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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00405
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 04-19-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00405
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See Pages 5B-8B Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 15th Issue Thursday, April 19, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe WakullanewsThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Community .....................................................................Page 6A School .............................................................................Page 7A Sports .............................................................................Page 8A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 9A Water Ways....................................................................Page 10A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 11A Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Summer Camps ................................................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 11 B INDEX OBITUARIES Frances Batton Lane Luell Gray McKenzie William M. Peters Norris McGraw Wimberly Sr. Bobby Pearce running for Superintendent of SchoolsDavid Miller announces retirementBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netRobert BobbyŽ Pearce announced last week that he is a candidate for Wakulla County Superintendent of Schools. Pearce has served Wakulla County for 23 years as an educator, coach, administrator and volunteer. As a Wakulla High School graduate, I have been a part of the successful Wakulla educational system for most of my life,Ž he said. I believe I have a deep understanding of why we routinely earn the Florida Department of Education designation as an Academically High Performing District, and a vision that will take us to even deeper levels of success.Ž With the announced retirement of longtime Superintendent David Miller (see front page story), Pearce will face Kimball Thomas in the November election for the superintendents post. Pearce was principal at Medart Elementary School, which had earned 10 consecutive AŽ grades during his tenure. He is currently on special assignment to the district of“ ce where he is working as the “ nance of“ cer. Pearce said he believes that combining his passion to provide rich educational opportunities with compassion for those who are struggling through the economic downturn will make him an effective leader of Wakulla County public schools. Im not sure weve ever seen a more dif“ cult time to educate,Ž Pearce said. He expressed concern about the impact of the upcoming Common Core State Standards … which are cutting-edge professional development for Wakulla educators as they continue the implementation of requirements for more rigorous national standards. Its not changing what we teach, but how,Ž he said. While he felt the changes will ultimately be a good thing, he worries about the implementation. Weve got to do it in a way that doesnt kill our folks,Ž he said. He stresses the need to keep teachers and other staff happy. Ultimately, a happy teacher is going to have a happy classroom,Ž he said. But teachers and other support staff are feeling the strain of the economic downturn … with no real payraise in years. At the same time, he indicated concern about the lawsuit over the 3-percent pension contribution for state workers found unconstitutional by Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford and headed to the Supreme Court. Wakulla school employees paid in $500,000 … which the district could ultimately be responsible for refunding. Continued on Page 2A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakullas long-time superintendent of schools, David Miller, announced this week that he has decided to retire at the end of his current term. Miller, who just turned 61 last week, is the longest serving school superintendent in Wakulla County, having held the post for 17 years. He was serving as principal of Wakulla High School when he was originally appointed superintendent by Gov. Lawton Chiles after the sudden death of Roger Stokley in May 1995. He was subsequently elected to the job and has been returned to office by voters ever since. Miller attended Wakulla schools as a student, then returned in 1973 to teach and has worked for the district ever since … 39 years as teacher, coach, assistant principal, principal and superintendent. Asked about his reasons for deciding to retire, Miller said there was no certain thing that prompted it … no moment of epiphany, he said … but noted with a wry smile that 39 years is a long time.Ž He said he had taken time to think and re” ect on his decision over the past few months. As with other things,Ž he said, I think you know when its time.Ž In a wide-ranging interview in his district of“ ce last week, Miller talked about the accomplishments hes most proud of for the school system, which is ranked 10th in the state and has been designated as a high performing district, and his feelings of loyalty to the school system. Continued on Page 3A SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBobby Pearce announced his candidacy this week. Children may knock Wakulla 2020 off the ballotHOUSE FIRE: Wakulla “ re“ ghters respond to a house “ re in the Bob Miller Road area on Saturday night, April 14. The residents of the wood-frame house were not at home at the time of the “ re. The “ re had greatly weakened what was remaining of the house. According to Fire Chief Michael Morgan, a partial collapse made “ re“ ghting efforts very dif“ cult and it took more than four hours to extinguish the “ re, which had spread to all parts of the house including underneath the raised ” oor. The State Fire Marshalls of“ ce was requested to investigate and determine the cause of the “ re.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAn educational workshop held on April 12 on the possibility of establishing a Childrens Services Council for the county took a dramatic turn and led to the Wakulla County Commission discussing the future of the Wakulla 2020 plan. Chairman Alan Brock brought the idea of establishing a Childrens Services Council forward after different citizens discussed the idea and hearing that Leon County was moving in that direction. He said he wanted to inform the commission and citizens about the council. I didnt expect it to go in that direction,Ž Brock said. The council is a special district created by ordinance and approved by voters through a tax referendum. This would create an independent taxing authority that funds childrens programs and services in the county. There are eight counties in the state that have created a CSC and seven of those are independent taxing authorities. Others operate as dependent districts and rely on funding from different sources, such as the county government, according to Florida Childrens Services Council CEO Brittany Birken. The Florida Childrens Services Council represents the eight special districts in the state and serves to support and connect the councils. Independent Children Services Councils levy ad valorem taxes and the maximum amount that can be levied is 50 cents for every $1,000 of taxable property value. A small portion of the increase in the millage rate, .013, goes to the Florida Childrens Services Council. Birken said they use an equitable dues formula. For St. Lucie County, that amount is around $10,000 annually. Brock said a half a mill would bring in $500,000 for the county. The discussion eventually turned to the Wakulla 2020 plan because both would be seeking voter approval of a tax to fund their projects. The Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee has already been established by the commission and is working to prioritize transportation projects throughout the county and come up with the language that will be added to the November ballot. Several commissioners did not feel comfortable with two referendums on the ballot and wanted it to be one or the other. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the commission needed to prioritize. If I had my druthers, this would be ahead of the 2020 plan,Ž Stewart said. He added that the Wakulla 2020 plan was a good one, but felt children were more important. Commissioner Jerry Moore originally said he was in support of anything for children, as long as it benefits the greatest number. To him, this meant a large majority of the money should go to parks and recreation. If it didnt, he wasnt going to vote for it. At the April 16 county commission meeting, he said he would not support putting it on the ballot at all. Citizens dont want another tax,Ž Moore said. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he was more concerned that the one-cent sales tax might not be renewed in 2014 if voters approve the half-cent tax proposed by Wakulla 2020. That local option sales tax goes to public safety, transportation and roads, public facilities and parks and recreation. The timing issue for me is everything,Ž Merritt said. He didnt feel comfortable asking the voters to pay for transportation and roads, and then two years later ask them to pay for something that also funds transportation. He was in support of the Childrens Services Council because there wasnt any overlap. Continued on Page 3A David Miller, the longtime superintendent of schools, will retire in November.If I had my druthers, this would be ahead of the 2020 plan, says one commissioner of the children services proposal. WORM GRUNTIN’ FESTIVAL Queen Gracie Rosier WilliamsPhotos, Page 12A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A Its the balance of “ scal responsibility in looking for more ways to use the taxpayers money wisely, such as with energy efficiency, without taking away from providing an excellent education, he said. His overall goal would be maintaining the psyche that Wakulla County has developed over the yearsŽ … a high performing district with a reputation for developing students and maintaining great teachers, he said. While he credits Miller as a mentor, he pointed to others hes learned from as well … including his grandfather, A.R. Pearce Jr., and his father, who taught him to Work hard. You get what you deserve from what you put into it.Ž Im a person who believes in getting out there and working hard,Ž he said. He also credits retired Medart and Sopchoppy principal Randy Anderson with teaching him how to treat people; retired teacher, coach and administrator Bob Myhre and Jimmie Duggar with having an impact on his decision-making, and retired Wakulla Coach J.D. Jones, who was his coach and who he later coached with. Pearce said he believes one of his strengths is building strong relationships with Wakullas students, their families and community members Seeing the whole child is important. At Medart, my goal was to create a climate of Know you by name and treat you like family. If children feel valued, they can succeed academically.Ž Pearce said he believes that one of Wakulla school systems strengths is its ability to assess what works and then improve upon it. The Wakulla school system cannot maintain a tradition of excellence without being on the cutting-edge of educational innovation,Ž he said. He noted ways in which Wakulla students and lifetime Wakulla educators like himself have demonstrated success so far: € 2011 district-wide, five-year accreditation of all Wakulla County public schools from Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12. € An 88 percent 2011 graduation rate compared to the states 80 percent. Wakulla is No. 1 of the surrounding counties, including Leon, Gadsden and Jefferson. € The fourth consecutive Academically High PerformingŽ designation from the state Department of Education. Only seven districts have achieved this status for this long. € Eight Career and Technical Education programs (formerly called Vocational) on the WHS campus that include the Medical Academy, Accounting, Carpentry, Culinary Arts, Web Design, Digital Design, TV Production and the new Engineering Academy for 2012-13. Pearce said he also supports innovative programs such as the Gifted Curriculum … which provides opportunities to take the Gifted Endorsement college courses taught in Wakulla and expanding on the gifted inclusion model that provides rich experiences for all students; as well as Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) … which supports students “ rst introduction to school as the foundation for learning by providing a research-based curriculum. I believe that educators serve the public and have to earn their trust,Ž Pearce said. We have a sacred responsibility to not only educate students, but also to recognize the needs of the whole child when they are under our supervision. Clearly, I care about our children. They are my priority and the reason why I am running for superintendent.Ž Pearce has been married to Jan Pearce for 21 years. She is a Wakulla County kindergarten teacher and also a product of Wakulla County schools. They have two children, both of whom attend Wakulla High School.Bobby Pearce is running for superintendentThe annual Law Enforcement Torch Run to raise awareness for Special Olympics of Wakulla County was held on Monday, April 16. Law enforcement officers with the Wakulla Correctional Institution, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, Department of Corrections and others ran alongside Special Olympics athletes from the sheriffs of“ ce to the Wakulla County Courthouse. Athlete Leader Keith Cline led the group carrying the ” ame of hope. We are truly building this program in Wakulla County,Ž said Sharon Scherbarth, county coordinator for Special Olympics. The Area 3 Special Olympics games were held on April 7 at Leon High School. Scherbarth said six athletes will compete at the Special Olympics Florida State Summer Games May 18-20 in Orlando. There are several upcoming events to raise money for Special Olympics of Wakulla County. The “ rst, Canopy Roads Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club Poker Run, will be held on April 28. The Tip A Cop fundraiser will be held May 4 at Poseys. Of“ cers serve as waiters and donate all the tips they receive to local Special Olympic programs. JENNIFER JENSENTorch Run SECOND ANNUALTRIPLE CROWN DERBY FOR MENTAL ILLNESSMark Your Calendars for APRIL 21stEveryo ne is Invi tedDine on B-B-Q and watch Wakulla County Of“cials jockeys race for the Derby Crown at the Wakulla Livestock Pavilion Our County & City Of“cials are committed advocates for mental illness awareness in Wakulla County Races begin at 5 p.m. with B-B-Q dinner following the grand eventTICKETS $20 Adults, Children 8-12 $10, 7 & under FREETickets are available for derby and dinner Monday at the NAMI Wakulla of“ce, 2140 C Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville, between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Call 926-1033 for ticket informationSo, Ladies, put on a big brim hat, and Gentlemen, dress in the spirit of the derby for a full evening of entertainment at NAMI Wakullas Triple Crown DerbyNAMI Wakulla is an af“liate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and a 501 (C) 3 non-pro“t organization RowellAuctions.comRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 10% Buyers Premium GAL AU-C002594For Detailed Information Visit RowellAuctions.comBANKRUPTCY AUCTION"Selling by Order of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court"Colquitt County, GA Apr 21, 2012 -:10:00 AMPine Ridge Angus Farms3 Farms Totaling 308 Acres CRAFTS • FOOD • RAFFLEat theSaturday, April 28 9AM-3PM YOUAREINVITED TOA Imyouragentforthat.1001177.1State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company StateFarmIndemnityCompanyBloomington,ILHavingmeasyouragentmeans havingarealpersontheretohelp youwhenyouneedit.Sowhen accidentshappen,youhave someonewhocangetthejob doneright,andrightaway. Likeagoodneighbor, StateFarmisthere. CALLFORAQUOTE24/7. Causeyou neverknow whatyou might runinto. Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, FL 32301-3609 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 3AContinued from Page 1ABrock and Commissioner Lynn Artz said they were OK with having both on the ballot. Artz said she shared the concerns with the one-cent sales tax, but those concerns should have been expressed earlier to the citizens who have led the push for the Wakulla 2020 plan. Brock didnt want to see Wakulla 2020 taken off the ballot and CSC put on if there wasnt support. Both need citizen backing,Ž Brock said. And Wakulla 2020 has that support and it became a project led by a citizens group, he said. Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee Member John Shuff said hundreds of hours have been spent on this plan and trying to move it forward. It is unfortunate that the commission is pausing on this critical economic issue,Ž Shuff said. Instead of placing a the half-cent sales tax on the ballot to fund the Wakulla 2020 plan, Merritt said the Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee could be used to prioritize transportation projects funded by the onecent sales tax. Merritt also mentioned establishing a Community Redevelopment Area for the Crawfordville area which would help fund the major project of the Wakulla 2020 plan, “ xing Highway 319. Shuff said the CRA is an excellent opportunity for Crawfordville. However, Shuff said, Our plan was a transportation plan for Wakulla County.Ž The Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee will meet to establish its future plans, Shuff said. He added that this issue was too important to let go. Last nights discussion was just that, a discussion, for a decision to be made, the initiative will have to be placed on the agenda,Ž Shuff said. Brock said meetings with Birken and the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee are being set up to discuss the Childrens Services Council and to see if there is support. If there is support, those groups would then need to ask that it be placed on the agenda at a future commission meeting for it to move forward. Many CSCs perform a needs assessment to determine where the money should go, Berkin said. Some counties have focused on early learning while others have invested in after school programs. Most of the councils give money to existing organizations and do not compete with the programs already offered, but help them “ ll in the gaps. The Florida CSC would offer support, lobbying, communication and sharing information among councils and data and trend analysis. If established, the CSC would consist of 10 members. They are school superintendent, school board member, district administrator for local Department of Children and Families, juvenile court judge and county commissioner. Five other members are appointed by the governor and the county commission would offer recommendations. The committee would then decide where the money goes and would also set the millage rate each year.Children may knock Wakulla 2020 o the ballotContinued from Page 1AWhen you spend 39 years of your life working for the same company, you have a little bit of loyalty to that company,Ž he said. He spoke of the impact of his mother, who was a teacher at Crawfordville, on him. My memory of her has guided me,Ž he said. Millers office now was his mothers classroom, and he recounts a visit from her to his of“ ce back in 2004, shortly after the remodeling of the old school in to district of“ ces, and telling her: In spite of all the success, I still havent made it beyond the back of your classroom.Ž When he looks back on his career and his time as superintendent, Miller said, I think Ill be remembered for being a pretty good coach, who put together a pretty good team.Ž Miller still regards himself as a coach in his role as superintendent, and his leadership style re” ects that with frequent references to team. Wakulla is in the Top 10 in most areas tested by the FCAT, which is unmatched in the Big Bend. He said he is proud of the Medical Academy at Wakulla High School, as well as the new Engineering and Business academies which are getting ready to start up. He points to improvements in Readiness scores in math, reading and writing … all well above the state average. Miller notes the middle schools will start offering high school credit classes next year, while the high school will have 15 Advanced Placement courses. He said his role as superintendent has been to look to the future to plan for the districts needs. All of the school facilities are under capacity, while the property where Riversink Elementary was built has enough land for a new high school, when that need arises. Miller has lead through certain core principles, he said. We will never compromise excellence, be satis“ ed with our successes, give up on a student, or sit down until the job is “ nished.Ž That last one, Miller notes, re” ects the agrarian work ethic of a farm-raised boy … himself … who learned the wisdom of working for a common goal from his parents and grandparents. One of those values, mentioned several times during the interview, is loyalty. Miller said that every school principal makes their own hiring decisions when it comes to teachers, but that he asks to meet the new teachers. They come into his of“ ce, some of them expecting to be interviewed by the superintendent, but Miller said its really just his intent to meet them, to learn a little about them. And he hands them a sheet of paper with a quote by Elbert Hubbard: Remember this: If you work for a man, in Heavens name, WORK for him. If he pays you wages which supply you bread and butter, work for him; stand by him and stand by the institution he represents... If you must vilify, condemn and eternally disparage … resign your position, and when you are outside, condemn to your hearts content.Ž Miller said when he gives it to teachers, Im not talking about your relationship to me.Ž He said the loyalty should ” ow to the principal, to other teachers, the team, to students, to the school, to parents. Every successful school system operates as a team,Ž he said, referring again to his leadership style as that of a coach. But when this coach walks off the “ eld, what will he do? Miller admitted he doesnt have plans. He doesnt hunt or fish. He has a vacation home in North Carolina he may spend a little more time at and a couple of grandkids. I know in retirement, youve got to have a purpose,Ž he said. He may do some consultant work. He will continue to be very interested in what happens in the school system. In 10 years, I want to read that this district has gone to ever greater heights,Ž he said.Cities may return to planning commissionBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn 2009, the Wakulla County Commission voted to change the composition of the Planning Commission, making Sopchoppy and St. Marks non-voting members. Many people in each community became upset, and some felt there was no point to even be on the committee at all if they did not have a say. At the April 16 commission meeting, Commissioner Jerry Moore was hoping to reverse that decision. Even though they are incorporated, they should still have a vote,Ž Moore said. The commission voted four to one, with Commissioner Lynn Artz opposing, to schedule a public hearing to make the revisions to the ordinance. Artz was the commissioner who brought up the item back in 2009. At that time, Nabors Giblin and Nickerson law “ rm had just started as the countys lawyer and wondered why both cities were on the planning commission, Artz said. She said the commission was told by the lawyers that no other county in the state had cities serving on their planning commissions. She said she also felt the cities had double representation on the planning commission and if she lived in Panacea or Crawfordville, she would be upset with that. It seemed logical,Ž Artz said of making Sopchoppy and St. Marks non-voting members. She added that many have said it should be a two-way street, meaning that the cities have a say on the countys planning commission and the county has representation on each citys planning commission. She said she would like to see a joint commission. Commissioner Mike Stewart, who voted against the change in 2009, said the real reason the cities became non-voting members was because St. Marks wanted to create a Community Redevelopment Area and people got upset. They got their panties in a wad,Ž Stewart said. On Oct. 30, 2008, the St. Marks City Commission adopted an ordinance creating the CRA trust fund, and a resolution to adopt the redevelopment plan. Sopchoppy Vice Mayor Richard Harden said the measure was done in retaliation and the City of Sopchoppy supports being added as a voting member. Decisions that are made at the Wakulla County Planning Commission affect things right at Sopchoppys doorstep, he said. Planning Commissioner Chuck Hess spoke up against changing the ordinance and stated that it would give 800 people two votes on the planning commission and yet the county had no input in their municipality. Chairman Alan Brock, who also voted against the change in 2009, said the cities should at least be approached about a joint planning commission. If a compromise can be reached, Brock said he felt like it was a good idea. He also wondered if the county would continue to add communities if they incorporate. Brock mentioned that community leaders in Panacea were discussing that possibility. The commission voted to move forward with a public hearing in the near future of adding Sopchoppy and St. Marks back as voting members.Miller will retire San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOyst ers Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. 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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:•Crawfordville man is killed in traffic crash • Kimball Thomas will run for Superintendent of Schools • Dig uncovers evidence of Ice Age humans •Joice Jane Satterfield Ventry obituary • A soldier returns • Arthur T. Anderson obituary • County commission: Board moves ahead with plans for new sheriff’s office annex • Worm Gruntin’ Festival is Saturday€ thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.READERS WRITE:Preparing for May 20 CelebrationEditor, The News: The Wakulla County Christian Coalition is partnering with the Greater Mount Trial Primitive Baptist Church, and Palaver Tree Theater Co., for this years May 20th celebration. On May 20, 1865, the Emancipation Proclamation, a public decree issued by President Abraham Lincoln that of“ cially freed all enslaved blacks, was announced in Florida. In honor of this day, a number of events are scheduled to take place throughout the month of May, and will culminate in a May Day celebration on the grounds of the Mount Trial Church, the original home of the Buckhorn School. Panel discussions, photo exhibits, a “ lm series and even a Buckhorn Cemetery tour are all included. Photos of Wakullas African-American community from the early 1970s to as far back as the 1800s are still being gathered for the exhibit. Images of schools, churches, along with those depicting the community at work and at play are still being sought. If youd like to submit a photo to be electronically scanned for consideration in the exhibit, please do so. Once scanned, the photo will be immediately returned to you. All events are being done in association with those listed above, as well as G-Signs, and the Wakulla County Public Library. Sponsors are always needed and all are encouraged to participate. Though this event is African-American in its orientation, the history and its impact affect us all, and everyone is invited to partake in the festivities. For more information on sponsorship and events, visit www.palavertreetheater. org, or call (718) 682-3870 or (850) 9267547. Herb Donaldson Artistic Director Palaver Tree Theater Co. Editor, The News: Commissioner Jerry Moore, in his agenda at the April 16 Board of County Commissioners meeting wants to change the rules of the Planning Commission. As it stands, each commissioner, one from each district, appoints a person to represent their district on the Planning Commission. The significance of this is important because the citizens of our “ ve districts each have their concerns and issues protected by their own representative. Besides the five, the BOCC then selects two citizens at large, one is a minority. That is our voting board. Commissioner Moore wants St. Marks and Sopchoppy to have an extra vote because, he says, they are municipalities.Ž This is not logical because as a municipality, they have their OWN planning board, besides being represented by their district appointee on the county Planning Commission. What has become very clear to me is that Commissioner Moore is concerned with special interest groups, not a commission established for and run by THE PEOPLE. He is a land developer and owns a lot of land in Wakulla County. I think there is something in it for him or he wouldnt suggest this, because it lacks logic. Shame on you, Mr. Moore. Two commissioners, Mr. Brock and Mr. Stewart are running for re-election. Are they for the people? Lets see how they vote! Gail Hickman Crawfordville A story in last weeks Wakulla News about Kimball Thomas running for superintendent of schools noted that he is married with two step-children, but omitted that he also has three adult sons by a previous marriage … Brandon, Bryon and Brett Thomas.Clari“ cation Commissioner Moore isnt being logical Check your facts before sending a letterEditor, The News: I am amused and amazed at the people who write letters “ lled with inaccuracies then send them in to be published in the newspaper. By spending just a little additional time doing research, this would not happen. Or maybe its simply a case of wanting to stir the pot.Ž The letter I am referencing in particular is about county vehicles being used for personal use (County vehicles used for personal trips?,Ž April 12). In the case of the Animal Control truck, while it is indeed a county vehicle, it is not under control of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. It has not been for several years. Maybe the person driving the truck was on call that weekend, but had permission to drive the truck to church in case he or she got a call. Stopping in to worship the Lord before continuing on your vacation would have given you the opportunity to ask the driver why they were using the truck on a Sunday morning. As far as the COAST Charter School bus is concerned, COAST is a nonpro“ t organization. Their bus is privately owned. It was not purchased by the county and it is not fueled, serviced or repaired by the county. A simple phone call could have clari“ ed all this. The county has enough problems without people with too much time on their hands trying to create more. Volunteer at one of the schools, or at the Senior Citizens Center, or one of the many other organizations in the county. Use your time wisely. Heidi Taylor Panacea By BILL MONTFORDState SenatorI appreciate the trust that has been placed in me by allowing me to serve as your state senator. I cherish and respect our way of life and am truly humbled that you have entrusted this job to me. I will always do my best to be a Senator you can be proud of. Part of my job as your senator is to help ensure that bills that may have a negative impact are fully scrutinized and prevented from passing if they are detrimental to the citizens of Florida. The following are examples that some of my colleagues and I helped prevent from passing: € Closing Jefferson County Correctional Facility. Thankfully, crime is down in Florida and for that we should all be very grateful. However, the sudden and unanticipated closing of a local prison in a small town can have devastating consequences. We held off this closure for at least a year, but there is no doubt that this “ ght will return again in 2013. € Privatizing Prisons. I believe it is bad public policy to entrust public safety to the lowest bidder. I also believe that turning over many of our states prisons to private companies would hurt the workers in those facilities. Thankfully, we defeated … in a very close vote … a measure that would have privatized 30 south Florida prisons and would have also created massive worker displacement of local correctional of“ cers in North Florida. This would have hurt local jobs and local families. € Allowing private companies to shut down/take over our public schools. Mislabeled as the so-called, parent triggerŽ bill, this measure would have allowed private companies to come in and lobby parents to take over … not “ x … a troubled school. This was not true parent empowerment and could have caused the shut down or privatization of many of our local public schools. € More harm to state public employees. The past few years have been very tough on state employees. This year, we fought hard to make sure that the legislature did not cut salaries, benefits or pensions … and I am thankful we were able to kill those bad ideas. Unfortunately, we were unable to stop what I believe is an unconstitutional invasion of privacy with the requirement that all state employees be subject to expensive random drug tests. However, through the combined efforts of a lot of people we were able to make some signi“ cant accomplishments. Some of them are: € A balanced approach to septic tanks. In 2010, the legislature passed an over-reaching program related to septic tank regulations that unfairly hit rural communities the hardest. This year, we were able to repeal that law and replace it with a more balanced and more sensible approach that protects precious water sources while scaling back the unnecessary and expensive evaluations and repairs. Additionally, we put more power into the hands of local communities to allow for more local control of the implementation of septic tank assessment programs. € Education Accountability. I sponsored and we passed a bill to improve Floridas educational accountability standards that clears up con” icts with the federal government. Such con” icts could have cost our state millions of dollars for our schools. € More money for our schools. While I opposed many of the cuts to badly needed programs, I am pleased that our state added back $1 billion in money for public schools. While these cuts only help repair some of many years of setbacks, I want to commend my legislative colleagues for recognizing that public schools cannot continue cutting educational programs at the expense of our children and I hope this trend will continue for many years to come. € Rural Economic development. Our Big Bend will be a major part of this effort, which will benefit the hard working people and their families throughout North Florida. € Redistricting. As required by the Florida Constitution, we passed maps for Senate, House and Congressional Districts. I am very disappointed that Jackson County will not be a part of our district, but look forward to working with Senator Gaetz to make sure we take care of North Florida. The people of Jackson County have always been a vital part of our district. We are fortunate to have all of Leon, Jefferson and Madison counties added to our district, as well as all of Taylor and Hamilton counties. In closing, I thank those who contacted me to share their concerns and ideas as to how I can be of greater service to the citizens. I value every contact and am grateful that so many of you care enough about our state and to have your voice heard. I am especially grateful to those community leaders who spent many hours working the halls to help us pass good bills for North Florida. I value and appreciate your con“ dence in me. I thank you for the opportunity to serve you and if I can ever be of service please call me at (850) 487-5004.Bill Montford is state senator who represents Wakulla County. Almost time for the Blue Crab FestivalEditor, The News: The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club is looking for entries and volunteers for the Blue Crab Festival Parade. The festival and parade will be held on May 5. The lineup for the parade begins at 9 a.m. The parade starts at 10 a.m. at Jer-BeLou Blvd. and Highway 98. Enter on Otter Lake Road. For more information, contact June Vause at 926-6840 or jvause@my100bank. com or Joann Daniels at 926-7905 or danielsj@rockmail.com. Coastal Optimists Club A look at what happened in the legislative session Candidates speak at Republican ClubEditor, The News: Guest speakers at the Wakulla Republican Club meeting on April 5 were Ralph Thomas, candidate for Wakulla County Commissioner District 1, Richard Harden, candidate for Wakulla County Commissioner District 5, and Don Curtis, candidate for Florida House of Representatives District 7. The Wakulla Republican Club meets the second Thursday of every month at Myra Jeans. It is always a good time and offers everyone an opportunity to talk about the most interesting, pressing and important events of our time. All are welcome. Cynthia Webster CrawfordvilleSPECIAL TO THE NEWS Political candidates Ralph Thomas, Richard Harden and Don Curtis spoke at a recent meeting of the Wakulla Republican Club.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 5AChurchreligious views and eventsMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesFrances Batton Lane Luell Gray McKenzie William M. Peters Norris McGraw Wimberly Sr.Church BriefsFrances Batton Lane, 96, died peacefully at her home on the Ochlockonee Bay on March 31 after a long and bountiful life. She was born in Biloxi, Miss., on Aug. 13, 1915. After graduation from Biloxi High School in 1931 she met and married her husband of 66 years, Capt. (USN retired) Edward A. Lane Jr. who passed away in May 2007. She was the daughter of Louisa Monica Elder and Burras Augustus Batton of Biloxi, who preceded her in death. She was a member of Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church and in the past was active in many volunteer activities to include assisting at a local hospital and library. As a Navy wife whose husband served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam, she served on numerous Navy boards, wives clubs and Navy charitable organizations. She also lived several times on both coasts, spending most of her time in Norfolk, Va., before moving to Florida. Frances enjoyed reading and loved visiting with family and friends. A memorial service will be held in Biloxi at a later date to be announced. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice. Survivors include three sisters, Nezelle Cluff, Grace Husley and Wilma Pierce; a brother and his wife; Burras and Sylvia Batton, all of whom live in the Mississippi Gulf Coast area; “ ve children, Deder Lane and Barbara Thompson of Tallahassee, Katherine Little and Edward Lane of Richmond, Va., and Stephen Lane of Panacea; 12 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. She also leaves behind her devoted longtime caregiver and friend, Lou Diebler, who made her last years truly enjoyable. She was predeceased by two sisters, Dorothy Harrell and Helen Daughdrill. Luell Gray McKenzie, 76, of Sopchoppy, went to be with her Heavenly Father on April 10. She was born June 5, 1935, in Medart, and was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. She was truly a Christian warrior and kept God at the forefront of her life. She spoke of God often, always with a prayer in her heart and her Bible by her side. Her unwavering faith and love for her family and friends gave her strength throughout her life. Visitation was held Thursday, April 12, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Friday, April 13, at West Sopchoppy Cemetery in Sopchoppy. She is survived by her only child, Mark D. McKenzie (Tammy); two precious grandchildren who loved her dearly, Jacob Daniel, 15, and Madeline Christine, 11, all from Fort Walton Beach; her sister, Betty Rudd of Sopchoppy; and numerous nieces and nephews and many other loving family and friends. She was predeceased by her husband of 31 years, Clinton McKenzie; her mother, Christine Crum; her stepfather, Rufus Crum; and her brother, Hilton (Butch) Crum. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Luell Gray McKenzie Frances Batton LaneWilliam M. Peters, 84, of Crawfordville, died Thursday, April 12, in Tallahassee. He was born in Slocum, Penn., the son of Frank and Jennie (Jones) Peters. He was of the Lutheran faith. He served in the U.S. Air Force for two years as a crew chief on P47 Fighters in the South Paci“ c-Guam. He was self-employed for 31 years as an excavation contractor. He built, owned and operated Moyers Grove Campground in Hobby, Penn., for 13 years. He was a member of Masonic Lodge 354, Shickshinny, Penn. He was Master of his Lodge in 1972 and Trustee of the Lodge for four years. He is survived by his sister, Gladys Whitmier; two-half brothers, Paul and Franklin Peters; two stepchildren: William Wilkinson and June Wilkinson; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife, Nancy E. Peters, in May 2011; his parents; his brothers, Winfred Peters Sr., Lee and Harry Peters; sisters, Lois Peters and Ruth Moyer; and stepsons, Michael Oster and George Wilkinson. Interment will be in The Nuremberg Cemetery in Nuremberg, Penn. Arrangements are being handled by Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com).William M. PetersNorris McGraw Wimberly Sr., 66, a loving and devoted family man, went home to be with the Lord on Friday, April 13. He passed away due to complications from heart surgery. The complications were brought on by the Agent Orange disease he acquired during his tour in the Vietnam War. Norris was born in Eddyville, Ky., on July 22, 1945, to Tommy and Ruby Wimberly, both of Princeton, Ky. He resided in Crawfordville for the last 30 years with most of his immediate family. Norris served our country for 14 years in the U.S. Army and was a Vietnam Veteran. He was a member of Central Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Visitation was held Wednesday, April 18, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel. Services will be Thursday, April 19, at 2 p.m., at Central Baptist Church. Services will be conducted by Pastor David Folsom with burial service at St. Elizabeth Cemetery in Crawfordville, with his “ nal resting place being in Heaven with his Lord and Savior. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Gainesville Fisher House Foundation for Veterans at www.gainesville“ sherhouse.org. Survivors include his loving wife of 33 years, Wanda Wimberly; “ ve children, Jerry (Leigh) of Crawfordville, Angela (Richard) of Tallahassee, Howard (Rita) of Panama City, Joe (Emily) of Crawfordville and Norris Jr. (Tracy) of North Carolina; 14 very special grandchildren; three super-special great-grandchildren; three sisters and one brother; many nieces and nephews and several close friends as well as his brothers and sisters in Christ. He is predeceased by one brother and two sisters. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Norris McGraw Wimberly Sr. Barbecue fundraiser in PanaceaPanacea Congregational Holiness Church will be having a youth fundraiser on Saturday, April 21 at the church, located at 1127 Coastal Highway in Panacea. The menu consists of pulled pork sandwiches and barbecue chicken sandwiches with two sides of potato salad, baked beans, cole slaw or chips and tea. Plates are $6 for adults and $3 for children. The serving will begin at 11 a.m. For more information, call 926-4557 or 984-5579. Tallahassee YoungLives is hosting its second annual Songwriters Bene“ t Concert: YoungLives and Lyrics at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 20, at Element3 Church located at 3540 Mahan Drive, in Tallahassee. There is no cost to attend and donations will be accepted. This years bene“ t will raise scholarship money for a group of teenage mothers and their children to attend a week long summer camp in Texas. Camp is an extraordinary opportunity for these girls to envision hope for their futures and to see life in the world beyond Tallahassee,Ž said YoungLives Program Coordinator Whitney McLean. During last years camp trip, one of the girls commented on how when (shes) at YoungLives, nothing can get her.Ž YoungLives is a non-denominational non-pro“ t outreach ministry and mentoring program for teen moms ages 13-19. YoungLives mentors invest in the lives of teen moms by developing life-long relationships of trust and acceptance. The organization hosts a wide range of relationship-building and life-skills programs for teens with the goal to see them “ nish school and make positive changes that will affect both them and their children.Gaballi Foods sampler is Saturday Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church at 2780 Surf Road in Panacea is hosting a tasting of the meats offered by Gaballi Foods this Saturday, April 21, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Please come by and taste the food from this faithbased, non-denominational food company spreading Gods love by providing quality foods at affordable prices to all of his children. For more information, call 984-0127.Tallahassee YoungLives will hold concertThe family of Grover SonnyŽ Whaley Jr. would like to thank the residents of Wakulla County for their thoughts and prayers during Sonnys recent illness and passing. Thank you for the wonderful way in which everyone came together to show your love for our loved one, Sonny! The Grover Whaley familyFamily appreciates thoughts and prayers

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappeningsCommunityStudio 88 wins big at competition Special to The NewsStudio 88 Dance Productions Company Elite Competition Team travelled to Stone Mountain, Ga., to attend the Access Broadway Regional Dance Competition, Talent Search and Workshops the weekend of March 2 to March 4. Company Elite brought home two Platinum awards, “ ve High-Gold awards and 10 Gold awards from that competition. In addition to winning a Platinum award, Its Your Wedding Day,Ž which was choreographed by Jessica Seavor, who is currently starring in 9 to 5 on Broadway, was awarded “ rst place in the High Score awards, as well as the Broadway Star and $50 for Best Debut Performance in the Debut Division. Money, Thats What I Want,Ž choreographed by Artistic Director Lauren Manning, was awarded second place in the High Score awards in addition to a Platinum. Students also participated in the audition portion with Aubrey Willis receiving a scholarship, making her a two-time Access Broadway scholarship winner. Manning said, Im so very proud of all of my students and appreciate the hard work and dedication that they have put in to make these awards possible.Ž Studio 88 Dance Productions, formerly Dancing with Miss Denise, is located in the Bealls Outlet Plaza at 2650 Crawfordville Highway and offers classes in ballet, pointe, jazz, tap, lyrical, hip-hop and contemporary as well as Mommy and Me. They can be reached at 9261698 or by e-mail at studio88dance@yahoo.com.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudio 88s Company Elite celebrates after winning numerous awards at Access Broadway in Stone Mountain, Ga. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChildren from Happy Time Instructional Child Care raise money for St. Jude Childrens Hospital. Special to The NewsOn March 13, Happy Time Instructional Child Care sponsored a Bring A Bike Day for St. Jude Childrens Hospital. About 45 children rode in the event to raise $900. This event is designed to expose pre-school children to the importance of bicycle safety and childhood cancer. Off-duty Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Mike Simmons volunteered to help teach the children bicycle safety and the importance of wearing a helmet. This was an exciting event for the children. Not only were they learning about road hazards and bicycle safety, but they were also riding for an important cause.Children raise funds for hospital Flight rally at the airport on April 21Special to The NewsWakulla County Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts ages 8-17 will have a chance to take to the skies on Saturday, April 21, as Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 445 hosts a Young Eagles Flight Rally at Wakulla County Airport in Panacea. The rally is part of the EAA Young Eagles Program, created to interest young people in aviation. Since the program was launched in 1992, Volunteer EAA pilots have ” own more than 1.4 million young people who reside in more than 90 countries. Free airplane rides are just part of the Flight Rally,Ž said Danny Deason, spokesman for the event. We hope to build one-to-one relationships between pilots and young people, giving a new generation a chance to learn more about the possibilities that exist in the world of aviation.Ž Pilots will explain how airplanes work and how ensuring safety is the prime concern before every ” ight. Following the flight, each participant will receive a certi“ cate making them an official Young Eagle. Their name will then be entered into the Worlds Largest Logbook,Ž which is on permanent display at the EAA Air Adventure Museum in Oshkosh, Wis. The Logbook is also accessible on the web at www. youngeagles.org. Other activities include aviation related training that will provide merit badges for those Scouts who fulfill the requirements. A limited number of ” ights will also be offered to any local children ages 8-17 after the Scouts are “ nished. Those wishing to attend the ” ight rally are asked to come to the airport starting at 11 a.m. to register. Flights will begin at noon, with registration closing at 12:30 p.m. A parent or legal guardians signature will be required. Additional information about EAA and the EAA Young Eagles program is available at www.eaa.org. The Young Eagles web page is www.youngeagles.org. Heltons welcome baby boy Josh and Tiffany Helton of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Braxton Davis Helton, on Feb. 24. He was born at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and weighed 6 pounds, 13 ounces and was 20-inches long. His maternal grandparents are Tim and Debbie Vanderveer of Riverview. His paternal grandparents are Jack and Gena Davis of Crawfordville and Larry and Cindy Helton of Ellijay, Ga. His maternal great-grandparents are Ruth Vanderveer of Lake Hamilton and Harold and Phyllis Ward of Fort Scott, Kansas. His paternal grea-grandparents are Joyce Young of Ellijay, Ga., Bonnie Helton of Ellijay, Ga., and Robert and Gaye Helton of Loxahatchee. NEW!! New courses at the TCC Wakulla CenterMove your career forward with free or low-cost trainingUpcoming opportunities in manufacturing and healthcare:Manufacturing EssentialsApril 23 … June 275:30 … 9:30 p.m. | Mondays and Wednesdays$350 or FREE to those who are unemployed Home Care AidMay 8 … August 76 … 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $299Medical Billing and CodingMay 15 … August 146 … 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays $810 (includes cost of national certification exam)Medical Administrative SpecialistMay 22 … July 126 … 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $420REGISTER TODAY! workforce.tcc.fl.edu/Wakulla | 922-6290 OOPS!The Girls from Evolution Day Spa Hair Salon~ Robyn ~ Miranda ~ Linda ~HAVEMOVEDANDARENOW OPENAT THEIR NEW LOCATIONHair Place That850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA 294-2085 LINDA 545-2905 MIRANDA Are you 62 or older, or will you be soon? Want to re nance at 2.99%-5.06% w/no payments? Want to Buy a Home? Remodel? Improve? Fix the Roof...? Lets have coffee and cake and talk about the HUD/FHA Govt. Insured Reverse Mortgage (FHA-255 Program) that is helping seniors pay for much needed services and retirement. (no income/credit needed) Meet us at the Wakulla Senior Center on Friday April 27 for two classes (45min. ea.) at 6:30 and 7:15 PM.Hosted by FirstBANK-Florida Senior Products Division Manager, Michael Weltman MBA, CSA, SRES 11 years in FHA Reverse, Financial ConsultantRSVP Bring a friend or two or call for info 850-556-6694Bankers, Credit Union Mgrs., Contractors, Remodelers, Home Renovation Companies, Pool Installers, Roofers, Insurance Agents, Realtors, Brokers, Builders, Home Care Agencies, Attorneys, CPA’s, Financial Planners, Seniors/Retirees, Mortgage Lenders, Residential Elevator Companies. ARE ALSO WELCOMED TO JOIN US! www.myretirementmortgage.com GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 7Aeducation news from local schoolsSchoolRMS students travel to D.C. Special to The NewsDuring spring break while most students were playing their X-Box or swimming at the beach, a group of students spent their time reviewing American History. Eighteen Riversprings Middle School students went to Washington, D.C., for four jam-packed days. After ” ying into D.C. on March 20, the students toured the Lincoln Memorial, Jefferson Memorial and Roosevelt Memorial. Students were not allowed to enter the Washington Monument, but attended many places around it. Also, the eighth graders viewed many memorials dedicated to past wars … World War II, Vietnam War and the Korean War. One of the students favorites was the sculpture dedicated to the battle of Iwo Jima. Two new memorials that our group toured were the Martin Luther King Jr. and the September 11th Pentagon Memorial. An oldie but goodieŽ was the tour of Fords Theatre, where President Lincoln was shot. Students also toured the Capitol where they received a special treat. The students were allowed to sit in on Senate and House sessions as bills were being read and recorded. Students viewed the Bill of Rights and the Constitution at the National Archives and explored the Library of Congress. Special clearance is needed these days to enter the White House, so the students opted for a photo shootŽ outside the gates. Four Smithsonian Museums on the tour were the Museum of Space and Aviation, American Indian Museum, Museum of Natural History and the Museum of American History. Another museum worth mentioning is the Holocaust Museum. Though somber and yet sometimes graphic, this museum is a must-see. Our middle school students discussed its impact far into the night. Another favorite location was the Arlington National Cemetery where we watched the changing of the guards at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Caylee Cox, Gabby Mohrfeld, Yesenia Reyes and Samantha Thompson were allowed to lay a wreath on the tomb. Students also saw the burial spot of President John F. Kennedy and the eternal flame. Students enjoyed a tour of Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington. Lunch and breakfast meals were in interesting Washington locations such as the Old Post Of“ ce, Union Station and, of course, the Hard Rock Caf. Other students enjoying the trip were Peyton Carter, Scott Curry, Kathryn Eck, Hannah Hart, Lauren Hatch, Whitley Kerce, Shelby Lenk, Erika McKown, Nick Miller, Kaitlyn Panzerino, Carly Rudd, Libby Sutton, Abby Weddle, and Jamie Wheeler. Teacher and parent chaperones were Steve Hatch, Leon Hillmon, Wayne Largent and Mina Sutton. By JOEY JACOBS RMS TeacherThe 2011-12 season has been a special one for the Riversprings Middle School Academic Team. The Bears parlayed a strong regular season into an invitation to the National Academic Quiz Tournament in Chicago. It is the “ rst invitation in the schools history. RMS kicked off the season on Nov. 5, 2011, at the Maclay Middle School Invitational in Tallahassee. Riversprings “ nished a solid fourth place, and RMS high scorer Daniel Sloan was the 12th overall leading scorer out of over 80 competitors. The Bears next action came Jan. 28 in Bainbridge, Ga. RMS had an A team and B team compete. Both teams “ nished in the top 10. The Bears then went on to compete in a tournament at TCC on March 8, before moving on to the Wakulla County Championship on March 15 hosted by the Coastal Optimists Club. Paced by strong performances by team captain Sloan (top scorer), Isaac Kent, Maclellan Hicks and Adrian Peacock, Riversprings defeated Wakulla Middle School, second place, and COAST Charter School (3rd), winning their fourth consecutive County Championship and 10 out of the 12 years since RMS opened. The Bears made a return trip to Bainbridge on March 31. The A team “ nished in third place, while the B team turned in a sixth place “ nish. Hicks was the seventh highest scorer. RMS will travel to the National Academic Quiz Tournament at Chicagos Hyatt Regency OHare Hotel on April 20-22. Riversprings is one of only two middle schools from the state invited to the tournament. Generous donations by RMS Student Council (sponsor Marlene Adams), Kevin and Shelia Mullens, the Coastal Optimist Club, Eugene and June Vause, Edward and Sonya Hicks, Susan Payne Turner, Noah Posey, Jo Ann Daniels, Coastal Gems Realty, Legal Shield, Quill Turk D.D.S., Wakulla Mens Club and Walgreens are helping with expenses for the trip to Nationals. The coaches and team offer a heartfelt thank you to those sponsors. Anyone interested in sponsoring can contact Coach Bill Taylor at 926-2300. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents visit several different memorials in Washington, D.C., including the National WWII Memorial. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversprings Middle School Academic Team Members D aniel Sloan, Isaac Kent, Maclellan Hicks and Adrian Peacock.Academic Team heads to Nationals Special to The NewsTo celebrate Earth Day, the FSU Coastal & Marine Laboratory will unveil its new Mural Wall, Seeking Knowledge from the Sea through Art and ScienceŽ on Saturday, April 21 at 9 a.m. Students from Riversink Elementary School and Medart Elementary School provided mural panels. These local schools agreed to paint a 4 by 8 mural panel.Mural wall unveiling will be April 21 Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala L.P.T.( 850 ) 528-4985PROFESSIONAL POOL MAINTENANCE poolproblems?atthelowestratesweoffermaintenanceandservice!Servicing Swimming Pools and Spas for over 10 yearsTitus Langston850528-4985Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured RITA HANEY,MSW,LCSWANNOUNCESTHEOPENING OFDiscovery PlaceCOUNSELINGANDSUBSTANCEABUSETREATMENTSERVICES.WelcomeKevin Norton, MSW850-926-2930 850-510-00643295 Crawfordville Hwy., #11 Crawfordville, FL 32327 • Interior Remodeling • Doors • Floors • Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling • Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach The 2-A District Track and Field Meet was held Thursday, April 12, at Florida High School in Tallahassee and the local girls team de“ nitely made their presence felt. The “ rst event of the day was the 4x800 meter relay and the Wakulla High School team of Cora Atkinson, Emily McCullers, Savanna Strickland and Marty Wiedeman found themselves in a head-to-head battle with the Florida High Team. Running the anchor leg, Atkinson was “ nally able to open a small gap and secured the win for the local team. This win set the tone for the remainder of the meet as the Wakulla girls went on to win the rest of the middle distance events, including the 800, 1600 and 3200 meter runs. Madi Harris, one of the top prep 800 meter runners in the state, easily won that event in 2:22.93, while two other WHS runners, Lydia Wiedeman (2:28.81) and Norma Woodcock (2:29.06), ran outstanding times and “ nished fourth and “ fth respectively. In this meet, the top four runners and/or relay teams qualify for the Regional Meet on April 19, at Boles High School in Jacksonville. In the 1600, sophomore Marty Wiedeman won for the second year in a row, running 5:41.72, almost 6 seconds ahead of the second place runner. Freshman Lili Broadway ran an excellent time of 6:03.14 to “ nish in fourth place and qualify for Regionals. In the 3200, Cora Atkinson again found herself in a battle with Florida Highs Amanda Toothman for the title. Toothman ran on Atkinsons heels for almost the entire race, but Atkinsons strength allowed her to open a gap in the final 400 meters and clinch the title in a new school record time of 12:15.67. Freshman Kasey James ran a strong 13:05.07 to “ nish in fourth place and punch her ticket for Regionals. The 4x400 Relay Team of Alina McCullers, Madi Harris, Savanna Harris and Norma Woodcock also turned in an outstanding performance by finishing in third place. In that race, Harris started the anchor leg 7 seconds back of the anchor for the Rickards Team and by the “ nish was almost able to almost completely close the gap, finishing less than one second out of second place. Their time of 4:17.50 also set a new school record and also quali“ ed them for the Regional Meet. Other girls scoring for the local team included; Emily McCullers (5th, long jump), Lisa House (7th, discus), Alexis Collins (6th, 100 meters), Alina McCullers (7th, 400), Taylor Vaughn (6th, 100 hurdles), Amber Stewart (8th, 300 hurdles), the 4x100 relay team (5th) and the 4x400 meter relay team (3rd). Additionally, two freshman girls, Shelby Alsup and Ashley Carr served notice that they should be factors to be considered in the years to come by placing well in both the discus throw and the shotput. Overall, the girls team placed third in the meet. BOYS RESULTS For the boys, senior Stanley Linton proved to be the class of the “ eld by winning the individual District Championship in both the 1600 meters and 3200 meters. In the 1600, Linton, who is known for his strength and endurance, showed that he has also developed a “ nishing kick by out-sprinting Mariannas Jesse McGowen, 4:37.11 to 4:37.90. An hour and a half later, he dominated the 3200 meters, running 10:16.41, to win by almost 30 seconds. Another highlight for the boys team was the performance of their 4x800 relay team. This team, composed almost entirely of “ rst year runners, started the season ranked last in the district, but showed how much they had improved by finishing in third place, just 1 1/2 seconds out of second place. That team was composed of Mitchell Atkinson, David Sloan, Gabe Hutchins and J.P. Piotrowski. Sophomore Kaedretis Keaton had an excellent outing in the triple jump, “ nishing in 5th place with a jump of 4101Ž. Senior Marshane Godbolt also ran well, placing 8th in the 100 meter “ nals in a time of 11:43 seconds. Also scoring for the WHS team were J.P. Piortrowski (7th, 1600 meters), Cody James (6th, 3200 meters), Mitchell Atkinson (8th, 3200 meters). Another bright spot for the boys included the performances of freshman Logan Hay in the discus and shotput and Alan Pearson in the 300 meter hurdles. Overall, the boys placed 6th, with Linton and the 4x800 meter relay team advancing to Thursdays Regional Meet. The WHS District Champions were the girls 4x800 Relay Team, Cora Atkinson (3200), Madi Harris (800), Marty Wiedeman (1600) and Stanley Linton (1600 and 3200). The girls team really performed well, especially our middle distance girls,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. Our overall goal was to sweep the middle distance events, with a different girl winning each of them, and qualify another individual in each event to the Regional Meet and we were able to do that. Im really proud of these girls and the effort they have given us all season long. They are pretty talented and de“ nitely tough! For the boys, Stanley had another really good meet. He is a supreme competitor and will “ ght you tooth-and-nail. Our 4x800 relay team has gotten so much better over the course of the season … it has been fun watching them mature and improve,Ž said Hoover. This was a tough meet for our sprinters. They have worked extremely hard this season, but things just didnt go right at this meet … it was just one of those days. But these are quality kids and I have no doubt that they will re-group and come back even better next year.Ž We qualified seven individuals and three relay teams for Regionals, so we will be taking 17 kids to Jacksonville, which is pretty good,Ž said Hoover. Its not quite what we had hoped for, but it is pretty close.Ž The WHS runners who qualified will compete next at the Regional Track Meet this Thursday, April 19, at Boles High School in Jacksonville. Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsTRACKWHS girls sweep middle distances at districtsBy ALAN ROSS Greg Biffle overcame a howling Texas wind and lap-leader Jimmie Johnson to post his “ rst Cup victory in 49 races Saturday night at Texas Motor Speedway, taking the Samsung Mobile 500 with a swashbuckling pass of Johnson with 31 laps to go. Whistling winds that topped 40 miles an hour played havoc with the Cup drivers, as trash and debris whipped around the 1.5mile oval and even factored in a crash that put Trevor Bayne into the wall. The race was a panacea for Bif” e, who not only got to pull on a Texas-sized hat in Victory Lane but also put a 19-point gap between him and Matt Kenseth and Dale Earnhardt Jr., both tied for second place in the standings. Besides Biffles and Johnsons superb efforts, perhaps the “ nest driving performance was turned in by Jeff Gordon who started 34th and brought it home in fourth. The race produced a slew of records, including a phenomenal 233 closing laps without a caution. And with just two cautions spread out over 334 laps, the “ eld set a blistering average speed record of 160 miles per hour that blew away the previous track average of just under 152 mph. That statistic also enabled the complete race to be run in just three hours and seven minutes, an astonishingly quick time for a 500-miler. ROADSIDE RAVES: Previously when two Toyotas “ nished in the Top 10, one automatically assumed it was a pair of Joe Gibbs Racing cars. Not anymore. Hats off to Michael Waltrip Racing, whose Mark Martin and Martin Truex Jr. both “ nished in the Top 10 at Texas. Truex, the polesitter, led four times in the race for 69 laps. Waltrip has positively shined in his new twin roles as team owner and FOX broadcasterƒHendrick Motorsports drivers failed to bring their owner his 200th Cup victory but all four “ nished in the Top 10: Johnson (2), Gordon (4), Kahne (7), and Earnhardt Jr., 10th. In addition, the Roush Fenway Racing trio of Bif” e (1), Kenseth (5), and Carl Edwards (8) also all grabbed spots in the Top Ten. CHINESE GRAND PRIX: In his 112th career Formula One start, Mercedes Nico Rosberg won his “ rst-ever grand prix, taking the Chinese edition at Shanghai by a blistering 20.6-second margin. For his efforts, Rosberg can now shuck the mantel of best driver never to win a grand prix.Ž The Swede also took pole for the “ rst time in his F1 career. Rosbergs Mercedes teammate, Michael Schumacher, started second on the grid but lost a wheel on the 12th lap and was forced to retire. McLarens Jenson Button and Lewis Hamilton beat back incumbent world champion Sebastian Vettel to take second and third place respectively.Alan Ross is the author of 32 books and a contributing editor at American Pro“ le. E-mail: alanross_sports@ yahoo.com.COOL DOWN LAPAnswer for Bi e is blowin in the wind Road trip! MAY7-13TPC SAWGRASS PONTE VEDRA BEACH, FL Create your PLAYERS story on and off the course and experience all the First Coast has to offer. Getaway packages start at $99 To book your trip, visit theplayerschampionshiptravel.com or visitjacksonville.com/golf Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY D’Arcy Brazier • Owner Serving Wakulla & Surrounding Counties for over 35 years60 Holiday Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327 509–2148 FOREIGN CAR REPAIR DOWN HOME TOYOTA • HONDA Specializing In Specializing In NISSAN • SUBARU Lic # MV15601www.DownHomeForeignCarRepair.com Come and Socialize in a Comfortable Atmosphere. PRESENTTHISCOUPONTOOBTAIN5 FREE ENTRIESW/ANY PURCHASE.Expires 04/30/2012 INTERNET SWEEPSTAKES TwoP alms TwoP alm s Internet Caf Internet Caf ATEnjoy complimentary refreshments, coffee, tea, sodas, pop-corn or chips.850745-61654360-B Crawfordville Hwy. (next to Captain SeaNile’s)OPENFROM 10A.M.TO MIDNIGHT

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, the March winds decided to wait until April to blow and blow they have done. The little cold snap that came through dropped the water temperatures a bit and with the lousy tides the bite was off a bit. This coming week and weekend should be excellent if the weather will cooperate. I talked with Bucky at Shell Island Fish Camp and he said he went out last Thursday and had a real good day. He caught a 27and 26-inch red and threw back quite a few in the 29to 30-inch categories. Along with that he had a 24-inch trout. The guide boats out of Shell Island have been doing really well and are “ shing west of the Lighthouse. Capt. Luke Frazier at AMS said he and Mike Crum “ shed out of the Ochlockonee River on Wednesday of last week and got their limit of big trout and they had two over 20. They used the Gulp under a Cajun Thunder. They went back after the cold spell and caught about half as many “ sh. The week before that he and Capt. Kent “ shed off of Piney Island and had about “ ve nice trout and a big Spanish. One of the trout was a 27-inch trout that weighed about 7 pounds. Capt. Kent and his nephew Frank Neal “ shed out of Panacea and got their limit of trout off Piney Island. He said they couldnt catch a “ sh under the Cajun Thunder and all their “ sh hit a leadhead/Gulp that was cast and retrieved real slow. Big reds are coming from the cut at St. George and plenty of Spanish are being caught. The pompano bite is on and use a Nylure tipped with a sand” ea or piece of shrimp for the best results. Trout and reds are being caught behind the island and lots of ” ounder are being caught. Use live bull minnows around the jetties at the cut or at the bridge from East Point to St. George. Capt. Randy Peart has been catching lots of “ sh around the Econ“ na using the Pearl White Gulp under a Cajun Thunder. He has been catching plenty of reds around the creeks and oyster bars in close. Capt. David Fife said he is catching plenty of reds between Oyster Bay and Dickerson Bay. Fish the last of the falling tide or end of the rise for the best results and “ sh a bull minnow on the bottom. I “ shed with Phil Sharp on Friday morning and that afternoon Dr. Joe Camps from Tallahassee joined us. We “ shed until just about dark and about an hour before dark the “ sh turned on like I havent seen in a while. The water is so clear that when the sun got real low the visibility dropped and the “ sh turned on. They wanted a Gulp on a jig head with a slow retrieve. On Saturday Phil headed toward St. Marks and caught two tripletail around the crab buoys. I “ shed with Mark Reese and his two daughters from Asheville, N.C., last week and fishing was good. We had plenty of trout. Mark caught a 6pound trout on the last cast of the day. Fishing a shrimp on the bottom for reds when it hit and he set the hook -it took off like a rocket and I thought it was another shark. Turned out to be a 26-inch trout. Mark your calendars for April 28 and 29. Thats the date of the fourth annual Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament at Rock Landing Marina in Panacea. There is a recreational, kayak and youth division with both inshore and offshore “ sh for the recreational and youth divisions. The kayak division covers trout, reds and ” ounder with prizes based on number of kayak entries. Entry fee is $50 per person until April 22 and then it goes to $60. Youth is $25 and goes to $35. There will be a $2,500 jackpot for the biggest King“ sh and a $1,500 jackpot for the biggest trout. You can also buy a raf” e ticket for $100 with a chance to win a 2012 Skeeter ZX20 Bay Boat. (No more than 250 tickets will be sold.) Last year was a huge success and they expect this one to be even larger. You can go to www.panacearockthedock.com for more information. Dont forget to know your limits and leave that ” oat plan with someone. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Fishing should be good this weekendFWC News Teaching children a lifelong hobby, instilling appreciation for our marine environment and providing fun, family outings are the objectives for the upcoming Kids Fishing Clinic in Panacea. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will offer a free Kids Fishing Clinic for children between the ages of 5 and 15 on Saturday, April 21. The clinic will take place at Woolley Park on Mound Street from 9 a.m. to noon. Advance registration is not required. This free clinic enables young people to learn the basics of environmental stewardship, “ shing ethics, angling skills and safety. In addition, environmental displays will offer participants a unique chance to experience Floridas marine life “ rsthand. Kids Fishing Clinics strive for several goals, but the main objective is to create responsible marine-resource stewards by teaching children about the vulnerability of Floridas marine ecosystems. In addition, organizers hope to teach fundamental saltwater “ shing skills and provide participants a positive “ shing experience. Fishing equipment and bait will be provided for kids to use during the clinic, but organizers encourage children who own “ shing tackle to bring it. A limited number of rods and reels will be given away to participants upon completion of the clinic. If conditions allow, participants will have the opportunity to practice their new skills and “ sh from the pier. This event is a photo catch-and-release activity. An adult must accompany all participants. Individuals or companies interested in helping sponsor this event or volunteering at the clinic should call Lori Nicholson at (850) 925-6121 or the FWCs Nancy Fisher at (850) 487-0554. To “ nd out more about taking a kid “ shing, go to MyFWC.com/Fishing.Free Kids Fishing Clinic promises day of learning and funSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is looking for a few good men and women, to borrow a phrase, to serve as law enforcement of“ cers. Applicants must be at least 19 years of age, possess a high school diploma and should have a love for protecting the outdoors. They must start the selection process by completing both a State of Florida employment application and an FWC supplemental application by visiting people“ rst. my” orida.com by April 30. Currently, the FWC has just over 700 officers to patrol more than 34 million acres of public and private lands, 12,000 miles of streams, rivers and canals and 7,700 lakes larger than 10 acres. The agency sends its new recruits through a six-month academy at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Center. Fish and wildlife law enforcement of“ cers have an incredible job,Ž said Of“ cer Philip Grif“ th, the FWCs Northwest Region law enforcement recruiter. When they complete the academy, they are fully certi“ ed state law enforcement officers and primarily spend their time protecting the states “ sh and wildlife resources and people.Ž He said law enforcement officers who are already certi“ ed and then hired by the FWC attend a shorter, specialized academy that focuses mostly on state “ sh and wildlife laws. Among the qualifying factors, Grif“ th said, all applicants must pass a background check and be willing to relocate. One thing we stress is those who are selected must be in good physical health. The academy is physically demanding, and they need to be in good shape to do the job,Ž Grif“ th said. They never know what they will have to do or respond to on a daily basis.Ž Starting pay for FWC of“ cers is $32,836.18 annually. For additional information, contact FWC Law Enforcement recruiter Philip Grif“ th at 850-232-9969, or visit MyFWC.com/Get-Involved. FWC is looking for officer candidatesFrom FWC Law Enforcement reports:FWC Pilots Frank Utermohlen and David Calianno responded to the search for a lost hunter. The 67-year-old man reportedly became disoriented and lost near Arran Road and Fire Road 13 in Wakulla County. After a brief search, the pilots located the hunter and landed to check on his well-being. They led ground units to his location and he was directed safely out of the woods.Lost hunter is found in Wakulla woodsSpecial to The News Gray, graceful shapes playfully twirl and dive in warm waters … welcome the manatee trio of Squeaky, Rocket and Annie, to Save the Manatee Clubs Adopt-A-Manatee program at Blue Spring State Park in Orange City. There are now 24 manatee adoptees to choose from at Blue Spring, and another 13 total from the Clubs adoption program on the East coast; at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park; in the Tampa Bay area; and in Alabama. Save the Manatee Club, a Florida-based international nonpro“ t manatee conservation organization, was founded 31 years ago by singer/songwriter Jimmy Buffett and former Florida Governor and U.S. Senator Bob Graham to help protect the states endangered marine mammals. Funds from the adoption program help with the Clubs extensive manatee and habitat conservation work. Earlier this year, Save the Manatee Club launched live manatee webcams at Blue Spring State Park, making it possible to see Squeaky, Rocket, Annie, and all the other manatees in real time during the winter months. The webcams can be accessed at www.savethemanatee.org/livecams.Adoption program adds new manatees Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555 The college of choice! Invest in yourself today EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT THE RISING COST OF COLLEGEƒ at TCC, tuition is signicantly lower than most other universities and colleges The Wakulla County Horseman’s Association Speed Show will be held on April 21st at the New Wakulla County Equestrian Center in Sopchoppy.New registration time 9AM and new start 10AM. Classes for all ages! Poles, Cones, Cloverleaf, Texas and Arena Race!!! Helmets mandatory ages 16 & under. Concessions available through the Wakulla County 4-H. Yall come out and join us for a fun day!Call Donna for directions: 284-0833. Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ƒONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EARƒ

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD This past weekend, members of Flotilla 12, Apalachee Bay met at the Crawfordville Fire Station for the April Meeting. While I was not able to be there, Duane Treadon was and reported on the following. Members met in the large auction room due to a con” ict in the main station. But since the Auxiliary is Semper Paratus, Always Ready, everyone just adapted. We had a large crowd with several members and members in process. After the business was complete, or newest member Bruce Connors took his oath of membership. This is always a moving event as we are all reminded why we joined and what we have committed to participate in. Bill Wannall was also awarded a sustained service award for his continued hours of service. As mentioned last week, following the business meeting the Flotilla was scheduled to participate in Team Coordination Training and Operations. However, we only focused on Team Coordination Training (TCT) this month and will re-schedule the operations workshop. TCT is an annual workshop that all Auxiliarists involved in operations must attend. During their last meeting the member of Flotilla 12, Apalachee Bay, attended this onehour training lead by Member Training Of“ cer Mark Rosen. What is TCT you may ask, it is a form of risk management used in the Auxiliary before, during and after a mission. Postincident investigations often indicate that human error is to blame. Many accidents on the water can be avoided with proper planning and continual assessment of current conditions. Applying this thought process members of the Auxiliary begin a patrol with an evaluation of weather condition, crew experience, limitation on facility, and nature of the assigned mission. Using a point system scale called GAR (GreenAmber-Red) the higher the number the greater the risk. Items like hot humid weather, smaller sized facility, three to four seas, crew in training on board can all lead to a higher score. When the score reaches the red level the mission cannot begin or if underway must end. This tool can be used by the boating public it insure a safe and fun day on the water. Here are some things to consider before going out on the water: € What are the limitations of your boat? If you have a small boat going out in poor weather or sea state condition would not be advisable. € How many experienced boaters are on board? A boat with mostly inexperienced boaters probable should stay closer to shore. A fully equipped boat with all the safety gear needed, experienced crew, a VHF marine radio and cell phone, and a properly “ led ” oat plan could be able to go out further and in tougher sea conditions. In the end it is the responsibility of the boater to make the call asking the question: Do I have the boat, equipment, and experience to ensure a fun day on the water. As you decide on the answer to that question, I will give you a little more food for thought: Definitions of terms used throughout the Navigation Rules. Rule 3 goes into great detail to avoid any confusion. The word vesselŽ includes most everything that moves on the water including sea planes. The term power-driven vesselŽ means any vessel using an engine to navigate through the water. The term sailing vesselŽ means is any boat under sail only and not using an engine or motor to move it through the water. Once the sailboat turns on its motor it becomes a power boat and must follow the same rules as a motor boat. The term vessel engaged in “ shingŽ means any commercial fishing vessel, with nets, lines, trawls which restrict their ability to move. This does not include recreational or charter “ shing vessels with trolling lines or “ shing poles. The term seaplaneŽ includes any aircraft designed to maneuver on the water. The term vessel not under commandŽ means a vessel which through some exceptional circumstance is unable to maneuver as required by these Rules and is therefore unable to keep out of the way of another vessel. Next week, we will visit a few more terms that are too complicated to go into in this same article. Be on the lookout for Auxiliary Patrols, we are of“ cially into our patrol season! We also have several upcoming Public Affairs events. You may “ nd us on land or sea. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Turn the camera to the left “ ve degrees and hold it steady,Ž came a voice in my helmet from the surface tender.Yes, right there, steady and dont move.Ž This last command was easy for them to ask but hovering mid water holding a large cylindrical video camera attached to the surface by a heavy cable was quite the challenge. Such performance was required back in 1976 when I assisted State Underwater Archeologist Sonny Cockrell at Warm Mineral Springs. Throughout that spring my wife worked at this underwater research site creating a three-dimensional map of the spring and its contents while I attended graduate school in Tallahassee. My frequent visits resulted in an early exposure, under the close scrutiny of Larry Murphy the sites research manager, to underwater archaeology research techniques. I later incorporated several into my own research on anemone symbioses with shrimp, crabs and “ sh on marine reefs. To measure this condition however, required the same tools and techniques, just called something different in each discipline. We both applied the Rosencrans Bubble Tube reference technique. Three dimensional sites require a reference grid with an X and Y and Z value. On land you might measure the distance between objects in a two dimensional grid, then get the elevation using a transit tool (mounted on a tripod with a scope to see elevation over each object in the grid). Because water quality is usually very poor on most underwater research sites, such optical tools do not work well. Now visualize a clear plastic tube with an air bubble holding the tube in an upward arc between the object of interest in a grid of many such objects and a datum stake of known elevation. The air-water interface serves as an arti“ cial reference, even at both ends, to which measurements may then be taken. I am certain this technique was taken from masons who apply the principle in reverse to maintain a straight line of bricks on a land based construction site. Dr. George Bass, the father of Underwater Archaeology, describe this technique in 1960 in one of his texts on the subject. Like the rest of you, my wife and I were trans“ xed to the History Channel last weekend watching the survey of the Titanic debris “ eld, over two miles underwater. Today we have sophisticated measuring devices to create these gridded three-dimensional maps permitting scientists to study the provenience between objects at an underwater scene. Propulsion vehicles with attached video or sonic cameras can produce transects of data that, using a computer, can produce an underwater mosaic picture, like the Titanic, in almost any water. Several years ago, I assisted State Archaeologist Keith Meverdens (Wisconsin Historic Society) to survey the Rouse Simmons or Christmas Tree Wreck located in Lake Michigan. Resting in 170 feet of cold water, this boat still held many secrets. We sought to “ nd out how/why it sank. But “ rst a photomosaic was created, a grid or term of reference, within which the diving scientists could recreate the sinking. Ground-truthing followed, identifying structures and their provenience to the rest of the boat. By the end of the six-week project, a forensic study, with publications to follow, detailed the “ nal moments of this tragedy. We have come such a very long way from measuring a clear tube to video photomosaic in one careers life time. We may see more happen right here in Wakulla County. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBruce Connors takes the oath of membership. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed Apr 25, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 2:09 AM 3.2 ft. 2:44 AM 3.3 ft. 3:17 AM 3.3 ft. 3:50 AM 3.2 ft. 4:24 AM 3.2 ft. 4:59 AM 3.0 ft. 5:38 AM High 0.9 ft. 7:47 AM 0.9 ft. 8:15 AM 1.0 ft. 8:42 AM 1.0 ft. 9:10 AM 1.1 ft. 9:39 AM 1.2 ft. 10:10 AM 1.3 ft. 10:44 AM Low 3.6 ft. 1:50 PM 3.7 ft. 2:16 PM 3.8 ft. 2:41 PM 3.8 ft. 3:06 PM 3.8 ft. 3:31 PM 3.8 ft. 3:58 PM 3.7 ft. 4:28 PM High -0.0 ft. 8:30 PM -0.2 ft. 9:03 PM -0.2 ft. 9:34 PM -0.2 ft. 10:05 PM -0.2 ft. 10:36 PM -0.1 ft. 11:08 PM -0.0 ft. 11:44 PM Low Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed Apr 25, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 2:06 AM 3.3 ft. 2:41 AM 3.3 ft. 3:14 AM 3.3 ft. 3:47 AM 3.3 ft. 4:21 AM 3.2 ft. 4:56 AM 3.1 ft. 5:35 AM High 1.0 ft. 7:44 AM 1.0 ft. 8:12 AM 1.1 ft. 8:39 AM 1.1 ft. 9:07 AM 1.2 ft. 9:36 AM 1.3 ft. 10:07 AM 1.4 ft. 10:41 AM Low 3.7 ft. 1:47 PM 3.8 ft. 2:13 PM 3.8 ft. 2:38 PM 3.9 ft. 3:03 PM 3.9 ft. 3:28 PM 3.8 ft. 3:55 PM 3.8 ft. 4:25 PM High -0.0 ft. 8:27 PM -0.2 ft. 9:00 PM -0.3 ft. 9:31 PM -0.3 ft. 10:02 PM -0.2 ft. 10:33 PM -0.1 ft. 11:05 PM -0.0 ft. 11:41 PM Low Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed A p r 25, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 2:45 AM 3.0 ft. 3:20 AM 3.0 ft. 3:53 AM 3.0 ft. 4:26 AM 3.0 ft. 5:00 AM 2.9 ft. 5:35 AM High 0.8 ft. 8:51 AM 0.9 ft. 9:19 AM 0.9 ft. 9:46 AM 0.9 ft. 10:14 AM 1.0 ft. 10:43 AM 1.1 ft. 11:14 AM -0.1 ft. 12:12 AM Low 3.3 ft. 2:26 PM 3.4 ft. 2:52 PM 3.5 ft. 3:17 PM 3.5 ft. 3:42 PM 3.5 ft. 4:07 PM 3.5 ft. 4:34 PM 2.8 ft. 6:14 AM High -0.0 ft. 9:34 PM -0.2 ft. 10:07 PM -0.2 ft. 10:38 PM -0.2 ft. 11:09 PM -0.2 ft. 11:40 PM 1.2 ft. 11:48 AM Low 3.4 ft. 5:04 PM High Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed Apr 25, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 2:01 AM 2.4 ft. 2:36 AM 2.4 ft. 3:09 AM 2.4 ft. 3:42 AM 2.4 ft. 4:16 AM 2.4 ft. 4:51 AM 2.3 ft. 5:30 AM High 0.7 ft. 7:58 AM 0.7 ft. 8:26 AM 0.7 ft. 8:53 AM 0.8 ft. 9:21 AM 0.8 ft. 9:50 AM 0.9 ft. 10:21 AM 1.0 ft. 10:55 AM Low 2.7 ft. 1:42 PM 2.8 ft. 2:08 PM 2.8 ft. 2:33 PM 2.9 ft. 2:58 PM 2.9 ft. 3:23 PM 2.8 ft. 3:50 PM 2.8 ft. 4:20 PM High -0.0 ft. 8:41 PM -0.1 ft. 9:14 PM -0.2 ft. 9:45 PM -0.2 ft. 10:16 PM -0.2 ft. 10:47 PM -0.1 ft. 11:19 PM -0.0 ft. 11:55 PM Low Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed Apr 25, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:53 AM 2.5 ft. 2:28 AM 2.5 ft. 3:01 AM 2.5 ft. 3:34 AM 2.5 ft. 4:08 AM 2.5 ft. 4:43 AM 2.4 ft. 5:22 AM High 0.9 ft. 7:26 AM 0.9 ft. 7:54 AM 1.0 ft. 8:21 AM 1.0 ft. 8:49 AM 1.1 ft. 9:18 AM 1.2 ft. 9:49 AM 1.3 ft. 10:23 AM Low 2.8 ft. 1:34 PM 2.9 ft. 2:00 PM 2.9 ft. 2:25 PM 3.0 ft. 2:50 PM 3.0 ft. 3:15 PM 2.9 ft. 3:42 PM 2.9 ft. 4:12 PM High -0.0 ft. 8:09 PM -0.2 ft. 8:42 PM -0.2 ft. 9:13 PM -0.2 ft. 9:44 PM -0.2 ft. 10:15 PM -0.1 ft. 10:47 PM -0.0 ft. 11:23 PM Low Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed A p r 25, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 2:34 AM 2.4 ft. 3:22 AM 2.4 ft. 4:05 AM 2.4 ft. 4:46 AM 2.4 ft. 5:26 AM 2.4 ft. 6:08 AM 2.4 ft. 6:53 AM High 1.1 ft. 7:12 AM 1.3 ft. 7:39 AM 1.4 ft. 8:02 AM 1.5 ft. 8:26 AM 1.6 ft. 8:52 AM 1.6 ft. 9:24 AM 1.6 ft. 10:03 AM Low 2.5 ft. 1:08 PM 2.6 ft. 1:25 PM 2.7 ft. 1:46 PM 2.8 ft. 2:11 PM 2.8 ft. 2:41 PM 2.8 ft. 3:16 PM 2.8 ft. 3:55 PM High 0.1 ft. 7:52 PM -0.1 ft. 8:26 PM -0.1 ft. 8:58 PM -0.1 ft. 9:28 PM -0.1 ft. 9:58 PM -0.1 ft. 10:30 PM -0.1 ft. 11:08 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 19 April 25First April 28 Full May 5 Last May 12 New April 20Major Times 12:02 AM 2:02 AM 12:23 PM 2:23 PM Minor Times 5:54 AM 6:54 AM 6:56 PM 7:56 PM Major Times 12:45 AM 2:45 AM 1:07 PM 3:07 PM Minor Times 6:27 AM 7:27 AM 7:50 PM 8:50 PM Major Times 1:29 AM 3:29 AM 1:51 PM 3:51 PM Minor Times 7:02 AM 8:02 AM 8:43 PM 9:43 PM Major Times 2:14 AM 4:14 AM 2:37 PM 4:37 PM Minor Times 7:40 AM 8:40 AM 9:36 PM 10:36 PM Major Times 3:00 AM 5:00 AM 3:24 PM 5:24 PM Minor Times 8:20 AM 9:20 AM 10:28 PM 11:28 PM Major Times 3:48 AM 5:48 AM 4:13 PM 6:13 PM Minor Times 9:05 AM 10:05 AM 11:19 PM 12:19 AM Major Times 4:37 AM 6:37 AM 5:02 PM 7:02 PM Minor Times --:---:-9:54 AM 10:54 AM Better Best SEASONS BEST Better++ Better Good Average7:05 am 8:07 pm 5:55 am 6:57 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:04 am 8:08 pm 6:28 am 7:50 pm 7:03 am 8:08 pm 7:03 am 8:44 pm 7:02 am 8:09 pm 7:40 am 9:37 pm 7:01 am 8:09 pm 8:21 am 10:29 pm 7:00 am 8:10 pm 9:06 am 11:19 pm 6:59 am 8:11 pm 9:55 am --:--12% 6% 0% 6% 12% 18% 24% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.)

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 11AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn April 6, Ronald Gilley of Crawfordville reported an overdue boater at the St. Marks Lighthouse boat ramp. The boat and trailer of the missing boater, Robert Gilley, was observed at the boat ramp. Deputies notified the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Coast Guard to begin a search. Approximately 20 minutes after the FWC helicopter arrived, Robert Gilley arrived on his own. Gilley got stuck on a sandbar and attempted to wade ashore only to “ nd that the water was too deep. Gilley was forced to wait until the rising tide helped ” oat his boat free. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On April 5, John Shivers of Crawfordville reported a lost wallet. The victim contacted two establishments where he may have lost the wallet without success. The wallet and contents are valued at more than $400. € On April 5, Valerie Schirf of Crawfordville reported a vehicle fire on Highway 365 just north of U.S. Highway 98. The victim smelled gasoline shortly before the vehicle stalled and ” ames began under the hood. The Wakulla County Fire Department put out the blaze. Damage was observed to the front compartment. € On April 5, John Sanders of Sopchoppy reported a burglary at his hunting camp. Someone broke into a camper and cabin on the hunting lease property. Two “ rearms were removed from the camper. A container of wine was also removed. The loss is estimated at more than $400. € On April 5, Deputy Mike Zimba responded to an upset 9-year-old girl sitting on the edge of a residential street in Crawfordville. The girl was dropped off at a residence after school, but nobody was home. Deputy Zimba contacted the childs mother who gave him the name and address of another relative who could care for the child. Deputy Zimba left the child with her uncle until her mother could pick her up. € On April 5, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a vehicle crash without injuries at the intersection of Lonnie Raker Lane and Thornwood Road in Crawfordville. A resident reported hearing a vehicle crash into a fence. Carl Andrew Stain, 45, of Tallahassee was detained for a DUI investigation. Following the tests, Stain was taken to the Wakulla County Jail and issued a DUI citation. A dozen containers of beer were observed in the vehicle along with several empty bottles of beer. Damage to the fence was estimated at $150. € On April 6, Alvin Louis Taylor, 45, of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle crash at Old Bethel Road and Windsong Circle North in Crawfordville. The victims truck was totaled and lying across the roadway. Taylor suffered an injured ankle and was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for treatment. Evidence at the scene provided Deputy Zimba with information that the driver ran off the roadway 75 yards from when the vehicle came to “ nal rest. The deputy estimated the speed of the vehicle at 70 to 75 miles per hour. The motorist apparently left the roadway, struck a tree and overturned several times. The vehicle, valued at $8,000, was a total loss. The driver will be issued a citation for careless driving. € On April 6, Julie Edmondson of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. Someone damaged the victims door frame. Damage was estimated at $100. € On April 6, John Hartsfield of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a boat motor from his property. The motor is valued at $750. € On April 6, Jennifer Warren of Crawfordville reported a lost wallet. The victim believes she left the wallet on top of her vehicle and drove off. The wallet and contents are valued at $250. € On April 6, Warren Gaston Shepherd, 30, of Crawfordville was charged with six counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill, and use of a “ rearm while under the in” uence of alcohol in connection with the “ ring of a shotgun during a noise dispute with neighbors. Shepherd “ red the weapon at a group of six individuals on the adjoining property. The weapon was seized and Shepherd was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Nobody was injured. € On April 7, Jimmy Don Blankenship, 50, of Tallahassee was involved in a motorcycle crash at Melaleuca Drive in Crawfordville. The motorcycle rider was involved in an accident on a curve. He suffered injuries to his ankle and head and was transported by Wakulla EMS to the hospital. The motorcycle was towed from the scene. € On April 7, Thomas Platt of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at A and P Seafood in Panacea. A window at the business was broken out. Damage was estimated at $150. € On April 8, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a vehicle with a broken taillight. After the traf“ c stop, Wells discovered that Justin Blake Kaser, 33, of Crawfordville did not possess a valid driver license. A female passenger possessed a learners license. Kasers license was revoked for driving on a suspended license. The suspect reportedly has been charged six times since 2010. Kaser was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked. € On April 8, Hunter Green of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a bulldog puppy from his home. The puppy is valued at $1,200. The next day, Robert Corbelt Green, 45, of Tallahassee, was charged with grand theft for taking the dog, and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Robert Green allegedly told Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Will Hudson that he sold the dog in Leon County. € On April 8, Lt. Sherrell Morrison responded to a four-wheeler accident involving Alejandro Scougal, 19, of Tallahassee. The crash occurred on Dorothy Loop Road and Wakulla EMS treated the victim for a possible broken leg. The fourwheeler driver was making jumps with the vehicle when he lost control. €On April 9, Susan Zanco of Crawfordville reported a vehicle incident in the area of 1653 Shadeville Highway. Louis H. Williford was traveling past Zanco when an object ” ew out of the Williford truck bed and struck her car, damaging the driver side mirror and left side panel. Damage was estimated at $750. There were no injuries. Williford was found at fault and issued a uniform traf“ c citation for failure to secure a load. € On April 9, a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart after a store employee allegedly observed Dylan Jacob Owens, 18, of Tallahassee obtain items from the deli counter and a cooler and go to a cash register that did not have a clerk. Owens obtained a WalMart bag, placed the stolen items inside and attempted to leave the store. The value of the stolen items is $10.70. Owens was arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. € On April 9, Deputy Clint Beam responded to Timberwood Court in Crawfordville and a report of a 3year-old child being burned. The child fell into a “ re pit in the backyard of his parents home. The child had secondand third-degree burns on his feet and hands. Wakulla EMS transported him to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. There was no active “ re in the pit, but the family had a bon“ re on the previous night and the coals were still hot. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 702 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportBurglary cases solved with arrestSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputies thwarted a residential burglary attempt Monday, April 9 in the Wakulla Gardens community of Crawfordville after a concerned citizen alerted law enforcement of a suspicious man, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Walter Hendry Bishop, 33, of Crawfordville was arrested by sheriffs deputies as he attempted to drive away from the scene. The concerned citizen was able to give deputies a detailed description of the suspect and his vehicle and deputies conducted a traf“ c stop within Wakulla Gardens. Bishop was charged with burglary of a structure and petit theft in connection with the breakin on Broken Bow Trail. Deputy Nick Gray stopped the vehicle and Bishop allegedly said he entered the home through a window by removing a screen. The screen was recovered in Bishops vehicle. Detectives Nick Boutwell and Derek Lawhon responded to the scene to question Bishop about other burglaries that have occurred in Wakulla Gardens that were similar in nature. During the investigation, Bishop allegedly admitted being involved in unsolved residential burglaries on Sioux Trail and Mohican Trail, also in the Wakulla Gardens area. He faces burglary and grand theft charges in connection with the two other open cases. On April 10, detectives contacted another Mohican Trail homeowner about a burglary at her home. The victim never “ led a report in the theft of money and personal property. Bishop faces burglary and grand theft charges in that case as detectives solved a total of four burglaries with the arrest in Wakulla Gardens. Walter Hendry Bishop TheNews Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408 Special Offer New Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County Only ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover r r s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Phone#_____________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 4/30/2012877-401-6408Get 10 Months for $20.12straight to your mailbox This is not a trick NO FOOLIN’ www.thewakullanews.com Patriots Day Cajun Cookout April 28Featuring Jambalaya and all the “xings.$10 a plate to bene“t The Three Soldiers Detail, South in Apalachicola.Program begins at 11 a.m. lunch is served at NoonTickets available at The Wakulla Chamber of Commercewww.threeservicemenstatuesouth.org HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com WORM GRUNTIN’ FESTIVAL Worm Gruntin Queen Gracie Rosier Williams. Hundreds of people were on hand for the Worm Gruntin Festival in Sopchoppy on Saturday, April 14. After professional grunter Gary Revell gave a demonstration on how to use a staub and piece of metal to drive worms from the ground, children took to the “ eld to try ttheir luck. There were dozens of vendors on hand selling food and arts and crafts.An earthwor m is caught.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN More photos of Worm Gruntin online at thewakullanews.net Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 DEMONSTRATIONS SMALL ENGINE REPAIR At 3Y You Get MOW For Your Money! Stop in to Register to win FREE Gifts.&OPEN HOUSE charliegrim@msn.comLubeXpert.usMon. Fri. 8am 6pm Sat. 8am 4pm2219 Crawfordville Hwy., 962-2920 with Door Prizes every hour5pm to 9pm both nights AND ALL U CAN EAT SPECIALS Butterfly Shrimp dinner ... $ 10.99 Mullet Dinner... $ 9.99 FREE KIDS HOTDOG & FRIES with any adult Entree (Children 12 & under) 2209 Sopchoppy Hwy.2209 Sopchoppy Hwy. Fri.&Sat.Night“THANK YOU” to our customers for your patronage and support of local business !!! Open Tuesday Saturday 11 am 9 pm Sunday 11 am 2 pm Wakulla County Third Annual Ronald Reagan Wakulla County Third Annual Ronald Reagan Affair Affair BLUE JEANS BLUE JEANSBlack Tie Black Tie& &May 3rd, 2012 at 6 pm at The Bistro at Wildwood 3896 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, Florida May 3rd, 2012 at 6 pm at The Bistro at Wildwood 3896 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, FloridaPaid for and approved by the Wakulla County Republican Executive Commiee. Not in support of any candidate. Featuring Key Note Speaker Peter Schweizer Author of Reagans WarThe epic story of his forty year struggle against and “nal triumph over communism Featuring Key Note Speaker Peter Schweizer Author of Reagans WarThe epic story of his forty year struggle against and “nal triumph over communism$35 for individual $50 for two dinner tickets $35 for individual $50 for two dinner ticketsSponsorships Available Sponsorships Availablewww.wakullarepublicans.com www.wakullarepublicans.com

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& Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Conference looked at impact of art on small townsStory, Page 3B SUMMER CAMPSSpecial pull-out section Pages 5B-8B Trayvon Martin case draws nation’s attention Weekly Roundup, Page 11B ‘Final Flick at The Flamingo’ was terrific funBy TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar“ eld@thewakullanews.netFinal Flick at the FlamingoŽ took the audience back to 1965 to a small town drivein movie theatre hang-out where teens and adults had a lot of fun. In this one little place, the Flamingo Drive-In Theatre and Pops Starlite Snacks, generations of the residents of a small town lived through many of their “ rsts,Ž experiencing everything from romance to violence and even tragedy. Final FlickŽ was written by Wakulla High Schools own Susan Solburg. The setting is the last night before the drive-ins demise. Change and progressŽ will take the life of the hang-out and change not only the face of that area of town, but the lives of all the folks who cherish the time theyve spent at the Flamingo. The “ rst act begins in the parking lot as cars are rolling in. Four of the characters, Will, also known as RomeoŽ (Hunter Wheatcraft), Jetter (Kyle Rozanski), Slick, (Mike King) and Briggs (Ronnie Allen), are listening and reminiscing as Briggs identi“ es who is arriving, just by listening to their car engine. The detail in his description of each vehicle was skillfully scripted to educate, as well as entertain. The scene moves to Pops where all the guys and girls are laying out their intentions, establishing their turf, sizing each other up. The character development was crafted to clearly identify each personality and social group of that era, while also touching on the raging hormones of teenagers wanting to attract members of the opposite sex. The second act took all the dialogue and character development of the “ rst act and sketched out scenes that were full of action, humor, sadness, happiness and even excellently choreographed violence through a “ ght scene at Pops. Throughout the play, audio scenes from old movies were occasionally heard in the background … Splendor in the Grass,Ž The Magni“ cent Seven,Ž ShaneŽ and Wakullas own Creature from the Black Lagoon.Ž Music from the 60s kept the audience rocking during the dance contest scene. Songs like Do You Love MeŽ by the Contours, Rockin Pneumonia and the Boogie Woogie FluŽ by Huey PianoŽ Smith and Bobby Days Rockin RobinŽ were played on a pink and black juke box complete with ” ashing lights. Once again, Wakulla High Schools Dramatis Personae and Thespian Troupe No. 5036 did a fantastic job presenting Final Flick at the Flamingo.Ž The staging, lighting, and performances were professional and very impressive. Hats off to the cast and the crew. Final Flick at e FlamingoŽ by Susan Solburg was performed on April 12-15 at the Wakulla High School auditorium. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARY KATHERINE WESTMARK wakulla.com Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Please Recycle

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, April 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group is for anyone, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050.  CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Friday, April 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB, member of the National Button Society, will meet at 11 a.m. at Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don and Barbara Lanier at 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol.com.  UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY, R. Don McLeod Chapter, will participate with the Sons of Confederate Veterans in a memorial service at the Confederate monument in Hudson Park at 9 a.m. After this service, the UDC will meet at the Wakulla County Public Library at 10:00 a.m. The guest speaker for the meeting will be Kathy Schmidt who will portray her great-grandmother and tell how the War Between the States affected her family. For more information call Louise Thomas at 962-1945. Sunday, April 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, April 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, April 24  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, April 26  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library.  LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library to discuss citizens’ views of previous elections. Call President Mary Cortese at 926-6058 or Gail Hickman at 926-9262.Special EventsThursday, April 19  CHAMBER AFTER HOURS EVENT will be held at the Wakulla Diving Center, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP to the Chamber at 926-1848.  WAKULLA COUNTY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at the Bistro at Wildwood 7 p.m. Come at 6 p.m. for conversation and a meal. They will be nalizing plans for the third Annual Ronald Reagan Day Blue Jeans and Black Tie Affair. They will also be holding a special election to ll the position of chair and vice-chair. Friday, April 20  ART ON THE TERRACE, part of the Wakulla Wildlife Festival, will be held at the Wakulla Springs Lodge from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. There will also be a silent auction. There will be complimentary hors d’ oeuvres and a cash bar, as well as jazz music played by Sammy Tedder.  RELAY FOR LIFE CELEBRATION will be held from 6 p.m. to noon on April 21 at the Wakulla High School track. At the event, teams will camp out and take turns walking around the track to raise money and awareness for the American Cancer Society. Join a team or make a donation. For more information visit www.relayforlife.org and enter 32327 to nd the local event.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will host a Cemetery Tour from 2 to 5 p.m. Meet at the Wakulla County Historical Society Museum and Archives. Call 926-1110 to make a reservation with Cal Jamison and Betty Green. An Old Courthouse tour will also be available.  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING will be held for Harvest Thrift Store at 11 a.m., located at 1596 Crawfordville Highway, Bldg. 2, Suite A. Call the Chamber of ce at 926-1848 for more information. Saturday, April 21  WAKULLA WILDLIFE FESTIVAL will be held at Wakulla Springs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be more than 30 exhibitors, living history demonstrations, bird or prey and reptile shows, children’s activities and art on the terrace. For more information, visit www.wakullawildlifefestival.org.  NAMI WAKULLA DERBY will be held at 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce’s livestock pavilion. A barbecue dinner will follow the festivities. Adult tickets are $20, children 8-12 $10, children 7 and under free. The county of cials, constitutional of cials, school board members and county commissioners will be participating and members of the Wakulla County Horsemen’s Association will be the jockeys.  SPRING FLING DANCE will be held at the Wakulla County Senior Center from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Cost is $15 per person and $25 per couple. The Tallahassee Swing Band will be performing. There will be dancing, music, hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. For more information, call Shelley at the center (850) 926-7145 ext. 221. All proceeds help to support the Senior Center meals program.  PAMPER YOUR POOCH DAY will be held by CHAT at Hudson Park from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. All natural shampoo bath, towel dry, nail clipping and a photo session. If your pet is not micro chipped, Dr. Hughes, DVM will be attending to micro chip your animal. For more information, call (850) 926-0890.  INAUGURAL WALK TO DEFEAT ALS will be held at the Wakulla Station Trail Head along the St. Mark’s Trail at 10 a.m. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. There will be an after walk party from 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be a DJ, hamburgers, hot dogs, chips and sodas will be available for purchase. Call 888-257-1717, ext. 115 or register online at www.WalktoDefeatALS.org.  ANNUAL ORCHID SHOW AND SALE by The Tallahassee Orchid Society will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Doyle Conner Agricultural Center, 3125 Conner Blvd., Tallahassee, Fl. This is a great opportunity to talk with the growers and buy orchids and supplies for the year. For more information, visit www.tallyorchid.org or call Harriet at (850) 320-6566.  MURAL WALL UNVEILING will be held at the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory at 9 a.m. Seeking Knowledge from the Sea through Art and Science is the title of the mural, working with the theme, Conservation: Taking Care of the River, Bay, and Gulf. Students from Riversink Elementary School and Medart Elementary School contributed to the mural.  YOUNG EAGLES FLIGHT RALLY will be held for Wakulla County Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts ages 8-17 by the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 445 at Wakulla County Airport in Panacea starting at 11 a.m. Flights will begin at noon, with registration closing at 12:30 p.m. A parent or legal guardian’s signature will be required for each to participate. A limited number of ights will be offered to any local area child ages 8-17 after the Scouts have completed their “mission.” Call Danny Deason at 5458810 for more information.  SPEED SHOW will be held at 10 a.m. at the Wakulla County Equestrian Center in Sopchoppy by the Wakulla County Horseman’s Association. Registration is at 9 a.m. There will be classes for all ages, including poles, cones, cloverleaf, Texas and arena race. Call Donna Shierling for directions at 284-0833. Sunday, April 22  ANNUAL ORCHID SHOW AND SALE by The Tallahassee Orchid Society will be held from noon to 5 p.m. at the Doyle Conner Agricultural Center, 3125 Conner Blvd., Tallahassee, Fl. This is a great opportunity to talk with the growers and buy orchids and supplies for the year. For more information, visit www.tallyorchid.org or call Harriet at (850) 320-6566.  CONQUISTADORS IN THE FABLED LAND OF THE APALACHEE will be held at San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park, Old Fort Road, St. Marks with tours at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Three-part discussions with archaeologist and Green Guide Phil Gerrell and historian Madeleine Carr. The rst Spanish encounters with the native population in 1528, pirate attacks, and stone cutters. This is part of Wild About Wakulla week. Reservations can be made through PalmettoExpeditions.com. The separate historic cruise is $10 with Green Guides James Hodges and Joey Tillman. Monday, April 23  BLOOD DRIVE hosted by the Southeastern Community Blood Center will be held from 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce. Register with Lt. Billy Jones by calling 728-6835 or 745-7108. Those who give blood will receive a blood donor T-shirt, “Get On Board!” Tuesday, April 24  AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM will be held at the library. For more information, contact Ernie Conte at 926-4605. Thursday, April 26  LANDSCAPING WITH NATIVE PLANTS CLASS will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Learn how to choose native plants for ornamental use in your home and garden landscape. Topics covered in class will include how to select plants that meet your needs, water saving plants, the care and feeding of native ornamental plant and much more.Upcoming EventsFriday, April 27  INFORMATION ON REVERSE MORTGAGES will be available from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. It will be hosted by FirstBANK Florida Senior Products Division Manager Michael J. Weltman and is intended for those almost 62 years old or older. For more information, call 556-6694. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Relay For Life from 6 p.m. to noon on Saturday at the WHS track. Wakulla Wildlife Festival from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Wakulla Springs. NAMI Wakulla Triple Crown Derby at 5 p.m. at the Livestock Pavilion. Spring Fling Dance at 7 p.m. at the Senior Center. FridaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, April 19  ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners Conference Room. Wednesday, April 25  AIRPORT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 2 p.m. in the Board of County Commissioners Conference Room.By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL Interim DirectorWed like to thank all who came out to our Book Extravaganza this past Saturday. Your generous donations raised more than $500 in three hours. Added to funds raised through the recent annual membership mailing, nearly $2,500 has been raised this month! Every cent of the money raised goes directly to funding our Summer Programs, a major portion of the book and materials budget, along with offsetting other needed expenses throughout the year. Wed also like to thank all of our great patrons for their patience as we continue to go through some growing pains with our new automation system. This new systems allows you to place holds, make renewals and comment on materials in our collection from the comfort of your own home. We are working our way through the hiccups and appreciate your understanding. Friday Night Movie On Friday, April 20, we are showing the action packed fourth “ lm in the Mission ImpossibleŽ series. Starring Tom Cruise and Jeremy Renner, this PG-13 (for action and violence) rated “ lm follows the Impossible Mission Force as they are blamed for a deadly bombing at the Kremlin and are disavowed by the U.S. government. We expect a big crowd for this action packed movie so arrive early! Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. New at WCPL This week at WCPL were happy to announce a few of the new additions to our collection. The Lost Years,Ž by Mary Higgins Clark, Capitol MurderŽ by Phillip Margolin, Thunder and RainŽ by Charles Martin, The One: the Life and Music of James BrownŽ by R.J. Smith and Calico JoeŽ by John Grisham. Come by and see our large collection. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 3B & By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsTell me: What will you do with your one wild and precious life?Ž This was the question posed by renowned classical and Shakespearean actress Peggy Rubin, founding director of the Center for Sacred Theatre in Ashland, Ore. She was one of the guest speakers at the Building Creative Communities Conference this past February. I had the tremendous luck of being offered a scholarship to attend this event, held annually by the Colquitt-Miller County Arts Council, in the small town of Colquitt, Ga. Their population is around 6,400, and was once considered something of a ghost town until resident Joy Jinks happened upon the idea of using the countys history as a means to spark its economy. In 1991, she met a director studying for his PhD, named Richard Geer (no, not that Richard Gere). Together, they developed their particular brand of community performancetheater. Volunteers gathered and recorded stories of people from the Colquitt area, and once collected, designed theatrical performances around them. From there, Swamp Gravy was born. Swamp Gravy,Ž a name that is indigenous to the area, is a stew type dish made from left over fried fish drippings combined with tomatoes, potatoes, onions and basically anything else a family had on hand to throw in the pot. By 1995, The Woodruff Foundation awarded the effort a $75,000 grant that was used to ignite a campaign to build a theater and museum from the decaying cotton mill in the center of town, now known as Cotton Hall. Their Millennium Mural Project began in 1999 with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and has become a tourist magnet for visitors throughout the year. The murals depict past events and social life of the county. The most beloved of these murals is the Agricultural Icon, created by Canadian artist Charlie Johnston. From miles away its visual effect … a giant of a man crouching low in an open “ eld … is stunning. Upon closer inspection, one sees that it tells the story of the American farmer and his intimate ties to the land. The economic impact of Swamp Gravy productions has been great. Tourists and theatergoers have spent more than $1.3 million at local restaurants, bed and breakfasts and other establishments. And all they did was tell their stories. I arrived at the conference with the sole intention of utilizing the Swamp Gravy model as a jump-off point for future Palaver Tree Theater productions in Wakulla. Our foundling group was already in the throes of starting something similar with WakullaStory. The second installment would premiere in less than a month. The conference consisted of three different tracks: Track 1: Art of Storytelling, led by Geer, cofounder of Swamp Gravy and founder of Community Performance Inc. Track 2: Art of Community Building presentation was given by Tim Chapin from the FSU Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Track 3: Art of Social Change, focused on how the arts play a major role in the development of shared awareness and sustainability for small towns. Led by Janet A. Sanders of the Jean Houston Foundation of Social Artistry Leadership, this track was informative due mainly to its practicality, or basic common sense. For examples, it used such projects as the River of WordsŽ based at the Center for Environmental Literacy in California. RiverŽ provides tools for teaching ecoliteracy „ the understanding of the natural world around us „ to children, teens, and teachers through art and poetry. Their One Square Block program is based on the belief that every blockŽ has its own story. Students explore a single square block in their community „ their own neighborhood, a local park or schoolyard „ and create poetry, art, and reports about what they “ nd. Younger students create “ eld guides to plants, trees and animals; learn where their water comes from, where the rain runoff goes, and who lived in their area ages ago. Older students investigate land use, transportation, zoning and conduct oral histories. Afterwards, a detailed block printŽ is posted online to compare their block with others from around the world. Id signed up for Track 1 (Storytelling). I knew that audience participation was required, but was unprepared for the extent of which my participation would be needed, and for where it would take me by the days end. Harvesting collective wisdom is a process that begins with sharing personal stories,Ž said Geer, addressing the audience. Performance and story are inextricable. You cannot have performance without story, or story without giving something of a performance. Have you ever had a really good conversation,Ž he asked. What did you need to make that conversation possible? Patience, vulnerability, love, honesty? Perhaps something happened in you … and the other person … that was beyond words. Not because either of you were magical, but because story, performance and relationship are our inheritance. Our stories lead to conversation,Ž he said. And from there come ideas that give rise to solutions for our community. Its far beyond problem solving. It moves us to committed action.Ž We worked in groups of two at first, and then into larger groups of “ ve or more. We told our stories to one another about how our enemies became our friends; how cycles of abuse were interrupted; and about times when we recalled the very moments our lives, along with our expectations, changed. We began at 9 a.m. There were more than 40 people in this one group, of all ages, from different areas of the U.S. The many different threads of our stories, in such a short period of time, became one complete fabric … one beautifully insightful history shared by all. By 7 p.m. that same day, we performed an entire two-act performance of our combined stories in front of an invited audience. Though the possibilities surrounding such an endeavor sound promising, con” ict cannot be avoided. In the rehearsal process of our own WakullaStory, one participant threatened to leave the show because she knew family members of a particular person mentioned in the script, and felt they would be embarrassed by the portrayal (though factual) that the play presented. Another, fearing the loss of her job, left the production altogether because of what was being said about Wakullas educational system. These fears and trepidations stemmed from writings and public records that appeared 50 years ago. Wakullas history did not write itself: there were human hands involved in its creation. If theres no honest discussion with those outside of our comfort zones, or an acceptance of our past and that of our ancestors, the lump in our proverbial throat will only grow in size, and choke-out what remains of our collective voice. Great theatre,Ž says Geer, exists at the edge of what dare not be spoken, or what dare not be shown. When you go to that place … together … you can create something today that will remain important for us all tomorrow.ŽConference looked at impact of art on small towns SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPlaywright Herb Donaldson, who has penned two installments of WakullaStory,Ž in Colquitt, Ga., in front of an agricultural mural painted on silos. Editors Note: Playwright Herb Donaldson, author of WakullaStory,Ž recently attended an arts conference in Colquitt, Ga., and shared this report: LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com The Wak ulla Newswww .thewakul lane ws.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 5B

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comCamp Catch-A-Dream Horseback riding Lessons [regular & therapeutic] plus trail rides. Will learn basic horse-manship skills, balance, following directions, working through fears, & con dence building. Age: Starting at age 7 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy $35 per Lesson or per hour, Scholarships may be available through WCCY, Camp Catch-A-Dream Anger Management & Family functioning Classes Will learn responsibility, respect and a better way to communicate. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505, 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy $15 per 1.5 hr session 10 sessions, Family rates upon request, Scholarships may be available through WCCY. Camp Catch-A-Dream Equine Assisted Growth & Learning Will learn responsibility, respect and communication skills. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp 962-9999, 778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy Rates for groups or individuals, Scholarships may be available through WCCY Camp Indian Springs, Capital Region YMCA, Traditional day / overnight summer camp programs where we encourage kids to build friendships face to face, get outdoors and appreciate our natural surroundings while learn good decision making skills based on the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility., All one week sessions. Age: Overnight Camp: 8 16; Day Camp: 5 12 Sessions start June 3 and run through August 4. Jim Bentley jbentley@capitalregionymca.org or www. campindiansprings.org 926-3361; fax: 926-3624 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville Overnight Camp: $480 per week Day Camp: $140 per week, Scholarships available. Gamerz Paradise Sign up for our Summer Camp! Video games, pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment. Age: 5 and up Daily, weekly and monthly rates available. Call 850-926-9100 theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com Gamerz Paradise, 635 Wakulla Arran Rd., Crawfordville Happytime Instructional Daycare Center Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs SUMMER CHILDCARE Includes a wide variety of eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children. We enjoy skating, swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Locally Owned and Operated by Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available. Call today for our very affordable pricing 926-5226 Crawfordville Hwy. North International Gold Gymnastics IGG A fun- lled themed week full of gymnastics, eld trips, crafts, movies, games, indoor and outdoor play. Lunch to be brought from home. Snacks are provided. Age: 5 12 Hours : 7am-6pm, Carol McAliley or Stephanie Burton at 926-4431 Email: go-iggc@hotmail.com, 54 Feli Way, Crawfordville Weekly rates: full day campers $145; half day campers $75; drop in campers $35/day, 10% discount for second child. Providence Christian Academy Individualized instruction in algebra, geometry, physical science, chemistry, physics, trigonometry, calculus, Spanish, and phonics courses. Grades K 12 Call today to schedule an appointment. 926-2456; 926-1326; 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville Ribits ARTtastic Summer Camp Adventure 2012 ART and FUN Pottery (clay between their ngers), Ceramics: sponge, splatter, bubble, toothbrush, brushes, yarn, stamps, stickers and other painting techniques, add mixed media and a few surprises, makes Ribits the best camp for the kids this summer. Ages: 5 and up June 4-8 11-15, 25-29, July 9-13, 16-20, 30-August 3, August 6-10 Time: 8:30 5:30 (early drop off and late pick upon request) 9:00 2pm ($175 for the half day) Cost: $225 for full day; $175 for half day Deposit: $100 Daily snacks included and lunch (Pizza) on Friday. Savary Academy Summer program to make up a class or recover credits for graduation. Grades 7 12 Ongoing Classes on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 9 a.m. 3 p.m. 926-9977 www.savaryacademy.com Savary Academy, 70-A Feli Way, Crawfordville, FL The Learning Curve SUMMER LEARNING CAMPS (For Students Entering) K 1st: ABCs and 123s; 1st 3rd: It All Adds Up (Addition/Subtraction Skills); 3rd 5th: Multiply Your Fun (Multiplication/Division Skills); 3rd 5th: Fun with Fractions; 4th 6th: Writing Right (Improving Writing Skills); 6th-7th: Solution Skills (Middle School Math Skills); 6th 8th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful Middle School Student); Grades 1 5 JUMP START (Individual grade level intro to next year); Grades: 1-3; 4-6; 7-8 Let's Speak Spanish (Conversational Spanish); 9th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful High School Student); 8th 9th: Intro to Algebra 1; 9th 10th: Intro to Geometry; Writing the AP History Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Writing the AP English Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Intro to AP Stats (Mastering the Graphing Calculator); GET ME TO COLLEGE WORKSHOPS (What Every Parent and Student Should Know about College Admissions and Financial Aid) 9TH 11TH 12TH FOR PARENTS: How do I do this New Math? (Instruction for parents to aid their children with next year's homework; classes for speci c grade levels) Call Melisa Taylor to Register at 926-2179 or visit www. tlctutoring.wordpress.com for summer schedules and pricing. The Learning Curve, 3119-B Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Tiger Rock Martial Arts Elite Martial Arts training Our youth will enhance their life skills and receive coaching that keeps them focused on goal setting, self-discipline and con dence. Sign your child up today! The focus is rewarding. The energy is radiating. All ages. 926-3777 www.crawfordvilletkd.com www.tigerrockmartialarts.com Crawfordville Tae Kwon Do 27 Azalea Drive, Suite A & B Crawfordville (Behind CVS) 5 Weeks of training for only $99 Wakulla Christian School Academic and Personal Enrichment Camp Activities include computers, cooking, dance, foreign language, martial arts, archery, piano, violin, guitar, music, photography, sports, woodworking, robotics, arts and crafts, gardening, special guests, eld trips and more. Ongoing Age: 3 14 Monday Friday 7 a.m. 6 p.m. Call 926-5583 or email wakullachristian@yahoo.comSUMMER OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH It’s time to relax and have some needed downtime. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is proud to sponsor this Summer OP PS section. Recognizing that young people seek to nd their place in the wider world through many ways and means, the community hopes the following Summer OPPS hit the intended mark with many Wakulla youth. Positive youth development refers to activities and programs that nurture young people and help them build on their strength s. Positive youth development is not about xing kids’ problems. Rather, it helps young people nd positive things to say yes to. Positive youth development happens anytime an individual or a program teaches young people skills, connects adults and young people in a meaningful way, involves young people in the life of the community, and gives them a sense of belonging and accomplishment. In Wakulla there are many places that young people can nd this kind of nurturing. Wakulla has its own unique network of people, groups, churches, clubs, teachers, businesses, and agencies that help young people grow into competent adult s. The nurturers might be piano teachers, soccer coaches, neighbors, Big Brother and Sisters, YMCA, church youth group leaders or grandparents… this seci on of the paper is intended to help you decide how to spend a bit of your time this summer.Don’t let fees stop you. If tuition assistance is needed, call 926 3526 for an application which will be reviewed by a select few Coalition leaders to determine eligibility.All Summer LongJune 4 June 8 Wakulla County 4-H Bachelor/Bachelorette Camp Attend this day camp and learn about budgeting, nancial management, how to take care of a baby, food preparation skills and clothing care. Hands-on learning experiences will be incorporated throughout. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 5 8 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 11 June 15 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology(Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5)Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Camp Cherry Lake This year camp will feature traditional activities including swimming, canoeing, kayaking, camp crafts, camp re, water games and archery. Not to be missed are the ever-popular marshmallow paint wars and dance! Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 11 15 (residential), Camp Cherry Lake, Madison, FL Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce 926-3931 $220.00 per week June 18 June 22 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Michelle Snow School of Music Summer Vocal Workshop In this camp, young people will learn the basics of producing and performing in a vocal production with choreography. Participants will get musical education as well as the opportunity to participate in all aspects of a small musical production. (Limited openings) June 18-22. Performance evening of Friday, June 22. 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Michelle Snow (850)926-7627 Jmcsnow5649@centurylink. net, 3102 Coastal Highway, Medart $125/week per child Wakulla County 4-H Project Runway Wakulla Participants will learn to put the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Repair philosophy into practice as they "re-build" a piece of clothing that has been overlooked in the closet or has been purchased from a re-use store. Participants will unleash their creativity as they re-create a clothing item of their choice through this artistic expression class. Boys and Girls are both encouraged to attend. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 19 22 (Tues Fri) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 25 June 29 Wakulla County 4-H Sew Fun and Quilting Campers will learn the basics of sewing, quilting and other fabric crafts such as pin making, weaving and other needlecrafts. The diligent camper will be able to complete a lap-sized quilt and one simple item of clothing by the end of the week. June 26 29 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $80.00/weekJuneMay 12 Wakulla Health Care Task Force Free Sports Physicals, Free physical examinations for student athletes, summer campers, and Special Olympians, Middle and high school students 9am 1 pm Students from WMS 9 a.m.; RMS 10 a.m.; WHS 11 a.m. Free Wakulla High School Clinic on Coastal Hwy (98) Tanya English 926-0065 X 253 Tanya. English@wcsb.us or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com WORKFORCE plus Get Connected, Stay Connected 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo Are you 16 -21 and ready to take the next step in your journey? Perhaps you are interested in a nding a job. Do you want to know more about joining the military or going to college? Maybe you would like to know more about the resources available in Wakulla County. Whatever your needs may be, make plans today to attend the WORKFORCE plus "Get Connected, Stay Connected" 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo and meet employers (who are hiring!), college and military recruiters and local community representatives. 11:00 am 1:00 pm TCC Wakulla Center 5 Crescent Way Crawfordville, FloridaMayMay 19 Wakulla County Sheriff's Of ce Fishing tournament Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 Wakulla County Coalition for Youth

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 7B (850) 926-3777 www. crawfordvilletkd .com www.tigerrockmartialarts.com ELITE MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING 5 Weeks of Training FIVE$99.00 WEEKS To be the best,We TRAIN with the best! Join Tiger-Rock Martial Arts. Every Revolution Starts With Evolution. Need to make up a class or recover credits for graduation? Make Your Summer Count! You DO NOT need to be enrolled in Savary Academy during the regular school year to take advantage of the Summer Program.Wakulla County students now have a choice … But space is limited and the deadline for enrollment is approaching quickly.Classes on Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday from 9am-3pm Grades 7-12Let us help you focus on the future today! www.savaryacademy.com “Jet Cadets... ying high for Christ!”Providence Christian AcademyAMinistry of Central Baptist ChurchGrades K-12 Enroll Today!Call today to schedule an appointment.(850) 926-2456, 926-1326, or 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327Providence Christian Academy grades K-12 with small pupil-to-staff ratio fully-funded scholarships July 9 July 13 Mission San Luis A Child’s Life (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Imagine you were born 350 years ago. What was life like for the young residents of the mission? Learn to dress, play, and live like a colonist through role-playing, studying site artifacts, and using period toys and games. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 8 – 11 (older students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 16 July 20 Mission San Luis New World Apprentice (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Join our bustling village as a living history interpreter and participate in a variety of apprenticeships. Enlist as a soldier, blacksmith, potter, and more! All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Survival 101: Cooking, Camping and Water Exploration Campers will learn how to shoot a bow and arrow, track game, build a camp re and cook a meal using a solar oven. We will learn how to nd safe drinking water as well as camp out overnight. Campers will also have the ability to sh and learn about the heritage of survival in Wakulla County throughout the years. (Tuesday – Friday) 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m., Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week July 23 July 27 Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 22 – 25 (younger students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla, Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 29 – August 3 Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Sheriff’s Youth Ranch Activities will include arts and crafts, sports, water safety, archery, nature hikes, bicycling, games, camp re activities and more. Applications available at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Deadline is May 31 Sponsorships FREE. 6 boys, 6 girls child age 10 -15, Caruth Camp in Levy County. Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 July 30 August 3 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. SwimmingGena DavisRed Cross Certi“ed teacher for over 20 years926-7685 510-2326 Private Pool All Ages-Day or Evening Classes -Starts End of May Sessions through Summer -Sessions are 2 weeks $50 per Person -Private Pool All AgesLesson’s Instructor: Resident Camp: 8-16 • Day Camp 5-12Resident Camp begins on June 3, We offer 9-one week sessions starting on Sunday at 2pm and ending on Saturday at 9am Day Camp begins on June 4th, We offer 11 one week sessions. Each day begins at 8 am with an early drop off option of 7am and the day ends at 5pm with a late pick up option until 6pm. Resident Camp Fees: Y Member $408 per session Non-Member $480 per session Day Camp Fees: Y member $123, Non-Member $140 Camp Indian Springs encourages building relationships face to face, teaching kids to make good decisions and getting outside to enjoy a healthier lifestyle in our beautiful natural setting of Wakulla County. The YMCA promotes the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility in all of its traditional camp activities like canoeing, archery, nature survival, sports and our non-traditional activities likefilm making, horseback riding, low ropes challenge course and our skatepark. If you have any questions please contact our Camp Registrar, 850-926-3361 or camp@capitalregionymca.org. You can also contact the Camp Director Jim Bentley atjbentley@capitalregionymca.org. theTMYMCA JulyAugust 6 August 10 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm.August L o o k i n g f o r Looking for t h e l a t e s t the latest L o c a l N e w s ? Local News? LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakulla news.com

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com ActivitiesInclude: Computers,Cooking,Dance, ForeignLanguage,MartialArts, Archery,Piano,Violin,Guitar, Music,Photography,Sports, Woodworking,Robotics,Arts& Crafts,Gardening,Special Guests,FieldTripsandMore! WakullaChristianSchool 1391CrawfordvilleHwy,Crawfordville,FL32327 1mile southofS.R.267(BloxhamCutoff) wakullachristian@yahoo.comMonday-Friday 7:00am to 6:00pm Ages3 thru 14 June 4 -August 10, 2012 facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fi MON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!SIGN UP NOW FOR OUR SUMMER CAMP!Video games, Pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment SUMMER CHILDCAREIncludes a wide variety of “eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children We enjoy skating, Swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Call today for our very affordable pricing. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available.HAPPY TIMEInstructional Child Care CenterEstablished 1983HAPPY TIMELocally Owned and Operated By Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs 926-5226CRAWFORDVILLEHWY.NORTH The Wakulla Before and A er School Summer ProgramPre-K 5th gradeARTS & CRAFTS • FIELD TRIPS “GULF WORLD” • SWIMMINGMovies • Bowling • Ska ng and So Much More!OPEN MONDAY THRU FRIDAY June 4 August 10 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. $125 / week or $25 / dayPlus Ac vity Fees.Children meet at The Wakulla County Senior Ci zens Center For the Summer ~ Drop-Ins WelcomeTo reserve a spot, please contact Camp Coordinators Debbie 926-7145 ext. 222 or Pat 9267145 ext.230 How to choose the right summer campSpecial to The NewsAttending summer camp has been a tradition in the United States for more than 150 years. Statistics indicate that around 30 million American kids attend summer camp each year. There are many bene“ ts to summer camp. Camp enables children to stay engaged during the summer when there may be limited interaction with school friends. It also gives parents both a safe and viable daycare solution during the summer. Summer camp pulls together children from different neighborhoods, social classes and backgrounds, which can make it a good place to meet new people … some of whom may become lifelong friends. Camps also provide a variety of activities that can challenge children to try new things that go beyond their comfort zones. Some children are very receptive to the idea of attending summer camp. Others need a little coaxing. But summer camp should never be forced on a child who does not want to go. In such instances, consider local daytime programs that may “ ll the void instead of programs that require being away from home. Once the decision for summer camp is made, there are some questions to answer. € What are your “ nances like? Do you have a budget for summer camp? € What size camp do you desire? € Should the camp be co-ed or single sex? € How far do you want your child to travel for summer camp? What are the options in your area? € Are there any camps that have been recommended by friends or family members? € What kinds of activities do your children enjoy? These types of questions will help you narrow down your options. Then you can visit and interview camps to find one that is the best “ t. When visiting camps, go armed with a checklist of questions. Some of these can include: € What is the philosophy of the camp? € Can you explain a typical day? € What are the types of activities and facilities offered? € What is the camper-tocounselor ratio? € What is the camps drug/alcohol policy? € Does the camp have insurance and security personnel? € What percentage of staff return each year? How are staff selected and trained? € What kind of health care is provided? € Can you tell me about the policy on phone calls and family visits? € What do you do in the event of emergencies? Dont wait too long to research and sign up for camps because many fill up quite early or have an extensive waiting list. Summer camp is a fun way that millions of children spend their summers each year. Special to The NewsNot every family can afford summer camp or chooses to have their children attend. But faced with two long months of vacation from school, what options are there for keeping children occupied during the lazy days of summer? A top-run, private, sleepaway camp can cost around $10,000 for the season. In todays tight economic climate, many families are choosing to scale back expenses, and that includes pricey summer camp. However, just because cost is a factor, it doesnt mean that children cant attend camp this season. Parents simply need to do their research or come up with other creative alternatives. First, investigate the opportunities in your area. Summer camp doesnt have to mean eight weeks of recreation in the middle of the wilderness. There may be locally run businesses that also offer summer programs. For example, many private daycare organizations open up their doors to campers for the summer. They may set a limit on age. Also, churches, synagogues and other houses of worship may offer a summer recreation program. If you are a parishioner you might be eligible for a discounted rate. Dont forget to check out the YMCA or other clubs in the area. They typically offer a summer program. Some places offer payment plans to spread out the financial responsibility, while others may offer scholarships based on “ nancial need. Find out if your childs elementary school has a program for the summer. Some may offer crafts, sports and other activities for a few hours during the day. This is a bene“ t to parents who have to work and cannot have their children home alone each day. Bus service may be available. If youve exhausted other options, get creative. If you have a number of reliable friends or neighbors, you can set up a camp rotation. Each member of the camp group will be responsible for the kids on a particular day. The responsibilities rotate among the other parents. This enables free time for adults during the summer, and the potential to stagger work schedules and accommodate children being out of school. Older adults, such as grandparents or other relatives, also may be able to assist in campŽ duties during the summer. Children, students and seniors often have a reduced admission rate to museums. Spending time together will help generations bond. If you missed the registration deadline for summer camp or simply cannot afford it this year, there are other alternatives to keep children engaged during the vacation months. Some alternatives to summer camp for childrenCamp for your kids could be as simple as neighborhood parents rotating supervision of vacationing children.

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Lost CAT male, nuet weighs 15lbs all white w/some tan on face Fluffy White & tan Tail blue collar last seen 3/29 Tin Oak Rd Tallahassee Fl (850) 7277504 German Shepherd Adult, female Shadeville Road, Hwy 61m, Near Tiger Hammock Rd. (850) 9264185 Lost Dog St Teresa Beach Sat. April 14th, Female, Tri Color White chest, 30lbs, 18Ž, long ears and tail (850) 5086981 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfor dville. Short domestic female cat, grey & white last seen The Farm Subdivision (801) 518-0385 Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)7421373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)3747294 Trades/ Skills Class-A FlatBed Drivers$ -Home EVERY Weekend, Run S.E. US REQUIRES 1 Yr OTR F.B. Exp, & payUP TO .39/mile Call (800)572-5489 x 227 SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC Drivers-New Freight for Refrigerated & Dry Van lines. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com General Help 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now!at Schneider National Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training! Job ready in 15 days! (888)3681964 25 Driver Trainees Needed!Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! (888)3681964 Career Opportunities A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401k, 2 Mo. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.me ltontruck.com/ drive Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.me ltontruck.com/ drive Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)3143769 Schools/ Instruction Can you Dig It?Ž We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator. (866)3626497 Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SHEV certified. Call (877) 206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLE Sat. April 28, 8a-2p Giant Yard Sale 50+ Families Christ Church AnglicanClothing, appliances, furniture, housewares, toys and much much more. Hwy 98 (E. of W akulla High) OCHLOCKONEESaturday, April 21st, 8AM-2PM at57 Wakulla Circle, Under carport. Good, Clean items. Mobile Homes For Rent CONVENIENT LOCATION3/2 large corner lot wooded buffer, porches, CHA, appls include washer & dryer $700/mo+ security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE2/1, Singlewide, clean, new deck, 53 Cayuse Row $425. Mo. $425. Sec. References required (904) 5488342 CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $595 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-5244090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $850, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 4433300 CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 9263832 Crawfordville.Cottage on large wooded lot, 2BR/1BA, washer/dryer included Screened -porch, covered carport, central heat/air. No smoking. $700/mo.+first/last. Small pet ok w/$250/deposit. 850-9263859. Real Estate For Sale Gorgeous! Like New! $85,000 (includes $5,000 new appliances and closing costs). 3BR/2BA, 1200sqft., on 2.5 lots. 85 Paulette Dr. For more details. 850-925-6704 after 6PM. Real Estate For Sale WOODVILLE3/2/1, Brick, 1/2 Acre Open kitchen, wood flooring, gas fireplace, huge Florida Room and Laundry room. 20x40 workshop Fenced yard, patio and pool $128,900 (850)9264090 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953 www. sunsetranch es.com New York State Land Sale Discounted to 1990s prices! 3 Acre Starter camp$17,995. 5 Acres w/Farmhouse$49,995. 52 Acres, Stream, 2 ponds, Beautiful woods & views. Access to road front, utilities and state land Limited offer. Call Christmas & Associates (800)229-7843 or visit landand camps.com Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 2x5.5 Fictitious Name Notices 5184-0419 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS NAME Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: NISEYS BAIT AND TACKLE located at 2146 Sopchoppy Hwy, Sopchoppy, FL 32358 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida Dated at Crawfordville, Florida this 11th day of April, 2012. /s/ David B. Morse, owner Published one (1) time in the The Wakulla News April 19, 2012 51840419 5187-0419 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS NAME Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of A. Souls Delight located at 972 Balkin Rd, Tallahassee, Florida 32305, in the County of Leon, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahasee, Florida this 9th day of April, 2012. /s/ Darius J.P. Mount, owner Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News April 19, 2012 5187-0419 2x4.75 3x3 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 9BSpringYARD & Bake Sale!Friday, April 20 Saturday, April 217AM-Until... Rain or Shine! household items, kitchen appliances, dishes, clothes, books, games, furniture and a little bit of everything!! Administrative Support Assistant 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Your Spanish Communicator• Document Translations (Spanish /English) • Conference Calls • Telephone Excellence Skills Training (English/Spanish) • Telephone outgoing voice recordingcall LKR COMMUNICATION & TRANSLATIONS, LLC for rates! 850-509-7129 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you”LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053 88 7408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONSRE-ROOFINGREPAIRSRESIDENTIALCOMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFINGCO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net MOVE IN CONDITION!This meticulously maintained home is ready and waiting for you! You will love how this 3/2 2007 home in Wakulla Gardens has a great open oor plan, tile kitchen, stainless appliances and a gorgeous over sized master shower. The backyard is an oasis of privacy as there are no homes on any sides. Located at 20 Comanche (right off of Spring Creek Hwy) Not a short sale, just a great price at $89,900! Call me for an appt Carole BeltzRealtor Keller Williams Realty Cell:(850)933-6362 Fax:(850)201-4664 carolebeltz@kw.com www.mytallahasseehomesales.com 1984 AVION RV 34ft.Excellent condition! Sleeps 6. Price reduced to $6,000. Call 850-556-6277 for more information. JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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3x3 C & P Towing NOS 5186-0419 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at C & P Towing at 2235 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 8:00 a.m. on May 9, 2012 the following vehicles: 2008 Chevrolet 2GIWD58C389121156 2005 Chevrolet 1GC6C13V25F848606 1988 Ford 1FTCR1572JPB94216 2001 Pontiac 1G2WP52K21F218428 2005 Chevrolet 2G1WW12EB59243403 2001 Ford 1FAFP55U01A221470 1996 Acura JH4DL2382TS001678 Published one time (1) in The Wakulla News April 19, 2012 5186-0419 Sopchoppy 5182-0419 CONCURRENT NOTICE NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNFICANT IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT AND NOTICE TO PUBLIC FOR REMOVAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS FLORIDA CDBG GRANT # 12DB-OH-02-75-02-N27 Date of Notice: April 19, 2012 Name of Responsible Entity: City of Sopchoppy, Florida Address: 105 Municipal Avenue (P.O. Box 1219) City, State, Zip Code: Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Sopchoppy NPEPA 5181-0419 Notice and Public Explanation of a Proposed Activity in the 100-Year Floodplain and Wetland FLORIDA CDBG GRANT # 12DB-OH-02-75-02-N27 Date of Notice: April 19, 2012 Name of Responsible Entity: City of Sopchoppy, Florida Address: 105 Municipal Avenue (P.O. Box 1219) City, State, Zip Code: Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Telephone Number: 850-962-4611 To: All interested Parties This is to give notice that the City of Sopchoppy conducted an evaluation as required by Executive Orders 11988 and 11990 in accordance with HUD regulations at 24 CFR 55.20 to determine the potential effect that its activity in the floodplain will have on the environment. The City of Sopchoppy intends to undertake a project to be funded by a Florida Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). The project includes the construction of drainage improvements and recreation improvements within the City of Sopchoppy (met needs). In addition, if funds are available after the construction of these activities, the City will construct additional drainage improvements in the same project area (future needs). The proposed CDBG recreation improvements (met needs) will include a play station for younger children with site improvements such as a low protective wall around the play station that can also serve as seating. This portion of the CDBG project will be located at Myron B. Hodge City Park which is adjacent to the Sopchoppy River. The proposed flood and drainage improvements (met needs) include installing a large stormwater pipe in the existing ditch on Gulf Street and backfilling it so that only a small swale will be needed along the street. Also proposed is replacing the culvert at Park Avenue with a new large size one which would include a large drainage retention box. After the met needs are accomplished, and if funds are available, future needs will include ditch reshaping and culverts for other streets that are near Gulf Street and Park Ave. The future need streets include Summer Street, Municipal Ave., Blossom Ave., Sheldon Street, Argyle Street, Faith Ave. and Yellow Jacket Street. Maps detailing project locations can be viewed by contacting the City. The City has determined that this project passes through the 100-year floodplain (and wetlands) on the public right-of-way and/or publicly owned property. There is no practical alternative to the proposed project. The project will have no significant impact on the environment for the following reasons: 1. Facilities will be in the existing street right-of-way or publicly owned property which is already improved. 2. All construction will be properly permitted by the applicable agencies. Although the project is located in the 100 year floodplain/wetland, the improvements cannot be undertaken in any other location due to the scope of the project. There is, therefore, no practicable alternative. The proposed improvements conform to applicable floodplain protection standards. The proposed action will not affect natural or beneficial floodplain values, and residents of the community will benefit from the improved flood protection. Additional agencies involved in this project include the State of Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Florida State Clearinghouse (having reviewed the project with no negative comments) and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (permits). Written comments on the proposed project will be accepted until Monday, May 7, 2012. Please send your comments to the City of Sopchoppy, attention: Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk at 105 Municipal Avenue (P.O. Box 1219). Sopchoppy, FL 32358. The City may also be contacted by email at jackie.lawhon@sopchoppy. org, or by phone at 850-962-4611. Comments will be considered prior to the City requesting release of funds. A more detailed description of the project and the flood/wetland maps are available for citizen review at the above address weekdays between the hours of 9:00 a.m and 4:00 pm. Colleen Q. Skipper, Mayor and Certifying Officer Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News 5181-0419 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Telephone Number: 850-962-4611 These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities to be undertaken by The City of Sopchoppy. REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS On or about May 8, 2012 The City of Sopchoppy plans to submit a request to the Department of Economic Opportunity for the release of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds under Title I of the Housing and Community Development (HCD) Act of 1974, as amended, for the construction of drainage improvements and recreation improvements within the City of Sopchoppy (met needs). In addition, if funds are available after the construction of these activities, the City will construct additional drainage improvements in the same project area (future needs). The proposed CDBG recreation improvements (met needs) will include a play station for younger children with site improvements such as a low protective wall around the play station that can also serve as seating. This portion of the CDBG project will be located at Myron B. Hodge City Park which is adjacent to the Sopchoppy River. The proposed flood and drainage improvements (met needs) include installing a large stormwater pipe in the existing ditch on Gulf Street and backfilling it so that only a small swale will be needed along the street. Also proposed is replacing the culvert at Park Avenue with a new large size one which would include a large drainage retention box. After the met needs are accomplished, and if funds are available, future needs will be addressed to include ditch reshaping and culverts for other streets that are near Gulf Street and Park Ave. The future need streets include Summer Street, Municipal Ave., Blossom Ave., Sheldon Street, Argyle Street, Faith Ave. and Yellow Jacket Street. Maps detailing project locations can be viewed by contacting the City. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The City of Sopchoppy has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ENVRR) on file at the City of Sopchoppy, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL 32358. The ENVRR can be examined or copied weekdays between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. To view the ENVRR, contact Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk by email at jackie.lawhon@sopchoppy.org, or by phone at 850-962-4611. PUBLIC COMMENTS Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the ENVRR to the City of Sopchoppy (ATTN: Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk, City of Sopchoppy) at P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 or jackie.lawhon@sopchoppy.org or 850-962-4611. All comments must be received by May 7, 2012. Comments will be considered prior to the City of Sopchoppy requesting a release of funds. RELEASE OF FUNDS The City of Sopchoppy certifies to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity and HUD that Colleen Q. Skipper, in her capacity as Mayor, consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. The States approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities and allows the City of Sopchoppy to use the CDBG funds. OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS HUD will accept objections to its release of funds and the City of Sopchoppys certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the City of Sopchoppy; (b) the City of Sopchoppy has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient has committed funds or incurred costs not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58, Sec. 58.76) and shall be addressed to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, CDBG Program, Small Cities CDBG Program, 107 East Madison, MSC-400, Tallahassee, Fl. 32399-6508. Potential objectors should contact the City of Sopchoppy (ATTN: Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk, City of Sopchoppy) at P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 or jackie.lawhon@sopchoppy.org or 850-962-4611 to verify the actual last day of the objection period. Colleen Q. Skipper, Mayor and Certifying Officer Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News 5182-0419 5183-0426 vs. Marcia D. Jones, Case No. 65-2012-CA-000031 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000031 Division 5185-0426 Vs. Menjor Patrick, case no. 65-2012-CA-000036 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000036 DIVISION: SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC., Plaintiff, vs. PATRICK MENJOR A/K/A PATRICK J. MENJOR,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JOHN B. LEMON LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:: 51 VIOLET LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN AMINATA LEMON LAST KNOWN ADDRESS : 51VIOLET LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property inWAKULLA County, Florida: LOT 135, THE FLOWERS, PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 49-52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in The W akulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 9th day of April, 2012. Brent X Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act-Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 19 and 26, 2012 5185-0426 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MARCIA J. JONES A/K/A MARCIA DENISE MITCHELL CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 2445 NW 41ST ST. MIAMI, FL 33142-4535 Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARCIA D. JONES A/K/A MARCIA DENISE MITCHELL CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 2445 NW 41ST ST. MIAMI, FL 33142-4535 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 20, BLOCK 3, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA commonly known as: 78 SPOKAN TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Lindsay Moczynski of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before May 19, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated:April 5, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. April 19 and 26, 2012 5183-0426 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5180-0419 Estate if Alma Payne, File No. 12-000018CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-000018 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ALMA PAYNE, Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of ALMA PAYNE, deceased, File Number 12-000018 CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327; that the total cash value of the estate is estimated to be $53,642.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Lavernne J. Davis 848 Brewer Street Tallahassee, Florida 32304 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 12, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ LAVERNNE J. DAVIS, 848 Brewer ST. Tallahassee, FL 32304 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /S/ RONALD A. MOWREY, Attorney for Personal Representative, Mowrey Law Firm, PA 515 North Adams, Tallahassee, FL 32301, PH: 850-222-9482, Fax: 850-561-6867 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, April 12 & 19, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5178-0419 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON MA Y 5, 2012 at 10:00 a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: CASEY LARSON BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF MA Y 5 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. April 12 & 19, 2012 51790419 Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property!We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! ANew Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 26-D Guinevere 3BR/2BA for $850 Mo. with $950 Deposit. Small pets ok with deposit20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. Selling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403 The Wakulla Newswww.thewakull anews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 – Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 13 … The national debate over guns, racial pro“ ling and a controversial self defense law continued this week as murder charges were brought against a neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed a 17-year-old black teenager. National news networks all went live as Special Prosecutor Angela Corey ended weeks of speculation by announcing Wednesday that 28-year-old George Zimmerman would face second degree murder charges for the death of Trayvon Martin, whose shooting in a gated community in Sanford has sparked a national furor. As Zimmerman turned himself in to Seminole County of“ cials before making a first appearance in court with a new lawyer, Gov. Rick Scott urged people to let the judicial process work. Scott also continued this week to review a $70 billion state budget while meeting with state university of“ cials and a prominent senator over tuition hikes and a proposal to add a 12th university to the pantheon of Florida higher education institutions. Scott has until April 21 to sign the budget, and he has line item veto power. Florida TaxWatch on Friday broke out the turkey call and urged the governor to veto nearly $150 million in questionable spending. On the campaign front, contributions for the “ rst quarter of 2012 showed that the Republican Party of Florida netted $3.1 million, more than double the $1.2 million raised by the Florida Democratic Party. But the Democrats were crowing over the fact that they registered more voters last month than the Republicans … though new no-party voters outnumbered those signing up with either. Individually, newcomers took advantage of the early legislative session to gain funding ground on incumbents who must refrain from campaign fundraising during the 60-day session. ZIMMERMAN ARREST DOMINATES AGENDA Synchronizing the announcement with the top of the evening news and following requests by Scott and others for calm, Corey announced charges of second degree murder against Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, who shot Martin on Feb. 26 under disputed circumstances. Police have said Martin was unarmed, and that Zimmerman followed Martin through the neighborhood, but other than that, the facts havent fully emerged. Lawyers who represented Zimmerman in the case until the last couple of days have said he acted in self defense when attacked by Martin. Others say Zimmerman was the aggressor, stalking Martin who was walking back from the convenience store to the home where he was staying in the gated community near Orlando. Zimmermans trial might be a test case for the states Stand Your GroundŽ statute, a controversial measure passed in 2005 that allows those who feel threatened to use force, including deadly force, to protect themselves with no duty to try to “ rst get out of harms way. Corey, appointed as a special prosecutor by Scott, promised to not only get justice but to “ nd the truth in the case that has rocked the state and captured the nations attention. We are not only ministers of justice, we are also seekers of the truth,Ž Corey said. We will continue to seek the truth throughout this case.Ž She and her co-workers will likely labor under a continued spotlight, but she said she wouldnt bow to pressure, and would respect the rights of the accused, though she made it clear she thinks he is guilty. There is no doubt we have a desire for justice in this case,Ž Corey said. But I want to stress we also took an oath to protect the due process rights of any person whom we charge with a crime. Our oath will be upheld for our victim, Trayvon Martin, and for the man responsible for his death, George Zimmerman.Ž The charges were welcomed by Martins parents and others, who praised Scott for appointing Corey to head the investigation. BUDGET TALKS AND POLY TECH Gov. Rick Scott has until April 21 to sign the Legislatures $70 billion spending plan and is getting all sorts of advice on how to do that. On Thursday, the governor met with Sen. JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, and chairman of the Senate Budget Committee. Alexander also spearheaded the effort to have Florida Polytechnic University in Polk County become the states 12th university. It would be split from the University of South Florida, which now oversees activities at the satellite campus. The plan has a host of critics and Alexander isnt taking any chances. Meanwhile, Florida TaxWatch on Friday outlined a list of $150 million in budget turkeys it says were improperly included in the spending plan and should be vetoed. Included in the groups Turkey WatchŽ list are $250,000 for Tune into Reading in Hernando County and $2 million for a digital learning center in Pinellas County, for example. Those projects were among $82.6 million worth of stuff placed in the budget during conference committee negotiations. The group also listed about $21 million in economic development projects that warrant more scrutiny. Not included in TaxWatchs turkey list? Florida Polytechnic. CAMPAIGN FINANCE The week brought with it the sound of cash registers as candidates for state and federal of“ ces reported contributions for the quarter ending March 31. With lawmakers in session much of the quarter, newcomers took the opportunity to out raise many of their incumbent opponents. Led by Monticello businessman Halsey Beshears, who reeled in more than $108,000, newcomers posted some of the top fundraising totals in legislative races during the “ rst three months of 2012. Beshears is running in a largely rural House District 7, which includes all or parts of 10 North Florida counties. In the Senate, former House member Kevin Rader, a Democrat, led all candidates, raising just over $72,000 in his bid to win a Senate seat in Palm Beach County. The campaign “ nance “ gures also brought a surprise: members of the Supreme Court who face merit retention votes are raising a ton of money as they expect an effort to get them removed. Also, leading the effort to keep one of the justices, Barbara Pariente, on the bench is former Justice Raoul Cantero. That would go largely unnoticed, usually, but on March 30, Cantero “ led a notice with the court that he would be representing the Senate during upcoming reapportionment arguments before the court, including Pariente. Cantero and his opposing counsel, former Rep. Dan Gelber, both said the situation is common and should not pose a problem. That happens in every courtroom,Ž said Gelber, counsel for Fair Districts Now. Judges across Florida receive campaign contributions from litigants.... I dont really see it as an issue that concerns me.Ž SEEING RED Meanwhile, U.S. Rep. Allen West sounded like he had gone back to the mid-1950s, and might be talking to J. Edgar Hoover and Joseph McCarthy. West said that about 80 members of the Congress … speci“ cally the members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus … are communists, though the Communist Party later said, essentially, it could only dream of having so many fellow travelers. West, a Republican running for re-election in the 18th Congressional District against Democrat Patrick Murphy, was asked at a town hall meeting how many legislators were cardcarrying Marxists. His answer, which put him on national cable television this week almost as much as George Zimmerman, is the quote of the week, below. STORY OF THE WEEK: Special Prosecutor Angela Corey announced Wednesday that the state would charge George Zimmerman with second degree murder in the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Thats a good question. I believe theres about 78 to 81 members of the Democratic Party that are members of the Communist Party... Its called the Congressional Progressive Caucus.Ž … U.S. Rep. Allen West answering, What percentage of the American legislature do you think are card-carrying Marxists?ŽWEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Trayvon Martin case draws nation inA general contractor has challenged the Florida Department of Financial Services’ decision to reject paying for historic photographs as part of the controversial construction of a 1st District Court of Appeal building in Tallahassee. Peter R. Brown Construction Inc. led the case Monday in the state Division of Administrative Hearings, challenging DFS’ use of rule to deny payment. The administrative case is an offshoot of a lawsuit led last year by Signature Art Gallery Inc., which contracted with Peter R. Brown Construction to place the photographs throughout the building. In that still-pending lawsuit, Signature has sued Peter R. Brown, DFS and the state Department of Management Services because the art rm has not been paid for its work. In the new administrative case, Peter R. Brown says DFS does not have a legally valid reason for denying the payment and that the general contractor also has been deprived of a related management fee. The case targets what it describes as a vague rule that says, in part, the state should not pay for “decorative” items. “Crown molding, moulded millwork, chandeliers, draperies, wainscoting, wall coverings, ceiling friezes and medallions, and columns with decorative bases and capitals, are all ‘decorative items’ within a building that enhance its appearance,’’ the challenge says. “Countless public buildings of the state of Florida have many of these elements, all of which were approved by DFS.” But in a document led in the circuit-court case, DFS says the photographs clearly would be decorative items barred by the rule. The 1st District Court of Appeal project has been at the center of a long-running controversy because of what many people consider its extravagances, with the building being dubbed the “Taj Mahal.” – News Service of Florida‘Taj Mahal’ spawns new legal ghtBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 42 44 52 60 65 68 2 37 61 3 38 62 21 39 56 4 15 18 40 53 5 29 34 45 6 30 43 54 63 66 69 7 31 46 57 8 24 35 58 22 32 41 59 9 16 19 36 47 55 10 33 48 11 25 49 64 67 70 12 26 50 13 27 51ACROSS1.Lass'smate 4.Wordsof compassion 9.Committeehead 14. Groundedavian 15.Snub-__ (short,as agun) 16.Sharefifty-fifty 17.Play__with(do mischief to) 18.Carpentryor plumbing,e.g. 19.Citywherevan Goghpainted 20.YANKEE 23.Thumb-turning critic 24.Nearlyworthless coin 25.Donthefeedbag 28.Communications technicianofsorts 32. Quickieportrait 34.Neural transmitter 36. Garbolineender 37.PULLEY 42.Beta'sfollower 43.Carpenter'sgroove 44.Whiz 46.Employmen tfor manyillegals 52.Brownof renown 53.DorisDaysong titlestarter 55.Roomydress 56.JERKY 60.Rashaction 63.Spoil 64.Sacrificeflystat 65.Inthe neighborhoodof 66.Beethoven honoree 67. Op.__ 68.Hockey thugs 69.Exodus memorial meal 70.Visitorsfromother worldsDOWN1.McCain-Obama debatemoderator Jim 2.Critter that multipliesby dividing 3.Conferred knighthoodupon 4.Counting everything 5.Businessname abbr. 6."Yesterday!",in businessmemos 7.Giveafreshlookto 8.Utopias 9. Eight-dayJewish celebration:Var. 10.LyricistLorenz 11.Thewhole enchilada 12."__seenenough!" 13.Scalenotes 21.__Lanka 22.Dawngoddess 25.Schoolfoundedby HenryVI 26.Teen'swoe 27.Wordoftenignored inindexing 29.__demer 30.Gavethepinkslip to 31.Onesans permanentaddress 33.Pharmaceutical giant__Lilly&Co. 35.Zilch 37.__-Coburg-Gotha (British royal house,once) 38.Littledevils 39.Mrs.,inMarseilles 40. Inlaidfloors 41.Shy,inaflirtatious way 42.Stylinggoo 45.Winerycask 47.Hookpartner 48.Priest'sgarment 49."The Devil's Dictionary"author 50. Intheleast 51.Makesalterations to 54.Acubehastwelve 56.Knocksenseless 57.Auditioner'sgoal 58."Whatam__?" (auctionquery) 59.Maneuvercarefully 60.Broomrider 61.Blood-typingletters 62.US/Canada's__ Canals American Prole Hometown Content 3/25/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 234 315 6531 4 652 71 8394 2 864 817 3945 200 9 HtCtt 197 2583 6 4 483196527 265437198 934 615872 576842913 821379456 752 983641 648521739 319764285 L E H R E R G E L H A G A M O E B A S A X E A B O D U B B E D I M P S S O O S R I M M E S T U N I N T O T O P A R Q U E T S C O R P M A L T U N A S A P A X E D E D G E S R E D O N O M A D R O L E E D E N S N A D A I B I D E O S C O Y E A S E C H A N U K A H L A D D E R H A R T E L I A L B A L L E T O N B I E R C E I V E A C N E O N E B I T R E S T H E R E F I T S Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsHeide Clifton knows a thing or two about love. A member of the Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment (CHAT), Clifton sold roses out of her backyard this weekend to bene“ t the organization. Heides 16th annual Rose Sale took place Saturday, April 14, and Sunday, April 15, with about 450 roses set to sell. Clifton grows the roses herself, referring to the task as a labor of love.Ž The roses were nearly all Heritage roses and have been cultivated to grow well in the region. They sold for a suggested donation of $7 each. In past years, the Rose Sale has raised thousands of dollars for CHAT. CHAT is a private, nonpro“ t organization with a no killŽ policy in their work to care for the homeless animals of Wakulla County. Besides running a shelter, CHAT also hosts area events to raise awareness for the needs of animals in the community. Local business, Just Fruits and Exotics was also in attendance at the event, selling plants and donating the proceeds to CHAT. Im proud to be a part of it,Ž said Sherri Thompson of Just Fruits. Animals need our help.Ž The 16th annual Heide’s Rose Sale held to benefit CHATLUCY CARTER/Special to The News Alex Ross and Dana Wilson load roses. A Dortmund Rose Balloon release marks celebrationBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netDreams Day Care Center in Crawfordville celebrated a Week of the YoungŽ last week and ended the celebration with a balloon release ceremony. Director Victoria Massey said the idea of was to celebrate the children and how special they are. Every morning, the daycare had an activity for the children and their parents, such as reading or sculpting with Play-Doh. Parents spent “ ve minutes with their child during drop-of time, Massey said. Massey said she thought the balloon release ceremony would be a fun thing for the kids and their parents to do together. Each child had a balloon with an index card attached to it with their name and the daycares phone number and asked that whoever “ nds the balloon call the daycare so they know how far the balloon traveled. The daycare is located at 470 Spring Creek Highway and enrolls infants to 4-year-olds. Their number is 926-0200.UP, UP AND AWAY: Children release balloons as part of Dreams Day Cares Week of the Young. BALLOON PLAY: Parents were invited to join in playing with the kids. Each balloon had a card with the daycare centers number to “ nd out how far the balloon traveled.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Charlotte SullivanMarch 2012 Winner Her name was drawn fromHunter, Hayden & Blake ReevesI like eating at the local family restaurants and were blessed with the many Wakulla County has to oer.Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winn er!One Meal fro m Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! We add an important bene“t to our free debit cards. Instant. The bene“t of our free instant-issue debit card is that you can get it today and use it today. Its that easy. And with Centennial Bank, you can also use any ATM in the country, free*. Any ATM at all. Just a few more ways we offer banking that comes to you.*Some restrictions may apply. See bank for details. FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALONTake advantage of Spring/ Summer RatesAsk for our monthly specials! FEATHER LOCKS are here!! 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) We offer ”exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT HAIRSALO N Book Your Prom Appoint mentNOW !10% OFFW/THIS ADEXP. 5/15/12 www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK



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See Pages 5B-8B Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 15th Issue Thursday, April 19, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe WakullanewsThe Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Community .....................................................................Page 6A School .............................................................................Page 7A Sports .............................................................................Page 8A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 9A Water Ways....................................................................Page 10A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 11A Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Summer Camps ................................................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B Weekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 11 B INDEX OBITUARIESFrances Batton Lane Luell Gray McKenzie William M. Peters Norris McGraw Wimberly Sr. Bobby Pearce running for Superintendent of SchoolsDavid Miller announces retirementBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netRobert Bobby Pearce announced last week that he is a candidate for Wakulla County Superintendent of Schools. Pearce has served Wakulla County for 23 years as an educator, coach, administrator and volunteer. As a Wakulla High School graduate, I have been a part of the successful Wakulla educational system for most of my life, he said. I believe I have a deep understanding of why we routinely earn the Florida Department of Education designation as an Academically High Performing District, and a vision that will take us to even deeper levels of success. With the announced retirement of longtime Superintendent David Miller (see front page story), Pearce will face Kimball Thomas in the November election for the superintendents post. Pearce was principal at Medart Elementary School, which had earned 10 consecutive A grades during his tenure. He is currently on special assignment to the district of ce where he is working as the nance of cer. Pearce said he believes that combining his passion to provide rich educational opportunities with compassion for those who are struggling through the economic downturn will make him an effective leader of Wakulla County public schools. Im not sure weve ever seen a more dif cult time to educate, Pearce said. He expressed concern about the impact of the upcoming Common Core State Standards which are cutting-edge professional development for Wakulla educators as they continue the implementation of requirements for more rigorous national standards. Its not changing what we teach, but how, he said. While he felt the changes will ultimately be a good thing, he worries about the implementation. Weve got to do it in a way that doesnt kill our folks, he said. He stresses the need to keep teachers and other staff happy. Ultimately, a happy teacher is going to have a happy classroom, he said. But teachers and other support staff are feeling the strain of the economic downturn with no real payraise in years. At the same time, he indicated concern about the lawsuit over the 3-percent pension contribution for state workers found unconstitutional by Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford and headed to the Supreme Court. Wakulla school employees paid in $500,000 which the district could ultimately be responsible for refunding. Continued on Page 2A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakullas long-time superintendent of schools, David Miller, announced this week that he has decided to retire at the end of his current term. Miller, who just turned 61 last week, is the longest serving school superintendent in Wakulla County, having held the post for 17 years. He was serving as principal of Wakulla High School when he was originally appointed superintendent by Gov. Lawton Chiles after the sudden death of Roger Stokley in May 1995. He was subsequently elected to the job and has been returned to office by voters ever since. Miller attended Wakulla schools as a student, then returned in 1973 to teach and has worked for the district ever since 39 years as teacher, coach, assistant principal, principal and superintendent. Asked about his reasons for deciding to retire, Miller said there was no certain thing that prompted it no moment of epiphany, he said but noted with a wry smile that years is a long time. He said he had taken time to think and re ect on his decision over the past few months. As with other things, he said, I think you know when its time. In a wide-ranging interview in his district of- ce last week, Miller talked about the accomplishments hes most proud of for the school system, which is ranked 10th in the state and has been designated as a high performing district, and his feelings of loyalty to the school system. Continued on Page 3A SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBobby Pearce announced his candidacy this week. Children may knock Wakulla 2020 off the ballotHOUSE FIRE: Wakulla re ghters respond to a house re in the Bob Miller Road area on Saturday night, April 14. The residents of the wood-frame house were not at home at the time of the re. The re had greatly weakened what was remaining of the house. According to Fire Chief Michael Morgan, a partial collapse made re ghting efforts very dif cult and it took more than four hours to extinguish the re, which had spread to all parts of the house including underneath the raised oor. The State Fire Marshalls of ce was requested to investigate and determine the cause of the re.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAn educational workshop held on April 12 on the possibility of establishing a Childrens Services Council for the county took a dramatic turn and led to the Wakulla County Commission discussing the future of the Wakulla 2020 plan. Chairman Alan Brock brought the idea of establishing a Childrens Services Council forward after different citizens discussed the idea and hearing that Leon County was moving in that direction. He said he wanted to inform the commission and citizens about the council. I didnt expect it to go in that direction, Brock said. The council is a special district created by ordinance and approved by voters through a tax referendum. This would create an independent taxing authority that funds childrens programs and services in the county. There are eight counties in the state that have created a CSC and seven of those are independent taxing authorities. Others operate as dependent districts and rely on funding from different sources, such as the county government, according to Florida Childrens Services Council CEO Brittany Birken. The Florida Childrens Services Council represents the eight special districts in the state and serves to support and connect the councils. Independent Children Services Councils levy ad valorem taxes and the maximum amount that can be levied is 50 cents for every $1,000 of taxable property value. A small portion of the increase in the millage rate, .013, goes to the Florida Childrens Services Council. Birken said they use an equitable dues formula. For St. Lucie County, that amount is around $10,000 annually. Brock said a half a mill would bring in $500,000 for the county. The discussion eventually turned to the Wakulla 2020 plan because both would be seeking voter approval of a tax to fund their projects. The Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee has already been established by the commission and is working to prioritize transportation projects throughout the county and come up with the language that will be added to the November ballot. Several commissioners did not feel comfortable with two referendums on the ballot and wanted it to be one or the other. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the commission needed to prioritize. If I had my druthers, this would be ahead of the 2020 plan, Stewart said. He added that the Wakulla 2020 plan was a good one, but felt children were more important. Commissioner Jerry Moore originally said he was in support of anything for children, as long as it benefits the greatest number. To him, this meant a large majority of the money should go to parks and recreation. If it didnt, he wasnt going to vote for it. At the April 16 county commission meeting, he said he would not support putting it on the ballot at all. Citizens dont want another tax, Moore said. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he was more concerned that the one-cent sales tax might not be renewed in 2014 if voters approve the half-cent tax proposed by Wakulla 2020. That local option sales tax goes to public safety, transportation and roads, public facilities and parks and recreation. The timing issue for me is everything, Merritt said. He didnt feel comfortable asking the voters to pay for transportation and roads, and then two years later ask them to pay for something that also funds transportation. He was in support of the Childrens Services Council because there wasnt any overlap. Continued on Page 3A David Miller, the longtime superintendent of schools, will retire in November.If I had my druthers, this would be ahead of the 2020 plan, says one commissioner of the children services proposal. WORM GRUNTIN FESTIVALQueen Gracie Rosier WilliamsPhotos, Page 12A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A Its the balance of scal responsibility in looking for more ways to use the taxpayers money wisely, such as with energy efficiency, without taking away from providing an excellent education, he said. His overall goal would be maintaining the psyche that Wakulla County has developed over the years a high performing district with a reputation for developing students and maintaining great teachers, he said. While he credits Miller as a mentor, he pointed to others hes learned from as well including his grandfather, A.R. Pearce Jr., and his father, who taught him to Work hard. You get what you deserve from what you put into it. Im a person who believes in getting out there and working hard, he said. He also credits retired Medart and Sopchoppy principal Randy Anderson with teaching him how to treat people; retired teacher, coach and administrator Bob Myhre and Jimmie Duggar with having an impact on his decision-making, and retired Wakulla Coach J.D. Jones, who was his coach and who he later coached with. Pearce said he believes one of his strengths is building strong relationships with Wakullas students, their families and community members Seeing the whole child is important. At Medart, my goal was to create a climate of Know you by name and treat you like family. If children feel valued, they can succeed academically. Pearce said he believes that one of Wakulla school systems strengths is its ability to assess what works and then improve upon it. The Wakulla school system cannot maintain a tradition of excellence without being on the cutting-edge of educational innovation, he said. He noted ways in which Wakulla students and lifetime Wakulla educators like himself have demonstrated success so far: 2011 district-wide, five-year accreditation of all Wakulla County public schools from Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 12. An 88 percent 2011 graduation rate compared to the states 80 percent. Wakulla is No. 1 of the surrounding counties, including Leon, Gadsden and Jefferson. The fourth consecutive Academically High Performing designation from the state Department of Education. Only seven districts have achieved this status for this long. Eight Career and Technical Education programs (formerly called Vocational) on the WHS campus that include the Medical Academy, Accounting, Carpentry, Culinary Arts, Web Design, Digital Design, TV Production and the new Engineering Academy for 2012-13. Pearce said he also supports innovative programs such as the Gifted Curriculum which provides opportunities to take the Gifted Endorsement college courses taught in Wakulla and expanding on the gifted inclusion model that provides rich experiences for all students; as well as Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten (VPK) which supports students rst introduction to school as the foundation for learning by providing a research-based curriculum. I believe that educators serve the public and have to earn their trust, Pearce said. We have a sacred responsibility to not only educate students, but also to recognize the needs of the whole child when they are under our supervision. Clearly, I care about our children. They are my priority and the reason why I am running for superintendent. Pearce has been married to Jan Pearce for 21 years. She is a Wakulla County kindergarten teacher and also a product of Wakulla County schools. They have two children, both of whom attend Wakulla High School.Bobby Pearce is running for superintendentThe annual Law Enforcement Torch Run to raise awareness for Special Olympics of Wakulla County was held on Monday, April 16. Law enforcement officers with the Wakulla Correctional Institution, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, Department of Corrections and others ran alongside Special Olympics athletes from the sheriffs of ce to the Wakulla County Courthouse. Athlete Leader Keith Cline led the group carrying the ame of hope. We are truly building this program in Wakulla County, said Sharon Scherbarth, county coordinator for Special Olympics. The Area 3 Special Olympics games were held on April 7 at Leon High School. Scherbarth said six athletes will compete at the Special Olympics Florida State Summer Games May 18-20 in Orlando. There are several upcoming events to raise money for Special Olympics of Wakulla County. The rst, Canopy Roads Law Enforcement Motorcycle Club Poker Run, will be held on April 28. The Tip A Cop fundraiser will be held May 4 at Poseys. Of cers serve as waiters and donate all the tips they receive to local Special Olympic programs. JENNIFER JENSENTorch Run SECOND ANNUALTRIPLE CROWN DERBY FOR MENTAL ILLNESSMark Your Calendars for APRIL 21stEveryo ne is Invi tedDine on B-B-Q and watch Wakulla County Ofcials jockeys race for the Derby Crown at the Wakulla Livestock Pavilion Our County & City Ofcials are committed advocates for mental illness awareness in Wakulla County Races begin at 5 p.m. with B-B-Q dinner following the grand eventTICKETS $20 Adults, Children 8-12 $10, 7 & under FREETickets are available for derby and dinner Monday at the NAMI Wakulla ofce, 2140 C Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville, between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. Call 926-1033 for ticket informationSo, Ladies, put on a big brim hat, and Gentlemen, dress in the spirit of the derby for a full evening of entertainment at NAMI Wakullas Triple Crown DerbyNAMI Wakulla is an afliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, and a 501 (C) 3 non-prot organization RowellAuctions.comRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 10% Buyers Premium GAL AU-C002594For Detailed Information Visit RowellAuctions.comBANKRUPTCY AUCTION"Selling by Order of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court"Colquitt County, GA Apr 21, 2012 -:10:00 AMPine Ridge Angus Farms3 Farms Totaling 308 Acres CRAFTS FOOD RAFFLEat theSaturday, April 28 9AM-3PM YOUAREINVITED TOA Imyouragentforthat.1001177.1State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company StateFarmIndemnityCompanyBloomington,ILHavingmeasyouragentmeans havingarealpersontheretohelp youwhenyouneedit.Sowhen accidentshappen,youhave someonewhocangetthejob doneright,andrightaway. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Page 3AContinued from Page 1ABrock and Commissioner Lynn Artz said they were OK with having both on the ballot. Artz said she shared the concerns with the one-cent sales tax, but those concerns should have been expressed earlier to the citizens who have led the push for the Wakulla 2020 plan. Brock didnt want to see Wakulla 2020 taken off the ballot and CSC put on if there wasnt support. Both need citizen backing, Brock said. And Wakulla 2020 has that support and it became a project led by a citizens group, he said. Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee Member John Shuff said hundreds of hours have been spent on this plan and trying to move it forward. It is unfortunate that the commission is pausing on this critical economic issue, Shuff said. Instead of placing a the half-cent sales tax on the ballot to fund the Wakulla 2020 plan, Merritt said the Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee could be used to prioritize transportation projects funded by the onecent sales tax. Merritt also mentioned establishing a Community Redevelopment Area for the Crawfordville area which would help fund the major project of the Wakulla 2020 plan, xing Highway 319. Shuff said the CRA is an excellent opportunity for Crawfordville. However, Shuff said, Our plan was a transportation plan for Wakulla County. The Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee will meet to establish its future plans, Shuff said. He added that this issue was too important to let go. Last nights discussion was just that, a discussion, for a decision to be made, the initiative will have to be placed on the agenda, Shuff said. Brock said meetings with Birken and the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and the Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee are being set up to discuss the Childrens Services Council and to see if there is support. If there is support, those groups would then need to ask that it be placed on the agenda at a future commission meeting for it to move forward. Many CSCs perform a needs assessment to determine where the money should go, Berkin said. Some counties have focused on early learning while others have invested in after school programs. Most of the councils give money to existing organizations and do not compete with the programs already offered, but help them ll in the gaps. The Florida CSC would offer support, lobbying, communication and sharing information among councils and data and trend analysis. If established, the CSC would consist of 10 members. They are school superintendent, school board member, district administrator for local Department of Children and Families, juvenile court judge and county commissioner. Five other members are appointed by the governor and the county commission would offer recommendations. The committee would then decide where the money goes and would also set the millage rate each year.Children may knock Wakulla 2020 o the ballotContinued from Page 1AWhen you spend 39 years of your life working for the same company, you have a little bit of loyalty to that company, he said. He spoke of the impact of his mother, who was a teacher at Crawfordville, on him. My memory of her has guided me, he said. Millers office now was his mothers classroom, and he recounts a visit from her to his of ce back in 2004, shortly after the remodeling of the old school in to district of ces, and telling her: In spite of all the success, I still havent made it beyond the back of your classroom. When he looks back on his career and his time as superintendent, Miller said, I think Ill be remembered for being a pretty good coach, who put together a pretty good team. Miller still regards himself as a coach in his role as superintendent, and his leadership style re ects that with frequent references to team. Wakulla is in the Top 10 in most areas tested by the FCAT, which is unmatched in the Big Bend. He said he is proud of the Medical Academy at Wakulla High School, as well as the new Engineering and Business academies which are getting ready to start up. He points to improvements in Readiness scores in math, reading and writing all well above the state average. Miller notes the middle schools will start offering high school credit classes next year, while the high school will have 15 Advanced Placement courses. He said his role as superintendent has been to look to the future to plan for the districts needs. All of the school facilities are under capacity, while the property where Riversink Elementary was built has enough land for a new high school, when that need arises. Miller has lead through certain core principles, he said. We will never compromise excellence, be satis ed with our successes, give up on a student, or sit down until the job is nished. That last one, Miller notes, re ects the agrarian work ethic of a farm-raised boy himself who learned the wisdom of working for a common goal from his parents and grandparents. One of those values, mentioned several times during the interview, is loyalty. Miller said that every school principal makes their own hiring decisions when it comes to teachers, but that he asks to meet the new teachers. They come into his of ce, some of them expecting to be interviewed by the superintendent, but Miller said its really just his intent to meet them, to learn a little about them. And he hands them a sheet of paper with a quote by Elbert Hubbard: Remember this: If you work for a man, in Heavens name, WORK for him. If he pays you wages which supply you bread and butter, work for him; stand by him and stand by the institution he represents... If you must vilify, condemn and eternally disparage resign your position, and when you are outside, condemn to your hearts content. Miller said when he gives it to teachers, Im not talking about your relationship to me. He said the loyalty should ow to the principal, to other teachers, the team, to students, to the school, to parents. Every successful school system operates as a team, he said, referring again to his leadership style as that of a coach. But when this coach walks off the eld, what will he do? Miller admitted he doesnt have plans. He doesnt hunt or fish. He has a vacation home in North Carolina he may spend a little more time at and a couple of grandkids. I know in retirement, youve got to have a purpose, he said. He may do some consultant work. He will continue to be very interested in what happens in the school system. In 10 years, I want to read that this district has gone to ever greater heights, he said.Cities may return to planning commissionBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn 2009, the Wakulla County Commission voted to change the composition of the Planning Commission, making Sopchoppy and St. Marks non-voting members. Many people in each community became upset, and some felt there was no point to even be on the committee at all if they did not have a say. At the April 16 commission meeting, Commissioner Jerry Moore was hoping to reverse that decision. Even though they are incorporated, they should still have a vote, Moore said. The commission voted four to one, with Commissioner Lynn Artz opposing, to schedule a public hearing to make the revisions to the ordinance. Artz was the commissioner who brought up the item back in 2009. At that time, Nabors Giblin and Nickerson law rm had just started as the countys lawyer and wondered why both cities were on the planning commission, Artz said. She said the commission was told by the lawyers that no other county in the state had cities serving on their planning commissions. She said she also felt the cities had double representation on the planning commission and if she lived in Panacea or Crawfordville, she would be upset with that. It seemed logical, Artz said of making Sopchoppy and St. Marks non-voting members. She added that many have said it should be a two-way street, meaning that the cities have a say on the countys planning commission and the county has representation on each citys planning commission. She said she would like to see a joint commission. Commissioner Mike Stewart, who voted against the change in 2009, said the real reason the cities became non-voting members was because St. Marks wanted to create a Community Redevelopment Area and people got upset. They got their panties in a wad, Stewart said. On Oct. 30, 2008, the St. Marks City Commission adopted an ordinance creating the CRA trust fund, and a resolution to adopt the redevelopment plan. Sopchoppy Vice Mayor Richard Harden said the measure was done in retaliation and the City of Sopchoppy supports being added as a voting member. Decisions that are made at the Wakulla County Planning Commission affect things right at Sopchoppys doorstep, he said. Planning Commissioner Chuck Hess spoke up against changing the ordinance and stated that it would give 800 people two votes on the planning commission and yet the county had no input in their municipality. Chairman Alan Brock, who also voted against the change in 2009, said the cities should at least be approached about a joint planning commission. If a compromise can be reached, Brock said he felt like it was a good idea. He also wondered if the county would continue to add communities if they incorporate. Brock mentioned that community leaders in Panacea were discussing that possibility. The commission voted to move forward with a public hearing in the near future of adding Sopchoppy and St. Marks back as voting members.Miller will retire San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOyst ers Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. 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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:Crawfordville man is killed in traffic crash Kimball Thomas will run for Superintendent of Schools Dig uncovers evidence of Ice Age humans Joice Jane Satterfield Ventry obituary A soldier returns Arthur T. Anderson obituary County commission: Board moves ahead with plans for new sheriffs office annex Worm Gruntin Festival is Saturday thewakullanews.com Follow us onLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.READERS WRITE:Preparing for May 20 CelebrationEditor, The News: The Wakulla County Christian Coalition is partnering with the Greater Mount Trial Primitive Baptist Church, and Palaver Tree Theater Co., for this years May 20th celebration. On May 20, 1865, the Emancipation Proclamation, a public decree issued by President Abraham Lincoln that of cially freed all enslaved blacks, was announced in Florida. In honor of this day, a number of events are scheduled to take place throughout the month of May, and will culminate in a May Day celebration on the grounds of the Mount Trial Church, the original home of the Buckhorn School. Panel discussions, photo exhibits, a lm series and even a Buckhorn Cemetery tour are all included. Photos of Wakullas African-American community from the early 1970s to as far back as the 1800s are still being gathered for the exhibit. Images of schools, churches, along with those depicting the community at work and at play are still being sought. If youd like to submit a photo to be electronically scanned for consideration in the exhibit, please do so. Once scanned, the photo will be immediately returned to you. All events are being done in association with those listed above, as well as G-Signs, and the Wakulla County Public Library. Sponsors are always needed and all are encouraged to participate. Though this event is African-American in its orientation, the history and its impact affect us all, and everyone is invited to partake in the festivities. For more information on sponsorship and events, visit www.palavertreetheater. org, or call (718) 682-3870 or (850) 9267547. Herb Donaldson Artistic Director Palaver Tree Theater Co. Editor, The News: Commissioner Jerry Moore, in his agenda at the April 16 Board of County Commissioners meeting wants to change the rules of the Planning Commission. As it stands, each commissioner, one from each district, appoints a person to represent their district on the Planning Commission. The significance of this is important because the citizens of our ve districts each have their concerns and issues protected by their own representative. Besides the five, the BOCC then selects two citizens at large, one is a minority. That is our voting board. Commissioner Moore wants St. Marks and Sopchoppy to have an extra vote because, he says, they are municipalities. This is not logical because as a municipality, they have their OWN planning board, besides being represented by their district appointee on the county Planning Commission. What has become very clear to me is that Commissioner Moore is concerned with special interest groups, not a commission established for and run by THE PEOPLE. He is a land developer and owns a lot of land in Wakulla County. I think there is something in it for him or he wouldnt suggest this, because it lacks logic. Shame on you, Mr. Moore. Two commissioners, Mr. Brock and Mr. Stewart are running for re-election. Are they for the people? Lets see how they vote! Gail Hickman Crawfordville A story in last weeks Wakulla News about Kimball Thomas running for superintendent of schools noted that he is married with two step-children, but omitted that he also has three adult sons by a previous marriage Brandon, Bryon and Brett Thomas.Clari cation Commissioner Moore isnt being logical Check your facts before sending a letterEditor, The News: I am amused and amazed at the people who write letters lled with inaccuracies then send them in to be published in the newspaper. By spending just a little additional time doing research, this would not happen. Or maybe its simply a case of wanting to stir the pot. The letter I am referencing in particular is about county vehicles being used for personal use (County vehicles used for personal trips?, April 12). In the case of the Animal Control truck, while it is indeed a county vehicle, it is not under control of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. It has not been for several years. Maybe the person driving the truck was on call that weekend, but had permission to drive the truck to church in case he or she got a call. Stopping in to worship the Lord before continuing on your vacation would have given you the opportunity to ask the driver why they were using the truck on a Sunday morning. As far as the COAST Charter School bus is concerned, COAST is a nonpro t organization. Their bus is privately owned. It was not purchased by the county and it is not fueled, serviced or repaired by the county. A simple phone call could have clari ed all this. The county has enough problems without people with too much time on their hands trying to create more. Volunteer at one of the schools, or at the Senior Citizens Center, or one of the many other organizations in the county. Use your time wisely. Heidi Taylor Panacea By BILL MONTFORDState SenatorI appreciate the trust that has been placed in me by allowing me to serve as your state senator. I cherish and respect our way of life and am truly humbled that you have entrusted this job to me. I will always do my best to be a Senator you can be proud of. Part of my job as your senator is to help ensure that bills that may have a negative impact are fully scrutinized and prevented from passing if they are detrimental to the citizens of Florida. The following are examples that some of my colleagues and I helped prevent from passing: Closing Jefferson County Correctional Facility. Thankfully, crime is down in Florida and for that we should all be very grateful. However, the sudden and unanticipated closing of a local prison in a small town can have devastating consequences. We held off this closure for at least a year, but there is no doubt that this ght will return again in 2013. Privatizing Prisons. I believe it is bad public policy to entrust public safety to the lowest bidder. I also believe that turning over many of our states prisons to private companies would hurt the workers in those facilities. Thankfully, we defeated in a very close vote a measure that would have privatized 30 south Florida prisons and would have also created massive worker displacement of local correctional of cers in North Florida. This would have hurt local jobs and local families. Allowing private companies to shut down/take over our public schools. Mislabeled as the so-called, parent trigger bill, this measure would have allowed private companies to come in and lobby parents to take over not x a troubled school. This was not true parent empowerment and could have caused the shut down or privatization of many of our local public schools. More harm to state public employees. The past few years have been very tough on state employees. This year, we fought hard to make sure that the legislature did not cut salaries, benefits or pensions and I am thankful we were able to kill those bad ideas. Unfortunately, we were unable to stop what I believe is an unconstitutional invasion of privacy with the requirement that all state employees be subject to expensive random drug tests. However, through the combined efforts of a lot of people we were able to make some signi cant accomplishments. Some of them are: A balanced approach to septic tanks. In 2010, the legislature passed an over-reaching program related to septic tank regulations that unfairly hit rural communities the hardest. This year, we were able to repeal that law and replace it with a more balanced and more sensible approach that protects precious water sources while scaling back the unnecessary and expensive evaluations and repairs. Additionally, we put more power into the hands of local communities to allow for more local control of the implementation of septic tank assessment programs. Education Accountability. I sponsored and we passed a bill to improve Floridas educational accountability standards that clears up con icts with the federal government. Such con icts could have cost our state millions of dollars for our schools. More money for our schools. While I opposed many of the cuts to badly needed programs, I am pleased that our state added back $1 billion in money for public schools. While these cuts only help repair some of many years of setbacks, I want to commend my legislative colleagues for recognizing that public schools cannot continue cutting educational programs at the expense of our children and I hope this trend will continue for many years to come. Rural Economic development. Our Big Bend will be a major part of this effort, which will benefit the hard working people and their families throughout North Florida. Redistricting. As required by the Florida Constitution, we passed maps for Senate, House and Congressional Districts. I am very disappointed that Jackson County will not be a part of our district, but look forward to working with Senator Gaetz to make sure we take care of North Florida. The people of Jackson County have always been a vital part of our district. We are fortunate to have all of Leon, Jefferson and Madison counties added to our district, as well as all of Taylor and Hamilton counties. In closing, I thank those who contacted me to share their concerns and ideas as to how I can be of greater service to the citizens. I value every contact and am grateful that so many of you care enough about our state and to have your voice heard. I am especially grateful to those community leaders who spent many hours working the halls to help us pass good bills for North Florida. I value and appreciate your con dence in me. I thank you for the opportunity to serve you and if I can ever be of service please call me at (850) 487-5004.Bill Montford is state senator who represents Wakulla County. Almost time for the Blue Crab FestivalEditor, The News: The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Club is looking for entries and volunteers for the Blue Crab Festival Parade. The festival and parade will be held on May 5. The lineup for the parade begins at 9 a.m. The parade starts at 10 a.m. at Jer-BeLou Blvd. and Highway 98. Enter on Otter Lake Road. For more information, contact June Vause at 926-6840 or jvause@my100bank. com or Joann Daniels at 926-7905 or danielsj@rockmail.com. Coastal Optimists Club A look at what happened in the legislative session Candidates speak at Republican ClubEditor, The News: Guest speakers at the Wakulla Republican Club meeting on April 5 were Ralph Thomas, candidate for Wakulla County Commissioner District 1, Richard Harden, candidate for Wakulla County Commissioner District 5, and Don Curtis, candidate for Florida House of Representatives District 7. The Wakulla Republican Club meets the second Thursday of every month at Myra Jeans. It is always a good time and offers everyone an opportunity to talk about the most interesting, pressing and important events of our time. All are welcome. Cynthia Webster CrawfordvilleSPECIAL TO THE NEWS Political candidates Ralph Thomas, Richard Harden and Don Curtis spoke at a recent meeting of the Wakulla Republican Club.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Page 5AChurchreligious views and eventsMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWere Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesFrances Batton Lane Luell Gray McKenzie William M. Peters Norris McGraw Wimberly Sr.Church BriefsFrances Batton Lane, 96, died peacefully at her home on the Ochlockonee Bay on March 31 after a long and bountiful life. She was born in Biloxi, Miss., on Aug. 13, 1915. After graduation from Biloxi High School in 1931 she met and married her husband of 66 years, Capt. (USN retired) Edward A. Lane Jr. who passed away in May 2007. She was the daughter of Louisa Monica Elder and Burras Augustus Batton of Biloxi, who preceded her in death. She was a member of Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church and in the past was active in many volunteer activities to include assisting at a local hospital and library. As a Navy wife whose husband served in World War II, Korea and Vietnam, she served on numerous Navy boards, wives clubs and Navy charitable organizations. She also lived several times on both coasts, spending most of her time in Norfolk, Va., before moving to Florida. Frances enjoyed reading and loved visiting with family and friends. A memorial service will be held in Biloxi at a later date to be announced. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice. Survivors include three sisters, Nezelle Cluff, Grace Husley and Wilma Pierce; a brother and his wife; Burras and Sylvia Batton, all of whom live in the Mississippi Gulf Coast area; ve children, Deder Lane and Barbara Thompson of Tallahassee, Katherine Little and Edward Lane of Richmond, Va., and Stephen Lane of Panacea; 12 grandchildren and 22 great-grandchildren. She also leaves behind her devoted longtime caregiver and friend, Lou Diebler, who made her last years truly enjoyable. She was predeceased by two sisters, Dorothy Harrell and Helen Daughdrill. Luell Gray McKenzie, 76, of Sopchoppy, went to be with her Heavenly Father on April 10. She was born June 5, 1935, in Medart, and was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. She was truly a Christian warrior and kept God at the forefront of her life. She spoke of God often, always with a prayer in her heart and her Bible by her side. Her unwavering faith and love for her family and friends gave her strength throughout her life. Visitation was held Thursday, April 12, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Friday, April 13, at West Sopchoppy Cemetery in Sopchoppy. She is survived by her only child, Mark D. McKenzie (Tammy); two precious grandchildren who loved her dearly, Jacob Daniel, 15, and Madeline Christine, 11, all from Fort Walton Beach; her sister, Betty Rudd of Sopchoppy; and numerous nieces and nephews and many other loving family and friends. She was predeceased by her husband of 31 years, Clinton McKenzie; her mother, Christine Crum; her stepfather, Rufus Crum; and her brother, Hilton (Butch) Crum. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Luell Gray McKenzie Frances Batton LaneWilliam M. Peters, 84, of Crawfordville, died Thursday, April 12, in Tallahassee. He was born in Slocum, Penn., the son of Frank and Jennie (Jones) Peters. He was of the Lutheran faith. He served in the U.S. Air Force for two years as a crew chief on P47 Fighters in the South Paci c-Guam. He was self-employed for 31 years as an excavation contractor. He built, owned and operated Moyers Grove Campground in Hobby, Penn., for 13 years. He was a member of Masonic Lodge 354, Shickshinny, Penn. He was Master of his Lodge in 1972 and Trustee of the Lodge for four years. He is survived by his sister, Gladys Whitmier; two-half brothers, Paul and Franklin Peters; two stepchildren: William Wilkinson and June Wilkinson; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife, Nancy E. Peters, in May 2011; his parents; his brothers, Winfred Peters Sr., Lee and Harry Peters; sisters, Lois Peters and Ruth Moyer; and stepsons, Michael Oster and George Wilkinson. Interment will be in The Nuremberg Cemetery in Nuremberg, Penn. Arrangements are being handled by Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com).William M. PetersNorris McGraw Wimberly Sr., 66, a loving and devoted family man, went home to be with the Lord on Friday, April 13. He passed away due to complications from heart surgery. The complications were brought on by the Agent Orange disease he acquired during his tour in the Vietnam War. Norris was born in Eddyville, Ky., on July 22, 1945, to Tommy and Ruby Wimberly, both of Princeton, Ky. He resided in Crawfordville for the last 30 years with most of his immediate family. Norris served our country for 14 years in the U.S. Army and was a Vietnam Veteran. He was a member of Central Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Visitation was held Wednesday, April 18, from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel. Services will be Thursday, April 19, at 2 p.m., at Central Baptist Church. Services will be conducted by Pastor David Folsom with burial service at St. Elizabeth Cemetery in Crawfordville, with his nal resting place being in Heaven with his Lord and Savior. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Gainesville Fisher House Foundation for Veterans at www.gainesville sherhouse.org. Survivors include his loving wife of 33 years, Wanda Wimberly; ve children, Jerry (Leigh) of Crawfordville, Angela (Richard) of Tallahassee, Howard (Rita) of Panama City, Joe (Emily) of Crawfordville and Norris Jr. (Tracy) of North Carolina; 14 very special grandchildren; three super-special great-grandchildren; three sisters and one brother; many nieces and nephews and several close friends as well as his brothers and sisters in Christ. He is predeceased by one brother and two sisters. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Norris McGraw Wimberly Sr. Barbecue fundraiser in PanaceaPanacea Congregational Holiness Church will be having a youth fundraiser on Saturday, April 21 at the church, located at 1127 Coastal Highway in Panacea. The menu consists of pulled pork sandwiches and barbecue chicken sandwiches with two sides of potato salad, baked beans, cole slaw or chips and tea. Plates are $6 for adults and $3 for children. The serving will begin at 11 a.m. For more information, call 926-4557 or 984-5579. Tallahassee YoungLives is hosting its second annual Songwriters Bene t Concert: YoungLives and Lyrics at 7 p.m. on Friday, April 20, at Element3 Church located at 3540 Mahan Drive, in Tallahassee. There is no cost to attend and donations will be accepted. This years bene t will raise scholarship money for a group of teenage mothers and their children to attend a week long summer camp in Texas. Camp is an extraordinary opportunity for these girls to envision hope for their futures and to see life in the world beyond Tallahassee, said YoungLives Program Coordinator Whitney McLean. During last years camp trip, one of the girls commented on how when (shes) at YoungLives, nothing can get her. YoungLives is a non-denominational non-pro t outreach ministry and mentoring program for teen moms ages 13-19. YoungLives mentors invest in the lives of teen moms by developing life-long relationships of trust and acceptance. The organization hosts a wide range of relationship-building and life-skills programs for teens with the goal to see them nish school and make positive changes that will affect both them and their children.Gaballi Foods sampler is Saturday Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church at 2780 Surf Road in Panacea is hosting a tasting of the meats offered by Gaballi Foods this Saturday, April 21, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Please come by and taste the food from this faithbased, non-denominational food company spreading Gods love by providing quality foods at affordable prices to all of his children. For more information, call 984-0127.Tallahassee YoungLives will hold concertThe family of Grover Sonny Whaley Jr. would like to thank the residents of Wakulla County for their thoughts and prayers during Sonnys recent illness and passing. Thank you for the wonderful way in which everyone came together to show your love for our loved one, Sonny! The Grover Whaley familyFamily appreciates thoughts and prayers

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappeningsCommunityStudio 88 wins big at competition Special to The NewsStudio 88 Dance Productions Company Elite Competition Team travelled to Stone Mountain, Ga., to attend the Access Broadway Regional Dance Competition, Talent Search and Workshops the weekend of March 2 to March 4. Company Elite brought home two Platinum awards, ve High-Gold awards and 10 Gold awards from that competition. In addition to winning a Platinum award, Its Your Wedding Day, which was choreographed by Jessica Seavor, who is currently starring in 9 to 5 on Broadway, was awarded rst place in the High Score awards, as well as the Broadway Star and $50 for Best Debut Performance in the Debut Division. Money, Thats What I Want, choreographed by Artistic Director Lauren Manning, was awarded second place in the High Score awards in addition to a Platinum. Students also participated in the audition portion with Aubrey Willis receiving a scholarship, making her a two-time Access Broadway scholarship winner. Manning said, Im so very proud of all of my students and appreciate the hard work and dedication that they have put in to make these awards possible. Studio 88 Dance Productions, formerly Dancing with Miss Denise, is located in the Bealls Outlet Plaza at 2650 Crawfordville Highway and offers classes in ballet, pointe, jazz, tap, lyrical, hip-hop and contemporary as well as Mommy and Me. They can be reached at 9261698 or by e-mail at studio88dance@yahoo.com.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudio 88s Company Elite celebrates after winning numerous awards at Access Broadway in Stone Mountain, Ga. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChildren from Happy Time Instructional Child Care raise money for St. Jude Childrens Hospital. Special to The NewsOn March 13, Happy Time Instructional Child Care sponsored a Bring A Bike Day for St. Jude Childrens Hospital. About 45 children rode in the event to raise $900. This event is designed to expose pre-school children to the importance of bicycle safety and childhood cancer. Off-duty Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Mike Simmons volunteered to help teach the children bicycle safety and the importance of wearing a helmet. This was an exciting event for the children. Not only were they learning about road hazards and bicycle safety, but they were also riding for an important cause.Children raise funds for hospital Flight rally at the airport on April 21Special to The NewsWakulla County Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts ages 8-17 will have a chance to take to the skies on Saturday, April 21, as Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 445 hosts a Young Eagles Flight Rally at Wakulla County Airport in Panacea. The rally is part of the EAA Young Eagles Program, created to interest young people in aviation. Since the program was launched in 1992, Volunteer EAA pilots have own more than 1.4 million young people who reside in more than 90 countries. Free airplane rides are just part of the Flight Rally, said Danny Deason, spokesman for the event. We hope to build one-to-one relationships between pilots and young people, giving a new generation a chance to learn more about the possibilities that exist in the world of aviation. Pilots will explain how airplanes work and how ensuring safety is the prime concern before every ight. Following the flight, each participant will receive a certi cate making them an official Young Eagle. Their name will then be entered into the Worlds Largest Logbook, which is on permanent display at the EAA Air Adventure Museum in Oshkosh, Wis. The Logbook is also accessible on the web at www. youngeagles.org. Other activities include aviation related training that will provide merit badges for those Scouts who fulfill the requirements. A limited number of ights will also be offered to any local children ages 8-17 after the Scouts are nished. Those wishing to attend the ight rally are asked to come to the airport starting at 11 a.m. to register. Flights will begin at noon, with registration closing at 12:30 p.m. A parent or legal guardians signature will be required. Additional information about EAA and the EAA Young Eagles program is available at www.eaa.org. The Young Eagles web page is www.youngeagles.org. Heltons welcome baby boy Josh and Tiffany Helton of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Braxton Davis Helton, on Feb. 24. He was born at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and weighed 6 pounds, 13 ounces and was 20-inches long. His maternal grandparents are Tim and Debbie Vanderveer of Riverview. His paternal grandparents are Jack and Gena Davis of Crawfordville and Larry and Cindy Helton of Ellijay, Ga. His maternal great-grandparents are Ruth Vanderveer of Lake Hamilton and Harold and Phyllis Ward of Fort Scott, Kansas. His paternal grea-grandparents are Joyce Young of Ellijay, Ga., Bonnie Helton of Ellijay, Ga., and Robert and Gaye Helton of Loxahatchee. NEW!! New courses at the TCC Wakulla CenterMove your career forward with free or low-cost trainingUpcoming opportunities in manufacturing and healthcare:Manufacturing EssentialsApril 23 June 275:30 9:30 p.m. | Mondays and Wednesdays$350 or FREE to those who are unemployed Home Care AidMay 8 August 76 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $299Medical Billing and CodingMay 15 August 146 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays $810 (includes cost of national certification exam)Medical Administrative SpecialistMay 22 July 126 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $420REGISTER TODAY!workforce.tcc.fl.edu/Wakulla | 922-6290 OOPS!The Girls from Evolution Day Spa Hair Salon~ Robyn ~ Miranda ~ Linda ~HAVEMOVEDANDARENOW OPENAT THEIR NEW LOCATIONHair Place That850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA 294-2085 LINDA 545-2905 MIRANDA Are you 62 or older, or will you be soon? Want to re nance at 2.99%-5.06% w/no payments? Want to Buy a Home? Remodel? Improve? Fix the Roof...?Lets have coffee and cake and talk about the HUD/FHA Govt. Insured Reverse Mortgage (FHA-255 Program) that is helping seniors pay for much needed services and retirement. (no income/credit needed)Meet us at the Wakulla Senior Center on Friday April 27 for two classes (45min. ea.) at 6:30 and 7:15 PM.Hosted by FirstBANK-Florida Senior Products Division Manager, Michael Weltman MBA, CSA, SRES 11 years in FHA Reverse, Financial ConsultantRSVP Bring a friend or two or call for info 850-556-6694Bankers, Credit Union Mgrs., Contractors, Remodelers, Home Renovation Companies, Pool Installers, Roofers, Insurance Agents, Realtors, Brokers, Builders, Home Care Agencies, Attorneys, CPAs, Financial Planners, Seniors/Retirees, Mortgage Lenders, Residential Elevator Companies. ARE ALSO WELCOMED TO JOIN US! www.myretirementmortgage.com GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Page 7Aeducation news from local schoolsSchoolRMS students travel to D.C. Special to The NewsDuring spring break while most students were playing their X-Box or swimming at the beach, a group of students spent their time reviewing American History. Eighteen Riversprings Middle School students went to Washington, D.C., for four jam-packed days. After ying into D.C. on March 20, the students toured the Lincoln Memorial, Jefferson Memorial and Roosevelt Memorial. Students were not allowed to enter the Washington Monument, but attended many places around it. Also, the eighth graders viewed many memorials dedicated to past wars World War II, Vietnam War and the Korean War. One of the students favorites was the sculpture dedicated to the battle of Iwo Jima. Two new memorials that our group toured were the Martin Luther King Jr. and the September 11th Pentagon Memorial. An oldie but goodie was the tour of Fords Theatre, where President Lincoln was shot. Students also toured the Capitol where they received a special treat. The students were allowed to sit in on Senate and House sessions as bills were being read and recorded. Students viewed the Bill of Rights and the Constitution at the National Archives and explored the Library of Congress. Special clearance is needed these days to enter the White House, so the students opted for a photo shoot outside the gates. Four Smithsonian Museums on the tour were the Museum of Space and Aviation, American Indian Museum, Museum of Natural History and the Museum of American History. Another museum worth mentioning is the Holocaust Museum. Though somber and yet sometimes graphic, this museum is a must-see. Our middle school students discussed its impact far into the night. Another favorite location was the Arlington National Cemetery where we watched the changing of the guards at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Caylee Cox, Gabby Mohrfeld, Yesenia Reyes and Samantha Thompson were allowed to lay a wreath on the tomb. Students also saw the burial spot of President John F. Kennedy and the eternal flame. Students enjoyed a tour of Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington. Lunch and breakfast meals were in interesting Washington locations such as the Old Post Of ce, Union Station and, of course, the Hard Rock Caf. Other students enjoying the trip were Peyton Carter, Scott Curry, Kathryn Eck, Hannah Hart, Lauren Hatch, Whitley Kerce, Shelby Lenk, Erika McKown, Nick Miller, Kaitlyn Panzerino, Carly Rudd, Libby Sutton, Abby Weddle, and Jamie Wheeler. Teacher and parent chaperones were Steve Hatch, Leon Hillmon, Wayne Largent and Mina Sutton. By JOEY JACOBS RMS TeacherThe 2011-12 season has been a special one for the Riversprings Middle School Academic Team. The Bears parlayed a strong regular season into an invitation to the National Academic Quiz Tournament in Chicago. It is the rst invitation in the schools history. RMS kicked off the season on Nov. 5, 2011, at the Maclay Middle School Invitational in Tallahassee. Riversprings nished a solid fourth place, and RMS high scorer Daniel Sloan was the 12th overall leading scorer out of over 80 competitors. The Bears next action came Jan. 28 in Bainbridge, Ga. RMS had an A team and B team compete. Both teams nished in the top 10. The Bears then went on to compete in a tournament at TCC on March 8, before moving on to the Wakulla County Championship on March 15 hosted by the Coastal Optimists Club. Paced by strong performances by team captain Sloan (top scorer), Isaac Kent, Maclellan Hicks and Adrian Peacock, Riversprings defeated Wakulla Middle School, second place, and COAST Charter School (3rd), winning their fourth consecutive County Championship and 10 out of the 12 years since RMS opened. The Bears made a return trip to Bainbridge on March 31. The A team nished in third place, while the B team turned in a sixth place nish. Hicks was the seventh highest scorer. RMS will travel to the National Academic Quiz Tournament at Chicagos Hyatt Regency OHare Hotel on April 20-22. Riversprings is one of only two middle schools from the state invited to the tournament. Generous donations by RMS Student Council (sponsor Marlene Adams), Kevin and Shelia Mullens, the Coastal Optimist Club, Eugene and June Vause, Edward and Sonya Hicks, Susan Payne Turner, Noah Posey, Jo Ann Daniels, Coastal Gems Realty, Legal Shield, Quill Turk D.D.S., Wakulla Mens Club and Walgreens are helping with expenses for the trip to Nationals. The coaches and team offer a heartfelt thank you to those sponsors. Anyone interested in sponsoring can contact Coach Bill Taylor at 926-2300. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStudents visit several different memorials in Washington, D.C., including the National WWII Memorial. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversprings Middle School Academic Team Members D aniel Sloan, Isaac Kent, Maclellan Hicks and Adrian Peacock.Academic Team heads to Nationals Special to The NewsTo celebrate Earth Day, the FSU Coastal & Marine Laboratory will unveil its new Mural Wall, Seeking Knowledge from the Sea through Art and Science on Saturday, April 21 at 9 a.m. Students from Riversink Elementary School and Medart Elementary School provided mural panels. These local schools agreed to paint a 4 by 8 mural panel.Mural wall unveiling will be April 21 Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala L.P.T.( 850 ) 528-4985PROFESSIONAL POOL MAINTENANCEpoolproblems?atthelowestratesweoffermaintenanceandservice!Servicing Swimming Pools and Spas for over 10 yearsTitus Langston850528-4985Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured RITA HANEY,MSW,LCSWANNOUNCESTHEOPENING OFDiscovery PlaceCOUNSELINGANDSUBSTANCEABUSETREATMENTSERVICES.WelcomeKevin Norton, MSW850-926-2930 850-510-00643295 Crawfordville Hwy., #11 Crawfordville, FL 32327 Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach The 2-A District Track and Field Meet was held Thursday, April 12, at Florida High School in Tallahassee and the local girls team de nitely made their presence felt. The rst event of the day was the 4x800 meter relay and the Wakulla High School team of Cora Atkinson, Emily McCullers, Savanna Strickland and Marty Wiedeman found themselves in a head-to-head battle with the Florida High Team. Running the anchor leg, Atkinson was nally able to open a small gap and secured the win for the local team. This win set the tone for the remainder of the meet as the Wakulla girls went on to win the rest of the middle distance events, including the 800, 1600 and 3200 meter runs. Madi Harris, one of the top prep 800 meter runners in the state, easily won that event in 2:22.93, while two other WHS runners, Lydia Wiedeman (2:28.81) and Norma Woodcock (2:29.06), ran outstanding times and nished fourth and fth respectively. In this meet, the top four runners and/or relay teams qualify for the Regional Meet on April 19, at Boles High School in Jacksonville. In the 1600, sophomore Marty Wiedeman won for the second year in a row, running 5:41.72, almost 6 seconds ahead of the second place runner. Freshman Lili Broadway ran an excellent time of 6:03.14 to nish in fourth place and qualify for Regionals. In the 3200, Cora Atkinson again found herself in a battle with Florida Highs Amanda Toothman for the title. Toothman ran on Atkinsons heels for almost the entire race, but Atkinsons strength allowed her to open a gap in the final 400 meters and clinch the title in a new school record time of 12:15.67. Freshman Kasey James ran a strong 13:05.07 to nish in fourth place and punch her ticket for Regionals. The 4x400 Relay Team of Alina McCullers, Madi Harris, Savanna Harris and Norma Woodcock also turned in an outstanding performance by finishing in third place. In that race, Harris started the anchor leg 7 seconds back of the anchor for the Rickards Team and by the nish was almost able to almost completely close the gap, finishing less than one second out of second place. Their time of 4:17.50 also set a new school record and also quali ed them for the Regional Meet. Other girls scoring for the local team included; Emily McCullers (5th, long jump), Lisa House (7th, discus), Alexis Collins (6th, 100 meters), Alina McCullers (7th, 400), Taylor Vaughn (6th, 100 hurdles), Amber Stewart (8th, 300 hurdles), the 4x100 relay team (5th) and the 4x400 meter relay team (3rd). Additionally, two freshman girls, Shelby Alsup and Ashley Carr served notice that they should be factors to be considered in the years to come by placing well in both the discus throw and the shotput. Overall, the girls team placed third in the meet. BOYS RESULTS For the boys, senior Stanley Linton proved to be the class of the eld by winning the individual District Championship in both the 1600 meters and 3200 meters. In the 1600, Linton, who is known for his strength and endurance, showed that he has also developed a nishing kick by out-sprinting Mariannas Jesse McGowen, 4:37.11 to 4:37.90. An hour and a half later, he dominated the 3200 meters, running 10:16.41, to win by almost 30 seconds. Another highlight for the boys team was the performance of their 4x800 relay team. This team, composed almost entirely of rst year runners, started the season ranked last in the district, but showed how much they had improved by finishing in third place, just 1 1/2 seconds out of second place. That team was composed of Mitchell Atkinson, David Sloan, Gabe Hutchins and J.P. Piotrowski. Sophomor e Kaedretis Keaton had an excellent outing in the triple jump, nishing in 5th place with a jump of 411. Senior Marshane Godbolt also ran well, placing 8th in the 100 meter nals in a time of 11:43 seconds. Also scoring for the WHS team were J.P. Piortrowski (7th, 1600 meters), Cody James (6th, 3200 meters), Mitchell Atkinson (8th, 3200 meters). Another bright spot for the boys included the performances of freshman Logan Hay in the discus and shotput and Alan Pearson in the 300 meter hurdles. Overall, the boys placed 6th, with Linton and the 4x800 meter relay team advancing to Thursdays Regional Meet. The WHS District Champions were the girls 4x800 Relay Team, Cora Atkinson (3200), Madi Harris (800), Marty Wiedeman (1600) and Stanley Linton (1600 and 3200). The girls team really performed well, especially our middle distance girls, said Coach Paul Hoover. Our overall goal was to sweep the middle distance events, with a different girl winning each of them, and qualify another individual in each event to the Regional Meet and we were able to do that. Im really proud of these girls and the effort they have given us all season long. They are pretty talented and de nitely tough! For the boys, Stanley had another really good meet. He is a supreme competitor and will ght you tooth-and-nail. Our 4x800 relay team has gotten so much better over the course of the season it has been fun watching them mature and improve, said Hoover. This was a tough meet for our sprinters. They have worked extremely hard this season, but things just didnt go right at this meet it was just one of those days. But these are quality kids and I have no doubt that they will re-group and come back even better next year. We qualified seven individuals and three relay teams for Regionals, so we will be taking 17 kids to Jacksonville, which is pretty good, said Hoover. Its not quite what we had hoped for, but it is pretty close. The WHS runners who qualified will compete next at the Regional Track Meet this Thursday, April 19, at Boles High School in Jacksonville. Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsTRACKWHS girls sweep middle distances at districtsBy ALAN ROSS Greg Biffle overcame a howling Texas wind and lap-leader Jimmie Johnson to post his rst Cup victory in 49 races Saturday night at Texas Motor Speedway, taking the Samsung Mobile 500 with a swashbuckling pass of Johnson with 31 laps to go. Whistling winds that topped 40 miles an hour played havoc with the Cup drivers, as trash and debris whipped around the 1.5mile oval and even factored in a crash that put Trevor Bayne into the wall. The race was a panacea for Bif e, who not only got to pull on a Texas-sized hat in Victory Lane but also put a 19-point gap between him and Matt Kenseth and Dale Earnhardt Jr., both tied for second place in the standings. Besides Biffles and Johnsons superb efforts, perhaps the nest driving performance was turned in by Jeff Gordon who started 34th and brought it home in fourth. The race produced a slew of records, including a phenomenal 233 closing laps without a caution. And with just two cautions spread out over 334 laps, the eld set a blistering average speed record of 160 miles per hour that blew away the previous track average of just under 152 mph. That statistic also enabled the complete race to be run in just three hours and seven minutes, an astonishingly quick time for a 500-miler. ROADSIDE RAVES: Previously when two Toyotas nished in the Top 10, one automatically assumed it was a pair of Joe Gibbs Racing cars. Not anymore. Hats off to Michael Waltrip Racing, whose Mark Martin and Martin Truex Jr. both nished in the Top 10 at Texas. Truex, the polesitter, led four times in the race for 69 laps. Waltrip has positively shined in his new twin roles as team owner and FOX broadcasterHendrick Motorsports drivers failed to bring their owner his 200th Cup victory but all four nished in the Top 10: Johnson (2), Gordon (4), Kahne (7), and Earnhardt Jr., 10th. In addition, the Roush Fenway Racing trio of Bif e (1), Kenseth (5), and Carl Edwards (8) also all grabbed spots in the Top Ten. CHINESE GRAND PRIX: In his 112th career Formula One start, Mercedes Nico Rosberg won his rst-ever grand prix, taking the Chinese edition at Shanghai by a blistering 20.6-second margin. For his efforts, Rosberg can now shuck the mantel of best driver never to win a grand prix. The Swede also took pole for the rst time in his F1 career. Rosbergs Mercedes teammate, Michael Schumacher, started second on the grid but lost a wheel on the 12th lap and was forced to retire. McLarens Jenson Button and Lewis Hamilton beat back incumbent world champion Sebastian Vettel to take second and third place respectively.Alan Ross is the author of 32 books and a contributing editor at American Pro le. E-mail: alanross_sports@ yahoo.com.COOL DOWN LAPAnswer for Bi e is blowin in the wind Road trip! MAY7-13TPC SAWGRASS PONTE VEDRA BEACH, FL Create your PLAYERS story on and off the course and experience all the First Coast has to offer. Getaway packages start at $99 To book your trip, visit theplayerschampionshiptravel.com or visitjacksonville.com/golf Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, the March winds decided to wait until April to blow and blow they have done. The little cold snap that came through dropped the water temperatures a bit and with the lousy tides the bite was off a bit. This coming week and weekend should be excellent if the weather will cooperate. I talked with Bucky at Shell Island Fish Camp and he said he went out last Thursday and had a real good day. He caught a 27and 26-inch red and threw back quite a few in the 29to 30-inch categories. Along with that he had a 24-inch trout. The guide boats out of Shell Island have been doing really well and are shing west of the Lighthouse. Capt. Luke Frazier at AMS said he and Mike Crum shed out of the Ochlockonee River on Wednesday of last week and got their limit of big trout and they had two over 20. They used the Gulp under a Cajun Thunder. They went back after the cold spell and caught about half as many sh. The week before that he and Capt. Kent shed off of Piney Island and had about ve nice trout and a big Spanish. One of the trout was a 27-inch trout that weighed about 7 pounds. Capt. Kent and his nephew Frank Neal shed out of Panacea and got their limit of trout off Piney Island. He said they couldnt catch a sh under the Cajun Thunder and all their sh hit a leadhead/Gulp that was cast and retrieved real slow. Big reds are coming from the cut at St. George and plenty of Spanish are being caught. The pompano bite is on and use a Nylure tipped with a sand ea or piece of shrimp for the best results. Trout and reds are being caught behind the island and lots of ounder are being caught. Use live bull minnows around the jetties at the cut or at the bridge from East Point to St. George. Capt. Randy Peart has been catching lots of sh around the Econ na using the Pearl White Gulp under a Cajun Thunder. He has been catching plenty of reds around the creeks and oyster bars in close. Capt. David Fife said he is catching plenty of reds between Oyster Bay and Dickerson Bay. Fish the last of the falling tide or end of the rise for the best results and sh a bull minnow on the bottom. I shed with Phil Sharp on Friday morning and that afternoon Dr. Joe Camps from Tallahassee joined us. We shed until just about dark and about an hour before dark the sh turned on like I havent seen in a while. The water is so clear that when the sun got real low the visibility dropped and the sh turned on. They wanted a Gulp on a jig head with a slow retrieve. On Saturday Phil headed toward St. Marks and caught two tripletail around the crab buoys. I shed with Mark Reese and his two daughters from Asheville, N.C., last week and fishing was good. We had plenty of trout. Mark caught a 6pound trout on the last cast of the day. Fishing a shrimp on the bottom for reds when it hit and he set the hook -it took off like a rocket and I thought it was another shark. Turned out to be a 26-inch trout. Mark your calendars for April 28 and 29. Thats the date of the fourth annual Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament at Rock Landing Marina in Panacea. There is a recreational, kayak and youth division with both inshore and offshore sh for the recreational and youth divisions. The kayak division covers trout, reds and ounder with prizes based on number of kayak entries. Entry fee is $50 per person until April 22 and then it goes to $60. Youth is $25 and goes to $35. There will be a $2,500 jackpot for the biggest King sh and a $1,500 jackpot for the biggest trout. You can also buy a raf e ticket for $100 with a chance to win a 2012 Skeeter ZX20 Bay Boat. (No more than 250 tickets will be sold.) Last year was a huge success and they expect this one to be even larger. You can go to www.panacearockthedock.com for more information. Dont forget to know your limits and leave that oat plan with someone. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Fishing should be good this weekendFWC News Teaching children a lifelong hobby, instilling appreciation for our marine environment and providing fun, family outings are the objectives for the upcoming Kids Fishing Clinic in Panacea. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will offer a free Kids Fishing Clinic for children between the ages of 5 and 15 on Saturday, April 21. The clinic will take place at Woolley Park on Mound Street from 9 a.m. to noon. Advance registration is not required. This free clinic enables young people to learn the basics of environmental stewardship, shing ethics, angling skills and safety. In addition, environmental displays will offer participants a unique chance to experience Floridas marine life rsthand. Kids Fishing Clinics strive for several goals, but the main objective is to create responsible marine-resource stewards by teaching children about the vulnerability of Floridas marine ecosystems. In addition, organizers hope to teach fundamental saltwater shing skills and provide participants a positive shing experience. Fishing equipment and bait will be provided for kids to use during the clinic, but organizers encourage children who own shing tackle to bring it. A limited number of rods and reels will be given away to participants upon completion of the clinic. If conditions allow, participants will have the opportunity to practice their new skills and sh from the pier. This event is a photo catch-and-release activity. An adult must accompany all participants. Individuals or companies interested in helping sponsor this event or volunteering at the clinic should call Lori Nicholson at (850) 925-6121 or the FWCs Nancy Fisher at (850) 487-0554. To nd out more about taking a kid shing, go to MyFWC.com/Fishing.Free Kids Fishing Clinic promises day of learning and funSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is looking for a few good men and women, to borrow a phrase, to serve as law enforcement of cers. Applicants must be at least 19 years of age, possess a high school diploma and should have a love for protecting the outdoors. They must start the selection process by completing both a State of Florida employment application and an FWC supplemental application by visiting people rst. my orida.com by April 30. Currently, the FWC has just over 700 officers to patrol more than 34 million acres of public and private lands, 12,000 miles of streams, rivers and canals and 7,700 lakes larger than 10 acres. The agency sends its new recruits through a six-month academy at the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Center. Fish and wildlife law enforcement of cers have an incredible job, said Of cer Philip Grif th, the FWCs Northwest Region law enforcement recruiter. When they complete the academy, they are fully certi ed state law enforcement officers and primarily spend their time protecting the states sh and wildlife resources and people. He said law enforcement officers who are already certi ed and then hired by the FWC attend a shorter, specialized academy that focuses mostly on state sh and wildlife laws. Among the qualifying factors, Grif th said, all applicants must pass a background check and be willing to relocate. One thing we stress is those who are selected must be in good physical health. The academy is physically demanding, and they need to be in good shape to do the job, Grif th said. They never know what they will have to do or respond to on a daily basis. Starting pay for FWC of cers is $32,836.18 annually. For additional information, contact FWC Law Enforcement recruiter Philip Grif th at 850-232-9969, or visit MyFWC.com/Get-Involved. FWC is looking for officer candidatesFrom FWC Law Enforcement reports:FWC Pilots Frank Utermohlen and David Calianno responded to the search for a lost hunter. The 67-year-old man reportedly became disoriented and lost near Arran Road and Fire Road 13 in Wakulla County. After a brief search, the pilots located the hunter and landed to check on his well-being. They led ground units to his location and he was directed safely out of the woods.Lost hunter is found in Wakulla woodsSpecial to The News Gray, graceful shapes playfully twirl and dive in warm waters welcome the manatee trio of Squeaky, Rocket and Annie, to Save the Manatee Clubs Adopt-A-Manatee program at Blue Spring State Park in Orange City. There are now 24 manatee adoptees to choose from at Blue Spring, and another 13 total from the Clubs adoption program on the East coast; at Ellie Schiller Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park; in the Tampa Bay area; and in Alabama. Save the Manatee Club, a Florida-based international nonpro t manatee conservation organization, was founded 31 years ago by singer/songwriter Jimmy Buffett and former Florida Governor and U.S. Senator Bob Graham to help protect the states endangered marine mammals. Funds from the adoption program help with the Clubs extensive manatee and habitat conservation work. Earlier this year, Save the Manatee Club launched live manatee webcams at Blue Spring State Park, making it possible to see Squeaky, Rocket, Annie, and all the other manatees in real time during the winter months. The webcams can be accessed at www.savethemanatee.org/livecams.Adoption program adds new manatees Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555The college of choice! Invest in yourself today EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT THE RISING COST OF COLLEGEat TCC, tuition is signicantly lower than most other universities and colleges The Wakulla County Horsemans Association Speed Show will be held on April 21st at the New Wakulla County Equestrian Center in Sopchoppy.New registration time 9AM and new start 10AM. Classes for all ages! Poles, Cones, Cloverleaf, Texas and Arena Race!!! Helmets mandatory ages 16 & under. Concessions available through the Wakulla County 4-H. Yall come out and join us for a fun day!Call Donna for directions: 284-0833. Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EAR

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD This past weekend, members of Flotilla 12, Apalachee Bay met at the Crawfordville Fire Station for the April Meeting. While I was not able to be there, Duane Treadon was and reported on the following. Members met in the large auction room due to a con ict in the main station. But since the Auxiliary is Semper Paratus, Always Ready, everyone just adapted. We had a large crowd with several members and members in process. After the business was complete, or newest member Bruce Connors took his oath of membership. This is always a moving event as we are all reminded why we joined and what we have committed to participate in. Bill Wannall was also awarded a sustained service award for his continued hours of service. As mentioned last week, following the business meeting the Flotilla was scheduled to participate in Team Coordination Training and Operations. However, we only focused on Team Coordination Training (TCT) this month and will re-schedule the operations workshop. TCT is an annual workshop that all Auxiliarists involved in operations must attend. During their last meeting the member of Flotilla 12, Apalachee Bay, attended this onehour training lead by Member Training Of cer Mark Rosen. What is TCT you may ask, it is a form of risk management used in the Auxiliary before, during and after a mission. Postincident investigations often indicate that human error is to blame. Many accidents on the water can be avoided with proper planning and continual assessment of current conditions. Applying this thought process members of the Auxiliary begin a patrol with an evaluation of weather condition, crew experience, limitation on facility, and nature of the assigned mission. Using a point system scale called GAR (GreenAmber-Red) the higher the number the greater the risk. Items like hot humid weather, smaller sized facility, three to four seas, crew in training on board can all lead to a higher score. When the score reaches the red level the mission cannot begin or if underway must end. This tool can be used by the boating public it insure a safe and fun day on the water. Here are some things to consider before going out on the water: What are the limitations of your boat? If you have a small boat going out in poor weather or sea state condition would not be advisable. How many experienced boaters are on board? A boat with mostly inexperienced boaters probable should stay closer to shore. A fully equipped boat with all the safety gear needed, experienced crew, a VHF marine radio and cell phone, and a properly led oat plan could be able to go out further and in tougher sea conditions. In the end it is the responsibility of the boater to make the call asking the question: Do I have the boat, equipment, and experience to ensure a fun day on the water. As you decide on the answer to that question, I will give you a little more food for thought: Definitions of terms used throughout the Navigation Rules. Rule 3 goes into great detail to avoid any confusion. The word vessel includes most everything that moves on the water including sea planes. The term power-driven vessel means any vessel using an engine to navigate through the water. The term sailing vessel means is any boat under sail only and not using an engine or motor to move it through the water. Once the sailboat turns on its motor it becomes a power boat and must follow the same rules as a motor boat. The term vessel engaged in shing means any commercial fishing vessel, with nets, lines, trawls which restrict their ability to move. This does not include recreational or charter shing vessels with trolling lines or shing poles. The term seaplane includes any aircraft designed to maneuver on the water. The term vessel not under command means a vessel which through some exceptional circumstance is unable to maneuver as required by these Rules and is therefore unable to keep out of the way of another vessel. Next week, we will visit a few more terms that are too complicated to go into in this same article. Be on the lookout for Auxiliary Patrols, we are of cially into our patrol season! We also have several upcoming Public Affairs events. You may nd us on land or sea. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Turn the camera to the left ve degrees and hold it steady, came a voice in my helmet from the surface tender.Yes, right there, steady and dont move. This last command was easy for them to ask but hovering mid water holding a large cylindrical video camera attached to the surface by a heavy cable was quite the challenge. Such performance was required back in 1976 when I assisted State Underwater Archeologist Sonny Cockrell at Warm Mineral Springs. Throughout that spring my wife worked at this underwater research site creating a three-dimensional map of the spring and its contents while I attended graduate school in Tallahassee. My frequent visits resulted in an early exposure, under the close scrutiny of Larry Murphy the sites research manager, to underwater archaeology research techniques. I later incorporated several into my own research on anemone symbioses with shrimp, crabs and sh on marine reefs. To measure this condition however, required the same tools and techniques, just called something different in each discipline. We both applied the Rosencrans Bubble Tube reference technique. Three dimensional sites require a reference grid with an X and Y and Z value. On land you might measure the distance between objects in a two dimensional grid, then get the elevation using a transit tool (mounted on a tripod with a scope to see elevation over each object in the grid). Because water quality is usually very poor on most underwater research sites, such optical tools do not work well. Now visualize a clear plastic tube with an air bubble holding the tube in an upward arc between the object of interest in a grid of many such objects and a datum stake of known elevation. The air-water interface serves as an arti cial reference, even at both ends, to which measurements may then be taken. I am certain this technique was taken from masons who apply the principle in reverse to maintain a straight line of bricks on a land based construction site. Dr. George Bass, the father of Underwater Archaeology, describe this technique in 1960 in one of his texts on the subject. Like the rest of you, my wife and I were trans xed to the History Channel last weekend watching the survey of the Titanic debris eld, over two miles underwater. Today we have sophisticated measuring devices to create these gridded three-dimensional maps permitting scientists to study the provenience between objects at an underwater scene. Propulsion vehicles with attached video or sonic cameras can produce transects of data that, using a computer, can produce an underwater mosaic picture, like the Titanic, in almost any water. Several years ago, I assisted State Archaeologist Keith Meverdens (Wisconsin Historic Society) to survey the Rouse Simmons or Christmas Tree Wreck located in Lake Mic higan. Resting in 170 feet of cold water, this boat still held many secrets. We sought to nd out how/why it sank. But rst a photomosaic was created, a grid or term of reference, within which the diving scientists could recreate the sinking. Ground-truthing followed, identifying structures and their provenience to the rest of the boat. By the end of the six-week project, a forensic study, with publications to follow, detailed the nal moments of this tragedy. We have come such a very long way from measuring a clear tube to video photomosaic in one careers life time. We may see more happen right here in Wakulla County. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBruce Connors takes the oath of membership. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed Apr 25, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 2:09 AM 3.2 ft. 2:44 AM 3.3 ft. 3:17 AM 3.3 ft. 3:50 AM 3.2 ft. 4:24 AM 3.2 ft. 4:59 AM 3.0 ft. 5:38 AM High 0.9 ft. 7:47 AM 0.9 ft. 8:15 AM 1.0 ft. 8:42 AM 1.0 ft. 9:10 AM 1.1 ft. 9:39 AM 1.2 ft. 10:10 AM 1.3 ft. 10:44 AM Low 3.6 ft. 1:50 PM 3.7 ft. 2:16 PM 3.8 ft. 2:41 PM 3.8 ft. 3:06 PM 3.8 ft. 3:31 PM 3.8 ft. 3:58 PM 3.7 ft. 4:28 PM High -0.0 ft. 8:30 PM -0.2 ft. 9:03 PM -0.2 ft. 9:34 PM -0.2 ft. 10:05 PM -0.2 ft. 10:36 PM -0.1 ft. 11:08 PM -0.0 ft. 11:44 PM Low Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed Apr 25, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 2:06 AM 3.3 ft. 2:41 AM 3.3 ft. 3:14 AM 3.3 ft. 3:47 AM 3.3 ft. 4:21 AM 3.2 ft. 4:56 AM 3.1 ft. 5:35 AM High 1.0 ft. 7:44 AM 1.0 ft. 8:12 AM 1.1 ft. 8:39 AM 1.1 ft. 9:07 AM 1.2 ft. 9:36 AM 1.3 ft. 10:07 AM 1.4 ft. 10:41 AM Low 3.7 ft. 1:47 PM 3.8 ft. 2:13 PM 3.8 ft. 2:38 PM 3.9 ft. 3:03 PM 3.9 ft. 3:28 PM 3.8 ft. 3:55 PM 3.8 ft. 4:25 PM High -0.0 ft. 8:27 PM -0.2 ft. 9:00 PM -0.3 ft. 9:31 PM -0.3 ft. 10:02 PM -0.2 ft. 10:33 PM -0.1 ft. 11:05 PM -0.0 ft. 11:41 PM Low Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed A p r 25, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 2:45 AM 3.0 ft. 3:20 AM 3.0 ft. 3:53 AM 3.0 ft. 4:26 AM 3.0 ft. 5:00 AM 2.9 ft. 5:35 AM High 0.8 ft. 8:51 AM 0.9 ft. 9:19 AM 0.9 ft. 9:46 AM 0.9 ft. 10:14 AM 1.0 ft. 10:43 AM 1.1 ft. 11:14 AM -0.1 ft. 12:12 AM Low 3.3 ft. 2:26 PM 3.4 ft. 2:52 PM 3.5 ft. 3:17 PM 3.5 ft. 3:42 PM 3.5 ft. 4:07 PM 3.5 ft. 4:34 PM 2.8 ft. 6:14 AM High -0.0 ft. 9:34 PM -0.2 ft. 10:07 PM -0.2 ft. 10:38 PM -0.2 ft. 11:09 PM -0.2 ft. 11:40 PM 1.2 ft. 11:48 AM Low 3.4 ft. 5:04 PM High Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed Apr 25, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 2:01 AM 2.4 ft. 2:36 AM 2.4 ft. 3:09 AM 2.4 ft. 3:42 AM 2.4 ft. 4:16 AM 2.4 ft. 4:51 AM 2.3 ft. 5:30 AM High 0.7 ft. 7:58 AM 0.7 ft. 8:26 AM 0.7 ft. 8:53 AM 0.8 ft. 9:21 AM 0.8 ft. 9:50 AM 0.9 ft. 10:21 AM 1.0 ft. 10:55 AM Low 2.7 ft. 1:42 PM 2.8 ft. 2:08 PM 2.8 ft. 2:33 PM 2.9 ft. 2:58 PM 2.9 ft. 3:23 PM 2.8 ft. 3:50 PM 2.8 ft. 4:20 PM High -0.0 ft. 8:41 PM -0.1 ft. 9:14 PM -0.2 ft. 9:45 PM -0.2 ft. 10:16 PM -0.2 ft. 10:47 PM -0.1 ft. 11:19 PM -0.0 ft. 11:55 PM Low Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed Apr 25, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:53 AM 2.5 ft. 2:28 AM 2.5 ft. 3:01 AM 2.5 ft. 3:34 AM 2.5 ft. 4:08 AM 2.5 ft. 4:43 AM 2.4 ft. 5:22 AM High 0.9 ft. 7:26 AM 0.9 ft. 7:54 AM 1.0 ft. 8:21 AM 1.0 ft. 8:49 AM 1.1 ft. 9:18 AM 1.2 ft. 9:49 AM 1.3 ft. 10:23 AM Low 2.8 ft. 1:34 PM 2.9 ft. 2:00 PM 2.9 ft. 2:25 PM 3.0 ft. 2:50 PM 3.0 ft. 3:15 PM 2.9 ft. 3:42 PM 2.9 ft. 4:12 PM High -0.0 ft. 8:09 PM -0.2 ft. 8:42 PM -0.2 ft. 9:13 PM -0.2 ft. 9:44 PM -0.2 ft. 10:15 PM -0.1 ft. 10:47 PM -0.0 ft. 11:23 PM Low Thu Apr 19, 12 Fri Apr 20, 12 Sat Apr 21, 12 Sun Apr 22, 12 Mon Apr 23, 12 Tue Apr 24, 12 Wed A p r 25, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 2:34 AM 2.4 ft. 3:22 AM 2.4 ft. 4:05 AM 2.4 ft. 4:46 AM 2.4 ft. 5:26 AM 2.4 ft. 6:08 AM 2.4 ft. 6:53 AM High 1.1 ft. 7:12 AM 1.3 ft. 7:39 AM 1.4 ft. 8:02 AM 1.5 ft. 8:26 AM 1.6 ft. 8:52 AM 1.6 ft. 9:24 AM 1.6 ft. 10:03 AM Low 2.5 ft. 1:08 PM 2.6 ft. 1:25 PM 2.7 ft. 1:46 PM 2.8 ft. 2:11 PM 2.8 ft. 2:41 PM 2.8 ft. 3:16 PM 2.8 ft. 3:55 PM High 0.1 ft. 7:52 PM -0.1 ft. 8:26 PM -0.1 ft. 8:58 PM -0.1 ft. 9:28 PM -0.1 ft. 9:58 PM -0.1 ft. 10:30 PM -0.1 ft. 11:08 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 19 April 25First April 28 Full May 5 Last May 12 New April 20Major Times 12:02 AM 2:02 AM 12:23 PM 2:23 PM Minor Times 5:54 AM 6:54 AM 6:56 PM 7:56 PM Major Times 12:45 AM 2:45 AM 1:07 PM 3:07 PM Minor Times 6:27 AM 7:27 AM 7:50 PM 8:50 PM Major Times 1:29 AM 3:29 AM 1:51 PM 3:51 PM Minor Times 7:02 AM 8:02 AM 8:43 PM 9:43 PM Major Times 2:14 AM 4:14 AM 2:37 PM 4:37 PM Minor Times 7:40 AM 8:40 AM 9:36 PM 10:36 PM Major Times 3:00 AM 5:00 AM 3:24 PM 5:24 PM Minor Times 8:20 AM 9:20 AM 10:28 PM 11:28 PM Major Times 3:48 AM 5:48 AM 4:13 PM 6:13 PM Minor Times 9:05 AM 10:05 AM 11:19 PM 12:19 AM Major Times 4:37 AM 6:37 AM 5:02 PM 7:02 PM Minor Times --:---:-9:54 AM 10:54 AM Better Best SEASONS BEST Better++ Better Good Average7:05 am 8:07 pm 5:55 am 6:57 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:04 am 8:08 pm 6:28 am 7:50 pm 7:03 am 8:08 pm 7:03 am 8:44 pm 7:02 am 8:09 pm 7:40 am 9:37 pm 7:01 am 8:09 pm 8:21 am 10:29 pm 7:00 am 8:10 pm 9:06 am 11:19 pm 6:59 am 8:11 pm 9:55 am --:--12% 6% 0% 6% 12% 18% 24% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.)

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Page 11AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn April 6, Ronald Gilley of Crawfordville reported an overdue boater at the St. Marks Lighthouse boat ramp. The boat and trailer of the missing boater, Robert Gilley, was observed at the boat ramp. Deputies notified the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Coast Guard to begin a search. Approximately 20 minutes after the FWC helicopter arrived, Robert Gilley arrived on his own. Gilley got stuck on a sandbar and attempted to wade ashore only to nd that the water was too deep. Gilley was forced to wait until the rising tide helped oat his boat free. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On April 5, John Shivers of Crawfordville reported a lost wallet. The victim contacted two establishments where he may have lost the wallet without success. The wallet and contents are valued at more than $400. On April 5, Valerie Schirf of Crawfordville reported a vehicle fire on Highway 365 just north of U.S. Highway 98. The victim smelled gasoline shortly before the vehicle stalled and ames began under the hood. The Wakulla County Fire Department put out the blaze. Damage was observed to the front compartment. On April 5, John Sanders of Sopchoppy reported a burglary at his hunting camp. Someone broke into a camper and cabin on the hunting lease property. Two rearms were removed from the camper. A container of wine was also removed. The loss is estimated at more than $400. On April 5, Deputy Mike Zimba responded to an upset 9-year-old girl sitting on the edge of a residential street in Crawfordville. The girl was dropped off at a residence after school, but nobody was home. Deputy Zimba contacted the childs mother who gave him the name and address of another relative who could care for the child. Deputy Zimba left the child with her uncle until her mother could pick her up. On April 5, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a vehicle crash without injuries at the intersection of Lonnie Raker Lane and Thornwood Road in Crawfordville. A resident reported hearing a vehicle crash into a fence. Carl Andrew Stain, 45, of Tallahassee was detained for a DUI investigation. Following the tests, Stain was taken to the Wakulla County Jail and issued a DUI citation. A dozen containers of beer were observed in the vehicle along with several empty bottles of beer. Damage to the fence was estimated at $150. On April 6, Alvin Louis Taylor, 45, of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle crash at Old Bethel Road and Windsong Circle North in Crawfordville. The victims truck was totaled and lying across the roadway. Taylor suffered an injured ankle and was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for treatment. Evidence at the scene provided Deputy Zimba with information that the driver ran off the roadway 75 yards from when the vehicle came to nal rest. The deputy estimated the speed of the vehicle at 70 to 75 miles per hour. The motorist apparently left the roadway, struck a tree and overturned several times. The vehicle, valued at $8,000, was a total loss. The driver will be issued a citation for careless driving. On April 6, Julie Edmondson of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. Someone damaged the victims door frame. Damage was estimated at $100. On April 6, John Hartsfield of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a boat motor from his property. The motor is valued at $750. On April 6, Jennifer Warren of Crawfordville reported a lost wallet. The victim believes she left the wallet on top of her vehicle and drove off. The wallet and contents are valued at $250. On April 6, Warren Gaston Shepherd, 30, of Crawfordville was charged with six counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill, and use of a rearm while under the in uence of alcohol in connection with the ring of a shotgun during a noise dispute with neighbors. Shepherd red the weapon at a group of six individuals on the adjoining property. The weapon was seized and Shepherd was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Nobody was injured. On April 7, Jimmy Don Blankenship, 50, of Tallahassee was involved in a motorcycle crash at Melaleuca Drive in Crawfordville. The motorcycle rider was involved in an accident on a curve. He suffered injuries to his ankle and head and was transported by Wakulla EMS to the hospital. The motorcycle was towed from the scene. On April 7, Thomas Platt of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at A and P Seafood in Panacea. A window at the business was broken out. Damage was estimated at $150. On April 8, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a vehicle with a broken taillight. After the traf c stop, Wells discovered that Justin Blake Kaser, 33, of Crawfordville did not possess a valid driver license. A female passenger possessed a learners license. Kasers license was revoked for driving on a suspended license. The suspect reportedly has been charged six times since 2010. Kaser was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked. On April 8, Hunter Green of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a bulldog puppy from his home. The puppy is valued at $1,200. The next day, Robert Corbelt Green, 45, of Tallahassee, was charged with grand theft for taking the dog, and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Robert Green allegedly told Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Will Hudson that he sold the dog in Leon County. On April 8, Lt. Sherrell Morrison responded to a four-wheeler accident involving Alejandro Scougal, 19, of Tallahassee. The crash occurred on Dorothy Loop Road and Wakulla EMS treated the victim for a possible broken leg. The fourwheeler driver was making jumps with the vehicle when he lost control. On April 9, Susan Zanco of Crawfordville reported a vehicle incident in the area of 1653 Shadeville Highway. Louis H. Williford was traveling past Zanco when an object ew out of the Williford truck bed and struck her car, damaging the driver side mirror and left side panel. Damage was estimated at $750. There were no injuries. Williford was found at fault and issued a uniform traf c citation for failure to secure a load. On April 9, a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart after a store employee allegedly observed Dylan Jacob Owens, 18, of Tallahassee obtain items from the deli counter and a cooler and go to a cash register that did not have a clerk. Owens obtained a WalMart bag, placed the stolen items inside and attempted to leave the store. The value of the stolen items is $10.70. Owens was arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. On April 9, Deputy Clint Beam responded to Timberwood Court in Crawfordville and a report of a 3year-old child being burned. The child fell into a re pit in the backyard of his parents home. The child had secondand third-degree burns on his feet and hands. Wakulla EMS transported him to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. There was no active re in the pit, but the family had a bon re on the previous night and the coals were still hot. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 702 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportBurglary cases solved with arrestSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputies thwarted a residential burglary attempt Monday, April 9 in the Wakulla Gardens community of Crawfordville after a concerned citizen alerted law enforcement of a suspicious man, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Walter Hendry Bishop, 33, of Crawfordville was arrested by sheriffs deputies as he attempted to drive away from the scene. The concerned citizen was able to give deputies a detailed description of the suspect and his vehicle and deputies conducted a traf c stop within Wakulla Gardens. Bishop was charged with burglary of a structure and petit theft in connection with the breakin on Broken Bow Trail. Deputy Nick Gray stopped the vehicle and Bishop allegedly said he entered the home through a window by removing a screen. The screen was recovered in Bishops vehicle. Detectives Nick Boutwell and Derek Lawhon responded to the scene to question Bishop about other burglaries that have occurred in Wakulla Gardens that were similar in nature. During the investigation, Bishop allegedly admitted being involved in unsolved residential burglaries on Sioux Trail and Mohican Trail, also in the Wakulla Gardens area. He faces burglary and grand theft charges in connection with the two other open cases. On April 10, detectives contacted another Mohican Trail homeowner about a burglary at her home. The victim never led a report in the theft of money and personal property. Bishop faces burglary and grand theft charges in that case as detectives solved a total of four burglaries with the arrest in Wakulla Gardens. Walter Hendry Bishop TheNews Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408 Special OfferNew Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County Only ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover rr s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Phone#_____________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 4/30/2012877-401-6408Get 10 Months for $20.12straight to your mailbox This is not a trick NO FOOLINwww.thewakullanews.com Patriots Day Cajun Cookout April 28Featuring Jambalaya and all the xings.$10 a plate to benet The Three Soldiers Detail, South in Apalachicola.Program begins at 11 a.m. lunch is served at NoonTickets available at The Wakulla Chamber of Commercewww.threeservicemenstatuesouth.org HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWORM GRUNTIN FESTIVAL Worm Gruntin Queen Gracie Rosier Williams. Hundreds of people were on hand for the Worm Gruntin Festival in Sopchoppy on Saturday, April 14. After professional grunter Gary Revell gave a demonstration on how to use a staub and piece of metal to drive worms from the ground, children took to the eld to try ttheir luck. There were dozens of vendors on hand selling food and arts and crafts.An earthwor m is caught.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENMore photos of Worm Gruntin online at thewakullanews.net Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 DEMONSTRATIONSSMALL ENGINE REPAIR At 3Y You Get MOW For Your Money! Stop in to Register to win FREE Gifts.&OPEN HOUSE charliegrim@msn.comLubeXpert.usMon. Fri. 8am 6pm Sat. 8am 4pm2219 Crawfordville Hwy., 962-2920 with Door Prizes every hour5pm to 9pm both nights AND ALL U CAN EAT SPECIALS Butterfly Shrimp dinner ... $ 10.99 Mullet Dinner... $ 9.99 FREE KIDS HOTDOG & FRIES with any adult Entree (Children 12 & under) 2209 Sopchoppy Hwy.2209 Sopchoppy Hwy. Fri.&Sat.NightTHANK YOU to our customers for your patronage and support of local business !!! Open Tuesday Saturday 11 am 9 pm Sunday 11 am 2 pm Wakulla County Third Annual Ronald Reagan Wakulla County Third Annual Ronald Reagan Affair Affair BLUE JEANS BLUE JEANSBlack Tie Black Tie& &May 3rd, 2012 at 6 pm at The Bistro at Wildwood 3896 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, Florida May 3rd, 2012 at 6 pm at The Bistro at Wildwood 3896 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, FloridaPaid for and approved by the Wakulla County Republican Executive Commiee. Not in support of any candidate. Featuring Key Note Speaker Peter Schweizer Author of Reagans WarThe epic story of his forty year struggle against and nal triumph over communism Featuring Key Note Speaker Peter Schweizer Author of Reagans WarThe epic story of his forty year struggle against and nal triumph over communism$35 for individual $50 for two dinner tickets $35 for individual $50 for two dinner ticketsSponsorships Available Sponsorships Availablewww.wakullarepublicans.com www.wakullarepublicans.com

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& Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Conference looked at impact of art on small townsStory, Page 3BSUMMER CAMPSSpecial pull-out section Pages 5B-8BTrayvon Martin case draws nations attention Weekly Roundup, Page 11BFinal Flick at The Flamingo was terrific funBy TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar eld@thewakullanews.netFinal Flick at the Flamingo took the audience back to 1965 to a small town drivein movie theatre hang-out where teens and adults had a lot of fun. In this one little place, the Flamingo Drive-In Theatre and Pops Starlite Snacks, generations of the residents of a small town lived through many of their rsts, experiencing everything from romance to violence and even tragedy. Final Flick was written by Wakulla High Schools own Susan Solburg. The setting is the last night before the drive-ins demise. Change and progress will take the life of the hang-out and change not only the face of that area of town, but the lives of all the folks who cherish the time theyve spent at the Flamingo. The rst act begins in the parking lot as cars are rolling in. Four of the characters, Will, also known as Romeo (Hunter Wheatcraft), Jetter (Kyle Rozanski), Slick, (Mike King) and Briggs (Ronnie Allen), are listening and reminiscing as Briggs identi- es who is arriving, just by listening to their car engine. The detail in his description of each vehicle was skillfully scripted to educate, as well as entertain. The scene moves to Pops where all the guys and girls are laying out their intentions, establishing their turf, sizing each other up. The character development was crafted to clearly identify each personality and social group of that era, while also touching on the raging hormones of teenagers wanting to attract members of the opposite sex. The second act took all the dialogue and character development of the rst act and sketched out scenes that were full of action, humor, sadness, happiness and even excellently choreographed violence through a ght scene at Pops. Throughout the play, audio scenes from old movies were occasionally heard in the background Splendor in the Grass, The Magni cent Seven, Shane and Wakullas own Creature from the Black Lagoon. Music from the s kept the audience rocking during the dance contest scene. Songs like Do You Love Me by the Contours, Rockin Pneumonia and the Boogie Woogie Flu by Huey Piano Smith and Bobby Days Rockin Robin were played on a pink and black juke box complete with ashing lights. Once again, Wakulla High Schools Dramatis Personae and Thespian Troupe No. 5036 did a fantastic job presenting Final Flick at the Flamingo. The staging, lighting, and performances were professional and very impressive. Hats off to the cast and the crew. Final Flick at e Flamingo by Susan Solburg was performed on April 12-15 at the Wakulla High School auditorium. PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARY KATHERINE WESTMARK wakulla.com Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Please Recycle

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, April 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group is for anyone, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Friday, April 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB, member of the National Button Society, will meet at 11 a.m. at Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don and Barbara Lanier at 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol.com. UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY, R. Don McLeod Chapter, will participate with the Sons of Confederate Veterans in a memorial service at the Confederate monument in Hudson Park at 9 a.m. After this service, the UDC will meet at the Wakulla County Public Library at 10:00 a.m. The guest speaker for the meeting will be Kathy Schmidt who will portray her great-grandmother and tell how the War Between the States affected her family. For more information call Louise Thomas at 962-1945. Sunday, April 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, April 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, April 24 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p. m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, April 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library to discuss citizens views of previous elections. Call President Mary Cortese at 926-6058 or Gail Hickman at 926-9262.Special EventsThursday, April 19 CHAMBER AFTER HOURS EVENT will be held at the Wakulla Diving Center, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP to the Chamber at 926-1848. WAKULLA COUNTY EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at the Bistro at Wildwood 7 p.m. Come at 6 p.m. for conversation and a meal. They will be nalizing plans for the third Annual Ronald Reagan Day Blue Jeans and Black Tie Affair. They will also be holding a special election to ll the position of chair and vice-chair. Friday, April 20 ART ON THE TERRACE, part of the Wakulla Wildlife Festival, will be held at the Wakulla Springs Lodge from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. There will also be a silent auction. There will be complimentary hors d oeuvres and a cash bar, as well as jazz music played by Sammy Tedder. RELAY FOR LIFE CELEBRATION will be held from 6 p.m. to noon on April 21 at the Wakulla High School track. At the event, teams will camp out and take turns walking around the track to raise money and awareness for the American Cancer Society. Join a team or make a donation. For more information visit www.relayforlife.org and enter 32327 to nd the local event. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will host a Cemetery Tour from 2 to 5 p.m. Meet at the Wakulla County Historical Society Museum and Archives. Call 926-1110 to make a reservation with Cal Jamison and Betty Green. An Old Courthouse tour will also be available. CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING will be held for Harvest Thrift Store at 11 a.m., located at 1596 Crawfordville Highway, Bldg. 2, Suite A. Call the Chamber of ce at 926-1848 for more information. Saturday, April 21 WAKULLA WILDLIFE FESTIVAL will be held at Wakulla Springs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be more than 30 exhibitors, living history demonstrations, bird or prey and reptile shows, childrens activities and art on the terrace. For more information, visit www.wakullawildlifefestival.org. NAMI WAKULLA DERBY will be held at 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ces livestock pavilion. A barbecue dinner will follow the festivities. Adult tickets are $20, children 8-12 $10, children 7 and under free. The county of cials, constitutional of cials, school board members and county commissioners will be participating and members of the Wakulla County Horsemens Association will be the jockeys. SPRING FLING DANCE will be held at the Wakulla County Senior Center from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Cost is $15 per person and $25 per couple. The Tallahassee Swing Band will be performing. There will be dancing, music, hors doeuvres and a cash bar. For more information, call Shelley at the center (850) 926-7145 ext. 221. All proceeds help to support the Senior Center meals program. PAMPER YOUR POOCH DAY will be held by CHAT at Hudson Park from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. All natural shampoo bath, towel dry, nail clipping and a photo session. If your pet is not micro chipped, Dr. Hughes, DVM will be attending to micro chip your animal. For more information, call (850) 926-0890. INAUGURAL WALK TO DEFEAT ALS will be held at the Wakulla Station Trail Head along the St. Marks Trail at 10 a.m. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. There will be an after walk party from 11:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. There will be a DJ, hamburgers, hot dogs, chips and sodas will be available for purchase. Call 888-257-1717, ext. 115 or register online at www.WalktoDefeatALS.org. ANNUAL ORCHID SHOW AND SALE by The Tallahassee Orchid Society will be held from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Doyle Conner Agricultural Center, 3125 Conner Blvd., Tallahassee, Fl. This is a great opportunity to talk with the growers and buy orchids and supplies for the year. For more information, visit www.tallyorchid.org or call Harriet at (850) 320-6566. MURAL WALL UNVEILING will be held at the FSU Coastal and Marine Laboratory at 9 a.m. Seeking Knowledge from the Sea through Art and Science is the title of the mural, working with the theme, Conservation: Taking Care of the River, Bay, and Gulf. Students from Riversink Elementary School and Medart Elementary School contributed to the mural. YOUNG EAGLES FLIGHT RALLY will be held for Wakulla County Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts ages 8-17 by the Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 445 at Wakulla County Airport in Panacea starting at 11 a.m. Flights will begin at noon, with registration closing at 12:30 p.m. A parent or legal guardians signature will be required for each to participate. A limited number of ights will be offered to any local area child ages 8-17 after the Scouts have completed their mission. Call Danny Deason at 5458810 for more information. SPEED SHOW will be held at 10 a.m. at the Wakulla County Equestrian Center in Sopchoppy by the Wakulla County Horsemans Association. Registration is at 9 a.m. There will be classes for all ages, including poles, cones, cloverleaf, Texas and arena race. Call Donna Shierling for directions at 284-0833. Sunday, April 22 ANNUAL ORCHID SHOW AND SALE by The Tallahassee Orchid Society will be held from noon to 5 p.m. at the Doyle Conner Agricultural Center, 3125 Conner Blvd., Tallahassee, Fl. This is a great opportunity to talk with the growers and buy orchids and supplies for the year. For more information, visit www.tallyorchid.org or call Harriet at (850) 320-6566. CONQUISTADORS IN THE FABLED LAND OF THE APALACHEE will be held at San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park, Old Fort Road, St. Marks with tours at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. Three-part discussions with archaeologist and Green Guide Phil Gerrell and historian Madeleine Carr. The rst Spanish encounters with the native population in 1528, pirate attacks, and stone cutters. This is part of Wild About Wakulla week. Reservations can be made through PalmettoExpeditions.com. The separate historic cruise is $10 with Green Guides James Hodges and Joey Tillman. Monday, April 23 BLOOD DRIVE hosted by the Southeastern Community Blood Center will be held from 1 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. Register with Lt. Billy Jones by calling 728-6835 or 745-7108. Those who give blood will receive a blood donor T-shirt, Get On Board! Tuesday, April 24 AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM will be held at the library. For more information, contact Ernie Conte at 926-4605. Thursday, April 26 LANDSCAPING WITH NATIVE PLANTS CLASS will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Learn how to choose native plants for ornamental use in your home and garden landscape. Topics covered in class will include how to select plants that meet your needs, water saving plants, the care and feeding of native ornamental plant and much more.Upcoming EventsFriday, April 27 INFORMATION ON REVERSE MORTGAGES will be available from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. It will be hosted by FirstBANK Florida Senior Products Division Manager Michael J. Weltman and is intended for those almost 62 years old or older. For more information, call 556-6694. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Relay For Life from 6 p.m. to noon on Saturday at the WHS track. Wakulla Wildlife Festival from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Wakulla Springs. NAMI Wakulla Triple Crown Derby at 5 p.m. at the Livestock Pavilion. Spring Fling Dance at 7 p.m. at the Senior Center. FridaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, April 19 ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners Conference Room. Wednesday, April 25 AIRPORT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 2 p.m. in the Board of County Commissioners Conference Room.By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL Interim DirectorWed like to thank all who came out to our Book Extravaganza this past Saturday. Your generous donations raised more than $500 in three hours. Added to funds raised through the recent annual membership mailing, nearly $2,500 has been raised this month! Every cent of the money raised goes directly to funding our Summer Programs, a major portion of the book and materials budget, along with offsetting other needed expenses throughout the year. Wed also like to thank all of our great patrons for their patience as we continue to go through some growing pains with our new automation system. This new systems allows you to place holds, make renewals and comment on materials in our collection from the comfort of your own home. We are working our way through the hiccups and appreciate your understanding. Friday Night Movie On Friday, April 20, we are showing the action packed fourth lm in the Mission Impossible series. Starring Tom Cruise and Jeremy Renner, this PG-13 (for action and violence) rated lm follows the Impossible Mission Force as they are blamed for a deadly bombing at the Kremlin and are disavowed by the U.S. government. We expect a big crowd for this action packed movie so arrive early! Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. New at WCPL This week at WCPL were happy to announce a few of the new additions to our collection. The Lost Years, by Mary Higgins Clark, Capitol Murder by Phillip Margolin, Thunder and Rain by Charles Martin, The One: the Life and Music of James Brown by R.J. Smith and Calico Joe by John Grisham. Come by and see our large collection. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Page 3B & By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsTell me: What will you do with your one wild and precious life? This was the question posed by renowned classical and Shakespearean actress Peggy Rubin, founding director of the Center for Sacred Theatre in Ashland, Ore. She was one of the guest speakers at the Building Creative Communities Conference this past February. I had the tremendous luck of being offered a scholarship to attend this event, held annually by the Colquitt-Miller County Arts Council, in the small town of Colquitt, Ga. Their population is around 6,400, and was once considered something of a ghost town until resident Joy Jinks happened upon the idea of using the countys history as a means to spark its economy. In 1991, she met a director studying for his PhD, named Richard Geer (no, not that Richard Gere). Together, they developed their particular brand of community performancetheater. Volunteers gathered and recorded stories of people from the Colquitt area, and once collected, designed theatrical performances around them. From there, Swamp Gravy was born. Swamp Gravy, a name that is indigenous to the area, is a stew type dish made from left over fried fish drippings combined with tomatoes, potatoes, onions and basically anything else a family had on hand to throw in the pot. By 1995, The Woodruff Foundation awarded the effort a $75,000 grant that was used to ignite a campaign to build a theater and museum from the decaying cotton mill in the center of town, now known as Cotton Hall. Their Millennium Mural Project began in 1999 with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and has become a tourist magnet for visitors throughout the year. The murals depict past events and social life of the county. The most beloved of these murals is the Agricultural Icon, created by Canadian artist Charlie Johnston. From miles away its visual effect a giant of a man crouching low in an open eld is stunning. Upon closer inspection, one sees that it tells the story of the American farmer and his intimate ties to the land. The economic impact of Swamp Gravy productions has been great. Tourists and theatergoers have spent more than $1.3 million at local restaurants, bed and breakfasts and other establishments. And all they did was tell their stories. I arrived at the conference with the sole intention of utilizing the Swamp Gravy model as a jump-off point for future Palaver Tree Theater productions in Wakulla. Our foundling group was already in the throes of starting something similar with WakullaStory. The second installment would premiere in less than a month. The conference consisted of three different tracks: Track 1: Art of Storytelling, led by Geer, cofounder of Swamp Gravy and founder of Community Performance Inc. Track 2: Art of Community Building presentation was given by Tim Chapin from the FSU Department of Urban and Regional Planning. Track 3: Art of Social Change, focused on how the arts play a major role in the development of shared awareness and sustainability for small towns. Led by Janet A. Sanders of the Jean Houston Foundation of Social Artistry Leadership, this track was informative due mainly to its practicality, or basic common sense. For examples, it used such projects as the River of Words based at the Center for Environmental Literacy in California. River provides tools for teaching ecoliteracy the understanding of the natural world around us to children, teens, and teachers through art and poetry. Their One Square Block program is based on the belief that every block has its own story. Students explore a single square block in their community their own neighborhood, a local park or schoolyard and create poetry, art, and reports about what they nd. Younger students create eld guides to plants, trees and animals; learn where their water comes from, where the rain runoff goes, and who lived in their area ages ago. Older students investigate land use, transportation, zoning and conduct oral histories. Afterwards, a detailed block print is posted online to compare their block with others from around the world. Id signed up for Track 1 (Storytelling). I knew that audience participation was required, but was unprepared for the extent of which my participation would be needed, and for where it would take me by the days end. Harvesting collective wisdom is a process that begins with sharing personal stories, said Geer, addressing the audience. Performance and story are inextricable. You cannot have performance without story, or story without giving something of a performance. Have you ever had a really good conversation, he asked. What did you need to make that conversation possible? Patience, vulnerability, love, honesty? Perhaps something happened in you and the other person that was beyond words. Not because either of you were magical, but because story, performance and relationship are our inheritance. Our stories lead to conversation, he said. And from there come ideas that give rise to solutions for our community. Its far beyond problem solving. It moves us to committed action. We worked in groups of two at first, and then into larger groups of ve or more. We told our stories to one another about how our enemies became our friends; how cycles of abuse were interrupted; and about times when we recalled the very moments our lives, along with our expectations, changed. We began at 9 a.m. There were more than 40 people in this one group, of all ages, from different areas of the U.S. The many different threads of our stories, in such a short period of time, became one complete fabric one beautifully insightful history shared by all. By 7 p.m. that same day, we performed an entire two-act performance of our combined stories in front of an invited audience. Though the possibilities surrounding such an endeavor sound promising, con ict cannot be avoided. In the rehearsal process of our own WakullaStory, one participant threatened to leave the show because she knew family members of a particular person mentioned in the script, and felt they would be embarrassed by the portrayal (though factual) that the play presented. Another, fearing the loss of her job, left the production altogether because of what was being said about Wakullas educational system. These fears and trepidations stemmed from writings and public records that appeared 50 years ago. Wakullas history did not write itself: there were human hands involved in its creation. If theres no honest discussion with those outside of our comfort zones, or an acceptance of our past and that of our ancestors, the lump in our proverbial throat will only grow in size, and choke-out what remains of our collective voice. Great theatre, says Geer, exists at the edge of what dare not be spoken, or what dare not be shown. When you go to that place together you can create something today that will remain important for us all tomorrow.Conference looked at impact of art on small towns SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPlaywright Herb Donaldson, who has penned two installments of WakullaStory, in Colquitt, Ga., in front of an agricultural mural painted on silos. Editors Note: Playwright Herb Donaldson, author of WakullaStory, recently attended an arts conference in Colquitt, Ga., and shared this report: LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com The Wakulla Newswww .thewakullane ws.com

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comCamp Catch-A-Dream Horseback riding Lessons [regular & therapeutic] plus trail rides. Will learn basic horse-manship skills, balance, following directions, working through fears, & con dence building. Age: Starting at age 7 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy $35 per Lesson or per hour, Scholarships may be available through WCCY, Camp Catch-A-Dream Anger Management & Family functioning Classes Will learn responsibility, respect and a better way to communicate. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp, 850-962-9999, 850-778-6505, 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy $15 per 1.5 hr session 10 sessions, Family rates upon request, Scholarships may be available through WCCY. Camp Catch-A-Dream Equine Assisted Growth & Learning Will learn responsibility, respect and communication skills. Age: Starting at age 12 Nancy Culp 962-9999, 778-6505 7221 Smith Creek Road Sopchoppy Rates for groups or individuals, Scholarships may be available through WCCY Camp Indian Springs, Capital Region YMCA, Traditional day / overnight summer camp programs where we encourage kids to build friendships face to face, get outdoors and appreciate our natural surroundings while learn good decision making skills based on the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility., All one week sessions. Age: Overnight Camp: 8 16; Day Camp: 5 12 Sessions start June 3 and run through August 4. Jim Bentley jbentley@capitalregionymca.org or www. campindiansprings.org 926-3361; fax: 926-3624 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville Overnight Camp: $480 per week Day Camp: $140 per week, Scholarships available. Gamerz Paradise Sign up for our Summer Camp! Video games, pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment. Age: 5 and up Daily, weekly and monthly rates available. Call 850-926-9100 theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com Gamerz Paradise, 635 Wakulla Arran Rd., Crawfordville Happytime Instructional Daycare Center Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs SUMMER CHILDCARE Includes a wide variety of eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children. We enjoy skating, swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Locally Owned and Operated by Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available. Call today for our very affordable pricing 926-5226 Crawfordville Hwy. North International Gold Gymnastics IGG A funlled themed week full of gymnastics, eld trips, crafts, movies, games, indoor and outdoor play. Lunch to be brought from home. Snacks are provided. Age: 5 12 Hours : 7am-6pm, Carol McAliley or Stephanie Burton at 926-4431 Email: go-iggc@hotmail.com, 54 Feli Way, Crawfordville Weekly rates: full day campers $145; half day campers $75; drop in campers $35/day, 10% discount for second child. Providence Christian Academy Individualized instruction in algebra, geometry, physical science, chemistry, physics, trigonometry, calculus, Spanish, and phonics courses. Grades K 12 Call today to schedule an appointment. 926-2456; 926-1326; 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville Ribits ARTtastic Summer Camp Adventure 2012 ART and FUN Pottery (clay between their ngers), Ceramics: sponge, splatter, bubble, toothbrush, brushes, yarn, stamps, stickers and other painting techniques, add mixed media and a few surprises, makes Ribits the best camp for the kids this summer. Ages: 5 and up June 4-8 11-15, 25-29, July 9-13, 16-20, 30-August 3, August 6-10 Time: 8:30 5:30 (early drop off and late pick upon request) 9:00 2pm ($175 for the half day) Cost: $225 for full day; $175 for half day Deposit: $100 Daily snacks included and lunch (Pizza) on Friday. Savary Academy Summer program to make up a class or recover credits for graduation. Grades 7 12 Ongoing Classes on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays 9 a.m. 3 p.m. 926-9977 www.savaryacademy.com Savary Academy, 70-A Feli Way, Crawfordville, FL The Learning Curve SUMMER LEARNING CAMPS (For Students Entering) K 1st: ABCs and 123s; 1st 3rd: It All Adds Up (Addition/Subtraction Skills); 3rd 5th: Multiply Your Fun (Multiplication/Division Skills); 3rd 5th: Fun with Fractions; 4th 6th: Writing Right (Improving Writing Skills); 6th-7th: Solution Skills (Middle School Math Skills); 6th 8th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful Middle School Student); Grades 1 5 JUMP START (Individual grade level intro to next year); Grades: 1-3; 4-6; 7-8 Lets Speak Spanish (Conversational Spanish); 9th: Study the A+ Way (How to be a Successful High School Student); 8th 9th: Intro to Algebra 1; 9th 10th: Intro to Geometry; Writing the AP History Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Writing the AP English Way (Introduction to the AP World and AP American History Essay); Intro to AP Stats (Mastering the Graphing Calculator); GET ME TO COLLEGE WORKSHOPS (What Every Parent and Student Should Know about College Admissions and Financial Aid) 9TH 11TH 12TH FOR PARENTS: How do I do this New Math? (Instruction for parents to aid their children with next years homework; classes for speci c grade levels) Call Melisa Taylor to Register at 926-2179 or visit www. tlctutoring.wordpress.com for summer schedules and pricing. The Learning Curve, 3119-B Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Tiger Rock Martial Arts Elite Martial Arts training Our youth will enhance their life skills and receive coaching that keeps them focused on goal setting, self-discipline and con dence. Sign your child up today! The focus is rewarding. The energy is radiating. All ages. 926-3777 www.crawfordvilletkd.com www.tigerrockmartialarts.com Crawfordville Tae Kwon Do 27 Azalea Drive, Suite A & B Crawfordville (Behind CVS) 5 Weeks of training for only $99 Wakulla Christian School Academic and Personal Enrichment Camp Activities include computers, cooking, dance, foreign language, martial arts, archery, piano, violin, guitar, music, photography, sports, woodworking, robotics, arts and crafts, gardening, special guests, eld trips and more. Ongoing Age: 3 14 Monday Friday 7 a.m. 6 p.m. Call 926-5583 or email wakullachristian@yahoo.comSUMMER OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH Its time to relax and have some needed downtime. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is proud to sponsor this Summer OPPS section. Recognizing that young people seek to nd their place in the wider world through many ways and means, the community hopes the following Summer OPPS hit the intended mark with many Wakulla youth. Positive youth development refers to activities and programs that nurture young people and help them build on their strength s. Positive youth development is not about xing kids problems. Rather, it helps young people nd positive things to say yes to. Positive youth development happens anytime an individual or a program teaches young people skills, connects adults and young people in a meaningful way, involves young people in the life of the community, and gives them a sense of belonging and accomplishment. In Wakulla there are many places that young people can nd this kind of nurturing. Wakulla has its own unique network of people, groups, churches, clubs, teachers, businesses, and agencies that help young people grow into competent adults. The nurturers might be piano teachers, soccer coaches, neighbors, Big Brother and Sisters, YMCA, church youth group leaders or grandparents this seci on of the paper is intended to help you decide how to spend a bit of your time this summer.Dont let fees stop you. If tuition assistance is needed, call 926 3526 for an application which will be reviewed by a select few Coalition leaders to determine eligibility.All Summer LongJune 4 June 8 Wakulla County 4-H Bachelor/Bachelorette Camp Attend this day camp and learn about budgeting, nancial management, how to take care of a baby, food preparation skills and clothing care. Hands-on learning experiences will be incorporated throughout. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 5 8 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 11 June 15 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology(Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5)Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Camp Cherry Lake This year camp will feature traditional activities including swimming, canoeing, kayaking, camp crafts, camp re, water games and archery. Not to be missed are the ever-popular marshmallow paint wars and dance! Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 11 15 (residential), Camp Cherry Lake, Madison, FL Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce 926-3931 $220.00 per week June 18 June 22 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Michelle Snow School of Music Summer Vocal Workshop In this camp, young people will learn the basics of producing and performing in a vocal production with choreography. Participants will get musical education as well as the opportunity to participate in all aspects of a small musical production. (Limited openings) June 18-22. Performance evening of Friday, June 22. 9 a.m. 2 p.m. Michelle Snow (850)926-7627 Jmcsnow5649@centurylink. net, 3102 Coastal Highway, Medart $125/week per child Wakulla County 4-H Project Runway Wakulla Participants will learn to put the Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Repair philosophy into practice as they re-build a piece of clothing that has been overlooked in the closet or has been purchased from a re-use store. Participants will unleash their creativity as they re-create a clothing item of their choice through this artistic expression class. Boys and Girls are both encouraged to attend. Age: 8-18 as of Sept. 1, 2011 June 19 22 (Tues Fri) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week June 25 June 29 Wakulla County 4-H Sew Fun and Quilting Campers will learn the basics of sewing, quilting and other fabric crafts such as pin making, weaving and other needlecrafts. The diligent camper will be able to complete a lap-sized quilt and one simple item of clothing by the end of the week. June 26 29 (Tues Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m. Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $80.00/weekJuneMay 12 Wakulla Health Care Task Force Free Sports Physicals, Free physical examinations for student athletes, summer campers, and Special Olympians, Middle and high school students 9am 1 pm Students from WMS 9 a.m.; RMS 10 a.m.; WHS 11 a.m. Free Wakulla High School Clinic on Coastal Hwy (98) Tanya English 926-0065 X 253 Tanya. English@wcsb.us or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com WORKFORCE plus Get Connected, Stay Connected 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo Are you 16 -21 and ready to take the next step in your journey? Perhaps you are interested in a nding a job. Do you want to know more about joining the military or going to college? Maybe you would like to know more about the resources available in Wakulla County. Whatever your needs may be, make plans today to attend the WORKFORCE plus Get Connected, Stay Connected 2012 Youth Resource & Career Expo and meet employers (who are hiring!), college and military recruiters and local community representatives. 11:00 am 1:00 pm TCC Wakulla Center 5 Crescent Way Crawfordville, FloridaMayMay 19 Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Fishing tournament Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 Wakulla County Coalition for Youth

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Page 7B (850) 926-3777 www. crawfordvilletkd .comwww.tigerrockmartialarts.com ELITE MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING 5 Weeks of Training FIVE$99.00WEEKS To be the best,We TRAIN with the best! Join Tiger-Rock Martial Arts.Every Revolution Starts With Evolution. Need to make up a class or recover credits for graduation? Make Your Summer Count! You DO NOT need to be enrolled in Savary Academy during the regular school year to take advantage of the Summer Program.Wakulla County students now have a choice But space is limited and the deadline for enrollment is approaching quickly.Classes on Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday from 9am-3pm Grades 7-12Let us help you focus on the future today! www.savaryacademy.com Jet Cadets... ying high for Christ!Providence Christian AcademyAMinistry of Central Baptist ChurchGrades K-12 Enroll Today!Call today to schedule an appointment.(850) 926-2456, 926-1326, or 274-1583 710 Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327Providence Christian Academy grades K-12 with small pupil-to-staff ratio fully-funded scholarships July 9 July 13 Mission San Luis A Childs Life (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Imagine you were born 350 years ago. What was life like for the young residents of the mission? Learn to dress, play, and live like a colonist through role-playing, studying site artifacts, and using period toys and games. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 8 11 (older students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 16 July 20 Mission San Luis New World Apprentice (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Join our bustling village as a living history interpreter and participate in a variety of apprenticeships. Enlist as a soldier, blacksmith, potter, and more! All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. Wakulla County 4-H Survival 101: Cooking, Camping and Water Exploration Campers will learn how to shoot a bow and arrow, track game, build a camp re and cook a meal using a solar oven. We will learn how to nd safe drinking water as well as camp out overnight. Campers will also have the ability to sh and learn about the heritage of survival in Wakulla County throughout the years. (Tuesday Friday) 9:00 a.m. 4:00 p.m., Sherri Kraeft sjkraeft@u .edu Wakulla.ifas.u .edu Wakulla County 4-H Facebook Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931 $50.00 per week July 23 July 27 Florida Federation of Garden Clubs SEEK Environmental Conference for Youth 4-day action-packed conference focused on important environmental topics. Includes workshops, eld trips, and fun outdoor activities Students currently in grades 9-11 (entering 10-12 in the fall) Sun Wed, July 22 25 (younger students) $225, Scholarships available through the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla, Based at the Lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park Dorothy Pate 926-0885 Pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 29 August 3 Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Sheriffs Youth Ranch Activities will include arts and crafts, sports, water safety, archery, nature hikes, bicycling, games, camp re activities and more. Applications available at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Deadline is May 31 Sponsorships FREE. 6 boys, 6 girls child age 10 -15, Caruth Camp in Levy County. Contact Lt. Billy Jones at 7457108 July 30 August 3 Mission San Luis Junior Archaeology (Ages 8-10; entering grades 3-5) Welcome to the fascinating world of archaeology! This introductory program will teach you to piece together the past with Mission San Luis archaeologists. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www.missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm. SwimmingGena DavisRed Cross Certied teacher for over 20 years926-7685 510-2326 Private Pool All Ages-Day or Evening Classes -Starts End of May Sessions through Summer -Sessions are 2 weeks $50 per Person -Private Pool All AgesLessons Instructor: Resident Camp: 8-16 Day Camp 5-12Resident Camp begins on June 3, We offer 9-one week sessions starting on Sunday at 2pm and ending on Saturday at 9am Day Camp begins on June 4th, We offer 11 one week sessions. Each day begins at 8 am with an early drop off option of 7am and the day ends at 5pm with a late pick up option until 6pm. Resident Camp Fees: Y Member $408 per session Non-Member $480 per session Day Camp Fees: Y member $123, Non-Member $140 Camp Indian Springs encourages building relationships face to face, teaching kids to make good decisions and getting outside to enjoy a healthier lifestyle in our beautiful natural setting of Wakulla County. The YMCA promotes the four core values of honesty, caring, respect and responsibility in all of its traditional camp activities like canoeing, archery, nature survival, sports and our non-traditional activities likefilm making, horseback riding, low ropes challenge course and our skatepark. If you have any questions please contact our Camp Registrar, 850-926-336 1 or camp@capitalregionymca.org. You can also contact the Camp Director Jim Bentley atjbentley@capitalregionymca.org. theTMYMCAJulyAugust 6 August 10 Mission San Luis Historical Archaeology (Ages 11-13; entering grades 6-8) Dig into the past and learn the tools of the trade alongside professional archaeologists. Mapping, water screening, sorting, and artifact identi cation are just some of the steps you will enjoy along the way. All camps start at 9 a.m. and end at 4:30 p.m. Extended care is available and must be prearranged. Each 5-day session is $160 for Friends of Mission San Luis and $180 for non-members. Registration forms and additional information can be found at www. missionsanluis.org/edPrograms/dayCamps.cfm.August Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com ActivitiesInclude: Computers,Cooking,Dance, ForeignLanguage,MartialArts, Archery,Piano,Violin,Guitar, Music,Photography,Sports, Woodworking,Robotics,Arts& Crafts,Gardening,Special Guests,FieldTripsandMore! WakullaChristianSchool 1391CrawfordvilleHwy,Crawfordville,FL32327 1mile southofS.R.267(BloxhamCutoff) wakullachristian@yahoo.comMonday-Friday 7:00am to 6:00pm Ages3 thru 14 June 4 -August 10, 2012 facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fi MON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!SIGN UP NOW FOR OUR SUMMER CAMP!Video games, Pool tournaments and Foosball in a clean, air conditioned and supervised environment SUMMER CHILDCAREIncludes a wide variety of eld trips and adventure during the summer for your children We enjoy skating, Swimming at Wakulla Springs, movies, bowling and so much more. Call today for our very affordable pricing. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available.HAPPY TIMEInstructional Child Care CenterEstablished 1983HAPPY TIMELocally Owned and Operated By Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs 926-5226CRAWFORDVILLEHWY.NORTH The Wakulla Before and A er School Summer ProgramPre-K 5th gradeARTS & CRAFTS FIELD TRIPS GULF WORLD SWIMMINGMovies Bowling Ska ng and So Much More!OPEN MONDAY THRU FRIDAY June 4 August 10 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. $125 / week or $25 / dayPlus Ac vity Fees.Children meet at The Wakulla County Senior Cizens Center For the Summer ~ Drop-Ins WelcomeTo reserve a spot, please contact Camp Coordinators Debbie 926-7145 ext. 222 or Pat 9267145 ext.230 How to choose the right summer campSpecial to The NewsAttending summer camp has been a tradition in the United States for more than 150 years. Statistics indicate that around 30 million American kids attend summer camp each year. There are many bene ts to summer camp. Camp enables children to stay engaged during the summer when there may be limited interaction with school friends. It also gives parents both a safe and viable daycare solution during the summer. Summer camp pulls together children from different neighborhoods, social classes and backgrounds, which can make it a good place to meet new people some of whom may become lifelong friends. Camps also provide a variety of activities that can challenge children to try new things that go beyond their comfort zones. Some children are very receptive to the idea of attending summer camp. Others need a little coaxing. But summer camp should never be forced on a child who does not want to go. In such instances, consider local daytime programs that may ll the void instead of programs that require being away from home. Once the decision for summer camp is made, there are some questions to answer. What are your nances like? Do you have a budget for summer camp? What size camp do you desire? Should the camp be co-ed or single sex? How far do you want your child to travel for summer camp? What are the options in your area? Are there any camps that have been recommended by friends or family members? What kinds of activities do your children enjoy? These types of questions will help you narrow down your options. Then you can visit and interview camps to find one that is the best t. When visiting camps, go armed with a checklist of questions. Some of these can include: What is the philosophy of the camp? Can you explain a typical day? What are the types of activities and facilities offered? What is the camper-tocounselor ratio? What is the camps drug/alcohol policy? Does the camp have insurance and security personnel? What percentage of staff return each year? How are staff selected and trained? What kind of health care is provided? Can you tell me about the policy on phone calls and family visits? What do you do in the event of emergencies? Dont wait too long to research and sign up for camps because many fill up quite early or have an extensive waiting list. Summer camp is a fun way that millions of children spend their summers each year. Special to The NewsNot every family can afford summer camp or chooses to have their children attend. But faced with two long months of vacation from school, what options are there for keeping children occupied during the lazy days of summer? A top-run, private, sleepaway camp can cost around $10,000 for the season. In todays tight economic climate, many families are choosing to scale back expenses, and that includes pricey summer camp. However, just because cost is a factor, it doesnt mean that children cant attend camp this season. Parents simply need to do their research or come up with other creative alternatives. First, investigate the opportunities in your area. Summer camp doesnt have to mean eight weeks of recreation in the middle of the wilderness. There may be locally run businesses that also offer summer programs. For example, many private daycare organizations open up their doors to campers for the summer. They may set a limit on age. Also, churches, synagogues and other houses of worship may offer a summer recreation program. If you are a parishioner you might be eligible for a discounted rate. Dont forget to check out the YMCA or other clubs in the area. They typically offer a summer program. Some places offer payment plans to spread out the financial responsibility, while others may offer scholarships based on nancial need. Find out if your childs elementary school has a program for the summer. Some may offer crafts, sports and other activities for a few hours during the day. This is a bene t to parents who have to work and cannot have their children home alone each day. Bus service may be available. If youve exhausted other options, get creative. If you have a number of reliable friends or neighbors, you can set up a camp rotation. Each member of the camp group will be responsible for the kids on a particular day. The responsibilities rotate among the other parents. This enables free time for adults during the summer, and the potential to stagger work schedules and accommodate children being out of school. Older adults, such as grandparents or other relatives, also may be able to assist in camp duties during the summer. Children, students and seniors often have a reduced admission rate to museums. Spending time together will help generations bond. If you missed the registration deadline for summer camp or simply cannot afford it this year, there are other alternatives to keep children engaged during the vacation months. Some alternatives to summer camp for childrenCamp for your kids could be as simple as neighborhood parents rotating supervision of vacationing children.

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Lost CAT male, nuet weighs 15lbs all white w/some tan on face Fluffy White & tan Tail blue collar last seen 3/29 Tin Oak Rd Tallahassee Fl (850) 7277504 German Shepherd Adult, female Shadeville Road, Hwy 61m, Near Tiger Hammock Rd. (850) 9264185 Lost Dog St Teresa Beach Sat. April 14th, Female, Tri Color White chest, 30lbs, 18, long ears and tail (850) 5086981 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfor dville. Short domestic female cat, grey & white last seen The Farm Subdivision (801) 518-0385 Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)7421373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)3747294 Trades/ Skills Class-A FlatBed Drivers$ -Home EVERY Weekend, Run S.E. US REQUIRES 1 Yr OTR F.B. Exp, & payUP TO .39/mile Call (800)572-5489 x 227 SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC Drivers-New Freight for Refrigerated & Dry Van lines. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com General Help 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now!at Schneider National Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training! Job ready in 15 days! (888)3681964 25 Driver Trainees Needed!Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! (888)3681964 Career Opportunities A Few Pro Drivers Needed Top Pay & 401k, 2 Mo. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.me ltontruck.com/ drive Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.me ltontruck.com/ drive Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)3143769 Schools/ Instruction Can you Dig It? We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operator. (866)3626497 Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SHEV certified. Call (877) 206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLE Sat. April 28, 8a-2p Giant Yard Sale 50+ Families Christ Church AnglicanClothing, appliances, furniture, housewares, toys and much much more. Hwy 98 (E. of W akulla High) OCHLOCKONEESaturday, April 21st, 8AM-2PM at57 Wakulla Circle, Under carport. Good, Clean items. Mobile Homes For Rent CONVENIENT LOCATION3/2 large corner lot wooded buffer, porches, CHA, appls include washer & dryer $700/mo+ security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE2/1, Singlewide, clean, new deck, 53 Cayuse Row $425. Mo. $425. Sec. References required (904) 5488342 CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $595 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-5244090 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $850, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 4433300 CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 9263832 Crawfordville.Cottage on large wooded lot, 2BR/1BA, washer/dryer included Screened -porch, covered carport, central heat/air. No smoking. $700/mo.+first/last. Small pet ok w/$250/deposit. 850-9263859. Real Estate For Sale Gorgeous! Like New! $85,000 (includes $5,000 new appliances and closing costs). 3BR/2BA, 1200sqft., on 2.5 lots. 85 Paulette Dr. For more details. 850-925-6704 after 6PM. Real Estate For Sale WOODVILLE3/2/1, Brick, 1/2 Acre Open kitchen, wood flooring, gas fireplace, huge Florida Room and Laundry room. 20x40 workshop Fenced yard, patio and pool $128,900 (850)9264090 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953 www. sunsetranch es.com New York State Land Sale Discounted to 1990s prices! 3 Acre Starter camp$17,995. 5 Acres w/Farmhouse$49,995. 52 Acres, Stream, 2 ponds, Beautiful woods & views. Access to road front, utilities and state land Limited offer. Call Christmas & Associates (800)229-7843 or visit landand camps.com Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 2x5.5 Fictitious Name Notices 5184-0419 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS NAME Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: NISEYS BAIT AND TACKLE located at 2146 Sopchoppy Hwy, Sopchoppy, FL 32358 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida Dated at Crawfordville, Florida this 11th day of April, 2012. /s/ David B. Morse, owner Published one (1) time in the The Wakulla News April 19, 2012 51840419 5187-0419 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS NAME Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of A. Souls Delight located at 972 Balkin Rd, Tallahassee, Florida 32305, in the County of Leon, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahasee, Florida this 9th day of April, 2012. /s/ Darius J.P. Mount, owner Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News April 19, 2012 5187-0419 2x4.75 3x3 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Page 9BSpringYARD & Bake Sale!Friday, April 20 Saturday, April 217AM-Until... Rain or Shine! household items, kitchen appliances, dishes, clothes, books, games, furniture and a little bit of everything!! Administrative Support Assistant 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec. Dep. 2-3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba House $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Your Spanish Communicator Document Translations (Spanish /English) Conference Calls Telephone Excellence Skills Training (English/Spanish) Telephone outgoing voice recordingcall LKR COMMUNICATION & TRANSLATIONS, LLC for rates! 850-509-7129 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053 88 7408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONSRE-ROOFINGREPAIRSRESIDENTIALCOMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFINGCO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net MOVE IN CONDITION!This meticulously maintained home is ready and waiting for you! You will love how this 3/2 2007 home in Wakulla Gardens has a great open oor plan, tile kitchen, stainless appliances and a gorgeous over sized master shower. The backyard is an oasis of privacy as there are no homes on any sides. Located at 20 Comanche (right off of Spring Creek Hwy) Not a short sale, just a great price at $89,900! Call me for an appt Carole BeltzRealtor Keller Williams Realty Cell:(850)933-6362 Fax:(850)201-4664 carolebeltz@kw.com www.mytallahasseehomesales.com 1984 AVION RV 34ft.Excellent condition! Sleeps 6. Price reduced to $6,000. Call 850-556-6277 for more information. JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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3x3 C & P Towing NOS 5186-0419 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction, pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at C & P Towing at 2235 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 8:00 a.m. on May 9, 2012 the following vehicles: 2008 Chevrolet 2GIWD58C389121156 2005 Chevrolet 1GC6C13V25F848606 1988 Ford 1FTCR1572JPB94216 2001 Pontiac 1G2WP52K21F218428 2005 Chevrolet 2G1WW12EB59243403 2001 Ford 1FAFP55U01A221470 1996 Acura JH4DL2382TS001678 Published one time (1) in The Wakulla News April 19, 2012 5186-0419 Sopchoppy 5182-0419 CONCURRENT NOTICE NOTICE OF FINDING OF NO SIGNFICANT IMPACT ON THE ENVIRONMENT AND NOTICE TO PUBLIC FOR REMOVAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS FLORIDA CDBG GRANT # 12DB-OH-02-75-02-N27 Date of Notice: April 19, 2012 Name of Responsible Entity: City of Sopchoppy, Florida Address: 105 Municipal Avenue (P.O. Box 1219) City, State, Zip Code: Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Sopchoppy NPEPA 5181-0419 Notice and Public Explanation of a Proposed Activity in the 100-Year Floodplain and Wetland FLORIDA CDBG GRANT # 12DB-OH-02-75-02-N27 Date of Notice: April 19, 2012 Name of Responsible Entity: City of Sopchoppy, Florida Address: 105 Municipal Avenue (P.O. Box 1219) City, State, Zip Code: Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Telephone Number: 850-962-4611 To: All interested Parties This is to give notice that the City of Sopchoppy conducted an evaluation as required by Executive Orders 11988 and 11990 in accordance with HUD regulations at 24 CFR 55.20 to determine the potential effect that its activity in the floodplain will have on the environment. The City of Sopchoppy intends to undertake a project to be funded by a Florida Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). The project includes the construction of drainage improvements and recreation improvements within the City of Sopchoppy (met needs). In addition, if funds are available after the construction of these activities, the City will construct additional drainage improvements in the same project area (future needs). The proposed CDBG recreation improvements (met needs) will include a play station for younger children with site improvements such as a low protective wall around the play station that can also serve as seating. This portion of the CDBG project will be located at Myron B. Hodge City Park which is adjacent to the Sopchoppy River. The proposed flood and drainage improvements (met needs) include installing a large stormwater pipe in the existing ditch on Gulf Street and backfilling it so that only a small swale will be needed along the street. Also proposed is replacing the culvert at Park Avenue with a new large size one which would include a large drainage retention box. After the met needs are accomplished, and if funds are available, future needs will include ditch reshaping and culverts for other streets that are near Gulf Street and Park Ave. The future need streets include Summer Street, Municipal Ave., Blossom Ave., Sheldon Street, Argyle Street, Faith Ave. and Yellow Jacket Street. Maps detailing project locations can be viewed by contacting the City. The City has determined that this project passes through the 100-year floodplain (and wetlands) on the public right-of-way and/or publicly owned property. There is no practical alternative to the proposed project. The project will have no significant impact on the environment for the following reasons: 1. Facilities will be in the existing street right-of-way or publicly owned property which is already improved. 2. All construction will be properly permitted by the applicable agencies. Although the project is located in the 100 year floodplain/wetland, the improvements cannot be undertaken in any other location due to the scope of the project. There is, therefore, no practicable alternative. The proposed improvements conform to applicable floodplain protection standards. The proposed action will not affect natural or beneficial floodplain values, and residents of the community will benefit from the improved flood protection. Additional agencies involved in this project include the State of Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Florida State Clearinghouse (having reviewed the project with no negative comments) and Florida Department of Environmental Protection (permits). Written comments on the proposed project will be accepted until Monday, May 7, 2012. Please send your comments to the City of Sopchoppy, attention: Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk at 105 Municipal Avenue (P.O. Box 1219). Sopchoppy, FL 32358. The City may also be contacted by email at jackie.lawhon@sopchoppy. org, or by phone at 850-962-4611. Comments will be considered prior to the City requesting release of funds. A more detailed description of the project and the flood/wetland maps are available for citizen review at the above address weekdays between the hours of 9:00 a.m and 4:00 pm. Colleen Q. Skipper, Mayor and Certifying Officer Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News 5181-0419 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Telephone Number: 850-962-4611 These notices shall satisfy two separate but related procedural requirements for activities to be undertaken by The City of Sopchoppy. REQUEST FOR RELEASE OF FUNDS On or about May 8, 2012, The City of Sopchoppy plans to submit a request to the Department of Economic Opportunity for the release of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds under Title I of the Housing and Community Development (HCD) Act of 1974, as amended, for the construction of drainage improvements and recreation improvements within the City of Sopchoppy (met needs). In addition, if funds are available after the construction of these activities, the City will construct additional drainage improvements in the same project area (future needs). The proposed CDBG recreation improvements (met needs) will include a play station for younger children with site improvements such as a low protective wall around the play station that can also serve as seating. This portion of the CDBG project will be located at Myron B. Hodge City Park which is adjacent to the Sopchoppy River. The proposed flood and drainage improvements (met needs) include installing a large stormwater pipe in the existing ditch on Gulf Street and backfilling it so that only a small swale will be needed along the street. Also proposed is replacing the culvert at Park Avenue with a new large size one which would include a large drainage retention box. After the met needs are accomplished, and if funds are available, future needs will be addressed to include ditch reshaping and culverts for other streets that are near Gulf Street and Park Ave. The future need streets include Summer Street, Municipal Ave., Blossom Ave., Sheldon Street, Argyle Street, Faith Ave. and Yellow Jacket Street. Maps detailing project locations can be viewed by contacting the City. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT The City of Sopchoppy has determined that the project will have no significant impact on the human environment. Therefore, an Environmental Impact Statement under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) is not required. Additional project information is contained in the Environmental Review Record (ENVRR) on file at the City of Sopchoppy, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL 32358. The ENVRR can be examined or copied weekdays between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. To view the ENVRR, contact Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk by email at jackie.lawhon@sopchoppy.org, or by phone at 850-962-4611. PUBLIC COMMENTS Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the ENVRR to the City of Sopchoppy (ATTN: Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk, City of Sopchoppy) at P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 or jackie.lawhon@sopchoppy.org or 850-962-4611. All comments must be received by May 7, 2012. Comments will be considered prior to the City of Sopchoppy requesting a release of funds. RELEASE OF FUNDS The City of Sopchoppy certifies to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity and HUD that Colleen Q. Skipper, in her capacity as Mayor, consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. The States approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities and allows the City of Sopchoppy to use the CDBG funds. OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS HUD will accept objections to its release of funds and the City of Sopchoppys certification for a period of fifteen days following the anticipated submission date or its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of the City of Sopchoppy; (b) the City of Sopchoppy has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR part 58; (c) the grant recipient has committed funds or incurred costs not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24 CFR Part 58, Sec. 58.76) and shall be addressed to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, CDBG Program, Small Cities CDBG Program, 107 East Madison, MSC-400, Tallahassee, Fl. 32399-6508. Potential objectors should contact the City of Sopchoppy (ATTN: Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk, City of Sopchoppy) at P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 or jackie.lawhon@sopchoppy.org or 850-962-4611 to verify the actual last day of the objection period. Colleen Q. Skipper, Mayor and Certifying Officer Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News 5182-0419 5183-0426 vs. Marcia D. Jones, Case No. 65-2012-CA-000031 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000031 Division 5185-0426 Vs. Menjor Patrick, case no. 65-2012-CA-000036 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000036 DIVISION: SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC., Plaintiff, vs. PATRICK MENJOR A/K/A PATRICK J. MENJOR,et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JOHN B. LEMON LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:: 51 VIOLET LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN AMINATA LEMON LAST KNOWN ADDRESS : 51VIOLET LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property inWAKULLA County, Florida: LOT 135, THE FLOWERS, PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 49-52, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Florida Default Law Group, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in The W akulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 9th day of April, 2012. Brent X Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act-Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 19 and 26, 2012 5185-0426 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MARCIA J. JONES A/K/A MARCIA DENISE MITCHELL CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 2445 NW 41ST ST. MIAMI, FL 33142-4535 Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: MARCIA D. JONES A/K/A MARCIA DENISE MITCHELL CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 2445 NW 41ST ST. MIAMI, FL 33142-4535 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 20, BLOCK 3, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA commonly known as: 78 SPOKAN TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Lindsay Moczynski of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before May 19, 2012, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated:April 5, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT, Honorable J. H. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration, Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301: (850) 577-4401 within 7 working days of your receipt of this notice: if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 1-800-955-8771. April 19 and 26, 2012 5183-0426 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5180-0419 Estate if Alma Payne, File No. 12-000018CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-000018 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ALMA PAYNE, Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of ALMA PAYNE, deceased, File Number 12-000018 CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327; that the total cash value of the estate is estimated to be $53,642.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Lavernne J. Davis 848 Brewer Street Tallahassee, Florida 32304 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 12, 2012. Personal Representative: /s/ LAVERNNE J. DAVIS, 848 Brewer ST. Tallahassee, FL 32304 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /S/ RONALD A. MOWREY, Attorney for Personal Representative, Mowrey Law Firm, PA 515 North Adams, Tallahassee, FL 32301, PH: 850-222-9482, Fax: 850-561-6867 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, April 12 & 19, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5178-0419 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON MA Y 5, 2012 at 10:00 a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: CASEY LARSON BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF MA Y 5 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. April 12 & 19, 2012 51790419 Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property!We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!ANew Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate47 Reservation Ct. 4BR/2BA House $1,250 Mo. 11-C Guinevere 3BR/2BA Townhouse. $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available May 1. 26-D Guinevere 3BR/2BA for $850 Mo. with $950 Deposit. Small pets ok with deposit20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Townhouse. 850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 6 River Cove Bay view 2BD/1BA Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 109 Dickerson Bay Rd. Panacea. 2BD/1BA Covered front porch, open back deck. $575 mo. Available May 1. No smoking. No pets. Selling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403 The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 13 The national debate over guns, racial pro ling and a controversial self defense law continued this week as murder charges were brought against a neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed a 17-year-old black teenager. National news networks all went live as Special Prosecutor Angela Corey ended weeks of speculation by announcing Wednesday that 28-year-old George Zimmerman would face second degree murder charges for the death of Trayvon Martin, whose shooting in a gated community in Sanford has sparked a national furor. As Zimmerman turned himself in to Seminole County of cials before making a first appearance in court with a new lawyer, Gov. Rick Scott urged people to let the judicial process work. Scott also continued this week to review a $70 billion state budget while meeting with state university of cials and a prominent senator over tuition hikes and a proposal to add a 12th university to the pantheon of Florida higher education institutions. Scott has until April 21 to sign the budget, and he has line item veto power. Florida TaxWatch on Friday broke out the turkey call and urged the governor to veto nearly $150 million in questionable spending. On the campaign front, contributions for the rst quarter of 2012 showed that the Republican Party of Florida netted $3.1 million, more than double the $1.2 million raised by the Florida Democratic Party. But the Democrats were crowing over the fact that they registered more voters last month than the Republicans though new no-party voters outnumbered those signing up with either. Individually, newcomers took advantage of the early legislative session to gain funding ground on incumbents who must refrain from campaign fundraising during the 60-day session. ZIMMERMAN ARREST DOMINATES AGENDA Synchronizing the announcement with the top of the evening news and following requests by Scott and others for calm, Corey announced charges of second degree murder against Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer, who shot Martin on Feb. 26 under disputed circumstances. Police have said Martin was unarmed, and that Zimmerman followed Martin through the neighborhood, but other than that, the facts havent fully emerged. Lawyers who represented Zimmerman in the case until the last couple of days have said he acted in self defense when attacked by Martin. Others say Zimmerman was the aggressor, stalking Martin who was walking back from the convenience store to the home where he was staying in the gated community near Orlando. Zimmermans trial might be a test case for the states Stand Your Ground statute, a controversial measure passed in 2005 that allows those who feel threatened to use force, including deadly force, to protect themselves with no duty to try to rst get out of harms way. Corey, appointed as a special prosecutor by Scott, promised to not only get justice but to nd the truth in the case that has rocked the state and captured the nations attention. We are not only ministers of justice, we are also seekers of the truth, Corey said. We will continue to seek the truth throughout this case. She and her co-workers will likely labor under a continued spotlight, but she said she wouldnt bow to pressure, and would respect the rights of the accused, though she made it clear she thinks he is guilty. There is no doubt we have a desire for justice in this case, Corey said. But I want to stress we also took an oath to protect the due process rights of any person whom we charge with a crime. Our oath will be upheld for our victim, Trayvon Martin, and for the man responsible for his death, George Zimmerman. The charges were welcomed by Martins parents and others, who praised Scott for appointing Corey to head the investigation. BUDGET TALKS AND POLY TECH Gov. Rick Scott has until April 21 to sign the Legislatures $70 billion spending plan and is getting all sorts of advice on how to do that. On Thursday, the governor met with Sen. JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, and chairman of the Senate Budget Committee. Alexander also spearheaded the effort to have Florida Polytechnic University in Polk County become the states 12th university. It would be split from the University of South Florida, which now oversees activities at the satellite campus. The plan has a host of critics and Alexander isnt taking any chances. Meanwhile, Florida TaxWatch on Friday outlined a list of $150 million in budget turkeys it says were improperly included in the spending plan and should be vetoed. Included in the groups Turkey Watch list are $250,000 for Tune into Reading in Hernando County and $2 million for a digital learning center in Pinellas County, for example. Those projects were among $82.6 million worth of stuff placed in the budget during conference committee negotiations. The group also listed about $21 million in economic development projects that warrant more scrutiny. Not included in TaxWatchs turkey list? Florida Polytechnic. CAMPAIGN FINANCE The week brought with it the sound of cash registers as candidates for state and federal of ces reported contributions for the quarter ending March 31. With lawmakers in session much of the quarter, newcomers took the opportunity to out raise many of their incumbent opponents. Led by Monticello businessman Halsey Beshears, who reeled in more than $108,000, newcomers posted some of the top fundraising totals in legislative races during the rst three months of 2012. Beshears is running in a largely rural House District 7, which includes all or parts of 10 North Florida counties. In the Senate, former House member Kevin Rader, a Democrat, led all candidates, raising just over $72,000 in his bid to win a Senate seat in Palm Beach County. The campaign nance gures also brought a surprise: members of the Supreme Court who face merit retention votes are raising a ton of money as they expect an effort to get them removed. Also, leading the effort to keep one of the justices, Barbara Pariente, on the bench is former Justice Raoul Cantero. That would go largely unnoticed, usually, but on March 30, Cantero led a notice with the court that he would be representing the Senate during upcoming reapportionment arguments before the court, including Pariente. Cantero and his opposing counsel, former Rep. Dan Gelber, both said the situation is common and should not pose a problem. That happens in every courtroom, said Gelber, counsel for Fair Districts Now. Judges across Florida receive campaign contributions from litigants.... I dont really see it as an issue that concerns me. SEEING RED Meanwhile, U.S. Rep. Allen West sounded like he had gone back to the mid-1950s, and might be talking to J. Edgar Hoover and Joseph McCarthy. West said that about 80 members of the Congress speci cally the members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus are communists, though the Communist Party later said, essentially, it could only dream of having so many fellow travelers. West, a Republican running for re-election in the 18th Congressional District against Democrat Patrick Murphy, was asked at a town hall meeting how many legislators were cardcarrying Marxists. His answer, which put him on national cable television this week almost as much as George Zimmerman, is the quote of the week, below. STORY OF THE WEEK: Special Prosecutor Angela Corey announced Wednesday that the state would charge George Zimmerman with second degree murder in the death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Thats a good question. I believe theres about 78 to 81 members of the Democratic Party that are members of the Communist Party... Its called the Congressional Progressive Caucus. U.S. Rep. Allen West answering, What percentage of the American legislature do you think are card-carrying Marxists?WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Trayvon Martin case draws nation inA general contractor has challenged the Florida Department of Financial Services decision to reject paying for historic photographs as part of the controversial construction of a 1st District Court of Appeal building in Tallahassee. Peter R. Brown Construction Inc. led the case Monday in the state Division of Administrative Hearings, challenging DFS use of rule to deny payment. The administrative case is an offshoot of a lawsuit led last year by Signature Art Gallery Inc., which contracted with Peter R. Brown Construction to place the photographs throughout the building. In that still-pending lawsuit, Signature has sued Peter R. Brown, DFS and the state Department of Management Services because the art rm has not been paid for its work. In the new administrative case, Peter R. Brown says DFS does not have a legally valid reason for denying the payment and that the general contractor also has been deprived of a related management fee. The case targets what it describes as a vague rule that says, in part, the state should not pay for decorative items. Crown molding, moulded millwork, chandeliers, draperies, wainscoting, wall coverings, ceiling friezes and medallions, and columns with decorative bases and capitals, are all decorative items within a building that enhance its appearance, the challenge says. Countless public buildings of the state of Florida have many of these elements, all of which were approved by DFS. But in a document led in the circuit-court case, DFS says the photographs clearly would be decorative items barred by the rule. The 1st District Court of Appeal project has been at the center of a long-running controversy because of what many people consider its extravagances, with the building being dubbed the Taj Mahal. News Service of FloridaTaj Mahal spawns new legal ghtBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 42 44 52 60 65 68 2 37 61 3 38 62 21 39 56 4 15 18 40 53 5 29 34 45 6 30 43 54 63 66 69 7 31 46 57 8 24 35 58 22 32 41 59 9 16 19 36 47 55 10 33 48 11 25 49 64 67 70 12 26 50 13 27 51ACROSS1.Lass'smate 4.Wordsof compassion 9.Committeehead 14. Groundedavian 15.Snub-__ (short,as agun) 16.Sharefifty-fifty 17.Play__with(do mischief to) 18.Carpentryor plumbing,e.g. 19.Citywherevan Goghpainted 20.YANKEE 23.Thumb-turning critic 24.Nearlyworthless coin 25.Donthefeedbag 28.Communications technicianofsorts 32. Quickieportrait 34.Neural transmitter 36. Garbolineender 37.PULLEY 42.Beta'sfollower 43.Carpenter'sgroove 44.Whiz 46.Employmen tfor manyillegals 52.Brownof renown 53.DorisDaysong titlestarter 55.Roomydress 56.JERKY 60.Rashaction 63.Spoil 64.Sacrificeflystat 65.Inthe neighborhoodof 66.Beethoven honoree 67. Op.__ 68.Hockey thugs 69.Exodus memorial meal 70.Visitorsfromother worldsDOWN1.McCain-Obama debatemoderator Jim 2.Critter that multipliesby dividing 3.Conferred knighthoodupon 4.Counting everything 5.Businessname abbr. 6."Yesterday!",in businessmemos 7.Giveafreshlookto 8.Utopias 9. Eight-dayJewish celebration:Var. 10.LyricistLorenz 11.Thewhole enchilada 12."__seenenough!" 13.Scalenotes 21.__Lanka 22.Dawngoddess 25.Schoolfoundedby HenryVI 26.Teen'swoe 27.Wordoftenignored inindexing 29.__demer 30.Gavethepinkslip to 31.Onesans permanentaddress 33.Pharmaceutical giant__Lilly&Co. 35.Zilch 37.__-Coburg-Gotha (British royal house,once) 38.Littledevils 39.Mrs.,inMarseilles 40. Inlaidfloors 41.Shy,inaflirtatious way 42.Stylinggoo 45.Winerycask 47.Hookpartner 48.Priest'sgarment 49."The Devil's Dictionary"author 50. Intheleast 51.Makesalterations to 54.Acubehastwelve 56.Knocksenseless 57.Auditioner'sgoal 58."Whatam__?" (auctionquery) 59.Maneuvercarefully 60.Broomrider 61.Blood-typingletters 62.US/Canada's__ CanalsAmerican Prole Hometown Content 3/25/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 234 315 6531 4 652 71 8394 2 864 817 3945 00 9 HtCtt 197 2583 6 4 483196527 265437198 934 615872 576842913 821379456 752 983641 648521739 319764285 L E H R E R G E L H A G A M O E B A S A X E A B O D U B B E D I M P S S O O S R I M M E S T U N I N T O T O P A R Q U E T S C O R P M A L T U N A S A P A X E D E D G E S R E D O N O M A D R O L E E D E N S N A D A I B I D E O S C O Y E A S E C H A N U K A H L A D D E R H A R T E L I A L B A L L E T O N B I E R C E I V E A C N E O N E B I T R E S T H E R E F I T S Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 19, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy LUCY CARTERSpecial to The NewsHeide Clifton knows a thing or two about love. A member of the Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment (CHAT), Clifton sold roses out of her backyard this weekend to bene t the organization. Heides 16th annual Rose Sale took place Saturday, April 14, and Sunday, April 15, with about 450 roses set to sell. Clifton grows the roses herself, referring to the task as a labor of love. The roses were nearly all Heritage roses and have been cultivated to grow well in the region. They sold for a suggested donation of $7 each. In past years, the Rose Sale has raised thousands of dollars for CHAT. CHAT is a private, nonpro t organization with a no kill policy in their work to care for the homeless animals of Wakulla County. Besides running a shelter, CHAT also hosts area events to raise awareness for the needs of animals in the community. Local business, Just Fruits and Exotics was also in attendance at the event, selling plants and donating the proceeds to CHAT. Im proud to be a part of it, said Sherri Thompson of Just Fruits. Animals need our help. The 16th annual Heides Rose Sale held to benefit CHATLUCY CARTER/Special to The News Alex Ross and Dana Wilson load roses. A Dortmund Rose Balloon release marks celebrationBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netDreams Day Care Center in Crawfordville celebrated a Week of the Young last week and ended the celebration with a balloon release ceremony. Director Victoria Massey said the idea of was to celebrate the children and how special they are. Every morning, the daycare had an activity for the children and their parents, such as reading or sculpting with Play-Doh. Parents spent ve minutes with their child during drop-of time, Massey said. Massey said she thought the balloon release ceremony would be a fun thing for the kids and their parents to do together. Each child had a balloon with an index card attached to it with their name and the daycares phone number and asked that whoever nds the balloon call the daycare so they know how far the balloon traveled. The daycare is located at 470 Spring Creek Highway and enrolls infants to 4-year-olds. Their number is 926-0200.UP, UP AND AWAY: Children release balloons as part of Dreams Day Cares Week of the Young. BALLOON PLAY: Parents were invited to join in playing with the kids. Each balloon had a card with the daycare centers number to nd out how far the balloon traveled.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringCharlotte SullivanMarch 2012 Winner Her name was drawn fromHunter, Hayden & Blake ReevesI like eating at the local family restaurants and were blessed with the many Wakulla County has to oer. OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal fro m Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! We add an important benet to our free debit cards. Instant. The benet of our free instant-issue debit card is that you can get it today and use it today. Its that easy. And with Centennial Bank, you can also use any ATM in the country, free*. Any ATM at all. Just a few more ways we offer banking that comes to you.*Some restrictions may apply. See bank for details. FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALONTake advantage of Spring/ Summer RatesAsk for our monthly specials! FEATHER LOCKS are here!! 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree)We offer exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT HAIRSALO N Book Your Prom AppointmentNOW !10% OFFW/THIS ADEXP. 5/15/12 www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK