat on bleachers in the raincooled sun at the Wakulla County Livestock Pavilion, watching horses race to skirt the single barrel at the end of the course. Perhaps because of the recent rain, two horses seemed especially energetic: The No. 8 horse, given the NAMI nickname of Denial jockeyed by Sam Dunway, ran off the track for a bit, seeming to head back to the horse trailers. Another horse, No. 11, nicknamed Depression and jockeyed by Jim Porter, certainly seemed unhappy for a moment, pushing Porter off in the nal stretch of the Public Awareness race. Placing rst overall in the Derby, was Stigma a quarter-horse jockeyed by Sonya Cutchin and sponsored by County Commissioner Alan Brock. Cutchin has ridden horses all her life. Horses are therapeutic she said, adding: Im excited to help NAMI, they do a lot of good things. Cutchin, who won the Bolt of Lightning Award for placing rst, sat with horse buddy Cassie Scott, jockey of Baker Act, a horse sponsored by Sheriff Donnie Crum. Scott accepted the Pure Gold Award given to the sponsoring team that raised the most money, on behalf of Crum. Its important to promote that there are resources and help available, Scott said of the event. Rita Odom, mother of Chris Odom, jockey of the horse Panic Attack, seemed to see a relationship between the event and the NAMI mission. It teaches responsibility but it is the two of you [horse and rider] youre not just on your own. Besides the races, guests were invited to admire hats decorated for the event by the Hillier family, while enjoying a barbecue dinner and awards ceremony. By LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsThe sweetest stars ever to grace the track at Wakulla High School werent sprinting for a fast finish or perfecting their running strides through practice, but walked the track with slow deliberation and open hearts this past Friday, April 20, holding candles high in the night air. In the Wakulla County Relay for Life, cancer survivors and their caretakers teamed with local citizens and activists who have seen the ravages of cancer in the people around them and came out to walk around the track in teams sponsored by local individuals, businesses, schools and civic organizations. Its hard to nd someone not touched by cancer, said Cori Revell, a co-chair with the event. One such family, deeply touched by cancer, was the family of Charles Buddy Updegraff, who passed away in February after a 10month struggle with melanoma. Updegraff worked for more than 20 years as a mail carrier in the area, and was an active member of Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Each year he came out to show his support in the ght against cancer signing up to walk in the relay in the early hours of the morning to let others rest. He was the one walking in the middle of the night, when no one else wanted to, his wife Barbara remembered. His daughter Mary, planned to take his place this year as the 4oclock walker. Mary credited the familys deep religious faith as being a source of strength, saying: Its easier when you know youll see him again. Relay for Life, sponsored by the American Cancer Society, takes place across the country, with each community dedicating 18 hours to holding the Relay. The idea is that cancer never sleeps, Revell explained. Many relay teams choose to spend the night, pitching tents in the center of the track eld and building small campfires around which they roasted marshmallows and talked late in to the night. Around one of these res sat Alena Burley and Jennifer Siniscalchi, two teachers from Riversink Elementary, representing the school in the relay. Both planned to spend the night and were proud of the schools commitment to the cause. Riversink Elementary has already raised more than $1,500 with fundraisers like Hat Day where, for 25 cents, a child was allowed to wear a hat to school. I just think every person can make a difference, said Siniscalchi. Her favorite part of the relay evening was the Survivor Walk, held at 6 p.m., in which cancer survivors walked a lap around the track together, cheered on by Relay supporters. You see people really think about everything theyve been through, she said. The Wakulla County Relay for Life is an annual event and was chaired this year by Kristin Dow. To learn more about Wakulla Countys Chapter of the Relay for Life event, and to track fundraising, visit relayforlife.org/wakulla Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comNAMI Derby is held Saturday LUCY CARTERSonya Cutchin, who won rst place, and Cassie Scott enjoying the winners table.Relay for Life helps raise money for cancer research PHOTOS BY LUCY CARTERRiversink teachers Alena Burley and Jennifer Siniscalchi roast marshmallows by their booth. Luminaria line the track at Relay for Life. Wakulla County Third Annual Ronald Reagan Wakulla County Third Annual Ronald Reagan Affair Affair BLU E JEANS BLU E JEANSBlack Tie Black Tie& &May 3rd, 2012 at 6 pm at The Bistro at Wildwood 3896 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, Florida May 3rd, 2012 at 6 pm at The Bistro at Wildwood 3896 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, FloridaPaid for and approved by the Wakulla County Republican Executive Commiee. Not in support of any candidate. Featuring Key Note Speaker Peter Schweizer Author of Reagans WarThe epic story of his forty year struggle against and nal triumph over communism Featuring Key Note Speaker Peter Schweizer Author of Reagans WarThe epic story of his forty year struggle against and nal triumph over communism$35 for individual $50 for two dinner tickets $35 for individual $50 for two dinner ticketsSpo nsorshi ps Available Spons ors hips Availablewww.wakullarepublicans.com www.wakullarepublicans.com Ariel McKenzieFrom mom, dad, sister, grandma, grandpa and J.J.Happy Birthday on April 27! Second AnnualTriple Crown Derby Thank YouNAMI Wakulla would like to take this opportunity to express thanks to all the people who contributed and par cipated in making the 2012 NAMI Wakulla Second Annual Triple Crown Derby a success on April 21, at the Livestock Pavilion Special Thanks to:The Wakulla County Horsemans Associa on, who worked up a sweat on Friday to make the race track perfect, also for providing the horses and jockeys for our event.Master of Derby Ceremonies: Merl Robb Music Provided by: Michelle Snow Invoca on: Rev. Bert Matlock Servers: Judge Jill Walker, Claudia Glover, Marian Revell, Brenda Hu o Chicken prepared and Cooked by: D.R. (Peewee) Vause Hats/Props Creators: Terry Hillier, Sara Hillier, Carly Hillier Flagbearers: Wakulla County Horsemans AssociaonCommunity Leaders:Call to Post:David Miller, Wakulla County Superintendant of SchoolsDonnie Crum, Wakulla County Sheri Jockey Cassi Sco Pure Gold Award Brent Thurmond, Wakulla County Clerk of Courts -Jockey Erica Odom Buddy Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elec ons Jockey Todd Porter Donnie Sparkman, Wakulla County Property Appraiser Jockey Emma Donaldson Alan Brock, Wakulla County Commissioner Jockey Sonya Cutchin Bolt of Lightning Award Randy Merri, Wakulla County Commissioner Jockey Bailey Russom Mike Stewart, Wakulla County Commissioner Jockey Chris Odom Jerry Evans, Wakulla County School Board Jockey Dennis Taylor Mike Sco, Wakulla County School Board Jockey Michelle Churchard Ray Gray, Wakulla County School Board Jockey Charlie Odom Greg Thomas, Wakulla County School Board Jockey Erika Wilson Chuck Shields, Mayor, City of St. Marks Jockey Jim Porter Colleen Skipper, Mayor, City of Sopchoppy Jockey Sam Dunaway Judge Jill Walker for volunteering her me and servingDerby Sponsors:Dr. Andrea Plagge The Wakulla News Wakulla Area Times Wakulla.com Centennial Bank Air Con of Wakulla, LLC Macks Country Meats Kelly Sheet Metal, Inc. Flowers Bakery Company Ashley Feed & Seed Revels Meats ACE Hardware/Woodville Walmart Winn Dixie Crawfordville McDonalds Apalachee Center, Inc. Rick Melton Enterprises Mary Ellen Davis, A orney at Law NAMI Wakulla believes it is our volunteers who break down the s gma of mental illness in our county and makes possible our support programs for people diagnosed with mental illness, their friends and family.NAMI Wakulla is an a liate of the Na onal Alliance on Mental Illness CRAFTS FOOD RAFFLEat theSaturday, April 28 9AM-3PM YOUAREINVITED TOA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAt the recent St. Marks City Commission meeting, the commission approved being the sponsor of a permit for a 10-year extension to reopen the St. Marks Reef, an arti cial reef 5 miles out from the St. Marks Lighthouse. The Organization for Arti cial Reefs and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are trying to enhance the reef, increasing it from 17.3 acres to 42. The reef will be made out of concrete and steel, said Tony Murray, board member of OAR. The economic enhancement brought to the community can turn into a lot of different aspects, Murray said. The reef will create additional shing grounds for the area. The artificial reef was placed in 1964 and 1965 and has developed a lot since then, Murray said. The reef is also outside of the original permitted location. So this reauthorization would also increase the area to include where the reef is currently located and where the permit said it should be. Even with the possible liability issues, the city agreed to sponsor the permit. When the reef was added in the 1960s, the city was also the sponsor. City Attorney Ron Mowrey said there are potential third party liabilities. Once the reef is placed, the city becomes responsible for it. Keith Millie, with FWC, said they recommend municipalities be the sponsor for the benefit of having general council oversight. He added that the liability issues typically lie with the transfer and placement of the reef, which could be placed with the construction company. Murray said OAR would make sure the placement is correct and there are no issues during construction. A post construction dive would be done to ensure the right material is placed and that it is in the right location, he said. Murray said he is unsure how much the permit will cost, but anticipated around $710. Billy Bishop, with the St. Marks Waterfronts Florida Partnership, said they would chip in a portion. There is a 500-pound minimum and it isnt expected there will be any movement once it is placed. Commissioner Allen Hobbs said if there is a storm large enough to move the arti cial reef, the city isnt going to be worrying about the reef. Columbus took a chance and he discovered America, Hobbs said. I think we should do it. Commissioner Phil Cantner agreed and said the benefits will far outweigh any possible chance of problems. The commission voted four to zero to approve the sponsorship of the permit. In another matter, Mowrey brought up the St. Marks Re nery site and said members of his law rm have been examining the citys deed on the site to determine exactly how much property the city owns. According to Mowrey, the city is the clear owner of the 55-acre tract where the tanks and buildings sit. With three other tracts, it was unclear. For one of the tracts, the deed came from Seminole Refinery and was transferred to the St. Marks Refinery, but it turned out Seminole Refinery never actually owned the land. Another piece was also not owned by the city and should never have been included in the deed, Mowrey said. Mowrey said he will work on correcting those issues. CITY OF ST. MARKSCity sponsors permit for arti cial reef NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING APRIL 26, 2012The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, May 14, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 4, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM and Monday, July 16, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS APRIL 26, 2012The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners propose to consider the following applications and/or adopt by ordinance. A Public Hearing is scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, May 14, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 4, 2012, and Monday July 16, 2012 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING APRIL 26, 2012The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, May 14, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 4, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing on May 21, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any nonEnglish speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.APRIL 26, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing Before the Planning Commission on May 14, 2012 at 7:00p.m. and the Board of County Commissioners on May 21, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any nonEnglish speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.APRIL 26, 2012

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Kimball Thomas will run for Superintendent of Schools Children raise funds for hospital Sheriffs Report for April 19 Brinson Richard Taylor Sr. obituary Studio 88 wins big at competition Balloon release marks celebration Worm Gruntin Festival is Saturday David Miller announces retirement thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:By LYNN ARTZ County commissioner I will not seek a second term in 2012. Though I would love to continue to serve the citizens of Wakulla County, I must take a break to focus on my family. I hope to return in four years. I have been struggling with this decision since last fall. There is so much more that I wanted to accomplish. I feel regret about not being able to continue my work with energy ef ciency and conservation, smart growth and environmental protection. As the economy picks up and the pace of development begins to accelerate, we need to take a different approach to the land use decisions we make or our problems with sprawl, traf c congestion and infrastructure de cits will only get worse. Though I wish that I had been able to accomplish more, Im proud of what Ive been able to achieve despite tough economic times, vacant staff positions, administrative turmoil and turnover and an increasingly conservative Board. I am particularly proud of my success in the grants arena. I wrote the only ARRA job-creation grant that Wakulla County received, a tree-planting grant designed to support employment for nurseries, arborists and landscaping companies. I wrote other successful grants to assist with Wakulla Gardens, the Crawfordville Town Plan and the Wild ower Project along 98. I am also proud of my work on behalf of youth and with regard to the Community Center. I am grateful to the many people who have helped and supported my work and I am sorry to disappoint the people who have been urging or expecting me to run for re-election in November. To lessen my guilt about stepping down, I have been trying without success to recruit a like-minded person to run in my place.Lynn Artz is the county commissioner for District 5, Sopchoppy.In the April 12 edition, the story Concealed weapons approach 1 million in Florida by the News Service of Florida incorrectly referred to Trayvon Martin shooter George Zimmerman as a convicted felon. Zimmerman had been arrested in 2005 and charged with resisting arrest. But after Zimmerman completed a pretrial diversion program, the charges were dropped. He had a domestic violence injunction issued against him in 2005, but wasnt charged or convicted of any crime. The News Service regrets the error.CorrectionArtz: I wont seek re-election anks for support of Worm Gruntin 5KEditor, The News: The 12th annual Worm Gruntin Festival was held this past weekend as always on the second Saturday in April. (Mark your calendars for next year!) This years festival had the return of the 5K Race and we had an unbelievable turnout. We had a total of 111 runners ranging from 8-year-old Molly Jones to 80-year-old Larry Luchi. Our goal was to have 100 runners and we exceeded that number very unexpectedly. Consequently, we are already preparing for the 2013 Worm Gruntin 5K race and would like to invite all of our runners to plan to participate and help us meet our goal of 150-plus runners next year. This years race went very well with all runners nishing the race and with no accidents. Unfortunately, only 50 percent of our awards arrived for recognizing the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place runners and we offer sincere apologies to our runners for this mishap. For our 2013 race, the nish line will be the same as this years starting line to allow all of our runners and spectators to remain in downtown Sopchoppy and enjoy the runners crossing the nish line. A very special thank you to all of the following: Our sponsors were Brooks Concrete and Backwoods Bistro. Thank you for funding a greater portion of the race expenses. Our refreshments were donated by Winn-Dixie, and the runners thoroughly enjoyed the cases of oranges, bananas and apples at the end of the race. Wal-Mart and Walgreens donated bottled water for rehydrating our runners. We appreciate each and every one of our supporters and donors. We would also like to thank our many volunteers who showed up at 7:30 a.m. to help register runners, hand out T-shirts, set up our race equipment, organize our runners, tabulate results and hand out awards. Congratulations to all of our runners and thank you for supporting our 2012 Worm Gruntin 5K Race. We hope to see you back next year with a friend for a bigger and better race! Susan Brooks Shearer smbshearer@aol.comTax Collectors o ce provides great serviceEditor, The News: I would like to thank Laura Rogers at the Wakulla County Tax Collectors Of ce for going above and beyond duty on April 17. I was injured and needed a quick form lled out. I arrived at the tax of ce two minutes before 5 p.m. expecting to be asked to come back tomorrow. I was on crutches and Laura came out to my car, found out what I needed and took care of it. This re ects highly on her of ce. John Knoblauch Crawfordville Editor, The News: In response to the Quote of the week (Weekly Roundup, Travyon Martin case draws nation in, April 19) about Congressman Wests comment on Democrats who are Communists, this is what he meant. You can debate the differences between Marxism, Communism and Socialism. The Socialist Party of America announced in their Oct. 2009 newsletter that 70 Congressional Democrats currently belonged to their caucus. Eleven belonged to the Judiciary Committee, including Chairman John Conyers. If you go on the internet you can link to this report at many sources. While some in the media try to ridicule Col. West, he is only being honest. I wish young people today had more historical knowledge of what the Iron Curtain and Socialism have actually been like to live under. Jeannie Beck Panacea Editor, The News: Thirty young artists participated in the Aspiring Artists competition held as part of the Wildlife Festival held this past weekend at Wakulla Springs State Park. With the guidance of ve art teachers, these Wakulla students showed off their developing skills. This years winners were: Elementary Category First Place: Daniel Weideman, fourth grade, Shadeville; Second Place: Jailyn Lamb, fourth grade, Shadeville; Third Place: Anna Thomas, fourth grade, Shadeville; Middle School Category First Place: Meghan Sarvis, eighth grade, Wakulla Middle; Second Place: Blake Berson, eighth grade, Wakulla Middle; Third Place: Lilianna Abraham, seventh grade, COAST Charter School. High School Category First Place: Hannah Noegel, Wakulla High; Second Place: Carissa Dyous, Wakulla High; Third Place: Kiersten Simmons, Wakulla High. GRAND PRIZE WINNER was Meghan Sarvis of Wakulla Middle. Congratulations to all these students. Each school was limited to six entries. There were also entries from six kindergarten students from Crawfordville Elementary. Their entries of manatees were particularly appropriate for the theme Water for Wildlife and were absolutely delightful. Soon they will learn the art skills to win prizes. As a community we bene t from knowing that Wakulla County, not only has many professional artists displaying their inspirational works at the festival, but due to the guidance of devoted art teachers, we have many aspiring, young artists too. Thanks to the judges, the students and especially the art teachers. Elinor Elfner eelfner@comcast.net Editor, The News: I wish to commend Dolly Mitchell and her co workers at Wakulla County Parks and Recreation for the organized way in which they run things. On a sunny April 14 morning, I went out to see my grandsons play their last T-ball games and get their trophies. While I was on the eld, a parent walked up to me out of nowhere and said is this your check? I said, no, and he said, Well, its someones close by. He handed it to me and walked off. I looked down and didnt recognize the name but it had pizza/trophies in the for line of the check in the amount of $13 so I knew it was something having to do with the days events. Unfortunately, it had nothing in the pay to the order line. In this economy, I know some parent was probably searching frantically for the money to pay for their childs pizza and trophy because I knew how it was when I was raising my two. I called Dolly Mitchell, who was working on a Saturday, and within minutes she called back that the parent was on the orange team. Now how organized was that? Well, there were two orange teams and one with the smaller kids was about to wrap up their party and leave so I went there rst. Nope, said the coach. They didnt even have pizza. So off to the second orange team who my grandsons team just happened to be playing. So, yep, the rst parent was right it was someone close by. After the game I asked the coach and he knew which parent it was right away. I walked over to her and sure enough she g ave me a big smile and thanked me for nding the check in Wakulla fashion. During all this I managed to watch both games and take some awesome memory pics with my grandsons Hunter and Jamie and see some folks I hadnt seen in quite a while. I wish to commend Wakulla County parents, coaches and rec park staff (you all know who you are) for their dedication during this and all sporting events so that our kids (and grandkids) have a decent place to grow up in and explore their abilities. Thank you too to many volunteers and staff. This is a much-needed vital program in the community and you dont get paid near what you are worth and all of you (especially Dolly Mitchell) need a raise. Keep up the great work! Respectfully, Kimberly Rose Wheatley (Yes, I am still around!) kimsold@earthlink.net By PADRAIC JUAREZMosquito Control DirectorOur mosquito control division is facing a severely reduced budget for the 2012 mosquito season. This reduction has caused us to come up with some creative solutions. Our mission of protecting the public from illness that can result from mosquito bites is still the basis for all that we do. In previous years that has meant that we would provide spray to individual homes as frequently as requested, put out larvacide to areas near populated areas, and by providing education on how individuals can protect themselves from mosquitoes. Our revised business plan will mean that we will concentrate on education and applying larvacide. We will still spray for adult mosquitoes at large gatherings of people, but we will no longer be providing individual home sprayings over and over through the season. If your organization is having an outdoor event and would like us to apply adulticide spray, please contact our of ce. We will also provide this service to individual homes twice over the months of May to October. (We are out there already spraying, and applying larvacide. The public just needs to call for that larvacide to be applied.) If your home has low areas that hold water for several days we will come out and apply larvacide to those areas upon request. Please read our suggestions below and watch throughout the summer for other tips on how to best protect yourself and family from mosquito bites. By following the FIVE Ds below everyone can help reduce the mosquito population near their homes and businesses: DRAIN. Small amounts of standing water can breed hundreds of mosquitoes! This includes ower pots, animal water bowls and buckets, bird baths, boats, trash cans, barbecue grills, wheelbarrows, tires, kiddie pools, and clogged rain gutters. DRESS. Some disease carrying mosquitoes bite during the day so, even though its hot, cover your skin when you will be outside especially at: DAWN and DUSK. Most mosquitoes swarm at these times so be sure to cover up! DEET. Sprays with up to 30 percent of this compound are found to be the most effective for the longest period. Children under 2 months old should not use DEET, but mosquito nets can be draped over strollers if you will have your infant outside. Permethrin products can be applied to clothing but not skin, again do not use on infants. Products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus provides long lasting protection at about the same rate as a DEET concentration of about 20 percent if you are concerned about chemical compounds. This should not be applied to children under 3 years. We need YOUR help! Please use the above preventative measures to help us reduce the risk of diseases carried by mosquitoes such as West Nile Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis. One bite from an infected mosquito can transmit these diseases. If you will be having an outdoor event and feel the area needs to be sprayed for mosquito protection, you must call the Environmental Health Unit at the Health Department at (850) 926-0401 ext. 241 to request spraying. Foggers can be purchased at local hardware stores and can be used successfully with a lower concentration of the same chemical used by the spray trucks. Be sure to follow instructions carefully.Padraic Juarez is administrator of the Wakulla County Health Department.Basis for Congressman Wests comment Dolly Mitchell does a great job at rec park Aspiring Artists competition results Mosquito Control is available

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 5A Friends of the Library will meet on ThursdayEveryone is welcome to come to the next Friends of the Library meeting on Thursday, April 26, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the library main meeting room. We are beginning the planning for our Second Annual Silent Auction to be held in September and want everyones input. League of Women Voters will hold its meeting on ThursdayThe League of Women Voters of Wakulla,will have their monthly meeting on Thursday, April 26, at the library at 7 p.m. With a statewide launch planned for October, the League of Women Voters of Floridas message is Ready, Set, Vote, Florida! Were charged with informing and educating Wakulla voters about issues and changes in the 2012 voting law, said Mary Cortese, League president. We are continuing our Fair Voting 2012 project with this meeting. We will have citizens views and observations of prior elections and we encourage all citizens to share their experiences with us at this meeting, as we are trying to identify problems that hopefully can be avoided this election. As a League we want to ensure fair voting in our county, said Cortese. Recent voting changes in state law make it more challenging to vote, so we want to do several things: encourage voters to register, update their registrations if necessary, encourage people to vote early and to avoid the problems of prior elections. Taking the first step, the Florida League is working on an aggressive statewide awareness campaign to encourage all Florida voters to update their registration this year. The 2012 election is important for Wakulla voters. We will be electing new constitutional officers, three county commissioners, as well as school board members, and most likely will have a half-cent sales tax referendum. Thats why information, education, a fair and transparent election process is critical. Two blood drives will be held locallySoutheastern Community Blood Center is reporting that it is currently very low in all negative blood types and in O positive blood. Several blood drives have been scheduled in the area, including: Thursday, April 26, at Wal-Mart from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 30, at Centennial Bank from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Intermittent lane closures on U.S. 319 in CrawfordvilleMotorists traveling U.S. Highway 319 between Wakulla-Arran Road and Bloxham Cutoff in Wakulla County can expect intermittent nighttime lane closures Sunday, April 22, through Friday, April 27, from 6:30 p.m. until 6 a.m. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL. Staff ReportsWILLIAM SNOWDENCub Scouts visit The Wakulla News of ce and pose with reporter Jennifer Jensen.By DENISE FOLH of The Wakulla NewsA group of Cub Scouts from Tiger Den No. 5 visited The Wakulla News on Tuesday, April 17. The scouts toured the of ce and were introduced to The News staff and learned about how the newspaper is written and produced. News receptionist Denise Folh guided the scouts through the facility and answered their questions. One cub scout asked, Why do we need a newspaper? The question was answered that its necessary to keep everyone well informed with important events in our community. Another cub scout said that his grandfather sits on his chair and puts his eyeglasses on and reads the paper for hours. The scouts received reporter notebooks and newspapers to mark their tour. The scouts met editor William Snowden and reporter Jennifer Jensen, graphic artist Eric Stanton and advertising representative Lynda Kinsey.Cub Scouts visit News officeBriefs Special to The NewsJoin us for the 39th annual Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta this weekend. Activities include sailboat and windsurfer races, the Parrothead Poker Run and a boat auction. The regatta draws more than 200 registered participants and hundreds more spectators from all over the southeast. There are races for boats of all sizes from yachts longer than 20 feet to catamarans and windsurfers. Dermatology Advanced Care will provide free skin cancer screenings on the beach before the races begin on Saturday and Bagel Bagel will provide a continental breakfast. All proceeds support the regional chapter of the American Cancer Society to provide patient care and educational programs about cancer. On Saturday, April 28, the Skippers Meeting is at 10:30 a.m. The races begin at noon at Shell Point Beach. The regatta is in honor of Stephen Smith, a local sailor who died from a rare form of leukemia at the age of 29. Last year, the Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta Foundation was able to donate $18,000 to the local American Cancer Society branch. Special thanks to the Shell Point Sailboard Club, the American Cancer Society, the Apalachee Bay Yacht Club and numerous businesses and individuals for making this event possible.Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta is this weekend e annual regatta will benefit the American Cancer SocietyFair set for mobile food vendorsSpecial to The NewsThe Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) is calling for mobile food vendors to register for its second Mobile Food Vendor Fair. The Department will hold the event on May 15, from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m. at its Tallahassee headquarters at the Northwood Centre, 1940 North Monroe Street. There are more than 60 mobile food vendors and hot dog carts licensed in Leon and Wakulla counties, and all have been invited to participate. DBPR licenses and regulates all food service establishments in the state, including mobile food vendors and hot dog carts. The fair is part of a continued initiative for the Department to encourage business development, especially for small business owners and entrepreneurs. The event is open to the public. Last December, DBPR hosted eight vendors and more than 300 people at its rst ever Mobile Food Vendor Fair. Vendors will be required to check-in with the Department in advance and undergo a full inspection from the Departments Division of Hotels and Restaurants. More information on the Mobile Food Vendor Fair can be found at www.my oridalicense.com/ dbpr/FoodFair5_15_12.html. The Department of Business and Professional Regulations mission is to license ef- ciently and regulate fairly. The Department licenses and regulates more than one million businesses and professionals ranging from hotels and restaurants, real estate agents and accountants to veterinarians, contractors and cosmetologists. For more information, please visit www.MyFloridaLicense.com.Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351 Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 For more information on this event, please contact Sherri Kraeft at the Wakulla County 4-H Extension Ofce at (850) 926-3931 or sjkraeft@u.edu GIANTYARD SALE50+ FAMILIES SATURDAY, April 28 8 am 2 pm CHRIST CHURCH ANGLICANHwy. 98 East of Wakulla High School FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALONTake advantage of Spring/ Summer RatesAsk for our monthly specials! FEATHER LOCKS are here!! 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree)We offer exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT HAIRSALO N Book Your Prom AppointmentNOW!10% OFFW/THIS ADEXP. 5/22/12

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWere Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesMary M. Moore-Gearhart Rona Lavon Hawkins Jr. Catherine Rosier Murray Delpha Syvelle Robison Porter Thelma Louise Sanders Brinson Richard Taylor Sr. Tommy Baldwin WallerChurch BriefsBrinson Richard Taylor Sr., 66, of Panacea, died Friday, April 20, at his home. Funeral Services were held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, April 24, in the Chapel of the Carson McLane Funeral Home of Valdosta, Ga. The burial followed in the Salem Cemetery. The family received friends on Tuesday from 9 a.m. until service time. Carson McLane Funeral Home of Valdosta is in charge of arrangements. Condolences to the family may be conveyed online at www.mclanecares.com. The Reeves Family gospel singing group will perform at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church, 165 Friendship Church Road, on Saturday, April 28, at 6 p.m. The performance is free, and everyone is welcome.The Reeves Family at FriendshipBuckhorn NewsBy ETHEL SKIPPER Thought for the week: We grow in our life for Christ through prayer. If we believe that Gods primary desire for us is a vibrant, intimate relationship with Him, and if we understand prayer as the means by which we communicate with Him, then prayer becomes about so much more than meeting an obligation. The Fifth Sunday Union meeting of the Church of Christ will be held at Skipper Temple, 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy. Everyone is welcome. The Primitive Baptist Union meeting will be held at Zion Hill Primitive Baptist Church April 27 through 29. Host Pastor is Elder Ervin Donaldson. Everyone is welcome. A memorial service for Catherine Rosier Murray will be held at Macedonia Church of Christ Written In Heaven, 1408 Sopchoppy Highway in Sopchoppy, on Saturday, April 28, at 11 a.m. To celebrate the National Day of Prayer on May 3, the Florida United Methodist Childrens Home will host an 11 a.m. ecumenical prayer service followed by a picnic lunch and a prayer walk over the property that will be developed into the Madison Youth Ranch in Pinetta. If you would like to caravan to the event with members of the Wakulla United Methodist Church, Wakulla Station, please call the church of ce at (850) 421-5741. Faith Holiness House of Prayer will host a Fifth Sunday Sing featuring the Drummonds ministering in song on Sunday, April 29, at 6 p.m. The church is located at 726 Woodville Highway, Crawfordville. For more information, call Pastor Cris Dudley at 421-1324 or Assistant Pastor Glinda Raker at 363-3294.National Day of Prayer travel Fifth Sunday features the DrummondsPioneer Baptist Church will host a community-wide Open Microphone Gospel Sing on Friday, April 27, at 7 p.m. Anyone who enjoys singing or playing gospel music is invited to participate. Others who enjoy listening are encouraged to attend and have a blessed night of worship through music. There is no charge for the concert. Pioneer Baptist Church, 486 Beech-wood Drive, is located four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the Dr. MLK Jr. Memorial Road and the Spring Creek Highway int ersec-tion. Please call Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-5224 for more information. We hope to see you.Gospel sing at Pioneer BaptistRona Lavon Hawkins Jr., 28, of Sopchoppy, died Tuesday, April 17, in Carrabelle from injuries sustained in an automobile accident. He was a chef and an entrepreneur. His service was held Wednesday, April 25, at 11 a.m. at River of Life Church in Crawfordville, with burial at Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church #1 in Crawfordville. The family received friends on Tuesday, April 24, from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Richardsons Family Funeral Care of Tallahassee Survivors include a daughter, Arianna LaNya Hawkins; his mother, Mayor Colleen Skipper (Tony) of Sopchoppy; sister, Elizabeth Clary of Quincy; nephew and niece, Gary Jr. and HeLyy; paternal grandparents, Weldon and Bonnie Hawkins; maternal grandparents, Deacon Willie and Pastor Ethel Skipper; uncles and aunts, Willie Skipper Jr., Carlton Hawkins, Chinesta Smith (Rodney), Glenda Simmons (Archie), Charlene Green (Leston), Beverly Jefferson (Donald) and Lisa Mitchell; and a host of great uncles and aunts, cousins and friends including his favorite dog T-Rex. He was predeceased by his father, Rona Lavon Hawkins Sr.; grandmother, Willie Mae Mills Webster; great-aunt, Julie Mills; and brother-in-law, the Rev. Gary E. Clary Sr. Richardsons Family Funeral Care of Tallahassee (850) 576-4144 was in charge of the arrangements.Rona Lavon Hawkins Jr. Brinson Richard Taylor Sr.A memorial service for Catherine Rosier Murray will be held at Macedonia Church of Christ Written In Heaven, 1408 Sopchoppy Highway, in Sopchoppy, on Saturday, April 28, at 11 a.m. She was a graduate of Florida A&M University and was a middle school mathematics teacher at Pierce Middle School. Survivors include her husband, Norman; son, Girardeau; daughter, Ashley; siblings, Richard Mills, Ezella Rosier, Frances Strokes, Grace Williams, Jollivet Holmes, Kenneth Rosier (Yolanda), Patrick Rosier (Teresa) and mother-in-law, Mrs. Gloria White; aunts, Ethel Skipper (Willie), Alberta Hines (Isaiah), Callie Gavin (Wender) and Ruth Easter; uncles, Joseph Rosier (Mary) and Meriddie Rosier (Bobbery); and a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. She was predeceased by her daughter Jasmine in 1988. Delpha Syvelle Robison Porter, 81, of Panacea, passed away on Monday, April 23. She was born in Ivan to Shirley and Mary Spears Robison. She was a member of the Panacea Full Gospel Assembly Church. She enjoyed attending church, singing and spending time with family and friends. Survivors include her sons, William Wright Porter, William Jackson Porter and Samuel Porter, all of Panacea; daughters, Shirley (Roy) West and Darlene (Rod) Thieme of Crawfordville, Minnie Robison, Essie (Dale) Long and Dorlene Porter, all of Panacea, and Cynthia (Robert) Dickey, Polly (Chris) Brown and Dellie Lively all of Tallahassee; 19 grandchildren, 32 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Steven Jackson Porter; and her daughter: Sheila Porter. Funeral services were held on Sunday, April 19 at 3 p.m. at the Crawfordville First Baptist Church with the Rev. B.B. Barwick and the Rev. Bruce Taylor of ciating. Interment will follow at Bonnett Pond Cemetery in Medart. The family will receive friends Saturday, April 28, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Crawfordville First Baptist Church. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850559-3380). Please sign the online guestbook at www. forbesfuneralhome.net. Delpha Syvelle Robison Porter Catherine Rosier Murray Obituaries continue on Page 12A

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 7AhappeningsCommunityBy MICHELLE KIRBY2nd vice president of UDCWith the end of another school year in sight, high school seniors and current college co-eds are looking for nancial resources for next year. The United Daughters of the Confederacy offers scholarships to descendants of Confederate veterans who gave service during the Civil War. Interested applicants should contact Michelle Kirby at rdonmcleodudc@gmail. com. The state division and local chapter deadlines are June 15. Visit http://rdonmcleod. wordpress.com for more information. Kinley Faith Pitman celebrated her rst birthday on April 22. She is the daughter of Page and Dana Pitman of Crawfordville. Her paternal grandparents are the late Eugene and Bettye Pitman. Her maternal grandparents are Allen and Susan Dees and the late Tony Bramblett and Judy all of Crawfordville. Happy rst birthdayThe Sopchoppy High School class of 1962 are front row: Annette Porter Strickland, Bessie Nell Thomas GIlbert, Louise Willis Thomas, Donna Gail Sanders Dees, Carolyn Sue Roberts Greener, Marvis Thomas. Back row: Steve Stephens Jr., Morris Metcalf, Leonard Crum, Pat Cassidy( English Teacher), Pleasant Vause, Ronnie Gray, Murray McLaughlin, Jerome Colvin, Walt Dickson. Those classmates who were unable to attend are Mildred Dalton Chandler, Linda Porter Hutton, Dorothy Anderson Gray, Clyde Nichols, Fred Davis, Wayne Richardson, Hayden Gray, Melvin Harrell and the late Franklin Jones.Sopchoppy High class of celebrates reunion SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Brittany L. Harrell and Tyler F. ScottScott to wed Harrell Brittany Leigh Harrell of Thomasville, Ga., and Tyler Freeman Scott of Crawfordville announce their engagement. Harrell is the daughter of Mike and Katrina Harrell of Thomasville, Ga. She is a 2005 graduate of Brookwood School and a graduate of Southwest Georgia Technical College where she received an associates degree in early childhood education. She is employed by the City of Thomasville. Scott is the son of Larry and Rosalyn Scott of Crawfordville. He is a 2005 graduate of Wakulla High School and a graduate of Florida State University where he received a bachelors degree in biochemistry with a minor in biological science. He is employed by Florida State University and assists with research in the area of neuroscience. A wedding is planned at The Retreat at Bradleys Pond on May 11.Michelle Kirby wins state recognition from DARSpecial to The NewsOne of Wakulla Countys own recently won state recognition from the Daughters of the American Revolution. Michelle McMillan Kirby, daughter of Finley and Jean McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay, entered her shell crochet baby afghan in DARs annual American Heritage competition. Kirby was recently presented her certi cate by her Chapter Regent, Kay Hollis, also of Wakulla County. Her entry is moving on to the regional level. If it places nationally, her blanket will be on display at the National DAR headquarters in Washington, D.C., during their Continental Congress week in July. If I win, I surely want to go to D.C. for this, said Kirby. It will also give me a chance to visit and work in the Children of the American Revolution museum also located at DAR headquarters. Kirby is also af liated with C.A.R. serving as Floridas current Senior State Curator. The blanket is an intended gift for a colleague who recently delivered her rst baby girl. Kirby is a writer, staff development and technology consultant and also currently work as a reading coach and teacher at Rickards High School in Tallahassee. She is active in Crawfordvilles R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469, United Daughters of the Confederacy, where she serves as 2nd vice president in charge of coordinating scholarships and as recorder of Military Service Awards. She also serves on the Poppy Committee of her American Legion Auxilliary Unit 13 in Tallahassee. She lives in Tallahassee with her husband Paul and son Andy. Michelle Kirby Kinley F. Pitman Seth and Ashley Hodge of Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughter, Brenley Nicole Hodge, born on March 13. She weighed 5 pounds, 9 ounces and was 18-inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Keith and Mary Wallace of Crawfordville. Her paternal grandparents are Richie and Renae Hodge of Crawfordville. She has an older brother Brody Hodge who is 10 years old.Hodges welcome a baby girlScholarships are available from United DaughtersCarraway graduates from Army basic combat training Special to The NewsArmy Pvt. Daniel J. Carraway has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson, Columbia, S.C During the nine weeks of training, he studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical tness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, rifle marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, eld tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic rst aid, foot marches, and eld training exercises. Carraway is the son of Sharon and Brad Carraway of Sopchoppy. He is a 2009 graduate of Wakulla High School.Email your community news to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net. Announcements are published as space becomes available and edited for style, length and clarity.Taking a Break Hope to Return WANTEDCounty Commission Candidate for District 5 (Medart, Sopchoppy, Smith Creek) to replace Commissioner Lynn Artz Preferred Qualications Community Oriented Seless seeks no personal gain Cares about all residents An advocate for children and youth Protects our Environment Recognizes that 96% of Wakullas residents want to protect our natural environment Understands that our Countys economic future depends on preserving our precious natural assets and our uniqueness Appreciates that we are temporary stewards for a brief moment in time Works to prevent tragedies of the commons Advocates Smart Growth Recognizes that most of Wakullas residents want clustered development, not sprawl Knows that clustered development is more efcient and less costly for local governments Advocates for development within Crawfordville, Panacea, Sopchoppy, & St. Marks Supports the Crawfordville Town Plan Promotes Sustainability Embraces the new energy economy Recognizes the savings potential of energy efciency and conservation Advocates for 21st century infrastructure Anticipates the future demand for green jobs Future Oriented, even Visionary Takes a long-term view Seeks successful models from other communities Avoids the mistakes of other communities Has a clear, comprehensive, and viable future vision for Wakulla County RationalDecision Maker Respects science, education, experience, and experts Thoroughly studies an issue Carefully weighs the pros and cons Makes evidence-based decisions Civil Colleague Kind, polite, courteous, and collegial Respectful of people with different views Positive, creative, seeks solutions, initiates Knows that being critical is easy the challenge is to offer a better alternative Has the courage to stand up for what is right Diversity Increases diversity on the Commission Helps the Commission look like the electorate If the above describes you, Wakulla County needs you. Please commit to taking your turn for the benet of all. Then RUN to the Supervisor of Elections Ofce to obtain campaign information and meet important deadlines. Please also contact me [926-8756(h), 320-2158(c), lynn_artz@hotmail.com] for campaign advice and assistance. From the desk of Lyn n Art z . .Dear Frien ds & Ne igh bors, Alt hou gh I w oul d love to continue to work o n you r be hal f f or fou r mo re yea rs, sa dly I m ust step d own fr om the Co unt y Co mmiss ion du e to fam ily conce rns I h ope to ret urn to the Commiss ion in fou r yea rs. In the me antime f or the sa ke of Wakull a Co unt ys f utu re, I a sk tha t yo u he lp wit h va lue s s imi lar to you rs an d mi ne. (See ad to rig ht. ) I w ill conti nue to volunt ee r an d h elp wit h com mun ity pr oje cts and a cti vities as m y tim e allows. I e nco ura ge you to bec ome mor e i nfo rme d a nd eng age d with yo ur local gov ern ment. Do ing so is vit all y im por tant fo r you r fu tur e and t he fut ure of o ur Cou nty War m r ega rds and b est wi shes, Lyn n WINDOWSBestWindow...Best Price...Best Choice! 1 Double Pane InsulatedGlass $179*Any size Installed of TALLAHASSEE COME VISITUS AT GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL850-519-5056www.abcwintallahassee.com

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com education news from local schoolsSchoolEmployee and Teacher of the Month are named for April Wakulla County student Julianna Lopez recently won second place in the Leon Wakulla Retired Educators Association essay contest. She is a fifth grader at Shadeville Elementary School. Members of the association presented Lopez with $50 and a plaque for her efforts on April 3. Special to The NewsWakulla County School District students just received word that they placed sixth in the state for the number of minutes read during the Florida Department of Education sponsored Million Minute Marathon held during Januarys Celebrate Literacy Week. The annual celebration focuses on building excitement and motivation for reading. Wakulla students clocked more than 200,000 minutes of reading for the contest. Recognizing the foundational importance of reading in a students education, Superintendent David Miller said, Our students and teachers are to be commended for making such a great effort to spotlight the importance of literacy by participating to such an extent. The Wakulla Million Minute Marathon was organized and supported by reading coaches, administrators and teachers. Class time was given to allow students to focus on reading beyond their usual reading lessons. Media specialists spotlighted books throughout the week, and school news shows featured teachers and students favorite books. Celebrate Literacy Week in Wakulla County public schools included other activities as well. Business leaders read in classrooms, and FSU athletes visited Wakulla High School to encourage students to read. A highlight of the week was the WHS visit by local author Rhett DeVane. In response to the recognition, Wakulla Middle School Principal Mike Barwick said, We are all about reading. Special to The NewsThe April Teacher of the Month is Riversink Elementary Schools Bryan Roddenberry and the April Employee of the Month is Transportation Department employee Hiram Carter. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the dependability and dedication these employees bring to the District, as well as the positive attitude they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Roddenberry has been coaching public school students in elementary physical education for almost 20 years. Fortunately, in 2007, he was hired at Riversink to speci cally share his knowledge and enthusiasm with the Otters. He has also coached for the Parks and Recreation Department for 15 years. Roddenberry has a bachelors and masters degree from Florida State University and is a National Board Certi ed Teacher. He grew up in South Florida graduating from Coral Springs High School. When asked what he enjoys most about his job at Riversink, Roddenberry said, The staff I work with at Riversink has the most positive attitude I have ever been around in my career. Principal Jackie High said, Bryan is a joy. He is fun and playful while remaining professional at all times. He has established an outstanding PE program and pick up routine at our school. He is dependable and dedicated and we appreciate him. Bryan Roddenberry plays a key role in the success of Riversink Elementary School. The April Employee of the Month is Carter. Carter has been a school bus driver for the district since January 2007. Prior to that time he worked for the state in the Information Systems Department. A 1959 graduate of Crawfordville High School, Carter said he enjoys interacting with co-workers and students. He said, Each day offers something new and different. This job has taught me how fortunate I am to be involved with a great school system, transporting wonderful and delightful students. Transportation Coordinator Pat Jones said, Mr. Carter is dedicated to the safety of Wakulla students and it shows in the smooth and ef cient running of his bus routes. He has a great cando attitude at all times. Mr. Carter possesses the knowledge, patience, natural talent and experience necessary to make our students feel safe. His contributions to the success of the transportation department are an asset. Bryan Roddenberry Hiram Carter SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLinda Davis, Juliannas fth grade teacher, Julianna Lopez and DeeAnn Hughes, assistant principal of Shadeville Elementary School. Lopez wins second place in contest Wakulla places sixth in reading contestWHS graduates attend Model UN conferenceSixteen students from Tallahassee Community College recently attended the National Model United Nations (NMUN) conference in New York City. The students, representing the United Nations delegation from Ireland, earned a Distinguished Delegation Award, one of the highest level awards given at the conference. Three Wakulla High School graduates were on the team, Kyle Patterson, Katie Lily and Christian Wilkes. All three participated in Model UN at Wakulla High School. Over 5,800 students from 44 countries convened in New York to participate in the simulation April 1 8.-Courtesy of TCC

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsA game winning y-ball catch by senior Sloan Barwick clenched the District title for Wakullas Lady War Eagles varsity softball team on Tuesday, April 17 against Suwannee High School. After having been defeated by Suwannee twice this season, Wakulla sailed to an easy 6-3 victory over the Bulldogs for the championship. Defensively, it all came together tonight, said Wakulla Head Coach Tom Graham. The top of the rst inning saw the Lady War Eagles ahead with three runs, even with star Suwannee pitcher Tinsley Smith on the mound. The War Eagles kept the lead throughout the game, scoring a run in the fth inning, and two more in the seventh. The Bulldogs scored runs in the fourth and the fth innings, and a nal run in the 7th, but were unable to catch up. Playing somebody the third time is rough, said Suwannee Head Coach Tommy Chambers. And when you get behind a good team, theyll just take a hold and get stronger. Before that game, the Lady War Eagles drubbed Rickards 11-1 in the District semi- nals at 5 p.m., setting up the nal against Suwannee for the district title. Graham attributed the win to teamwork and a lot of effort put forth by the girls. Taylor Hussey ended the game as the relief pitcher coming in after Michael Cooper, who wowed the crowd with two impressive change-ups in the second inning. Kenzie Lee had two strong hits at the top of the fth and seventh and made it to third base on a bunt in the rst inning, driving home three runs. Second baseman Cami Eaton also had a strong showing at the game, catching a grounder and a linedrive in the second inning and catching a y in the fourth inning. With Wakulla in the eld, at the bottom of the fourth, Courtney Flowers delivered the ball to first baseman Sloan Barwick to tag out Suwannee High number 11, Haejin Choe. Flowers repeated the move in the fth inning and caught a pop y in the same inning. The Lady War Eagles will play the rst round of regionals at home on Wednesday, April 25, at 7 p.m. The Lady War Eagles made it to regionals last year and this year will be playing Panama City-Arnold or West Florida Tech to advance to the next round.SOFTBALLLady War Eagles are district champs LUCY CARTER/Special to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles celebrate the district title.TRACKBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach The Wakulla High School track athletes and relay teams who qualified in Districts, traveled to Jacksonville on Thursday, April 19, to compete in the 2A Region 1 nals. The local runners had a good meet with two athletes bringing home individual Regional Titles. Last years Regional 800 Meter Champion, sophomore Madison (Madi) Harris, running in that event, took the lead from the starting gun, pushed the pace and was never seriously challenged. She won the event in the excellent time of 2:18.29, almost 5 seconds ahead of the second place nisher and became a twotime Regional Champion. For the boys, senior Stanley Linton continued to prove that he is one of the best middle distance runners in the state. Running in the 3200-meter run, he ran a very controlled race for the rst 1600 meters (metric mile), running comfortably in 5-6th place. Then he began to push the pace and took over the lead of the pack of ve pursuing the Bishop Kenny runner who had opened what appeared to be an insurmountable lead. Over the next four laps, the chase pack remained almost 100 meters behind the lead runner. In the last 400 meters, Linton and the chase pack started to close the gap, but coming off the last curve, the Bishop Kenny runner still looked to have the race won. However, approximately 50 meters from the nish, he tied up and Linton and the chase group blew by him. From then on it was a battle of wills and toughness to see which of the three runners left in the pursuing pack would cross the nish line rst. Linton proved that he wanted it the most and held his slim lead, winning the race by .29 of a second, for his rst Regional Title. Harris and Lintons performances made WHS history as this is the rst time that the local team has had two regional winners in the same year and the rst time both a boy and girl won Regional titles in the same year. Overall, the other WHS runners had a very good meet. The opening running event was the girls 4x800 relay and the local team of Cora Atkinson, Emily McCullers, Norma Woodcock and Lydia Wiedeman ran a solid race, finishing in seventh place in 10:34.04, only about 3 seconds off the school record. The boys 4x800 relay team of David Sloan, Mitchell Atkinson, Gabe Hutchins and J.P. Piotrowski followed them and ran well to place 11th in 9:09.94. In the girls 1600 meters, sophomore Marty Wiedeman ran aggressively with the leaders through three laps, but faded a little in the 4th one to finish in 7th place in the very good time of 5:42.24. Freshman Lili Broadway also ran a solid 1600 meters to nish in 6:06.99, in 14th place. In the girls open 800 meters, freshman Lydia Wiedeman served notice that she will be a factor for the next three years by nishing in 10th place in 2:31.51. Senior Cora Atkinson and freshman Kasey James were the local entrants in the nal individual event of the evening, the 3200 meter run. Atkinson, one of the best and most consistent runners on the team, ran solidly once again, placing 7th in the good time of 12:23.97. James, running in her rst high school Regionals, ran well, nishing in 13:15.85 and placing 13th. In the last event, the WHS girls 4x400 meter relay team of Alina McCullers, Emily McCullers, Norma Woodcock and Madison Harris challenged the best teams thet region had to offer. The rst three legs for the local team all ran well and were in 7th place, approximately 5 seconds behind the 6th place team from Rickards High School when Harris took the baton. At Districts last week Harris started the nal leg 7 seconds behind the same Rickards team and came within a few hundredths of a second of catching their anchor runner. Harris again set off in pursuit of the Rickards anchor leg and this time she was able to close the gap and nipped the girl at the tape and the local team nished in 6th place, .02 of a second ahead of the Rickards team. The WHS team nished in the excellent time of 4:13.42, which is a new school record for the event. Overall, the girls team had their best showing ever at Regionals, finishing in 12th place out of 29 teams. The boys nished in 20th place. We really did have a good meet, said Coach Paul Hoover. As recently as two years ago, our main goal was simply to qualify for Regionals. Now we expect to be competitive at the meet and we de nitely were.Harris repeats; Linton wins PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStanley Linton, top, crosses the nish line; Madi Harris, above, in the lead, was never seriously challenged.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Red Sox 12u travel baseball team, coached by Keith Anderson and Mike Barwick, went undefeated in the recent Blue Devil Classic Tournament in Tifton, Ga., earning the coveted championship trophy on Saturday, April 21. The one-day tournament, despite the looming weather forecast throughout the day, belonged to the Red Sox as they remained steady and focused each game. Great defense, hitting and pitching, not to mention three homers, all contributed to the tournament win. It was the tournament of 2012 for the Red Sox. Standing: Coach Anderson, Jared Weber, Tyler Olah, Bradley Lord, Hunter Greene, Hayden Carlton, and Coach Barwick; kneeling: Bailey Fagan, Carson Dykes, Jacob Dismuke, Thomas Anderson and Will Barwick. BASEBALLRed Sox 12u win Blue Devil Classic all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comOutdoors SportsBy MICHAEL BRIGGSSpecial to The NewsWakulla Babe Ruth opened this weekend with renditions of our National Anthem by Marc Carters mom, Angel, and Katherine Martinez. The fundraiser was a lot of fun and very successful, with the Home Run Derby won by Aaron Price, Golden Arm won by Josh Conway and Fastest Base Runner won by Michael McGlamry. Parents, friends and relatives really stepped up by donating $1,500 on a stormy day for lunch organized by Suzanne Kilgore and Maria Lentz. Business support was strong as well from team sponsors Harrison Bail Bonds, Ameris Bank, Badcock Furniture and Tallahassee Surgical Associates. League sponsors are High Quality Heating & Air and Hamrick Insurance. GAME SUMMARIES Thursday: Outlaws vs. Rays 4-1. Outlaws pitchers were Chase Forester, Skyler Talavera and Lucas Briggs. Greysen Rudd opened the Babe Ruth season with a lead-off double. Hits for the Outlaws were by Greysen, Chase, Nick Lentz, and Lucas. Rays pitchers were Shane Davis, Aaron Price, Nolan Terry and Clayton Burroughs. Rays hitters were Shane, Brice Brooks, Clayton, and Aaron had a pair. Friday: Sluggers vs. Titans, in a victory for the Sluggers, 15-3. Sluggers pitchers were Caleb Langston, Marc Carter and Tyler Teegan. Sluggers spread the hitting out with Michael McGalmry, Caleb, Jake Bryan, Marc Carter had two hits, Dylan Causseaux, Josh Conway, Gabe Barwick, Tyler and Daniel Lamarche. Titans worked out the bullpen with Jordan Vaughan, John Weber, RJ Kinard, Jackson Montgomery, Zach Norman, and Aaron Ginn. Titans hitters were Zach, John Weber with 2 hits, and Jackson. Sluggers and Outlaws tied 2-2 in game 3, the Saturday morning opener. Sluggers pitchers were Jake and Tyler. Sluggers hitters were a pair by Michael and a double by Tyler. Outlaws pitchers were Greysen and Nick. Outlaws hitters were Greysen, Chase, Nick, Brandon Bennett, Skyler with a double, and James Calhoun. Game 4 Rays and Titans was postponed due to the storm, and Game 5, same teams, was postponed due to FCAT. These games will be made up during the season. All in all, a very successful opening. Thanks to the players, coaching, umpiring (Jim Posey and crew), parents, friends, local businesses, the Rec park, Wakulla Babe Ruth Board members and many answered prayers. Remember to check out the Wakulla Babe Ruth Facebook page for pictures and status updates.BASEBALLBabe Ruth opener is held PHOTOS BY LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Sluggers remove their caps for the games opening ceremonies. Homerun Derby winner Aaron Price of the RaysSpecial to The NewsThe Panacea Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament will be held Saturday and Sunday, April 28 and 29. The event was founded in 2009 to bene t the Panacea Coastal Community and to promote the excellent shing and boating opportunities in and around Panacea. This family-oriented event has raised money for improvements to the Panacea Coastal Community, including the restoration of the Rock Landing Dock and Boat Ramp. Registration and the Captains Party/Meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Friday, April 27, next to the Rock Landing Marina. Attendance is mandatory for all participating anglers and the event is open to the public. Dinner will be provided by Poseys Up the Creek restaurant for all registered participants, with additional food and beverage available for purchase. Entertainment will be provided by Locomotive. Weigh-ins for the twoday shing event will be held Saturday, April 28, from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, April 29, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The tournament will feature a purse of nearly $20,000 in cash and prizes. Also included will be a 12-foot G-3 jonboat, Yamaha motor, Minn Kota Trolling Motor, Hummingbird Fish Finder and Road King 12foot trailer, to be awarded to one of the Youth Division competitors. Also one lucky angler in the Kayak division can win a 14-foot Red sh Heritage Angler Kayak donated by T-n-T Hide-A-Way Canoe Rental. Lady anglers can register to win a prize package worth over $500. In addition to the Youth division, the event features Recreational and Kayak Divisions, each with individual prizes. Skeeter Demo Rides will be offered on Friday from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., and Saturday and Sunday at noon to be eligible to win a free tarpon shing vacation for two. Also, take a Dodge demo ride to be eligible to win a free rod and reel. Vendors will be set up on both days. The tournament will include family-oriented activities, vendors and music on Saturday and Sunday during the nal weigh-ins. For more information and registration please visit the website, www. panacearockthedock.com or on Facebook, or contact Mark Mitchell at (850) 508-3379. Rock the Dock is this weekend in Panacea e Captains Meeting is Friday night next to Rock Landing Marina at 6 p.m. e weigh-in is Saturday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. MAY 19th, 2012Heaviest FIVE fishTROUT stringer. Big Fish is the longest Redfish orTrout*Cash Prizes are based on # of participant entries.Tournament Directors: Lee Rutledge (850) 251-2536Brings you the Rock Landing Marina Panacea, FL Rock Landing Marina Panacea, FL 1st Place 2nd Place 3rd Place Big Fish 1st Place 2nd Place 3 r d Place Big Fish $1000 $500 $250 $150 Proceeds to benefit:ENT RY FEE ONL Y $50PER ANGL ERKID S $ 25The Tallahassee Professional Firefighters Foundation(Including the NORTH FLORIDA CHILDRENS BURN CAMP)&local heroes competing in the State Police and Fire Olympics1800411 PAIN 72 4 6MEDICAL and LAWYER REFERAL SERVICE LIVE MUSIC by L.P.T.( 850 ) 528-4985PROFESSIONAL POOL MAINTENANCEpoolproblems?atthelowestratesweoffermaintenanceandservice!Servicing Swimming Pools and Spas for over 10 yearsTitus Langston850528-4985Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured Patriots Day Cajun Cookout April 28Featuring Jambalaya and all the xings.$10 a plate to benet The Three Soldiers Detail, South in Apalachicola.Program begins at 11 a.m. lunch is served at NoonTickets available at The Wakulla Chamber of Commercewww.threeservicemenstatuesouth.org www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD What a welcome break we had from the typical April weather this weekend with a cooler than average weekend. After a good soaking to wash away dust and grime, there was nothing to complain about. Saturday was the annual Apalachicola Antique and Classic Boat show. Larry Kolk has entered his handbuilt wooden vessel for several years. The Georgiana invokes the style of the classic lifeboats used by the Coast Guard in its early years. As one of our long-time members, Larry always goes above and beyond to showcase our efforts as well as his beautiful vessel. Next weekend, members will once again head over to the more western reaches of our Area of Responsibility for the 22nd Annual Carrabelle Riverfront Festival. This year we are honored to be a part of the festivities along with the Governor Stone, an historic, two-masted wooden sailing vessel from 1877. This annual event is not only exciting to be a part of, but also a great opportunity to remind residents and visitors about our presence in the area. We have several active Flotilla members in the St. George, Apalachicola, Carrabelle area and they are working hard to provide safe boating information and re-establish the auxiliarys presence in the area. Please stop by our booth by the Seahawk to nd out about what we are up to and how you can be a part of increasing safe boating. As I continue to bring you parts of the Navigation Rules that mostly pertain to our area, here are a few more de nitions that are used throughout the rules: The term vessel restricted in her ability to maneuver means a vessel that due to the works she is engaged, cannot move out of the way of another vessel. This can include vessels like a buoy tender, dredgers in the channels, pilot boats or other vessels transferring people or cargo while both vessels are underway, vessels assisting in towing aircrafts, and vessels towing cargo that severely limits her ability to maneuver. The next term, a vessel constrained by her draft means a vessel powered by an engine or motor, that is restricted in her ability to move from her course due to the depth of the water and the depth needed to ensure she does not damage her hull or run aground. Draft is the distance from where the hull meets the water to the lowest point on the boat. When a vessel is said to be underway, that means that she is not anchored, moored to a shoreline/buoy or aground on an oyster bed or sand bar. That means a vessel that is drifting, is a vessel underway. Length means the greatest distance from bow to stern, her overall length. Breadth is the greatest distance from the port (left) to starboard (right) sides of the vessel, her width. Vessels shall be deemed to be in sight of one another only when one can be seen visually from the other. This does not include using radar or other navigational equipment. The term restricted visibility means any condition in which the ability to see is restricted by fog, mist, falling snow, heavy rainstorms, sandstorms or any other similar causes. For us, this is often fog and rain. Afternoon pop up showers and morning/evening fog can come without warning and be very dangerous. We have lost boaters in years past to fog when they became disoriented. I will continue to put relevant navigation rules in the article when there is space. Soon our forgotten coast will not be so forgotten as summer vacationers and locals head out to enjoy the beauty of our coast. Knowing your navigation rules is important to being prepared and safe when out on the water. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! A practical comparison. Monday, Travis and I went for a typical dive. We drove 100 miles to Jackson County to their Meritts Mill Pond, to a cave called Jackson Blue. There we paid for the privilege to dive their cave system, a dive to a depth of 95 feet and a penetration of 2,500 feet one-way, or 5,000 feet roundtrip taking us 141 minutes, including decompression. I make these dives on the average of once a week, exercise for my good health and mental improvement, not unlike a brisk stroll in the park. I dive a Closed Circuit Rebreather (CCR), while Travis dives Open Circuit (OC). Our very different con guration on todays dive is called mixed team diving and is common these days. The opposing philosophy believes both divers must dive exactly the same con guration, and preferably OC. On our way home this evening we began to compare the challenges we each faced with our different technology and realized this would make a great topic for this column. To safely complete this dive, Travis consumed 230 cubic feet of breathing gas over the 141 minutes. He breathed Nitrox 32 percent to minimize decompression stress and 100 percent oxygen above 20 feet to reduce decompression time. For safety reasons he carried 80 cubic feet of gas as a bail-out option, should his primary gases fail, since he could not rely upon my rebreather as a reserve supply. He also used two-thirds of his primary breathing gas keeping the rest, or 160 cubic feet, for emergencies. If you add this all up he carried 510 cubic feet of breathing gas to safely complete this dive. That volume of gas translated into seven diving cylinders. Had he consolidated his cylinders better, he might have been able to get the number down to six or even ve cylinders, but not today. Each cylinder has a regulator and harness totaling $4,000 for the lot. The gas cost $65 but the gas used was about $25 as there was ample reserve. We both wore dry suits to keep warm in the 67-degree water, carried very bright lamps rendering the cave spectacularly beautiful, computers for safe decompression and reels to help map our exit and carried matching back up supplies each costing the same at about $6,000. I made this same trip breathing from a CCR, recirculating the gas, and adding consumed oxygen. I took two 20 cubic foot cylinders attached to my CCR, one with 100 percent oxygen and one with air (21 percent). I used one-third of the oxygen and 1/10th of the air during the 141 minute dive. I also carried one 80 cf cylinder of Nitrox 32 percent as bailout and consumed about 10 percent as make-up gas. I left a 30 cf cylinder of 100 percent oxygen at 20 feet as a precaution, which I did not use. My gas taken cost $15. I also used one- fth of my Carbon Dioxide lter (called the scrubber) at a cost of $5, so round out my gasses taken at $20 for the 141 minute dive. My rebreather cost $8,000 to purchase, about twice that of Travis OC rig. Both systems require about the same investment in yearly maintenance assuming Travis, as a reg tech, services his own equipment. Assuming both rigs last as long, when will our investment equal each other? Call me at (850) 545-9198 if you can gure it out! One thing we did agree upon after the dive: I was much more relaxed not hauling so many cylinders as Travis. My footprint (as they call it) weighed 100 pounds while his weighed 225 pounds. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday py Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed May 2, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 6:23 AM High 1.5 ft. 11:23 AM 0.1 ft. 12:27 AM 0.3 ft. 1:20 AM 0.5 ft. 2:26 AM 0.6 ft. 3:38 AM 0.7 ft. 4:46 AM 0.7 ft. 5:44 AM Low 3.6 ft. 5:03 PM 2.8 ft. 7:18 AM 2.8 ft. 8:25 AM 2.8 ft. 9:38 AM 3.0 ft. 10:41 AM 3.2 ft. 11:30 AM 3.4 ft. 12:11 PM High 1.7 ft. 12:12 PM 1.8 ft. 1:20 PM 1.8 ft. 2:50 PM 1.5 ft. 4:21 PM 1.0 ft. 5:33 PM 0.4 ft. 6:31 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:46 PM 3.1 ft. 6:44 PM 2.9 ft. 8:14 PM 2.8 ft. 10:05 PM 3.0 ft. 11:36 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed May 2, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 6:20 AM High 1.6 ft. 11:20 AM 0.1 ft. 12:24 AM 0.3 ft. 1:17 AM 0.5 ft. 2:23 AM 0.6 ft. 3:35 AM 0.7 ft. 4:43 AM 0.8 ft. 5:41 AM Low 3.6 ft. 5:00 PM 2.9 ft. 7:15 AM 2.8 ft. 8:22 AM 2.9 ft. 9:35 AM 3.0 ft. 10:38 AM 3.3 ft. 11:27 AM 3.5 ft. 12:08 PM High 1.8 ft. 12:09 PM 2.0 ft. 1:17 PM 1.9 ft. 2:47 PM 1.6 ft. 4:18 PM 1.1 ft. 5:30 PM 0.4 ft. 6:28 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:43 PM 3.2 ft. 6:41 PM 2.9 ft. 8:11 PM 2.9 ft. 10:02 PM 3.1 ft. 11:33 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed Ma y 2, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 12:12 AM High -0.0 ft. 12:48 AM 0.1 ft. 1:31 AM 0.3 ft. 2:24 AM 0.4 ft. 3:30 AM 0.5 ft. 4:42 AM 0.6 ft. 5:50 AM 0.7 ft. 6:48 AM Low 2.7 ft. 6:59 AM 2.6 ft. 7:54 AM 2.6 ft. 9:01 AM 2.6 ft. 10:14 AM 2.8 ft. 11:17 AM 3.0 ft. 12:06 PM 3.2 ft. 12:47 PM High 1.4 ft. 12:27 PM 1.5 ft. 1:16 PM 1.6 ft. 2:24 PM 1.6 ft. 3:54 PM 1.3 ft. 5:25 PM 0.9 ft. 6:37 PM 0.4 ft. 7:35 PM Low 3.3 ft. 5:39 PM 3.1 ft. 6:22 PM 2.9 ft. 7:20 PM 2.7 ft. 8:50 PM 2.6 ft. 10:41 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed May 2, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 6:15 AM High 1.1 ft. 11:34 AM 0.1 ft. 12:38 AM 0.2 ft. 1:31 AM 0.3 ft. 2:37 AM 0.4 ft. 3:49 AM 0.5 ft. 4:57 AM 0.5 ft. 5:55 AM Low 2.7 ft. 4:55 PM 2.1 ft. 7:10 AM 2.1 ft. 8:17 AM 2.1 ft. 9:30 AM 2.2 ft. 10:33 AM 2.4 ft. 11:22 AM 2.6 ft. 12:03 PM High 1.2 ft. 12:23 PM 1.3 ft. 1:31 PM 1.3 ft. 3:01 PM 1.1 ft. 4:32 PM 0.7 ft. 5:44 PM 0.3 ft. 6:42 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:38 PM 2.3 ft. 6:36 PM 2.1 ft. 8:06 PM 2.1 ft. 9:57 PM 2.3 ft. 11:28 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed May 2, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 6:07 AM High 1.5 ft. 11:02 AM 0.1 ft. 12:06 AM 0.3 ft. 12:59 AM 0.4 ft. 2:05 AM 0.6 ft. 3:17 AM 0.6 ft. 4:25 AM 0.7 ft. 5:23 AM Low 2.8 ft. 4:47 PM 2.2 ft. 7:02 AM 2.1 ft. 8:09 AM 2.2 ft. 9:22 AM 2.3 ft. 10:25 AM 2.5 ft. 11:14 AM 2.7 ft. 11:55 AM High 1.6 ft. 11:51 AM 1.8 ft. 12:59 PM 1.7 ft. 2:29 PM 1.4 ft. 4:00 PM 1.0 ft. 5:12 PM 0.4 ft. 6:10 PM Low 2.6 ft. 5:30 PM 2.4 ft. 6:28 PM 2.2 ft. 7:58 PM 2.2 ft. 9:49 PM 2.4 ft. 11:20 PM High Thu Apr 26, 12 Fri Apr 27, 12 Sat Apr 28, 12 Sun Apr 29, 12 Mon Apr 30, 12 Tue May 1, 12 Wed Ma y 2, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 7:41 AM 2.4 ft. 8:31 AM High 1.6 ft. 10:53 AM 1.6 ft. 11:57 AM 0.1 ft. 12:48 AM 0.3 ft. 1:50 AM 0.4 ft. 2:55 AM 0.6 ft. 3:56 AM 0.8 ft. 4:53 AM Low 2.7 ft. 4:39 PM 2.6 ft. 5:32 PM 2.4 ft. 9:19 AM 2.4 ft. 10:01 AM 2.4 ft. 10:37 AM 2.5 ft. 11:07 AM 2.5 ft. 11:34 AM High 0.0 ft. 11:53 PM 1.6 ft. 1:21 PM 1.4 ft. 2:50 PM 1.1 ft. 4:04 PM 0.8 ft. 5:03 PM 0.4 ft. 5:54 PM Low 2.4 ft. 6:38 PM 2.2 ft. 8:04 PM 2.1 ft. 9:44 PM 2.2 ft. 11:24 PM HighGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 26 May 2First April 28 Full May 5 Last May 12 New May 20Major Times 5:26 AM 7:26 AM 5:51 PM 7:51 PM Minor Times 12:06 AM 1:06 AM 10:45 AM 11:45 AM Major Times 6:15 AM 8:15 AM 6:40 PM 8:40 PM Minor Times 12:51 AM 1:51 AM 11:40 AM 12:40 PM Major Times 7:04 AM 9:04 AM 7:28 PM 9:28 PM Minor Times 1:34 AM 2:34 AM 12:36 PM 1:36 PM Major Times 7:53 AM 9:53 AM 8:17 PM 10:17 PM Minor Times 2:13 AM 3:13 AM 1:35 PM 2:35 PM Major Times 8:41 AM 10:41 AM 9:05 PM 11:05 PM Minor Times 2:51 AM 3:51 AM 2:34 PM 3:34 PM Major Times 9:30 AM 11:30 AM 9:55 PM 11:55 PM Minor Times 3:28 AM 4:28 AM 3:37 PM 4:37 PM Major Times 10:20 AM 12:20 PM 10:46 PM 12:46 AM Minor Times 4:05 AM 5:05 AM 4:40 PM 5:40 PM Average Average Average Average+ Average+ Average Average6:58 am 8:11 pm 10:46 am 12:07 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:57 am 8:12 pm 11:41 am 12:52 am 6:56 am 8:13 pm 12:38 pm 1:34 am 6:55 am 8:13 pm 1:36 pm 2:14 am 6:54 am 8:14 pm 2:36 pm 2:52 am 6:53 am 8:15 pm 3:37 pm 3:28 am 6:52 am 8:15 pm 4:41 pm 4:05 am30% 36% 43% 49% 56% 63% 70% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. 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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThelma Louise Sanders, 78, of Hosford, passed away on Monday, April 23, in Tallahassee. She was born in Greensboro, to Kinch and Della (Durden) Arnold. She and her husband, Eric T. Sanders, who she married April 3, 1953, lived in various parts of the United States as his job required at the time, but returned home to Liberty County after the birth of their daughter, Joy. From that time, Louise was a homemaker and also worked for several years as a teachers aide at Hosford School. She was a member of Corinth Baptist Church of Hosford. She was one of the happiest people on the planet, and always had a ready smile for everyone she met. The care and well-being of her family was always her No. 1 priority and she enjoyed cooking, baking and sewing for them. She loved music and singing and her family was used to her singing from the time she woke in the morning until she retired at night. She had many health issues over the past few years, some of which cost her her legs, but even through all of that she never lost her smile. She lived the last three years at Blountstown Health and Rehabilitation where she was a social butter y wheeling around in her motorized wheelchair visiting with other friends both old and new. Even after the loss of her legs, she stated many times that she didnt know the purpose that God had for her without her legs, but if she could be an example to someone else that you should never give up or feel sorry for yourself, then she would be the example that God wanted her to be. Funeral services were held Wednesday, April 25, at 3 p.m. at Corinth Baptist Church in Hosford with Kyle Peddie and the Honorable Ken Hosford of ciating. Interment will follow in Hosford Cemetery. The family will receive friends on Tuesday, April 24, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Corinth Baptist Church. Survivors include her daughter, Joy Sanders Harts- eld of Crawfordville; two step-daughters, Glyndell Perri of Tallahassee and Jackie Hallman and her husband, Doug of Graceville; four grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; and four great-great-grandchildren; a brother, Thomas Eustas Arnold of Telogia; two sisters, Elma Arnold Kent of Branford and Sarah Arnold Boogie Sauls and her husband, Bobby of Abbeville, Ala. She will be missed by a large family of cousins and a host of nieces and nephews who were all a very special part of her life; and also a very special friend, Marion Mercer who was like a sister to her. She will be greatly missed, but we know that we will walk with her again on golden streets one day. Adams Funeral Home in Bristol is in charge of the arrangements. (850-674-5449) Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com. Mary M. Moore-Gearhart, 93, of Crawfordville, passed away on Thursday, April 19. She was born in Crawfordville to the May Wright and Rosa Nell Lawhon Moore. She retired twice from the Department of Labor with a total of 47 years of service to the State of Florida, was a member of the Crawfordville First Baptist Church and was a 60 year cancer survivor. Funeral services were held 11 a.m. on Monday, April 23, at the Crawfordville First Baptist Church with the Rev. Dave Fell and the Rev. William Bill Payne of- ciating. The family received friends one hour prior to the service at the church. Interment followed at the Crawfordville Cemetery. Memorial donations can be made to Big Bend Hospice of Tallahassee. Survivors include her son, Kenneth Kent Gearhart Jr.; a daughter, Rosemary Gearhart (Bruce) Reed; two grandchildren, Dennie Connell and Wayne Connell Jr.; a loving nephew, Walter Page; four nieces, Ouida Sites, Michelle Lee, Nell McPherson, and Gretchen Martin; and four great-grandchildren, Kristin, DJ, Blake and Kayla. She was predeceased by her husband, Kenneth Gearhart Sr.; a brother, George Moore; and sisters, Rosa Mae Duggar and Eva M. Page. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850559-3380). Please sign the online guestbook at www. forbesfuneralhome.net. Tommy Baldwin Waller, 65, died on April 13 at his residence, surrounded by his family. He was born Aug. 30, 1946, in Tallahassee. His professional career consisted of 30 years with the Brinks Company, starting at the bottom and working his way to assistant manager before retiring. He met many people along the way and would always lend a helping hand in many different ways, never expecting anything in return, just respect. A graveside service will be held Thursday, April 19, at 11 a.m. at Oakland Cemetery in Tallahassee. Survivors include two sons, Tom Jr. and Carl; and three daughters, Linda Louise, Elizabeth (and husband Kenny) and Kala (and husband Jeff); the mother of his children and best friend, Ruth Brumbley; a brother, Ray (wife Lynn) of Colorado; and two sisters, Betty and Mary Lou. He will be missed by nine grandchildren; and numerous friends and family members. He was predeceased by his parents, Carl Ray Baldwin and Helen Waller Baldwin. He lost his parents at a very young age and was then adopted by his grandparents, Otway Waddell Waller and Lillian Waller, whom he loved, admired and had a great respect for. Bevis Funeral Home, (850)385-2193, www.bevisfh. com, is in charge of the arrangements.Tommy Baldwin Waller Mary M. Moore-Gearhart Thelma Louise SandersObituariesContinued from Page 6A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt took a jury only a few minutes to return a not guilty verdict against Brian Gilpin, 28, who was charged with being at the wheel of a crash that turned deadly back in January 2009. Wakulla re ghter Richard Rhea died at the scene, electrocuted by downed powerlines caused by the crash. The jury was not told about Rheas death at Gilpins one-day trial, held Thursday, April 19, on a misdemeanor charge of DUI causing serious bodily injury. The serious bodily injury was another passenger in the vehicle, Luis Rodriguez, who spent a week in the hospital with broken ribs and a broken collarbone. According to testimony at the trial, Gilpin and Rodriguez were drinking, went to a Crawfordville bar and drank some more, and then left in Rodriguez truck. Lt. Mike Kemp of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce was following the car down U.S. Highway 319 onto Lower Bridge Road, now known as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Drive, where the truck reached speeds of 80 miles an hour and missed the curve near the land ll, sailing into a power pole. Kemp said he saw Gilpin ejected, and Gilpin was in the bed of the truck as he approached, warning him not to move because of the downed powerlines. Rodriguez was in the passenger seat. Rodriguez testi ed that he was drunk and threw up at the bar and asked Gilpin to drive that night. The next thing he remembered was being in the hospital. Much was made of the apparent discrepancy between Kemps account, claiming the truck did not roll, and Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Chuck Cooks traf c report that said the truck rolled. Defense attorney Steven Glazer mounted a defense that it wasnt Gilpin who was driving, and presented a traf c reconstruction specialist, Liu Wang, who testi ed that from the biomechanics of the crash whether it rolled or not Rodriguez was most likely the driver. The credibility of Wang was attacked by Assistant State Attorney Louise Wilhite-St. Laurent, who argued in closing that, basically, Wang contended Rodriguez was driving because thats what she was paid to do. The states own expert, Investigator Joe Giangrosso of Tallahassee Police Department, said it was dif cult to determine who was driving without being able to look at the truck for evidence of impact and force. The truck was placed in a tow yard, but apparently removed in the nearly three years the case was pending. Gilpin did not take the stand to testify at his trial. He was also hospitalized after the crash, and a blood draw at the time showed Gilpin had a blood alcohol level of .139. The legal limit is .08. Friends dont let friends drive drunk, Glazer said in his closing, contending that Rodriguez would never have allowed a man who was .13 to drive. The jury has again spoken the truth, Glazer said, when asked for a comment after the not guilty verdict. Gilpin still faces a misdemeanor charge of driving with a suspended license, which is set for May. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker presided over the trial.Man found not guilty of DUI in crash where re ghter was killedContinued from Page 1A Chairman Alan Brock said he agrees that the studies are proving that a majority of the pollution of Wakulla Springs is coming from the north, however, he felt the county should still have those protections. The City of Tallahassee could weaken its protections if it sees Wakulla County doing nothing, he said. Merritt said, I think we are doing our part and Tallahassee is doing their part. Artz disagreed. It seems to me its very short-sighted and its not addressing the real problem which she said is the nancial burden placed on residents. She said she would like to focus on nding a solution to help with costs instead of decreasing protection. She also suggested offering incentives for people who voluntarily upgrade. We have a pollution problem now, Artz said. She was concerned about the possible long term effects these revisions might have, such as turning Wakulla Springs into the black lagoon. Merritt said, I think Wakulla Springs will be beautiful 500 years from now. The commission voted four to one, with Artz opposing, to schedule the public hearings to consider transmittal of the text amendment of the Comprehensive Plan.Proposed septic tank revisions going forward HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EAR OOPS!The Girls from Evolution Day Spa Hair Salon~ Robyn ~ Miranda ~ Linda ~HAVEMOVEDANDARENOW OPENAT THEIR NEW LOCATIONHair Place That850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA 294-2085 LINDA 545-2905 MIRANDA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn April 10, Eddie Harts- eld of Panacea reported a grand theft. An outboard motor and generator was reported missing from a Crawfordville property. The missing property is valued at $700 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On April 10, Teresa Murray of St. Marks reported the theft of a bicycle. The bike is valued at $175 and was taken from the victims home. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On April 11, Gina Vericker of Crawfordville reported the theft of her wallet and a wallet owned by a relative. The items were taken from her home. The value of the wallets and contents were $250 and a suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On April 11, Ross Mathews of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash. The victims vehicle was parked on the Crawfordville Highway when it was struck by an unknown vehicle. Mathews vehicle suffered damage to the right rear portion. The victim was away from the vehicle when it was struck. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On April 11, Shawna Katlyn Lytle, 19, of Crawfordville was traveling eastbound on Taff Drive when a Honda 50cc dirt bike, operated by Howard Walter Kolb, 48, of Crawfordville, failed to yield at the intersection with a dirt service road that enters the ACE Hardware property. Kolb suffered injuries to his arms and was treated by Wakulla EMS personnel. The Lytle vehicle suffered damage to the right front portion. Kolb received a traf c citation. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On April 11, Joseph Dean Hicks, 29 of Panacea was charged with resisting an of cer without violence after Deputies Will Hudson and Sean Wheeler attempted to serve warrants on him. The two deputies approached the suspect at a Crawfordville residence and Hicks reportedly ran back into the house and allegedly jumped out a window. After a foot pursuit into a wooded area, Hicks was taken into custody with the deployment of a Taser. Hicks was arrested on outstanding warrants for violation of probation and felony battery. On April 10, Deputy Vicki Mitchell worked a minor traffic accident involving a vehicle and a bear. The small bear suffered an injury to its leg and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission was contacted to care for the bear off Springhill Road. On April 11, Brittany Rayburn of Murphy Oil reported a vehicle accident involving one of the gas pumps. Damage to the pump was estimated at $10. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On April 12, Thomas White of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to le his taxes but discovered that someone had already used his Social Security number. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On April 12, Donald T. Krasczyk, 62, of Crawfordville and Natacha Michelle Allen, 38, of Crawfordville, were involved in a traf c crash. Krasczyk was traveling northbound on Cajer Posey Road and Allen was eastbound on Highway 61. Krasczyk entered the intersection into the path of Allen, whose car struck Krasczyks at the rear passenger door. Allen and a male passenger were transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital with minor injuries and Krasczyk was issued a traf c citation for careless driving. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. On April 12, Yadira Salazar-Ramirez of Crawfordville reported a brush re on Hickory Road. The Wakulla Fire Department put out the re which started when burning leaves caught a neighboring fence on re. Arrangements were made to replace the fence. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. On April 12, Mildred Pigott of Crawfordville reported a traffic crash at Walgreens in Crawfordville. Pigott attempted to back out of a parking spot, but the vehicle was in drive and jumped the curb and struck a cinderblock pillar. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $4,500. There were no injuries. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On April 12, deputies and re ghters responded to a mobile home re at 2852 Shadeville Highway. The property owner, Karen S. Thompson, of Crawfordville, allowed individuals to collect scrap metal from the abandoned structure. The re was investigated by the state Fire Marshals office and the blaze was determined to have started from an acetylene cutting torch used in collecting scrap metal. The re was ruled an accident. Deputy Scott Powell, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Detective Matt Helms investigated. On April 13, Public Service Of cer Mitch Hampton of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at the clubhouse at the Gardens of Saralan in Crawfordville. Hampton was conducting a security check when he observed damage to the window screen and a smashed ceramic pedestal in the middle of the room. Damage was estimated at $60. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On April 13, Darrell Taylor of Crawfordville reported a marine burglary in Sopchoppy. A steering wheel and hydraulic equipment, valued at $2,000, were reported missing. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. On April 13, Isaac Thomas of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A neighbor heard the victims alarm system and contacted law enforcement. A door window was smashed and the door was standing open. Damage to the home was estimated at $300 and a jewelry box was stolen from inside. Deputy Mike Crum and Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. On April 14, a 17-yearold female was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment during a Party Patrol in Panacea. Lt. Jimmy Sessor and Detective Nick Boutwell found the juvenile behind a closed Panacea area business. The female was issued a Juvenile Civil Citation and 24 hours of community service and the teenagers mother responded to pick her up. The marijuana weighed 4.4 grams and drug paraphernalia was also seized. On April 14, Marc Hooker of Crawfordville recovered a wallet owned by Robert Jorge Rodriguez of Cooper City. The wallet was found in the middle of U.S. Highway 319 near Winn-Dixie. It contained personal items and cash. Attempts to locate the owner have been unsuccessful and the wallet was turned over to the Evidence Division. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On April 14, Chris Barwick of Panacea reported a missing handgun. The gun is valued at $100. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On April 14, Stacia Conner of Amazing Mail Solutions r eported a fraud as someone posing as Western Union created two transactions valued at $917. Conner became suspicious and contacted law enforcement. It has not been determined if the business has suffered any nancial loss. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On April 14, a structure re was reported at 30 Richardson Road in Crawfordville. The home is owned by Randall Franklin of Tallahassee. The home was fully engulfed in ames when Deputy Ian Dohme responded. Wakulla Fire ghters worked several hours to put the blaze out at the unoccupied home. The state Fire Marshal and Detective Josh Langston responded to the scene. The investigation continues, but the house was a total loss. On April 15, Jason Walker of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A shotgun, valued at $300, was reported missing. Deputy Mike Crum and Deputy Clint Beam also investigated other cases with similar backgrounds including the theft of a firearm and a GPS. Charles King of Crawfordville reported a ashlight and GPS theft. The items were taken from his vehicle and are valued at $230. A rearm was taken from a vehicle owned by Kenneth Adams of Crawfordville. It is valued at $250. Detectives Nick Boutwell and Derek Lawhon also investigated. On April 15, Nancy Speigner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to le her tax return but discovered that someone already used her Social Security number. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On April 15, Sgt. Mike Helms reported someone removing the trailer receiver and two inch ball on the back of his patrol vehicle. The property is valued at $50. On April 16, Neil Watts of Wakulla ESG reported a criminal mischief. Someone broke a window of a countyowned mower-tractor by throwing a rock through it. The tractor was located at U.S. Highway 98 and Jack Crum Road. Damage was estimated at $250. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On April 16, a 17year-old female driver was southbound on DonaldsonWilliams Road in Crawfordville when she became distracted and struck a tree on the right side of the dirt road. There were no injuries. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On April 17, Dennis Loney of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a atbed trailer. The trailer was valued at $1,200 and was stored on his property. The trailer was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. On April 17, Frederick Matuschak of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his metal fence. Damage was estimated at $50 and a suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On April 17, Olivia Langston of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to file her tax return when she discovered that someone was already using her Social Security number. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On April 17, Dale Hilbert of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of garden tiller, valued at $500. James Mathew Corbett, 49, of Crawfordville was supposed to repair the tiller for the victim, but allegedly failed to return the property. The property was located at a Woodville pawn shop and Corbett was charged with grand theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Will Hudson and Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On April 17, Carrie Riley of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of $1,300 worth of jewelry from her home. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On April 17, Jenifer Godwin of Panacea reported a criminal mischief to a Crawfordville home in which she is caretaker. Windows were discovered broken and damage was also observed to the interior. Damages were estimated at $1,940. Doors were damaged along with sheet rock and the bathroom. The home is owned by Citi Mortgage, Inc. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On April 17, Christopher Hargrave of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered that someone used his Social Security number to le a tax return. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. On April 18, Joyce Glow of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. A company sent the victim a letter stating that they would not send an electronics package to her without a payment of $1,618 being sent to them rst. Glow did not place any orders to the company. The shipping address for the product was Lansing, Mich. The company was contacted by Lt. Brad Taylor and reported that the transaction was stopped after being discovered as a fraud. On April 18, Wendy Segree of Crawfordville reported a fraud as a check was cashed on her bank account without her authorization. The check was for $100. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On April 18, Deanna Strickland of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash and criminal mischief. The victim discovered damage to her vehicle and Deputy Mike Zimba estimated the damage at $1,000. It appeared the victims vehicle may have been struck by another vehicle. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,326 calls for service during the past week including 27 business and residential alarms; 13 assists to other agencies; 132 citizen contacts; 65 abandoned E-911 calls; 40 E-911 emergency calls; 14 frauds; 65 investigations; 20 noise/loud music complaints; 74 medical emergencies; 238 residential and business security checks; 38 special details; 18 suspicious people; 23 suspicious vehicles; 16 thefts; 11 traf c crashes with no injuries; 100 traffic enforcements; 89 traf c stops; 11 vehicle maintenances; 37 reckless vehicles; 15 wanted people and 22 watch orders.Sheri s Report Design Provided By http://www.panacearockthedock.com DUBREJA PLAZA94 COTTONWOOD STREET, CRAWFORDVILLEFL o o Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing glitzNc lip CALL850926-TRIM( 8746 )to Schedule Your Prom Makeover!Prom Day Make-Up $20 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla Wildlife Festival was held this past weekend at Wakulla Springs State Park and exhibitors, vendors and living history demonstrators lled the park. Those in attendance were able to learn how to make butter, spin yarn, make moonshine, spear points and blacksmith techniques. Music could be heard throughout the day, played by several different bands, including the Biscuit Boys, Pickin and Grinnin Band, Coon Bottom Creek and The Hot Pepper Steppers. Festival goers were also able to view and learn about replies and birds of prey at the shows held by the Center for Wildlife Education at Georgia Southern University. Jonathan Jackson, a student employee with the Center, invited participants to meet a 40-pound Columbian Red Tail Boa named Salvador. He told those in the crowd that the snake was 7 or 8 years old and could live to be 15 or 20 years old. Florida Wild Mammal Association also brought along animals for participants to meet, such as Doofy the pelican. The festival was the end of Wild About Wakulla Week, which celebrates Wakulla County and starts with the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival.Wakulla Wildlife Festival More photos online at thewakullanews.com SCENES FROM THE FESTIVAL: Clockwise from above, Steve Hein talks about the Peregrine Falcon during the bird of prey show; tractors on display; Jonathan Jackson shows off Salvador during the reptile show; exhibitors demonstrate the art of spinning; John Boy Watson of the Florida Artist Blacksmith Association makes an S hook; and a pelican named Doofy being walked by Jessica Beatty with the Florida Wild Mammal Association. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN Up To 2012 Dodge Ram 2500 2012 Dodge Ram 3500 Caband Chassis $10,000 OFF MSRP Eric Lee 850-766-8530$10,000 off MSRP: Stk#12D113, 2012 Ram 2500 Laramie Longhorn Crew Cab Dealer retains all rebates and incentives

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Senior Centers volunteer appreciation luncheon is heldStory, Page 3BCONTRIBUTIONS AND EXPENDITURESPages 5B & 6B$70 billion budget approved with $143 million cutsWeekly Roundup, Page 11BSenior Center is a community e ortThe Wakulla County Senior Centers Board of Directors and staff including myself often hear compliments from our community about the quality of service provided to the senior citizens of Wakulla County. We all know that this center could not function without the support of our community. We try to let our community know how essential their support is for the seniors. I cant list everything that our community provides that enables the Senior Center to provide services but I want to list a few examples to let all of you know how important our community support is. Anonymous Donations: Im surprised how often donors bring a check to our of ce and ask not to be recognized or have their donation published. These donations normally are $50 or more. We do honor their request for anonymity. Churches: Some churches include the Senior Center in their budget and send a check monthly. Some send a check annually. Others send checks when they have available funds. Several churches hold their banquets and pastor appreciation dinners in the Senior Center. Rotary Club: Weekly, the Wakulla Rotary Club meets in the Senior Center. They choose to pay more for lunch than we initially offered because they wanted to support the center. They also make cash contributions from their fundraising activities. Wakulla Realtors: They hold their monthly breakfast meeting in the senior center. They show their support for the Senior Center even though the real estate market slump may impact them more than the average citizen. Chamber of Commerce: The Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce holds many social functions such as installation banquets and business recognition dinners. Forgotten Coast Kayak Anglers: This shing tournament reaches from Cape San Blas to Steinhatchee and is headquartered in Wakulla County. They provide all their proceeds to our Meals-on-Wheels program. These anglers are primarily from the southeastern states, with some from Canada and California and a few states in between. Our Tourist Development Council has chosen to not participate in this event. We host more than 125 visitors during this event. Many of them are staying in our hotels and parks for their rst time. Forgotten Coast Kayak Anglers was organized and is managed by a local resident who works for a national corporation and has to travel often. He recruits help from us and some of our local businesses. Our most recent tournament was April 13 and 14. Civic and Social Clubs: The Optimist Club holds their fashion show at the center. Several homeowners associations meet in the center. Several groups such as Crawfordville Young at Heart and the Sopchoppy Homemakers come in for lunch periodically. During this political season there will be forums held in the center. Gifts of Time and Energy: Each April we provide a Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon. Each year we recognize more than 150 volunteers that have helped serve the Senior Citizens over the last year. Their support is beyond measure. Others: I know I have missed some groups of donors. After our annual Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon we always learn that we have missed recognizing someone. At least Ive reached the age to have a legitimate excuse to forget someone. We have seen so many senior citizens that had given up on life but came to the Senior Center only to appease a friend and discover that they were alive and could enjoy each day. Many of you dont get the opportunity to see these wonderful events but its your gifts of time and resources that creates these opportunities. Again, I repeat, these are some of the reasons that Im so proud to live in Wakulla County. This is a wonderful place to live. R.H. CarterWakulla County Senior CenterSeniors enjoyed St. Patricks, crafts, music, programs on tortoises and recreation for adults with disabilitiesBy DIANE LANTER and TAMARA BYRNESof the Senior CenterThe Lion and the Lamb of March 2012 came with beautiful weather and a great St. Patricks Day celebration. We enjoyed an early spring and this month we are feeling the effects of an early summer too, lots of sun, birds, butter ies and early blooming owers. The Iris Garden Club has been assisting the seniors in planting tomatoes and vegetables in our raised bed gardens. Tamara led a class on building a salad garden in a pot. We are all looking forward to a delicious harvest. Our herbs and native garden are thriving as well. We are trying to establish our blueberry patch and a fruit tree area but we still have a long way to go. Hardy citrus trees and tomato cages are on our wish list. If you have not had the chance to see our garden and vine covered pergola, please stop by and check it out. Our next gardening day is April 24 and we sure could use some helping hands to spread mulch donated by Brians Best for Less Tree Service. Thank you, Brian! Shelley Swenson from the county extension of- ce helped us with a Tuesday craft class. We recycled upholstery fabric and discarded metal tape measures. They were turned into useful eyeglass and cell phone holders, as well as small coin purses. This was a fun project for all. Once again Sharon Fox entertained us with her lovely voice and her saxophones. Music is something that we all look forward to, and Sharon never disappoints us. We are very thankful to all the musicians who perform at the center. The FSU student nurses had a good time checking blood pressures for the seniors and we always look forward to their visits. The Florida Wildlife Commission presented a program on our local Gopher Tortoises. They brought two tortoises for the seniors to see and we learned a great deal from this program. We also learned that they are a protected species and if we encounter one on our property, we must not move them or try to capture them. The FWC has several programs that are bene cial and we appreciate the information. Lisa Evans from the Florida Disabled Outdoors Association gave a wonderful presentation on recreation for adults with disabilities. Some of the activities that are available to participants include bowling, hunting, horseback riding, kayaking, shing and football, but the possibilities are endless! Continued on Page 3B PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe FWC presented a program on gopher tortoises, above; dancing to the sounds of Pickin n Grinnin, below. LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, April 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Friday, April 27 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Ofce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. Sunday, April 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, April 30 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, May 1 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p .m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, May 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Special EventsThursday, April 26 LANDSCAPING WITH NATIVE PLANTS CLASS will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Learn how to choose native plants for ornamental use in your home and garden landscape. Topics covered in class will include how to select plants that meet your needs, water saving plants, the care and feeding of native ornamental plant and much more. BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 27 INFORMATION ON REVERSE MORTGAGES will be available from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. It will be hosted by FirstBANK Florida Senior Products Division Manager Michael J. Weltman and is intended for those almost 62 years old or older, who want to re nance their mortgage or want to buy a home, and those who need any services or companies and want the bill paid for with a Reverse Mortgage. For more information, call 556-6694. GRANT PEEPLES will perform his original music at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Special guest, Chelsea Dix Kessler, will also be performing with Peeples on some songs. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Saturday, April 28 JAM 4 CAMP will be held by Wakulla County 4-H from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Hudson Park. This is the day to sign up for Camp Cherry Lake and day camps that will be offered through 4-H. There will be a free concert, as well as vendors. For more information, contact Sherri Kraeft at 926-3931 or sjkraeft@u .edu. 39TH ANNUAL STEPHEN C. SMITH MEMORIAL REGATTA will be held from 8:30 a.m. on Saturday to 4 p.m. on Sunday at Shell Point Beach. Races begin at noon on Saturday. There will be two days of racing, beach activities, sun, fun, food and the live auction on Sunday. The regatta bene ts the Leon County Unit of the American Cancer Society which serves Leon, Wakulla and other Big Bend counties. For more information visit www.smithregatta.com. ROCK THE DOCK FISHING TOURNAMENT will be held Saturday and Sunday in Panacea. The Skeeter Rock the Dock Annual Fishing Tournament is scheduled for April 28-29. The captains meeting and dinner is scheduled for Friday, April 27. Win a 2012 Skeeter Zx20 Bay Boat, including an aluminum trailer, package valued at $35,000. Cost is $50 per person for recreational, $50 per person for kayak and $25 per person for youth. For more information, visit www.PanaceaRockTheDock.com or call 508-3379. LAW ENFORCEMENT MOTORCYCLE CLUB POKER RUN will be held at the Capital Circle Harley Davidson in Tallahassee to bene t Wakulla County Special Olympics. Registration takes place from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. with the last bike out at 11 a.m. Cost is $15 per rider, $10 per passenger and $5 per additional hand. There will be prizes for the best hand, worst hand, as well as a 50/50 drawing and door prizes. Free T-shirts will be given to the rst 100 participants. Contact Mike Crews at 445-4381, Barry Henson at 509-9902 or George Williams at 556-5442. FERALTONES will perform at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Comprised of Dave Leporati on mandolin, Kim Thomas on guitar, Bobby Cutts on harmonica and Adam Straubinger on ddle, all band members write music and sing. Their original music has evolved into a blend of old bluegrass, blues and country styles, with a twist. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10 Monday, April 30 BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Centennial Bank from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, May 3 THIRD ANNUAL REAGAN DAY BLUE JEANS AND BLACK TIE AFFAIR will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood beginning at 6 p.m. with social hour, followed by dinner and the program at 7 p.m. The featured speaker will be best selling author Peter Schweizer, author of Throw Them All Out: How Politicians and Their Friends Get Rich off Insider Stock Tips, Land Deals, and Cronyism That Would Send the Rest of Us to Prison. Schweizer also wrote Reagans War, and his speech will be titled The Reagan No One Knew. Tickets are $35 for an individual and $50 for two tickets. Sponsorships are available for $500 and include a table for 8 and recognition during the program. Tickets are available for purchase at www.wakullarepublicans.com.Upcoming EventsFriday, May 4 FACING LIBERTY photo exhibit will be held at GSigns, across from courthouse, at 6 p.m. The photos are of Wakullas African-American population from the early s to as far back as the 1800s. Exhibit includes schools, churches, along with the community at work and at play. Saturday, May 5 PANACEA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held at Woolley Park starting at 10 a.m. with a parade down U.S. Highway 98 and will last until 6 p.m. Following the parade, gates will open at the park. There will be live music, dance performances by cloggers and historic demonstrations. A long-time tradition of the festival is the Crab Pickin Contest and the Mullet Toss, where contestants throw a real mullet in a distance-toss competition. SHOWING OF ROOTS, episodes 1 and 2 at 1 p.m. at the library. Alex Haleys Pulitzer Prize-winning Roots tells a story for all Americans and remains an engrossing entertainment more than 30 years later. Sunday, May 6 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Michael Keys, wildlife biologist, at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge at 2 p.m. He will present Lightning, Longleaf and a Formerly Common Woodpecker. The red-cockaded woodpecker is an excellent management indicator species re ecting the health of the re-dependent longleaf pine-grassland ecosystems to which it has evolved. Seating is limited so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 850.925-6121 for more information. Friday, May 11 SPEAKING FREELY, a panel discussion on the history of May 20, Emancipation Proclamation, and what it means to experience freedom in Wakulla County, along with a few invited guests, will be held at 7 p.m. at the library. Saturday, May 12 SHOWING OF ROOTS Episodes 3 and 4 will be held at 1 p.m. at the library. Friday, May 18 IN BITS AND PIECES, a documentary night, will be held beginning at 5 p.m. at the library. Crossing Over: How Roots Captivated An Entire Nation, followed by Shirley Chisholm : Go on the road with Shirley Chisholm as she embarks on a journey to become President of the United States, and ending with The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975: During the rise of The Black Power Movement, Swedish TV journalists documented an unfolding cultural revolution for their audiences back home. Director Gran Hugo Olsson highlights key gures and events in a light completely different from that of the American media at the time. Saturday, May 19 MAY 20TH CELEBRATION will be held from noon to 4 p.m. at the grounds of the Old Buckhorn School, Mount Trial Church. Planting of the May Pole, cakewalks, three-legged races, music, food, softball games, free clothing giveaway, Buckhorn Cemetery tour, information on how to research your family tree and more. WAKULLA SPRINGS 5K RUN AND 1-MILE FUN RUN will be held by the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park at Wakulla Springs State Park. This unique run winds through The Sanctuary, a wilderness area of Wakulla Springs State Park which is not open to the general public. Packet pickup and race day registration will begin at 7 a.m. The 1 Mile Fun Run will begin at 8 a.m., followed by the 5K run at 8:30 a.m. To access the Wakulla Springs 5K Run and 1 Mile Fun Run registration form, visit www.wakullasprings. org/projects.html. To register online, visit www.raceit.com. For more information, contact Trudy Thompson at (850) 962-2064. Sunday, May 20 BAT FEST 2012 will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park from 1 to 5 p.m. This is an opportunity for the public to connect with wildlife biologists from across the Southeast and learn about bats, bat biology and conservation. This event is free to the public and is presented by the Florida Bat Working Group in conjunction with the Southeastern Bat Diversity Network 2012 Bat Blitz. There will be an admission fee to access the park. There will be crafts, demonstrations, youth conservation talk, a guest speaker and more. Saturday, May 26 SHOWING OF ROOTS Episodes 5 and 6 at the library at 1 p.m. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Blood Drive at Wal-Mart from 2 to 4:30 p.m. Jam 4 Camp at Hudson Park from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta at Shell Point Beach starting at 8:30 a.m. Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament at Rock Landing in Panacea. ThursdaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Grant Peeples will perform at Posh Java on April 27 at 8 p.m. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 3BContinued from Page 1BLisa spoke of the Sportsability event at the Ochlockonee River State Park on April 14. For more information call the association at (850) 201-2944. Soon, Jessica Welch from the Of ce of Public Information will be here to explain about the county accepting applications for solid waste and re services hardship assistance program. Plan to attend if you have any questions concerning this situation. We will be having a Luau and also celebrating Mothers Day on Friday, May 11 plan to come and join us. Also, if you have any questions concerning Social Security, a representative will be here on May 30 at 11:15 a.m. to answer any questions you may have. For more information, call 926-7145.Seniors celebrate PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENKeynote speaker Karen Henry of Covenant Hospice at the luncheon. Seated at the head table are Senior Center board members Peggy Mackin, Maurice Langston, Cheryll Olah, Senior Center Executive Director R.H. Carter and Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis. The Senior Center dining hall was packed for the volunteer appreciation luncheon. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe dining hall at the Senior Center was packed on Wednesday, April 18, for the centers annual volunteer appreciation luncheon. Keynote speaker Karen Henry of Covenant Hospice read a proclamation from President Obama praising the generous heart of volunteers and promoting volunteerism. Henry recounted meeting the centers Executive Director R.H. Carter when she came to the county in 2010. His advice: You have to give back to the community you work in. She said she took the advice to heart, and praised the philosophy. Carter recognized Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis. Wakulla Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, whos on the centers board, read off a list of the hundreds of volunteers who help with the numerous functions and programs provided there. Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis says a few words. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 23 Preparing for Floridas shift to a statewide Medicaid managed-care system, 20 health companies and organizations are interested in competing for contracts to serve seniors who need long-term care. Potential bidders faced a deadline last week to submit non-binding letters of intent that signaled their interest in the long-term care program, as the state Agency for Health Care Administration gets ready to move forward with a lengthy contracting process. Those expressing interest ranged from major managed-care industry players, such as Humana and WellCare, to smaller regional organizations, such as Brevard Alzheimers Foundation Inc., and Miami Jewish Health Systems. The list of potential bidders only re ects health plans interested in the long-term care portion of a statewide managed-care system. AHCA has not sought similar letters of intent for plans hoping to serve the broader Medicaid population, such as children and women. Nevertheless, the list of potential long-term care bidders is the rst of its kind since Florida lawmakers last year approved a plan to transform Medicaid. That plans remains subject to federal approval, but AHCA is preparing to start the contracting process. Under the system, the state would be divided into 11 regions, with managed-care plans competing for contracts in each region. Plans could win contracts in multiple regions. The list of potential long-term care bidders provides a glimpse of how different parts of the state could be served and how companies and organizations view the markets. Seven health plans submitted letters indicating they are interested in competing in all regions. They are American Eldercare, Amerigroup, Humana, Simply Healthcare, Sunshine State Health Plan, UnitedHealthcare and WellCare. Those seven also are the only plans that indicated interest in competing in a massive region of 14 counties that spans from Holmes and Washington counties in the Panhandle to Madison and Taylor counties in the Big Bend. During the legislative deliberations last year, questions were raised about the number of health plans that would want to do business in such relatively rural areas. In the end, lawmakers decided that contracts would only be awarded to two plans in the 14-county region. Similarly, two plans would win contracts in another region of the western Panhandle. AHCA plans this summer to issue what is known as an invitation to negotiate as a rst step in the process.Health plans line up for new Medicaid systemVolunteer luncheon CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY Are you 62 or older, or will you be soon? Want to re nance at 2.99%-5.06% w/no payments? Want to Buy a Home? Remodel? Improve? Fix the Roof...?Lets have coffee and cake and talk about the HUD/FHA Govt. Insured Reverse Mortgage (FHA-255 Program) that is helping seniors pay for much needed services and retirement. (no income/credit needed)Meet us at the Wakulla Senior Center on Friday April 27 for two classes (45min. ea.) at 6:30 and 7:15 PM.Hosted by FirstBANK-Florida Senior Products Division Manager, Michael Weltman MBA, CSA, SRES 11 years in FHA Reverse, Financial ConsultantRSVP Bring a friend or two or call for info 850-556-6694Bankers, Credit Union Mgrs., Contractors, Remodelers, Home Renovation Companies, Pool Installers, Roofers, Insurance Agents, Realtors, Brokers, Builders, Home Care Agencies, Attorneys, CPAs, Financial Planners, Seniors/Retirees, Mortgage Lenders, Residential Elevator Companies. ARE ALSO WELCOMED TO JOIN US! www.myretirementmortgage.com Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. 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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DOUG HEINLEN Theyre at it again. Washington is talking about big changes to Social Security and Medicare. But just as in the past year and a half, the debate is going on mostly behind closed doors, and its mostly about numbers on charts and graphs. The discussion is missing a vitally important voice yours. Thats why AARP has launched Youve Earned a Say, a national conversation to ensure you and millions of other Floridians will have your say on the future of Medicare and Social Security. In coming months, AARP Florida will sponsor more than 200 town halls, community conversations and other discussions, plus tele-Town Halls, bus tours and other events all with the goal of giving you a chance to state your views and offer ideas about how to keep Social Security and Medicare strong for the long haul. Keep up to date about when events are happening in your community at www.aarp.org/fl or call 1-866-595-7678 for more information. Your voice matters, because Social Security and Medicare are the foundation of income and health security in retirement for most Floridians 50+. In Florida, nearly 3.7 million residents depend on Social Security bene ts to help pay the bills every month, and 3 million-plus count on Medicare to help them afford health care, including guaranteed coverage for doctors, hospitals and prescription drugs. The Medicare fund that pays hospital bills could face a shortfall after 2024. Social Security can pay all scheduled bene ts until about 2036, and about 75 percent afterward. AARP will provide information about the programs and the challenges they face, free of Washington spin and jargon. Our website www.earnedasay.org will give you straightforward information and enable you to share your ideas about how to strengthen these programs with Congress and the political candidates. You can also weigh in directly, right now, on what you think about Social Security and Medicare. Take AARPs survey on the future of Social Security and Medicare online at www. earnedasay.org Doug Heinlen is the state president of AARP Florida.Dear Savvy Senior, What can you tell me about life settlements? I have a life insurance policy that I really dont need any longer and Ive heard that selling it can produce a nice payout. Interested In Selling Dear Interested, If you dont need your life insurance policy any longer, are having a dif cult time keeping up with the premium payments or could just use the money, a life settlement is de nitely an option worth considering. How it Works A life settlement is the sale of an existing life insurance policy to a third party company for cash. Life settlements are typically best suited for people over age 65 who own a policy with a face value of $250,000 or more. Historically, if an owner of a life insurance policy decided they no longer needed it, they would either let the policy lapse or turn it in for a meager cash surrender value. But now, with the life settlement option, you can actually sell your policy for two to three times more than the cash surrender value would be, but less than its net death bene t. Once you sell it however, the life settlement company then becomes the new owner of the policy, pays the future premiums and collects the death bene t when you die. How much money you can expect to get with a life settlement will depend on your age, health and life expectancy, the type of insurance policy, the premium costs and the value of your policy. Most sellers generally get 20 to 30 percent of the death bene t. If youre interested in a life settlement here are some things you should know: Shop around: To ensure you get the best deal, get quotes from several brokers or life settlement providers. Also, nd out what fees youll be required to pay. To locate credible providers or brokers, the Life Insurance Settlement Association (LISA) provides a referral service at lisa.org. Tax implications: Life settlements are also taxable if the cash surrender value of the policy exceeds the premiums paid on it. This can be very complicated, so be sure to consult a tax advisor. Also, be aware that receiving money from a life settlement can affect eligibility for public assistance programs like Medicaid or food stamps. Be cautious: Life settlements are not regulated in every state so be careful who you deal with. Make sure the broker or life settlement rm you choose is either licensed in your state or is a member of LISA. Other Options If you dont like the idea of selling your life insurance policy but could use some extra cash, here are some other options your insurance agent can help you investigate: Cash value withdraw: If you have any cash value in your policy, you can probably withdraw some of it to meet your immediate needs and keep your policy for your bene ciaries. A loan: You may also be able to use your policy to secure a loan from the insurance company, as well as a bank, credit union or other lender. Annuity 035 conversion: Find out if youre able to convert the cash value of your policy into an immediate annuity, which will make regular payments to you for a set number of years or for the rest of your life. Accelerated bene t: If youre terminally ill, some policies have an accelerated death bene t which pays some of the policys death bene t before you die. Reduced premiums: If premium payments are your problem, your life insurer may be able to convert your policy to a paid-up policy, or lower your death bene t amount in order to reduce your premiums. Or, consider asking your bene ciaries to help pay the premiums. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy Senior book. By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior New ways to cash in on your life insurance policy AARP FLORIDAYouve earned a sayBattling the discomfort of chronic pain can be an enormous problem for people living with this ongoing health problem. Pain that is chronic can last anywhere from a few months to years and can range from intermittent discomfort like headaches to excruciating back pain. Recent research has linked chronic pain with powerful memories lodged in part of brain that specializes in emotional intelligence and learning. The memories aggravate that part of brain like a wound that wont heal. Stress is also a common underlying cause of pain that may develop as seemingly unrelated physical symptoms. Seeing the whole board for chronic pain suffers means being open and ready to evaluate your current health with a detectives gaze. Create a pain management plan: In addition to utilizing a traditional approach to pain management, you may want to include various therapies such as acupuncture, massage and other appropriate therapies. Look for clues: What time of day does the pain occur most often? Are there other patterns with your chronic pain? Do you eat well and exercise? Understand how these clues may fit into larger picture of your overall well being. While there may not be a de nitive cure for your pain, there are many effective and safe types of therapies designed to help you feel better. It may take some time and patience, but chronic pain can be conquered if you believe there is hope to start living the way you want again. Visit www.TheGoodNewsAboutAging.com for more articles and tips for healthy aging.GOOD NEWS ABOUT AGINGIts possible to conquer chronic pain DArcy Brazier Owner Serving Wakulla & Surrounding Counties for over 35 years60 Holiday Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327 509 FOREIGN CAR REPAIR DOWN HOME TOYOTA HONDA Specializing In Specializing In NISSAN SUBARULic # MV15601www.DownHomeForeignCarRepair.com TheNews Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408 Special OfferNew Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County Only ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover rr s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Phone#_____________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 4/30/2012877-401-6408Get 10 Months for $20.12straight to your mailbox This is not a trick NO FOOLINwww.thewakullanews.com 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

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Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 18, Noon Publication Date: May 31 Remember This Years GraduateCongratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2012Sponsor Line........$20 Eighth Page...........$50 Quarter Page......$100.............................................................. $50 Half Page..............$200.............................................................. $75 Full Page...............$300............................................................. $125 Back Page.............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available For the period Jan. 1 to March 31. Sheriff CHARLIE CREEL: Contributions this period, $12,325; expenditures $5,809. Total contributions to date, $18,164; total expenditures, $10,228. Contributions: William Hampton, Crawfordville, $100; Judith Grass, Crawfordville, $100; Daniel Mosley, Crawfordville,$50; Marjorie Freeman, Crawfordville,$50; Nancy Speigner, Crawfordville, $40; John & Elnita Burke, Crawfordville, retired, $250; Danny Willis, Crawfordville, $10; Larry Roberts, Sopchoppy, $100; Frank & Linda Presnell, Crawfordville, $50; Walter Liddell, Tallahassee, $50; Richard Gowdi, Crawfordville, $50; Phillip & Paula Cooksey, Crawfordville, Kelly Sheet Metal, $300; Doyle Donnell, Crawfordville, $100; Richard Williford, Crawfordville, $200; Mary Esther Cortese, Crawfordville, $100; Ronald Isham, Crawfordville, $30; Jennings Knox, Tallahassee, contractor, $500; Scott Knox, Tallahassee, contractor, $250; Michael Scaringe, Tallahassee, contractor, $250; Mathers Process Service, Tallahassee, $250; Howard Hobby, Crawfordville, $50; Linda Hobby, Crawfordville, $50; Danny & Karla Dotson, Crawfordville, $50; Richard Ruryk, Crawfordville, $100; Emile Barnes Jr., Crawfordville, $25; Betty Barnes, Crawfordville, $25; Donald Hudgins, Crawfordville, $20; William Stephens Jr., Crawfordville, mechanic, $200; Malcolm Thomas, Crawfordville, $100; Faye Waller, Crawfordville, $50; Harry Eater, Crawfordville, $50; Richard Nicholson, Sopchoppy, $25; James Brock, Crawfordville, $50; Ronald Piasecki, Crawfordville, $100; Debra Soloman, Tallahassee, notary public, $500; GF McKenzie, Crawfordville, retired, $300; Ken Edmonds, Jacksonville, retired, $150; Martha Crisler, Tallahassee, accountant, $500; D.R. Vause, Tallahassee, Vause Mechanical owner, $500; Dalynda Vause, Tallahassee, substitute teacher, $500; Cheryl Mallow, Crawfordville, $25; Lynn Harvey Sapp, Sopchoppy, $150; Annie Shepard, Crawfordville, $25; William Anderson II, Mabelton, Ga., retired, $150; Judy Floyd, Tallahassee, $100; Kevin & Crystal Parson, Crawfordville, correctional of cer, $200; Kim Buckley, Tallahassee, $50; Ben Buckley, Tallahassee, $50; Theresa Hillier, Crawfordville, $50; Henry Vause, Crawfordville, $50; Gay Vause, Crawfordville, $50; Anihinga Marketing, Crawfordville, $25; Viking Interior Solutions, Panacea, $100; Tallahassee Construction Rental, Tallahassee, $300; Anthony Sanders, Tallahassee, $50; Shari Sanders, Tallahassee, $50; Lois Jacobs, Crawfordville, $100; Keith Vause, Tallahasssee, Vause Mechanical, $500; Frank Smith, Capital City Insulation owner, $300; Jeffrey & Cynthia Smith, Tallahassee, retired, $200; Edith Franzen, Panacea, $100; Claude & Susie Tooke, Crawfordville, retired & appraiser, $500; Julian Alford Jr., Tallahassee, $50; William & Bobbie Stephens, Sopchoppy, waterworks superintendent, $200; Joe Chancy, Lake City, $100; Malenie Williams, Louisville, Ky., $25; Steven Jones, Crawfordville, $50; Walter Blackstock, Lawrenceburg, Tenn., retired, $500; William Smith Jr., Tallahassee, banker, $250; Scott Falmien, Raleigh, N.C., $100; Ken Vassenderp, Tallahassee, attorney, $250; Gerlad Lucking, Crawfordville, $50; John Ryan, Crawfordville, $100; Anne Ahrendt, Crawfordville, $75; Roger & Shawna Norris, Crawfordville, $100; SNA Aviation II, Tallahassee, aircraft operations, $500; David & Valerie Lahart, Panacea, $100; David & Mary Bellamy, Tallahassee, doctor, $500; Tye Buckley, Tallahassee, $50; Chad Buckley, Tallahassee, $50; Clyde & Peggy Baker, Jacksonville, $100; Robert Kerns, Crawfordville, $25. Expenditures: Wakulla Rotary, booth for Valentines Day Festival, $10; Cheryl Creel, reimbursement for mail-outs, $397; Budget Printing, Tallahassee, rack cards, $317; Crawfordville Lions Club, booth for St. Patricks Day Festival, $10; Wakulla Christian Coalition, table and tickets at Christian Coalition dinner, $225; Wakulla Sign Company, Crawfordville, signs, $1,187; D.R. Vause, Tallahassee, food for campaign event, $653; Wakulla Sign Company, signs, $1,391; Budget Printing, bumper stickers, $382; Home Depot, Tallahassee, lumber, $717; Ace Hardware, Crawfordville, lumber, $98; Specialty Sportswear, Tallahassee, buttons, $419. T.W. MAURICE LANGSTON: Contributions this period, $7,405, $898 in-kind; expenditures, $20,705. Total contributions to date, $39,545; total expenditures, $26,197. Contributions: C.W. Parish General Agency, Bushnell, insurance, $250; Kenneth & Brenda Strickland, Fairfax, Va., $100; F.W. Carraway Jr., Tallahassee, retired, $250; Jerry & Wanda Causseaux, Tallahassee, $20; Sheriff David B. Shoar, St. Augustine, $100; Lee Fordham, Tallahassee, retired, $100; Neil & Nannette Watts, Sopchoppy, $50; A.J. Smith, Tallahassee, communications consultant, $500; ATN Inc., St. Marys, Ga., inmate telephone systems, $300; Terry & Diane Herring, Crawfordville, $100; Huston N. Joyner, Quincy, $75; Charles E. Johnson Jr., Tallahassee, $50; Mary Jo & Terry Godbold, Roswell, Ga., actuary, $250; Pamela C. Woodroffe, Decatur, Ga., $100; Ronald C. Mitchell, Crawfordville, $50; Homer G. Tedder d/b/a Forest Edge Enterprises, Tallahassee, $50; Alicia & Donnie Crum, Panacea, Wakulla County Sheriff, $150; Joe & Anna Bell Crutch eld, Crawfordville, $30; Robert M. Porter, Tallahassee, $100; Wakulla Station Mobile Home Community Joan Sharman, Crawfordville, $50; Charles M. Purvis, Ochlockonee Bay, architect, $250; Bellamys Outdoor Sports Inc., Crawfordville, recreational vehicle sales, $500; Jody Quick, Crawfordville, $10; Leona & George Strickland, Sopchoppy, $100; John & Ethel Jefferson, Crawfordville, $100; Russell Lee Perkins, Tallahassee, $100; William Ferguson, Tallahassee, CPA, $200; Roy McLeod, Sopchoppy, retired, $200; Sue & Larry Massa, Crawfordville, $100; Alicia & Donnie Crum, Panacea, Wakulla County Sheriff, $200; Enwood Ashmore, Havana, $100; Barry Broering, Crawfordville, $40; Leslie C. Herold, Crawfordville, FHP lieutenant, $200; Larry W. Lassiter, Crawfordville, vice-president MarPan, $250; Clear Cut Solutions LLC, Carrabelle, construction, $100; Keith Blackmar, Crawfordville, $50; S&R Acoustics, Crawfordville, construction, $100; Ralph Goodson, Sopchoppy, $50; Joyce Alexander, Crawfordville, $50; Wright Alexander, Crawfordville, $50; Guy Revell, Crawfordville, retired, $500; anonymous, $10; Lamar Cox, Tallahassee, $35; Marjorie Law, Crawfordville, $10; Betty Jane Evans, Crawfordville, $100; Crawfordville Lions Club, refund, $25; Jeff R. Schremser, Crawfordville, $100; John D. Rojas, Crawfordville, $100; James & Mary Jeanne Davis, Crawfordville, $100; William and Thelma Gaupin, Crawfordville, $50; James G. Keen, Tallahassee, consultant, $150; Helen K. Cleveland, Crawfordville, $100; R.T. Land, Tallahassee, $25; Randolph G. Lewis, Crawfordville, $30; James D. & Laure Boyd, Crawfordville, $50; Dr. Joseph A. Abal, Crawfordville, realtor and auctioneer, $100; Jon & Lois Petrie, Crawfordville, $200; Robert E. Giddens, Crawfordville, $25; Christopher & Joani Chase, Tallahassee, $100; Derek Lawhon, Crawfordville, $20; Hookin Transport Services Inc., Crawfordville, transport Fedex, $100; Alan Wade Vanlandinham, Quincy, $50; Lee Ann Allen, Crawfordville, in-kind eight bottles of glitter, $54; Fred Nichols, Sopchoppy, in-kind pressure-treated post, $293; Marjorie Law, in-kind ice cream, $50; Bryon & Linda Price, Crawfordville, in-kind food & drink, $150; Cale Langston, Crawfordville, inkind computer work, $350. Expenditures: Auto trim Design & Signs, Crawfordville, signs, banners, T-shirts and buttons (partial payment), $2,762; Wakulla Rotary Valentine Celebration, booth fee, $10; Judy Langston, Crawfordville, reimbursement for float supplies, $177; Wakulla Swine Show, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $100; Auto Trim Design, balance of payment, $2,718; Wakulla County Christian Coalition, banquet table and eight tickets, $225; Gulf Coast Lumber, Crawfordville, oat supplies, $166; Wakulla Ducks Unlimited, Crawfordville, Mallard sponsor, $750; Auto Trim Design, T-shirts, digital magnetics, $1,043; Mike Kemp, gas reimbursement for sign installation, $102; Judy Langston, reimbursement for float supplies, $348; Auto Trim Design, 4x4 signs, $1,157; Front Line Strategies, Tallahassee, cards, consulting fees for December-February, $3,693; Gene Lambert, Crawfordville, reimbursement for candy and oat supplies, $154; William T. Stokley, Panacea, reimbursement for personal gas to install signs, $44; Auto Trim Design, T-shirts, $866; Judy Langston, candy and canopy, $293; Lions Club, booth fee, $35; Auto Trim Design, T-shirts, digital magnetics, $882; Sams Club, Tallahassee, candy for parade, $103; EMRI Corporation, Brandon, webelect, net & map option, $421; Auto Trim Design, yard signs, $1,899; Mike Kemp, gas reimbursement, $155; Wakulla Middle School baseball, Crawfordville, advertisement at baseball eld, $185; PayPal, Omaha, Neb. transaction fee, $3.20; Auto Trim Design, 4x4 signs, $1,157; Citizens Supports Others Fund, Crawfordville, hole sponsorship, $200; Miss Wakulla County Pageant, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $50; Front Line Strategies, consulting services for March, $1,000. County Commission, District 1 ALAN BROCK: Contributions this period, $14, 484; expenditures, $6,794. Total contributions to date, $14,484; total expenditures, $6,794. Contributions: Crawfordville LLC. Tallahassee, $500; John Dailey, Tallahassee, consultant, $100; Albert Pasini, Crawfordville, executive, $100; Nancy Rubin, Tallahassee, teacher, $100; Natalie Kato, Orlando, legislative analyst, $50; Dirk Wiggins, Washington, D.C., consultant, $250; Lat Penland, Crawfordville, retired, $50; Joshua Hicks, Washington, D.C., non-pro t fundraiser, $75; Eric Jotkoff, Tampa, press secretary, $50; Nathaniel Forman, Fort Lauderdale, student, $100; William St. John Forma, Fort Lauderdale, student, $250; Jennifer Forman, Fort Lauderdale, homemaker, $250; H. Collins Forman, Fort Lauderdale, attorney, $250; M. Emma Brock, Crawfordville, paralegal, $25; Ralph Mills, Tallahassee, manager, $300; Rachel Pienta, Crawfordville, professor, $25; Neece Tire & Auto Service, Tallahassee, auto service, $200; Raquel Simon, Tallahassee program director, $50; Susan Shoemaker, Tallahassee, teacher, $50; Stephen Slepin, Tallahassee, attorney, $100; Leonard Bembry, Greenville, state representative, $100; Alma Gonzalez, Tallahassee, attorney, $25; Eden Rogers, Tallahassee, mother, $50; Ed Carter, Tallahassee, retired, $50; A.J. Smith, Tallahassee, law enforcement, $250; Chebon Marshall, Norman, Okla., consultant, $100; R. Jai Gillum, Tallahassee, non-pro t fundraiser, $250; Nancy Miller, Tallahassee, Tallahassee city commissioner, $100; Ralph Rish, Port St. Joe, engineeer, $500; Beth Ann Matuga, Tallahassee, consultant, $250; Bart Gunter, Tallahassee, insurance agent, $250; Debra Preble, Tallahassee, engineer, $500; Beth Labasky & Associates LLC, Tallahassee, consultant, $200; Center for Orthopedic & Sports Physical Therapy P.A., Tallahassee, medical, $200; Ajax Building Corporation, Midway, construction, $250; Preble-Rish Inc., Port St. Joe, engineers, $500; Hammond Design Group LLC, Tallahassee, architecture, $350; Edge Communications LLC, Miami, communications, $500; Louis Garcia, Tallahassee, Big Brothers Big Sisters CEO, $20; Douglas Martin, Tallahassee, government affairs, $100; Governance, Tallahassee, consulting, in-kind catering, $282; Kurt Spitzer, Panacea, environmental consultant, $40; Ben Sohl, Durham, N.H., staffer, $50; Diane Wilson, Panacea, retired, $100; Allison Stribling, Tallahassee, consultant, $150; Emily Beer, Alexandria, Va., consultant, $500; Rachel Pienta, Crawfordville, professor, $50; Lindsay Barrett, Statesville, N.C., senior organizer, $100; Waste Pro, Longwood, solid waste management, $500; Akerman Senterfitt, Orlando, law rm, $500; Bruce Platt, Tallahassee, attorney, $50; Laura Deeb, Beverly Hills, Calif., communications, $50; Bethany Mathers, Crawfordville, ESE program specialist, $50; Shelby Williams, Crawfordville, teacher, $25; M. Emma Brock, Crawfordville, paralegal, $25; Sarah Howell, Crawfordville, speech therapist, $50; Elena Myrhe, Crawfordville, designer, $100; Donald C. Henderson, Panacea, retired, $100; Joan Hendrix, Crawfordville, retired, $100; Walter Dickson, Panacea, developer, $50; G. Kevin Vaughn, Tallahassee, insurance agent, $250; Millie Bruce, Crawfordville, registered nurse, $50; Christina Marie Johnson, Crawfordville, homemaker, $75; Albert Pasini, Crawfordville, executive, $150; Edward Brock, Crawfordville, chemist, $50; Lionel Dazvedo, Crawfordville, realtor, $50; Maggie Gaby, Crawfordville, boss, $100; Amanda Weilbacker, Tallahassee, social worker, $25; Amanda Wade, Tallahassee, server, $20; Brad Smith, Tallahassee, sales, $20; Susan Pourciau, Crawfordville, executive director, $25; Sally Gandy, Panacea, retired, $25; David Roddenberry, Sopchoppy, author, $25; Chuck Hess, Crawfordville, professor, $100; Mike Carter, Crawfordville, retired, $50; Scott Gaby, Crawfordville, banker, in-kind catering $410; Jule Gaby, Crawfordville, nurse, in-kind rental $300; Kristen McMillan, Sopchoppy, photographer, in-kind photography $50; Herb Donaldson, Crawfordville, writer, $25; Jamie Hayes, St. Marks, teacher, $10; Bettie Glover, Crawfordville, retired, $5; Queen McRae, Crawfordville, retired, $2; Ted Gaupin, Crawfordville, Realtor, $20; Frank Carter, Tallahassee, retired, $50; Jina Malek, Crawfordville, state employee, $20; Joy Schneider, Crawfordville, consultant, $20; Allison Hudson, Crawfordville, senior management, $10; Laura Nicholson, Crawfordville, speech therapist, $10; Dustin Grubbs, Crawfordville, engineer, $20; Corinne Rubin, Tallahassee, legislative analyst, $260; Simeon Queen, Prairie, Texas, city councilman, $10; Crystal Gould, Washington, D.C., data analyst, $50; Jean Bell, Gainesville, medical transcriptionist, $500; West Flagler Associates LTD., Miami, entertainment, $500; Donna Beer, Farmersville, Texas, homemaker, $50; Governance, Tallahassee, consulting, $227; Governance Services LLC, Tallahassee, consulting, $500; www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 5BCampaign contributions and expendituresContinued on Page 6B

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comCampaign contributions and expendituresCathy Stevens, Bainbridge, Ga., special ed teacher, $25; Jason Icerman, Gainesville, engineer, $50; Charles Maddox, Tallahassee, executive, $500; Jim Kersh, Tallahassee, retired, $25; Richard Swanson, Chicago, corporate communications, $50; Murray McLaughlin, Crawfordville, retired, $50; Phillip Perry, Washington, D.C., senior associate, $100; Ben King, Tallahassee, consultant, $100; Arvil White, Tallahassee, planner, $100; Rick Minor, Tallahassee, chief of staff, $100; Kevin Cate, Tallahassee, consultant, $50; Julia Landry, Tallahassee, consultant, $50; Sara Jones, DeWitt, Mich., alumni relations, $50. Expenditures: Wakulla County Youth Fair Association, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $50; Kristen McMillan Photography, Sopchoppy, photography, $50; U.S. Postal Service, Crawfordville, post of ce box and stamps, $79; petty cash, $50; Amazing Mail Solutions, Crawfordville, copies, $28; rally. org, San Francisco, bank processing fee, $11.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; Civic Communications, Tallahassee, consulting, $200; Chamber of Commerce, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $250; Wakulla NJROTC, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $100; rally.org, bank processing fee, $3.37; Of ce Depot, Tallahassee, supplies, $54; Best Buy, Tallahassee, supplies, $68; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally. org, bank processing fee, $4.50; Delta Air Lines, travel, $543; rally.org, bank processing fee, $4.50; rally.org, bank processing fee, $1.12; Capital City Bank, Crawfordville, checks, $121; petty cash, $350; Sprint, Overland Park, Kan., telecommunications, $258; rally.org, bank processing fee,$2.25; Wakulla Discount Liquors, Panacea, cetering, $527; Crawfordville Elementary School, rally. org, bank processing fee, sponsorship, $125; Kristen McMillan Photography, photography, $100; Backwoods Bistro, Sopchoppy, catering, $1,700; Wal-Mart, Crawfordville, supplies, $66; Amazing Mail Solutions, Crawfordville, copies, $85; Wakulla Florist, Crawfordville, flowers, $85; WinnDixie, Crawfordville, supplies, $19; 101 Restaurant, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $108; Millers Ale House, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $169; Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, Crawfordville, sponsorship, $425; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally. org, bank processing fee, $22.50; rally.org, bank processing fee, .45; Sakura Sushi & Grill, Tallahasse, meal for volunteers, $51; Barnes & Noble, Tallahassee, thank you notes, $50; Miccosukee Root Cellar, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $83; Proof, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $16; 101 Restaurant, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $18.50; Wildwood Golf Course, Crawfordville, meal for volunteers, $99.18; Network of Young Professionals, tickets, $45; El Jalsico, Crawfordville, meal/meeting, $20; rally.org, bank processing fee, $1.12; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; Shell Oil, Crawfordville, fuel, $28.60; Stone Creek Pizza, Crawfordville, meal for volunteers, $17; rally.org, bank processing fee, $1.12; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; TGI Fridays, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $80; Siam Sushi, Tallahassee, meal for volunteers, $44; Wildwood Golf Course, meal/meeting, $13; Wakulla County Ducks Unlimited, Crawfordville, tickets, $150; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $4.50; rally.org, bank processing fee, $4.50; Starbucks, Tallahassee, coffee for volunteers, $30; Delta Air Lines, travel, $25; Pizza Hut, Atlanta, meal-travel, $6; Shell Oil, Crawfordville, fuel, $15; rally.org, bank processing fee, $4.50; rally. org, bank processing fee, $4.50; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; rally.org, bank processing fee, $2.25; Park at 14th, Washington, D.C., meal-travel, $142; Legal Seafoods, Washington, D.C., meal-travel, $44. RALPH C. THOMAS JR.: Contributions, $1,125. Expenditures, $448. Contributions: Ralph C. Thomas Jr., Crawfordville, mortgage loan of cer, $1,000 loan; Garland Burdette, Crawfordville, $25; Ralph C. Thomas Jr., $100. Expenditures: Auto Trim Design, Crawfordville, signs, $243; Supervisor of Elections, petition validation, $19; Auto Trim Design, Crawfordville, signs, $22; Capital City Bank, Crawfordville, checks, $62; Wakulla Supports Others, golf tournament donation, $100. County Commission, District 3 HOWARD KESSLER: contributions this period. $13,560. Cash and checks $12,010, total in-kind $449. Total expenditures this reporting period $3,829.41. Contributions: Joyce Tarnow, Cross City, $50; Dot Skofronick, Tallahassee, $40; James Cavanagh, Tallahassee, $100; Rebecca Martin, Tallahassee, $100; Tom Chase, Tallahassee, $50; Ben Fusaro, Tallahassee, $150; Howard Kessler, in-kind printing supplies, $45; Ross Burnaman, Tallahassee, $50; Grayal Farr, Tallahassee, $50; Gary Whittenberger, Tallahassee, $35; Howard Pardue, Tallahassee, $20; Gertrude Deyle, Tallahassee, $50; Ron Saff, M.D., Tallahassee, $50; Merry Lynne Warfel, Tallahassee, $100; John Sojat, Tallahassee, $100; Ron Crowe, Monticello, $35; David Loper, Tallahassee, $150; Southern Realty, Pat Hamilton, St. Augustine, $100; Preston Robertson, Tallahassee, $25; Ovida Black, Talking Rock, Ga., $50; Jr. Prescott, Tallahassee, $250; Victor Lambou, Crawfordville, $250; William Anderson, Atlanta, Ga., $400; John Hedrick, Monticello, $100; Joe Lama, Tallahassee, $35; Randall Denker, Tallahassee, $20; Michael Sheridan, Tallahassee, $250; William Herrnkind, Tallahassee, $200; Theodore Simon, Sarasota, $100; John Whitton, Tallahassee, $100; Grady McKenzie, Crawfordville, $500; Anne Van Meter, Panacea, in-kind printing, $80.09; Geo Hydros, Reno, Nv., LLC, $200; Raymond Bellamy, Tallahassee, $300; Karen Johnson, Crawfordville, $25; Ordella Kerckhoff, Crawfordville, $25; Christine Summers, Hahira, Ga., $500; Ramona Colson, Panacea, $100; Jacqueline Green, Crawfordville, $50; Mary Cortese, Crawfordville, $50; James Brock, Crawfordville, $50; Hugh Taylor, Crawfordville, $50; Robert Lee Knight, Gainesville, $100; Steve Van Sciver, Tallahassee, $75; H. A. McDaniel, Tallahassee, $100; Angret Piasecki, Crawfordville, $200; Steve Fults, Panacea, $105; Bossie Hawkins, Tallahassee, $50; Steve Urse, Tallahassee, $50; William Pike,Tallahassee, $200; Don Axelrad, Tallahassee, $20; Rick Grant, Tallahassee, $50; Kathryn Wilson, Crawfordville, $20; Crystal Wakoa, Crawfordville, $100; Lat Penland, Crawfordville, $50; Patricia Sudduth, $150; Janet Siamis, Crawfordville, $200; Alice Veasman, Sopchoppy, $50; Debra Sparks, Crawfordville, $100; Helen McLaughlin, Crawfordville, $50; Mark Prance, Crawfordville, $50; Jack Joiner, Panacea, $50; Darlene Osterhoff, Crawfordville, $100; Jayne Parker, Crawfordville, $100; Karen Murrell, Crawfordville, $200; Judith Harriss, Sopchoppy, $25; John Potter, Crawfordville, $35; Robert Ross, Crawfordville, $35; Kay Kerns, Crawfordville, $25; Fay Dansby, Panacea, $35; Lois Isensee, Sopchoppy, $50; Donna Watkins, Crawfordville, $50; Annie mills, Crawfordville, $30; Forest Coxen, Panacea, $35; Norman James, Crawfordville, $50; Edward McIntyre, Crawfordville, $100; A Lee Cook, Crawfordville, $25; Alan Laner, Panacea, $60; Patti Calhoun, Crawfordville, $100; Kellie Keys, Crawfordville, $10; Howard Kessler, in-kind parade items, $20; Dave Roberts, Panacea, $50; Betty Faye Russell, Panacea, $100; Monte Dickey, Crawfordville, $50; Kenneth Voland, Crawfordville, $50; Capt. Ted Kiper, Crawfordville, $25; Bonnie Sturchio, Sopchoppy, $25; Diane Robida, Crawfordville, $100; Ray Bellamy, Tallahassee, $100; Jean Beck, Panacea, $20; Gail Hickman, Crawfordville, $100; Almeda Pettit, Tallahassee, $100; Trudy Thompson, Crawfordville, $50; Woodrow Lewis, Crawfordville, $100; Suzann Walton, Crawfordville, $50; Marcia Bjerragaard, Crawfordville, $50; James Gerus, Crawfordville, $100; Chris Parkinson, Sopchoppy, $200; Carmen Sturchio, Sopchoppy, $20; Judith Mulloy, Crawfordville, $20; James Kates, Crawfordville, $20; Richard Dubin, Panacea, $35; Larry Roberts, Sopchoppy, $200; Howard Kessler, in-kind business cards, $54; Scott Paterna, Crawfordville, $30; Elizabeth Davies, Panacea, $500; Sylvia Ann Dunaway, Crawfordville, $50; Kessler, Inc., Wayne, NJ, $200; James Muller, Tallahassee, $35; Laura Jones, Panacea, $50; Anne Ahrendt, Crawfordville, $50; Nancy Myers, Crawfordville, $200; Janice Williamson, Panacea, $50; Cathy Cameron, Crawfordville, $30; Mimi Jones, Tallahassee, $100; Douglas Gilbert, Crawfordville, $50; Eleanor Enge, Portage, Mi., $100; Sandy Cook, Crawfordville, $100; Jean Williams, Tallahassee, $100; George Harrison, Crawfordville, $20; H A McDaniel, Tallahassee, $25; Greg Gibson, Crawfordville, $50; Rita Powell, Crawfordville, $25; Karen Johnson, Crawfordville, $25; Jeri Lucking, Crawfordville, $50; Randy Smith, Crawfordville, $50; Eva Sanchez Thorpe, Sopchoppy, $50; Donald Allen, Crawfordville, $50; Mary Wade, Crawfordville, $50; Al Shylkofski, Crawfordville, $100; Christy Noftz, Crawfordville, $50; Rosalie Pace, Sopchoppy, $50; Marvin Norris, Crawfordville, $100; Leon Nettles, Crawfordville, $100; Daniel Corley, Sopchoppy, $100; Luther Council, Crawfordville, $30; Bonnie Mobley, Crawfordville, $30; Allen Hardesty, Crawfordville, $50; Jana Tollefsen, Panacea, $20; David Hove, Crawfordville, $20; Jack Joiner, Panacea, $10; Peggy Bump, Crawfordville, $20; Dick Bickford, Crawfordville, $20; Carmen Sturchio, Sopchoppy, $10; Grant Peeples, Crawfordville, in-kind music, $250. Expenditures: U. S. Post Of ce, postage, $88; Wakulla Co. Supervisor of Elections, voter information, $10; Wakulla Rotary Club, booth rent, $10; Wal-Mart, meeting supplies, $74.60; Vista Print, advertising material, $69.94; Piryx, online donation fee, $4.73; U. S. Post Of ce, postage, $90; U. S. Post Of ce, postage, $90; Piryx, online donation fee, $4.50; Staples, paper, $14.28; U. S. Post Of ce, postage, $32; Staples, ink/paper, $57.81; Crawfordville Lions Club, booth rent, $10; The Wakulla News, advertising, $1,710; Sams Club, party supplies, $95.70; Wal-Mart, party supplies, $34.94; WalMart, party, $14.71; Dollar Tree, party, $10.70, Stedebains, signs, $1,123.50; Piryx, online donation fee, $4.50; Supervisor of Elections, petition fee, $19.40; Dollar Tree, party supplies, $19.26; Wakulla Ag Center, rent, $105; Winn Dixie, party supplies, $37.75; Staples, printing, $98.09. MIKE STEWART: Total contributions this period $2,650. Cash and checks $2,050, loans, $600. Total expenditures this reporting period $2,445.58. Contributions: Mike Stewart, loan, $100; Mike Stewart, loan, $500; Peavy & Son, Havana, $500; Jennifer Forman, Fort Lauderdale, $350; H. Collins Forman Jr., Fort Lauderdale, $250; William St. John Forman, Fort Lauderdale, $250; Jason Wessinger Const., $200; Ted Gaupin, Crawfordville, $250; Thelma Gaupin, Crawfordville, $250. Expenditures: Supervisor of Elections, petition verification, $18.10; Auto Trim & Design, signs, $361; Auto Trim & Design, $673.03; Gulf Coast Lumber, lumber for signs, $54.57; Chamber of Commerce, low country boil dinner, $70; Gulf Coast Lumber, lumber for signs, $54.57; Auto Trim & Design, signs, $597.06; Auto Trim & Design, $617.12. County Commission, District 5 RICHARD HARDEN: Total contributions this reporting period $2,115. Cash and checks $1,885, loans, $10. Total expenditures this reporting period $1,742.37. Contributions: Robert Roddenberry, Sopchoppy, $250; Gerald Harden, Sopchoppy, $60; Ronald Kent Brown, Crawfordville, $200; Fred Nichols, Sopchoppy, $25; Patricia Lamon, Crawfordville, $100; Rebecca Harden, Sopchoppy, $300; W. Jackson Durward, II, St. Marks, $500; Larry and Teresa Harden, Sopchoppy, $150; Todd and Cheryl Andrews, $50; Garland and Brenda Burdette, Crawfordville, $25; Susie W. Harrison, Crawfordville, $75; Richard Chichetti, DMD, St. Marks, $150; Richard W. Harden, Sopchoppy, loan, $10. Expenditures: Auto Trim & Design, banner, $30; Auto Trim & Design, banner, $34.20; Auto Trim & Design, banner/business cards, $117.70; Supervisor of Elections, petitions, $18.80; Auto Trim & Design, rack cards, $220; Auto Trim & Design, rack cards/magnetic signs, $348.17; Supervisor of Elections, petitions, .50; Crawfordville Lions Club, booth, $10; Auto Trim & Design, 2-sided signs with stands, $963. JOHN SHUFF: Total contributions this reporting period $3,315.23. Cash and checks $1,315, loans, $2,000, total in-kind $600. Total expenditures this reporting period $162.23. Contributions: John and P etra Shuff, Crawfordville, loan, $200; Roan K. Vaning, Coral Gables, $80; Richard Greene, Palmetto, $80; Doug Gove, Tallahassee, $50; Heide Clifton, Crawfordville, $50; Lawrence Deddy, Coral Gables, $50; Anne Ahrendt, Crawfordville, $25; Diane Brooke, Jacksonville, $300; Mary Ellen Davis, Crawfordville, $100; Kevin Vaughn, Crawfordville, $250; David Pienta, Crawfordville, $500; Clint Weatherman, Havana, $120; Gregory Deddy, $50; John and Petra Shuff, Crawfordville, loan, $1,800; PayPal, .23; Bob Rogers, Davie, $80; Steve Reilly, $100; Bill Russell, Panacea, $100. Expenditures: Amazing Mail Solutions, Inc., $107; Deep South Signs, LLC, $55; PayPal, .23. Supervisor of Elections HENRY F. BUDDY WELLS: Total contributions to date, $100; total expenditures, N/A. Contributions: Henry F. Wells, supervisor of elections, $100 loan. Tax Collector CHERYLL OLAH: Total contributions to date, $100; total expenditures, $18.20. Contributions: Cheryll Olah, tax collector, $100 loan. Expenditures: Supervisor of elections office to verify petition signatures, $18.20. School Board, District 4 GREGORY THOMAS : Total contributions, $100; total expenditures, none. Contributions: Gregory Thomas, state employee, $100 loan. Continued from Page 5B Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555The college of choice! Invest in yourself todayAordable tuition at TCC+higher wages for those with college degrees = A really smart investment HELP WANTEDWAKULLA URGENT CARE CRAWFORDVILLEemail resume/salary requirements to rachelbrown@wakullaurgentcare.comfull time We offer Health, Vision, Dental, and Life insurance Paid Time Off Compensation depending on experience X-RAY TECHNOLOGISTS Certi ed by the ARRT, HIPPA Certi ed Maintain State License. Also, responsible for DEXA scans, Pulmonary Function Testing, Sleep Study and Overnight Pulse Ox Testing. This job requires a lot of PR work!! Prepare patients for radiologic procedures Collect and deliver data to Physician Responsible for operating X-ray Maintains quantity and quality control checks MEDICAL ASSISTANT Experience and Requirements: Must be Certied and/or Registered HIPPA certied CPR Certied At least 1 year experience working in a medical of ce Excellent oral and written communication skillsGreat Patient interactionFamiliar with front and back procedures Procient in venipuncture, urinalysis, EKGs Exceptional Organizational Skills a mustTeam Player A Must Must have knowledge of anatomy & medical terminology.Must have knowledge of medications

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 7BBefore and After School Summer Program Arts, crafts, eld trips, Gulf World, swimming, movies, bowling, skating, and so much more! Age: Pre-K through 5th grade June 4 August 10 Monday through Friday 6:30 a.m. 6:30 p.m. Children meet daily at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Debbie 926-7145 ext. 222; Pat 926-7145 ext. 230 $125/week or $25/day plus activity fees. Drop-ins welcome. Camp Catch-A-Dream Horseback riding Lessons [regular & therapeutic] plus trail rides. Will learn basic horse-manship skills, balance, following directions, working through fears, & con dence building. Age: Starting at age 7 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy $35 per Lesson or per hour, Scholarships may be available through WCCY, Camp Catch-A-Dream Anger Management & Family functioning Classes Will learn responsibility, respect and a better way to communicate. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505, 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy $15 per 1.5 hr session 10 sessions, Family rates upon request, Scholarships may be available through WCCY. Camp Catch-A-Dream Equine Assisted Growth & Learning Will learn responsibility, respect and communication skills. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp 962-9999, 778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy Rates for groups or individuals, Scholarships may be available through WCCY Camp Indian Springs, Capital Region YMCA, Traditional day / overnight summer camp programs where we encourage kids to build friendships face to face, get outdoors and appreciate our natural surroundings while learn good decision making skills based on the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility., All one week sessions. Age: Overnight Camp: 8 16; Day Camp: 5 12 Sessions start June 3 and run through August 4. Jim Bentley jbentley@capitalregionymca.org or www. campindiansprings.org 926-3361; fax: 926-3624 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville Overnight Camp: $480 per week Day Camp: $140 per week, Scholarships available. Gamerz Paradise Sign up for our Summer Camp! Video games, pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment. Age: 5 and up Daily, weekly and monthly rates available. Call 850-926-9100 theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com Gamerz Paradise, 635 Wakulla Arran Rd., Crawfordville Gena Davis, Instructor Swimming lessons. Day or evening classes. Beginning end of May offering sessions throughout the summer. All ages. 926-7685 or 510-2326. Happytime Instructional Daycare Center Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs SUMMER CHILDCARE Includes a wide variety of eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children. We enjoy skating, swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Locally Owned and Operated by Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available. Call today for our very affordable pricing 926-5226 Crawfordville Hwy. North International Gold Gymnastics IGG A funlled themed week full of gymnastics, eld trips, crafts, movies, games, indoor and outdoor play. Lunch to be brought from home. Snacks are provided. Age: 5 12 Hours : 7am-6pm, Carol McAliley or Stephanie Burton at 926-4431 Email: go-iggc@hotmail.com, 54 Feli Way, Crawfordville Weekly rates: full day campers $145; half day campers $75; drop in campers $35/day, 10% discount for second child. Providence Christian Academy Individualized instruction in algebra, geometry, physical science, chemistry, physics, trigonometry, calculus, Spanish, and phonics courses. Grades K 12 Call today to schedule an appointment. 926-2456; 926-1326; 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville Ribits ARTtastic Summer Camp Adventure 2012 ART and FUN Pottery (clay between their ngers), Ceramics: sponge, splatter, bubble, toothbrush, brushes, yarn, stamps, stickers and other painting techniques, add mixed media and a few surprises, makes Ribits the best camp for the kids this summer. Ages: 5 and up June 4-8 11-15, 25-29, July 9-13, 16-20, 30-August 3, August 6-10 Time: 8:30 5:30 (early drop off and late pick upon request) 9:00 2pm ($175 for the half day) Cost: $225 for full day; $175 for half day Deposit: $100 Daily snacks included and lunch (Pizza) on Friday. Savary Academy Summer program to make up a class or recover credits for graduation. Grades 7 12 Ongoing Classes on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 9 a.m. 3 p.m. 926-9977 www.savaryacademy.com Savary Academy, 70-A Feli Way, Crawfordville, FL The Learning Curve SUMMER LEARNING CAMPS (For Students Entering) K 1st: ABCs and 123s; 1st 3rd: It All Adds Up (Addition/Subtraction Skills); 3rd 5th: Multiply Your Fun (Multiplication/Division Skills); 3rd 5th: Fun with Fractions; 4th 6th: Writing Right (Improving Writing Skills); 6th-7th: Solution Skills (Middle School Math Skills); 6th 8th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful Middle School Student); Grades 1 5 JUMP START (Individual grade level intro to next year); Grades: 1-3; 4-6; 7-8 Lets Speak Spanish (Conversational Spanish); 9th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful High School Student); 8th 9th: Intro to Algebra 1; 9th 10th: Intro to Geometry; Writing the AP History Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Writing the AP English Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Intro to AP Stats (Mastering the Graphing Calculator); GET ME TO COLLEGE WORKSHOPS (What Every Parent and Student Should Know about College Admissions and Financial Aid) 9TH 11TH 12TH FOR PARENTS: How do I do this New Math? (Instruction for parents to aid their children with next years homework; classes for speci c grade levels) Call Melisa Taylor to Register at 926-2179 or visit www. tlctutoring.wordpress.com for summer schedules and pricing. The Learning Curve, 3119-B Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Tiger Rock Martial Arts Elite Martial Arts training Our youth will enhance their life skills and receive coaching that keeps them focused on goal setting, self-discipline and con dence. Sign your child up today! The focus is rewarding. The energy is radiating. All ages. 926-3777 www.crawfordvilletkd.com www.tigerrockmartialarts.com Crawfordville Tae Kwon Do 27 Azalea Drive, Suite A & B Crawfordville (Behind CVS) 5 Weeks of training for only $99 Wakulla Christian School Academic and Personal Enrichment Camp Acti vities include computers, cooking, dance, foreign language, martial arts, archery, piano, violin, guitar, music, photography, sports, woodworking, robotics, arts and crafts, gardening, special guests, eld trips and more. Ongoing Age: 3 14 Monday Friday 7 a.m. 6 p.m. Call 926-5583 or email wakullachristian@yahoo.comSUMMER OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH Its time to relax and have some needed downtime. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is proud to sponsor this Summer OPPS section. Recognizing that young people seek to nd their place in the wider world through many ways and means, the community hopes the following Summer OPPS hit the intended mark with many Wakulla youth. Positive youth development refers to activities and programs that nurture young people and help them build on their strength s. Positive youth development is not about xing kids problems. Rather, it helps young people nd positive things to say yes to. Positive youth development happens anytime an individual or a program teaches young people skills, connects adults and young people in a meaningful way, involves young people in the life of the community, and gives them a sense of belonging and accomplishment. In Wakulla there are many places that young people can nd this kind of nurturing. Wakulla has its own unique network of people, groups, churches, clubs, teachers, businesses, and agencies that help young people grow into competent adults. The nurturers might be piano teachers, soccer coaches, neighbors, Big Brother and Sisters, YMCA, church youth group leaders or grandparents this seci on of the paper is intended to help you decide how to spend a bit of your time this summer.All Summer LongJune 4 June 8 Wakulla County 4-H Bachelor/Bachelorette Camp Attend this day camp and learn about budgeting, nancial management, how to take care of a baby, food preparation skills and clothing care. Hands-on learning experiences will be incorporated throughout. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 5 8 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 11 June 15 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology(Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5)Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Camp Cherry Lake This year camp will feature traditional activities including swimming, canoeing, kayaking, camp crafts, camp re, water games and archery. Not to be missed are the ever-popular marshmallow paint wars and dance! Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 11 15 (residential), Camp Cherry Lake, Madison, FL Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce 926-3931 $220.00 per week June 18 June 22 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Michelle Snow School of Music Summer Vocal Workshop In this camp, young people will learn the basics of producing and performing in a vocal production with choreography. Participants will get musical education as well as the opportunity to participate in all aspects of a small musical production. (Limited openings) June 18-22. Performance evening of Friday, June 22. 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Michelle Snow (850)926-7627 Jmcsnow5649@centurylink. net, 3102 Coastal Highway, Medart $125/week per child Wakulla County 4-H Project Runway Wakulla Participants will learn to put the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Repair philosophy into practice as they re-build a piece of clothing that has been overlooked in the closet or has been purchased from a re-use store. Participants will unleash their creativity as they re-create a clothing item of their choice through this artistic expression class. Boys and Girls are both encouraged to attend. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 19 22 (Tues Fri) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 25 June 29 Wakulla County 4-H Sew Fun and Quilting Campers will learn the basics of sewing, quilting and other fabric crafts such as pin making, weaving and other needlecrafts. The diligent camper will be able to complete a lap-sized quilt and one simple item of clothing by the end of the week. June 26 29 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $80.00/weekJuneMay 12 Wakulla Health Care Task Force Free Sports Physicals, Free physical examinations for student athletes, summer campers, and Special Olympians, Middle and high school students 9am 1 pm Students from WMS 9 a.m.; RMS 10 a.m.; WHS 11 a.m. Free Wakulla High School Clinic on Coastal Hwy (98) Tanya English 926-0065 X 253 Tanya. English@wcsb.us or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com WORKFORCE plus Get Connected, Stay Connected 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo Are you 16 -21 and ready to take the next step in your journey? Perhaps you are interested in a nding a job. Do you want to know more about joining the military or going to college? Maybe you would like to know more about the resources available in Wakulla County. Whatever your needs may be, make plans today to attend the WORKFORCE plus Get Connected, Stay Connected 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo and meet employers (who are hiring!), college and military recruiters and local community representatives. 11:00 am 1:00 pm TCC Wakulla Center 5 Crescent Way Crawfordville, FloridaMayMay 19 Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Fishing tournament Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 Wakulla County Coalition for Youth

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comJuly 9 July 13 Mission San Luis A Childs Life (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Imagine you were born 350 years ago. What was life like for the young residents of the mission? Learn to dress, play, and live like a colonist through role-playing, studying site artifacts, and using period toys and games. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 8 11 (older students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 16 July 20 Mission San Luis New World Apprentice (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Join our bustling village as a living history interpreter and participate in a variety of apprenticeships. Enlist as a soldier, blacksmith, potter, and more! All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Survival 101: Cooking, Camping and Water Exploration Campers will learn how to shoot a bow and arrow, track game, build a camp re and cook a meal using a solar oven. We will learn how to nd safe drinking water as well as camp out overnight. Campers will also have the ability to sh and learn about the heritage of survival in Wakulla County throughout the years. (Tuesday Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m., Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week July 23 July 27 Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 22 25 (younger students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla, Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 29 August 3 Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Sheriffs Youth Ranch Activities will include arts and crafts, sports, water safety, archery, nature hikes, bicycling, games, camp re activities and more. Applications available at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Deadline is May 31 Sponsorships FREE. 6 boys, 6 girls child age 10 -15, Caruth Camp in Levy County. Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 July 30 August 3 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm.JulyAugust 6 August 10 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm.AugustSUMMER OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH, CONT. This page sponsored in part by: Have you ever heard of the Ringling Bros. & Barnum & Bailey Circus? It is a combination of circuses started long ago, including one run by P.T. Barnum. Barnum was known for finding great circus acts, including Jumbo the elephant. Barnum found Jumbo at the London Zoo where the elephant was famous for giving kids rides. In fact, when P.T. Barnum offered to buy Jumbo from the zoo, thousands of children wrote to Queen Victoria begging her not to let the sale take place. Barnum bought Jumbo for $10,000 and showed the elephant in his circus until it died in 1885. Jumbos story did not end there, however. Barnum made several donations to Tufts University, and in his honor, the University named Jumbo its mascot.One of Barnums Best Name That AnimalSome circus acts have animals in them. Fill in the blanks to name some of the animals found at a circus.Answers: 1) Lions, 2) Tigers, 3) Dogs, 4) Elephants, 5) Sea Lions, 6) Chimps, 7) Horses 1) L __ __ N S2) T I __ E R __3) D __ G __4) E __ E P H __ N __ S5) S __ A L I __ __ S6) __ __ I M P S7) H __ __ S E S Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe W akull a Newswww.the wakullanews.co m

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Lost Lost Dog St Teresa Beach Sat. April 14th, Female, Tri Color White chest, 30lbs, 18, long ears and tail (850) 5086981 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfor dville. Short domestic female cat, grey & white last seen The Farm Subdivision (801) 5180385 Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)7421373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)3747294 Professional CJIS GROUP Inc., a Market Research firmhas a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUPbenefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Sales Help HUGE OPPORTUNITYNew company coming to the area, looking for 3 Professional Sales people w/management skills.. Six figure Income.Call 410-2022324 Trades/ Skills Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay 2Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Class A FlatBed Drivers $$$Home every weekend, Run S.E. US Requires 1 YR OTR F.B. Exp. & pay UP TO .39/mile call 800-572-5489 x 227 SunBElt T ransport, LLC. DriversKnight has a steady & Refrigerated freight. Annual salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. Modern trucks! CDL-A, 3 months current OTR expereince 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Trades/ Skills EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS Earn 50-55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Vets welcome. Call: (843)266-3731 bulldoghiway.com EOE NEW TO TRUCKING? Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com General Help 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now!at Schneider National Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training! Job ready in 15 days! (888)3681964 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now!at Schneider National Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training! Job ready in 15 days! (888)3681964 WANTEDLOVING, DEPENDABLETEACHER6:30am to 9:30am & 3:30pm to 6:30pm please send resume Attn: Teacher position busybeelearning 32327@yahoo.com Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)3143769 Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline .com Can You Dig It?We will train, certify and provide lifetime assistant landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator 866-362-6497 Garage/ Yard Sales CrawfordvilleNear Sheriffs Dept. Sat 9a-? Everything must go.. 71 Oak St CRAWFORDVILLE Sat. April 28, 8a-2p Giant Yard Sale 50+ Families Christ Church AnglicanClothing, appliances, furniture, housewares, toys and much much more. Hwy 98 (E. of W akulla High) OCHLOCKONEE BAYGot Rained out will try this again Saturday, April 28th, 9AM-2PM at57 Wakulla Circle, Lots of good clean items Sat, April 28, 8 -2pm Hshold Items Food processor, Sofa w/matching chair, Lighted Oak China Hutch, Bakers Rack, Kimball Console Piano, Pecan finish-like new, all kinds of STUFF 32 Nuthatch Trail in Song Bird Division Estate Sales ALLIGATOR PT Fri, Apr 27, Sat Apr 28, 9am to 1pm Second of Several antique gaming table, silver coins, sleeper couch, lift chair, Eng. Tea Cart, Recliners, jewelry, artist supplies, security safe, kitchen items, glassware, lamps Xmas items, and more than you can imagine! 658 PINE ST Mobile Homes For Rent CONVENIENT LOCATION3/2 large corner lot wooded buffer, porches, CHA, appls include washer & dryer $700/mo+ security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 2511253 CRAWFORDVILLE2/1, Singlewide, clean, new deck, 53 Cayuse Row $425. Mo. $425. Sec. References required (904) 5488342 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA on 5 acres (48 Willie Jenkins Rd.), NE Wakulla County. $800/month. Call 850-5106200. CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $595 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-5244090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $800, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 4433300 CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA, All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 9263832 Rent: Houses Unfurnished SHELL POINT BEACH30 Janet Drive Paradise Village Newly renovated 3BR/2BA, DWMH, granite kitchen, tile baths, wood floors, washer/dryer, workshop, Canal, Dock, Davits, Gated Community with pool and lawn care $1,200 mo. + security (850) 9265930 Real Estate For Sale WOODVILLE3/2/1, Brick, 1/2 Acre Open kitchen, wood flooring, gas fireplace, huge Florida Room and Laundry room. 20x40 workshop Fenced yard, patio and pool $128,900 (850)9264090 Auctions Estates AUCTION NCTwo Mountain homes, acreage, www.swicegoodau ctions.com. Three bedroom english cottage. Two bedroom Retreat 16 acres, Little Switzerland, NCAL8805 NCRL195929, Swicegood Group 336-7514444 x 3 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953www. sunsetranches.com Recreation Vehicles BUY/ SELL AN RVONLINEBest Deals and Selections. Visit RVT. com Classifieds Thousands of RVs for Sale by Owner & Dealer Lisitings www. RVT.com call 888-2602043 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 5190-0506 TWN Vs. Fleming, Dian D, Case No. 65-2008 CA 000256 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2008 CA 000256 US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5 Plaintiff, vs. DIAN D. FLEMING, et al Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated April 18, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65 2008 CA 000256 of the Circuit Court of the THIRD Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5, is Plaintiff, and DIAN D. FLEMING, et al are Defendants, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 24th day of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT NUMBER 13, IN BLOCK A, UNIT THREE(3) OF SHELL POINT BEACH, A SUBDIVISION IN LOT 121 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, AS SHOWN BY PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 58 OF PLAT BOOK NUMBER 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19thday of April, 2012. PHELAN HALLINAN PLC,888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By:/s/Betzy Falgas,Attorney for Plaintiff Owei Z. Belleh, Esq., Florida Bar No. 617598 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 Joshua I. Goldman, Esq., Florida Bar No. 689361 Drew T. Melville, Esq., Florida Bar No. 34986 Annabella Barboza, Esq., Florida Bar No. 040627 Hope Touchton, Esq., Florida Bar No. 60043 Susan Falardeau, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0059948 Bradford Willard, Esq., Florida Bar No. 62827 David A. Cramer, Esq., Florida Bar No. 64780 Jonathan L. Blackmore, Esq., Florida Bar No. 67902 Joy Kohl, Esq., Florida Bar No. 69406 Erik DeLEtoile, Esq., Florida Bar No. 71675 Betzy Falgas, Esq., Florida Bar No. 76882 Aaron Hines, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81690 Jherna A. Shahani, Esq., Florida Bar No. 81994 Jenine R. Davey, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0089325 Ashland Roberts, Esq., Florida Bar No. 89578 Geoffrey Cowen, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91377 Heather Griffiths, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0091444 Andrew Wilson, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0092155 Cynthia Hatch, Esq., Florida Bar No. 91460 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 9BA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Your Spanish Communicator Document Translations (Spanish /English) Conference Calls Telephone Excellence Skills Training (English/Spanish) Telephone outgoing voice recordingcall LKR COMMUNICATION & TRANSLATIONS, LLC for rates! 850-509-7129 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053 88 7408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONSRE-ROOFINGREPAIRSRESIDENTIALCOMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFINGCO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSelling Something? 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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets.US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF CMLTI 2006-AR5 TRUST FUND, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR5 c/o Phelan Hallinan PLCAttorneys for Plaintiff 888 SE 3rd Avenue, Suite 201Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact:Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 26 and May 3, 2012 5190-0503 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5183-0426 vs. Marcia D. Jones, Case No. 65-2012-CA-000031 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000031 Division SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MARCIA J. JONES A/K/A MARCIA DENISE MITCHELL CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 2445 NW 41ST ST. MIAMI, FL 33142-4535 Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARCIA D. JONES A/K/A MARCIA DENISE MITCHELL CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 2445 NW 41ST ST. MIAMI, FL 33142-4535 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 20, BLOCK 3, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA commonly known as: 78 SPOKAN TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Lindsay Moczynski of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before May 19, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated:April 5, 2012. 5185-0426 Vs. Menjor Patrick, case no. 65-2012-CA-000036 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000036 DIVISION: SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC., Plaintiff, vs. PATRICK MENJOR A/K/A PATRICK J. MENJOR,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JOHN B. LEMON LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:: 51 VIOLET LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 5188-0503 Vs. Llewllyn Patrick Mcewan Case No. 65-2010-CA-000083 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000083 DIVISION: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. LLEWLLYN PATRICK MCEWAN A/K/A LLEWELLYN PATRICK MCEWAN,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000083 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and LLEWLLYN PATRICK MCEWAN A/K/A LLEWELLYN PATRICK MCEWAN; CAROL NELSON MCEWAN A/K/A CAROL MCEWAN; RIVER WALK ESTATES HOMES ASSOCIATION, INC,; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at lobby OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 A.M, on the 24th of May, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, BLOCK D, RIVER WALK ESTATES, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THERE OF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 4 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A RIVER DRIVE, PANACEA, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this court on April 16, 2012. Brent X Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act-Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 26 and May 3, 2012 5188-0503 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN AMINATA LEMON LAST KNOWN ADDRESS : 51VIOLET LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property inWAKULLA County, Florida: LOT 135, THE FLOWERS, PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 49-52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in The W akulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 9th day of April, 2012. Brent X Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act-Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 19 and 26, 2012 5185-0426 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. April 19 and 26, 2012 5183-0426 5189-0503TWN Blount, Jeffrey Allan Case No. 12-30-CP Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 12-30-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JEFFREY ALLAN BLOUNT, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JEFFREY ALLAN BLOUNT, deceased, Case Number 12-30-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE TO THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 26, 2012. Personal Representative /s/WILLIAM BRYANT BLOUNT 218 S.W. Whitewood Drive, Port St. Lucie, FL 34953 Attorney for the Personal Representative /s/MARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.949884 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, FL 32326 April 26 & May 3, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5191-0503 (5 /12 Sale-ABC Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act. Florida Statutes, Chapeter 83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, May 12, Self Storage Notices 2012, at 2PM, at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini Warehouse containing personal property of: FINAL NOTICE DARRELL N. HODGE CLA Y BROGDON NORMAN BUTCH MCCALISTER LAMAR HIERS Payments must be made Self Storage Notices before Saturday, May 12, 2012 at 2:00p.m. The owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or by paying in person at the warehouse. Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News April 26 & May 3, 2012 5191-0503 Self Storage Notices The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. The following Employees were recognized: Employee of the Month Hiram Carter, Teacher of the Month Bryan Roddenberry. Both employees were congratulate and presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. All Board Members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the agenda. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the following consent items: 1. Approved Minutes of the Meeting held on March 12, 2012. 2. Approved the following Employment of Personnel: New Hires: 12 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Richardson, DavidDO/MaintenanceTrade Specialist04/04/12-06/30/12 Williams, RoyTransportationMechanic04/05/12-06/30/12 9 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Williams, MaryWMSCustodian04/09/12-06/04/12 Transfers: 10 Month Employee Time Limited TL Part-time PT NamePositionProgramPosition ProgramTerm of Service FromFromToTo Nicholson, LauraT.L.Speech PathCESSpeechPathPre-K/WEC03/05/12-06/04/12 Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Barron, JohnWMSCustodian Time Limited03/12/12-04/25/12 Brooks TerriRMSTeacher Time Limited04/23/12-06/04/12 Sanders, KristinaPre-K/WECParaprofessional Time Limited03/26/12-06/04/12 Thurmond, MeganDO/HRSecretary Time Limited04/09/12-05/31/12 West, CaraRESParaprofessional Time Limited03/26/12-06/04/12 3. Approved the following Letters of Retirement: Cynthia Shrestha/effective June 30, 2012 Pat Calhoun/effective June 4, 2012 Kelly Roberts/effective July 31, 2012 OQuinn Willis/effective August 2, 2012 David Willis/effective June 4, 2012 Norma Shotwell/effective June 4, 2012 Diane Perez/effective June 4, 2012 Hossein Achtchi/effective June 30, 2012 Patricia Coddington/effective June 4, 2012. 4. Approved the following Letters of Resignation: Sheila Vick/effective June 4, 2012 Jeff Dutrow/effective April 20, 2012 Mollie Walker/effective March 27, 2012 Darrell Lawhon/effective March 23, 2012 5. Approved the following requests for Leave of Absence: Mary Taff/effective March 1 June 4, 2012 Dorothy Franklin/effective March 15 June 30, 2012 Ronnie Pumphrey/effective April 3 May 15, 2012 approx. Lester Dunlap/effective March 12, June 30, 2012. 6. Approved Illness in the Line of Duty. (See Supplemental File #21) 7. Approved the Disposal of Equipment. (See Supplemental File #21) 8. Approved Budget Amendments #11/12 6 & 7. 9. Approved the March nancial statement. 10. Approved the Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the school board member voting districts as advertised. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Cooperative Agreement with the National Park Service. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Energy Conservation Policy as submitted by Energy Education, Inc., for the Wakulla County School Board. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve an additional Utility Easement for Wakulla County for the Medart Elementary lift station. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve a Letter of Agreement between the National Literacy Project and the Wakulla County School Board. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the 2012-13 Project Lead the Way (PLTW) STEM Agreement. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the 2011-2012 Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Secondary Grant Amendment #2 request for Restored Continuing Resolution Funds. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the revised 2012 VPK, ESE, High School and Middle School Summer School Schedules. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the 2012-13 Adult Education and Family Literacy Adult General Education Grant. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Auditor Generals Report for the scal year ending June 30, 2011. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Gray, Mr. Evans, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. An executive session was held immediately after the board meeting to discuss issues pertaining to collective bargaining. Superintendent Miller, Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott, Mr. Thomas, Mrs. Wells, Mr. Beach, Mr. Pearce and Mrs. ODonnell were in attendance.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON APRIL 16, 2012APRIL 26, 2012 Trying to sell something?Call and enter aClassi ed Ad for Only $10 inTheWakulla news 877-676-1403YARD SALE!!!Fri., April 27 and Sat., April 28 from 8AM to 2PM, 238 Gertie Brown Road Sopchoppy.Former antique store owners need more living space. Some antiques, collectibles, housewares, Pats Fun Jewelry, quality pre-owned clothes. An eclectic bunch of goodies, just waiting on you! Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 MAY 5 9AM EST--F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTIONTractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU426610% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646 TO VIEW PARTIAL LIST OF PHOTOS VISIT www.auctionzip.com RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property!We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!ANew Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 26-D Guinevere 3BR/2BA for $850 Mo. with $950 Deposit. Small pets ok with deposit20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE, April 20 Gov. Rick Scott signed a $70 billion budget this week as he touted new money for education, but wielded more than $142 million in vetoes for projects he said the cash strapped state cant afford. Facing a budget that had already been cut after successive years of tough economic times, the governors veto pen used less ink this time, as he marked out far less than the $600 million he axed a year ago. The courts were also busy this week as cases dealing with congressional and state Senate reapportionment wound their way through separate courts. The Florida Supreme Court took a look at revised maps for the state Senate while a few blocks away a circuit judge took arguments in a tussle over congressional districts drawn by the Republican-led Legislature. Meanwhile, the focus continued on the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin by a neighborhood watch volunteer back in February. A day before shooter George Zimmerman appeared on his own behalf, apologized to Martins family and was released on $150,000 bail, Scott introduced members of a committee set up to review Floridas controversial stand your ground law and related issues dealing with race, guns and citizen protection. Serving as a backdrop, businesses and individuals observed a dubious anniversary as they marked two years since the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill shut down Floridas tourism and seafood industries. Whether coincidental or not, the company this week outlined a $7.8 billion class action settlement that comes in additional to nearly $6.3 billion already spent. BUDGET Scott kicked off the week by signing the states $70 billion budget. Meeting with elementary school students at Cunningham Creek Elementary School in St. Johns County, Scott used the occasion to tout a $1 billion increase in K12 funding, a boost that critics were quick to point does not make up for nearly $1.3 billion in cuts made last year to states public schools. This budget is an education budget, Scott told a small crowd of squirming but quiet elementary students at the school. But attention turned to what the governor did not allow to remain in the states spending blueprint. From local museums and neighborhood development projects to bigger items, Scott downsized the budget. Among the vetoes was $2 million less for attorneys to represent low-income residents through foreclosure proceedings, domestic violence hearings and consumer fraud cases. Critics say the cuts to the states civil legal assistance program will mean a 25 percent reduction in the number of attorneys available for legal assistance on civil matters in the coming year. On the health care front, $38.2 million in vetoes hit the healthand human-services section of the budget, and some money for healthrelated projects also was eliminated from other parts of the spending plan. The vetoes were only a tiny fraction of the roughly $29.9 billion that the state expects to spend in 2012-13 on health and human-services programs, but still are expected to be felt by hospitals and others in health care. I focus on the hundreds and hundreds of projects and meritorious programs that were funded, said Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart and chairman of the Senate HHS budget committee. In a letter issued as part of the budget signing, Scott praised legislative decisions such as setting aside money for development of a new hospital-payment system in Medicaid and providing money for mental-health and substance-abuse programs. REDISTRICTING Democrats and three voting-rights organizations asked a Leon County circuit judge to throw out newlypassed congressional districts this week in a battle likely to make its way to the Florida Supreme Court, maybe further. In several hours of arguments before Circuit Court Judge Terry Lewis, the groups accused the Legislature of racial and political gerrymandering. The Legislatures lawyer countered that the Democrats objections would mean that black voters would be parceled out among districts that would subsequently elect white Democrats. The case marks the rst time that a court has reviewed the congressional plan under the anti-gerrymandering Fair Districts amendments, approved by voters in a November 2010 referendum. On Friday, the Florida Supreme got into action as it reviewed for the second time, maps outlining the states Senate districts. During testimony, the high court appeared to blunt arguments by Fair Districts that the revised plans still do not satisfy requirements under the act. A GOVERNOR WHO IS RICH VS. A DEMOCRAT WHO IS NAMED RICH? Senate Democratic Leader Nan Rich con rmed this week that shell run for governor in 2014, the rst to toss a hat in the ring to challenge the Republican governor. The Democrat from Weston, in Broward County, said comments she made to Broward Democrats on Tuesday evening werent intended as a formal announcement but con rmed shes in and formulating a strategic and financial plan. Asked whether a liberal Jewish woman from South Florida can succeed in a statewide race, Rich said voters would have to decide that. BP SPILL SECOND ANNIVERSARY Meanwhile Floridians marked the second anniversary of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill this week as the oil company came to terms with parties in a class action lawsuit over the explosion and re that killed 11 and sent 4.9 million barrels of crude into the Gulf. Two years after the explosion, BP has paid nearly $2.7 billion in claims to Florida businesses and individuals for damages caused by the worst spill in U.S. history. Florida regions economically devastated by the spill that began April 20, 2010, have generally rebounded, as tourists have returned to the beaches. Along with payments to individuals and businesses totaling more than $6.3 billion to date, BP has spent millions more to reimburse local and state governments from Louisiana to Florida on an array of fronts from helping market Florida seafood to restoring sand dunes and building parks in the Pensacola area. But despite the dollars spent, critics say the longrange effects of the spill may take years to ascertain, while the issue slips from the collective memory of state and federal of cials charged with making sure BP pays to clean up the mess. STAND YOUR GROUND Gov. Rick Scott on Thursday named the members of a task force formed to look at the states self-defense law in the wake of Trayvon Martins shooting death on Feb. 26. Last month, as national outrage grew over the lack of an ar rest in the case, Scott announced the task force and tapped Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll to chair it. But he said at the time he would not name the panel members or schedule their rst meeting until the criminal investigation was complete. Now, with special prosecutor Angela Coreys announcement last week that the acknowledged shooter, neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman, would face second-degree murder charges, Scott said the task force will meet starting May 1. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Scott signs $70 billion budget, touts $1 billion for education. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Were not walking into this with any preconceived notions. We live in a state where the crime rate is at a 40-year low, and I want to keep it that way. Gov. Rick Scott on naming a commission to examine the states stand your ground self defense law. WEEKLY ROUND-UP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Budget: $70 billion good, nearly $143 million badBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 34 37 42 46 52 61 65 68 2 27 53 3 28 54 4 24 50 62 18 21 43 55 5 15 35 38 47 6 29 48 63 66 69 7 30 44 56 8 25 39 57 22 40 51 9 16 19 36 49 10 26 41 45 64 67 70 11 23 31 58 12 32 59 13 33 60ACROSS1.Egotist'sconcern 5.Pullanall-nighter 9.Word accompanyinga poundinggavel 14.Itbeatsnothing 15.TurnerorCantrell 16.Wetbehindthe ears 17.Slips,spills,and such 19.Plumedwader 20.Petal-plucker's word 21.SDSmember,e.g. 23.Closedown 24.An Oscarismostly this 25.Black-borderedbio 27.Theymayneedle you 34.Essen'svalley 35.SingerZadora 36."Arenot!" response 37.ComposerSatie 38.Bitofparsley 41.Numberedwork 42.Try tobuyyour ownstuff,atan auction 44.CollegeWebsite su ffix 45.SouthSeasstaple 46.Hickok'slasthand 50.Icycoating 51.Susanof"L.A. Law" 52.Sine__non 55.Peppersfromthe air 58.__NOHOOKS 61. Quitter'scry 63.Criticalhurdles 65.Europeanviper 66.It'soff-limits 67.Pilots' guesstimates,for short 68.Punishesfor lateness,maybe 69.Bitofkindling 70.DropforthecountDOWN1.Workoutvenues 2.Apop 3.Cooties 4.Popularhappyhourday:Abbr. 5.Post-partychores 6.AuthorAyn 7.Naysayer 8.Army's mule,e.g. 9.Former Italiancoin denomination 10.Mol otovcocktail fuse 11.Calamitous 12.Alltiedup 13.Emeritus:Abbr. 18.Crashingbore 22.Egypt's__Simbel 24.__bath(hotspot) 26.TripperLeary 27.Containinggold 28.Scoldmildly 29.Barelybeat 30.Thoughtfulsoul 31.Mar.honoree 32.PromotesaCD, perhaps 33.Nogreatshakes 34.McEntireofcountry 39.Ox tail? 40.Poochwho'sa leader 43.Makersof hangman'sknots 47. Industrialtub 48.Wideofthemark 49.Taleofadventure 52.Campusarea, briefly 53.Presstheescape key,say 54.Electricalletters 56."Don'thave__, man!" 57.A rtist's"Done!" 58.AsheStadiuminits. 59.Collarstiffener 60.OldnameatUS pumps 62.Albaniancurrency unit 64.ComicsshriekAmerican Prole Hometown Content 4/1/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 12 3 4 5 617 28 8 3962 39 79413 94 563 46719 00 9 HtCtt 128 7369 4 5 356419782 947258163 584 397621 631825497 279641538 713 984256 895162374 462573819 S P A S R E B A Q U A D E A C H A U R I C U N D O L I C E C H I D E A C D C F R I T U R K I S H L E K D R I P N O O S E R S C L E A N U P S V A T R A N D N I P E R R A N T A N T I C A R E R A C O W M A S C O T I D E F I N I A B U G U I D E D O G O N E L I R A G E S T R A G T I M O T H Y E E K D I R E S T P A T U S T A E V E N T O U R S S T A Y R E T D S O S O E S S O Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com 1-866-742-1373Get your business noticedOne Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Dont make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.florida-classifieds.com Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 26, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with side Talk o The Town Deli Choice of Sandwich & DrinkHamaknockers Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken Bouys By The Bay Shrimp Basket & Drink Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m.1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99MixedTues. & urs. Kids EatFree on Wednesday12 & under 926-4329mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Private Party Rooms Private Party Rooms Tuesday Nights Tuesday Nights $ 4 95 $ 4 95 Spaghetti with Meat Sauce Spaghetti with Meat Sauce OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Win ner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringWin One Meal from Every Restaurant! EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the theEATIN pathOFF the Winner Mike Harveydrawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville 850926-4737 1 Block South of the Courthouse 850 926-4737 1 Block South of the Courthouse The Great BBQ Dis cou nt C ard! The Great BBQ Dis cou nt Card!Menu & Spe cials Menu & Spe cials Recharge Recharge Menu & Specials Menu & Specials The Great BBQ Discount Card! The Great BBQ Discount Card!Menu & Specials Menu & Specials Re-charge Re-charge Charge this card with $25 .00RECIEVE 27.50INVALUE!$50 .00REC IEV E $5 7.50IN VALUE!$10 0REC IEV E $1 20IN VALUE!Charge this card with $25 .00REC IEVE 27.50INVALUE!$50 .00REC IEV E $5 7.50IN VAL UE!$10 0REC IEV E $1 20IN VALUE! Its Like FREE Money! Its Like FREE Money!20 Dif fer ent Beers 20 Dif fer ent Beers Spe cia lty IPA Beers Spe cia lty IPA Beers SWEET SHOP COMING SOON SWEET SHOP COMING SOON 850-984-9994 SEAFOOD RESTAURANT & MORE 1349 B COASTAL HWY 98, PANACEA FL. 850-984-9994 12 PIECE SHRIMP BASKET ......... $ 7 99 LUNCH BUFFET ................... $ 10 00 MON. FRI. 11 2 TUES. & WED. BREAKFAST 6 10am Open Lunch & Dinner 7 Days A Week 11 9 11 10 on Weekends COME IN AND SEE US COME IN AND SEE US Family business re-openedBuoys by the Bay and Panaceas Mineral SpringsTim G. Williams, Jr. and his wife, Kimberly, of Williams Seafood, Inc., are the owners of Panaceas Mineral Springs by the Bay, a fresh seafood market, and Buoys by the Bay, a restaurant serving fresh seafood. The Williams reopened Mineral Springs by the Bay in May of 2007. Once we moved from Tallahassee to Panacea and fell in love with the coast, my husband and I decided to reopen our family business. As of this year our fresh and local seafood market has been in business for over 18 years. We catch a large portion of the product for our fresh seafood market and purchase other fresh catches from local shermen, oystermen and shrimpers. In October 2011, the Williams purchased a seafood restaurant, Buoys by the Bay. Buoys offers fresh seafood straight from the seafood market, as well as stuffed bacon-wrapped shrimp, freshly smoked salmon, homemade deviled crab and smoked sh dips. Please come see us in Panacea and give our fresh seafood market a try and take home some local, fresh seafood for you and your family. If you dont want to cook, come see us at Buoys by the Bay, also located in Panacea, and let us do the cooking for you. On Saturday, May 5, come to the restaurant and hang with us for the Blue Crab Festival. Our son Casey and his band will be playing live and we will be cooking up live craw sh and live crabs prepared just for you. If you have any questions or need additional information, call the Williamses at either location. Mineral Springs Seafood Market (850) 984-2248 or Buoys Seafood Restaurant (850) 984-9994. Just ask for Tim or Kim Williams. Mineral Springs by the Bay is located at 1612 Coastal Hwy. 98 in Panacea, and Buoys Seafood by the Bay is located at 1349-B Coastal Hwy. 98, also in Panacea. Tim and Kim Williams with best friend Capt. Joel Weir heading home with a fresh catch. JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org