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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00404
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 04-12-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00404
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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 14th Issue Thursday, April 12, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews A special pull-out section featuring information about the week’s festivals, tours and events is inside. Starts on Page 5B By BILL LOWRIESpecial to The NewsIts that time of year again! The weather is warm and the worms are squirming. Our local bait harvesters are doing a booming business as veteran “ shers love our feisty bait. It must be time for the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival. And so it is. On Saturday, April 14, the festival will kick off at 8 a.m. with registration for the 5K Run with the Worms RaceŽ which will start at 8:45 a.m. At 9 a.m., more than 100 vendors of arts and crafts, great food and childrens games will be open for business. And, of course, our awesome T-shirts will be on sale. The full schedule can be seen in our ad in this issue of The News or visit our website wormgruntinfestival. com where you can also see this years T-shirt design. At 9:30 a.m., the Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Quartet will lead us into the unique worm gruntin demonstration and contest which awards cash prizes for kids 12 and under who have the best luck. Continued on Page 2AWorm Gruntin’ Festival is SaturdayPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Community .....................................................................Page 6A School .............................................................................Page 7A Sports .............................................................................Page 8A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 9A Water Ways....................................................................Page 10A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 11A Green Scene ....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Wild About Wakulla .........................................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B INDEX OBITUARIES Michael Lafayette Jett Shirley ‘Ann’ Vause Moulton Betty Marie Roger Rodger Stephen Smith Joice Jane Satterfield Ventry Grover ‘Sonny’ Cleveland Whaley Jr.Kimball omas will run for Superintendent of SchoolsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netKimball Thomas announced last week that he is a candidate for Wakulla County Superintendent of Schools. A native Wakulla Countian, Thomas is currently principal of East Gadsden High School. He lives in Ochlockonee Bay and commutes to Gadsden County daily. He was speaker at the Wakulla Christian Coalitions banquet back in February and commented at the time that his ambition was to one day be Wakullas superintendent of schools. He admitted in a recent interview that he was talking about running in 2016, but said the reaction he got from people is what convinced him to run this year. Thomas grew up in the Bethel community and attended “ rst through fourth grades at the old Shadeville School, back during segregation. In the fifth grade, Thomas was bused to the newly integrated Crawfordville Elementary … and remembered the shock of going to a school where there was carpet on the ” oor and air conditioning and, most stunning to him, new books that didnt have other students names in them. At Shadeville School, the students had hand-medown books that came from the white schools. Thomas remembered vividly the feeling of opening that brand-new, glossy book. He was so excited, he broke the rules by taking it home to show to his mother. There was a promise, a hope, and a dreamŽ that sprang from that moment, he said, the belief that he could do anything. Thomas points to the American flag lapel pin, saying he believes in the promise it symbolizes. If you work hard, if you give it your best, you may not get everything, but you have a chance to come out on top.Ž Current Superintendent of Schools David Miller has yet to announce whether he will seek re-election. But Thomas move to run appears to have prompted former Medart Elementary Principal Bobby Pearce, currently on special assignment at the district of“ ce, to “ le his intent to run. Efforts to contact Miller for comment about his plans were unsuccessful. Thomas attended Wakulla High School and was elected junior and senior class president. During high school he worked at Pigotts Cash & Carry and remembered Steve Pigott gave him a chance to work in the front of the store, which surprised some customers who perhaps werent prepared to see a black face there. He later attended Florida A&M University and was having dif“ culty trying to decide on a major. He had tried journalism, then computer science. He recounted one day in the middle of class trying to figure out what he should do, and thought of how he enjoyed teaching Sunday School in church … and decided to go into education. Continued on Page 2A A soldier returnsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA legislative bill that was approved on March 9 and signed by Gov. Rick Scott could end up costing the 67 counties in the state around $325 million, with Wakulla Countys share being around $52,000. House Bill 5301 will require each county to pay its share of disputed Medicaid bills for the last 12 years. The total backlog for each county is determined by the Agency for Health Care Administration. The bill revised the methodology for collecting each countys contribution to Medicaid. For past due billings, those from November 2001 through April 30, 2012, each county must pay 85 percent of the amount due over the next “ ve years. County Administrator David Edwards said AHCA is going back 12 years, but state statute requires counties to destroy their records after “ ve years. Thats a problem,Ž Edwards said. AHCA met with the county last Wednesday to discuss the amount owed. The county was the “ rst to meet with AHCA. At that meeting, Edwards said AHCA said the county owed $52,000 and they pointed out that county records show the state owes the county $95,000 because of double billing. AHCA has until Aug. 1 to certify payments to each county. Continued on Page 3ACounty could owe $52,000 in Medicaid billsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen Wakulla County resident Shirley Moreno was 4 years old, her uncle was killed in the Korean War. Army Sgt. William GeneŽ Brashear was just 24 years old when he died on Nov. 2, 1950, during a battle south of Unsan, North Korea. Almost 600 other soldiers with the 8th Calvary died alongside him. Brashears body and the others were unable to be recovered and were likely buried on the battlefield by Chinese or North Korean forces, according to the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Of“ ce. Now, 62 years later, Brashear has finally been laid to rest. On March 31, Brashear, who also served in Europe during WWII, was buried with military honors beside the graves of his parents, Gilbert Eugene and Porter Lou Petri Brashear, in his hometown, Owensboro, Ky. It was a long time waiting,Ž Moreno says. Moreno says she received the call from her cousin who told her Brashears remains had been identi“ ed and he would be coming home. It sent goosebumps through me,Ž Moreno says. An urn with Brashears ashes was ” own into the Evansville Regional Airport with U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Raymond Schuck on March 30. A motorcade of nine police agencies, a unit from the Airport-Sorgho Fire Department and 26 motorcycles from three chapters of Rolling Thunder escorted the remains of Brashear to the Kentucky National Guard Armory in Owensboro prior to his burial. Although Moreno was too young to truly have known her uncle, she was extremely close with his wife, Thelma Lee. Continued on Page 12AFILE PHOTOKids try their luck gruntin for worms at last years festival. WILLIAM SNOWDENKimball Thomas announced his intent to run last week. WILD ABOUT WAKULLAPhoto by LOU KELLENBERGER GARY EMORD-NETZLEY/Messenger-InquirerThe U.S. Army honor guard from Fort Campbell, Ky., including a lone bugler, stand at attention as they wait for the start of the funeral for Army Sgt. William Eugene Brashear, above. Brashear was killed on Nov. 2, 1950, during the Battle of Unsan. The military photo was published with his obituary in late 1950.A Crawfordville womans uncle, killed in Korea in 1950, has his remains identified by DNA and returned to the family for burial after 62 years. County Administrator David Edwards calls the bill an unfunded mandate.

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A He returned to the county and taught at Wakulla Middle School and rose to assistant principal. He earned a doctorate in educational leadership. But he says he felt he hit a career ceiling in Wakulla and accepted a post in 1993 as principal of Rickards High School in Tallahassee. Among his accomplishments was getting an International Baccalaureate program there. He was principal at FAMU High for a couple of years, then was a full-time pastor for a while, eventually returning to the “ eld with the state Department of Educations Department of School Improvement, in which he worked to improve schools in a 14-county area. He later served as an adjunct professor at Gainesville State College in the Atlanta area. But he decided to return home after his grandmothers death two years ago. He recalls his mother, whom he describes as a paragon of strength as a single-mother raising a family, telling him she was lonely. In describing his goals for Wakulla schools, Thomas uses the word inclusiveŽ numerous times, and says he wants to bring students, teachers, parents and support staff together. Wakulla schools are often de“ ned as good,Ž he says. I want to move it from good to great.Ž Noting Wakulla is ranked 11th among school systems in Florida, Thomas says he wants to create world class schoolsŽ here. Among his goals are a comprehensive high school … one that includes more career options for students with vocational education. Many high school graduates wont be going to college, he says, and schools should offer some training so that they are quali“ ed to get a job the day they graduate. He suggests there should be a change in how the district does business. First, he says, he would look at how the administrative of“ ce is managed, then the hiring and support of principals, and follow that with a look at how effective the district is. They may be ef“ cient now,Ž he says, but how effective are they?Ž With the new schoolgrading system coming down from the state, Thomas contends that business as its been done will not be able to overcome that.Ž His past experience in school improvement will give him an edge in solving that. As for the challenges facing the district with state budget cuts, Thomas says he would ask for an evaluation of every program to compare student success and look at what is most effective. Thomas grew up near Wakulla Springs in the Bethel community and is a member of Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist No. 2. Hes married and has two step-children.Kimball omas will run for superintendentContinued from Page 1A You will want to witness the crowning of this years queen, Gracie Rosier Williams, at noon. Gracie is the daughter of the queen of the 2003 festival, Lossie Mae Rosier, who raised her large family for a number of years harvesting bait worms. Gracie collected her share of those worms on those early, early mornings and has some heartwarming stories of her experiences growing up in this industrious family. Get those horseshoes clanking if you want to compete in the Horseshoe Championship and limber up those hips for the hula hoop contest for folks of any age. There will be live entertainment throughout the afternoon with Hot Tamale, Frank Lindamood, Chelsea Dix-Kessler and Coon Bottom Creek. The fun continues in the evening with the Worm Grunters Ball featuring area musicians such as Rick Ott and Sammy Tedder to name just a couple. All of this takes place in downtown Sopchoppy and is free and open to the public. Robert Seidler of Seidler Productions created and posted a YouTube video of worm grunting on the internet which has been viewed more than 36,000 times. Also check out an Assignment Earth feature on You Tube where there is a detailed description of the scienti“ c reasons for the behavior of these worms. (Spoiler alert … they are terri“ ed of moles.) A few interesting earthworm facts: apparently, the earthworm from Sopchoppy and the Apalachicola National Forest is unlike any other. Its scientific name is diplocardia mississippiensisŽ and it has 16 hearts each the size of a pinhead. Of particular interest to “ shermen, it does not go limp in the water or easily wilt in the sun. Earthworms are mostly protein and they keep the soil soft and healthy. An acre of land can produce one million earthworms. As described by Thomas Tobin of the St. Pete Times, Sopchoppy is located in an idyllic area of Florida that is rich in biological resources on the Upper Sopchoppy River surrounded by the Apalachicola National Forest and the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. The geographical isolation of the region of Florida contributes to the unique evolution of the earthworm for its economic value.Ž Its always nice to have a part of Wakulla County noticed for its unique culture and beauty, but equally important, it is also interesting to know that the art of worm grunting allowed generations of local grunters to make as much as $200 to $300 in a morning to help raise families, pay the rent and buy groceries. Dubbed The Worm Grunting Capital,Ž one writer commented that Sopchoppy was 35 miles and 100 years SW of TLH.Ž Though it may not have been the writers intent for this to be a compliment, I believe the residents of this little town believe it to be so. After all, the town motto is Sopchoppy and Easy Living Go Together!Ž Worm Gruntin Festival is SaturdayFILE PHOTOA crowd gathers to watch kids try to grunt for worms at last years festival. Crawfordville man is killed in traf c crashStaff reportA Thursday, April 5 traf“ c crash at Emmett Whaley Road and U.S. Highway 319 claimed the life of a 72-year-old Crawfordville man as Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputies and Florida Highway Patrol troopers arrived on the scene at 2:16 p.m. Rodger Stephen Smith died in the two-vehicle accident which also involved Freeman Pigott, 73, of Crawfordville. FHP troopers are still investigating the crash. The impact of the collision ” ipped the Smith vehicle and he was pinned inside the vehicle in an upside-down position. Wakulla County EMS and Fire-Rescue worked together to conduct a lengthy extraction free Smith from the overturned SUV. An off-duty “ re“ ghter drove up on the crash immediately after it occurred. Fire Chief Mike Morgan was at the library attending a class when the accident happened. Both rendered aid as additional help was summoned. The unconscious and seriously injured Smith was extricated using hydraulic rescue tools. The roof of the overturned vehicle had to be partially removed before paramedics from EMS could access the patient. Once removed, he was transported to TMH. Due to poor weather conditions, Smith and Pigott were transported to the hospital by Wakulla EMS ground transportation. The afternoon rainstorm prevented the launch of a medical helicopter. Smith died at the hospital several hours later. Pigotts injuries were not life threatening. Severe damage was reported to both Smiths SUV and Pigotts truck. Wakulla Fire Chief Mike Morgan said EMS and “ re personnel did an excellent job with a very dif“ cult extrication. The FHP investigation continues. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFATAL CRASH: The SUV belonging to Rodger Smith, above, after he was extricated from the vehicle by “ re“ ghters using the jaws of life. He died after being transported to the hospital. The truck belonging to Freeman Pigott, left, after the wreck. He suffered minor injuries. 000ARJF NEW!! New courses at the TCC Wakulla CenterMove your career forward with free or low-cost trainingUpcoming opportunities in manufacturing and healthcare:Manufacturing EssentialsApril 23 … June 275:30 … 9:30 p.m. | Mondays and Wednesdays$350 or FREE to those who are unemployed Home Care AidMay 8 … August 76 … 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $299Medical Billing and CodingMay 15 … August 146 … 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays $810 (includes cost of national certification exam)Medical Administrative SpecialistMay 22 … July 126 … 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $420REGISTER TODAY! workforce.tcc.fl.edu/Wakulla | 922-6290

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCongressman Steve Southerland made a couple of stops in Wakulla County this week, including a town hall meeting at the community center. Southerland also had a meet-and-greet at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea afterwards. Southerland, a Republican “ rst-term Congressman from Panama City, continued to stress the need for fiscal responsibility and solving the problem of the nations debt. Its not a Republican or Democrat thing,Ž he said. Its just math.Ž He called the budgeting process in Washington a shell gameŽ and expressed frustration with budget cuts that later turn up as not having been actually cut. About 30 people attended the town hall meeting, which included some questions from an unrelenting citizen about whether the rich should pay more taxes. Southerland didnt answer whether he thought the rich should pay more, but countered with a question of his own about how much is fair. He cited some statistics that 52 percent of Americans pay no taxes, and that the top 10 percent of earners pay 71 percent of taxes. Wakulla Tourist Development Council Diector Pam Portwood asked for the congressmans support for National Scenic Byways, saying the local scenic byway is an important part of tourism development. But Southerland was adamant that he would not vote for the transportation bill in which the scenic byway language appears … as it currently stands. Southerland also pointed out a Democratic tracker he called MaxŽ who was “ lming the meeting. He vowed not to track any of his Democratic opponents in the upcoming election, saying he believed you should do unto others as you have them do unto you.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper.  TCC’s April Board Meeting to be held in CrawfordvilleTallahassee Community College’s District Board of Trustees will convene for its April meeting on Monday, April 16 at the Centennial Bank, 2932 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. The board workshop is scheduled to begin at 2:30 p.m. The business meeting will take place immediately following the workshop. Rose Sale to bene t CHAT is this weekendThe 16th Annual Rose Sale will be held on Saturday, April 14, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Sunday, April 15, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The roses are Heirloom roses, also known as Heritage roses, that do well in this area. They are asking a donation of $7 per 3 gal container. The featured roses are on the CHAT website – www.chatofwakulla.org All proceeds will bene t the homeless animals in our county. The sale will be at Heide Clifton’s home at 382 Crawfordville Highway. It would be best to use the entrance on Pinewood due to the roadwork on the highway. If you have any questions, please call Heide at 926-3849. Sheriff’s Of ce will crack down on alcohol on county propertyThe Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce will be cracking down on alcohol possession on county property as the spring weather begins to turn toward the summer months. Wakulla County has an ordinance that bans the possession of alcohol on county property. County property includes the beaches with warmer weather bringing more visitors to the waterfront, as well as the April 28 regatta at Shell Point. Sheriff Donnie Crum said he hopes that everyone has a safe and enjoyable time while taking part in recreational activities on county property, but the ban of alcohol will be strictly enforced.  ‘My Life as a Turkey’ to be presented by Wakulla’s Joe Hutto Tallahassee-native Joe Hutto, author of the acclaimed 1995 book “Illuminations in the Flatwoods” about his experience raising wild turkeys from eggs, will speak to the Tallahassee Scienti c Society. He will appear before the group at their meeting on Wednesday, April 25, at the IMAX theatre at Kleman Plaza in Tallahassee beginning at 7 p.m Tickets for $6 for members and $12 for non-members. Hutto’s books will be for sale at the event and he will be available to sign copies. For tickets or information, www. tallysci. org or call (850) 877-0224. Last November, the popular PBS-BBC “Nature” TV series debuted “My Life as a Turkey,” a documentary based on ”Illumination in the Flatwoods.” The book chronicles Hutto’s extraordinary, two-year experiment in raising wild turkeys from eggs while living at his home in Sopchoppy. An FSU-trained biologist, Hutto now lives in Wyoming where he studies bighorn sheep and mule deer. His book on the bighorn, “The Light in High Places” (2009) won the Wyoming State Historical Society’s Book Award in 2010. Sarracenia Chapter of Native Plant Society will meet April 17The Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will present a program on macro photography at the Wakulla County Public Library on Tuesday, April 17, that will include a showing of the video “Macro Photography” by famed nature photographer Taylor Lockwood. The video includes information on lighting, composition, and how to use common household items to get the effects you want without having to buy expensive equipment. Sarracenia members, who know a lot about photography, will be on hand to answer questions. A beautiful calendar featuring Lockwood’s photographs will be given away as a door prize. Sarracenia meetings are free and open to the public. Come early at 6 p.m. to mingle and enjoy some tasty snacks. AARP Driver Safety Class will be held April 24There will be an AARP Driver safety class held at the Wakulla Public Library in Crawfordville. This program is offered to seniors age 50 and older. It is a classroom setting and no driving is done. The program discusses how age related physical changes can effect the way seniors drive. The class is a one-day session and a discount will be given by the driver’s insurance company for three years following the class. The cost for AARP members is $12 Non members $14 Seniors can register by calling (850) 926-4605. The class schedule is as follows: April 24, June 26, Aug. 28, and Oct. 23. Third annual Reagan Day Blue Jeans and Black Tie is setWakulla County Third Annual Reagan Day Blue Jeans and Black Tie Affair will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood on May 3. The featured speaker this year will be best selling author Peter Schweizer, author of ”Throw Them All Out: How Politicians and Their Friends Get Rich off Insider Stock Tips, Land Deals, and Cronyism That Would Send the Rest of Us to Prison.” Schweizer is also the author “Reagan’s War,” and his speech is titled “The Reagan No One Knew” and will center around Reagan’s long series of struggles with communists – including information from secret documents obtained from communist archives about President Reagan. Tickets include dinner and are $35 for an individual and $50 for two tickets. Sponsorships are available for $500 and include a table for eight and recognition during the program. The social portion begins at 6 p.m., dinner and the program will begin at 7 p.m. There will also be a live band performing. Tickets are available for purchase at www.wakullarepublicans.comall.  Red Carpet for the Red Cross gala is April 20 in TallahasseeThe American Red Cross, Capital Area Chapter will be hosting the evening at Goodwood Museum and Gardens on Friday, April 20, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Enjoy fabulous food catered by The Black Fig, dance the night away with the Crooked Shooz Band and win prizes from our silent auction, all while helping our neighbors in need. Individual tickets are limited. Attire is “red tie.” Tallahassee Orchid Show is April 21 and 22The Tallahassee Orchid Society will present it’s annual Orchid Show and Sale on April 21 and April 22 at the Doyle Conner Agricultural Center, 3125 Conner Blvd. in Tallahassee. The show will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 21 and noon to 5 p.m. on April 22. This is a great opportunity to talk with the growers and buy orchids and supplies for the year. There will be someone available for help in potting or repotting orchids for a fee. Admission is free – donations accepted. For more information see www.tallyorchid. org or call Harriet at 850-320-6566.– Staff ReportsBriefsContinued from Page 1A Wakulla County Commissioner Alan Brock said there is an inaccuracy in the billing process and the timeline is too short to make sure all inaccuracies are corrected. If all is cleared up, Edwards said the county could either get money back or break even. For all future Medicaid billings, the state will withhold a portion of the countys revenue from the one-cent sales tax. Edwards said instead of receiving a bill, the county will receive a statement of what was taken out. Edwards said it is an unfunded mandate. Its pushing more taxes and responsibility to the local governments,Ž he added. Brock said, This puts a new burden on all of the counties.Ž The Wakulla County Commission, along with numerous counties, sent a letter to Gov. Scott urging him to veto the bill, citing the erroneous Medicaid billing system. This legislation makes it virtually impossible for a county to verify and ensure correct billings from the State; and, therefore be billed accurately and fairly,Ž the letter stated. If the county believes there is a problem, it can go through an extensive appeals process, Edwards said. In Scotts letter to the secretary of state, he acknowledged the concern that had been expressed, but stated that after conversations with counties, all agreed that legitimate “ nancial obligations should be paid. I have pledged to the counties that AHCA and my staff will work diligently with them to certify that any billings for which counties are charged are accurate and valid,Ž Scott said. Florida Association of Counties has expressed its disapproval of the bill. President of FAC, Doug Smith, issued a statement saying, This bill represents the worst kind of blow to taxpayers. Rather than correcting Tallahassees error-ridden Medicaid billing system, HB5301 codi“ es it and leaves taxpayers with the bill.Ž FAC will hold a special board meeting on April 12 to discuss the bill and legal options. Brock said the county will be working with FAC and will see what they recommend, whether it be entering into a lawsuit or lobbying to make the law better.Special to The NewsWakulla Democratic Executive Committee Chair Rachel Pienta announced today that the DEC will be hosting members of the Leon and Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation District Boards at the scheduled Thursday, April 12, meeting. Three of the “ ve seats on the Wakulla district are up for re-election this year,Ž Pienta said. One seat is vacant and open to be “ lled by appointment. During this election year, well be highlighting candidates and races as well as discussing opportunities for citizens to become engaged in the electoral process.Ž The meeting will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library beginning at 7 p.m. Its free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. At the meeting, the duties and responsibilities of the Wakulla-elected Soil & Water Conservation District Of“ cials will be the topic for discussion. The public is invited to join committee members and representatives of both the Wakulla and Leon County Soil & Water Conservation Districts to “ nd out more about these important positions and the role they play in preserving and protecting our natural resources. Wakulla County has four elected of“ cials serving as members of the Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation District: Seat 1, Terrell Rudd; Seat 2-Vacant; Seat 3-Daniel Harvey (Secretary/ Treasurer); Seat 4-Allan Loftin (Vice Chairman); and Seat 5-Joseph Duggar (Chairman). Seats 1, 3, and 5 are up for re-election this year and Seat 2 can be “ lled for the remaining two years of its term. The positions are unpaid. There are more than 3,000 soil & water conservation districts in the U.S. It is mainly through these local districts that the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service assists individuals, groups, and units of government with natural resources conservation. The “ ve locally elected of“ cials for each of Floridas 63 soil and water conservation district (SWCD) boards serve four year terms. In addition to local board members, Blas Gomez, Tabitha Frazier, and Stan Peacock of the Leon Soil & Water Conservation District will be on hand to discuss what the Board does in other counties … including grant opportunities available to these organizations. For more information about the Wakulla County Democratic Executive Committee, please visit online at http://wakullademocrats. org.Program set on Soil and Water DistrictsCounty could owe $52,000 in Medicaid billsCongressman holds town meeting WILLIAM SNOWDEN Steve Southerland at the town hall meeting. NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVEThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, May 14, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 4, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.APRIL 12, 2012 PLAN TEXT AMENDMENT TRANSMITTAL PUBLIC HEARING

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Update: One dead in Thursday traffic crash • Big Bend Hospice honors veterans with ceremony for their valor • County commission: Board moves ahead with plans for new sheriff’s annex •Bike Florida tours Wakulla County, stays at Wildwood Inn • Arthur T. Anderson obituary • Webpage opposing cave diving misleads • Wakulla’s housing problem € thewakullanews.com Follow us on Victim of Domestic or Sexual Violence? Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111Editor, The News: I have been remiss in not thanking Editor Bill Snowden and The Wakulla News for the excellent, factual presentation they reported on the Joseph A. Abal and Associates collision reconstruction of an incident involving Sheriff David Harvey. The article gleaned facts from a work product report prepared in the incident and submitted to Sheriff Harveys attorneys. Editor Snowden, from my perspective, presented the reports factual conclusions in an accurate and straight-forward manner. The article did not attempt to twist or contextualize any of my factual opinions. The conclusions were based on the science and math of forensic collision reconstruction and were rooted in the physical evidence I uncovered. Oft times, in todays media-driven world, people, places and events have a way of being distorted. The NewsŽ and its Editor got it correct and I applaud the effort. Joseph A. Abal, Ph.D. Joseph A. Abal & Associates Editor, The News: I just wanted to give the paper a story about the Lion in Azalea Park. I dont think people driving by would realize it is NOT a little green person.Ž March 12, 2012, marked the 100th anniversary of the Girl Scouts. Our Junior Girl Scout Troupe 802 looked up the uniform from 1912 and came up with their interpretation of that uniform. They painted it a couple of weeks ago. I thought you might like to put a picture of it in the paper with the story before someone goes and paints over it! (I think its scheduled to be changed on April 7.) Nancy Culp Crawfordville READERS WRITE:WILLIAM SNOWDENThe Lion in Azalea Park painted as a Girl Scout.Lion painted to celebrate Girl ScoutsEditor, The News: Wakulla Pregnancy Centers 2012 Lifewalk was a great success and a wonderful time as well. The day started with thunder, lightning and then the rain came in. Once Pastor Jeff McFalls from Medart Assembly of God started his message, the clouds rolled away, and the sun came out to stay. The two-mile walk started with light rain, and many came prepared with umbrellas and rain gear. However, after a short time the sun was shining brightly, and we walked with the warmth of the sun around us. There were more than 30 baskets and items for the silent auction, and lots of great baked goods were donated. Horton the elephant joined us to remind people that a person is a person no matter how small. Marcia McNaney from PARFA spoke about the sanctity of human life, and reminded everyone to get out and vote for life this election year. Emunah Johnson sang A Babys Prayer,Ž and the youth group Total Impact from Wakulla Springs Baptist Church came out and performed. Wakulla Pregnancy Center would like to thank all of the following sponsors: Wakulla Realty, Wildfire Grill, Cypress Stump Marine, AAA Constant Comfort Heating & Air, Associated Services, The Barber Shoppe & Tangles Hair Salon, Bevis Funeral Home & Harvey Young Chapel. AMS Marine, T-N-T Canoe Rental, Capital City Bank, Clinicare Medical Resources, Dazzles Hair Studio, Moodys Auto Service, Riverside Cafe, Roses Botanicals, Premier Motor Cars, Savannahs Country Buffet, Southern Flooring, Woodville Ace Hardware, Mikes Marine, AAA Lock Service, and the Sweet Magnolia Bed & Breakfast. We would also like to offer a special thanks to Doug Apple from WAKU radio, Scott Beagle from WFRF, Lady Haskins, MPC Print, 88.1 radio, Wakulla.com., The Wakulla News and the volunteers who helped to make this event possible. Angie Holshouser Wakulla Pregnancy Center By GOV. RICK SCOTT Last October, while visiting Metal Essence, a precision metals and plastics fabricator in Orlando, I called on the Florida Legislature to pass my 2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth Agenda. I would like to thank the Legislature for answering my call and joining me in the effort to make Florida the best place for businesses to grow and create jobs for Floridians. This plan is designed to ensure that Floridas unemployment rate continues to drop. During recent weeks, I met with working Floridians to talk about what this legislation means to them. I would like to thank all of the great companies that I visited: Entera in Bay County, Load King Manufacturing in Jacksonville, Advanced Protection Technologies in Clearwater, Ring Power Inc. in Sarasota, as well as Metal Essence in Longwood and Workforce Central Florida in Orlando. Overall, my 2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth Agenda will eliminate burdensome rules and regulations, reform our unemployment system to a reemployment system, provide tax relief to our job creators and hold accountable the workforce boards tasked with connecting Floridians to job opportunities. I would like to highlight four reforms that we have put into place and how they better position our state to create jobs. First, we took steps to restore accountability and credibility to Floridas Regional Workforce Boards so they are better able to serve Floridas unemployed citizens. In response to irresponsible spending of taxpayer dollars that should have been dedicated to getting people back to work, Floridas Regional Workforce Boards will be held accountable and will be able to better serve Floridas jobseekers. I have been monitoring daily rankings for job placements from each regional workforce board to ensure that they are serving the citizens of Florida. Members not ful“ lling this duty can now be removed. Next, we became the “ rst state in the nation to reform our unemployment system into a system focused on re-employment. This new system will direct efforts to providing free job skills training to Floridas out-of-work citizens who need it the most, while providing unemployment compensation tax relief to Florida businesses. The next reform continues the process I started on my “ rst day in of“ ce, the repeal of burdensome state rules and regulations that often discourages businesses from creating jobs. Since taking office, I have reviewed and repealed nearly five hundred unnecessary rules and regulations. I will continue this process to ensure that our state government is efficient and not standing in the way of business. The last measure of my 2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth Agenda is tax relief for Floridas working families and businesses. Working with the Florida Legislature, we delivered two tax cuts. First, we continued efforts begun last year to eliminate the corporate income tax by doubling the exemption, representing a 66 percent re-education of total payers since I became Governor. In addition, Floridas manufacturers will now be able to more easily qualify for a sales tax exemption on machinery and equipment. Both tax cuts will help grow jobs in Florida, by helping business and families keep more of their hard earned money. In February, Florida recorded an unemployment rate of 9.4 percent, a threeyear low. Were headed in the right direction, but there is still a lot of work to do to make Florida the number one state in the nation for business. Since becoming Governor, creating jobs in Florida has been my top priority. I am con“ dent that my 2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth Agenda will help Florida create, retain and attract jobs. Rick Scott is the Governor of the State of Florida.2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth agendaEditor, The News: Economic development and wetland protection can co-exist, but not in the manner that our short-sighted Board of Commissioners is proposing. Randy Merritt, Jerry Moore and Mike Stewart have a different agenda. One that will impact the wetlands and, without your help, no one will be able to stop them. Most people do not understand the importance of wetlands and are understandably too busy to follow what the Board of County Commissioners are doing to our County. Most assume that the Board is looking out for the best interests of the people, and if they are not, someone else will step in. However, not in this case. This time, they need to hear from you. Most counties have learned now, how important wetlands are, and they try to protect them, and even spend millions to restore them. Wetlands protect and improve water quality, provide “ sh and wildlife habitats, store ” oodwaters, and help to prevent ” ooding. Our Board wants to change the wetland protection that we currently have in place. Outside of allowing builders to build in sensitive wetland areas, why would this Board change the existing protection that was put into place by another Board to protect the County? Why? So that builders can build right up to the water line and destroy what protects Wakulla Countys property values, water quality and wildlife. Commissioner Moore alone has accepted thousands of campaign dollars from developers and supporters who own wetland property as well as thousands of dollars from Real Estate PACS. How many acres of wetlands does Moore own? Approximately 100 acres, according to the Property Appraisers of“ ce. Check out how many of Moores developer supporters and campaign contributors have purchased worthless wetland property. How will they bene“ t from this change? They can build more structures to the edge of fragile wetlands, possibly in-“ ll the wetlands, and infringe on and destroy the nature and beauty that belongs to the people of Wakulla. If you care about the future of this county, the value of your home, the quality of your drinking water, and what the county will look like in just a few short years, then you need to step in, and email those Board members now, the representatives who supposedly are looking out for you, and tell them to leave our wetland ordinance alone. What these few people can do in their next meeting can forever impact this county. Sue Damon Shell PointLifewalk was a great success Wetlands are too valuable to risk e Wakulla News got the story rightEditor, The News: On Sunday morning, March 18, at 9:43 a.m., as we were leaving Wakulla Station to go on vacation we were behind a Wakulla County Animal Control truck with the #AC-02 on the bumper. We followed this truck north on Woodville Highway up into Woodville in Leon County and at the elementary school this Wakulla County vehicle turned right just past the school and parked in the parking lot of the church there. My question is WHY? Why is a county vehicle under the control of the Wakulla Sheriffs Of“ ce being used to drive someone on a Sunday Morning to a church in LEON County? Were they putting on a animal display? or, is that the church they attend? On another note, since we live on Woodville Highway and I am retired, I spend a fair amount of time doing as little as possible and part of what I do is sit and watch the animal life in our yard, the trucks that haul gravel, and in particular a school bus with COAST Charter School written on the side of it. It is normal to see this bus during school days but to have it pass my home late on a Saturday night, between 8:30 and 10 p.m., is a bit odd. I am curious … is this bus supposed to be on the road at these late, off-school hours? There are never children on the bus at night. Over the years I have seen this bus stopped at the Dollar General and at the Subway in St. Marks. Do these drivers of these two different county vehicles use these vehicles for their own personal transportation? And if they do, where do I sign up as my gas costs almost $4 a gallon? John Pierotti cedartree@comcast.netCounty vehicles used for personal trips? In February, Florida recorded an unemployment rate of 9.4 percent, a threeyear low. Were headed in the right direction, but there is still a lot of work to do.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 5AChurchreligious views and eventsMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesMichael Lafayette Jett Shirley ‘Ann’ Vause Moulton Betty Marie Roger Rodger Stephen Smith Joice Jane Satterfield Ventry Grover ‘Sonny’ Cleveland Whaley Jr.Michael Lafayette Jett, 60, of Panama City, died at his home in Panacea on Tuesday, April 3. He was born Oct. 17, 1951, at Eglin Air Force Base in Fort Walton Beach. Survivors include his parents, Lafayette and Betty Jett; his son, Sevren L. Jett; his daughter, Leila C. Jett; two brothers, Greg and Dave; and a granddaughter, Sanibelle. Contact family members or Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville regarding service arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Shirley AnnŽ Vause Moulton, 77, of Tallahassee, passed away on Sunday, April 8. She was predeceased by her husband of 54 years, William R. BillŽ Moulton. Survivors include her son, Tim (Diane); daughter, Kimberly; and son, Rick (Donna); two grandsons, Ricky and Kylan; a sister, Sadie Butler (Raber) of Calvary, Ga.; and a brother, Roderick Vause (Robbie) of Quincy. She also leaves behind many very special nieces, nephews, greatnieces and great-nephews. She was also preceded in death by her brothers, Hansel Vause (Edna) of Tallahassee and Johnny Vause (Alice) of Quincy. The family received friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, April 10 at Bevis Funeral Home (850.385.2193 or www. bevisfh.com), 2710 North Monroe St., in Tallahassee. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, April 11, at Immanuel Baptist Church, 2351 Mahan Drive, with burial following at Piedmont Cemetery, Piedmont Road, in Calvary, Ga.Michael L. Jett Shirley ‘Ann’ Vause Moulton Betty Marie Roger, 72, passed away Sunday, April 8, in Crawfordville. She was born Aug. 2, 1939, in Rochester, N.Y., and had lived in this area for 33 years coming from Lyons, N.Y. She was a Christian and a member of Women of the Moose. Services will be at a later date. Survivors include her son, David E. Gansz (Laura) of Rochester, N.Y.; daughters, Susan Clark of Sopchoppy, and Chantha Zippay (Jason) of Tallahassee; sister, Carol Pruitt (Bob) of Massachusetts; grandchildren, Lauren, Garrett, Jenna and Ethan Clark, Drew Gansz, Andy and Max Zippay; a great-grandchild, Lila Stelly; and many other family and friends. She was predeceased by her parents, William and Loretta DeDee. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com)Betty Marie RogerRodger Stephen Smith, 72, of Crawfordville, died Thursday, April 5, of injuries he received in an automobile accident near his home. A native of Michigan, he moved to Tallahassee from Oxnard, Calif., in 1992. Retired as a mechanical engineer, he received his degree in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. He and his wife operated the Mail Box, located on Mahan Drive at Magnolia Drive, for several years before “ nally retiring to Crawfordville in 1999. Services will be privately held. Gifts in memory of Smith may be made to the American Diabetes Association (www.donations.diabetes.org). Survivors include his wife of 50 years, Ruby Smith, also of Crawfordville; his son, Brian Smith and his wife Beth of Tallahassee; and two grandchildren, Rachael and Byren Smith, also of Tallahassee. He was predeceased by his daughter, Janet Smith, in 1998. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville, assisted the Smith family. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Rodger Stephen SmithJoice Jane Satter“ eld Ventry, 68, of Crawfordville, passed away Saturday, April 7. She was born in South Boston, Va., on Aug. 5, 1943, and was a resident of Crawfordville since 1990 coming from Tallahassee. She was a graduate of Florida State University and continued cheering on the Seminoles. She was a certi“ ed meeting planner and enjoyed life and loved seeing others have fun; she loved listening to the music of Elvis, and playing poker and trivia games. A celebration and remembrance of her life will be held for friends and family at the Ventry Residence, 148 Longleaf Drive in Crawfordville from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. Memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer Society in lieu of ” owers. Survivors include her three children, Chris Ventry of Crawfordville, Rebecca Moore of Crawfordville and Jerry Hurd Jr. of Clinton, Conn.; five grandchildren; and two sisters, Christine Clayton of Alton, Va., and Rachel Matthews of Greensboro, N.C.; and companion, Ray Lowe.Joice Jane Satter eld Ventry Grover SonnyŽ Cleveland Whaley Jr., 79, of Los Lunas, N.M., passed away Saturday, April 7, in Tallahassee. He was born Aug. 6, 1932, in St. Marks. He retired after 30 years as a Chief Master Sergeant in the U.S. Air Force. He loved to travel. He loved hunting and “ shing in his younger days in Alaska. He was a devoted family man. Graveside services will be Thursday, April 12, at 11 a.m. at St. Marks Cemetery. Visitation will be prior to the service from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Survivors include his wife of 47 years, Ramona Tellez Whaley of Los Lunas, N.M.; one brother, Charlie Whaley of St. Marks; two sisters, Clester Horne and Genevieve Oaks of Medart; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, Grover Cleveland Whaley Sr. and Henrietta Gertrude Whaley; two brothers, Eugene Floyd and Robert Floyd; and a sister, Mary Martin.Grover ‘Sonny’ Cleveland Whaley Jr.WILLIAM SNOWDENEASTER PASSION: Jesus and the two thieves hung on crosses as part of the Medart Assembly of Gods observance on Thursday, April 5, of the events leading up to Easter. A Roman Centurion patrolled in front as Mary and Mary Magdalene keep vigil.Church BriefsElder Payne’s sermons broadcastElder Jerry Paynes sermons are being broadcast on Comcast channel 195 at 8 p.m. on the third Thursday of every month. His sermons also appear on WTAL 1450 on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and Friday at 10:30 a.m. Payne, of Crawfordville, has a website for the ministry of Elder Jerry and Sheila Payne at payneministries.com. He can be reached at (850) 528-5603. Fundraiser set at Burney TempleThe community is invited to a testimonial service on the fourth Sunday, April 22, at 6 p.m. at Burneys Temple Church on Highway 61. The service is a fundraiser for Pastor Mary Harvey. PayneHeart of Jesus Church to hold yard saleThe Heart of Jesus Gospel Church will hold a yard sale fundraisers on Saturday, April 14, to raise money for the church building fund. The yard sale will be held at the Panacea VFD beginning at 8 a.m. Something for everyone! The church pastor is Mike and Lori Barwick. For more information, call Lisa at (850) 984-5101.

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our communityCommunitySpecial to The NewsPeople who do something about itŽ were recognized and honored during United Way of the Big Bends (UWBB) Wakulla County Campaign Awards Breakfast at Capital City Bank in Crawfordville on April 5. At a time when so many people are facing financial challenges, this years Wakulla County United Way Campaign is a testament to the character of our community,Ž said Commissioner Alan Brock, Wakulla County United Way Campaign Chair. Last year, this campaign raised just over $79,000. This year, our campaign goal was to increase the campaign to $90,000. We blew past this goal and raised $102,560. Every single dollar will stay right here in Wakulla County, providing much needed services to our citizens in need. That is a tremendous investment.Ž The Bronze Award (campaign between $1,000 and $2,499) was presented to the Wakulla Mens Club, $1,000; Walmart No. 3307 Wakulla, $1,100; ESG, $1,352 and CSG, $1,553. The Silver Award (campaign between $2,500 and $4,999) was presented to Residential Elevators, Inc., $2,500; Progress Energy Services, $2,534; Wakulla County Senior Citizens Council, $2,577; Wakulla County employees, $2,668; Capital City Bank, $2,840; Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, $2,956; Shields Marina, $3,210; and Centennial Bank, Wakulla, $3,350. The Presidents Award (campaign between $10,000 and $24,999) went to Wakulla County Schools, $12,030. The Excellence Award (campaign between $50,000 and $99,999) went to St. Marks Powder, $66,183. The Outstanding Neighboring County New Campaign was Shields Marina. They have been a part of the St. Marks community since 1928. This family owned business has seen many changes in its 80+ year history and their commitment to create and grow a business that will provide jobs and economic impact in Wakulla County, is steadfast. Their help those less fortunate in their community is just as strong. Employees have been involved with the UW campaign in Wakulla County off and on for the last 15 years. This year, they not only re-engaged, they stepped it up. By not only educating their employees, but also encouraging their participation with a corporate match, Shields Marina sailed their commitment right to the top as one of the top 5 companies in Wakulla County investing in their community through United Way. Most Creative Neighboring County Campaign went to St. Marks Powder. They shot to the top this year in Wakulla County with their campaign creativity. EDUCATE EMPLOYEES: Information Passport … Each employee was given a passport to visit each agency booth, learn about what they did in Wakulla County and get a stamp which entered them into a drawing for a chance to win a gift card. MAKE IT FUN! Sparky Bingo, Stuff the Truck food drive, on-line auction, drawing for a Harley Davidson leather jacket. ENGAGE YOUR PARTNERS … Their team created a golf tournament for their vendors and employees to participate in, even getting the donation of a car for a possible hole in one shot. They ended their campaign with a steak dinner for each employee and a 13-percent increase in the dollars that they raised. Outstanding Neighboring County Volunteer went to Commissioner Alan Brock. Brock is no stranger to United Way. He has even worked as part of our staff, serving as the Executive Director of Whole Child Leon. He is a leadership giver, and outspoken proponent of the work that UW does. This year, he took the charge and led a very successful Wakulla County team to not only reach their campaign goal, but blew past it to just over $102,000. We are thrilled to say that while he is passing the chairmanship baton to another, he will continue as a valued member of the Wakulla Team.United Way celebrates successful campaign WILLIAM SNOWDEN The Wakulla County United Way Committee members are Keith Blackmar, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce; Courtney Peacock, Capital City Bank; United Way President Heather Mitchell; Chairman Alan Brock; Amanda Carroll, St. Marks Powder; Trish Andrews, CSG; Nanette Watts, ESG; and Marc Dickieson, United Way. Kirton accepts fellowship Stratton Kirton, son of Kenneth Kirton and Patricia Kirton of Crawfordville, will graduate this spring from Georgetown Universitys Security Studies Program with his Master of Arts in Energy Security. He has accepted a postgraduate fellowship sponsored by the Alfa Bank, the largest private commercial bank in the Russian Federation, that will consist of individual Russian language tutoring in the U.S. followed by a 10-month placement in Moscow. While in Moscow, Kirton will attend classes for the “ rst four months followed by placement with an energy-related “ rm. Kirton graduated from Stetson University with honors in 2007 with a Bachelors in Russian Studies and Political Science with a minor in Russian language. He moved to Washington, D.C. in 2008 to work in the of“ ce of Sen. Bill Nelson. In 2010, he took a position as a legislative assistant to Congressman Mike McIntyre of North Carolina. A graduate of Wakulla High School, Kenneth Kirton gives credit for his sons academic success to Susan Solburg, the drama teacher, and to a love for learning imbued by Ms. Kendricks, a teacher at Shadeville Elementary. Stratton KirtonHappy “ rst birthday, Travin Travin Pusey celebrated his “ rst birthday on March 28. His parents are Sheila Kilgore and Steven Pusey of Spring Creek. He has one brother, Tyler Moore. His maternal grandparents are Paula Kilgore and Hank Agerton of Spring Creek. His maternal great-grandparents are Gladys Kilgore of Spring Creek and Dorothy Stevens of Panacea. His paternal grandparents are Vicki Strickland and Ted Pusey, of Crawfordville. His paternal great-grandparents are Norma and Chester Davis, Walland, Tenn. Travin Pusey TheNews Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408 Special Offer New Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County Only ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover r r s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Phone#_____________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 4/30/2012877-401-6408Get 10 Months for $20.12straight to your mailbox This is not a trick NO FOOLIN’ www.thewakullanews.com Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Special to The NewsTen people meet in a room. Each person shakes hands once with everyone else in the room. How many handshakes take place? You have 30 seconds to answer, no calculator and an anxious audience of nearly 200 parents, peers and teachers. Such were the challenges presented by Florida Engineering Societys 29th annual MATHCOUNTS competition, held Feb. 25 at the FAMU/FSU College of Engineering in Tallahassee. Riversprings Middle School placed “ fth among top mathematicians from 12 competing middle schools around the Big Bend area in the regional competition. The challenges included timed Sprint, Target and Team round competitions, as well as an entertaining Cipher round in the afternoon that was open to parents, coaches and spectators. Mattias Gunnarsson placed 18th among all competitors and was the teams top individual scorer, followed by Kyle Pearson, Nic Samlal and Isaac Kent. Riversprings Middle School Team members were eighth-grade students Gunnarsson, Kyle Pearson, Samlal, Kent, John Ahrendt, Blakeleigh Bolton, Maria Parmer and Jenna Franck, and seventh-grade student, Paige Pearson. The team is coached by John Kane. The day-long event featured team photos, competitions, a pizza luncheon and closed with a Mathlete awards ceremony. The MATHCOUNTS meet was hosted by the FAMU/ FSU College of Engineering and sponsored by the Florida Engineering Society, the Big Bend Chapter of the Florida Engineering Society and numerous local supporters. A special thank you to Patrick Becker, Riversprings Middle School, and Ro Samlal, Shadeville Elementary School, for their time and effort supporting the team and for making the competition possible. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 7Aeducation news from local schoolsSchoolHigh school spring play is this weekend Special to The NewsWhen drama director, Susan Solburg began teaching and directing plays at Wakulla High School in the late 80s and early 90s, she had problems “ nding plays with large enough casts to accommodate the many talented students she had trying out for productions. So, she began to write plays as a way to get more students involved. One of those plays, Final Flick at the Flamingo,Ž roughly parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre and how it was the best teenage hang-out ever invented. The combination of movies, music, dancing, food and friendship all under the watchful eye of families, parking lot attendants, security personnel and snack stand owners made it a fun and safe environment for teenagers back in the day. She first produced the show in 1993 and had a fabulous cast of characters to bring it to life. A second production was held in 2002. One of her former students, Travis Herndon, who played the character Rick Harley in the “ rst show, came back to help. Herndon, who is a professional stuntman, actor and dancer, was an enormous help with the physically demanding stage business in the show. He reprised and re-wrote some scenes for Rick and once again the show was another great success. This time around will probably be the last time the show will be produced and once again a former student and cast member is on board to help with the production. Cameron Ray, who played Slick in the 2002 cast, will now be Officer Lovell. He has been assisting with the same physically demanding scenes and trying to get the 35 young actors ready for the shows opening night. If youve seen the show before, then come on back one more time and walk down memory lane. The movies, music and teenage angst will all be there along with the comedic moments provided by the multitude of memorable characters. The soundtracks from golden movies of the day, the fabulous music and the smell of popcorn will bring it all back to those of you who ever enjoyed a night at the drive-in movie theatre. How many of you in Wakulla County know that Mr. Freeman Pigotts business sits on the site of the old County Drive-In? The show opens to the public on Friday and Saturday, April 13 and 14, at 7:30 P.M. and again on Sunday, April 15 at 2:30 p.m. Doors open thirty minutes prior to curtain where tickets can be purchased. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission.Progress Energy help fund Odyssey of the Mind project at Riversink Elementary Katrina Cochran, of Progress Energy, presents students with the Odyssey of the Mind group $250 for their project. This is a group of bright fourth and “ fth graders who attend Riversink Elementary School. Their teacher, Megan Crombie, was also Teacher of the Year.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRMS team takes “ fth places at MATHCOUNTS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversprings Middle School students place “ fth at MathCounts competition. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Actors practice scenes from this weekends play. WHS advisory council meets April 16The Wakulla High School Advisory Council will hold its next meeting on Monday, April 16 from 3 to 5 p.m. in the WHS library. Anyone who would like to attend is welcome.Show times:€ Friday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. € Saturday, April 14 at 7:30 p.m. € Sunday, April 15 at 2:30 p.m. Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555 The college of choice! Invest in yours elf today Aordable tuition at TCC+higher wages for those with college degrees = A really smart investment

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsWAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS:Tuesday, April 10 TENNIS: Regional tournament at Panama City-Arnold. Wednesday, April 10 SOFTBALL: Makeup game vs. Madison at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 12 TRACK: District championship at Florida High. Tuesday, April 17 SOFTBALL: District tournament: Game 1 at 5 p.m. with championship game following at 7 p.m. At Wakulla. Tuesday, April 24 BASEBALL: District tournament at Suwannee, Game 1 at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 26 BASEBALL: District tournament at Suwannee with Game 2 at 7 p.m.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla High School boys tennis team “ nished their 2012 season with a respectable third place “ nish in the district tournament behind “ rst place Florida High and second place Rickards. This year, new teams like Florida High, Madison and Taylor counties were added to an already crowded district, bringing the total number of teams competing to seven. No. 1 seed Sam Proulx “ nished his senior year 9-5 with his only losses coming from district rivals Florida High and Rickards. Proulx and Wyatt Harvey the No. 1 doubles team, “ nished strong with a 9-4 record, again their only losses come from Florida High and Rickards. No. 2 seed Daniel McCullers a “ rst year varsity player “ nished 76. The No. 2 doubles team of McCullers and Chad Peltier “ nished with a record of 7-6. No. 3 seed Wyatt Harvey won second place overall for his seed in the district tournament and finished with a 9-6 record. The No. 4 seed Johnathan Phillips “ nished 6-6. The No. 5 seed Chad Peltier had the best record on the team at 10-3, with his only loses coming from rivals Rickards and Florida High. Tennis season starts in January and the district tournament was played April 3 and 4 this year at Tom Brown Park. The boys have great hopes for next year as they are only losing one senior and have many JV players eager to move up. Special to The NewsThree teams were added to our district this year … Florida High, Madison and Taylor counties. The other teams are Rickards, Suwannee and Godby. The ladies were hopeful at the start of the tournament when all players won their “ rst matches easily. Number one player Alicia Porter beat Suwannee in the semi“ nals to face her only loss during the season, Florida High for the “ nals. Alicia lost the “ rst set but was coming back strong and the Florida High player was falling apart. The momentum was de“ nitely with Alicia, but then a storm rolled into Tom Brown Park very quickly. When it was 6-6 tied, they were in a tie breaker … “ rst one to seven wins, but has to win by two. Well, at 9-9 the storm hit and play was suspended. The next morning, day three of the tournament, Alicia went to battle against Florida High. Each point was taking 50 volleys each, and Florida High won 12-10. Alicia came in second place as the No. 1 player. Alicia had a 9-2 record coming into districts and “ nished with a 12-3 record and the district runner up. Next Alyssa Porter, who had already beaten the Florida High player in the semi “ nals faced Rickards in the “ nals but lost. Alyssa was the district runner up and “ nished her season at the No. 2 seed with a 10-5 record. Chelsea Carroll was the No. 3 player this year and it is her “ rst year playing tennis. Chelsea “ nished the season at 8-3 and lost in the semi-“ nals against Florida High, bringing her record to 9-4 and we are looking forward to her return next year. The No. 4 girl is Rachel Dix-Kessler who is the District Tournament Champion at the No. 4 seed. Her season record was 7-4 she faced Florida High in the “ nals and she won bringing her record to 10-4 and we look forward to her return as well. Rachels win over Florida High left us one point behind Florida High with 12 points and the tournament could have ended with a variety of scenarios. Our No. 5 seed is a new player to tennis, Christina Evans Her season record was 7-4 and she won her “ rst match of districts but then lost to Florida High in the semi-“ nals bringing her record to 8-5. Christina is only a freshman and we look forward to three more years of tennis. Our No. 2 doubles team of Rachel DixKessler and Chelsea Carroll won the “ rst round but then lost in the semi-“ nals to Rickards. Their season record was 8-3 and “ nished at 9-4. They made a great team and will be even better next year. Our No. 1 doubles team made up of senior twins Alicia and Alyssa Porter had a great year playing together ending the regular season at 9-2 giving them the No. 2 seed in the tournament. The Porters made it to the finals to play against Florida High for the district championship. If the Porters won, we took second place in the tournament … lose and we had to play a tie-breaker with Rickards. Well, they got it done winning the “ rst set then winning the second and winning the District Championship at No. 1 doubles. The girls district “ nished the closest in years Florida High “ rst with 14 points Wakulla second with 13 points, Rickards took third and Suwannee was close behind at fourth. Being the District Champion at the No. 1 doubles automatically qualifies them to compete at the State Tennis Finals in Altamonte Springs. This will be Alicia Porters second time to the state “ nals … she also competed last year in singles and doubles. First the girls team as District Runner Up will travel to Arnold High School in Panama City on Tuesday, April 10, to play in the “ rst round of regionals.GIRLS TENNISLady War Eagles second in district tournament SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Lady War Eagles tennis team.BOYS TENNISWar Eagles “ nish third at district tournamentPorter twins qualify for state tourney in doubles SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe War Eagles tennis team. The W akulla Newswww.the wakullan ews.com all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsI was the Curator of Reptiles at the past Crandon Park Zoo out on Key Biscayne, Miami, (which later in the early 1970s became the Metro Zoo of south Miami). One day I was at the headquarters, where we also had the sick bay,Ž a large room off the directors of“ ce where sick or injured zoo animals were kept until they recovered. Dr. Hubble the zoos director noticed I was in the facility, and requested I come in his of“ ce. George,Ž he said. Do you have any idea what this is?Ž He pointed to a small white squarish thing on his desk, and then reached over and handed it to me. It was about the size of a ping-pong ball, and nearly as light in weight, fairly square, and had a hole on one of the sides. It appeared to be of bone? Im fairly good at identifying skulls, and other animal bones but this one had me stumped. I made a few wild guesses, and then of course gave up. With a twinkle in his eye, this wonderful director, whom the staff all loved (and Patti and I are still in contact with) said, Well, George … its the ampli“ er or voice resonator of a Howler Monkeys voice box.Ž Years later, this February to be exact, Patti and I (as many of my readers have noted) were down in Central America, in the country of Belize. We were staying at Chan Chich Lodge, a resort famous for hardcore birders and those really into nature. Its part of the Gallon Jug estate (or ranch) … a 130,000 private nature preserve. On our “ rst full day there, Patti announced to me that a distant noise we were hearing was a Howler Monkey. I was a little skeptical … it sounded like logs being sawed length-wise at a sawmill to me. But I gave pursuit, and spent about 10 minutes walking fast to near homes where the resorts staff lived, when the loud noise ceased. I “ gured they had a workshop there, and were sawing up logs for bridges, shelters, etc. However I was wrong, Patti was right (having heard Howlers hundreds of times in her many trips to Central and South America). The next day I got straightened out when a troop of these monkeys appeared right next to the lodge high in the forest on some ancient Mayan ruins. Realizing that they may call only for “ ve or 10 minutes, I practically ran from our bungalow to beyond the lodge, and dining area. And, there in the forest canopy were a half dozen primates about the size of two-year-old children, swinging from limb to limb, and walking around on branches with absolute no fear of falling. Awesome. And there was the dominate male roaring out his challenge to another group of Howlers perhaps a half mile away. Like an auto without a muffler, the sound this male emitted was way out of proportion to its size. A full six to eight seconds of a roaring exhale, followed by an also fairly long load inhale. Like the lonely call of the loon over a northern lake or cry of a distant Arctic wolf, it was a sound Ill know from now on, one Ill not forget. We saw and/heard them many times that week, and one morning while we watched a Morelets Crocodile, and a Rufous-tailed Jacamar with its iridescent green plumage, we realized we had a young Howler directly over us about 20 feet. We could even see his eyes focusing on branches as it moved through the trees. By the way, Old World monkeys lack the prehensile tails that our Central and South America monkeys posses, which they truly use like a “ fth hand. I have been seeing-hearing a lot locally and in my next article Ill be “ lling yall in on some of our exciting observations. For instance here is a list of the butter” ies weve seen so far at our ” ower garden this spring … Spicebush Swallowtail, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Zebra Swallowtail (North Americas most beautiful), Palamedes Swallowtail (most abundant local swallowtails), Cloudless Sulphur (most abundant local butter” y), Sleepy Orange, several Brushfooted species … Common Buckeye, Red-spotted Purple, Phaon and Pearl Crescents, American Lady, Red Admiral, Question Mark, Variegated Fritillary, two satyr species, the Carolina Satyr and the Little Wood Satyr, one blue, Spring Azure, and the skippers … Horaces Duskywing, Whirlabout and Southern Cloudywing.Howler Monkeys sound like a sawmillWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHSeventeen-year-old Spencer Sapp came down from Atlanta to spend his Easter vacation “ shing in Wakulla County state waters for grouper. Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security Inc. took Spencer and his dad, Dr. Jerry Sapp, out of Shell Point and Alans son, Danny, served as First Mate. Spencer had a great time catching grouper within sight of land while trolling and “ shing live bait. He even let his dad catch some. Dr. Sapp said that he was glad that the FWC listened to the local folks and opened the season on gags in state waters, When we come down here we spend a lot of money on licenses, restaurants, tackle, bait, gas and other supplies and if we cant “ sh, well go spend it someplace else,Ž he said. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSYoung shermanSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service offered “ ve tips today to help Floridians protect themselves against the dangers of wild“ re. Wildfire Awareness Week, which recognizes the wild“ res that raged through Florida in 1998, burning more than 500,000 acres and damaging or destroying 337 homes and other structures, will be held April 8 through April 14. Florida is unique in that it experiences a year-round wild“ re season, with heightened wild“ re activity during the spring months,Ž said Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam. Although we may receive sporadic rain, extended drought conditions are forecasted to persist throughout spring and into summer. Over the coming weeks and months, it is likely that Florida will experience very high to extreme wild“ re danger due to these dry conditions. It is critical for Floridians to take steps to ensure their own safety.Ž The departments Florida Forest Service manages more than one million acres of public forest land and protects more than 26 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wild“ re. Since January 1, more than 1,100 wildfires have burned nearly 20,000 acres in Florida. Most of these “ res were caused by human carelessness. To prevent wildfires, follow these five simple steps: 1. Check with local authorities for any temporary restrictions on burning yard waste. 2. Contain fires to an eight-foot diameter pile or non-combustible barrel at least 25 feet from forests, 25 feet from homes, 50 feet from paved public roads and 150 feet from other occupied buildings. 3. Do not burn on windy days or when the humidity is below 30 percent. 4. Never leave a “ re unattended and make sure it is completely out before leaving. 5. Keep a shovel and water hose handy in case a small “ re escapes containment. In addition to the tips listed above, Floridians should also report any suspicious “ res or “ re activity to 911 or their local Florida Forest Service of“ ce. In 2011, the Florida Forest Service responded to more than 4,700 wild“ res that burned over 220,000 acres, a 32 percent increase from the previous year. Five safety tips during wild“ re seasonDepartment of Agriculture and Consumer Services o ers “ ve tips for protecting homes during wild“ re season Like an auto without a mu er, the sound this male Howler emitted was way out of proportion to its size. A recent prescribed burn at Clear Lake Wilderness Area.USDA FOREST SERVICEAsk FWC€ Along the Florida coast, sea turtles annually make between 40,000 and 84,000 nests. € Females nest every two to three years, laying several nests on sandy beaches. Learn more at myFWC.com.FWC Facts: CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Flor i da Cert i ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM LUNCH PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies I sincerely hope that everyone had a wonderful time being with family and friends over the holiday weekend. No matter what you were doing the last weekend, no one could argue that the weather was phenomenal and a welcome relief before we head into the dog days of summer! As mentioned last week, members of Flotilla 12, Apalachee Bay will be meeting Saturday at the Fire Station in Crawfordville. Following the business meeting, which begins at 9:15 a.m., there will be mandatory Team Coordination Training from 11 a.m. to noon and an operations workshop from noon until 1 p.m. Why all the training, you might ask? Before we go out on the water annually, the Coast Guard requires that all Auxiliarists undergo refresher training to ensure that when we go out on the water, we are not a danger to ourselves while assisting others. Even the active duty have annual currencies that they must undergo to be out on the water. From the U.S. Coast Guard website: Team Coordination Training (TCT) is a program that focuses on reducing the probability for human error by increasing individual and team effectiveness. Safety has long been the Commanding Of“ cers responsibility and, until recently, was assumed to be the logical result of “ nely tuned technical skills. U.S. Coast Guard mishap data suggests that while technical skills are an essential component of any job, they alone will not ensure safety. We are all taught that we are equal stakeholders in ensuring the safety of the crew when out on patrol. But no person can be everything to everyone, so it takes a team approach. For us, we also strongly encourage members who will be involved in surface operations (patrols) to participate in the Operations Workshop. This provides an opportunity for members to practice their TCT skills and work through scenarios that spark discussion on how each person might respond. There is no one correct answer, but there are definite wrong responses. Practice makes perfect, and we try to model that for the boating public in our area. We are human and we do make mistakes, but when we do, we practice so that we have the skills to now how to respond. As I mentioned last week, I will be trying to highlight a Navigation Rule each week as space allows. Given our upcoming training Rule 2 … Responsibility is fitting for this week. (a) Nothing in these Rules shall exonerate any vessel, or the owner, master, or crew thereof, from the consequences of any neglect to comply with these Rules or of the neglect of any precaution which may be required by the ordinary practice of seamen, or by the special circumstances of the case. (b) In construing and complying with these Rules due regard shall be had to all dangers of navigation and collision and to any special circumstances, including the limitations of the vessels involved, which may make a departure from these Rules necessary to avoid immediate danger In all, follow the rules unless doing so will cause or possible cause risk for serious danger to you, your vessel/passengers or the other vessel/passengers. But, to follow them means that you have to know what they are. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Knowing your navigation rules is important to being prepared and safe when out on the water. Scientist-In-The-Sea.During the summer of 1970, NOAAs Man in the Sea Program funded Florida State University to offer a series of semester-long residence classes at the Naval Coastal System Center in Panama City. Capt. George Bond, MD, organized U.S. Navy resources to host diving science faculty from many disciplines to expose their graduate students to naval underwater technology that might serve underwater research. Over the next three years they perfected the program such that by the time I attended in 1974, they accommodated 20 graduate students, with me being the last Scientist-In-The Sea student accepted into the program as funding soon ended. I was winding down a two-years-plus experience at Harbor Branch Foundation Lab (HBFL), still in search of a career in Diving Science. I was taking graduate courses at Florida Atlantic University, but frustrated with the previous years tragedy of the trapped mini-sub Johnson-Sea-Link off the Florida Keys that took the lives of Dr. Ed Links son and a respected Navy man. Dr. Larry Briel and Walley Jenkins invited me up to Panama City to meet with Dr. Bond to see if I could “ nd an alternate path. After a brief discussion of my past performance, he told Walley Id do just “ ne, to report for training in a few months and the interview was over. My lifes paradigm shift happened so quickly I missed the relevance of the moment. I returned to my job at HBFL and began plans for a productive summer at the lab oblivious of the opportunity. I did not know anything about the then prestigious NOAA funded Navy-FSU program called Scientist-InThe-Sea until Chris Combs, their graduate coordinator called me angrily a month later to ask if I was going to apply or stop wasting his time. His lecture was enough to get me on track, secure time off from my job, get graduate recommendations secured and forms completed to report to the base on time. Little was the same afterwards. My lifelong beard was removed, I was issued a jump-suit uniform, we moved into dormitories, issued military visitor IDs, ate at the military mess and, yes, began PT every morning (swimming and jogging). After PT, morning lectures and afternoon practical “ eld or pool exercises followed six days a week for the next 10 weeks. This fast paced schedule was too much for me! The week we were trained on Surface Supplied diving (helmets included), I rebelled. I could see no science in what we were doing, just exposure to technology, the Navy way. While fascinating in its own right, I sought the academic interaction I thought would be provided. I threatened to quit the program. That got me a meeting with the Master Chief Wilbur Eaton. He was surprised at “ rst, then amused. He said the faculty of the program had already pinned their hopes on me to coordinate the next SITS Program, through dif“ cult, unfunded times. I greeted this with incredulity! I was the graduate student after all, I was supposed to learn from them, and how disappointed I was in the direction I was being lead. Wilbur said his amusement was in my failure to recognize that they were the past, graduate students were the future, and the sooner we came to grips with it, the sooner we could change it. I stayed. With Navy assistance, I organized and coordinated SITS 1976 at the FSU Marine Lab with 35 guest faculty speakers, a staff of six and 10 students. I again organized and coordinated SITS 2000 on base in Panama City with similar results. Master Chief Wilbur Eaton empowered me in 1974 to stop following and take the lead. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonFWC NewsTheyre back. Gulf sturgeon have begun their annual migration back into the Suwannee River. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of“ cers have reported seeing the “ sh jump already this year. People have been injured in accidental collisions with the jumping sturgeon. In 2011, six boaters were hurt and 11 encounters with sturgeon were reported. Last season, we had quite a few people hurt, some seriously,Ž said Maj. Roy Brown, regional law enforcement commander for the FWCs North Central Region, based in Lake City. Just one person getting hurt is too many. We want people to be aware the Gulf sturgeon are returning to the Suwannee, and the risk of injury to boaters does exist.Ž In 2006, FWC officials began working on a public awareness campaign to alert boaters to the risks of jumping sturgeon. We posted signs at each boat ramp along the Suwannee, explaining the risk of impacts with these “ sh,Ž Brown said. Our of“ cers will be on water patrol during this period and into the summer months in a continued effort to educate boaters about these jumping “ sh.Ž Whats the best course of action for avoiding a collision? We recommend boaters reduce their speed to reduce the risk of impact and to give people more time to react if they do encounter a jumping sturgeon,Ž Brown said. The FWC also recommends that all boaters wear their life jackets.Ž The Suwannee River appears to support the largest viable population of Gulf sturgeon. Biologists estimate the annual population at 10,000-14,000 “ sh, averaging approximately 40 pounds each. Adult “ sh spend eight to nine months each year in the river spawning and three to four of the coolest months in Gulf waters. Biologists are unsure why sturgeon jump. Theories include that the “ sh jump to communicate or as a dominance display. I have seen these collisions referred to as attacks. However, these “ sh are in no way attacking when they jump. They are simply doing what they have been doing for millions of years: jumping. They arent targeting the boaters,Ž Brown said. Gulf sturgeon can get quite big, exceeding eight feet and 200 pounds. They have five rows of rock-hard scutes along their sides, back and belly. When sturgeon and boaters collide, the results can be devastating,Ž Brown said. State and federal laws protect sturgeon, just like bald eagles, panthers and sea turtles. It is illegal to harvest Gulf sturgeon. To report sturgeon collisions, call 888-404-FWCC (3922). If anyone is involved in an incident with a jumping sturgeon, please report it to the FWC. With the data received, we can get a better overall view of where the “ sh are jumping and get the word out to the public,Ž Brown said. For more information about the Gulf sturgeon, go to MyFWC.com/Research and click on Saltwater.ŽSturgeon returning to Suwannee RiverCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed Apr 18, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 12:44 AM 3.1 ft. 1:30 AM High -0.1 ft. 1:16 AM 0.2 ft. 2:29 AM 0.5 ft. 3:49 AM 0.6 ft. 5:03 AM 0.7 ft. 5:59 AM 0.8 ft. 6:42 AM 0.8 ft. 7:17 AM Low 2.4 ft. 7:52 AM 2.4 ft. 9:18 AM 2.5 ft. 10:43 AM 2.7 ft. 11:40 AM 3.0 ft. 12:20 PM 3.2 ft. 12:53 PM 3.4 ft. 1:23 PM High 1.8 ft. 12:07 PM 1.9 ft. 1:25 PM 1.9 ft. 3:38 PM 1.5 ft. 5:32 PM 1.0 ft. 6:34 PM 0.6 ft. 7:18 PM 0.2 ft. 7:56 PM Low 3.3 ft. 6:08 PM 2.9 ft. 7:26 PM 2.6 ft. 10:00 PM 2.7 ft. 11:42 PM High Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed Apr 18, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 12:41 AM 3.1 ft. 1:27 AM High -0.1 ft. 1:13 AM 0.3 ft. 2:26 AM 0.5 ft. 3:46 AM 0.7 ft. 5:00 AM 0.8 ft. 5:56 AM 0.8 ft. 6:39 AM 0.9 ft. 7:14 AM Low 2.5 ft. 7:49 AM 2.4 ft. 9:15 AM 2.5 ft. 10:40 AM 2.8 ft. 11:37 AM 3.0 ft. 12:17 PM 3.3 ft. 12:50 PM 3.5 ft. 1:20 PM High 1.9 ft. 12:04 PM 2.1 ft. 1:22 PM 2.0 ft. 3:35 PM 1.6 ft. 5:29 PM 1.1 ft. 6:31 PM 0.6 ft. 7:15 PM 0.2 ft. 7:53 PM Low 3.4 ft. 6:05 PM 2.9 ft. 7:23 PM 2.7 ft. 9:57 PM 2.8 ft. 11:39 PM High Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed A p r 18, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:18 AM 2.7 ft. 1:20 AM 2.8 ft. 2:06 AM High -0.1 ft. 2:20 AM 0.2 ft. 3:33 AM 0.4 ft. 4:53 AM 0.6 ft. 6:07 AM 0.6 ft. 7:03 AM 0.7 ft. 7:46 AM 0.8 ft. 8:21 AM Low 2.3 ft. 8:28 AM 2.2 ft. 9:54 AM 2.3 ft. 11:19 AM 2.5 ft. 12:16 PM 2.8 ft. 12:56 PM 3.0 ft. 1:29 PM 3.2 ft. 1:59 PM High 1.6 ft. 1:11 PM 1.7 ft. 2:29 PM 1.7 ft. 4:42 PM 1.3 ft. 6:36 PM 0.9 ft. 7:38 PM 0.5 ft. 8:22 PM 0.2 ft. 9:00 PM Low 3.1 ft. 6:44 PM 2.7 ft. 8:02 PM 2.5 ft. 10:36 PM High Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed Apr 18, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 12:36 AM 2.3 ft. 1:22 AM High -0.1 ft. 1:27 AM 0.2 ft. 2:40 AM 0.4 ft. 4:00 AM 0.5 ft. 5:14 AM 0.5 ft. 6:10 AM 0.6 ft. 6:53 AM 0.6 ft. 7:28 AM Low 1.8 ft. 7:44 AM 1.8 ft. 9:10 AM 1.9 ft. 10:35 AM 2.0 ft. 11:32 AM 2.2 ft. 12:12 PM 2.4 ft. 12:45 PM 2.6 ft. 1:15 PM High 1.3 ft. 12:18 PM 1.4 ft. 1:36 PM 1.4 ft. 3:49 PM 1.1 ft. 5:43 PM 0.7 ft. 6:45 PM 0.4 ft. 7:29 PM 0.2 ft. 8:07 PM Low 2.5 ft. 6:00 PM 2.2 ft. 7:18 PM 2.0 ft. 9:52 PM 2.1 ft. 11:34 PM High Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed Apr 18, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 12:28 AM 2.4 ft. 1:14 AM High -0.1 ft. 12:55 AM 0.2 ft. 2:08 AM 0.5 ft. 3:28 AM 0.6 ft. 4:42 AM 0.7 ft. 5:38 AM 0.8 ft. 6:21 AM 0.8 ft. 6:56 AM Low 1.9 ft. 7:36 AM 1.8 ft. 9:02 AM 1.9 ft. 10:27 AM 2.1 ft. 11:24 AM 2.3 ft. 12:04 PM 2.5 ft. 12:37 PM 2.7 ft. 1:07 PM High 1.7 ft. 11:46 AM 1.9 ft. 1:04 PM 1.8 ft. 3:17 PM 1.4 ft. 5:11 PM 1.0 ft. 6:13 PM 0.6 ft. 6:57 PM 0.2 ft. 7:35 PM Low Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed A p r 18, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 12:30 AM 2.2 ft. 1:39 AM High -0.1 ft. 1:05 AM 0.1 ft. 2:20 AM 0.2 ft. 3:29 AM 0.4 ft. 4:30 AM 0.6 ft. 5:21 AM 0.8 ft. 6:04 AM 0.9 ft. 6:41 AM Low 2.2 ft. 9:34 AM 2.2 ft. 10:33 AM 2.2 ft. 11:15 AM 2.2 ft. 11:46 AM 2.3 ft. 12:12 PM 2.4 ft. 12:33 PM 2.4 ft. 12:51 PM High 1.6 ft. 12:06 PM 1.5 ft. 1:54 PM 1.3 ft. 3:34 PM 1.0 ft. 4:48 PM 0.7 ft. 5:45 PM 0.5 ft. 6:33 PM 0.2 ft. 7:14 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 12 April 18First April 28 Full April 6 Last April 13 New April 20Major Times 6:57 AM 8:57 AM 7:25 PM 9:25 PM Minor Times 1:35 AM 2:35 AM 12:20 PM 1:20 PM Major Times 7:52 AM 9:52 AM 8:18 PM 10:18 PM Minor Times 2:23 AM 3:23 AM 1:22 PM 2:22 PM Major Times 8:42 AM 10:42 AM 9:06 PM 11:06 PM Minor Times 3:06 AM 4:06 AM 2:21 PM 3:21 PM Major Times 9:30 AM 11:30 AM 9:52 PM 11:52 PM Minor Times 3:44 AM 4:44 AM 3:19 PM 4:19 PM Major Times 10:15 AM 12:15 PM 10:36 PM 12:36 AM Minor Times 4:18 AM 5:18 AM 4:14 PM 5:14 PM Major Times 10:58 AM 12:58 PM 11:19 PM 1:19 AM Minor Times 4:50 AM 5:50 AM 5:09 PM 6:09 PM Major Times 11:41 AM 1:41 PM 12:02 AM 2:02 AM Minor Times 5:22 AM 6:22 AM 6:03 PM 7:03 PM Average Average+ Average Average Average Average Good7:13 am 8:03 pm 1:36 am 12:21 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:11 am 8:03 pm 2:24 am 1:23 pm 7:10 am 8:04 pm 3:07 am 2:22 pm 7:09 am 8:04 pm 3:44 am 3:20 pm 7:08 am 8:05 pm 4:19 am 4:16 pm 7:07 am 8:06 pm 4:51 am 5:10 pm 7:06 am 8:06 pm 5:23 am 6:04 pm58% 51% 44% 38% 31% 25% 19% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 11AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn March 30, Derek Burton Fogg, 29, of Crawfordville and Andi Eugene Mysch, 35, of Crawfordville were arrested for battery after getting into an altercation on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Road. The two men were riding inside the same vehicle when they got into a dispute, got out of the vehicle and became involved in an altercation along the side the road. Both men fell to the ground and suffered minor injuries but declined EMS treatment. The two men are related and reside together. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On March 29, Michael Boxberger of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at Funky Fiddler in Panacea. Several items were stolen from outside the establishment including a channel marker, red log cabin television stand and four large ” ower planters “ lled with dirt. The items were valued at $820. € On March 29, a 30-yearold Crawfordville woman suffered minor injuries when she jumped off a second story balcony at her home. EMS treated the woman at the scene. She was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital as a precaution. € On March 29, Joseph Avery of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash. Avery was traveling on Spring Creek Highway when he was struck by a vehicle driven by Myrtle Frances Ladd of Crawfordville who was traveling on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Road. Ladd failed to stop at the stop sign and struck the Avery vehicle before leaving the scene. She was found a short time later. Both vehicles suffered $1,000 worth of damage and the drivers refused medical treatment. € On March 30, Synethia Jones of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her vehicle. Someone struck the victims vehicle with a rock. The rocks were taken from a grave in the Crawfordville Cemetery and thrown at the vehicle. € On March 31, David Smith of Crawfordville reported a structure “ re. He reported hearing a transformer blow and noticed sparks emitting from the electrical box at his neighbors home. No “ re or smoke damage was observed inside the residence. A tree limb falling on the electrical line caused the transformer to blow and created minor damage to the siding of the home and electrical box. Damage was estimated at $300. € On March 31, Larry Bell of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft. The victims bulldog was reported missing. The dog is valued at $700. € On March 31, Joe Walker of Crawfordville reported being struck by a vehicle at the intersection of Old Shell Point Road and Ball Court. The victim stopped his vehicle for a stop sign and Charles McLaughlin of Crawfordville reportedly struck the back of Walkers vehicle. Both vehicles were damaged and McLaughlin was found at fault in the accident. A fence also suffered $100 worth of damage. € On March 31, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after an employee allegedly observed Brittany Louvon Harris, 20, of Palmetto, place a swimsuit in her purse and pass the checkout area without paying for the item. The swimsuit was valued at $39 and Harris was taken to the Wakulla County Jail. € On March 31, Joseph A.T. Humphries, 73, of Crawfordville was involved in a traffic crash at Riverside Caf in St. Marks. Humphries failed to stop at a stop sign on Highway 363 and struck a van parked at the establishment. The van was owned by Matthew D. McKinney of Crawfordville. Restaurant patrons secured Humphries until law enforcement arrived on the scene. Field sobriety exercises were conducted at a nearby business establishment and Humphries was arrested for DUI. Due to injuries received in the accident, Humphries was allowed to seek outside medical treatment. € On April 1, Tabitha Mathers of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her vehicle on Wakulla Beach Road. A suspect has been identi“ ed. The medication is valued at $71. € On April 1, Donald Cayson of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. A lawn mower, television, washer and dryer and couch were reported missing. Later, an air conditioning unit was discovered missing. The stolen property is valued at $3,100. € On April 1, Robert Kemp of Crawfordville reported the theft of bicycles. Four bicycles were stolen from the victims yard. They are valued at $335. € On March 31, two Perry men were involved in a traf“ c crash on U.S. Highway 98 near Walker Farm. The Taylor County men struck a tree that came down across the road in a storm. There were no injuries but $5,000 worth of damage was reported to a truck and boat. € On April 1, a 17-yearold female was involved in a traffic crash at U.S. Highway 98 and Sopchoppy Highway at the Lower Y. The juvenile pulled in front of a vehicle driven by Sarah Averill and was struck on the driver side. Damage to the juveniles vehicle was estimated at $7,500 and damage to Averills vehicle was estimated at $4,000. The juvenile was found at fault for failure to yield the right of way. Field sobriety exercises were given to the juvenile who passed the exercises. An 18-year-old female was a passenger in the vehicle with the juvenile driver. € On April 2, Wesley White of Tallahassee reported a grand theft in Panacea. The victim left his boat in front of a Panacea business establishment. The vessel was stolen prior to being stored in a secured boat yard. The boat, boat motor, trailer and equipment is valued at $24,725. The property was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. € On April 2, William Smith of Sopchoppy reported a theft in Panacea. The victim reported that steel plates were stolen off a work barge owned by Ben Withers Construction at an Ochlockonee Bay boat ramp. Seven plates were stolen with a value of $50 each. The plates cover manholes for the hull of the boat. € On April 2, Louis A. Sutton of Crawfordville reported the theft of copper tubing from an air conditioning unit and propane tank. The victim had not been at the home for several weeks and the cuts were not fresh. The value of the copper is $120. € On April 2, Katelyn Mosley of Panacea reported a criminal mischief to her residence. A forced entry was discovered and damage to the home was estimated at $100. Nothing was taken from inside the home. € On April 3, Billy Whit“ eld of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to property owned by Talquin Electric. He responded to a home on Smokey Hollow Drive in Crawfordville to investigate a possible theft of copper being stolen out of a meter box. Damage to the meter box was estimated at $250. € On April 4, David Cochrane of Tuscaloosa, Ala., reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. Two marine batteries were stolen from the victims Crawfordville home. The batteries were removed from vessels at the home. The stolen property is valued at $200. While Deputy Clint Beam was investigating the theft he determined that other thefts have also been committed in the area and suspects have been identi“ ed. € On April 4, Richard Armstrong of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of metal. A variety of vehicle parts, tool boxes and wheels were reported missing from is property. The stolen property is valued at $7,000. € On April 4, Russell Chubb of Thomasville, Ga., reported a residential burglary. A marine battery was stolen from the victims boat at his Crawfordville home. The battery was valued at $100. € On April 4, Judith Smith of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. Someone damaged a door lock at the victims home. Damage was estimated at $20. € On April 4, Jeanine Dalton of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim gave a friend her credit card to make repairs on her vehicle. She observed nine unauthorized charges on her credit card totaling $577. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 804 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce has identi“ ed the man whose body was discovered in Sopchoppy on Saturday, April 7. The badly decomposed body of Michael Arthur Ballard, 68, was discovered inside a camper trailer after the property owner observed a wildlife near the trailer. An autopsy was conducted over the weekend that determined that Ballard died of natural causes. Ballards relatives have been noti“ ed in South Florida. A resident on Bugger Bottom Road reported that the man was deceased inside a camper trailer near the reporting persons home. The victim was living on part of the reporting persons land at the time of his death. Detectives observed a badly decomposed body lying on the ” oor of the camper. Dead mans body found in SopchoppyWakulla County Fire-Rescue responded to a car “ re on Spring Creek Highway one mile north of Coastal Highway on Wednesday, April 5. A passerby was able to get the lone occupant out of the car before she sustained any injuries. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCar re SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHonesty recognizedWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum presented Johnny B. Ross Jr. of Crawfordville with a plaque on Tuesday, April 3, honoring him for his honesty in returning a tourists lost wallet and fanny pack on March 20. The property was owned by a man from Quebec, Canada, and was left on a Medart convenience store gasoline pump as the motorcycle tourist was changing into warmer clothing and fueling up. OOPS!The Girls from Evolution Day Spa Hair Salon~ Robyn ~ Miranda ~ Linda ~HAVEMOVEDANDARENOW OPENAT THEIR NEW LOCATIONHair Place That850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. 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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A My aunt loved him with all her heart,Ž Moreno says. She used to babysit their son, Alan Brashear, who was only 7 months old when his father was killed, and she remembers her aunt talking about her husband often. It really got to her,Ž Moreno says of Brashears death. She was upset for years.Ž Thelma Lee passed away about four years ago and Alan received a heart transplant in 1987 and died a few years after. I wish my aunt and cousin had got to be there,Ž Moreno says. Moreno says she remembers the picture of Gene Brashear that Thelma Lee kept and how much Alan looked like his father. He was a good looking man,Ž Moreno says. Although Moreno was unable to attend the burial service, several other families were able to attend, including numerous cousins and Brashears granddaughter Alysen Davis and her daughter. I wish I could have been there,Ž Moreno says. Her family members who attended said more people showed up than expected and the support was overwhelming. They couldnt believe it,Ž Moreno says. In 2000, the Korean War Project launched a program to identify the remains of American forces found in Korea. A joint U.S. and Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea team, led by Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, excavated a mass grave in Unsan in 2000. Remains of at least “ ve individuals were found, as well as U.S. military uniforms. In 2007, thanks to technology, scientists from the Armed Forces DNA Identi“ cation Laboratory reanalyzed the remains. Moreno says Brashears cousin gave the lab blood for DNA. Scientists then used dental records and the DNA from the cousin and a sister to identify the remains. Brashear was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star, Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, Korean Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal and United Nations Service Medal, Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal. Moreno is originally from Kentucky and moved to Wakulla County about 20 years ago with her daughter and son-in-law. Brashear has three great-granddaughters, seven great-great grandchildren and one great-greatgreat-grandson who live in Wakulla County. According to the DPMO, more than 7,900 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. PHOTOS BY GARY EMORD-NETZLEY/Messenger-InquirerThe motorcade carrying the remains of Army Sgt. William Eugene Brashear.A soldier is “ nally returned home A ceremonial ” ag is given to Alysen Davis, granddaughter of Sgt. William Eugene Brashear, during a military funeral service for Brashear. Sitting next to Davis is her sister, Lesley Brashear and Davis daughter, Lucia Davis. Relay for Life paints the LionTAMMIE BARFIELDThis years honorary chair, Alexis Tully. A student at Wakulla High School, she is a cancer survivor who was diagnosed last year with basal carcinoma/nasal cancer. She is attending events around the county to create awareness of Relay for Life and will participate in the opening ceremony at the Relay for Life event. The Lion at Azalea Park got a fresh coat of paint on Saturday, April 7, from Relay for Life. The annual fundraiser for the American Cancer Society is set for Friday, April 20 through Saturday, April 21, at the track at Wakulla High School. TAMMIE BARFIELDThe artist painting the lion is Urika Delvecchio from Tallahassee. She is a volunteer on the Relay for Life committee. VisitWakullaThe Natural Place to Be in FloridaThank You to our Sponsors FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALONTake advantage of Spring/ Summer RatesAsk for our monthly specials! FEATHER LOCKS are here!! 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) We offer ”exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT HAIRSALO N Book Your Prom Appoint mentNOW !10% OFFW/THIS ADEXP. 5/8/12 the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Charlotte SullivanMarch 2012 Winner Her name was drawn fromHunter, Hayden & Blake ReevesI like eating at the local family restaurants and were blessed with the many Wakulla County has to oer.Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winn er!One Meal fro m Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much!

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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 What are the most fuel-ef cient cars? EarthTalk, Page 12B FDA is studying Bisphenol A By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Several months ago I wrote an article about some of the safety concerns expressed by many on the use of Bisphenol A (BPA). It had been suggested that everyone consider lessoning the amount of canned foods consumed or seek canned foods that are in containers lined with an alternative material. This was due to the BPA that is contained in can linings and in some baby and water bottles. I would like to continue this discussion with an update from the Food and Drug Administration. What is BPA? It is a chemical used in the production of plastics and resins, such as some water and baby bottles and the coatings of some food cans. It is also used in some consumer goods, such as compact discs and thermal cash register tapes. It has generated controversy about its impact on human health and development. What are the concerns? Research has shown that BPA can seep into food or beverages from containers made with BPA and into your body when you handle products made with it. It was suggested that the possible health effects of BPA may affect the brain, behavior and prostate glands of fetuses, infants and children. Infants are a potentially sensitive population for BPA because their neurological and endocrine, elimination and detoxi“ cation systems are immature. In 2008, the FDA conducted a review of toxicology research and information on BPA, and at that time, judged foodrelated material containing BPA on the market to be safe. But recent studies reported subtle effects of low doses of BPA in laboratory animals. While it was not proven to harm children or adults, the newer studies led federal health of“ cials to express some concern about the safety of BPA. What did the FDAs updated research reveal? The latest scienti“ c assessment continues to suggest that the evidence at this time does not support that the very low levels of human exposure to BPA through the diet are unsafe. FDA scientist have also recently determined that exposure to BOA through foods for infants is much less than had been previously believed and that the trace amounts of the chemical that enter the body, whether it is an adult or a child are rapidly metabolized and eliminated. Because there had been particular concern about its use in infant bottles and training (sippy) cups, FDA supported efforts to “ nd alternatives to BPA in the manufacture of these products. The FDAs “ ndings include: € The elevation of BPA from food that could be passed from pregnant mothers to the fetus is so low that it could not be measured. € Exposure to BPA in human infants is from 84 to 92 percent less than previously estimated. € BPA is rapidly metabolized and eliminated through feces and urine. What can a consumer do if still concerned? It is recommended that consumers avoid changes in their food consumption that would prevent good nutrition, particularly for infants. If a consumer wants to limit exposure to BPA, the following is suggested: € Plastic containers have recycle codes on the bottom. Some, but not all, plastics that are marked with recycle codes 3 to 7 may be made with BPA. This allows the consumer to avoid the use of BPA containers if desired. Continued on Page 12BFrom DEP NewsGovernor Rick Scott issued a proclamation celebrating April 22 as Earth Day 2012 and to celebrate, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection is holding events statewide throughout the month of April. Celebrated worldwide, Earth Day encourages people of all ages to protect and preserve the planets natural resources. Earth Day at the Capitol will be held on Friday, April 20, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Capitol Courtyard in Tallahassee. DEPs Of“ ce of Environmental Education is hosting Earth Day at the Capitol. The theme for this years event is Green Schools: Creating Healthy, Ef“ cient and Productive Learning Environments. The celebration at the Capitol recognizes the important role students and educators play in environmental protection. Hands-on educational booths and activities will be featured throughout the day, as well as a collection event where Easy As One staff will collect plastic bags and old cell phones. Speakers throughout the ceremony include DEP Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration Greg Munson, DOH Interim Surgeon General Dr. Harris and Florida Power & Light Co. Vice President for State Governmental Affairs Mike Sole. A District-wide Plastic Bag Recycling Competition will be held the week of April 16April 20 at DEPs Northwest District Of“ ces in Panama City, Pensacola and Tallahassee in honor of Earth Day. Bags will be taken to local grocery stores for recycling.Earth Day will be celebrated April 22Statewide bluebird blitz is April 13-14 The second annual Statewide Bluebird Blitz will take place on Friday April 13, and Saturday April 14. The Florida Bluebird Society is an af“ liate of the North American Bluebird Society. Our mission is the conservation and protection of Eastern bluebirds and other native cavity-nesting bird species through educational programs and the collection and dissemination of pertinent and relevant information. One of our goals is to establish the location of Eastern bluebirds throughout the state. The Spring Bluebird Blitz will help us determine where Eastern bluebirds are breeding and nesting in Florida. It is a concentrated effort by as many volunteers as possible going out all over the state of Florida trying to locate as many Eastern bluebirds as they can find. It is a great reason to get outside and enjoy one of Floridas public lands. State parks, state forests, county natural lands or preserves and city parks are all great places to go for a walk in search of Eastern bluebirds. Some people are also fortunate enough to have bluebirds in their own neighborhoods or backyards. You do not need to be an experienced birder to “ nd Eastern bluebirds. They are easy to spot thanks to their open behavior and their lovely plumage. John Burroughs, a popular nineteenth-century American naturalist, described them as having the earth tinge on his breast and the sky tinge on his back.Ž Males have blue backs, rusty colored breasts, and white bellies. Participation is simple: € Go outside on Friday April 13 and/or Saturday April 14, and look for bluebirds € Record as much as you are able about the bluebirds you see. Location, behavior, sex, age, etc. We also want to know where you looked and did not “ nd any bluebirds. € Download, complete and submit the Blitz Report form that is on the Florida Bluebird Society web site, ” oridabluebirdsociety.com. An adult male and two immature Eastern bluebirds. Florida Bluebird Society expanding knowledge about eastern bluebirds throughout Florida with a statewide bluebird blitz.GLENDA SIMMONS JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, April 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a last 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Highway. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350. Friday, April 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, April 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, April 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, April 17  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  IRIS GARDEN CLUB will meet at Just Fruits Nursery at 1 p.m. Betsy Smith will be presenting ideas for lawn beauti cation. For more information, call Jeannie Brodhead at 926-2264 or email irisgardenclub.wakulla@gmail.com. SARRACENIA CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY will show the video “Macro Photography” by nature photographer Taylor Lockwood at 6 p.m. at the library. The video includes information on lighting, composition and how to use common household items to get the right effects. Wednesday, April 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, April 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group is for anyone, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Special EventsThursday, April 12  WAKULLA COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Join committee members and representatives of the Wakulla and Leon County Soil and Water Conservation Districts to nd out more about these positions and the role they play in preserving and protecting natural resources. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. Friday, April 13  RIBBON CUTTING for First Bank, Senior Products Division at 11:45 a.m. at the chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville. Join them in welcoming Michael Weltman with First Bank, Senior Products Division.  SPRING PRODUCTION “FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO” will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at the auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a show on Saturday and Sunday. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. “Final Flick at The Flamingo” by Susan Solburg parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre.  SARAH MAC BAND will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. For reservations, contact poshjava@gmail. com or call 962-1010. Saturday, April 14  SOPCHOPPY WORM GRUNTIN’ FESTIVAL will be held from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. There will be music, arts and craft vendors, worm gruntin’ contest, crowning of king and queen, horseshoe championship, bait casting contest, hula hoop contest and worm grunters ball. For more information, visit www.wormgruntinfestival.com or call 962-4138.  HEIDE’S 16TH ANNUAL ROSE SALE will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Highway. Proceeds bene t CHAT of Wakulla. Heirloom roses in a 3 gallon container will be sold for $7. For more information, call 926-3849 or 926-0890. Roses will also be sold on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m.  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or email carriejstevens@comcast.net. Children need to bring a train, snack and drink.  FIFTH ANNUAL RALLY FOR THE CURE BREAST CANCER GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held at Wildwood Golf Course. This event is sponsored by Capital City Bank. For more information, contact Karen Waters at karen.wildwood@aol.com or at 926-1222 or 926-4653.  GROW MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES CLASS on Bugs and Water will be held from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. Learn to identify good and bad insects. Call 926-3931 for more information.  SPRING PRODUCTION “FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO” will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at the auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a show on Sunday afternoon. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. “Final Flick at The Flamingo” by Susan Solburg parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre.  BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the library. Browse through books, video and audio. Donations go to the Friends of the Library.  SOPCHOPPY HIGH SCHOOL REUNION will be held at the school beginning at 1 p.m. Call 926-7373 for more information.  SOPCHOPPY OPRY Branson and Vegas Style Show will be held in the Historic Sopchoppy School Auditorium at 7 p.m. with Todd Allen performing the songs of Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Elvis. Call 962-3711 for ticket information. Sunday, April 15  HEIDE’S 16TH ANNUAL ROSE SALE will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Highway. Proceeds bene t homeless animal and CHAT. Heirloom roses can be purchased for $7. Call 926-3849 or 926-0890 for more information.  SPRING PRODUCTION “FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO” will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at the auditorium at 2:30 p.m. Cost for students is $4 and adults is $6. “Final Flick at The Flamingo” by Susan Solburg roughly parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre.  PHOTO EXHIBIT RECEPTION for Lou and Betsy Kellenberger’s “Wonders of Wakulla” will be held at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.  CONQUISTADORS IN THE FABLED LAND OF THE APALACHEE will be held at San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park, St. Marks, with tours at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. including a discussion with archaeologist Phil Gerrell and historian Madeleine Carr. Reservations can be made at PalmettoExpeditions.com. A separate historic cruise is $10.  SPECIAL PRESENTATION “Dark Side of the Loon Migration and Winter Biology of the Common Loon” by Dr. Paul Spitzer will be held at 2 p.m. at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Spitzer has been a eld biologist, naturalist and ecologist for 45 years. Call 925-6121 for more information. Monday, April 16 SEN. MARCO RUBIO OFFICE HOURS will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at Sopchoppy City Hall. Members of his staff will be available to answer questions. Wednesday, April 18  BROWN BAG LUNCH SERIES “Employee Retention,” will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the chamber of ce. Registration is required. Contact the Chamber at 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com.  ST. MARKS FISH FRY for Wild About Wakulla Week will begin at 5 p.m. at the Yacht Club. Grouper, cheese grits, hushpuppies and sweet tea will be served. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for children under 12. Tickets are available at St. Mark’s City Hall or by calling 321-4522.  CONQUISTADORS IN THE FABLED LAND OF THE APALACHEE will be held at San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park, St. Marks, with tours at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. including a discussion with archaeologist Phil Gerrell and historian Madeleine Carr. Reservations can be made at PalmettoExpeditions.com. A separate historic cruise is $10. Thursday, April 19  CHAMBER AFTER HOURS EVENT will be held at the Wakulla Diving Center, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP to the Chamber at 926-1848. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. WHS spring production, “Final Flick at the Flamingo” at 7:30 p.m. Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin’ Festival 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Heide’s Rose Sale 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Highway. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, April 12  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for a workshop on the Children Services Council at 5 p.m. at the commission chambers.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. at city hall.  TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Tuesday, April 17  WAKULLA 2020 ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 4 p.m. at the library. They will review and prioritize projects in the Crawfordville Town Plan and other transportation projects throughout the county. Thursday, April 19  ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners Conference Room. By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL Interim DirectorBook Extravaganza Our bi-monthly Book Extravaganza Fundraiser will be held Saturday, April 14 from 9 a.m. to noon in our Main Meeting Room. As always, well have thousands of books, video and audio for your browsing pleasure. While monetary donations are not required, all funds raised go directly to the Friends of the Library. The Friends fund our Summer Program of Events, paid for our new public computers, and help pay for needed library expenses. As Ive stated before, the Friends have saved the citizens of Wakulla County more than $50,000 over the past 2 years by their fundraising efforts. They, along with the library, still need your help so please come out and help support your library. Members of the Friends will also be on hand for those wanting more information or wishing to contribute their time and money to help the WCPL grow into the library you deserve. Last chance for Tax Prep With tax day rapidly approaching, the AARPs last sessions of free tax preparation are upon us. They will be at the WCPL from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday and from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, April 17, which is tax day. This is your last chance to take advantage of this free opportunity. This service is intended for low to middle income “ lers with an emphasis on those over 50. On behalf of the 100s of people who have taken advantage of this service over the past 2 months, Id like to thank the AARP volunteers for all their time and hard work! Free Computer Classes We still have some seats available for some of our free computer classes the rest of this month. For those interested in web design, we have a Getting Started class on Tuesday, April 17, at 9:30 a.m. On Wednesday, April 25, were offering Windows 7: Email also at 9:30 a.m. Two other classes, Microsoft Excel 2007: More Formulas and Functions at 1:30 p.m. on April 17 and Windows 7: Organize Your Computer Files on April 25 are fully booked, but we will still take names for an on call list. As always, the classes require early registration. The schedule for the next round of classes will be out in late April. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 3BHEALTH & FITNESSYoga can help with anxiety and panic attacks, as those are in many ways exaggerated forms of stress. Both conditions are marked by a rajasic (agitated) state of mind and by what is known in Ayurveda as vata derangement. And both respond to various yogic tools, including asana (postures) and pranayama ( breathing), as well as lifestyle adjustments and the cultivation of pratyahara ( withdraw of the senses), turning the senses inward. One of the most useful yogic tools in these cases is a good asana practice, which burns off the nervous energy that can contribute to anxiety. And a number of breathing practices, including abdominal breathing and lengthening the exhalation relative to the inhalation, help reduce symptoms of anxiety. Scientific studies suggest that left-nostril breathing can effectively reduce symptoms of obsessivecompulsive disorder (and its probably also useful for less extreme forms of anxiety). In addition, the regular practice of both asana and pranayama (breathing techniques) leads to greater internal sensitivity, which can allow students to detect the first glimmer of an anxiety or panic attack and respond with yogic tools that might head off the problem. The earlier in the process you can intervene, the greater the likely ef“ cacy. For students who are open to them, bhakti practices such as prayer, chanting and devotional singing may be highly therapeutic for anxiety. In the long term, meditation and selfstudy (svadhyaya) offer the hope of getting at the deeper causes of the problem. Through meditation perhaps more than any other yogic tool, you start to see how busy your mind is, and you gain insight into some of the tricks that it plays. Many people may not realize how repetitive thoughts, of which they are usually barely aware, may be fueling their worries. Getting your students to start to see this pattern clearly is often the “ rst step to bringing it under greater control. In fact, seeing clearly can be helpful for anxiety and panic attacks in a variety of ways. Over the years Ive seen a few students, most of whom were otherwise vigorous and healthy, with incapacitating panic attacks. Their hearts were beating hard and fast, they were hyperventilating, and they felt as if they were having a heart attack and might suddenly die. But the reality is that a young and healthy person who is panicking is probably not going to have a heart attack no matter how fast and hard their hearts beat (when students are older or have risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure or elevated cholesterol, you need to be more careful). It often helps them simply to understand that panic is at its core an emotional, not a physical, problem. Seeing clearly is also useful in dealing with more run-of-the-mill anxiety. Most people who are anxious will admit, if theyre honest and paying attention, that much of what they worry about never happens. And even if it does, the consequences are often not as negative as they would have predicted. Sometimes, in retrospect, they realize that the thing they feared the most was precisely what needed to happen for them to grow or learn or get out of a bad situation „ in other words, it was ultimately a good thing. One useful self-study exercise is to have my students write down the 10 things theyre most worried about, then look back weeks or months later to see how many came true, and, if so, whether the consequences were as dire as theyd imagined. Keep in mind that anxiety can be a useful symptom, and the ability to get anxious has survival value. Thinking about potential threats, and planning how you might lower the risk or respond appropriately, can be extremely useful, even lifesaving. Going over the same worry dozens or even hundreds of times, when the iterations bring no new insight, isnt helpful and can make you miserable. This is where yogic philosophy can be useful. It teaches that, ultimately, no one can control whats going to happen. Despite your best efforts, some bad things undoubtedly will occur. All you can do is try to plan intelligently, give your best effort, let the universe take its course, and, when it does, respond as well as you can. When you realize that you ultimately dont have control over the future, it can take the pressure off „ and that alone may reduce anxiety. Heart opening yoga is doing backbends. Incorrect posture, mainly while sitting, can close and constrict the area around your heart. Things like low self-esteem and feeling generally bad can be from that. Take care of the present, said the great 20th-century master Ramana Mararshi, and the future will take care of itself.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140.By GENA DAVIS Whenever you start a new exercise program or diet, does it seem like something comes along and derails all your great plans and good intentions? A lot of people have issues or problems that they think prohibit them from working out or eating healthy. What can they do? I tell my clients that lifeŽ is always going to happen and you have to decide beforehand that you are going to work around whatever situation you “ nd yourself in. If your job, family or schedule make it dif“ cult to stick to a healthy diet and regular meals, start taking your meals in a cooler. Always have healthy food options on hand, even if you have to stash snacks in your car, purse, desk, etc. Explain to any family members that object to your eating plan that this is something you are doing for yourself and it will make you healthier and happier in the long run. Eat something small and healthy before going out with family or co-workers. That way you wont be starving and will be able to stick to your plan. Being hungry when you are in an environment that is full of temptation to overeat or make bad choices makes you more vulnerable emotionally and more likely to cave in to the temptation and make poor choices. You will only regret them later. If you are having trouble “ nding time to work out, you may need to sit down and ask yourself some hard questions. Do you have time to watch TV? Talk on the phone? Catch up with your friends on Facebook? Play games on the computer? If the answer to any of these questions is yes,Ž you have the time to work out, you just dont make the time. People will “ nd the time for the things that are most important to them. I have clients who work out at 5 or 6 a.m., simply because thats the only time that is available. I also have clients who work out after work, on their lunch break, or in the evenings. Whenever the most time is available is the best time to work out. Suppose you start working out and have an injury? If you have a lower body injury, you can still do upper body, and you can do lower body with an upper body injury, as long as your doctor approves, of course! Chances are, you can “ nd things to do that still get your heart rate up and make you break a sweat. If you are willing to work around whatever problem you have, there is a way. Bottom line, no one is going to offer to watch your kids, cook your dinner or clean your house so you can go to the gym! If that is something you want for yourself, you have to be willing to do whatever it takes to get you there. There are trainers who will come to your house, or meet you at the gym. There are classes you can go to, groups you can join. There are even TV shows and video games that you can use to get a workout. So get your doctors approval and then DO SOMETHING! There is always a way when you really want to achieve your goals. It may not be easy or quick, but you can get there, I promise. Have faith in yourself and take that “ rst step towards a healthy lifestyle. You will be glad you did!Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY GET FITSmall commitment,big reward!Yoga can help relieve stress Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain THG-11909 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ƒONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EARƒ www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926–8116 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Fun facts about earthworms There are more than 2,700 different types of earthworms residing on the planet. Earthworms are often known to be workhorses in the garden, helping to aerate and fertilize the soil while lling it with nutrients. Earthworms recycle materials like dead leaves, decaying animals and feces so new plant seedlings can grow and have the process begin anew. Worms have been around for 120 million years -one of the few species of insects that have stood the test of time. In just one acre of soil, there may be a million or more earthworms turning over the soil and chewing on organic matter. Without earthworms, most plants would not thrive. Earthworms have mucous covering their bodies in order to stay moist. This helps them to breathe through their skin. You may have noticed that after it rains worms appear on sidewalks and outside of their underground burrows. This is not because they are drowning underground, but because the environment is moist after it rains, making it more conducive for worms to breathe and move around to nd mates. Normally the dry conditions above ground make them dry out and die. Earthworms can be remarkable creatures to watch. Contrary to popular belief, worms do have a mouth and an opposite end for waste removal that is not interchangeable. This page sponsored in part by: How many words can you make from the word:S O P C H O P P Y How many words can you make from the word:S O P C H O P P Y 1. __ H O __ 2. __ H __ P P __ 3. H __ __ 4. C __ __ 5. P __ __ 6. P __ P P __ 7. __ O O __ H 8. __ H O __ 9. H __ __ P 10. C __ __ P 1. shop 2. choppy 3. hop 4. cop 5. pop 6. poppy 7. pooch 8. shop 9. hoop 10. coop Answers:

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Special to The NewsWild About Wakulla Week is from April 14 to April 22 and highlights the heritage and outdoor recreational opportunities of Wakulla County. The Kick-Off event is the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival on Saturday, April 14. The festival celebratesthe art of worm gruntin … pounding a stake (stob) into the ground and rubbing a flat piece of iron across its top creating vibrations that drive earthworms from the ground where they are collected for “ sh bait. The festival is held along the downtown streets of Sopchoppy with events beginning at 9 a.m. More than 80 vendors will be on hand to provide food, arts and crafts. The day concludes with the Worm Grunters Ball. There is no admission to the event and it is loaded with family oriented activities. Please visit www.WormGruntinFestival.com for more information. Special events, tours, and activities will be held April 15-22 throughout Wakulla Countys scenic, friendly and historic communities. SUNDAY, APRIL 15 WONDERS OF WAKULLA PHOTOGRAPHS On Sunday, April 15, the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea will host a reception for Lou and Betsy Kellenbergers Wonders of WakullaŽ photographic exhibit from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Both award-winning photographers, the couples art evokes a passion for the heritage and natural beauty of the region. TUESDAY, APRIL 17 GULF SPECIMEN Visit the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea with your children or grandchildren to be introduced to the glee of hands-on discovery. This is a mustexperience opportunity not only during Wild About Wakulla Week but anytime the explorerŽ inside you is looking to create vivid memories. Visit www.GulfSpecimen.org to get started on your family adventure or go to www.PalmettoExpeditions.com to make arrangements for a special tour on Tuesday, April 17. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18 ST. MARKS St. Marks, Americas oldest river town, exempli“ es the hospitality of a cozy Gulf coast village. Although any day is a good day to visit this community, its welcoming arms will offer guests special hometown opportunities on Wednesday, April 18. The Sweet Magnolia Inn will host a tour of its historic Bed and Breakfast. Shields Marina, Bo Lynn Store and Shell Island Fish Camp, are just a few of the businesses which will be inviting guests by for conversation, snacks and raf” e sign-ups. If manatees are an inspiration, then contact T-n-T Hide-A-Way at (850) 9256412 for more information on their guided manatee observation tour. Sunsets on the bay are certain memory makers and St. Marks Charters (StMarksCharters.com) can make those memories happen. For information regarding a shorter and very reasonably priced St. Marks River Sample Cruise on Wednesday, April 18, visit www.WildAboutWakulla. com. Hometown hospitality culminates with a “ sh fry beginning at 5 p.m. at the St. Marks Yacht Club, featuring grouper, cheese grits, hushpuppies and sweet tea. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for children under 12. Tickets are available at St. Marks city hall or by calling (850) 321-4522. Raf” e winners will be chosen during the “ sh fry. Evening activities continue at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge with a lanternlight tour of the lighthouse keepers home beginning at 7:30 p.m. Space is limited. Please call (850) 925-6121 for reservations. FRIDAY, APRIL 20 ART ON THE TERRACE On Friday evening, April 20, the Wakulla Wildlife Festival will delight residents and visitors with its Art on the Terrace at the historic Wakulla Springs Lodge in Wakulla Springs State Park. Fine art, “ ne food and fine music highlight the evenings activities. SATURDAY, APRIL 21 WAKULLA WILDLIFE FESTIVAL The fun continues on Saturday, April 21 at Wakulla Springs State Park as the Wakulla Wildlife Festival goes into high gear offering inspiring local musicians, knowledgeable exhibitors, dazzling presentations, convincing living history demonstrators and special premium guided tours. Visit www.WakullaWildlifeFestival.org for more information. SUNDAY, APRIL 22 CONQUISTADORS The weeks events wrap up on Sunday, April 22 with Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee.Ž Celebrating Viva Florida 500, the event dramatically captures the rich history at the confluence of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers with informative boat cruises along with museum and fort tours at San Marcos de Apalache State Park. Please visit www.PalmettoExpeditions.com for dates, times, and registration. Palmetto Expeditions offers a wide selection of tours suited to varying tastes and activity levels throughout the week. The website is a gateway to outdoor fun in Wakulla County and the Big Bend Region. Make arrangements for a trail ride, a sunset cruise or an action packed saltwater “ shing charter. Perhaps a personalized tour of Wakulla Countys sinkholes with a gourmet cheese and fruit picnic included would be more to your taste. Please visit www.WildAboutWakulla.com to guide you to more of what makes Wakulla County a destination for heritage and outdoor recreational activities and adventure. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 5B WILD ABOUT WAKULLA A celebration of Wakulla County, April 14-22€ Saturday, April 14 … Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival. € Sunday, April 15 … Wonders of Wakulla,Ž a reception for an opening of an exhibit featuring the photographs of Lou and Betsy Kellenberger at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. € Tuesday, April 17 … Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea. € Wednesday, April 18 … St. Marks Day. € Friday, April 20 … Art on the Terrace at Wakulla Springs State Park. € Saturday, April 21 … Wakulla Wildlife Festival at Wakulla Springs State Park. € Sunday, April 22 … Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee.Ž LOU KELLENBERGER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe St. Marks Lighthouse. It will be included in Wonders of Wakulla,Ž an exhibition of photographs by Lou and Betsy Kellenberg er, which opens with a reception on Sunday, April 15. A tour of the lighthouse keepers home will be part of the St. Marks Day events on Wednesday, April 18. Celebrates 2012 Wild About Wakulla Weekwith Certi“ed Green Guide tours • Birding/wildlife • Nature/historical walks • Sinkhole hikes • Nature photography • Scenic boat tours • Trail rides/trail hikes • Clay sculpture workshops For complete schedule, details & registration please visitwww.PalmettoExpeditions.com Corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy Register for gift Basket Proceeds for local Spay & Neuter Feral catsThursday donate shelf stable food here for Manna Food Bank DIRT PUDDINGWITH GUMMYWORMS DURINGTHE FESTIVALON SATURDAY “A Clay Experience”at the Wakulla Welcome Centerin Panacea • Tuesday 2-4 Meet Nancy Je erson, local clay artist and Certi ed Green Guide, to enjoy a “hands-on” clay experience. Let Nancy show you how she uses nature to inspire her creations as she guides you in hand building a turtle, a kayak or canoe, a bird or sh, or whatever ora, fauna or experience has inspired you! All materials supplied and nal piece glazed and red. Completed pieces will be shipped via US Post O ce at cost. O ered through www.NancyJeffersonPottery.com

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy CAPT. JAMES HODGESSpecial to The NewsWe have four raf” es that began April 1, and will end on Wednesday, April 18. The idea is to get as many people as possible to physically go inside these four businesses in an effort to reveal how special St. Marks really is. St. Marks Charters is raf” ing off a Sunset Cruise for SixŽ … simply stop in Bo Lynns Grocery and put your name in the jar. Shields Marina is offering a half-day Pontoon boat. Stop in Shields Marina and drop your name into the jar. Shell Island has an overnight stay for two. Stop in Shell Island Marina and drop your name into the jar. Sweet Magnolia Bed and Breakfast has an overnight stay for two, including breakfast. Drop by Sweet Magnolia, or Shields Marina to get your name in the jar. Sweet Magnolia will be giving open house guided tours of their beautiful establishment on the weekends, and on April 18. We are using the catchphrase from The Hunger GamesŽ … May the odds forever be in your favor!Ž The winners names will be drawn at the Fish Fry being served at the St. Marks Yacht Club on Wednesday, April 18 at 5 p.m. The cost is $10 per plate, featuring fried grouper with all the “ xings. Immediately following the “ sh fry, those who have made reservations can drive to the St. Marks Refuge for the guided lantern tour of the lighthouse. On Sunday, April 15, Wednesday, April 18 and Sunday, April 22, St. Marks Charters will be offering Guided Sampler tours of the town via boat in the mornings. Pick up and drop off is at Shields Marina. The cost is $5 per person. Beginning at 12:30 p.m. we will move down to the old fort and start our ConquistadorŽ tour, which is the historic telling of how the Spanish explorers came to St. Marks, where their fort was built, etc. The historical walking tour of the fort and brief lecture inside the fort museum will be a charge of $8 per person which includes the admission fee to the museum. Historian Madeleine Carr will tell of the historic adventure from the old fort after the boat tour. Space is limited, so please call (850)925-6121 for reservations, or visit St. Marks Lighthouse, Lantern Tour for details. For more information, visit the webpage, www. wildaboutwakulla.com/ April18.html.Special to The NewsYou are invited to the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea to enjoy the Wonders of WakullaŽ photographic exhibit and reception of Tallahassees Lou and Betsy Kellenberger. Lou Kellenberger is a conservation, nature and outdoor photographer. Public lands, including state parks, national forests and refuges are some of his favorite places to look for photo opportunities. His goal is to evoke a certain time and place and for the viewer to feel that they are there with him. In recent years, Lou has been photographing the people and places of Floridas Forgotten Coast in an effort to preserve the history of Old Florida and to create an awareness of visiting and living in this special place. He has started a Blue Highway Collection, featuring scenes along back roads, byways and seldom seen places. Betsy Kellenberger is a nature and outdoor photographer, always looking for the perfect light to catch that once in a lifetime shot. Northwest Florida is an excellent place to “ nd opportunities for nature photography with a variety of state parks, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, the beaches and numerous wildlife management areas. Most weekends “ nd us out with our cameras looking for interesting subjects such as migrating ducks, manatees or wildflowers. We look for our favorite spots with the changing of the seasons and often return to these places year after year. We love to travel and always come home with memory cards full of pictures to process,Ž she said. If you are truly Wild About Wakulla,Ž we will see you Sunday, April 15, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. You can stroll across the street to the Panacea Mineral Springs and view the historical interpretation and the future restoration of the springs. LOU KELLENBERGER Lou has taught digital photography classes for several years. Lou likes to share his experiences and knowledge of photography with anyone from beginners to advanced photographers. One of the aspects of photography Lou enjoys most is taking individuals and small groups on “ eld trips to learn hands-on photography. Lou is constantly learning as digital cameras and equipment become more sophisticated. He is an active member of the St. Marks NWR Photo Club and the Tallahassee SNAPP Photo Club. His photographs have been featured in annual reports, brochures, calendars, exhibits, magazines and displayed on various websites. He serves on the Boards of Directors of the Friends of Maclay Gardens, the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park and the St. Marks Refuge Association, where he is a lifetime member. He is also a member of the Florida Lighthouse Association. Lou is a member of the Photographic Society of America, Canon Professional Services and is a lifetime member of the Florida Wildlife Federation. BETSY KELLENBERGER Her interest in digital photography began in 2005 when she was out at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge with her husband while he was practicing his photography. Suddenly a thought came to her mind and she said, Since Im out here I should be taking pictures too!Ž Her husband gave her a camera and he got a new one. My Canon Rebel was a great learning camera along with a 28-135 mm lens and I made some fairly good pictures with it,Ž she said. I graduated through many more levels and now shoot with a Canon 50D, a 30D and a number of different lenses. I am a nature and outdoor photographer, always looking for the perfect light to catch that once-ina-lifetime shot. Northwest Florida is an excellent place to find opportunities for nature photography with a variety of state parks, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, the beaches, and numerous wildlife management areas. Most weekends “ nd us out with our cameras looking for interesting subjects such as migrating ducks, manatees or wild” owers. We look for our favorite spots with the changing of the seasons and often return to these places year after year. We love to travel and always come home with memory cards full of pictures to process. Event photography is another favorite. The challenge comes from trying to get good candid shots of people doing interesting things. I volunteer at Maclay Gardens State Park, Wakulla Springs State Park and St. Marks NWR where I document many of the special events. A sharp picture of a child holding a butter” y or a couple launching their kayaks gives me a sense of accomplishment. No matter what kind of photography Im doing I always look for bright colors whether it be the blue of the sky, the pink of a sunset or the red of a ” ower. My photos have been featured in magazines, brochures, newsletters, newspapers and posters. Ive shown my work in exhibits and won awards in several contests. I belong to the St. Marks Refuge Photo Club and the SNAPP Photo Club. I also assist my husband Lou in teaching photography to individuals and groups.Ž WILD ABOUT WAKULLA Wildlife photos show ‘Wonders of Wakulla’Exhibit of photographs by Lou and Betsy Kellenberger will be featured at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea on Sunday, April 15 St. Marks will shine on Wednesday, April 18LOU KELLENBERGER€ Open House at Shell Island Fish Camp … all day. € Meet Miss Joy At Bo Lynns Grocery from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. € Wakulla River Wildlife Observation paddle from 8 a.m. to noon. € St. Marks River Sampler and Sunset Cruises from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. € Free donuts and co ee at Shields Marina from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. € Open House at Sweet Magnolia Inn at 11 a.m. € Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the ApalacheeŽ from 12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. € Fish Fry at St. Marks Yacht Club at 5 p.m. Cost is $10 for grouper plate. € St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Sunset Lighthouse Tour at 7:30 p.m. FILE PHOTOCharacters representing different periods in the history of St. Marks in line at Bo Lynns with Miss Joy Brown behind the cash register. SHELL ISLAND FISH CAMP OPEN HOUSE WEDNESDAY,APRIL 18

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Wakulla Wildlife Festival www.wakullawildlifefestival.orgBy JEFF HUGOSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Department of Environmental Protections Wakulla Springs State Park will host the Wakulla Wildlife Festival on Friday, April 20 and Saturday, April 21. Participants in the Wakulla Wildlife Festival will be immersed in the rich heritage and diverse ecosystems that envelop them in the Wakulla Springs watershed. Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park will be the hub of activities designed to educate, inspire and empower people by connecting them with their environment and heritage. The Wakulla Wildlife Festival caters to the diversity of its participants by offering “ ne art, living history demonstrations, exceptional music, activities for children and families, and environmental experiences both rare and compelling. All will enjoy viewing the wildlife and heritage of the region through the eyes of gifted artists during the Art Opening on Friday evening and the continuing Wildlife Art Show on Saturday. There will be “ ne pottery that create the essence of past cultures and mimic the natural designs of our environment. Photography, paintings and drawings hold in suspended animation the magical moments of the region as artists have seen, held captive and shared. ART ON FRIDAY During the Art Opening on Friday evening, April 20, the beguiling jazz of Sammy Tedder will “ ll the Lodge with the musical expression of the festivals mission. His contemplative Native American ” ute or soulful sax often mixes with the eclectic voices of the night wilderness. It is a haunting reminder of the quality of life enjoyed in a region touted as The Natural Place to Be.Ž Visit www.SammyTedder.com to sample his work. The silent auction is a favorite way to support the Wakulla Wildlife Festival. It is also a great way to view samples of the artists work and acquire “ ne art at a consumer determined value. Bidding begins at 6:30 p.m. and ends at 9:10 p.m. Winners are welcome to claim their prizes at the end of bidding. Complimentary hors doeuvres and a cash bar offering wine and beer punctuate an evening enhanced with “ ne food designed to tempt the palette. Guests can experience fine dining in the Ball Room Restaurant as they titillate their taste buds with fine Southern cuisine. Reservations for a special evening out can be made by calling (850) 4212000. GUIDED TOURS Premium Guided Tours (additional fees apply) offer nature lovers an opportunity to hone their wildlife-watching skills and senses. Visitors might seek the unexpected on a night cruise down the Wakulla River as the rubyred eyes of alligators glow in the re” ected light of a ” ashlight. Others may prefer to quietly celebrate a serene sunrise with morning light dancing through the silvery strands of Spanish moss dangling from ancient cypress limbs. Still others might choose to be escorted to the seldom seen windows into a submerged underground cave system. The colorful wings of butter” ies ” itting among the parks spring blooms are testimony of the allure these remarkable ambassadors of the insect kingdom have for many guests. Others are vivified as they join a group of photographers to utilize that new camera for capturing moments of outdoor splendor. Children squeal with delight as they play a game, create a craft or get their faces painted under the Childrens Activities tent. The childrens activities are part of the many exhibitors who introduce visitors to magni“ cent wildlife, area nature centers and museums and recreational opportunities. Living history demonstrators will present a proud heritage of ingenuity and hard work. There will be the brutal power of the blacksmith as he bends iron to his whim and the gentle grace of the spinner as she creates thread from various “ bers. Basket makers, cow hunters and soldiers from past Florida con” icts will offer a glimpse into past lives. All the while, bluegrass music will quicken the pulse and set toes to tapping. Excited festival guests return year after year to enjoy the phenomenal Bird of Prey and Reptile shows presented by the Center for Wildlife Education, Georgia Southern University. Guests are mesmerized as they discover the mysterious yet vital role snakes and lizards play in our world. Eagles, hawks and owls swoop overhead while their handlers present predator/prey relations and raptors as indicators of environmental health. The shows are interactive with considerable audience participation. It is easy to become part of the celebration. Simply visit www.WakullaWildlifeFestival.org for a complete listing of activities. Please register on-line early for the premium tours as they often “ ll up fast. Out of town guests can discover true Southern hospitality during a stay at the Wakulla Springs Lodge (wakullaspringslodge.com), the Inn at Wildwood (www. InnatWildwood.com) or the Best Western Wakulla Inn and Suites (www.bestwestern.com/wakullainn). Visitors can also enjoy the taste of locally fresh caught seafood at many area restaurants. For more information about Florida State Parks, visit www.FloridaStateParks.org, follow us on Twitter at www.Twitter. com/FLStateParks and like us on Facebook at FLStateParks. Wakulla Springs State Park is hub for annual festival SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA view of the Wakulla River on a foggy morning. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpinners at the Wildlife Festival demonstrate how fabric is made from raw thread. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA swallowtail butter” y on a cone” ower. LOU KELLENBERGERPhotographers prepare to get shots on the riverboat cruise on the Wakulla River. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 7B $5Guided History Tour of the oldest port in North America $ 5Guided History Tour of the oldest port in North AmericaSunset TourTravel past the scenic historic lighthouse and out into Apalachee Bay for a spectactular view of the sunset $149 Includes up to 6 passengers call for reservations.850-508-2660www.stmarkscharters.com Capt. James HodgesCerti“ed Green Guide per person Wed. April 1830-45 min.St. Marks Charters St. Marks ChartersApril 14 22 6:30-8:30 per person Wed. April 1830-45 min. Were WILDŽabout Oysters and Smoked MulletJoin us for Wild about Wakulla WeekApril 14 April 21U.S. Coastal Hwy., 98 At the Bridge, Newport(850) 925-6448Visit our Website www.OuztsToo.com Open Wednesday Sunday

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MADELINE CARRSpecial to The NewsWaking to the cacophonous and joyous birds announcing a new day. Red bird shouting you, you, youŽ or is it chew, chew, chewŽ? The hawks are still tucked away, as are the woodpeckers. Not the owls. They howl and cackle, Wake up, yall, wake up right now.Ž Is it at a good sound or one that scares the ” ying squirrels into keeping their own heads low, their legs tucked in? The sounds precede the suns rays that will awaken the butter” ies from their perches underneath the leaves. Such is the wild side of Wakulla County. Another wild scene emerges on the rivers and on the Apalachee Bay. Otters pop their heads up, whiskers glistening. In daylight, the clear waters magnify “ sh pursuing breakfast, the occasional victim breaking through ” ashing a glistening, semaphoring farewell to the world. Birds stalk the shallow waters, their long feet disturbing critters for a welcome breakfast. And so the Ides of March give way to April. A poet called it the cruelest month. People in Wakulla disagree. April is time to celebrate the wildness of Wakulla. To celebrate nature returned. The art in nature rearranges itself in the cooler months. Settles into a new order of things. Brown on the ground, emerald green above. Impenetrable, some say. They would be wrong. Annually in the third week in April nature is revealed to visitors curious about this natural place to be. Dawn unveils the awakening world, and dusk brings a cloak of mystery to visitors signing up for Wild About Wakulla Week. Unhurried, people who know about such things take their time to guide the curious on boats and on hikes into Wakullas wilderness. No experience is necessary. No training, just a sense of wonderment at the green guides enjoyment of place and expertise. The curious can select from 68 tours listed through Palmetto Expeditions. The companys owner, Cynthia Paulson, herself a green guide, coordinates the regions “ rst tour operation online. Paulson sees the dawning of what lies ahead. The companys websites (PalmettoExpeditions.com and WildAboutWakulla.com) are updated regularly. Paulson, a St. Petersburg native and FSU graduate whose children grew up in Wakulla County, always imagined a continuation of a slower time in Florida. Her image for Palmetto Expeditions is, after all, styled along the classy bathing beauties of yesteryear. I branded my company to evoke those memories when bathing beauties adorned trees, motorcycles, umbrella ads in addition to the famous beaches,Ž Paulson says. In 2008 Paulson received her Green Guide certi“ cation from Tallahassee Community Colleges Ecotourism Institute as have all the tour guides for whom she attracts visitors. After completing the comprehensive induction into Wakulla Countys environment and heritage, dozens of graduates have taken satis“ ed visitors on guided hikes, kayak trips, geological discoveries, and even equestrian forays through the woods. Several certified boat captains also have taken the course. Interpreted cruises include trips on the St. Marks, the Ochlocknee and portions of the Wakulla rivers. According to Capt. James Hodges of St. Marks Charters, he is torn between his historic river cruises, and the sunset cruises near the St. Marks Lighthouse. Likewise Capt. Jody Campbell of Shell Point. When not guiding visitors to the best “ shing spots, he also has a soft spot for the birders he takes out to the many small islands in Apalachee Bay, with or without sunsets. The attraction for Paulson is to package all of the tours, to reach out to the world to show that Wakulla County is 100 percent natural. We have several guides who cross over into Franklin County as well.Ž She explains that green guides in that county offer another ecological view of our area altogether. What became apparent to me is that there are so many opportunities for visitors to see the best natural place left in Florida,Ž she says. But there was not one place to shop for these adventures.Ž And so her marketing plan … part of the course she took through TCC … focused on becoming a licensed incoming tour operator. One regional offering includes a preview of what might be a big draw in 2013, the Viva 500 Florida celebrations. Leon and Wakulla counties are the sites of two Spaniards who came in the 16th century to the fabled land of the Apalachee, and together with historians and archaeologists several special tours are listed during Wild About WakullaŽ week. That was the time when panthers and bears, bobcats and turtles, turkeys and geese were plentiful and aboriginal people were plentiful. Five hundred years has been enough time to alter the Apalachee state of affairs forever. This is an important time for the region, Paulson says. Even the natural world changes constantly and Wakullas own upcoming anniversaries are a witness to bygone eras. These include this falls 75th anniversary of the opening of the Wakulla Springs Lodge, continuing next year with the establishment of Wakulla County 170 years ago in 1843. Palmetto Expeditions guests receive the highest quality and most memorable travel experience. Paulson says that she can foresee a party atmosphere at almost all of the travel experiences between now and the 2013. Stateside and international visitors discover in this region the best natural and heritage treasures unique to Wakulla County and the Forgotten Coast,Ž says Paulson, who continues to update tour offerings. Online reservations are picking up, Paulson says, and some of the tours will sell out early during Wild About Wakulla Week.Ž Many of those special tours, upon request, can be arranged later on and Paulsons online business also reserves hotels, arranges for special needs for what is known in the tourism world as full service, first-class experience. Paulson, author of a Wakulla Green monthly column in Forgotten CoastLine, is a leader in the tourism community. I and all the other Green Guides are convinced that tourism is the only economic development opportunity in the region,Ž she says.Cynthia Paulson operates Palmetto ExpeditionsBy MADELEINE CARRSpecial to The NewsWere so wild about Wakulla in April that archaeologists, historians and green guides are reaching way back to prepare visitors for the 2013 Viva Florida 500 celebration. This is one of many tours offered during Wild About Wakulla Week, April 14-22. Who were the Apalachee the Spanish encountered in North Florida in the 16th century? Where did they live and what happened to them? Palmetto Expeditions (palmettoexpeditions.com), a North Florida tour operator, includes a unique opportunity to explore the contact between the Apalachee Indians and the Spanish. Entitled Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee,Ž reservations are now open for these tours that include a fun look at the land that almost killed the Spanish conquistadors. Beginning with a self-guided trip to the DeSoto site in Tallahassee, visitors will make their way to the Spanish fort in St. Marks. There, certified Green Guide Captains James Hodges and Joey Tillman take small groups for a waters edge view of the Spanish fort. Get set to be thoroughly entertained during an amusing, historic account of contact between the Apalachee and Spaniards on this interpretive cruise. Awaiting you at the fort for a discussion about the earliest natives and the Spanish are historians Madeleine Carr and Johnathan Grandage and archaeologists Phil Gerrell and Rochelle Marrinan. Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the ApalacheeŽ is presented on Sundays, April 15 and 22, and Wednesday, April 18. Historic cruises leave from the public boat ramp, Old Fort Road, St. Marks at 12:30, 1:30 and 2:20 p.m. To ensure your spot on the boat for a preferred time, pre-registration is highly suggested. Cost is $10 per passenger. Talks at the fort will be held at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. on all three days. Cost is $8 per person, including admission to the forts museum. It is one of many tours that are part of the Wild About Wakulla annual celebrations in Wakulla County, offered annually during the third week in April. For more information, contact Palmetto Expeditions (wakulla@palmettoexpeditions.com).Conquistadors around here?Special to The NewsRepresentatives from the Friends of the Big Bend Maritime Center will be at the upcoming Worm Grunting Festival to showcase the centers boat building programs, sign up new members and share details about the organizations other exciting plans and activities for 2012, which include the following highlights: € Completing development plans for the centers Panacea site, which will support education and community events. € Introducing family and student boat building workshops. € Sponsoring on-the-water activities for area youth and families. € Furthering cooperation between area schools and community organizations. € Hosting the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival on Oct. 27. A major display at the Maritime Centers Worm Grunting Festival booth will be a 15-foot mahogany skiff, which was donated to the maritime center un“ nished and was then completed by the industrial arts class at Wakulla High School. The skiffs hull is made of mahogany marine plywood and epoxy. Its transom, rails, frames, stem and three seats are solid mahogany, and the ” oor is solid cypress. The plywood is “ nished light blue, and the solid wood pieces are varnished clear. All fasteners are stainless steel, and the paint and varnish are marine grade. Shortly after the Sopchoppy festival, the Friends of the Big Bend Maritime Center will hold a silent auction at the Blue Crab Festival in Panaceas Woolley Park on May 5. The auction will feature newly built boats, fantastic merchandise, local services and more … including a “ shing trip, a beach house weekend or the Jimbo Fisher signed FSU football helmet.Finished boat to be displayed SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCynthia Paulson of Palmetto Expeditions. FILE PHOTOVolunteers work on the skiff at last years Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival. Located On Scenic Hwy. 98/Coastal Hwy. 30 Miles South of Tallahassee Approx. 10 Miles From Beautiful Wakulla Springs, Beach, Rivers & Short Drive to Wildlife Refuge High Speed Internet Access Outdoor Pool Complimentary Hot Breakfast www.wakullainnhotel.com Each Best Western Hotel is Independently Owned & Operated AAA/AARP/Corporate Rates 850-926-3737 3292 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville FL (Medart Area) Special Rates for W AKULLA ild about Wakulla Inn & Suites W AKULLA ild about DONT Go Home Hungry!Join us at the Hardee’s of Crawfordville and enjoy these special o ers. 1/3 lb. Southwest Pa ymelt Thickburgers O er expires May 15, 2012. $79910 piece Hand-Breaded Chicken TendersTM O er expires May 15, 2012. Only available at the Hardee’s of Crawfordville.2994 Crawfordville Hwy850-926-83372 FOR $5 OPEN MON-WED 10AM-5PM, THURS-FRI 10AM-6PM, SAT. 10AM-5PM. 850-926-6241 LOCATED 1/2 MI. SO. OF HWY 267 ON CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 9BA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Your Spanish Communicator• Document Translations (Spanish /English) • Conference Calls • Telephone Excellence Skills Training (English/Spanish) • Telephone outgoing voice recordingcall LKR COMMUNICATION & TRANSLATIONS, LLC for rates! 850-509-7129 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you”LICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053 88 7408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONSRE-ROOFINGREPAIRSRESIDENTIALCOMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFINGCO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Lost CAT male, nuet weighs 15lbs all white w/some tan on face Fluffy White & tan Tail blue collar last seen 3/29 Tin Oak Rd Tallahassee Fl (850) 727-7504 German Shepherd Adult, female Shadeville Road, Hwy 61m, Near Tiger Hammock Rd. (850) 926-4185 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)742-1373 Domestic HOUSEKEEPER WANTED2/3 times per week. References Required call after 3pm (850) 567-1486 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Trades/ Skills Class-A FlatBed Drivers$ -Home EVERY Weekend, Run S.E. US REQUIRES 1 Yr OTR F.B. Exp, & payUP TO .39/mile Call (800)572-5489 x 227 SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC Drivers-Knight has steady Dry Van and Refrigerated freight. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS Earn 50-55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Vets welcome. Call: (843)266-3731 bulldoghiway.com EOE Trades/ Skills HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCE D TANKER DRIVERS! Great benefits and Pay! New fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp. Req.-Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www.OakleyT ransport .com General Help 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now!at Schneider National Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training! Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 25 Driver Trainees Needed!Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! (888)368-1964 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 LIVE-WORK-PARTY PLAY! Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. (866)574-7454 Schools/ Instruction Can you Dig It?Ž We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operatorl (866)362-6497 Garage/ Yard Sales PANACEA FIRE DEPT Sat, April 14, 8am -? To benefit the Church Building Fund. Something for everyone!! Pastor Mike and Lori Barwick PANACEAMark your calendar!! Saturday, April 21st. Two-Family sale. Ladies clothing, books, cassettes, household items. Ochlockonee Bay. Garage/ Yard Sales SHELL POINTSat 4/14 8a -4p 2 sofas, household goods, clothes, man/woman, lots more follow signs Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE M/H for rent, 3BR/1BA.$450/mo. includes water, garbage, lawn-care. Quiet neighborhood. No pets. Call after 6pm850-926-3280 CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $595 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-524-4090 Mobile Homes and Land Foreclosed Mobile Home with land, ready to move in, great value Approx 1500 sq ft, 3br/2ba. Serious offers only No renters. Call (850) 308-6473 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 926-3832 Crawfordville.Cottage on large wooded lot, 2BR/1BA, washer/dryer included Screened -porch, covered carport, central heat/air. No smoking. $700/mo.+first/last. Small pet ok w/$250/deposit. 850-926-3859. Real Estate For Sale Gorgeous! Like New! $85,000 (includes $5,000 new appliances and closing costs). 3BR/2BA, 1200sqft., on 2.5 lots. 85 Paulette Dr. For more details. 850-925-6704 after 6PM. Commercial Real Estate WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953 www. sunsetranch es.com New York State Land Sale Discounted to 1990s prices! 3 Acre Starter camp$17,995. 5 Acres w/Farmhouse$49,995. 52 Acres, Stream, 2 ponds, Beautiful woods & views. Access to road front, utilities and state land Limited offer. Call Christmas & Associates (800)229-7843 or visit landand camps.com Appliance Repair Appliance Repairs.All major appliances. PTAC A/C units, heat-pumps, window/wall a/c units and mini-split A/C units.Call Jerry Payne 850-528-5603. Instruction HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA FROM HOME, 6-8 weeks, ACCREDITED Get a Diploma. Get a Job! FREE Brochure. (800)264-8330 Benjamin Franklin High School www.diplo mafr omhome.com Out of Town Real Estate 5178-0412 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, April 16, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE : Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 April 12, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5172-0412 Vs. McClain Kerri; Case No. 11-304-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON f/k/aTheBank of New York Trust Company National Association, as Trustee, Successor Trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, As Trustee, By Its Servicer Associates Housing Finance LLC f/k/a Ford Consumer Finance Company, Inc., By its Duly Authorized Attorney-in-Fact, Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc., Under the Power of Attorney Dated and Executed November 18, 2010 Case Number:11-304-CA Plaintiff, vs. KERRI McCLAIN; GREGORY McCLAIN, et al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of foreclosure dated March 8, 2012, entered in Case No.11-304-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Ju5177-0412 vs. Yeomans, Leslie; Case No. 65-2009-CA-000123 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000123 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-C, Plaintif, vs, LESLIE L. YEOMANS; JAMES YEOMANS; CACV OF COLORADO, LLC Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Please publish in THE WAKULLA NEWS ) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 20th, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000123, of the Circuit Court of the second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/ATHE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-C is Plaintiff and LESLIE L. YEOMANS; JAMES YEOMANS; CACV OF COLORADO, LLC; are defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale IN THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, FL 32327 at 11:00 a.m., on the 26th day of April 2012; the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 32, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 111, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, as Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who n eeds any accommodations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 5th and 12th, 2012 5177-0412 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Administrative Support Assistant Garage Sale!148 Magnolia Ridge, Crawfordville Miscellaneous household items and home dcor. Unique accent pieces, vintage accessories, rattan chairs (pair), small wicker set. Junior clothes: Sz. 1 & 3, and small tops. Come check us out. SpringYARD & Bake Sale! Fri-April 6 & Sat-April 7 Fri-April 13 & Sat-April 14 Fri-April 20 & Sat April 217AM-Until... Rain or Shine! household items, kitchen appliances, dishes, clothes, books, games, furniture and a little bit of everything!!

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 2012 N FLA/SO GAAUCTION Trucks, vehicles & equipment from (8) area counties, utilities & bank repos THURSDAY, APRIL 19: 9AM Tallahassee, FL;North Fla. Fairgrounds PREVIEW: 9AM-4PM on Wed., April 18 MIDWAY MACHINERY & AUCTION dicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, Brent X. Thurmond as the Clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at public sale at the courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Wakulla County in Crawfordville, Florida with the sale commencing at 11:00AM on the 19th day of April 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: Legal Description: Lot 9, Block EŽ, Springwood, Phase 1, A subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 2, pages 74 and 75 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. To include: 2002 Oakwood Home, serial numbers GAFL234A75364CY21 and GAFL234B75364CY21. Address: 64 Springwood Boulevard, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of March, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, April 5th and 12th, 2012 5172-0412 5171-0412 Vs. Doyle, James. A. Case No. 2011-260-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-260-CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC 7360 S. KYRENE ROAD, TEMPE, AZ 85283 Plaintiff vs. JAMES A. DOYLE, JR., SIMONE C. DOYLE, BENEFICIAL FLORIDA, INC., and CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment For Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT AŽ, TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1995 66 x 28 REDMAN MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBER: 146M8923. Commonly known as: 70 Roberts Williams Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the W akulla County Court house, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy, Crawfor dville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), on the 3rd day of May, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ Commence at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument marking the Southeast Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5180-0419 Estate if Alma Payne, File No. 12-000018CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-000018 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ALMA PAYNE, Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of ALMA PAYNE, deceased, File Number 12-000018 CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327; that the total cash value of the estate is estimated to be $53,642.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Lavernne J. Davis 848 Brewer Street Tallahassee, Florida 32304 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 12, 2012. Personal Representative: Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5175-0412 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida StatuesŽ, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday,April 19, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of 1 Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Kim Jackson Before the sale date of April 19th, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 April 5 and 12, 2012. 5126-0223 5178-0419 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON MA Y 5, 2012 at 10:00 a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: CASEY LARSON BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF MA Y 5 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. April 12 & 19, 2012 5179-0419 5173-0412 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Self Storage Notices Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, April 21, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Jessica Tucker Brenda Merrill Self Storage Notices Before the sale date of Saturday, April 21st, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. April 5th & April 12, 2012 5173-0412 Self Storage Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices corner of Lot 87 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run North 17 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds West along the East boundary of said Lot 87 (as monumented) # distance of 1605.25 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 72 degrees 20 minutes 39 seconds West 536 feet to the center point of a cul-de-sac having a radius of 50.00 feet said point also lying on the centerline of a 60.00 foot wide roadway and also marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 17 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds East along the centerline 534.22 feet to a point lying on the intersection with the centerline of another 60 foot wide roadway, thence run South 72 degrees 21 minutes 14 seconds West along centerline 536.06 feet to a point, thence leaving said centerline run North 17 degrees 15 minutes 35 seconds West 534.72 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument, thence run North 72 degrees 21 minutes 14 seconds East 536.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 50.00 foot radius cul-de-sac lying over and across the Northeasterly portion thereof. ALSO SUBJECT TO A 60.00 foot wide roadway lying over and across the Easterly and Southerly 30.00 feet thereof. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 5 and 12, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration /s/ LAVERNNE J. DAVIS, 848 Brewer ST. Tallahassee, FL 32304 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /S/ RONALD A. MOWREY, Attorney for Personal Representative, Mowrey Law Firm, PA 515 North Adams, Tallahassee, FL 32301, PH: 850-222-9482, Fax: 850-561-6867 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, April 12 & 19, 2012 5 Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2 Goto http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 415 Mashes Sands Rd. on Ochlockonee Bay 3 Bdr./ 2 ba $825. Pets with Deposit No smoking. 6 River Cove Bay view 2 Bdr. 1 ba Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit62 Sylvania Drive -St. Marks 2 Bd/2ba with Sun room. Includes attached In-Law Suite 1 Bd/1ba with kitchen. $1,800 mo. No smoking, No pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3Bd/2Ba MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres – $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Available April 1st.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 – Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 6, … Campaign “ nance “ gures began trickling in this week as respective camps touted the relative strength of their candidates in the quarterly chest-pounding that accompanies the election cycle. With all House and Senate seats up for grabs and a presidential and U.S. Senate race to boot, campaign cash registers were ringing up all over the state as candidates jockeyed for position in campaign season pushed ahead by an early end to the legislative session. But while fundraising continues, some state Senate candidates still dont know for sure what districts they are running in, a lack of information that Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi took steps to alleviate this week by sending the proposed new state Senate map to the Florida Supreme Court … which rejected an earlier effort to redraw the 40 Senate districts. Meanwhile, Gov. Rick Scott received the Legislatures $70 billion spending proposal, one of several pieces of legislation that landed on his desk and must be dealt with over the next two weeks. Also included in the bevy of bills is a controversial proposal to create the Florida Polytechnic Institute by splitting the Polk County campus from its University of South Florida parent. But much of the news generated in Florida this week had its antecedents outside the capital city, as the highly publicized deaths of a black Sanford teen and a FAMU drum major in separate instances in Central Florida continued to steal headlines. MARTIN CASE PROMPTING REACT The Trayvon Martin case continues to drive the agenda as the February shooting of the Sanford teenager prompted incoming Senate Democratic Leader Chris Smith, D-Fort Lauderdale, to assemble a group to address the issue of gun violence and the states Stand Your GroundŽ law that is the backdrop for the shooters defense. Speaking to reporters early in the week, Smith called on the governor and others to speed up investigations into the death of Martin, 17, who was shot to death by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in what could be a test case for the 2005 Florida law allowing residents to use deadly force when they feel threatened. Scott and others have said they want to wait until more information comes from the Martin case before a panel looking at that law is convened. Smith said the law has already prompted ample evidence that it can be misunderstood, and can be assessed immediately. We have years of data on Stand Your Ground,Ž Smith said. Trayvon Martin may be an outlier when it comes to Stand Your Ground ...but we need to take a look at the entire statute and we dont need the Trayvon Martin case to take a look.Ž But it is the Martin case that has prompted an international storm as critics see the death of the unarmed black man as proof that racial pro“ ling is alive and made more deadly by Stand your GroundŽ laws now in the books in Florida and nearly half of other U.S. states. The Martin case has drawn attention away from the November death of Robert Champion, a 26year-old drum major for the Florida A&M University Marching 100 who died in an alleged hazing incident in Orlando. FAMU continued to look at that issue this week at its trustees meeting … and the athletic director and president said its not clear how long the band may remain suspended, raising the prospect of FAMU football in the fall without the most famous part of FAMU football, the halftime show by the Marching 100. REDISTRICTING BACK TO COURT It was just a formality, but an important one, when Attorney General Pam Bondi sent the new Senate map to the court. It was also an expensive one for the Senate, which will be represented in court by former Supreme Court Justice Raoul Cantero. The Miami Herald reported this week that Cantero, now a lawyer in private practice, will get a shade under $700 an hour to make the Legislatures overture to his former colleagues that the map is legally suf“ cient. RIVERA STILL FACES NO DEM CHALLENGER Despite being targeted by national Democrats as vulnerable, U.S. Rep. David Rivera, R-Miami, doesnt have a serious opponent. This past week, the candidate who was running against him, state Rep. Luis Garcia, D-Miami Beach, got out. And former MiamiDade County Mayor Alex Penelas, thought to be a great possible candidate to replace Garcia, all but said no. Garcia will instead run for a Miami-Dade county commission spot. As for Penelas, the highly regarded Democrat said his priorities lie elsewhere, at least for now. Hes staying closer to home to help raise his young kids. Id love to do it,Ž Penelas said. I think Id be a great congressman. ... But realities are realities.Ž Riveras campaign has been hampered by questions about whether he can hold the seat … and last year had more debt than money in the bank. The campaign reported $92,800 cash on hand at the end of 2011, with just more than $154,000 in debt, according to federal campaign records. Garcia quit the race after a public falling-out with national Democratic Party officials, who have made Florida a centerpiece of its efforts to gain the 25 seats needed to take control of the House after two years of Republican rule. CAMPAIGNS U.S. Senate hopeful Connie Mack led Florida fundraisers this week as his campaign announced the sitting congressman had raised more than $1 million for the quarter ending March 31. Mack is facing a relatively crowded Republican “ eld for the opportunity to take on Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson, who has already amassed more than $10 million for his reelection efforts. Also, the Lets Get to Work Committee, which is Gov. Scotts re-election arm, announced it had raised $910,000 for the “ rst three months of the year, bringing to $1.3 million his bankroll for trying to stick around. Speaking of sticking around, Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New Port Richey, became the latest term limited member to set his sights on another legislative of“ ce. Fasano, an 18-year veteran who has reached his term limit in the Senate, joins a crowded Republican “ eld in an upcoming race for House District 36. STORY OF THE WEEK: Despite his vulnerable status, Rep. David Rivera became an unchallenged incumbent as Democrats scurry to “ nd a standard bearer after former MiamiDade Mayor Alex Penelas and former state Rep. Luis Garcia both decided this week not to challenge the Miami Republican. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Now they hire a former Supreme Court justice at $695 an hour to help their cause in the likely event their maps are struck down again. Where was all this money when they cut $300 million from our universities and forced deep cuts to our hospitals? If its available to protect political futures, it should have been available for university students and hospital care.Ž … Nan Rich on the appointment of former Florida Supreme Court Justice Raoul Cantero to defend the Legislatures latest Senate boundary map.WEEKLY ROUND-UP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government and politics)A mil for the quarter, $700 an hour, and a $70B budgetBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 4 – With more than 800,000 issued, nearly one in every 15 Florida adults has a license to carry a concealed weapon, according to data compiled by the state. The number of concealed weapons permits has risen dramatically in recent years as new laws making it easier to obtain them have been placed on the books by lawmakers, spurred on by the National Ri e Association, one of the most effective lobbying forces in the capital city. The laws have come under scrutiny since the death of Trayvon Martin, who was shot to death in February by a neighborhood watch member, a convicted felon who had a permit to carry a concealed weapon. George Zimmerman, 28, contends he was defending himself under Florida’s “Stand Your Ground” statute passed in 2005. He has not been charged. Gun control advocates say lax gun laws in Florida are at least partially to blame for Martin’s death. They also say Florida is being used as a test case for gun control legislation in other states. “In Florida, being armed in public is such a casual formality that law enforcement does not issue the license to carry a loaded, concealed gun; that is done by the Department of Agriculture – the same agency charged with issuing permits to pick tomatoes or transport livestock,” said Dan Gross, of the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, during recent congressional testimony. Among Floridians over 18 years of age, about 6.5 percent have applied for and received permits to carry a concealed weapon. Add the 104,210 permits brought into the state by outof-state visitors and the total rises to 906,924 as of Feb. 29, according to Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, which administers the licensing program Dixie County leads the state in the number of concealed weapons permits issued per capita, with nearly one in 10 residents of the rural county licensed to carry. It is followed by Monroe County, which is the Florida Keys, where 7.3 percent of the population is licensed. Seven Florida Counties –Gilchrist, St. Johns, Sumter, Lafayette, Glades, Liberty and Calhoun – have the lowest per capita concealed weapons rates in the state, all under 3 percent. Statewide, the per capita average is 4.2 percent. Take out children under 18, who make up about 21 percent of Florida’s population, and the rate rises to 6.1 percent.Concealed weapons approach 1 million in FloridaBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 33 40 43 50 56 63 66 69 2 28 51 3 29 52 4 23 41 46 5 34 57 64 67 70 18 30 47 6 15 24 44 53 7 21 31 48 58 8 25 35 54 65 9 32 42 59 10 36 55 68 71 26 49 11 16 19 22 37 45 60 12 38 61 13 39 62ACROSS1.Some tuskers 6.Mariner's"Halt!" 11. GPsetal. 14.Turntopsy-turvy 15.Trackofficial 16.Hamelincasualty 17.DorisDayhit,off themainland? 19.Sidewalkstand purchase 20.Placeforanace? 21.Bullpenstats 22.SoccerstarHamm 23.Floggingmemento 25.Patriarchofa tribe of Israel 27.Marshall__ (Truman implementation) 30.Tickoff 32.Euroforerunner 33.PartofRSVP 34.Plaintosee 36.Male:Prefix 40.Partingwords,off themainland? 43.Cabinet department 44.D oesacheckout chore 45. Oftennon-PC suffix 46.Audiophile'sstack 48.Proprietary symbols:Abbr. 49.Baby-sitter's nightmare 50.SunflowerState city 54.Stableparent 56.Hydrogen'satomic number 57.Forever,seemingly 59.Digsdeeply 63."__MutualFriend" 64.Twoshakesofa lamb'stail,offthe mainland? 66.Journal conclusion? 67."Crazy"singer Patsy 68.Bullfiddles'little brothers 69.__Plaines, Illinois 70.Ruhrindustrialhub 71.Wordona revolutionaryflagDOWN1.TampaBay team, forshort 2.Fallbirthstone 3."__sow,soshall ..." 4.Mended,inaway 5.Moundgreat Carlton 6.__snail'space 7.Carpenter'stool 8."...__bagatelle" 9.Mariachi'swrap 10. "Circularfiles" 11.Soapopera,e.g. 12.Piechartlines 13.Propellantfor CaseyJones 18.Visitthroughprimal therapy 24.Snake,toMedusa 26.Crosspiece 27.Trident-shaped letters 28.Pre-discountprice 29.__breve(2/2 time) 31.Atattention 34.Fido'sfieldof study? 35.Shirtsandskins, e.g. 37.Batikartisan 38.Parksin1955 news 39.Bootout 41.Work withacid 42.Likesomejokesor jobs 47. "Cheers"perches 49.Bible__ (certain fundamentalist) 50.Winedanddined 51. "Ocupado" 52.Dwarfplanetinthe asteroidbelt 53.Thoseagainst 55.Flinch,say 58.Trigratio 60.Lemmingkin 61.Firstnameinscat 62.Rodethebanister 65.Kasparov'ssixteen American Prole Hometown Content 3/18/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 12 34 5 673158 9 673 12 4259 94 8365 7 3481 200 9 HtCtt 182 7536 9 4 945286137 673941582 529 678413 761394258 438125976 294 817365 816532749 357469821 B U C S P S I S W O O E D O P A L L I S T I N U S E A S Y E A L L A C E R E S R E S E W N E T C H S T E V E O B E D I E N C E R E L I V E S T O O L S A T A T R E S S A N T I S V I S E E R E C T S I N E A M E R E T E A M S M E N S E R A P E I N S I D E T R A S H C A N S R E A C T R U N G B E L T E R D R A M A D Y E R V O L E R A D I I R O S A E L L A S T E A M O U S T S L I D Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: Which are the most fuel-ef“ cient hybrid and/ or all-electric cars available to consumers today (just the affordable ones, please!)? Jack Madison Chicago Given increased environmental awareness, high gas prices and a continually slumping economy, its no wonder that more fuel ef“ cient cars are all the rage these days. The best deal going may be Hondas hybrid, the 42 miles-per-gallon Insight ($18,350). Meanwhile, the newest version of Toyotas ” agship hybrid, the Prius ($23,015), garners an impressive 50 MPG. Other solid choices include Toyotas 41-MPG Camry hybrid ($25,900), Fords 39-MPG Fusion hybrid ($28,700), Lexus 42MPG CT 200h ($29,120) and Lincolns 39-MPG MKZ Hybrid ($34,755). For even greater efficiency and lower sticker prices, consider going electric, whereby you can charge your vehicle at ordinary electric outlets at home or work. Mitsubishis new MiEV ($29,125) electric is the most fuel ef“ cient car available to U.S. consumers in the 2012 model year, achieving 112 MPG-equivalentŽ (the U.S. Environment Protection Agencys rating for electric vehicles that swaps in electricity for gas in its calculations) and a 62 mile range per full charge … not bad considering four adults can fit fairly comfortably inside. Another option is Smarts FourTwo Electric ($28,752), a two-seater with an 87 MPGequivalent. And Nissans all-electric Leaf ($35,200) achieves 99 MPG ef“ ciency for a range up to 100 miles. So-called plug-inŽ hybrids also allow drivers to charge their vehicles electric batteries via common power outlets, but also can use gasoline as needed for a longer range. Though pricey at $39,145, the Chevy Volt may save you money in the long run because it gets a whopping 94 MPG-equivalent in its preferred all-electric mode. An onboard gas generator produces more electricity as the vehicle is driven, extending the cars range with a full tank of gas to some 375 miles. Toyota released a plug-in version of its Prius ($32,760) this year, as well. It gets 87 MPG in electric mode (but this will only get you 15 miles without gas assistance) and a respectable 49 MPG in regular hybrid mode. Another factor to consider when deciding which of these new uber-ef“ cient vehicles may be right for you is the availability of additional incentives. Buyers of a new Volt, MiEV, FourTwo Electric or Leaf, for example, can cash in on a federal tax credit of $7,500 „ and some states may offer additional incentives „ bringing the overall cost of these cars down to within the range of similarly sized traditional car models. The U.S. Department of Energy posts all of the relevant federal tax incentives online at its Fuel Ef“ cient Vehicle Tax Information Center website. For state-bystate incentives, check out the Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE), a free online resources maintained by the North Carolina Solar Center and the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Of course, consumers dont have to go hybrid or electric to enjoy improved fuel ef“ ciency these days. Scions iQ ($15,265) and Hondas CR-Z ($19,545) each get 37 MPG out of sporty little gas-powered internal combustion engines. Kia, Toyota, Chevrolet, Hyundia and Nissan also make smaller traditional cars that get a respectable 33-34 MPG for sticker prices under $15,000. Dear EarthTalk: How is it that dams actually hurt rivers? Missy Davenport Boulder, Colo. Dams are a symbol of human ingenuity and engineering prowess „ controlling the ” ow of a wild rushing river is no small feat. But in this day and age of environmental awareness, more and more people are questioning whether generating a little hydroelectric power is worth destroying riparian ecosystems from their headwaters in the mountains to their mouths at the ocean and beyond. According to the nonpro“ t American Rivers, over 1,000 dams across the U.S. have been removed to date. And the biggest dam removal project in history in now well underway in Olympic National Park in Washington State where two century-old dams along the Elwha River are coming out. But why go to all the trouble and expense of removing dams, especially if they contribute muchneeded renewable, pollution-free electricity to our power grids? The decision usually comes down to a cost/benefit analysis taking into account how much power a given dam generates and how much harm its existence is doing to its host rivers environment. Removing the dams on the Elwha River was a nobrainer, given that they produced very little usable electricity and blocked “ sh passage on one of the regions premiere salmon rivers. Other cases arent so clear cut. According to the Hydropower Reform Coalition (HRC), a consortium of 150 groups concerned about the impact of dams, degraded water quality is one of the chief concerns. Organic materials from within and outside the river that would normally wash downstream get built up behind dams and start to consume a large amount of oxygen as they decompose. In some cases this triggers algae blooms which, in turn, create oxygen-starved dead zonesŽ incapable of supporting river life of any kind. Also, water temperatures in dam reservoirs can differ greatly between the surface and depths, further complicating survival for marine life evolved to handle natural temperature cycling. And when dam operators release oxygen-deprived water with unnatural temperatures into the river below, they harm downstream environments as well. Dammed rivers also lack the natural transport of sediment crucial to maintaining healthy organic riparian channels. Rocks, wood, sand and other natural materials build up at the mouth of the reservoir instead of dispersing through the rivers meandering channel. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine, (www.emagazine.com). € Do not put very hot or boiling liquid that you intend to consume in plastic containers made with BPA. BPA levels rise in food when container/ products made with the chemical are heated and come in contact with food. € Discard all bottles with scratches, as these may harbor bacteria and, if BPA-containing, may lead to greater release of BPA. Please let me know if you would like additional information on this topic or any other that the UF/IFAS has available to Florida citizens. Shelley Swenson UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Agent II, Family and Consumer Sciences/Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Agent. She can be reached at 926-3931.Swenson: FDA studying Bisphenol A What are the most fuel-e cient (a ordable) cars? Increased environmental awareness, high gas prices and a continually slumping economy have combined to make fuel ef“ cient cars are all the rage today. Pictured from top to bottom: the Electric Mitsubishi Miev, Toyotas Plug-in Hybrid Prius; General Motors gas sipping Chevy Sonic.Plug-in hybrids allow drivers to charge their vehicles electric batteries via common power outlets, but also can use gasoline as needed for a longer range. ~ BY Le CHAT BOUTIQUE~ WHAT:A DAY AT THE SPA FOR YOUR SPECIAL POOCH WHEN:SATURDAY, April 21, 2012 FROM 10:00 A.M. … 3:00 P.M. WHERE:Hudson Park, Crawfordville AMENITIES FOR THE DISCRIMINATING POOCH: All Natural Ingredients; Aromatherapy Bubble Bath (lavender, vanilla, mintƒmore); Le Flea & Tick Dip; Grooming; Towel Drying; Brushing; PAWdicures; DONATIONS:$10.00 -ALL AMENITIES/Flea dip included $ 5.00 REGULAR BATH ONLY $ 5.00 GLAMOUR PHOTO (pearls, bow ties, hats, ribbons, boas, etc.) $ 25.00 Micro … chipping, including registration of micro chip ~NATURAL GOURMET DOGGIE BISCUITS FOR PURCHASE~ Please remember to spay and neuter your pets. CHAT needs volunteers. CHAT Memberships start at $15 a year. C.H.A.T. OF Wakulla Inc. PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326www.chatofwakulla.org A copy of the of“cial registration CH-13163 and “nancial information may be obtained from the FL Division of Consumer Services. Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK



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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 14th Issue Thursday, April 12, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews A special pull-out section featuring information about the weeks festivals, tours and events is inside. Starts on Page 5BBy BILL LOWRIESpecial to The NewsIts that time of year again! The weather is warm and the worms are squirming. Our local bait harvesters are doing a booming business as veteran shers love our feisty bait. It must be time for the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival. And so it is. On Saturday, April 14, the festival will kick off at 8 a.m. with registration for the 5K Run with the Worms Race which will start at 8:45 a.m. At 9 a.m., more than 100 vendors of arts and crafts, great food and childrens games will be open for business. And, of course, our awesome T-shirts will be on sale. The full schedule can be seen in our ad in this issue of The News or visit our website wormgruntinfestival. com where you can also see this years T-shirt design. At 9:30 a.m., the Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Quartet will lead us into the unique worm gruntin demonstration and contest which awards cash prizes for kids 12 and under who have the best luck. Continued on Page 2AWorm Gruntin Festival is SaturdayPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Community .....................................................................Page 6A School .............................................................................Page 7A Sports .............................................................................Page 8A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 9A Water Ways....................................................................Page 10A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 11A Green Scene ....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Wild About Wakulla .........................................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9BINDEX OBITUARIESMichael Lafayette Jett Shirley Ann Vause Moulton Betty Marie Roger Rodger Stephen Smith Joice Jane Satterfield Ventry Grover Sonny Cleveland Whaley Jr.Kimball omas will run for Superintendent of SchoolsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netKimball Thomas announced last week that he is a candidate for Wakulla County Superintendent of Schools. A native Wakulla Countian, Thomas is currently principal of East Gadsden High School. He lives in Ochlockonee Bay and commutes to Gadsden County daily. He was speaker at the Wakulla Christian Coalitions banquet back in February and commented at the time that his ambition was to one day be Wakullas superintendent of schools. He admitted in a recent interview that he was talking about running in 2016, but said the reaction he got from people is what convinced him to run this year. Thomas grew up in the Bethel community and attended rst through fourth grades at the old Shadeville School, back during segregation. In the fifth grade, Thomas was bused to the newly integrated Crawfordville Elementary and remembered the shock of going to a school where there was carpet on the oor and air conditioning and, most stunning to him, new books that didnt have other students names in them. At Shadeville School, the students had hand-medown books that came from the white schools. Thomas remembered vividly the feeling of opening that brand-new, glossy book. He was so excited, he broke the rules by taking it home to show to his mother. There was a promise, a hope, and a dream that sprang from that moment, he said, the belief that he could do anything. Thomas points to the American flag lapel pin, saying he believes in the promise it symbolizes. If you work hard, if you give it your best, you may not get everything, but you have a chance to come out on top. Current Superintendent of Schools David Miller has yet to announce whether he will seek re-election. But Thomas move to run appears to have prompted former Medart Elementary Principal Bobby Pearce, currently on special assignment at the district of ce, to le his intent to run. Efforts to contact Miller for comment about his plans were unsuccessful. Thomas attended Wakulla High School and was elected junior and senior class president. During high school he worked at Pigotts Cash & Carry and remembered Steve Pigott gave him a chance to work in the front of the store, which surprised some customers who perhaps werent prepared to see a black face there. He later attended Florida A&M University and was having dif culty trying to decide on a major. He had tried journalism, then computer science. He recounted one day in the middle of class trying to figure out what he should do, and thought of how he enjoyed teaching Sunday School in church and decided to go into education. Continued on Page 2A A soldier returnsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA legislative bill that was approved on March 9 and signed by Gov. Rick Scott could end up costing the 67 counties in the state around $325 million, with Wakulla Countys share being around $52,000. House Bill 5301 will require each county to pay its share of disputed Medicaid bills for the last 12 years. The total backlog for each county is determined by the Agency for Health Care Administration. The bill revised the methodology for collecting each countys contribution to Medicaid. For past due billings, those from November 2001 through April 30, 2012, each county must pay 85 percent of the amount due over the next ve years. County Administrator David Edwards said AHCA is going back 12 years, but state statute requires counties to destroy their records after ve years. Thats a problem, Edwards said. AHCA met with the county last Wednesday to discuss the amount owed. The county was the rst to meet with AHCA. At that meeting, Edwards said AHCA said the county owed $52,000 and they pointed out that county records show the state owes the county $95,000 because of double billing. AHCA has until Aug. 1 to certify payments to each county. Continued on Page 3ACounty could owe $52,000 in Medicaid billsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen Wakulla County resident Shirley Moreno was 4 years old, her uncle was killed in the Korean War. Army Sgt. William Gene Brashear was just 24 years old when he died on Nov. 2, 1950, during a battle south of Unsan, North Korea. Almost 600 other soldiers with the 8th Calvary died alongside him. Brashears body and the others were unable to be recovered and were likely buried on the battlefield by Chinese or North Korean forces, according to the Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Of- ce. Now, 62 years later, Brashear has finally been laid to rest. On March 31, Brashear, who also served in Europe during WWII, was buried with military honors beside the graves of his parents, Gilbert Eugene and Porter Lou Petri Brashear, in his hometown, Owensboro, Ky. It was a long time waiting, Moreno says. Moreno says she received the call from her cousin who told her Brashears remains had been identi ed and he would be coming home. It sent goosebumps through me, Moreno says. An urn with Brashears ashes was own into the Evansville Regional Airport with U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Raymond Schuck on March 30. A motorcade of nine police agencies, a unit from the Airport-Sorgho Fire Department and 26 motorcycles from three chapters of Rolling Thunder escorted the remains of Brashear to the Kentucky National Guard Armory in Owensboro prior to his burial. Although Moreno was too young to truly have known her uncle, she was extremely close with his wife, Thelma Lee. Continued on Page 12AFILE PHOTOKids try their luck gruntin for worms at last years festival. WILLIAM SNOWDENKimball Thomas announced his intent to run last week. WILD ABOUT WAKULLAPhoto by LOU KELLENBERGER GARY EMORD-NETZLEY/Messenger-InquirerThe U.S. Army honor guard from Fort Campbell, Ky., including a lone bugler, stand at attention as they wait for the start of the funeral for Army Sgt. William Eugene Brashear, above. Brashear was killed on Nov. 2, 1950, during the Battle of Unsan. The military photo was published with his obituary in late 1950.A Crawfordville womans uncle, killed in Korea in 1950, has his remains identified by DNA and returned to the family for burial after 62 years. County Administrator David Edwards calls the bill an unfunded mandate.

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A He returned to the county and taught at Wakulla Middle School and rose to assistant principal. He earned a doctorate in educational leadership. But he says he felt he hit a career ceiling in Wakulla and accepted a post in 1993 as principal of Rickards High School in Tallahassee. Among his accomplishments was getting an International Baccalaureate program there. He was principal at FAMU High for a couple of years, then was a full-time pastor for a while, eventually returning to the eld with the state Department of Educations Department of School Improvement, in which he worked to improve schools in a 14-county area. He later served as an adjunct professor at Gainesville State College in the Atlanta area. But he decided to return home after his grandmothers death two years ago. He recalls his mother, whom he describes as a paragon of strength as a single-mother raising a family, telling him she was lonely. In describing his goals for Wakulla schools, Thomas uses the word inclusive numerous times, and says he wants to bring students, teachers, parents and support staff together. Wakulla schools are often de ned as good, he says. I want to move it from good to great. Noting Wakulla is ranked 11th among school systems in Florida, Thomas says he wants to create world class schools here. Among his goals are a comprehensive high school one that includes more career options for students with vocational education. Many high school graduates wont be going to college, he says, and schools should offer some training so that they are quali ed to get a job the day they graduate. He suggests there should be a change in how the district does business. First, he says, he would look at how the administrative of ce is managed, then the hiring and support of principals, and follow that with a look at how effective the district is. They may be ef cient now, he says, but how effective are they? With the new schoolgrading system coming down from the state, Thomas contends that business as its been done will not be able to overcome that. His past experience in school improvement will give him an edge in solving that. As for the challenges facing the district with state budget cuts, Thomas says he would ask for an evaluation of every program to compare student success and look at what is most effective. Thomas grew up near Wakulla Springs in the Bethel community and is a member of Mt. Olive Primitive Baptist No. 2. Hes married and has two step-children.Kimball omas will run for superintendentContinued from Page 1A You will want to witness the crowning of this years queen, Gracie Rosier Williams, at noon. Gracie is the daughter of the queen of the 2003 festival, Lossie Mae Rosier, who raised her large family for a number of years harvesting bait worms. Gracie collected her share of those worms on those early, early mornings and has some heartwarming stories of her experiences growing up in this industrious family. Get those horseshoes clanking if you want to compete in the Horseshoe Championship and limber up those hips for the hula hoop contest for folks of any age. There will be live entertainment throughout the afternoon with Hot Tamale, Frank Lindamood, Chelsea Dix-Kessler and Coon Bottom Creek. The fun continues in the evening with the Worm Grunters Ball featuring area musicians such as Rick Ott and Sammy Tedder to name just a couple. All of this takes place in downtown Sopchoppy and is free and open to the public. Robert Seidler of Seidler Productions created and posted a YouTube video of worm grunting on the internet which has been viewed more than 36,000 times. Also check out an Assignment Earth feature on You Tube where there is a detailed description of the scienti c reasons for the behavior of these worms. (Spoiler alert they are terri ed of moles.) A few interesting earthworm facts: apparently, the earthworm from Sopchoppy and the Apalachicola National Forest is unlike any other. Its scientific name is diplocardia mississippiensis and it has 16 hearts each the size of a pinhead. Of particular interest to shermen, it does not go limp in the water or easily wilt in the sun. Earthworms are mostly protein and they keep the soil soft and healthy. An acre of land can produce one million earthworms. As described by Thomas Tobin of the St. Pete Times, Sopchoppy is located in an idyllic area of Florida that is rich in biological resources on the Upper Sopchoppy River surrounded by the Apalachicola National Forest and the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. The geographical isolation of the region of Florida contributes to the unique evolution of the earthworm for its economic value. Its always nice to have a part of Wakulla County noticed for its unique culture and beauty, but equally important, it is also interesting to know that the art of worm grunting allowed generations of local grunters to make as much as $200 to $300 in a morning to help raise families, pay the rent and buy groceries. Dubbed The Worm Grunting Capital, one writer commented that Sopchoppy was 35 miles and 100 years SW of TLH. Though it may not have been the writers intent for this to be a compliment, I believe the residents of this little town believe it to be so. After all, the town motto is Sopchoppy and Easy Living Go Together! Worm Gruntin Festival is SaturdayFILE PHOTOA crowd gathers to watch kids try to grunt for worms at last years festival. Crawfordville man is killed in traf c crashStaff reportA Thursday, April 5 traf- c crash at Emmett Whaley Road and U.S. Highway 319 claimed the life of a 72-year-old Crawfordville man as Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputies and Florida Highway Patrol troopers arrived on the scene at 2:16 p.m. Rodger Stephen Smith died in the two-vehicle accident which also involved Freeman Pigott, 73, of Crawfordville. FHP troopers are still investigating the crash. The impact of the collision ipped the Smith vehicle and he was pinned inside the vehicle in an upside-down position. Wakulla County EMS and Fire-Rescue worked together to conduct a lengthy extraction free Smith from the overturned SUV. An off-duty re ghter drove up on the crash immediately after it occurred. Fire Chief Mike Morgan was at the library attending a class when the accident happened. Both rendered aid as additional help was summoned. The unconscious and seriously injured Smith was extricated using hydraulic rescue tools. The roof of the overturned vehicle had to be partially removed before paramedics from EMS could access the patient. Once removed, he was transported to TMH. Due to poor weather conditions, Smith and Pigott were transported to the hospital by Wakulla EMS ground transportation. The afternoon rainstorm prevented the launch of a medical helicopter. Smith died at the hospital several hours later. Pigotts injuries were not life threatening. Severe damage was reported to both Smiths SUV and Pigotts truck. Wakulla Fire Chief Mike Morgan said EMS and re personnel did an excellent job with a very dif cult extrication. The FHP investigation continues. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFATAL CRASH: The SUV belonging to Rodger Smith, above, after he was extricated from the vehicle by re ghters using the jaws of life. He died after being transported to the hospital. The truck belonging to Freeman Pigott, left, after the wreck. He suffered minor injuries. 000ARJF NEW!! New courses at the TCC Wakulla CenterMove your career forward with free or low-cost trainingUpcoming opportunities in manufacturing and healthcare:Manufacturing EssentialsApril 23 June 275:30 9:30 p.m. | Mondays and Wednesdays$350 or FREE to those who are unemployed Home Care AidMay 8 August 76 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $299Medical Billing and CodingMay 15 August 146 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays $810 (includes cost of national certification exam)Medical Administrative SpecialistMay 22 July 126 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $420REGISTER TODAY!workforce.tcc.fl.edu/Wakulla | 922-6290

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCongressman Steve Southerland made a couple of stops in Wakulla County this week, including a town hall meeting at the community center. Southerland also had a meet-and-greet at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea afterwards. Southerland, a Republican rst-term Congressman from Panama City, continued to stress the need for fiscal responsibility and solving the problem of the nations debt. Its not a Republican or Democrat thing, he said. Its just math. He called the budgeting process in Washington a shell game and expressed frustration with budget cuts that later turn up as not having been actually cut. About 30 people attended the town hall meeting, which included some questions from an unrelenting citizen about whether the rich should pay more taxes. Southerland didnt answer whether he thought the rich should pay more, but countered with a question of his own about how much is fair. He cited some statistics that 52 percent of Americans pay no taxes, and that the top 10 percent of earners pay 71 percent of taxes. Wakulla Tourist Development Council Diector Pam Portwood asked for the congressmans support for National Scenic Byways, saying the local scenic byway is an important part of tourism development. But Southerland was adamant that he would not vote for the transportation bill in which the scenic byway language appears as it currently stands. Southerland also pointed out a Democratic tracker he called Max who was lming the meeting. He vowed not to track any of his Democratic opponents in the upcoming election, saying he believed you should do unto others as you have them do unto you.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. TCCs April Board Meeting to be held in CrawfordvilleTallahassee Community Colleges District Board of Trustees will convene for its April meeting on Monday, April 16 at the Centennial Bank, 2932 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. The board workshop is scheduled to begin at 2:30 p.m. The business meeting will take place immediately following the workshop. Rose Sale to bene t CHAT is this weekendThe 16th Annual Rose Sale will be held on Saturday, April 14, from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Sunday, April 15, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The roses are Heirloom roses, also known as Heritage roses, that do well in this area. They are asking a donation of $7 per 3 gal container. The featured roses are on the CHAT website www.chatofwakulla.org All proceeds will bene t the homeless animals in our county. The sale will be at Heide Cliftons home at 382 Crawfordville Highway. It would be best to use the entrance on Pinewood due to the roadwork on the highway. If you have any questions, please call Heide at 926-3849. Sheriffs Of ce will crack down on alcohol on county propertyThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will be cracking down on alcohol possession on county property as the spring weather begins to turn toward the summer months. Wakulla County has an ordinance that bans the possession of alcohol on county property. County property includes the beaches with warmer weather bringing more visitors to the waterfront, as well as the April 28 regatta at Shell Point. Sheriff Donnie Crum said he hopes that everyone has a safe and enjoyable time while taking part in recreational activities on county property, but the ban of alcohol will be strictly enforced. My Life as a Turkey to be presented by Wakullas Joe Hutto Tallahassee-native Joe Hutto, author of the acclaimed 1995 book Illuminations in the Flatwoods about his experience raising wild turkeys from eggs, will speak to the Tallahassee Scienti c Society. He will appear before the group at their meeting on Wednesday, April 25, at the IMAX theatre at Kleman Plaza in Tallahassee beginning at 7 p.m Tickets for $6 for members and $12 for non-members. Huttos books will be for sale at the event and he will be available to sign copies. For tickets or information, www. tallysci. org or call (850) 877-0224. Last November, the popular PBS-BBC Nature TV series debuted My Life as a Turkey, a documentary based on Illumination in the Flatwoods. The book chronicles Huttos extraordinary, two-year experiment in raising wild turkeys from eggs while living at his home in Sopchoppy. An FSU-trained biologist, Hutto now lives in Wyoming where he studies bighorn sheep and mule deer. His book on the bighorn, The Light in High Places (2009) won the Wyoming State Historical Societys Book Award in 2010. Sarracenia Chapter of Native Plant Society will meet April 17The Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will present a program on macro photography at the Wakulla County Public Library on Tuesday, April 17, that will include a showing of the video Macro Photography by famed nature photographer Taylor Lockwood. The video includes information on lighting, composition, and how to use common household items to get the effects you want without having to buy expensive equipment. Sarracenia members, who know a lot about photography, will be on hand to answer questions. A beautiful calendar featuring Lockwoods photographs will be given away as a door prize. Sarracenia meetings are free and open to the public. Come early at 6 p.m. to mingle and enjoy some tasty snacks. AARP Driver Safety Class will be held April 24There will be an AARP Driver safety class held at the Wakulla Public Library in Crawfordville. This program is offered to seniors age 50 and older. It is a classroom setting and no driving is done. The program discusses how age related physical changes can effect the way seniors drive. The class is a one-day session and a discount will be given by the drivers insurance company for three years following the class. The cost for AARP members is $12 Non members $14 Seniors can register by calling (850) 926-4605. The class schedule is as follows: April 24, June 26, Aug. 28, and Oct. 23. Third annual Reagan Day Blue Jeans and Black Tie is setWakulla County Third Annual Reagan Day Blue Jeans and Black Tie Affair will be held at the Bistro at Wildwood on May 3. The featured speaker this year will be best selling author Peter Schweizer, author of Throw Them All Out: How Politicians and Their Friends Get Rich off Insider Stock Tips, Land Deals, and Cronyism That Would Send the Rest of Us to Prison. Schweizer is also the author Reagans War, and his speech is titled The Reagan No One Knew and will center around Reagans long series of struggles with communists including information from secret documents obtained from communist archives about President Reagan. Tickets include dinner and are $35 for an individual and $50 for two tickets. Sponsorships are available for $500 and include a table for eight and recognition during the program. The social portion begins at 6 p.m., dinner and the program will begin at 7 p.m. There will also be a live band performing. Tickets are available for purchase at www.wakullarepublicans.comall. Red Carpet for the Red Cross gala is April 20 in TallahasseeThe American Red Cross, Capital Area Chapter will be hosting the evening at Goodwood Museum and Gardens on Friday, April 20, from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Enjoy fabulous food catered by The Black Fig, dance the night away with the Crooked Shooz Band and win prizes from our silent auction, all while helping our neighbors in need. Individual tickets are limited. Attire is red tie. Tallahassee Orchid Show is April 21 and 22The Tallahassee Orchid Society will present its annual Orchid Show and Sale on April 21 and April 22 at the Doyle Conner Agricultural Center, 3125 Conner Blvd. in Tallahassee. The show will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 21 and noon to 5 p.m. on April 22. This is a great opportunity to talk with the growers and buy orchids and supplies for the year. There will be someone available for help in potting or repotting orchids for a fee. Admission is free donations accepted. For more information see www.tallyorchid. org or call Harriet at 850-320-6566. Staff ReportsBriefsContinued from Page 1A Wakulla County Commissioner Alan Brock said there is an inaccuracy in the billing process and the timeline is too short to make sure all inaccuracies are corrected. If all is cleared up, Edwards said the county could either get money back or break even. For all future Medicaid billings, the state will withhold a portion of the countys revenue from the one-cent sales tax. Edwards said instead of receiving a bill, the county will receive a statement of what was taken out. Edwards said it is an unfunded mandate. Its pushing more taxes and responsibility to the local governments, he added. Brock said, This puts a new burden on all of the counties. The Wakulla County Commission, along with numerous counties, sent a letter to Gov. Scott urging him to veto the bill, citing the erroneous Medicaid billing system. This legislation makes it virtually impossible for a county to verify and ensure correct billings from the State; and, therefore be billed accurately and fairly, the letter stated. If the county believes there is a problem, it can go through an extensive appeals process, Edwards said. In Scotts letter to the secretary of state, he acknowledged the concern that had been expressed, but stated that after conversations with counties, all agreed that legitimate nancial obligations should be paid. I have pledged to the counties that AHCA and my staff will work diligently with them to certify that any billings for which counties are charged are accurate and valid, Scott said. Florida Association of Counties has expressed its disapproval of the bill. President of FAC, Doug Smith, issued a statement saying, This bill represents the worst kind of blow to taxpayers. Rather than correcting Tallahassees error-ridden Medicaid billing system, HB5301 codi es it and leaves taxpayers with the bill. FAC will hold a special board meeting on April 12 to discuss the bill and legal options. Brock said the county will be working with FAC and will see what they recommend, whether it be entering into a lawsuit or lobbying to make the law better.Special to The NewsWakulla Democratic Executive Committee Chair Rachel Pienta announced today that the DEC will be hosting members of the Leon and Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation District Boards at the scheduled Thursday, April 12, meeting. Three of the ve seats on the Wakulla district are up for re-election this year, Pienta said. One seat is vacant and open to be lled by appointment. During this election year, well be highlighting candidates and races as well as discussing opportunities for citizens to become engaged in the electoral process. The meeting will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library beginning at 7 p.m. Its free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. At the meeting, the duties and responsibilities of the Wakulla-elected Soil & Water Conservation District Of cials will be the topic for discussion. The public is invited to join committee members and representatives of both the Wakulla and Leon County Soil & Water Conservation Districts to nd out more about these important positions and the role they play in preserving and protecting our natural resources. Wakulla County has four elected of cials serving as members of the Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation District: Seat 1, Terrell Rudd; Seat 2-Vacant; Seat 3-Daniel Harvey (Secretary/ Treasurer); Seat 4-Allan Loftin (Vice Chairman); and Seat 5-Joseph Duggar (Chairman). Seats 1, 3, and 5 are up for re-election this year and Seat 2 can be lled for the remaining two years of its term. The positions are unpaid. There are more than 3,000 soil & water conservation districts in the U.S. It is mainly through these local districts that the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service assists individuals, groups, and units of government with natural resources conservation. The ve locally elected of cials for each of Floridas 63 soil and water conservation district (SWCD) boards serve four year terms. In addition to local board members, Blas Gomez, Tabitha Frazier, and Stan Peacock of the Leon Soil & Water Conservation District will be on hand to discuss what the Board does in other counties including grant opportunities available to these organizations. For more information about the Wakulla County Democratic Executive Committee, please visit online at http://wakullademocrats. org.Program set on Soil and Water DistrictsCounty could owe $52,000 in Medicaid billsCongressman holds town meeting WILLIAM SNOWDEN Steve Southerland at the town hall meeting. NOTICE OF COMPREHENSIVEThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, May 14, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, June 4, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.APRIL 12, 2012 PLAN TEXT AMENDMENT TRANSMITTAL PUBLIC HEARING

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Update: One dead in Thursday traffic crash Big Bend Hospice honors veterans with ceremony for their valor County commission: Board moves ahead with plans for new sheriffs annex Bike Florida tours Wakulla County, stays at Wildwood Inn Arthur T. Anderson obituary Webpage opposing cave diving misleads Wakullas housing problem thewakullanews.com Follow us on Victim of Domestic or Sexual Violence? Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111Editor, The News: I have been remiss in not thanking Editor Bill Snowden and The Wakulla News for the excellent, factual presentation they reported on the Joseph A. Abal and Associates collision reconstruction of an incident involving Sheriff David Harvey. The article gleaned facts from a work product report prepared in the incident and submitted to Sheriff Harveys attorneys. Editor Snowden, from my perspective, presented the reports factual conclusions in an accurate and straight-forward manner. The article did not attempt to twist or contextualize any of my factual opinions. The conclusions were based on the science and math of forensic collision reconstruction and were rooted in the physical evidence I uncovered. Oft times, in todays media-driven world, people, places and events have a way of being distorted. The News and its Editor got it correct and I applaud the effort. Joseph A. Abal, Ph.D. Joseph A. Abal & Associates Editor, The News: I just wanted to give the paper a story about the Lion in Azalea Park. I dont think people driving by would realize it is NOT a little green person. March 12, 2012, marked the 100th anniversary of the Girl Scouts. Our Junior Girl Scout Troupe 802 looked up the uniform from 1912 and came up with their interpretation of that uniform. They painted it a couple of weeks ago. I thought you might like to put a picture of it in the paper with the story before someone goes and paints over it! (I think its scheduled to be changed on April 7.) Nancy Culp Crawfordville READERS WRITE:WILLIAM SNOWDENThe Lion in Azalea Park painted as a Girl Scout.Lion painted to celebrate Girl ScoutsEditor, The News: Wakulla Pregnancy Centers 2012 Lifewalk was a great success and a wonderful time as well. The day started with thunder, lightning and then the rain came in. Once Pastor Jeff McFalls from Medart Assembly of God started his message, the clouds rolled away, and the sun came out to stay. The two-mile walk started with light rain, and many came prepared with umbrellas and rain gear. However, after a short time the sun was shining brightly, and we walked with the warmth of the sun around us. There were more than 30 baskets and items for the silent auction, and lots of great baked goods were donated. Horton the elephant joined us to remind people that a person is a person no matter how small. Marcia McNaney from PARFA spoke about the sanctity of human life, and reminded everyone to get out and vote for life this election year. Emunah Johnson sang A Babys Prayer, and the youth group Total Impact from Wakulla Springs Baptist Church came out and performed. Wakulla Pregnancy Center would like to thank all of the following sponsors: Wakulla Realty, Wildfire Grill, Cypress Stump Marine, AAA Constant Comfort Heating & Air, Associated Services, The Barber Shoppe & Tangles Hair Salon, Bevis Funeral Home & Harvey Young Chapel. AMS Marine, T-N-T Canoe Rental, Capital City Bank, Clinicare Medical Resources, Dazzles Hair Studio, Moodys Auto Service, Riverside Cafe, Roses Botanicals, Premier Motor Cars, Savannahs Country Buffet, Southern Flooring, Woodville Ace Hardware, Mikes Marine, AAA Lock Service, and the Sweet Magnolia Bed & Breakfast. We would also like to offer a special thanks to Doug Apple from WAKU radio, Scott Beagle from WFRF, Lady Haskins, MPC Print, 88.1 radio, Wakulla.com., The Wakulla News and the volunteers who helped to make this event possible. Angie Holshouser Wakulla Pregnancy Center By GOV. RICK SCOTT Last October, while visiting Metal Essence, a precision metals and plastics fabricator in Orlando, I called on the Florida Legislature to pass my 2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth Agenda. I would like to thank the Legislature for answering my call and joining me in the effort to make Florida the best place for businesses to grow and create jobs for Floridians. This plan is designed to ensure that Floridas unemployment rate continues to drop. During recent weeks, I met with working Floridians to talk about what this legislation means to them. I would like to thank all of the great companies that I visited: Entera in Bay County, Load King Manufacturing in Jacksonville, Advanced Protection Technologies in Clearwater, Ring Power Inc. in Sarasota, as well as Metal Essence in Longwood and Workforce Central Florida in Orlando. Overall, my 2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth Agenda will eliminate burdensome rules and regulations, reform our unemployment system to a reemployment system, provide tax relief to our job creators and hold accountable the workforce boards tasked with connecting Floridians to job opportunities. I would like to highlight four reforms that we have put into place and how they better position our state to create jobs. First, we took steps to restore accountability and credibility to Floridas Regional Workforce Boards so they are better able to serve Floridas unemployed citizens. In response to irresponsible spending of taxpayer dollars that should have been dedicated to getting people back to work, Floridas Regional Workforce Boards will be held accountable and will be able to better serve Floridas jobseekers. I have been monitoring daily rankings for job placements from each regional workforce board to ensure that they are serving the citizens of Florida. Members not ful lling this duty can now be removed. Next, we became the rst state in the nation to reform our unemployment system into a system focused on re-employment. This new system will direct efforts to providing free job skills training to Floridas out-of-work citizens who need it the most, while providing unemployment compensation tax relief to Florida businesses. The next reform continues the process I started on my rst day in of ce, the repeal of burdensome state rules and regulations that often discourages businesses from creating jobs. Since taking office, I have reviewed and repealed nearly five hundred unnecessary rules and regulations. I will continue this process to ensure that our state government is efficient and not standing in the way of business. The last measure of my 2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth Agenda is tax relief for Floridas working families and businesses. Working with the Florida Legislature, we delivered two tax cuts. First, we continued efforts begun last year to eliminate the corporate income tax by doubling the exemption, representing a 66 percent re-education of total payers since I became Governor. In addition, Floridas manufacturers will now be able to more easily qualify for a sales tax exemption on machinery and equipment. Both tax cuts will help grow jobs in Florida, by helping business and families keep more of their hard earned money. In February, Florida recorded an unemployment rate of 9.4 percent, a threeyear low. Were headed in the right direction, but there is still a lot of work to do to make Florida the number one state in the nation for business. Since becoming Governor, creating jobs in Florida has been my top priority. I am con dent that my 2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth Agenda will help Florida create, retain and attract jobs. Rick Scott is the Governor of the State of Florida.2012 Job Creation and Economic Growth agendaEditor, The News: Economic development and wetland protection can co-exist, but not in the manner that our short-sighted Board of Commissioners is proposing. Randy Merritt, Jerry Moore and Mike Stewart have a different agenda. One that will impact the wetlands and, without your help, no one will be able to stop them. Most people do not understand the importance of wetlands and are understandably too busy to follow what the Board of County Commissioners are doing to our County. Most assume that the Board is looking out for the best interests of the people, and if they are not, someone else will step in. However, not in this case. This time, they need to hear from you. Most counties have learned now, how important wetlands are, and they try to protect them, and even spend millions to restore them. Wetlands protect and improve water quality, provide sh and wildlife habitats, store oodwaters, and help to prevent ooding. Our Board wants to change the wetland protection that we currently have in place. Outside of allowing builders to build in sensitive wetland areas, why would this Board change the existing protection that was put into place by another Board to protect the County? Why? So that builders can build right up to the water line and destroy what protects Wakulla Countys property values, water quality and wildlife. Commissioner Moore alone has accepted thousands of campaign dollars from developers and supporters who own wetland property as well as thousands of dollars from Real Estate PACS. How many acres of wetlands does Moore own? Approximately 100 acres, according to the Property Appraisers of ce. Check out how many of Moores developer supporters and campaign contributors have purchased worthless wetland property. How will they bene t from this change? They can build more structures to the edge of fragile wetlands, possibly in- ll the wetlands, and infringe on and destroy the nature and beauty that belongs to the people of Wakulla. If you care about the future of this county, the value of your home, the quality of your drinking water, and what the county will look like in just a few short years, then you need to step in, and email those Board members now, the representatives who supposedly are looking out for you, and tell them to leave our wetland ordinance alone. What these few people can do in their next meeting can forever impact this county. Sue Damon Shell PointLifewalk was a great success Wetlands are too valuable to risk e Wakulla News got the story rightEditor, The News: On Sunday morning, March 18, at 9:43 a.m., as we were leaving Wakulla Station to go on vacation we were behind a Wakulla County Animal Control truck with the #AC-02 on the bumper. We followed this truck north on Woodville Highway up into Woodville in Leon County and at the elementary school this Wakulla County vehicle turned right just past the school and parked in the parking lot of the church there. My question is WHY? Why is a county vehicle under the control of the Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce being used to drive someone on a Sunday Morning to a church in LEON County? Were they putting on a animal display? or, is that the church they attend? On another note, since we live on Woodville Highway and I am retired, I spend a fair amount of time doing as little as possible and part of what I do is sit and watch the animal life in our yard, the trucks that haul gravel, and in particular a school bus with COAST Charter School written on the side of it. It is normal to see this bus during school days but to have it pass my home late on a Saturday night, between 8:30 and 10 p.m., is a bit odd. I am curious is this bus supposed to be on the road at these late, off-school hours? There are never children on the bus at night. Over the years I have seen this bus stopped at the Dollar General and at the Subway in St. Marks. Do these drivers of these two different county vehicles use these vehicles for their own personal transportation? And if they do, where do I sign up as my gas costs almost $4 a gallon? John Pierotti cedartree@comcast.netCounty vehicles used for personal trips? In February, Florida recorded an unemployment rate of 9.4 percent, a threeyear low. Were headed in the right direction, but there is still a lot of work to do.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 5AChurchreligious views and eventsMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWere Here to Share the Journey... ObituariesMichael Lafayette Jett Shirley Ann Vause Moulton Betty Marie Roger Rodger Stephen Smith Joice Jane Satterfield Ventry Grover Sonny Cleveland Whaley Jr.Michael Lafayette Jett, 60, of Panama City, died at his home in Panacea on Tuesday, April 3. He was born Oct. 17, 1951, at Eglin Air Force Base in Fort Walton Beach. Survivors include his parents, Lafayette and Betty Jett; his son, Sevren L. Jett; his daughter, Leila C. Jett; two brothers, Greg and Dave; and a granddaughter, Sanibelle. Contact family members or Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville regarding service arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Shirley Ann Vause Moulton, 77, of Tallahassee, passed away on Sunday, April 8. She was predeceased by her husband of 54 years, William R. Bill Moulton. Survivors include her son, Tim (Diane); daughter, Kimberly; and son, Rick (Donna); two grandsons, Ricky and Kylan; a sister, Sadie Butler (Raber) of Calvary, Ga.; and a brother, Roderick Vause (Robbie) of Quincy. She also leaves behind many very special nieces, nephews, greatnieces and great-nephews. She was also preceded in death by her brothers, Hansel Vause (Edna) of Tallahassee and Johnny Vause (Alice) of Quincy. The family received friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, April 10 at Bevis Funeral Home (850.385.2193 or www. bevisfh.com), 2710 North Monroe St., in Tallahassee. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, April 11, at Immanuel Baptist Church, 2351 Mahan Drive, with burial following at Piedmont Cemetery, Piedmont Road, in Calvary, Ga.Michael L. Jett Shirley Ann Vause Moulton Betty Marie Roger, 72, passed away Sunday, April 8, in Crawfordville. She was born Aug. 2, 1939, in Rochester, N.Y., and had lived in this area for 33 years coming from Lyons, N.Y. She was a Christian and a member of Women of the Moose. Services will be at a later date. Survivors include her son, David E. Gansz (Laura) of Rochester, N.Y.; daughters, Susan Clark of Sopchoppy, and Chantha Zippay (Jason) of Tallahassee; sister, Carol Pruitt (Bob) of Massachusetts; grandchildren, Lauren, Garrett, Jenna and Ethan Clark, Drew Gansz, Andy and Max Zippay; a great-grandchild, Lila Stelly; and many other family and friends. She was predeceased by her parents, William and Loretta DeDee. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com)Betty Marie RogerRodger Stephen Smith, 72, of Crawfordville, died Thursday, April 5, of injuries he received in an automobile accident near his home. A native of Michigan, he moved to Tallahassee from Oxnard, Calif., in 1992. Retired as a mechanical engineer, he received his degree in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. He and his wife operated the Mail Box, located on Mahan Drive at Magnolia Drive, for several years before nally retiring to Crawfordville in 1999. Services will be privately held. Gifts in memory of Smith may be made to the American Diabetes Association (www.donations.diabetes.org). Survivors include his wife of 50 years, Ruby Smith, also of Crawfordville; his son, Brian Smith and his wife Beth of Tallahassee; and two grandchildren, Rachael and Byren Smith, also of Tallahassee. He was predeceased by his daughter, Janet Smith, in 1998. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville, assisted the Smith family. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Rodger Stephen SmithJoice Jane Satter eld Ventry, 68, of Crawfordville, passed away Saturday, April 7. She was born in South Boston, Va., on Aug. 5, 1943, and was a resident of Crawfordville since 1990 coming from Tallahassee. She was a graduate of Florida State University and continued cheering on the Seminoles. She was a certi ed meeting planner and enjoyed life and loved seeing others have fun; she loved listening to the music of Elvis, and playing poker and trivia games. A celebration and remembrance of her life will be held for friends and family at the Ventry Residence, 148 Longleaf Drive in Crawfordville from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. Memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer Society in lieu of owers. Survivors include her three children, Chris Ventry of Crawfordville, Rebecca Moore of Crawfordville and Jerry Hurd Jr. of Clinton, Conn.; five grandchildren; and two sisters, Christine Clayton of Alton, Va., and Rachel Matthews of Greensboro, N.C.; and companion, Ray Lowe.Joice Jane Satter eld Ventry Grover Sonny Cleveland Whaley Jr., 79, of Los Lunas, N.M., passed away Saturday, April 7, in Tallahassee. He was born Aug. 6, 1932, in St. Marks. He retired after 30 years as a Chief Master Sergeant in the U.S. Air Force. He loved to travel. He loved hunting and shing in his younger days in Alaska. He was a devoted family man. Graveside services will be Thursday, April 12, at 11 a.m. at St. Marks Cemetery. Visitation will be prior to the service from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee, FL 32308. Survivors include his wife of 47 years, Ramona Tellez Whaley of Los Lunas, N.M.; one brother, Charlie Whaley of St. Marks; two sisters, Clester Horne and Genevieve Oaks of Medart; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, Grover Cleveland Whaley Sr. and Henrietta Gertrude Whaley; two brothers, Eugene Floyd and Robert Floyd; and a sister, Mary Martin.Grover Sonny Cleveland Whaley Jr.WILLIAM SNOWDENEASTER PASSION: Jesus and the two thieves hung on crosses as part of the Medart Assembly of Gods observance on Thursday, April 5, of the events leading up to Easter. A Roman Centurion patrolled in front as Mary and Mary Magdalene keep vigil.Church BriefsElder Paynes sermons broadcastElder Jerry Paynes sermons are being broadcast on Comcast channel 195 at 8 p.m. on the third Thursday of every month. His sermons also appear on WTAL 1450 on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. and Friday at 10:30 a.m. Payne, of Crawfordville, has a website for the ministry of Elder Jerry and Sheila Payne at payneministries.com. He can be reached at (850) 528-5603. Fundraiser set at Burney TempleThe community is invited to a testimonial service on the fourth Sunday, April 22, at 6 p.m. at Burneys Temple Church on Highway 61. The service is a fundraiser for Pastor Mary Harvey. PayneHeart of Jesus Church to hold yard saleThe Heart of Jesus Gospel Church will hold a yard sale fundraisers on Saturday, April 14, to raise money for the church building fund. The yard sale will be held at the Panacea VFD beginning at 8 a.m. Something for everyone! The church pastor is Mike and Lori Barwick. For more information, call Lisa at (850) 984-5101.

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our communityCommunitySpecial to The NewsPeople who do something about it were recognized and honored during United Way of the Big Bends (UWBB) Wakulla County Campaign Awards Breakfast at Capital City Bank in Crawfordville on April 5. At a time when so many people are facing financial challenges, this years Wakulla County United Way Campaign is a testament to the character of our community, said Commissioner Alan Brock, Wakulla County United Way Campaign Chair. Last year, this campaign raised just over $79,000. This year, our campaign goal was to increase the campaign to $90,000. We blew past this goal and raised $102,560. Every single dollar will stay right here in Wakulla County, providing much needed services to our citizens in need. That is a tremendous investment. The Bronze Award (campaign between $1,000 and $2,499) was presented to the Wakulla Mens Club, $1,000; Walmart No. 3307 Wakulla, $1,100; ESG, $1,352 and CSG, $1,553. The Silver Award (campaign between $2,500 and $4,999) was presented to Residential Elevators, Inc., $2,500; Progress Energy Services, $2,534; Wakulla County Senior Citizens Council, $2,577; Wakulla County employees, $2,668; Capital City Bank, $2,840; Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, $2,956; Shields Marina, $3,210; and Centennial Bank, Wakulla, $3,350. The Presidents Award (campaign between $10,000 and $24,999) went to Wakulla County Schools, $12,030. The Excellence Award (campaign between $50,000 and $99,999) went to St. Marks Powder, $66,183. The Outstanding Neighboring County New Campaign was Shields Marina. They have been a part of the St. Marks community since 1928. This family owned business has seen many changes in its 80+ year history and their commitment to create and grow a business that will provide jobs and economic impact in Wakulla County, is steadfast. Their help those less fortunate in their community is just as strong. Employees have been involved with the UW campaign in Wakulla County off and on for the last 15 years. This year, they not only re-engaged, they stepped it up. By not only educating their employees, but also encouraging their participation with a corporate match, Shields Marina sailed their commitment right to the top as one of the top 5 companies in Wakulla County investing in their community through United Way. Most Creative Neighboring County Campaign went to St. Marks Powder. They shot to the top this year in Wakulla County with their campaign creativity. EDUCATE EMPLOYEES: Information Passport Each employee was given a passport to visit each agency booth, learn about what they did in Wakulla County and get a stamp which entered them into a drawing for a chance to win a gift card. MAKE IT FUN! Sparky Bingo, Stuff the Truck food drive, on-line auction, drawing for a Harley Davidson leather jacket. ENGAGE YOUR PARTNERS Their team created a golf tournament for their vendors and employees to participate in, even getting the donation of a car for a possible hole in one shot. They ended their campaign with a steak dinner for each employee and a 13-percent increase in the dollars that they raised. Outstanding Neighboring County Volunteer went to Commissioner Alan Brock. Brock is no stranger to United Way. He has even worked as part of our staff, serving as the Executive Director of Whole Child Leon. He is a leadership giver, and outspoken proponent of the work that UW does. This year, he took the charge and led a very successful Wakulla County team to not only reach their campaign goal, but blew past it to just over $102,000. We are thrilled to say that while he is passing the chairmanship baton to another, he will continue as a valued member of the Wakulla Team.United Way celebrates successful campaign WILLIAM SNOWDEN The Wakulla County United Way Committee members are Keith Blackmar, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce; Courtney Peacock, Capital City Bank; United Way President Heather Mitchell; Chairman Alan Brock; Amanda Carroll, St. Marks Powder; Trish Andrews, CSG; Nanette Watts, ESG; and Marc Dickieson, United Way. Kirton accepts fellowship Stratton Kirton, son of Kenneth Kirton and Patricia Kirton of Crawfordville, will graduate this spring from Georgetown Universitys Security Studies Program with his Master of Arts in Energy Security. He has accepted a postgraduate fellowship sponsored by the Alfa Bank, the largest private commercial bank in the Russian Federation, that will consist of individual Russian language tutoring in the U.S. followed by a 10-month placement in Moscow. While in Moscow, Kirton will attend classes for the rst four months followed by placement with an energy-related rm. Kirton graduated from Stetson University with honors in 2007 with a Bachelors in Russian Studies and Political Science with a minor in Russian language. He moved to Washington, D.C. in 2008 to work in the of ce of Sen. Bill Nelson. In 2010, he took a position as a legislative assistant to Congressman Mike McIntyre of North Carolina. A graduate of Wakulla High School, Kenneth Kirton gives credit for his sons academic success to Susan Solburg, the drama teacher, and to a love for learning imbued by Ms. Kendricks, a teacher at Shadeville Elementary. Stratton KirtonHappy rst birthday, Travin Travin Pusey celebrated his rst birthday on March 28. His parents are Sheila Kilgore and Steven Pusey of Spring Creek. He has one brother, Tyler Moore. His maternal grandparents are Paula Kilgore and Hank Agerton of Spring Creek. His maternal great-grandparents are Gladys Kilgore of Spring Creek and Dorothy Stevens of Panacea. His paternal grandparents are Vicki Strickland and Ted Pusey, of Crawfordville. His paternal great-grandparents are Norma and Chester Davis, Walland, Tenn. Travin Pusey TheNews Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408 Special OfferNew Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County Only ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover rr s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Phone#_____________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 4/30/2012877-401-6408Get 10 Months for $20.12straight to your mailbox This is not a trick NO FOOLINwww.thewakullanews.com Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Special to The NewsTen people meet in a room. Each person shakes hands once with everyone else in the room. How many handshakes take place? You have 30 seconds to answer, no calculator and an anxious audience of nearly 200 parents, peers and teachers. Such were the challenges presented by Florida Engineering Societys 29th annual MATHCOUNTS competition, held Feb. 25 at the FAMU/FSU College of Engineering in Tallahassee. Riversprings Middle School placed fth among top mathematicians from 12 competing middle schools around the Big Bend area in the regional competition. The challenges included timed Sprint, Target and Team round competitions, as well as an entertaining Cipher round in the afternoon that was open to parents, coaches and spectators. Mattias Gunnarsson placed 18th among all competitors and was the teams top individual scorer, followed by Kyle Pearson, Nic Samlal and Isaac Kent. Riversprings Middle School Team members were eighth-grade students Gunnarsson, Kyle Pearson, Samlal, Kent, John Ahrendt, Blakeleigh Bolton, Maria Parmer and Jenna Franck, and seventh-grade student, Paige Pearson. The team is coached by John Kane. The day-long event featured team photos, competitions, a pizza luncheon and closed with a Mathlete awards ceremony. The MATHCOUNTS meet was hosted by the FAMU/ FSU College of Engineering and sponsored by the Florida Engineering Society, the Big Bend Chapter of the Florida Engineering Society and numerous local supporters. A special thank you to Patrick Becker, Riversprings Middle School, and Ro Samlal, Shadeville Elementary School, for their time and effort supporting the team and for making the competition possible. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 7Aeducation news from local schoolsSchoolHigh school spring play is this weekend Special to The NewsWhen drama director, Susan Solburg began teaching and directing plays at Wakulla High School in the late 80s and early 90s, she had problems nding plays with large enough casts to accommodate the many talented students she had trying out for productions. So, she began to write plays as a way to get more students involved. One of those plays, Final Flick at the Flamingo, roughly parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre and how it was the best teenage hang-out ever invented. The combination of movies, music, dancing, food and friendship all under the watchful eye of families, parking lot attendants, security personnel and snack stand owners made it a fun and safe environment for teenagers back in the day. She first produced the show in 1993 and had a fabulous cast of characters to bring it to life. A second production was held in 2002. One of her former students, Travis Herndon, who played the character Rick Harley in the rst show, came back to help. Herndon, who is a professional stuntman, actor and dancer, was an enormous help with the physically demanding stage business in the show. He reprised and re-wrote some scenes for Rick and once again the show was another great success. This time around will probably be the last time the show will be produced and once again a former student and cast member is on board to help with the production. Cameron Ray, who played Slick in the 2002 cast, will now be Officer Lovell. He has been assisting with the same physically demanding scenes and trying to get the 35 young actors ready for the shows opening night. If youve seen the show before, then come on back one more time and walk down memory lane. The movies, music and teenage angst will all be there along with the comedic moments provided by the multitude of memorable characters. The soundtracks from golden movies of the day, the fabulous music and the smell of popcorn will bring it all back to those of you who ever enjoyed a night at the drive-in movie theatre. How many of you in Wakulla County know that Mr. Freeman Pigotts business sits on the site of the old County Drive-In? The show opens to the public on Friday and Saturday, April 13 and 14, at 7:30 P.M. and again on Sunday, April 15 at 2:30 p.m. Doors open thirty minutes prior to curtain where tickets can be purchased. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission.Progress Energy help fund Odyssey of the Mind project at Riversink Elementary Katrina Cochran, of Progress Energy, presents students with the Odyssey of the Mind group $250 for their project. This is a group of bright fourth and fth graders who attend Riversink Elementary School. Their teacher, Megan Crombie, was also Teacher of the Year.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRMS team takes fth places at MATHCOUNTS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversprings Middle School students place fth at MathCounts competition. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Actors practice scenes from this weekends play. WHS advisory council meets April 16The Wakulla High School Advisory Council will hold its next meeting on Monday, April 16 from 3 to 5 p.m. in the WHS library. Anyone who would like to attend is welcome.Show times: Friday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 14 at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 15 at 2:30 p.m. Visit www.GoToTCC.com or call (850) 201-8555The college of choice! Invest in yourself todayAordable tuition at TCC+higher wages for those with college degrees = A really smart investment

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsWAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS:Tuesday, April 10 TENNIS: Regional tournament at Panama City-Arnold. Wednesday, April 10 SOFTBALL: Makeup game vs. Madison at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 12 TRACK: District championship at Florida High. Tuesday, April 17 SOFTBALL: District tournament: Game 1 at 5 p.m. with championship game following at 7 p.m. At Wakulla. Tuesday, April 24 BASEBALL: District tournament at Suwannee, Game 1 at 7 p.m. Thursday, April 26 BASEBALL: District tournament at Suwannee with Game 2 at 7 p.m.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla High School boys tennis team nished their 2012 season with a respectable third place nish in the district tournament behind rst place Florida High and second place Rickards. This year, new teams like Florida High, Madison and Taylor counties were added to an already crowded district, bringing the total number of teams competing to seven. No. 1 seed Sam Proulx nished his senior year 9-5 with his only losses coming from district rivals Florida High and Rickards. Proulx and Wyatt Harvey the No. 1 doubles team, nished strong with a 9-4 record, again their only losses come from Florida High and Rickards. No. 2 seed Daniel McCullers, a rst year varsity player nished 76. The No. 2 doubles team of McCullers and Chad Peltier nished with a record of 7-6. No. 3 seed Wyatt Harvey won second place overall for his seed in the district tournament and finished with a 9-6 record. The No. 4 seed Johnathan Phillips nished 6-6. The No. 5 seed Chad Peltier had the best record on the team at 10-3, with his only loses coming from rivals Rickards and Florida High. Tennis season starts in January and the district tournament was played April 3 and 4 this year at Tom Brown Park. The boys have great hopes for next year as they are only losing one senior and have many JV players eager to move up. Special to The NewsThree teams were added to our district this year Florida High, Madison and Taylor counties. The other teams are Rickards, Suwannee and Godby. The ladies were hopeful at the start of the tournament when all players won their rst matches easily. Number one player Alicia Porter beat Suwannee in the semi nals to face her only loss during the season, Florida High for the nals. Alicia lost the rst set but was coming back strong and the Florida High player was falling apart. The momentum was de nitely with Alicia, but then a storm rolled into Tom Brown Park very quickly. When it was 6-6 tied, they were in a tie breaker rst one to seven wins, but has to win by two. Well, at 9-9 the storm hit and play was suspended. The next morning, day three of the tournament, Alicia went to battle against Florida High. Each point was taking 50 volleys each, and Florida High won 12-10. Alicia came in second place as the No. 1 player. Alicia had a 9-2 record coming into districts and nished with a 12-3 record and the district runner up. Next Alyssa Porter, who had already beaten the Florida High player in the semi nals faced Rickards in the nals but lost. Alyssa was the district runner up and nished her season at the No. 2 seed with a 10-5 record. Chelsea Carroll was the No. 3 player this year and it is her rst year playing tennis. Chelsea nished the season at 8-3 and lost in the semi- nals against Florida High, bringing her record to 9-4 and we are looking forward to her return next year. The No. 4 girl is Rachel Dix-Kessler who is the District Tournament Champion at the No. 4 seed. Her season record was 7-4 she faced Florida High in the nals and she won bringing her record to 10-4 and we look forward to her return as well. Rachels win over Florida High left us one point behind Florida High with 12 points and the tournament could have ended with a variety of scenarios. Our No. 5 seed is a new player to tennis, Christina Evans. Her season record was 7-4 and she won her rst match of districts but then lost to Florida High in the semi- nals bringing her record to 8-5. Christina is only a freshman and we look forward to three more years of tennis. Our No. 2 doubles team of Rachel DixKessler and Chelsea Carroll won the rst round but then lost in the semi- nals to Rickards. Their season record was 8-3 and nished at 9-4. They made a great team and will be even better next year. Our No. 1 doubles team made up of senior twins Alicia and Alyssa Porter had a great year playing together ending the regular season at 9-2 giving them the No. 2 seed in the tournament. The Porters made it to the finals to play against Florida High for the district championship. If the Porters won, we took second place in the tournament lose and we had to play a tie-breaker with Rickards. Well, they got it done winning the rst set then winning the second and winning the District Championship at No. 1 doubles. The girls district nished the closest in years Florida High rst with 14 points Wakulla second with 13 points, Rickards took third and Suwannee was close behind at fourth. Being the District Champion at the No. 1 doubles automatically qualifies them to compete at the State Tennis Finals in Altamonte Springs. This will be Alicia Porters second time to the state nals she also competed last year in singles and doubles. First the girls team as District Runner Up will travel to Arnold High School in Panama City on Tuesday, April 10, to play in the rst round of regionals.GIRLS TENNISLady War Eagles second in district tournament SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Lady War Eagles tennis team.BOYS TENNISWar Eagles nish third at district tournamentPorter twins qualify for state tourney in doubles SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe War Eagles tennis team. The W akulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsI was the Curator of Reptiles at the past Crandon Park Zoo out on Key Biscayne, Miami, (which later in the early 1970s became the Metro Zoo of south Miami). One day I was at the headquarters, where we also had the sick bay, a large room off the directors of ce where sick or injured zoo animals were kept until they recovered. Dr. Hubble the zoos director noticed I was in the facility, and requested I come in his of ce. George, he said. Do you have any idea what this is? He pointed to a small white squarish thing on his desk, and then reached over and handed it to me. It was about the size of a ping-pong ball, and nearly as light in weight, fairly square, and had a hole on one of the sides. It appeared to be of bone? Im fairly good at identifying skulls, and other animal bones but this one had me stumped. I made a few wild guesses, and then of course gave up. With a twinkle in his eye, this wonderful director, whom the staff all loved (and Patti and I are still in contact with) said, Well, George its the ampli er or voice resonator of a Howler Monkeys voice box. Years later, this February to be exact, Patti and I (as many of my readers have noted) were down in Central America, in the country of Belize. We were staying at Chan Chich Lodge, a resort famous for hardcore birders and those really into nature. Its part of the Gallon Jug estate (or ranch) a 130,000 private nature preserve. On our rst full day there, Patti announced to me that a distant noise we were hearing was a Howler Monkey. I was a little skeptical it sounded like logs being sawed length-wise at a sawmill to me. But I gave pursuit, and spent about 10 minutes walking fast to near homes where the resorts staff lived, when the loud noise ceased. I gured they had a workshop there, and were sawing up logs for bridges, shelters, etc. However I was wrong, Patti was right (having heard Howlers hundreds of times in her many trips to Central and South America). The next day I got straightened out when a troop of these monkeys appeared right next to the lodge high in the forest on some ancient Mayan ruins. Realizing that they may call only for ve or 10 minutes, I practically ran from our bungalow to beyond the lodge, and dining area. And, there in the forest canopy were a half dozen primates about the size of two-year-old children, swinging from limb to limb, and walking around on branches with absolute no fear of falling. Awesome. And there was the dominate male roaring out his challenge to another group of Howlers perhaps a half mile away. Like an auto without a muffler, the sound this male emitted was way out of proportion to its size. A full six to eight seconds of a roaring exhale, followed by an also fairly long load inhale. Like the lonely call of the loon over a northern lake or cry of a distant Arctic wolf, it was a sound Ill know from now on, one Ill not forget. We saw and/heard them many times that week, and one morning while we watched a Morelets Crocodile, and a Rufous-tailed Jacamar with its iridescent green plumage, we realized we had a young Howler directly over us about 20 feet. We could even see his eyes focusing on branches as it moved through the trees. By the way, Old World monkeys lack the prehensile tails that our Central and South America monkeys posses, which they truly use like a fth hand. I have been seeing-hearing a lot locally and in my next article Ill be lling yall in on some of our exciting observations. For instance here is a list of the butter ies weve seen so far at our ower garden this spring Spicebush Swallowtail, Eastern Tiger Swallowtail, Zebra Swallowtail (North Americas most beautiful), Palamedes Swallowtail (most abundant local swallowtails), Cloudless Sulphur (most abundant local butter y), Sleepy Orange, several Brushfooted species Common Buckeye, Red-spotted Purple, Phaon and Pearl Crescents, American Lady, Red Admiral, Question Mark, Variegated Fritillary, two satyr species, the Carolina Satyr and the Little Wood Satyr, one blue, Spring Azure, and the skippers Horaces Duskywing, Whirlabout and Southern Cloudywing.Howler Monkeys sound like a sawmillWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHSeventeen-year-old Spencer Sapp came down from Atlanta to spend his Easter vacation shing in Wakulla County state waters for grouper. Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security Inc. took Spencer and his dad, Dr. Jerry Sapp, out of Shell Point and Alans son, Danny, served as First Mate. Spencer had a great time catching grouper within sight of land while trolling and shing live bait. He even let his dad catch some. Dr. Sapp said that he was glad that the FWC listened to the local folks and opened the season on gags in state waters, When we come down here we spend a lot of money on licenses, restaurants, tackle, bait, gas and other supplies and if we cant sh, well go spend it someplace else, he said. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSYoung shermanSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service offered ve tips today to help Floridians protect themselves against the dangers of wild re. Wildfire Awareness Week, which recognizes the wild res that raged through Florida in 1998, burning more than 500,000 acres and damaging or destroying 337 homes and other structures, will be held April 8 through April 14. Florida is unique in that it experiences a year-round wild re season, with heightened wild re activity during the spring months, said Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam. Although we may receive sporadic rain, extended drought conditions are forecasted to persist throughout spring and into summer. Over the coming weeks and months, it is likely that Florida will experience very high to extreme wild re danger due to these dry conditions. It is critical for Floridians to take steps to ensure their own safety. The departments Florida Forest Service manages more than one million acres of public forest land and protects more than 26 million acres of homes, forestland and natural resources from the devastating effects of wild re. Since January 1, more than 1,100 wildfires have burned nearly 20,000 acres in Florida. Most of these res were caused by human carelessness. To prevent wildfires, follow these five simple steps: 1. Check with local authorities for any temporary restrictions on burning yard waste. 2. Contain fires to an eight-foot diameter pile or non-combustible barrel at least 25 feet from forests, 25 feet from homes, 50 feet from paved public roads and 150 feet from other occupied buildings. 3. Do not burn on windy days or when the humidity is below 30 percent. 4. Never leave a re unattended and make sure it is completely out before leaving. 5. Keep a shovel and water hose handy in case a small re escapes containment. In addition to the tips listed above, Floridians should also report any suspicious res or re activity to 911 or their local Florida Forest Service of ce. In 2011, the Florida Forest Service responded to more than 4,700 wild res that burned over 220,000 acres, a 32 percent increase from the previous year. Five safety tips during wild re seasonDepartment of Agriculture and Consumer Services o ers ve tips for protecting homes during wild re season Like an auto without a mu er, the sound this male Howler emitted was way out of proportion to its size. A recent prescribed burn at Clear Lake Wilderness Area.USDA FOREST SERVICEAsk FWC Along the Florida coast, sea turtles annually make between 40,000 and 84,000 nests. Females nest every two to three years, laying several nests on sandy beaches. Learn more at myFWC.com.FWC Facts: CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM LUNCH PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies I sincerely hope that everyone had a wonderful time being with family and friends over the holiday weekend. No matter what you were doing the last weekend, no one could argue that the weather was phenomenal and a welcome relief before we head into the dog days of summer! As mentioned last week, members of Flotilla 12, Apalachee Bay will be meeting Saturday at the Fire Station in Crawfordville. Following the business meeting, which begins at 9:15 a.m., there will be mandatory Team Coordination Training from 11 a.m. to noon and an operations workshop from noon until 1 p.m. Why all the training, you might ask? Before we go out on the water annually, the Coast Guard requires that all Auxiliarists undergo refresher training to ensure that when we go out on the water, we are not a danger to ourselves while assisting others. Even the active duty have annual currencies that they must undergo to be out on the water. From the U.S. Coast Guard website: Team Coordination Training (TCT) is a program that focuses on reducing the probability for human error by increasing individual and team effectiveness. Safety has long been the Commanding Of cers responsibility and, until recently, was assumed to be the logical result of nely tuned technical skills. U.S. Coast Guard mishap data suggests that while technical skills are an essential component of any job, they alone will not ensure safety. We are all taught that we are equal stakeholders in ensuring the safety of the crew when out on patrol. But no person can be everything to everyone, so it takes a team approach. For us, we also strongly encourage members who will be involved in surface operations (patrols) to participate in the Operations Workshop. This provides an opportunity for members to practice their TCT skills and work through scenarios that spark discussion on how each person might respond. There is no one correct answer, but there are definite wrong responses. Practice makes perfect, and we try to model that for the boating public in our area. We are human and we do make mistakes, but when we do, we practice so that we have the skills to now how to respond. As I mentioned last week, I will be trying to highlight a Navigation Rule each week as space allows. Given our upcoming training Rule 2 Responsibility is fitting for this week. (a) Nothing in these Rules shall exonerate any vessel, or the owner, master, or crew thereof, from the consequences of any neglect to comply with these Rules or of the neglect of any precaution which may be required by the ordinary practice of seamen, or by the special circumstances of the case. (b) In construing and complying with these Rules due regard shall be had to all dangers of navigation and collision and to any special circumstances, including the limitations of the vessels involved, which may make a departure from these Rules necessary to avoid immediate danger In all, follow the rules unless doing so will cause or possible cause risk for serious danger to you, your vessel/passengers or the other vessel/passengers. But, to follow them means that you have to know what they are. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Knowing your navigation rules is important to being prepared and safe when out on the water. Scientist-In-The-Sea.During the summer of 1970, NOAAs Man in the Sea Program funded Florida State University to offer a series of semester-long residence classes at the Naval Coastal System Center in Panama City. Capt. George Bond, MD, organized U.S. Navy resources to host diving science faculty from many disciplines to expose their graduate students to naval underwater technology that might serve underwater research. Over the next three years they perfected the program such that by the time I attended in 1974, they accommodated 20 graduate students, with me being the last Scientist-In-The Sea student accepted into the program as funding soon ended. I was winding down a two-years-plus experience at Harbor Branch Foundation Lab (HBFL), still in search of a career in Diving Science. I was taking graduate courses at Florida Atlantic University, but frustrated with the previous years tragedy of the trapped mini-sub Johnson-Sea-Link off the Florida Keys that took the lives of Dr. Ed Links son and a respected Navy man. Dr. Larry Briel and Walley Jenkins invited me up to Panama City to meet with Dr. Bond to see if I could nd an alternate path. After a brief discussion of my past performance, he told Walley Id do just ne, to report for training in a few months and the interview was over. My lifes paradigm shift happened so quickly I missed the relevance of the moment. I returned to my job at HBFL and began plans for a productive summer at the lab oblivious of the opportunity. I did not know anything about the then prestigious NOAA funded Navy-FSU program called Scientist-InThe-Sea until Chris Combs, their graduate coordinator called me angrily a month later to ask if I was going to apply or stop wasting his time. His lecture was enough to get me on track, secure time off from my job, get graduate recommendations secured and forms completed to report to the base on time. Little was the same afterwards. My lifelong beard was removed, I was issued a jump-suit uniform, we moved into dormitories, issued military visitor IDs, ate at the military mess and, yes, began PT every morning (swimming and jogging). After PT, morning lectures and afternoon practical eld or pool exercises followed six days a week for the next 10 weeks. This fast paced schedule was too much for me! The week we were trained on Surface Supplied diving (helmets included), I rebelled. I could see no science in what we were doing, just exposure to technology, the Navy way. While fascinating in its own right, I sought the academic interaction I thought would be provided. I threatened to quit the program. That got me a meeting with the Master Chief Wilbur Eaton. He was surprised at rst, then amused. He said the faculty of the program had already pinned their hopes on me to coordinate the next SITS Program, through dif cult, unfunded times. I greeted this with incredulity! I was the graduate student after all, I was supposed to learn from them, and how disappointed I was in the direction I was being lead. Wilbur said his amusement was in my failure to recognize that they were the past, graduate students were the future, and the sooner we came to grips with it, the sooner we could change it. I stayed. With Navy assistance, I organized and coordinated SITS 1976 at the FSU Marine Lab with 35 guest faculty speakers, a staff of six and 10 students. I again organized and coordinated SITS 2000 on base in Panama City with similar results. Master Chief Wilbur Eaton empowered me in 1974 to stop following and take the lead. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonFWC NewsTheyre back. Gulf sturgeon have begun their annual migration back into the Suwannee River. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission of cers have reported seeing the sh jump already this year. People have been injured in accidental collisions with the jumping sturgeon. In 2011, six boaters were hurt and 11 encounters with sturgeon were reported. Last season, we had quite a few people hurt, some seriously, said Maj. Roy Brown, regional law enforcement commander for the FWCs North Central Region, based in Lake City. Just one person getting hurt is too many. We want people to be aware the Gulf sturgeon are returning to the Suwannee, and the risk of injury to boaters does exist. In 2006, FWC officials began working on a public awareness campaign to alert boaters to the risks of jumping sturgeon. We posted signs at each boat ramp along the Suwannee, explaining the risk of impacts with these sh, Brown said. Our of cers will be on water patrol during this period and into the summer months in a continued effort to educate boaters about these jumping sh. Whats the best course of action for avoiding a collision? We recommend boaters reduce their speed to reduce the risk of impact and to give people more time to react if they do encounter a jumping sturgeon, Brown said. The FWC also recommends that all boaters wear their life jackets. The Suwannee River appears to support the largest viable population of Gulf sturgeon. Biologists estimate the annual population at 10,000-14,000 sh, averaging approximately 40 pounds each. Adult sh spend eight to nine months each year in the river spawning and three to four of the coolest months in Gulf waters. Biologists are unsure why sturgeon jump. Theories include that the sh jump to communicate or as a dominance display. I have seen these collisions referred to as attacks. However, these sh are in no way attacking when they jump. They are simply doing what they have been doing for millions of years: jumping. They arent targeting the boaters, Brown said. Gulf sturgeon can get quite big, exceeding eight feet and 200 pounds. They have five rows of rock-hard scutes along their sides, back and belly. When sturgeon and boaters collide, the results can be devastating, Brown said. State and federal laws protect sturgeon, just like bald eagles, panthers and sea turtles. It is illegal to harvest Gulf sturgeon. To report sturgeon collisions, call 888-404-FWCC (3922). If anyone is involved in an incident with a jumping sturgeon, please report it to the FWC. With the data received, we can get a better overall view of where the sh are jumping and get the word out to the public, Brown said. For more information about the Gulf sturgeon, go to MyFWC.com/Research and click on Saltwater.Sturgeon returning to Suwannee RiverCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed Apr 18, 12 Date 2.9 ft. 12:44 AM 3.1 ft. 1:30 AM High -0.1 ft. 1:16 AM 0.2 ft. 2:29 AM 0.5 ft. 3:49 AM 0.6 ft. 5:03 AM 0.7 ft. 5:59 AM 0.8 ft. 6:42 AM 0.8 ft. 7:17 AM Low 2.4 ft. 7:52 AM 2.4 ft. 9:18 AM 2.5 ft. 10:43 AM 2.7 ft. 11:40 AM 3.0 ft. 12:20 PM 3.2 ft. 12:53 PM 3.4 ft. 1:23 PM High 1.8 ft. 12:07 PM 1.9 ft. 1:25 PM 1.9 ft. 3:38 PM 1.5 ft. 5:32 PM 1.0 ft. 6:34 PM 0.6 ft. 7:18 PM 0.2 ft. 7:56 PM Low 3.3 ft. 6:08 PM 2.9 ft. 7:26 PM 2.6 ft. 10:00 PM 2.7 ft. 11:42 PM High Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed Apr 18, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 12:41 AM 3.1 ft. 1:27 AM High -0.1 ft. 1:13 AM 0.3 ft. 2:26 AM 0.5 ft. 3:46 AM 0.7 ft. 5:00 AM 0.8 ft. 5:56 AM 0.8 ft. 6:39 AM 0.9 ft. 7:14 AM Low 2.5 ft. 7:49 AM 2.4 ft. 9:15 AM 2.5 ft. 10:40 AM 2.8 ft. 11:37 AM 3.0 ft. 12:17 PM 3.3 ft. 12:50 PM 3.5 ft. 1:20 PM High 1.9 ft. 12:04 PM 2.1 ft. 1:22 PM 2.0 ft. 3:35 PM 1.6 ft. 5:29 PM 1.1 ft. 6:31 PM 0.6 ft. 7:15 PM 0.2 ft. 7:53 PM Low 3.4 ft. 6:05 PM 2.9 ft. 7:23 PM 2.7 ft. 9:57 PM 2.8 ft. 11:39 PM High Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed A p r 18, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:18 AM 2.7 ft. 1:20 AM 2.8 ft. 2:06 AM High -0.1 ft. 2:20 AM 0.2 ft. 3:33 AM 0.4 ft. 4:53 AM 0.6 ft. 6:07 AM 0.6 ft. 7:03 AM 0.7 ft. 7:46 AM 0.8 ft. 8:21 AM Low 2.3 ft. 8:28 AM 2.2 ft. 9:54 AM 2.3 ft. 11:19 AM 2.5 ft. 12:16 PM 2.8 ft. 12:56 PM 3.0 ft. 1:29 PM 3.2 ft. 1:59 PM High 1.6 ft. 1:11 PM 1.7 ft. 2:29 PM 1.7 ft. 4:42 PM 1.3 ft. 6:36 PM 0.9 ft. 7:38 PM 0.5 ft. 8:22 PM 0.2 ft. 9:00 PM Low 3.1 ft. 6:44 PM 2.7 ft. 8:02 PM 2.5 ft. 10:36 PM High Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed Apr 18, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 12:36 AM 2.3 ft. 1:22 AM High -0.1 ft. 1:27 AM 0.2 ft. 2:40 AM 0.4 ft. 4:00 AM 0.5 ft. 5:14 AM 0.5 ft. 6:10 AM 0.6 ft. 6:53 AM 0.6 ft. 7:28 AM Low 1.8 ft. 7:44 AM 1.8 ft. 9:10 AM 1.9 ft. 10:35 AM 2.0 ft. 11:32 AM 2.2 ft. 12:12 PM 2.4 ft. 12:45 PM 2.6 ft. 1:15 PM High 1.3 ft. 12:18 PM 1.4 ft. 1:36 PM 1.4 ft. 3:49 PM 1.1 ft. 5:43 PM 0.7 ft. 6:45 PM 0.4 ft. 7:29 PM 0.2 ft. 8:07 PM Low 2.5 ft. 6:00 PM 2.2 ft. 7:18 PM 2.0 ft. 9:52 PM 2.1 ft. 11:34 PM High Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed Apr 18, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 12:28 AM 2.4 ft. 1:14 AM High -0.1 ft. 12:55 AM 0.2 ft. 2:08 AM 0.5 ft. 3:28 AM 0.6 ft. 4:42 AM 0.7 ft. 5:38 AM 0.8 ft. 6:21 AM 0.8 ft. 6:56 AM Low 1.9 ft. 7:36 AM 1.8 ft. 9:02 AM 1.9 ft. 10:27 AM 2.1 ft. 11:24 AM 2.3 ft. 12:04 PM 2.5 ft. 12:37 PM 2.7 ft. 1:07 PM High 1.7 ft. 11:46 AM 1.9 ft. 1:04 PM 1.8 ft. 3:17 PM 1.4 ft. 5:11 PM 1.0 ft. 6:13 PM 0.6 ft. 6:57 PM 0.2 ft. 7:35 PM Low Thu Apr 12, 12 Fri Apr 13, 12 Sat Apr 14, 12 Sun Apr 15, 12 Mon Apr 16, 12 Tue Apr 17, 12 Wed A p r 18, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 12:30 AM 2.2 ft. 1:39 AM High -0.1 ft. 1:05 AM 0.1 ft. 2:20 AM 0.2 ft. 3:29 AM 0.4 ft. 4:30 AM 0.6 ft. 5:21 AM 0.8 ft. 6:04 AM 0.9 ft. 6:41 AM Low 2.2 ft. 9:34 AM 2.2 ft. 10:33 AM 2.2 ft. 11:15 AM 2.2 ft. 11:46 AM 2.3 ft. 12:12 PM 2.4 ft. 12:33 PM 2.4 ft. 12:51 PM High 1.6 ft. 12:06 PM 1.5 ft. 1:54 PM 1.3 ft. 3:34 PM 1.0 ft. 4:48 PM 0.7 ft. 5:45 PM 0.5 ft. 6:33 PM 0.2 ft. 7:14 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 12 April 18First April 28 Full April 6 Last April 13 New April 20Major Times 6:57 AM 8:57 AM 7:25 PM 9:25 PM Minor Times 1:35 AM 2:35 AM 12:20 PM 1:20 PM Major Times 7:52 AM 9:52 AM 8:18 PM 10:18 PM Minor Times 2:23 AM 3:23 AM 1:22 PM 2:22 PM Major Times 8:42 AM 10:42 AM 9:06 PM 11:06 PM Minor Times 3:06 AM 4:06 AM 2:21 PM 3:21 PM Major Times 9:30 AM 11:30 AM 9:52 PM 11:52 PM Minor Times 3:44 AM 4:44 AM 3:19 PM 4:19 PM Major Times 10:15 AM 12:15 PM 10:36 PM 12:36 AM Minor Times 4:18 AM 5:18 AM 4:14 PM 5:14 PM Major Times 10:58 AM 12:58 PM 11:19 PM 1:19 AM Minor Times 4:50 AM 5:50 AM 5:09 PM 6:09 PM Major Times 11:41 AM 1:41 PM 12:02 AM 2:02 AM Minor Times 5:22 AM 6:22 AM 6:03 PM 7:03 PM Average Average+ Average Average Average Average Good7:13 am 8:03 pm 1:36 am 12:21 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:11 am 8:03 pm 2:24 am 1:23 pm 7:10 am 8:04 pm 3:07 am 2:22 pm 7:09 am 8:04 pm 3:44 am 3:20 pm 7:08 am 8:05 pm 4:19 am 4:16 pm 7:07 am 8:06 pm 4:51 am 5:10 pm 7:06 am 8:06 pm 5:23 am 6:04 pm58% 51% 44% 38% 31% 25% 19% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 11AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn March 30, Derek Burton Fogg, 29, of Crawfordville and Andi Eugene Mysch, 35, of Crawfordville were arrested for battery after getting into an altercation on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Road. The two men were riding inside the same vehicle when they got into a dispute, got out of the vehicle and became involved in an altercation along the side the road. Both men fell to the ground and suffered minor injuries but declined EMS treatment. The two men are related and reside together. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On March 29, Michael Boxberger of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at Funky Fiddler in Panacea. Several items were stolen from outside the establishment including a channel marker, red log cabin television stand and four large ower planters lled with dirt. The items were valued at $820. On March 29, a 30-yearold Crawfordville woman suffered minor injuries when she jumped off a second story balcony at her home. EMS treated the woman at the scene. She was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital as a precaution. On March 29, Joseph Avery of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash. Avery was traveling on Spring Creek Highway when he was struck by a vehicle driven by Myrtle Frances Ladd of Crawfordville who was traveling on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Road. Ladd failed to stop at the stop sign and struck the Avery vehicle before leaving the scene. She was found a short time later. Both vehicles suffered $1,000 worth of damage and the drivers refused medical treatment. On March 30, Synethia Jones of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her vehicle. Someone struck the victims vehicle with a rock. The rocks were taken from a grave in the Crawfordville Cemetery and thrown at the vehicle. On March 31, David Smith of Crawfordville reported a structure re. He reported hearing a transformer blow and noticed sparks emitting from the electrical box at his neighbors home. No re or smoke damage was observed inside the residence. A tree limb falling on the electrical line caused the transformer to blow and created minor damage to the siding of the home and electrical box. Damage was estimated at $300. On March 31, Larry Bell of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft. The victims bulldog was reported missing. The dog is valued at $700. On March 31, Joe Walker of Crawfordville reported being struck by a vehicle at the intersection of Old Shell Point Road and Ball Court. The victim stopped his vehicle for a stop sign and Charles McLaughlin of Crawfordville reportedly struck the back of Walkers vehicle. Both vehicles were damaged and McLaughlin was found at fault in the accident. A fence also suffered $100 worth of damage. On March 31, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after an employee allegedly observed Brittany Louvon Harris, 20, of Palmetto, place a swimsuit in her purse and pass the checkout area without paying for the item. The swimsuit was valued at $39 and Harris was taken to the Wakulla County Jail. On March 31, Joseph A.T. Humphries, 73, of Crawfordville was involved in a traffic crash at Riverside Caf in St. Marks. Humphries failed to stop at a stop sign on Highway 363 and struck a van parked at the establishment. The van was owned by Matthew D. McKinney of Crawfordville. Restaurant patrons secured Humphries until law enforcement arrived on the scene. Field sobriety exercises were conducted at a nearby business establishment and Humphries was arrested for DUI. Due to injuries received in the accident, Humphries was allowed to seek outside medical treatment. On April 1, Tabitha Mathers of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her vehicle on Wakulla Beach Road. A suspect has been identi ed. The medication is valued at $71. On April 1, Donald Cayson of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. A lawn mower, television, washer and dryer and couch were reported missing. Later, an air conditioning unit was discovered missing. The stolen property is valued at $3,100. On April 1, Robert Kemp of Crawfordville reported the theft of bicycles. Four bicycles were stolen from the victims yard. They are valued at $335. On March 31, two Perry men were involved in a traf- c crash on U.S. Highway 98 near Walker Farm. The Taylor County men struck a tree that came down across the road in a storm. There were no injuries but $5,000 worth of damage was reported to a truck and boat. On April 1, a 17-yearold female was involved in a traffic crash at U.S. Highway 98 and Sopchoppy Highway at the Lower Y. The juvenile pulled in front of a vehicle driven by Sarah Averill and was struck on the driver side. Damage to the juveniles vehicle was estimated at $7,500 and damage to Averills vehicle was estimated at $4,000. The juvenile was found at fault for failure to yield the right of way. Field sobriety exercises were given to the juvenile who passed the exercises. An 18-year-old female was a passenger in the vehicle with the juvenile driver. On April 2, Wesley White of Tallahassee reported a grand theft in Panacea. The victim left his boat in front of a Panacea business establishment. The vessel was stolen prior to being stored in a secured boat yard. The boat, boat motor, trailer and equipment is valued at $24,725. The property was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. On April 2, William Smith of Sopchoppy reported a theft in Panacea. The victim reported that steel plates were stolen off a work barge owned by Ben Withers Construction at an Ochlockonee Bay boat ramp. Seven plates were stolen with a value of $50 each. The plates cover manholes for the hull of the boat. On April 2, Louis A. Sutton of Crawfordville reported the theft of copper tubing from an air conditioning unit and propane tank. The victim had not been at the home for several weeks and the cuts were not fresh. The value of the copper is $120. On April 2, Katelyn Mosley of Panacea reported a criminal mischief to her residence. A forced entry was discovered and damage to the home was estimated at $100. Nothing was taken from inside the home. On April 3, Billy Whit- eld of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to property owned by Talquin Electric. He responded to a home on Smokey Hollow Drive in Crawfordville to investigate a possible theft of copper being stolen out of a meter box. Damage to the meter box was estimated at $250. On April 4, David Cochrane of Tuscaloosa, Ala., reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. Two marine batteries were stolen from the victims Crawfordville home. The batteries were removed from vessels at the home. The stolen property is valued at $200. While Deputy Clint Beam was investigating the theft he determined that other thefts have also been committed in the area and suspects have been identi ed. On April 4, Richard Armstrong of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of metal. A variety of vehicle parts, tool boxes and wheels were reported missing from is property. The stolen property is valued at $7,000. On April 4, Russell Chubb of Thomasville, Ga., reported a residential burglary. A marine battery was stolen from the victims boat at his Crawfordville home. The battery was valued at $100. On April 4, Judith Smith of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. Someone damaged a door lock at the victims home. Damage was estimated at $20. On April 4, Jeanine Dalton of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim gave a friend her credit card to make repairs on her vehicle. She observed nine unauthorized charges on her credit card totaling $577. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 804 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce has identi ed the man whose body was discovered in Sopchoppy on Saturday, April 7. The badly decomposed body of Michael Arthur Ballard, 68, was discovered inside a camper trailer after the property owner observed a wildlife near the trailer. An autopsy was conducted over the weekend that determined that Ballard died of natural causes. Ballards relatives have been noti ed in South Florida. A resident on Bugger Bottom Road reported that the man was deceased inside a camper trailer near the reporting persons home. The victim was living on part of the reporting persons land at the time of his death. Detectives observed a badly decomposed body lying on the oor of the camper. Dead mans body found in SopchoppyWakulla County Fire-Rescue responded to a car re on Spring Creek Highway one mile north of Coastal Highway on Wednesday, April 5. A passerby was able to get the lone occupant out of the car before she sustained any injuries. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCar re SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHonesty recognizedWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum presented Johnny B. Ross Jr. of Crawfordville with a plaque on Tuesday, April 3, honoring him for his honesty in returning a tourists lost wallet and fanny pack on March 20. The property was owned by a man from Quebec, Canada, and was left on a Medart convenience store gasoline pump as the motorcycle tourist was changing into warmer clothing and fueling up. OOPS!The Girls from Evolution Day Spa Hair Salon~ Robyn ~ Miranda ~ Linda ~HAVEMOVEDANDARENOW OPENAT THEIR NEW LOCATIONHair Place That850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. 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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A My aunt loved him with all her heart, Moreno says. She used to babysit their son, Alan Brashear, who was only 7 months old when his father was killed, and she remembers her aunt talking about her husband often. It really got to her, Moreno says of Brashears death. She was upset for years. Thelma Lee passed away about four years ago and Alan received a heart transplant in 1987 and died a few years after. I wish my aunt and cousin had got to be there, Moreno says. Moreno says she remembers the picture of Gene Brashear that Thelma Lee kept and how much Alan looked like his father. He was a good looking man, Moreno says. Although Moreno was unable to attend the burial service, several other families were able to attend, including numerous cousins and Brashears granddaughter Alysen Davis and her daughter. I wish I could have been there, Moreno says. Her family members who attended said more people showed up than expected and the support was overwhelming. They couldnt believe it, Moreno says. In 2000, the Korean War Project launched a program to identify the remains of American forces found in Korea. A joint U.S. and Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea team, led by Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, excavated a mass grave in Unsan in 2000. Remains of at least ve individuals were found, as well as U.S. military uniforms. In 2007, thanks to technology, scientists from the Armed Forces DNA Identi cation Laboratory reanalyzed the remains. Moreno says Brashears cousin gave the lab blood for DNA. Scientists then used dental records and the DNA from the cousin and a sister to identify the remains. Brashear was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star, Purple Heart with Oak Leaf Cluster, Korean Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal and United Nations Service Medal, Korean Presidential Unit Citation and the Republic of Korea War Service Medal. Moreno is originally from Kentucky and moved to Wakulla County about 20 years ago with her daughter and son-in-law. Brashear has three great-granddaughters, seven great-great grandchildren and one great-greatgreat-grandson who live in Wakulla County. According to the DPMO, more than 7,900 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. PHOTOS BY GARY EMORD-NETZLEY/Messenger-InquirerThe motorcade carrying the remains of Army Sgt. William Eugene Brashear.A soldier is nally returned home A ceremonial ag is given to Alysen Davis, granddaughter of Sgt. William Eugene Brashear, during a military funeral service for Brashear. Sitting next to Davis is her sister, Lesley Brashear and Davis daughter, Lucia Davis. Relay for Life paints the LionTAMMIE BARFIELDThis years honorary chair, Alexis Tully. A student at Wakulla High School, she is a cancer survivor who was diagnosed last year with basal carcinoma/nasal cancer. She is attending events around the county to create awareness of Relay for Life and will participate in the opening ceremony at the Relay for Life event. The Lion at Azalea Park got a fresh coat of paint on Saturday, April 7, from Relay for Life. The annual fundraiser for the American Cancer Society is set for Friday, April 20 through Saturday, April 21, at the track at Wakulla High School. TAMMIE BARFIELDThe artist painting the lion is Urika Delvecchio from Tallahassee. She is a volunteer on the Relay for Life committee. VisitWakullaThe Natural Place to Be in FloridaThank You to our Sponsors FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALONTake advantage of Spring/ Summer RatesAsk for our monthly specials! FEATHER LOCKS are here!! 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree)We offer exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT HAIRSALO N Book Your Prom AppointmentNOW !10% OFFW/THIS ADEXP. 5/8/12 the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringCharlotte SullivanMarch 2012 Winner Her name was drawn fromHunter, Hayden & Blake ReevesI like eating at the local family restaurants and were blessed with the many Wakulla County has to oer. OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal fro m Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much!

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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 What are the most fuel-ef cient cars?EarthTalk, Page 12BFDA is studying Bisphenol A By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Several months ago I wrote an article about some of the safety concerns expressed by many on the use of Bisphenol A (BPA). It had been suggested that everyone consider lessoning the amount of canned foods consumed or seek canned foods that are in containers lined with an alternative material. This was due to the BPA that is contained in can linings and in some baby and water bottles. I would like to continue this discussion with an update from the Food and Drug Administration. What is BPA? It is a chemical used in the production of plastics and resins, such as some water and baby bottles and the coatings of some food cans. It is also used in some consumer goods, such as compact discs and thermal cash register tapes. It has generated controversy about its impact on human health and development. What are the concerns? Research has shown that BPA can seep into food or beverages from containers made with BPA and into your body when you handle products made with it. It was suggested that the possible health effects of BPA may affect the brain, behavior and prostate glands of fetuses, infants and children. Infants are a potentially sensitive population for BPA because their neurological and endocrine, elimination and detoxi cation systems are immature. In 2008, the FDA conducted a review of toxicology research and information on BPA, and at that time, judged foodrelated material containing BPA on the market to be safe. But recent studies reported subtle effects of low doses of BPA in laboratory animals. While it was not proven to harm children or adults, the newer studies led federal health of cials to express some concern about the safety of BPA. What did the FDAs updated research reveal? The latest scienti c assessment continues to suggest that the evidence at this time does not support that the very low levels of human exposure to BPA through the diet are unsafe. FDA scientist have also recently determined that exposure to BOA through foods for infants is much less than had been previously believed and that the trace amounts of the chemical that enter the body, whether it is an adult or a child are rapidly metabolized and eliminated. Because there had been particular concern about its use in infant bottles and training (sippy) cups, FDA supported efforts to nd alternatives to BPA in the manufacture of these products. The FDAs ndings include: The elevation of BPA from food that could be passed from pregnant mothers to the fetus is so low that it could not be measured. Exposure to BPA in human infants is from 84 to 92 percent less than previously estimated. BPA is rapidly metabolized and eliminated through feces and urine. What can a consumer do if still concerned? It is recommended that consumers avoid changes in their food consumption that would prevent good nutrition, particularly for infants. If a consumer wants to limit exposure to BPA, the following is suggested: Plastic containers have recycle codes on the bottom. Some, but not all, plastics that are marked with recycle codes 3 to 7 may be made with BPA. This allows the consumer to avoid the use of BPA containers if desired. Continued on Page 12BFrom DEP NewsGovernor Rick Scott issued a proclamation celebrating April 22 as Earth Day 2012 and to celebrate, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection is holding events statewide throughout the month of April. Celebrated worldwide, Earth Day encourages people of all ages to protect and preserve the planets natural resources. Earth Day at the Capitol will be held on Friday, April 20, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Capitol Courtyard in Tallahassee. DEPs Of ce of Environmental Education is hosting Earth Day at the Capitol. The theme for this years event is Green Schools: Creating Healthy, Ef cient and Productive Learning Environments. The celebration at the Capitol recognizes the important role students and educators play in environmental protection. Hands-on educational booths and activities will be featured throughout the day, as well as a collection event where Easy As One staff will collect plastic bags and old cell phones. Speakers throughout the ceremony include DEP Deputy Secretary of Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration Greg Munson, DOH Interim Surgeon General Dr. Harris and Florida Power & Light Co. Vice President for State Governmental Affairs Mike Sole. A District-wide Plastic Bag Recycling Competition will be held the week of April 16April 20 at DEPs Northwest District Of ces in Panama City, Pensacola and Tallahassee in honor of Earth Day. Bags will be taken to local grocery stores for recycling.Earth Day will be celebrated April 22Statewide bluebird blitz is April 13-14 The second annual Statewide Bluebird Blitz will take place on Friday April 13, and Saturday April 14. The Florida Bluebird Society is an af liate of the North American Bluebird Society. Our mission is the conservation and protection of Eastern bluebirds and other native cavity-nesting bird species through educational programs and the collection and dissemination of pertinent and relevant information. One of our goals is to establish the location of Eastern bluebirds throughout the state. The Spring Bluebird Blitz will help us determine where Eastern bluebirds are breeding and nesting in Florida. It is a concentrated effort by as many volunteers as possible going out all over the state of Florida trying to locate as many Eastern bluebirds as they can find. It is a great reason to get outside and enjoy one of Floridas public lands. State parks, state forests, county natural lands or preserves and city parks are all great places to go for a walk in search of Eastern bluebirds. Some people are also fortunate enough to have bluebirds in their own neighborhoods or backyards. You do not need to be an experienced birder to nd Eastern bluebirds. They are easy to spot thanks to their open behavior and their lovely plumage. John Burroughs, a popular nineteenth-century American naturalist, described them as having the earth tinge on his breast and the sky tinge on his back. Males have blue backs, rusty colored breasts, and white bellies. Participation is simple: Go outside on Friday April 13 and/or Saturday April 14, and look for bluebirds Record as much as you are able about the bluebirds you see. Location, behavior, sex, age, etc. We also want to know where you looked and did not nd any bluebirds. Download, complete and submit the Blitz Report form that is on the Florida Bluebird Society web site, oridabluebirdsociety.com. An adult male and two immature Eastern bluebirds. Florida Bluebird Society expanding knowledge about eastern bluebirds throughout Florida with a statewide bluebird blitz.GLENDA SIMMONS JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, April 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a last 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Highway. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350. Friday, April 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, April 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, April 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, April 17 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. IRIS GARDEN CLUB will meet at Just Fruits Nursery at 1 p.m. Betsy Smith will be presenting ideas for lawn beauti cation. For more information, call Jeannie Brodhead at 926-2264 or email irisgardenclub.wakulla@gmail.com. SARRACENIA CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY will show the video Macro Photography by nature photographer Taylor Lockwood at 6 p.m. at the library. The video includes information on lighting, composition and how to use common household items to get the right effects. Wednesday, April 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE D ANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, April 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group is for anyone, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Special EventsThursday, April 12 WAKULLA COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Join committee members and representatives of the Wakulla and Leon County Soil and Water Conservation Districts to nd out more about these positions and the role they play in preserving and protecting natural resources. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m. Friday, April 13 RIBBON CUTTING for First Bank, Senior Products Division at 11:45 a.m. at the chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville. Join them in welcoming Michael Weltman with First Bank, Senior Products Division. SPRING PRODUCTION FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at the auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a show on Saturday and Sunday. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. Final Flick at The Flamingo by Susan Solburg parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre. SARAH MAC BAND will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. For reservations, contact poshjava@gmail. com or call 962-1010. Saturday, April 14 SOPCHOPPY WORM GRUNTIN FESTIVAL will be held from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. There will be music, arts and craft vendors, worm gruntin contest, crowning of king and queen, horseshoe championship, bait casting contest, hula hoop contest and worm grunters ball. For more information, visit www.wormgruntinfestival.com or call 962-4138. HEIDES 16TH ANNUAL ROSE SALE will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Highway. Proceeds bene t CHAT of Wakulla. Heirloom roses in a 3 gallon container will be sold for $7. For more information, call 926-3849 or 926-0890. Roses will also be sold on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or email carriejstevens@comcast.net. Children need to bring a train, snack and drink. FIFTH ANNUAL RALLY FOR THE CURE BREAST CANCER GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held at Wildwood Golf Course. This event is sponsored by Capital City Bank. For more information, contact Karen Waters at karen.wildwood@aol.com or at 926-1222 or 926-4653. GROW MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES CLASS on Bugs and Water will be held from 9 to 11 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. Learn to identify good and bad insects. Call 926-3931 for more information. SPRING PRODUCTION FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at the auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a show on Sunday afternoon. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. Final Flick at The Flamingo by Susan Solburg parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre. BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the library. Browse through books, video and audio. Donations go to the Friends of the Library. SOPCHOPPY HIGH SCHOOL REUNION will be held at the school beginning at 1 p.m. Call 926-7373 for more information. SOPCHOPPY OPRY Branson and Vegas Style Show will be held in the Historic Sopchoppy School Auditorium at 7 p.m. with Todd Allen performing the songs of Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Elvis. Call 962-3711 for ticket information. Sunday, April 15 HEIDES 16TH ANNUAL ROSE SALE will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Highway. Proceeds bene t homeless animal and CHAT. Heirloom roses can be purchased for $7. Call 926-3849 or 926-0890 for more information. SPRING PRODUCTION FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at the auditorium at 2:30 p.m. Cost for students is $4 and adults is $6. Final Flick at The Flamingo by Susan Solburg roughly parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre. PHOTO EXHIBIT RECEPTION for Lou and Betsy Kellenbergers Wonders of Wakulla will be held at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. CONQUISTADORS IN THE FABLED LAND OF THE APALACHEE will be held at San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park, St. Marks, with tours at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. including a discussion with archaeologist Phil Gerrell and historian Madeleine Carr. Reservations can be made at PalmettoExpeditions.com. A separate historic cruise is $10. SPECIAL PRESENTATION Dark Side of the Loon Migration and Winter Biology of the Common Loon by Dr. Paul Spitzer will be held at 2 p.m. at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Spitzer has been a eld biologist, naturalist and ecologist for 45 years. Call 925-6121 for more information. Monday, April 16 SEN. MARCO RUBIO OFFICE HOURS will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at Sopchoppy City Hall. Members of his staff will be available to answer questions. Wednesday, April 18 BROWN BAG LUNCH SERIES Employee Retention, will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the chamber of ce. Registration is required. Contact the Chamber at 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com. ST. MARKS FISH FRY for Wild About Wakulla Week will begin at 5 p.m. at the Yacht Club. Grouper, cheese grits, hushpuppies and sweet tea will be served. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for children under 12. Tickets are available at St. Marks City Hall or by calling 321-4522. CONQUISTADORS IN THE FABLED LAND OF THE APALACHEE will be held at San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park, St. Marks, with tours at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. including a discussion with archaeologist Phil Gerrell and historian Madeleine Carr. Reservations can be made at PalmettoExpeditions.com. A separate historic cruise is $10. Thursday, April 19 CHAMBER AFTER HOURS EVENT will be held at the Wakulla Diving Center, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP to the Chamber at 926-1848. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. WHS spring production, Final Flick at the Flamingo at 7:30 p.m. Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Heides Rose Sale 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Highway. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, April 12 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for a workshop on the Children Services Council at 5 p.m. at the commission chambers. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. at city hall. TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. Tuesday, April 17 WAKULLA 2020 ADVISORY COMMITTEE will meet at 4 p.m. at the library. They will review and prioritize projects in the Crawfordville Town Plan and other transportation projects throughout the county. Thursday, April 19 ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners Conference Room. By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL Interim DirectorBook Extravaganza Our bi-monthly Book Extravaganza Fundraiser will be held Saturday, April 14 from 9 a.m. to noon in our Main Meeting Room. As always, well have thousands of books, video and audio for your browsing pleasure. While monetary donations are not required, all funds raised go directly to the Friends of the Library. The Friends fund our Summer Program of Events, paid for our new public computers, and help pay for needed library expenses. As Ive stated before, the Friends have saved the citizens of Wakulla County more than $50,000 over the past 2 years by their fundraising efforts. They, along with the library, still need your help so please come out and help support your library. Members of the Friends will also be on hand for those wanting more information or wishing to contribute their time and money to help the WCPL grow into the library you deserve. Last chance for Tax Prep With tax day rapidly approaching, the AARPs last sessions of free tax preparation are upon us. They will be at the WCPL from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday and from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Tuesday, April 17, which is tax day. This is your last chance to take advantage of this free opportunity. This service is intended for low to middle income lers with an emphasis on those over 50. On behalf of the 100s of people who have taken advantage of this service over the past 2 months, Id like to thank the AARP volunteers for all their time and hard work! Free Computer Classes We still have some seats available for some of our free computer classes the rest of this month. For those interested in web design, we have a Getting Started class on Tuesday, April 17, at 9:30 a.m. On Wednesday, April 25, were offering Windows 7: Email also at 9:30 a.m. Two other classes, Microsoft Excel 2007: More Formulas and Functions at 1:30 p.m. on April 17 and Windows 7: Organize Your Computer Files on April 25 are fully booked, but we will still take names for an on call list. As always, the classes require early registration. The schedule for the next round of classes will be out in late April. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 3BHEALTH & FITNESSYoga can help with anxiety and panic attacks, as those are in many ways exaggerated forms of stress. Both conditions are marked by a rajasic (agitated) state of mind and by what is known in Ayurveda as vata derangement. And both respond to various yogic tools, including asana (postures) and pranayama ( breathing), as well as lifestyle adjustments and the cultivation of pratyahara ( withdraw of the senses), turning the senses inward. One of the most useful yogic tools in these cases is a good asana practice, which burns off the nervous energy that can contribute to anxiety. And a number of breathing practices, including abdominal breathing and lengthening the exhalation relative to the inhalation, help reduce symptoms of anxiety. Scientific studies suggest that left-nostril breathing can effectively reduce symptoms of obsessivecompulsive disorder (and its probably also useful for less extreme forms of anxiety). In addition, the regular practice of both asana and pranayama (breathing techniques) leads to greater internal sensitivity, which can allow students to detect the first glimmer of an anxiety or panic attack and respond with yogic tools that might head off the problem. The earlier in the process you can intervene, the greater the likely ef cacy. For students who are open to them, bhakti practices such as prayer, chanting and devotional singing may be highly therapeutic for anxiety. In the long term, meditation and selfstudy (svadhyaya) offer the hope of getting at the deeper causes of the problem. Through meditation perhaps more than any other yogic tool, you start to see how busy your mind is, and you gain insight into some of the tricks that it plays. Many people may not realize how repetitive thoughts, of which they are usually barely aware, may be fueling their worries. Getting your students to start to see this pattern clearly is often the rst step to bringing it under greater control. In fact, seeing clearly can be helpful for anxiety and panic attacks in a variety of ways. Over the years Ive seen a few students, most of whom were otherwise vigorous and healthy, with incapacitating panic attacks. Their hearts were beating hard and fast, they were hyperventilating, and they felt as if they were having a heart attack and might suddenly die. But the reality is that a young and healthy person who is panicking is probably not going to have a heart attack no matter how fast and hard their hearts beat (when students are older or have risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure or elevated cholesterol, you need to be more careful). It often helps them simply to understand that panic is at its core an emotional, not a physical, problem. Seeing clearly is also useful in dealing with more run-of-the-mill anxiety. Most people who are anxious will admit, if theyre honest and paying attention, that much of what they worry about never happens. And even if it does, the consequences are often not as negative as they would have predicted. Sometimes, in retrospect, they realize that the thing they feared the most was precisely what needed to happen for them to grow or learn or get out of a bad situation in other words, it was ultimately a good thing. One useful self-study exercise is to have my students write down the 10 things theyre most worried about, then look back weeks or months later to see how many came true, and, if so, whether the consequences were as dire as theyd imagined. Keep in mind that anxiety can be a useful symptom, and the ability to get anxious has survival value. Thinking about potential threats, and planning how you might lower the risk or respond appropriately, can be extremely useful, even lifesaving. Going over the same worry dozens or even hundreds of times, when the iterations bring no new insight, isnt helpful and can make you miserable. This is where yogic philosophy can be useful. It teaches that, ultimately, no one can control whats going to happen. Despite your best efforts, some bad things undoubtedly will occur. All you can do is try to plan intelligently, give your best effort, let the universe take its course, and, when it does, respond as well as you can. When you realize that you ultimately dont have control over the future, it can take the pressure off and that alone may reduce anxiety. Heart opening yoga is doing backbends. Incorrect posture, mainly while sitting, can close and constrict the area around your heart. Things like low self-esteem and feeling generally bad can be from that. Take care of the present, said the great 20th-century master Ramana Mararshi, and the future will take care of itself.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140.By GENA DAVIS Whenever you start a new exercise program or diet, does it seem like something comes along and derails all your great plans and good intentions? A lot of people have issues or problems that they think prohibit them from working out or eating healthy. What can they do? I tell my clients that life is always going to happen and you have to decide beforehand that you are going to work around whatever situation you nd yourself in. If your job, family or schedule make it dif cult to stick to a healthy diet and regular meals, start taking your meals in a cooler. Always have healthy food options on hand, even if you have to stash snacks in your car, purse, desk, etc. Explain to any family members that object to your eating plan that this is something you are doing for yourself and it will make you healthier and happier in the long run. Eat something small and healthy before going out with family or co-workers. That way you wont be starving and will be able to stick to your plan. Being hungry when you are in an environment that is full of temptation to overeat or make bad choices makes you more vulnerable emotionally and more likely to cave in to the temptation and make poor choices. You will only regret them later. If you are having trouble nding time to work out, you may need to sit down and ask yourself some hard questions. Do you have time to watch TV? Talk on the phone? Catch up with your friends on Facebook? Play games on the computer? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, you have the time to work out, you just dont make the time. People will nd the time for the things that are most important to them. I have clients who work out at 5 or 6 a.m., simply because thats the only time that is available. I also have clients who work out after work, on their lunch break, or in the evenings. Whenever the most time is available is the best time to work out. Suppose you start working out and have an injury? If you have a lower body injury, you can still do upper body, and you can do lower body with an upper body injury, as long as your doctor approves, of course! Chances are, you can nd things to do that still get your heart rate up and make you break a sweat. If you are willing to work around whatever problem you have, there is a way. Bottom line, no one is going to offer to watch your kids, cook your dinner or clean your house so you can go to the gym! If that is something you want for yourself, you have to be willing to do whatever it takes to get you there. There are trainers who will come to your house, or meet you at the gym. There are classes you can go to, groups you can join. There are even TV shows and video games that you can use to get a workout. So get your doctors approval and then DO SOMETHING! There is always a way when you really want to achieve your goals. It may not be easy or quick, but you can get there, I promise. Have faith in yourself and take that rst step towards a healthy lifestyle. You will be glad you did!Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY GET FITSmall commitment,big reward!Yoga can help relieve stress Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC.Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain THG-11909 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EAR www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Fun facts about earthworms There are more than 2,700 different types of earthworms residing on the planet. Earthworms are often known to be workhorses in the garden, helping to aerate and fertilize the soil while lling it with nutrients. Earthworms recycle materials like dead leaves, decaying animals and feces so new plant seedlings can grow and have the process begin anew. Worms have been around for 120 million years -one of the few species of insects that have stood the test of time. In just one acre of soil, there may be a million or more earthworms turning over the soil and chewing on organic matter. Without earthworms, most plants would not thrive. Earthworms have mucous covering their bodies in order to stay moist. This helps them to breathe through their skin. You may have noticed that after it rains worms appear on sidewalks and outside of their underground burrows. This is not because they are drowning underground, but because the environment is moist after it rains, making it more conducive for worms to breathe and move around to nd mates. Normally the dry conditions above ground make them dry out and die. Earthworms can be remarkable creatures to watch. Contrary to popular belief, worms do have a mouth and an opposite end for waste removal that is not interchangeable. This page sponsored in part by: How many words can you make from the word:S O P C H O P P YHow many words can you make from the word:S O P C H O P P Y1. __ H O __ 2. __ H __ P P __ 3. H __ __ 4. C __ __ 5. P __ __ 6. P __ P P __ 7. __ O O __ H 8. __ H O __ 9. H __ __ P 10. C __ __ P 1. shop 2. choppy 3. hop 4. cop 5. pop 6. poppy 7. pooch 8. shop 9. hoop 10. coop Answers:

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Special to The NewsWild About Wakulla Week is from April 14 to April 22 and highlights the heritage and outdoor recreational opportunities of Wakulla County. The Kick-Off event is the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival on Saturday, April 14. The festival celebratesthe art of worm gruntin pounding a stake (stob) into the ground and rubbing a flat piece of iron across its top creating vibrations that drive earthworms from the ground where they are collected for sh bait. The festival is held along the downtown streets of Sopchoppy with events beginning at 9 a.m. More than 80 vendors will be on hand to provide food, arts and crafts. The day concludes with the Worm Grunters Ball. There is no admission to the event and it is loaded with family oriented activities. Please visit www.WormGruntinFestival.com for more information. Special events, tours, and activities will be held April 15-22 throughout Wakulla Countys scenic, friendly and historic communities. SUNDAY, APRIL 15 WONDERS OF WAKULLA PHOTOGRAPHS On Sunday, April 15, the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea will host a reception for Lou and Betsy Kellenbergers Wonders of Wakulla photographic exhibit from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Both award-winning photographers, the couples art evokes a passion for the heritage and natural beauty of the region. TUESDAY, APRIL 17 GULF SPECIMEN Visit the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea with your children or grandchildren to be introduced to the glee of hands-on discovery. This is a mustexperience opportunity not only during Wild About Wakulla Week but anytime the explorer inside you is looking to create vivid memories. Visit www.GulfSpecimen.org to get started on your family adventure or go to www.PalmettoExpeditions.com to make arrangements for a special tour on Tuesday, April 17. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18 ST. MARKS St. Marks, Americas oldest river town, exempli es the hospitality of a cozy Gulf coast village. Although any day is a good day to visit this community, its welcoming arms will offer guests special hometown opportunities on Wednesday, April 18. The Sweet Magnolia Inn will host a tour of its historic Bed and Breakfast. Shields Marina, Bo Lynn Store and Shell Island Fish Camp, are just a few of the businesses which will be inviting guests by for conversation, snacks and raf e sign-ups. If manatees are an inspiration, then contact T-n-T Hide-A-Way at (850) 9256412 for more information on their guided manatee observation tour. Sunsets on the bay are certain memory makers and St. Marks Charters (StMarksCharters.com) can make those memories happen. For information regarding a shorter and very reasonably priced St. Marks River Sample Cruise on Wednesday, April 18, visit www.WildAboutWakulla. com. Hometown hospitality culminates with a sh fry beginning at 5 p.m. at the St. Marks Yacht Club, featuring grouper, cheese grits, hushpuppies and sweet tea. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for children under 12. Tickets are available at St. Marks city hall or by calling (850) 321-4522. Raf e winners will be chosen during the sh fry. Evening activities continue at the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge with a lanternlight tour of the lighthouse keepers home beginning at 7:30 p.m. Space is limited. Please call (850) 925-6121 for reservations. FRIDAY, APRIL 20 ART ON THE TERRACE On Friday evening, April 20, the Wakulla Wildlife Festival will delight residents and visitors with its Art on the Terrace at the historic Wakulla Springs Lodge in Wakulla Springs State Park. Fine art, ne food and fine music highlight the evenings activities. SATURDAY, APRIL 21 WAKULLA WILDLIFE FESTIVAL The fun continues on Saturday, April 21 at Wakulla Springs State Park as the Wakulla Wildlife Festival goes into high gear offering inspiring local musicians, knowledgeable exhibitors, dazzling presentations, convincing living history demonstrators and special premium guided tours. Visit www.WakullaWildlifeFestival.org for more information. SUNDAY, APRIL 22 CONQUISTADORS The weeks events wrap up on Sunday, April 22 with Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee. Celebrating Viva Florida 500, the event dramatically captures the rich history at the confluence of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers with informative boat cruises along with museum and fort tours at San Marcos de Apalache State Park. Please visit www.PalmettoExpeditions.com for dates, times, and registration. Palmetto Expeditions offers a wide selection of tours suited to varying tastes and activity levels throughout the week. The website is a gateway to outdoor fun in Wakulla County and the Big Bend Region. Make arrangements for a trail ride, a sunset cruise or an action packed saltwater shing charter. Perhaps a personalized tour of Wakulla Countys sinkholes with a gourmet cheese and fruit picnic included would be more to your taste. Please visit www.WildAboutWakulla.com to guide you to more of what makes Wakulla County a destination for heritage and outdoor recreational activities and adventure. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 5BWILD ABOUT WAKULLAA celebration of Wakulla County, April 14-22 Saturday, April 14 Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival. Sunday, April 15 Wonders of Wakulla, a reception for an opening of an exhibit featuring the photographs of Lou and Betsy Kellenberger at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 17 Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea. Wednesday, April 18 St. Marks Day. Friday, April 20 Art on the Terrace at Wakulla Springs State Park. Saturday, April 21 Wakulla Wildlife Festival at Wakulla Springs State Park. Sunday, April 22 Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee. LOU KELLENBERGER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe St. Marks Lighthouse. It will be included in Wonders of Wakulla, an exhibition of photographs by Lou and Betsy Kellenberg er, which opens with a reception on Sunday, April 15. A tour of the lighthouse keepers home will be part of the St. Marks Day events on Wednesday, April 18. Celebrates 2012 Wild About Wakulla Weekwith Certied Green Guide tours Birding/wildlife Nature/historical walks Sinkhole hikes Nature photography Scenic boat tours Trail rides/trail hikes Clay sculpture workshops For complete schedule, details & registration please visitwww.PalmettoExpeditions.com Corner of Rose Street and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy Register for gift Basket Proceeds for local Spay & Neuter Feral catsThursday donate shelf stable food here for Manna Food Bank DIRT PUDDINGWITH GUMMYWORMSDURINGTHE FESTIVALON SATURDAY A Clay Experienceat the Wakulla Welcome Centerin Panacea Tuesday 2-4 Meet Nancy Jeerson, local clay artist and Certi ed Green Guide, to enjoy a hands-on clay experience. Let Nancy show you how she uses nature to inspire her creations as she guides you in hand building a turtle, a kayak or canoe, a bird or sh, or whatever ora, fauna or experience has inspired you! All materials supplied and nal piece glazed and red. Completed pieces will be shipped via US Post O ce at cost. O ered throughwww.NancyJeffersonPottery.com

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy CAPT. JAMES HODGESSpecial to The NewsWe have four raf es that began April 1, and will end on Wednesday, April 18. The idea is to get as many people as possible to physically go inside these four businesses in an effort to reveal how special St. Marks really is. St. Marks Charters is raf- ing off a Sunset Cruise for Six simply stop in Bo Lynns Grocery and put your name in the jar. Shields Marina is offering a half-day Pontoon boat. Stop in Shields Marina and drop your name into the jar. Shell Island has an overnight stay for two. Stop in Shell Island Marina and drop your name into the jar. Sweet Magnolia Bed and Breakfast has an overnight stay for two, including breakfast. Drop by Sweet Magnolia, or Shields Marina to get your name in the jar. Sweet Magnolia will be giving open house guided tours of their beautiful establishment on the weekends, and on April 18. We are using the catchphrase from The Hunger Games May the odds forever be in your favor! The winners names will be drawn at the Fish Fry being served at the St. Marks Yacht Club on Wednesday, April 18 at 5 p.m. The cost is $10 per plate, featuring fried grouper with all the xings. Immediately following the sh fry, those who have made reservations can drive to the St. Marks Refuge for the guided lantern tour of the lighthouse. On Sunday, April 15, Wednesday, April 18 and Sunday, April 22, St. Marks Charters will be offering Guided Sampler tours of the town via boat in the mornings. Pick up and drop off is at Shields Marina. The cost is $5 per person. Beginning at 12:30 p.m. we will move down to the old fort and start our Conquistador tour, which is the historic telling of how the Spanish explorers came to St. Marks, where their fort was built, etc. The historical walking tour of the fort and brief lecture inside the fort museum will be a charge of $8 per person which includes the admission fee to the museum. Historian Madeleine Carr will tell of the historic adventure from the old fort after the boat tour. Space is limited, so please call (850)925-6121 for reservations, or visit St. Marks Lighthouse, Lantern Tour for details. For more information, visit the webpage, www. wildaboutwakulla.com/ April18.html.Special to The NewsYou are invited to the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea to enjoy the Wonders of Wakulla photographic exhibit and reception of Tallahassees Lou and Betsy Kellenberger. Lou Kellenberger is a conservation, nature and outdoor photographer. Public lands, including state parks, national forests and refuges are some of his favorite places to look for photo opportunities. His goal is to evoke a certain time and place and for the viewer to feel that they are there with him. In recent years, Lou has been photographing the people and places of Floridas Forgotten Coast in an effort to preserve the history of Old Florida and to create an awareness of visiting and living in this special place. He has started a Blue Highway Collection, featuring scenes along back roads, byways and seldom seen places. Betsy Kellenberger is a nature and outdoor photographer, always looking for the perfect light to catch that once in a lifetime shot. Northwest Florida is an excellent place to nd opportunities for nature photography with a variety of state parks, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, the beaches and numerous wildlife management areas. Most weekends nd us out with our cameras looking for interesting subjects such as migrating ducks, manatees or wildflowers. We look for our favorite spots with the changing of the seasons and often return to these places year after year. We love to travel and always come home with memory cards full of pictures to process, she said. If you are truly Wild About Wakulla, we will see you Sunday, April 15, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. You can stroll across the street to the Panacea Mineral Springs and view the historical interpretation and the future restoration of the springs. LOU KELLENBERGER Lou has taught digital photography classes for several years. Lou likes to share his experiences and knowledge of photography with anyone from beginners to advanced photographers. One of the aspects of photography Lou enjoys most is taking individuals and small groups on eld trips to learn hands-on photography. Lou is constantly learning as digital cameras and equipment become more sophisticated. He is an active member of the St. Marks NWR Photo Club and the Tallahassee SNAPP Photo Club. His photographs have been featured in annual reports, brochures, calendars, exhibits, magazines and displayed on various websites. He serves on the Boards of Directors of the Friends of Maclay Gardens, the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park and the St. Marks Refuge Association, where he is a lifetime member. He is also a member of the Florida Lighthouse Association. Lou is a member of the Photographic Society of America, Canon Professional Services and is a lifetime member of the Florida Wildlife Federation. BETSY KELLENBERGER Her interest in digital photography began in 2005 when she was out at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge with her husband while he was practicing his photography. Suddenly a thought came to her mind and she said, Since Im out here I should be taking pictures too! Her husband gave her a camera and he got a new one. My Canon Rebel was a great learning camera along with a 28-135 mm lens and I made some fairly good pictures with it, she said. I graduated through many more levels and now shoot with a Canon 50D, a 30D and a number of different lenses. I am a nature and outdoor photographer, always looking for the perfect light to catch that once-ina-lifetime shot. Northwest Florida is an excellent place to find opportunities for nature photography with a variety of state parks, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, the beaches, and numerous wildlife management areas. Most weekends nd us out with our cameras looking for interesting subjects such as migrating ducks, manatees or wild- owers. We look for our favorite spots with the changing of the seasons and often return to these places year after year. We love to travel and always come home with memory cards full of pictures to process. Event photography is another favorite. The challenge comes from trying to get good candid shots of people doing interesting things. I volunteer at Maclay Gardens State Park, Wakulla Springs State Park and St. Marks NWR where I document many of the special events. A sharp picture of a child holding a butter y or a couple launching their kayaks gives me a sense of accomplishment. No matter what kind of photography Im doing I always look for bright colors whether it be the blue of the sky, the pink of a sunset or the red of a ower. My photos have been featured in magazines, brochures, newsletters, newspapers and posters. Ive shown my work in exhibits and won awards in several contests. I belong to the St. Marks Refuge Photo Club and the SNAPP Photo Club. I also assist my husband Lou in teaching photography to individuals and groups.WILD ABOUT WAKULLAWildlife photos show Wonders of WakullaExhibit of photographs by Lou and Betsy Kellenberger will be featured at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea on Sunday, April 15 St. Marks will shine on Wednesday, April 18LOU KELLENBERGER Open House at Shell Island Fish Camp all day. Meet Miss Joy At Bo Lynns Grocery from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Wakulla River Wildlife Observation paddle from 8 a.m. to noon. St. Marks River Sampler and Sunset Cruises from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Free donuts and co ee at Shields Marina from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Open House at Sweet Magnolia Inn at 11 a.m. Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee from 12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Fish Fry at St. Marks Yacht Club at 5 p.m. Cost is $10 for grouper plate. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Sunset Lighthouse Tour at 7:30 p.m. FILE PHOTOCharacters representing different periods in the history of St. Marks in line at Bo Lynns with Miss Joy Brown behind the cash register. SHELL ISLAND FISH CAMP OPEN HOUSE WEDNESDAY,APRIL 18

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Wakulla Wildlife Festivalwww.wakullawildlifefestival.orgBy JEFF HUGOSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Department of Environmental Protections Wakulla Springs State Park will host the Wakulla Wildlife Festival on Friday, April 20 and Saturday, April 21. Participants in the Wakulla Wildlife Festival will be immersed in the rich heritage and diverse ecosystems that envelop them in the Wakulla Springs watershed. Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park will be the hub of activities designed to educate, inspire and empower people by connecting them with their environment and heritage. The Wakulla Wildlife Festival caters to the diversity of its participants by offering ne art, living history demonstrations, exceptional music, activities for children and families, and environmental experiences both rare and compelling. All will enjoy viewing the wildlife and heritage of the region through the eyes of gifted artists during the Art Opening on Friday evening and the continuing Wildlife Art Show on Saturday. There will be ne pottery that create the essence of past cultures and mimic the natural designs of our environment. Photography, paintings and drawings hold in suspended animation the magical moments of the region as artists have seen, held captive and shared. ART ON FRIDAY During the Art Opening on Friday evening, April 20, the beguiling jazz of Sammy Tedder will ll the Lodge with the musical expression of the festivals mission. His contemplative Native American ute or soulful sax often mixes with the eclectic voices of the night wilderness. It is a haunting reminder of the quality of life enjoyed in a region touted as The Natural Place to Be. Visit www.SammyTedder.com to sample his work. The silent auction is a favorite way to support the Wakulla Wildlife Festival. It is also a great way to view samples of the artists work and acquire ne art at a consumer determined value. Bidding begins at 6:30 p.m. and ends at 9:10 p.m. Winners are welcome to claim their prizes at the end of bidding. Complimentary hors doeuvres and a cash bar offering wine and beer punctuate an evening enhanced with ne food designed to tempt the palette. Guests can experience fine dining in the Ball Room Restaurant as they titillate their taste buds with fine Southern cuisine. Reservations for a special evening out can be made by calling (850) 4212000. GUIDED TOURS Premium Guided Tours (additional fees apply) offer nature lovers an opportunity to hone their wildlife-watching skills and senses. Visitors might seek the unexpected on a night cruise down the Wakulla River as the rubyred eyes of alligators glow in the re ected light of a ashlight. Others may prefer to quietly celebrate a serene sunrise with morning light dancing through the silvery strands of Spanish moss dangling from ancient cypress limbs. Still others might choose to be escorted to the seldom seen windows into a submerged underground cave system. The colorful wings of butter ies itting among the parks spring blooms are testimony of the allure these remarkable ambassadors of the insect kingdom have for many guests. Others are vivified as they join a group of photographers to utilize that new camera for capturing moments of outdoor splendor. Children squeal with delight as they play a game, create a craft or get their faces painted under the Childrens Activities tent. The childrens activities are part of the many exhibitors who introduce visitors to magni cent wildlife, area nature centers and museums and recreational opportunities. Living history demonstrators will present a proud heritage of ingenuity and hard work. There will be the brutal power of the blacksmith as he bends iron to his whim and the gentle grace of the spinner as she creates thread from various bers. Basket makers, cow hunters and soldiers from past Florida con icts will offer a glimpse into past lives. All the while, bluegrass music will quicken the pulse and set toes to tapping. Excited festival guests return year after year to enjoy the phenomenal Bird of Prey and Reptile shows presented by the Center for Wildlife Education, Georgia Southern University. Guests are mesmerized as they discover the mysterious yet vital role snakes and lizards play in our world. Eagles, hawks and owls swoop overhead while their handlers present predator/prey relations and raptors as indicators of environmental health. The shows are interactive with considerable audience participation. It is easy to become part of the celebration. Simply visit www.WakullaWildlifeFestival.org for a complete listing of activities. Please register on-line early for the premium tours as they often ll up fast. Out of town guests can discover true Southern hospitality during a stay at the Wakulla Springs Lodge (wakullaspringslodge.com), the Inn at Wildwood (www. InnatWildwood.com) or the Best Western Wakulla Inn and Suites (www.bestwestern.com/wakullainn). Visitors can also enjoy the taste of locally fresh caught seafood at many area restaurants. For more information about Florida State Parks, visit www.FloridaStateParks.org, follow us on Twitter at www.Twitter. com/FLStateParks and like us on Facebook at FLStateParks. Wakulla Springs State Park is hub for annual festival SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA view of the Wakulla River on a foggy morning. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpinners at the Wildlife Festival demonstrate how fabric is made from raw thread. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA swallowtail butter y on a cone ower. LOU KELLENBERGERPhotographers prepare to get shots on the riverboat cruise on the Wakulla River. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 7B $5Guided History Tour of the oldest port in North America$ 5Guided History Tour of the oldest port in North AmericaSunset TourTravel past the scenic historic lighthouse and out into Apalachee Bay for a spectactular view of the sunset $149 Includes up to 6 passengers call for reservations.850-508-2660www.stmarkscharters.com Capt. James HodgesCertied Green Guide per person Wed. April 1830-45 min.St. Marks Charters St. Marks ChartersApril 14 22 6:30-8:30 per person Wed. April 1830-45 min. Were WILDabout Oysters and Smoked MulletJoin us for Wild about Wakulla WeekApril 14 April 21U.S. Coastal Hwy., 98 At the Bridge, Newport(850) 925-6448Visit our Website www.OuztsToo.com Open Wednesday Sunday

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MADELINE CARRSpecial to The NewsWaking to the cacophonous and joyous birds announcing a new day. Red bird shouting you, you, you or is it chew, chew, chew? The hawks are still tucked away, as are the woodpeckers. Not the owls. They howl and cackle, Wake up, yall, wake up right now. Is it at a good sound or one that scares the ying squirrels into keeping their own heads low, their legs tucked in? The sounds precede the suns rays that will awaken the butter ies from their perches underneath the leaves. Such is the wild side of Wakulla County. Another wild scene emerges on the rivers and on the Apalachee Bay. Otters pop their heads up, whiskers glistening. In daylight, the clear waters magnify sh pursuing breakfast, the occasional victim breaking through ashing a glistening, semaphoring farewell to the world. Birds stalk the shallow waters, their long feet disturbing critters for a welcome breakfast. And so the Ides of March give way to April. A poet called it the cruelest month. People in Wakulla disagree. April is time to celebrate the wildness of Wakulla. To celebrate nature returned. The art in nature rearranges itself in the cooler months. Settles into a new order of things. Brown on the ground, emerald green above. Impenetrable, some say. They would be wrong. Annually in the third week in April nature is revealed to visitors curious about this natural place to be. Dawn unveils the awakening world, and dusk brings a cloak of mystery to visitors signing up for Wild About Wakulla Week. Unhurried, people who know about such things take their time to guide the curious on boats and on hikes into Wakullas wilderness. No experience is necessary. No training, just a sense of wonderment at the green guides enjoyment of place and expertise. The curious can select from 68 tours listed through Palmetto Expeditions. The companys owner, Cynthia Paulson, herself a green guide, coordinates the regions rst tour operation online. Paulson sees the dawning of what lies ahead. The companys websites (PalmettoExpeditions.com and WildAboutWakulla.com) are updated regularly. Paulson, a St. Petersburg native and FSU graduate whose children grew up in Wakulla County, always imagined a continuation of a slower time in Florida. Her image for Palmetto Expeditions is, after all, styled along the classy bathing beauties of yesteryear. I branded my company to evoke those memories when bathing beauties adorned trees, motorcycles, umbrella ads in addition to the famous beaches, Paulson says. In 2008 Paulson received her Green Guide certi cation from Tallahassee Community Colleges Ecotourism Institute as have all the tour guides for whom she attracts visitors. After completing the comprehensive induction into Wakulla Countys environment and heritage, dozens of graduates have taken satis ed visitors on guided hikes, kayak trips, geological discoveries, and even equestrian forays through the woods. Several certified boat captains also have taken the course. Interpreted cruises include trips on the St. Marks, the Ochlocknee and portions of the Wakulla rivers. According to Capt. James Hodges of St. Marks Charters, he is torn between his historic river cruises, and the sunset cruises near the St. Marks Lighthouse. Likewise Capt. Jody Campbell of Shell Point. When not guiding visitors to the best shing spots, he also has a soft spot for the birders he takes out to the many small islands in Apalachee Bay, with or without sunsets. The attraction for Paulson is to package all of the tours, to reach out to the world to show that Wakulla County is 00 percent natural. We have several guides who cross over into Franklin County as well. She explains that green guides in that county offer another ecological view of our area altogether. What became apparent to me is that there are so many opportunities for visitors to see the best natural place left in Florida, she says. But there was not one place to shop for these adventures. And so her marketing plan part of the course she took through TCC focused on becoming a licensed incoming tour operator. One regional offering includes a preview of what might be a big draw in 2013, the Viva 500 Florida celebrations. Leon and Wakulla counties are the sites of two Spaniards who came in the 16th century to the fabled land of the Apalachee, and together with historians and archaeologists several special tours are listed during Wild About Wakulla week. That was the time when panthers and bears, bobcats and turtles, turkeys and geese were plentiful and aboriginal people were plentiful. Five hundred years has been enough time to alter the Apalachee state of affairs forever. This is an important time for the region, Paulson says. Even the natural world changes constantly and Wakullas own upcoming anniversaries are a witness to bygone eras. These include this falls 75th anniversary of the opening of the Wakulla Springs Lodge, continuing next year with the establishment of Wakulla County 170 years ago in 1843. Palmetto Expeditions guests receive the highest quality and most memorable travel experience. Paulson says that she can foresee a party atmosphere at almost all of the travel experiences between now and the 2013. Stateside and international visitors discover in this region the best natural and heritage treasures unique to Wakulla County and the Forgotten Coast, says Paulson, who continues to update tour offerings. Online reservations are picking up, Paulson says, and some of the tours will sell out early during Wild About Wakulla Week. Many of those special tours, upon request, can be arranged later on and Paulsons online business also reserves hotels, arranges for special needs for what is known in the tourism world as full service, first-class experience. Paulson, author of a Wakulla Green monthly column in Forgotten CoastLine, is a leader in the tourism community. I and all the other Green Guides are convinced that tourism is the only economic development opportunity in the region, she says.Cynthia Paulson operates Palmetto ExpeditionsBy MADELEINE CARRSpecial to The NewsWere so wild about Wakulla in April that archaeologists, historians and green guides are reaching way back to prepare visitors for the 2013 Viva Florida 500 celebration. This is one of many tours offered during Wild About Wakulla Week, April 14-22. Who were the Apalachee the Spanish encountered in North Florida in the 16th century? Where did they live and what happened to them? Palmetto Expeditions (palmettoexpeditions.com), a North Florida tour operator, includes a unique opportunity to explore the contact between the Apalachee Indians and the Spanish. Entitled Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee, reservations are now open for these tours that include a fun look at the land that almost killed the Spanish conquistadors. Beginning with a self-guided trip to the DeSoto site in Tallahassee, visitors will make their way to the Spanish fort in St. Marks. There, certified Green Guide Captains James Hodges and Joey Tillman take small groups for a waters edge view of the Spanish fort. Get set to be thoroughly entertained during an amusing, historic account of contact between the Apalachee and Spaniards on this interpretive cruise. Awaiting you at the fort for a discussion about the earliest natives and the Spanish are historians Madeleine Carr and Johnathan Grandage and archaeologists Phil Gerrell and Rochelle Marrinan. Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee is presented on Sundays, April 15 and 22, and Wednesday, April 18. Historic cruises leave from the public boat ramp, Old Fort Road, St. Marks at 12:30, 1:30 and 2:20 p.m. To ensure your spot on the boat for a preferred time, pre-registration is highly suggested. Cost is $10 per passenger. Talks at the fort will be held at 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. on all three days. Cost is $8 per person, including admission to the forts museum. It is one of many tours that are part of the Wild About Wakulla annual celebrations in Wakulla County, offered annually during the third week in April. For more information, contact Palmetto Expeditions (wakulla@palmettoexpeditions.com).Conquistadors around here?Special to The NewsRepresentatives from the Friends of the Big Bend Maritime Center will be at the upcoming Worm Grunting Festival to showcase the centers boat building programs, sign up new members and share details about the organizations other exciting plans and activities for 2012, which include the following highlights: Completing development plans for the centers Panacea site, which will support education and community events. Introducing family and student boat building workshops. Sponsoring on-the-water activities for area youth and families. Furthering cooperation between area schools and community organizations. Hosting the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival on Oct. 27. A major display at the Maritime Centers Worm Grunting Festival booth will be a 15-foot mahogany skiff, which was donated to the maritime center un nished and was then completed by the industrial arts class at Wakulla High School. The skiffs hull is made of mahogany marine plywood and epoxy. Its transom, rails, frames, stem and three seats are solid mahogany, and the oor is solid cypress. The plywood is nished light blue, and the solid wood pieces are varnished clear. All fasteners are stainless steel, and the paint and varnish are marine grade. Shortly after the Sopchoppy festival, the Friends of the Big Bend Maritime Center will hold a silent auction at the Blue Crab Festival in Panaceas Woolley Park on May 5. The auction will feature newly built boats, fantastic merchandise, local services and more including a shing trip, a beach house weekend or the Jimbo Fisher signed FSU football helmet.Finished boat to be displayed SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCynthia Paulson of Palmetto Expeditions. FILE PHOTOVolunteers work on the skiff at last years Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival. Located On Scenic Hwy. 98/Coastal Hwy. 30 Miles South of Tallahassee Approx. 10 Miles From Beautiful Wakulla Springs, Beach, Rivers & Short Drive to Wildlife Refuge High Speed Internet Access Outdoor Pool Complimentary Hot Breakfast www.wakullainnhotel.com Each Best Western Hotel is Independently Owned & Operated AAA/AARP/Corporate Rates 850-926-3737 3292 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville FL (Medart Area) Special Rates for W AKULLA ild about Wakulla Inn & Suites W AKULLA ild aboutDONT Go Home Hungry!Join us at the Hardees of Crawfordville and enjoy these special o ers. 1/3 lb. Southwest Pa ymelt ThickburgersO er expires May 15, 2012.$79910 piece Hand-Breaded Chicken TendersTMO er expires May 15, 2012.Only available at the Hardees of Crawfordville.2994 Crawfordville Hwy850-926-83372 FOR $5 OPEN MON-WED 10AM-5PM, THURS-FRI 10AM-6PM, SAT. 10AM-5PM. 850-926-6241 LOCATED 1/2 MI. SO. OF HWY 267 ON CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 9BA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Your Spanish Communicator Document Translations (Spanish /English) Conference Calls Telephone Excellence Skills Training (English/Spanish) Telephone outgoing voice recordingcall LKR COMMUNICATION & TRANSLATIONS, LLC for rates! 850-509-7129 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED CCC 053 88 7408-8563ROOF INSPECTIONSRE-ROOFINGREPAIRSRESIDENTIALCOMMERCIALFree Estimates SEMINOLE ROOFINGCO.SERVING WAKULLASINCE 1980 STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Lost CAT male, nuet weighs 15lbs all white w/some tan on face Fluffy White & tan Tail blue collar last seen 3/29 Tin Oak Rd Tallahassee Fl (850) 727-7504 German Shepherd Adult, female Shadeville Road, Hwy 61m, Near Tiger Hammock Rd. (850) 926-4185 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 120 community newspapers, 32 websites, 26 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)742-1373 Domestic HOUSEKEEPER WANTED2/3 times per week. References Required call after 3pm (850) 567-1486 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Trades/ Skills Class-A FlatBed Drivers$ -Home EVERY Weekend, Run S.E. US REQUIRES 1 Yr OTR F.B. Exp, & payUP TO .39/mile Call (800)572-5489 x 227 SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC Drivers-Knight has steady Dry Van and Refrigerated freight. Annual Salary $45k to $60k. Flexible hometime. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERS Earn 50-55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Vets welcome. Call: (843)266-3731 bulldoghiway.com EOE Trades/ Skills HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCE D TANKER DRIVERS! Great benefits and Pay! New fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp. Req.-Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www.OakleyT ransport .com General Help 25 Driver Trainees Needed Now!at Schneider National Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training! Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 25 Driver Trainees Needed!Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises! Earn $800 per week! No experience needed! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! (888)368-1964 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 LIVE-WORK-PARTY PLAY! Play in Vegas, Hang in LA, Jet to New York! Hiring 18-24 girls/guys. $400-$800 wkly. Paid expenses. Signing Bonus. (866)574-7454 Schools/ Instruction Can you Dig It? We will train, certify & provide lifetime assistance landing work. Hiring in Florida. Start digging as a heavy equipment operatorl (866)362-6497 Garage/ Yard Sales PANACEA FIRE DEPT Sat, April 14, 8am -? To benefit the Church Building Fund. Something for everyone!! Pastor Mike and Lori Barwick PANACEAMark your calendar!! Saturday, April 21st. Two-Family sale. Ladies clothing, books, cassettes, household items. Ochlockonee Bay. Garage/ Yard Sales SHELL POINTSat 4/14 8a -4p 2 sofas, household goods, clothes, man/woman, lots more follow signs Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE M/H for rent, 3BR/1BA.$450/mo. includes water, garbage, lawn-care. Quiet neighborhood. No pets. Call after 6pm850-926-3280 CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $595 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-524-4090 Mobile Homes and Land Foreclosed Mobile Home with land, ready to move in, great value Approx 1500 sq ft, 3br/2ba. Serious offers only No renters. Call (850) 308-6473 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLENewer Quality Built House 3BD, 2BA All amenities including washer and dryer, on 1 secluded acres. Small fenced back yard, borders national forest 1st last & sec. $900/mo. w/ one year lease (850) 926-3832 Crawfordville.Cottage on large wooded lot, 2BR/1BA, washer/dryer included Screened -porch, covered carport, central heat/air. No smoking. $700/mo.+first/last. Small pet ok w/$250/deposit. 850-926-3859. Real Estate For Sale Gorgeous! Like New! $85,000 (includes $5,000 new appliances and closing costs). 3BR/2BA, 1200sqft., on 2.5 lots. 85 Paulette Dr. For more details. 850-925-6704 after 6PM. Commercial Real Estate WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953 www. sunsetranch es.com New York State Land Sale Discounted to 1990s prices! 3 Acre Starter camp$17,995. 5 Acres w/Farmhouse$49,995. 52 Acres, Stream, 2 ponds, Beautiful woods & views. Access to road front, utilities and state land Limited offer. Call Christmas & Associates (800)229-7843 or visit landand camps.com Appliance Repair Appliance Repairs.All major appliances. PTAC A/C units, heat-pumps, window/wall a/c units and mini-split A/C units.Call Jerry Payne 850-528-5603. Instruction HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA FROM HOME, 6-8 weeks, ACCREDITED Get a Diploma. Get a Job! FREE Brochure. (800)264-8330 Benjamin Franklin High School www.diplo mafr omhome.com Out of Town Real Estate 5178-0412 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, April 16, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE : Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 April 12, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5172-0412 Vs. McClain Kerri; Case No. 11-304-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON f/k/aTheBank of New York Trust Company National Association, as Trustee, Successor Trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, As Trustee, By Its Servicer Associates Housing Finance LLC f/k/a Ford Consumer Finance Company, Inc., By its Duly Authorized Attorney-in-Fact, Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc., Under the Power of Attorney Dated and Executed November 18, 2010 Case Number:11-304-CA Plaintiff, vs. KERRI McCLAIN; GREGORY McCLAIN, et al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of foreclosure dated March 8, 2012, entered in Case No.11-304-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Ju5177-0412 vs. Yeomans, Leslie; Case No. 65-2009-CA-000123 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000123 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-C, Plaintif, vs, LESLIE L. YEOMANS; JAMES YEOMANS; CACV OF COLORADO, LLC Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Please publish in THE WAKULLA NEWS) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 20th, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000123, of the Circuit Court of the second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/ATHE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-C is Plaintiff and LESLIE L. YEOMANS; JAMES YEOMANS; CACV OF COLORADO, LLC; are defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale IN THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, FL 32327 at 11:00 a.m., on the 26th day of April 2012; the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 32, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 111, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, as Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who n eeds any accommodations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 5th and 12th, 2012 5177-0412 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Administrative Support Assistant Garage Sale!148 Magnolia Ridge, Crawfordville Miscellaneous household items and home dcor. Unique accent pieces, vintage accessories, rattan chairs (pair), small wicker set. Junior clothes: Sz. 1 & 3, and small tops. Come check us out. SpringYARD & Bake Sale! Fri-April 6 & Sat-April 7 Fri-April 13 & Sat-April 14 Fri-April 20 & Sat April 217AM-Until... Rain or Shine! household items, kitchen appliances, dishes, clothes, books, games, furniture and a little bit of everything!!

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 2012 N FLA/SO GAAUCTIONTrucks, vehicles & equipment from (8) area counties, utilities & bank repos THURSDAY, APRIL 19: 9AM Tallahassee, FL;North Fla. Fairgrounds PREVIEW: 9AM-4PM on Wed., April 18 MIDWAY MACHINERY & AUCTION dicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, Brent X. Thurmond as the Clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at public sale at the courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Wakulla County in Crawfordville, Florida with the sale commencing at 11:00AM on the 19th day of April 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: Legal Description: Lot 9, Block E, Springwood, Phase 1, A subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 2, pages 74 and 75 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. To include: 2002 Oakwood Home, serial numbers GAFL234A75364CY21 and GAFL234B75364CY21. Address: 64 Springwood Boulevard, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of March, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, April 5th and 12th, 2012 5172-0412 5171-0412 Vs. Doyle, James. A. Case No. 2011-260-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-260-CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC 7360 S. KYRENE ROAD, TEMPE, AZ 85283 Plaintiff vs. JAMES A. DOYLE, JR., SIMONE C. DOYLE, BENEFICIAL FLORIDA, INC., and CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment For Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT A, TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1995 66 x 28 REDMAN MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBER: 146M8923. Commonly known as: 70 Roberts Williams Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at theW akulla County Court house, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy, Crawfor dville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), on the 3rd day of May, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument marking the Southeast Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5180-0419 Estate if Alma Payne, File No. 12-000018CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 12-000018 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ALMA PAYNE, Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (Summary Administration) TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of ALMA PAYNE, deceased, File Number 12-000018 CP, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327; that the total cash value of the estate is estimated to be $53,642.00, and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address Lavernne J. Davis 848 Brewer Street Tallahassee, Florida 32304 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 12, 2012. Personal Representative: Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5175-0412 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statues, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday,April 19, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of 1 Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Kim Jackson Before the sale date of April 19th, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 April 5 and 12, 2012. 5126-0223 5178-0419 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON MA Y 5, 2012 at 10:00 a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: CASEY LARSON BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF MA Y 5 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. April 12 & 19, 2012 5179-0419 5173-0412 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Self Storage Notices Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, April 21, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Jessica Tucker Brenda Merrill Self Storage Notices Before the sale date of Saturday, April 21st, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. April 5th & April 12, 2012 5173-0412 Self Storage Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices corner of Lot 87 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run North 17 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds West along the East boundary of said Lot 87 (as monumented) # distance of 1605.25 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 72 degrees 20 minutes 39 seconds West 536 feet to the center point of a cul-de-sac having a radius of 50.00 feet said point also lying on the centerline of a 60.00 foot wide roadway and also marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 17 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds East along the centerline 534.22 feet to a point lying on the intersection with the centerline of another 60 foot wide roadway, thence run South 72 degrees 21 minutes 14 seconds West along centerline 536.06 feet to a point, thence leaving said centerline run North 17 degrees 15 minutes 35 seconds West 534.72 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument, thence run North 72 degrees 21 minutes 14 seconds East 536.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 50.00 foot radius cul-de-sac lying over and across the Northeasterly portion thereof. ALSO SUBJECT TO A 60.00 foot wide roadway lying over and across the Easterly and Southerly 30.00 feet thereof. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 5 and 12, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration /s/ LAVERNNE J. DAVIS, 848 Brewer ST. Tallahassee, FL 32304 Attorney for Person Giving Notice: /S/ RONALD A. MOWREY, Attorney for Personal Representative, Mowrey Law Firm, PA 515 North Adams, Tallahassee, FL 32301, PH: 850-222-9482, Fax: 850-561-6867 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, April 12 & 19, 2012 5Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2Goto http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click Continue. We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 415 Mashes Sands Rd. on Ochlockonee Bay 3 Bdr./ 2 ba $825. Pets with Deposit No smoking. 6 River Cove Bay view 2 Bdr. 1 ba Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit62 Sylvania Drive -St. Marks 2 Bd/2ba with Sun room. Includes attached In-Law Suite 1 Bd/1ba with kitchen. $1,800 mo. No smoking, No pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3Bd/2Ba MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Available April 1st.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 Page 11BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 6, Campaign nance gures began trickling in this week as respective camps touted the relative strength of their candidates in the quarterly chest-pounding that accompanies the election cycle. With all House and Senate seats up for grabs and a presidential and U.S. Senate race to boot, campaign cash registers were ringing up all over the state as candidates jockeyed for position in campaign season pushed ahead by an early end to the legislative session. But while fundraising continues, some state Senate candidates still dont know for sure what districts they are running in, a lack of information that Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi took steps to alleviate this week by sending the proposed new state Senate map to the Florida Supreme Court which rejected an earlier effort to redraw the 40 Senate districts. Meanwhile, Gov. Rick Scott received the Legislatures $70 billion spending proposal, one of several pieces of legislation that landed on his desk and must be dealt with over the next two weeks. Also included in the bevy of bills is a controversial proposal to create the Florida Polytechnic Institute by splitting the Polk County campus from its University of South Florida parent. But much of the news generated in Florida this week had its antecedents outside the capital city, as the highly publicized deaths of a black Sanford teen and a FAMU drum major in separate instances in Central Florida continued to steal headlines. MARTIN CASE PROMPTING REACT The Trayvon Martin case continues to drive the agenda as the February shooting of the Sanford teenager prompted incoming Senate Democratic Leader Chris Smith, D-Fort Lauderdale, to assemble a group to address the issue of gun violence and the states Stand Your Ground law that is the backdrop for the shooters defense. Speaking to reporters early in the week, Smith called on the governor and others to speed up investigations into the death of Martin, 17, who was shot to death by neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman in what could be a test case for the 2005 Florida law allowing residents to use deadly force when they feel threatened. Scott and others have said they want to wait until more information comes from the Martin case before a panel looking at that law is convened. Smith said the law has already prompted ample evidence that it can be misunderstood, and can be assessed immediately. We have years of data on Stand Your Ground, Smith said. Trayvon Martin may be an outlier when it comes to Stand Your Ground ...but we need to take a look at the entire statute and we dont need the Trayvon Martin case to take a look. But it is the Martin case that has prompted an international storm as critics see the death of the unarmed black man as proof that racial pro ling is alive and made more deadly by Stand your Ground laws now in the books in Florida and nearly half of other U.S. states. The Martin case has drawn attention away from the November death of Robert Champion, a 26year-old drum major for the Florida A&M University Marching 100 who died in an alleged hazing incident in Orlando. FAMU continued to look at that issue this week at its trustees meeting and the athletic director and president said its not clear how long the band may remain suspended, raising the prospect of FAMU football in the fall without the most famous part of FAMU football, the halftime show by the Marching 100. REDISTRICTING BACK TO COURT It was just a formality, but an important one, when Attorney General Pam Bondi sent the new Senate map to the court. It was also an expensive one for the Senate, which will be represented in court by former Supreme Court Justice Raoul Cantero. The Miami Herald reported this week that Cantero, now a lawyer in private practice, will get a shade under $700 an hour to make the Legislatures overture to his former colleagues that the map is legally suf cient. RIVERA STILL FACES NO DEM CHALLENGER Despite being targeted by national Democrats as vulnerable, U.S. Rep. David Rivera, R-Miami, doesnt have a serious opponent. This past week, the candidate who was running against him, state Rep. Luis Garcia, D-Miami Beach, got out. And former MiamiDade County Mayor Alex Penelas, thought to be a great possible candidate to replace Garcia, all but said no. Garcia will instead run for a Miami-Dade county commission spot. As for Penelas, the highly regarded Democrat said his priorities lie elsewhere, at least for now. Hes staying closer to home to help raise his young kids. Id love to do it, Penelas said. I think Id be a great congressman. ... But realities are realities. Riveras campaign has been hampered by questions about whether he can hold the seat and last year had more debt than money in the bank. The campaign reported $92,800 cash on hand at the end of 2011, with just more than $154,000 in debt, according to federal campaign records. Garcia quit the race after a public falling-out with national Democratic Party officials, who have made Florida a centerpiece of its efforts to gain the 25 seats needed to take control of the House after two years of Republican rule. CAMPAIGNS U.S. Senate hopeful Connie Mack led Florida fundraisers this week as his campaign announced the sitting congressman had raised more than $1 million for the quarter ending March 31. Mack is facing a relatively crowded Republican eld for the opportunity to take on Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson, who has already amassed more than $10 million for his reelection efforts. Also, the Lets Get to Work Committee, which is Gov. Scotts re-election arm, announced it had raised $910,000 for the rst three months of the year, bringing to $1.3 million his bankroll for trying to stick around. Speaking of sticking around, Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New Port Richey, became the latest term limited member to set his sights on another legislative of ce. Fasano, an 18-year veteran who has reached his term limit in the Senate, joins a crowded Republican eld in an upcoming race for House District 36. STORY OF THE WEEK: Despite his vulnerable status, Rep. David Rivera became an unchallenged incumbent as Democrats scurry to nd a standard bearer after former MiamiDade Mayor Alex Penelas and former state Rep. Luis Garcia both decided this week not to challenge the Miami Republican. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Now they hire a former Supreme Court justice at $695 an hour to help their cause in the likely event their maps are struck down again. Where was all this money when they cut $300 million from our universities and forced deep cuts to our hospitals? If its available to protect political futures, it should have been available for university students and hospital care. Nan Rich on the appointment of former Florida Supreme Court Justice Raoul Cantero to defend the Legislatures latest Senate boundary map.WEEKLY ROUND-UP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government and politics)A mil for the quarter, $700 an hour, and a $70B budgetBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 4 With more than 800,000 issued, nearly one in every 15 Florida adults has a license to carry a concealed weapon, according to data compiled by the state. The number of concealed weapons permits has risen dramatically in recent years as new laws making it easier to obtain them have been placed on the books by lawmakers, spurred on by the National Ri e Association, one of the most effective lobbying forces in the capital city. The laws have come under scrutiny since the death of Trayvon Martin, who was shot to death in February by a neighborhood watch member, a convicted felon who had a permit to carry a concealed weapon. George Zimmerman, 28, contends he was defending himself under Floridas Stand Your Ground statute passed in 2005. He has not been charged. Gun control advocates say lax gun laws in Florida are at least partially to blame for Martins death. They also say Florida is being used as a test case for gun control legislation in other states. In Florida, being armed in public is such a casual formality that law enforcement does not issue the license to carry a loaded, concealed gun; that is done by the Department of Agriculture the same agency charged with issuing permits to pick tomatoes or transport livestock, said Dan Gross, of the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, during recent congressional testimony. Among Floridians over 18 years of age, about 6.5 percent have applied for and received permits to carry a concealed weapon. Add the 104,210 permits brought into the state by outof-state visitors and the total rises to 906,924 as of Feb. 29, according to Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, which administers the licensing program Dixie County leads the state in the number of concealed weapons permits issued per capita, with nearly one in 10 residents of the rural county licensed to carry. It is followed by Monroe County, which is the Florida Keys, where 7.3 percent of the population is licensed. Seven Florida Counties Gilchrist, St. Johns, Sumter, Lafayette, Glades, Liberty and Calhoun have the lowest per capita concealed weapons rates in the state, all under 3 percent. Statewide, the per capita average is 4.2 percent. Take out children under 18, who make up about 21 percent of Floridas population, and the rate rises to 6.1 percent.Concealed weapons approach 1 million in FloridaBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 33 40 43 50 56 63 66 69 2 28 51 3 29 52 4 23 41 46 5 34 57 64 67 70 18 30 47 6 15 24 44 53 7 21 31 48 58 8 25 35 54 65 9 32 42 59 10 36 55 68 71 26 49 11 16 19 22 37 45 60 12 38 61 13 39 62ACROSS1.Some tuskers 6.Mariner's"Halt!" 11. GPsetal. 14.Turntopsy-turvy 15.Trackofficial 16.Hamelincasualty 17.DorisDayhit,off themainland? 19.Sidewalkstand purchase 20.Placeforanace? 21.Bullpenstats 22.SoccerstarHamm 23.Floggingmemento 25.Patriarchofa tribe of Israel 27.Marshall__ (Truman implementation) 30.Tickoff 32.Euroforerunner 33.PartofRSVP 34.Plaintosee 36.Male:Prefix 40.Partingwords,off themainland? 43.Cabinet department 44.D oesacheckout chore 45. Oftennon-PC suffix 46.Audiophile'sstack 48.Proprietary symbols:Abbr. 49.Baby-sitter's nightmare 50.SunflowerState city 54.Stableparent 56.Hydrogen'satomic number 57.Forever,seemingly 59.Digsdeeply 63."__MutualFriend" 64.Twoshakesofa lamb'stail,offthe mainland? 66.Journal conclusion? 67."Crazy"singer Patsy 68.Bullfiddles'little brothers 69.__Plaines, Illinois 70.Ruhrindustrialhub 71.Wordona revolutionaryflagDOWN1.TampaBay team, forshort 2.Fallbirthstone 3."__sow,soshall ..." 4.Mended,inaway 5.Moundgreat Carlton 6.__snail'space 7.Carpenter'stool 8."...__bagatelle" 9.Mariachi'swrap 10. "Circularfiles" 11.Soapopera,e.g. 12.Piechartlines 13.Propellantfor CaseyJones 18.Visitthroughprimal therapy 24.Snake,toMedusa 26.Crosspiece 27.Trident-shaped letters 28.Pre-discountprice 29.__breve(2/2 time) 31.Atattention 34.Fido'sfieldof study? 35.Shirtsandskins, e.g. 37.Batikartisan 38.Parksin1955 news 39.Bootout 41.Work withacid 42.Likesomejokesor jobs 47. "Cheers"perches 49.Bible__ (certain fundamentalist) 50.Winedanddined 51. "Ocupado" 52.Dwarfplanetinthe asteroidbelt 53.Thoseagainst 55.Flinch,say 58.Trigratio 60.Lemmingkin 61.Firstnameinscat 62.Rodethebanister 65.Kasparov'ssixteenAmerican Prole Hometown Content 3/18/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 12 34 5 673158 9 673 12 4259 94 8365 7 3481 00 9 HtCtt 182 7536 9 4 945286137 673941582 529 678413 761394258 438125976 294 817365 816532749 357469821 B U C S P S I S W O O E D O P A L L I S T I N U S E A S Y E A L L A C E R E S R E S E W N E T C H S T E V E O B E D I E N C E R E L I V E S T O O L S A T A T R E S S A N T I S V I S E E R E C T S I N E A M E R E T E A M S M E N S E R A P E I N S I D E T R A S H C A N S R E A C T R U N G B E L T E R D R A M A D Y E R V O L E R A D I I R O S A E L L A S T E A M O U S T S L I D Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: Which are the most fuel-ef cient hybrid and/ or all-electric cars available to consumers today (just the affordable ones, please!)? Jack Madison Chicago Given increased environmental awareness, high gas prices and a continually slumping economy, its no wonder that more fuel ef- cient cars are all the rage these days. The best deal going may be Hondas hybrid, the 42 miles-per-gallon Insight ($18,350). Meanwhile, the newest version of Toyotas agship hybrid, the Prius ($23,015), garners an impressive 50 MPG. Other solid choices include Toyotas 41-MPG Camry hybrid ($25,900), Fords 39-MPG Fusion hybrid ($28,700), Lexus 42MPG CT 200h ($29,120) and Lincolns 39-MPG MKZ Hybrid ($34,755). For even greater efficiency and lower sticker prices, consider going electric, whereby you can charge your vehicle at ordinary electric outlets at home or work. Mitsubishis new MiEV ($29,125) electric is the most fuel ef cient car available to U.S. consumers in the 2012 model year, achieving 112 MPG-equivalent (the U.S. Environment Protection Agencys rating for electric vehicles that swaps in electricity for gas in its calculations) and a 62 mile range per full charge not bad considering four adults can fit fairly comfortably inside. Another option is Smarts FourTwo Electric ($28,752), a two-seater with an 87 MPGequivalent. And Nissans all-electric Leaf ($35,200) achieves 99 MPG ef ciency for a range up to 100 miles. So-called plug-in hybrids also allow drivers to charge their vehicles electric batteries via common power outlets, but also can use gasoline as needed for a longer range. Though pricey at $39,145, the Chevy Volt may save you money in the long run because it gets a whopping 94 MPG-equivalent in its preferred all-electric mode. An onboard gas generator produces more electricity as the vehicle is driven, extending the cars range with a full tank of gas to some 375 miles. Toyota released a plug-in version of its Prius ($32,760) this year, as well. It gets 87 MPG in electric mode (but this will only get you 15 miles without gas assistance) and a respectable 49 MPG in regular hybrid mode. Another factor to consider when deciding which of these new uber-ef cient vehicles may be right for you is the availability of additional incentives. Buyers of a new Volt, MiEV, FourTwo Electric or Leaf, for example, can cash in on a federal tax credit of $7,500 and some states may offer additional incentives bringing the overall cost of these cars down to within the range of similarly sized traditional car models. The U.S. Department of Energy posts all of the relevant federal tax incentives online at its Fuel Ef cient Vehicle Tax Information Center website. For state-bystate incentives, check out the Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy (DSIRE), a free online resources maintained by the North Carolina Solar Center and the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Of course, consumers dont have to go hybrid or electric to enjoy improved fuel ef ciency these days. Scions iQ ($15,265) and Hondas CR-Z ($19,545) each get 37 MPG out of sporty little gas-powered internal combustion engines. Kia, Toyota, Chevrolet, Hyundia and Nissan also make smaller traditional cars that get a respectable 33-34 MPG for sticker prices under $15,000. Dear EarthTalk: How is it that dams actually hurt rivers? Missy Davenport Boulder, Colo. Dams are a symbol of human ingenuity and engineering prowess controlling the ow of a wild rushing river is no small feat. But in this day and age of environmental awareness, more and more people are questioning whether generating a little hydroelectric power is worth destroying riparian ecosystems from their headwaters in the mountains to their mouths at the ocean and beyond. According to the nonpro t American Rivers, over 1,000 dams across the U.S. have been removed to date. And the biggest dam removal project in history in now well underway in Olympic National Park in Washington State where two century-old dams along the Elwha River are coming out. But why go to all the trouble and expense of removing dams, especially if they contribute muchneeded renewable, pollution-free electricity to our power grids? The decision usually comes down to a cost/benefit analysis taking into account how much power a given dam generates and how much harm its existence is doing to its host rivers environment. Removing the dams on the Elwha River was a nobrainer, given that they produced very little usable electricity and blocked sh passage on one of the regions premiere salmon rivers. Other cases arent so clear cut. According to the Hydropower Reform Coalition (HRC), a consortium of 150 groups concerned about the impact of dams, degraded water quality is one of the chief concerns. Organic materials from within and outside the river that would normally wash downstream get built up behind dams and start to consume a large amount of oxygen as they decompose. In some cases this triggers algae blooms which, in turn, create oxygen-starved dead zones incapable of supporting river life of any kind. Also, water temperatures in dam reservoirs can differ greatly between the surface and depths, further complicating survival for marine life evolved to handle natural temperature cycling. And when dam operators release oxygen-deprived water with unnatural temperatures into the river below, they harm downstream environments as well. Dammed rivers also lack the natural transport of sediment crucial to maintaining healthy organic riparian channels. Rocks, wood, sand and other natural materials build up at the mouth of the reservoir instead of dispersing through the rivers meandering channel. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine, (www.emagazine.com). Do not put very hot or boiling liquid that you intend to consume in plastic containers made with BPA. BPA levels rise in food when container/ products made with the chemical are heated and come in contact with food. Discard all bottles with scratches, as these may harbor bacteria and, if BPA-containing, may lead to greater release of BPA. Please let me know if you would like additional information on this topic or any other that the UF/IFAS has available to Florida citizens. Shelley Swenson UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Agent II, Family and Consumer Sciences/Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program Agent. She can be reached at 926-3931.Swenson: FDA studying Bisphenol A What are the most fuel-e cient (a ordable) cars? Increased environmental awareness, high gas prices and a continually slumping economy have combined to make fuel ef cient cars are all the rage today. Pictured from top to bottom: the Electric Mitsubishi Miev, Toyotas Plug-in Hybrid Prius; General Motors gas sipping Chevy Sonic.Plug-in hybrids allow drivers to charge their vehicles electric batteries via common power outlets, but also can use gasoline as needed for a longer range. ~ BY Le CHAT BOUTIQUE~ WHAT:A DAY AT THE SPA FOR YOUR SPECIAL POOCH WHEN:SATURDAY, April 21, 2012 FROM 10:00 A.M. 3:00 P.M. WHERE:Hudson Park, CrawfordvilleAMENITIES FOR THE DISCRIMINATING POOCH:All Natural Ingredients; Aromatherapy Bubble Bath (lavender, vanilla, mintmore); Le Flea & Tick Dip; Grooming; Towel Drying; Brushing; PAWdicures; DONATIONS:$10.00 -ALL AMENITIES/Flea dip included $ 5.00 REGULAR BATH ONLY $ 5.00 GLAMOUR PHOTO (pearls, bow ties, hats, ribbons, boas, etc.) $ 25.00 Micro chipping, including registration of micro chip ~NATURAL GOURMET DOGGIE BISCUITS FOR PURCHASE~Please remember to spay and neuter your pets. CHAT needs volunteers. CHAT Memberships start at $15 a year. C.H.A.T. OF Wakulla Inc. PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326www.chatofwakulla.org A copy of the ofcial registration CH-13163 and nancial information may be obtained from the FL Division of Consumer Services. Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK