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Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00403
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 04-05-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00403
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAs part of Florida Archaeology Month, the Florida Public Archaeology Network held several public lectures to encourage people to learn more about archaeology and the history of the state, entitled, Creeks, Conquistadors and Confederates: Archaeology of the Big Bend.Ž One of these lectures featured retired archaeologist with the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research, Jim Dunbar, and his work at two different sites, Wakulla Springs Lodge and PageLadson. The digs performed at these sites yielded evidence of the “ rst Ice-Age Floridians, dating back to around 14,500 years ago. To know where were going, we have to know where we have been,Ž Dunbar said. For more than 70 years, it was believed that the Clovis period, or early Paleo-indian, which dates back to 13,000 to 13,500 years ago, was the oldest occupation in the Americas, Dunbar said. That theory has now gone away, with several sites all over the Americas dating older than the Clovis, he added. The Wakulla Springs and Page-Ladson sites are two of these sites which date to pre-Clovis. Wakulla Springs has a long archaeological history, with 55 recorded sites on the property and a variety of types represented, including Paleo-indian kill sites, campsites, village areas and a mount/village complex. In the underwater caves, mastodon bones have also been found. In the 1850s, people discovered mastodon bones at Wakulla Springs and started taking them out of the springs. It became a popular thing,Ž Dunbar said. In 1930, a Florida Geological Survey was done at Wakulla Springs and mastodon bones were discovered. The large animal was put back together and now resides at the Florida Museum of Natural History, Dunbar said. In 1935, two different sites proved the evidence of Pleistocene people in the Americas, which was 2 million to 10,000 years ago, and when large animals, such as the mastodon roamed. From 1955 to 1957, divers explored the caves at Wakulla Springs, “ nding many artifacts. But because the people kept the artifacts, Dunbar said it isnt known what exactly came out of Wakulla Springs. There was great potential being seen at Wakulla Springs, but it never caught “ re,Ž Dunbar said. Continued on Page 2APublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B INDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 13th Issue Thursday, April 5, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews OBITUARIES Arthur T. Anderson Bonnie Marie Linton Mobley Frances Lowe Waldby JENNIFER JENSENArchaeologist Jim Dunbar at last weeks lecture on “ nds from 2008 dig at Wakulla Springs.Dig uncovers evidence of Ice Age humans SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWAKULLA SPRINGS DIG: Watching the progress are Tom Scott of the Florida Geological Survey (now retired), Jim Dunbar of the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research (now retired), W. Jack Rink McMaster of the University Hamilton-Canada and, in the pit, Harley Means of the Florida Geological Survey inspecting the stratigraphy and preparing to take samples.Bike Florida tours Wakulla County, stays at Wildwood Inn By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAlthough Commissioner Randy Merritt does not have the full support of the Wakulla County Commission to allow variances within the 35-foot wetland buffer, some are willing to discuss the possibility. Commissioner Lynn Artz has made it clear she would not support allowing variances within the buffer. Artz said most of the people she has spoken with are happy with the ways things are. They see risk with changes,Ž Artz said. Merritt was proposing establishing a mechanism for people to apply for a variance to develop within the 35-foot buffer, which is the part of the total 75-foot zone that is closest to the wetlands. Commissioner Alan Brock said, At this time, as its written, I dont anticipate supporting it.Ž Commissioner Jerry Moore was on board with Merritt and Commissioner Mike Stewart said he would be willing to discuss it, but was unsure if he would support it. Merrit said, I dont think this 35 feet is touched by God.Ž Brock pointed out that there are several variances for different access already in place, such as those for building a boardwalk or dock. Merritt said this would allow someone to build a home inside the buffer, instead of having to build a smaller home. To not allow someone to build on their own land is a taking of personal property, he said at a previous meeting. Continued on Page 3ABoard discusses wetlands, but no decision reached Commissioner Lynn Artz said most people shes spoken with are happy with the way things are.FILE PHOTO By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netHundreds of tourists on bicycles made their way through Wakulla County last week, stopping off at the Ochlockonee River State Park and the City of Sopchoppy on their way to Wildwood Inn and Country Club, where hundreds of tents were pitched on the golf courses driving range and along the cart path on the “ rst hole. Bicyclists also camped inside at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, while some took it easier with accommodations at the Inn at Wildwood and Best Western. Several vendors set up, and meals were being served to the bicyclists in the country clubs restaurant. And numerous local of“ cials made the rounds, welcoming the bicyclists to the county. Tourist Development Council Director Pam Portwood was offering information on Wakulla, and Chamber of Commerce President Amy Geiger introduced herself and welcomed the riders. St. Marks Mayor Chuck Shields and City Manager Zoe Mansfield were also on hand. Bike Florida tourists Ed and Paulette Bernstein from Huntsville, Ala., said they were enjoying themselves. All the people in the little towns are very friendly,Ž said Ed Bernstein. The tour trucks luggage from spot-to-spot while the bicyclists travel 50 to 60 miles a day. Theres outdoor camping, indoor camping or, as the Bernsteins do, theres hotel rooms for those who dont want to rough it after a days ride. The Bernsteins said that they enjoy the scenery as well as meeting other riders. Continued on Page 2AVISIT WAKULLA: A village of tents, left, set up on the driving range at the Wildwood golf course for the Bike Florida tourists. Paulette and Ed Bernstein, below, from Huntsville, Ala., were two of the riders, but said they preferred staying in a hotel after a days ride.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Easter Egg Hunt Photos, Page 14A Happy Easter!

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Continued from Page 1A From 1984 to 1997, Dunbar worked the site at PageLadson. They found tusks with cut marks, ” int, gourd seeds, and lithics … which are artifacts made out of stone. The gourd seeds dated back 14,500 years ago, Dunbar said. In the Aucilla River at Page-Ladson, they found ” int blades that were not diagnostic of a certain time period, Dunbar said. They also found spearheads. In 1995, Calvin Jones found a large stone blade and Clovis spear points used during the Paleo-indian period while the Wakulla Springs Lodge was being renovated. Dunbar said after “ nding artifacts at Page-Ladson, they wanted to see if there were any artifacts like what they found somewhere else, some that were diagnostic enough. So, in 2008, Dunbar and his team set out to date the piece Jones had found at Wakulla Springs and also look for other artifacts. The Public Lands Archaeology Program in the Bureau of Archaeological Research was awarded a grant from National Geographic Society. The Wakulla Springs Lodge site was the only known site that yielded a distinctive type of artifact assemblage in an undisturbed context that likely dated back to the “ rst appearance of humans in Florida. Dunbar said in two different pits, they found diagnostic artifacts. In one pit, the artifact was Clovis related. In the other pit that was at the same depth Jones made his discovery, they found a projectile point that was similar to the ones found at Page-Ladson. What was found was a large Simpson-like preform. This was used to make tools. Dunbar said the people would ” ake a rock, called ” int knapping, to form tools. This pre-form was never finished, but looks like it was probably a skinning knife, he said. In that same pit, they found a scraper that was diagnostic with Paleo-indian. All these items were dated and Dunbar said the youngest possible age the Clovis point could be was 12,700 years ago. The youngest possible date of the deeper artifact was 13,500 years ago. Those dates are the youngest possible,Ž Dunbar said. If the median age is taken, that would date them at 14,500 years ago, which is the same age as those artifacts found at Page-Ladson, he said. Theres not too many places in the Americas where you can say pre-Clovis people stood,Ž Dunbar said. The Page-Ladson and Wakulla Springs sites are two of those places. In Florida, they are seeing, for the “ rst time, evidence that humans were here 14,500 years ago. The Native American culture in the Americas is a lot more diverse than we ever thought to be,Ž Dunbar said. Dunbar said the distribution of sites across the Panhandle suggests a very healthy human population in North Florida during the pre-Clovis time period. Dunbar said he will return to the Page-Ladson site this summer to con“ rm the dates of the artifacts. During the Ice Age and Pleistocene period, Dunbar said Wakulla Springs looked a lot different than it does today. What Wakulla Springs is today, was probably a sink hole,Ž Dunbar. The water tables were much lower and there was no flowing river and the sink hole acted as a watering hole for animals and prime hunting ground for predators, he said. When the glaciers started receding, environments didnt stay the same. Climates probably changed every 200 to 1,000 years, Dunbar said. Were spoiled today with a constant environment,Ž Dunbar said. The environmental change, stress and ef“ ciency of hunters were what probably lead to the extinction of the larger animals seen during the Pleistocene period, he said. Florida lost almost 50 percent of its species during this time. They either moved out or became extinct, Dunbar said. The humans got to stay on survivor island, and the big animals didnt,Ž Dunbar said. Dunbar said he hopes to be able to go back to the Wakulla Springs site, but it will depend on research grants. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDig uncovers new evidence of Ice Age humans at Wakulla Springs WORKERS ON DIG: A group shot of those who participated in the 2008 dig, including Phil Gerrell, Rachael Porter, Grayal Farr, Jim Dunbar, Jessi Halligan, Ed Green, Tom Kelley, Micah P. Mones, Madeleine Carr, John Roberts, C. Andrew Hemmings, Kevin Porter, Palmer Carr and David Thulman. Continued from Page 1A They said theyve met riders on this tour who are from Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, California and Canada. Its wonderful,Ž said Paulette Bernstein. She added that she always feels safe on the tours. This was day 6 of the weeklong Forgotten Coast Tour, and featured a ride from Apalachicola to Medart, a 58-mile ride. There were rest stops at Ochlockonee State Park, where Keep Wakulla County Beautiful was on hand to provide water and food. At Posh Java in Sopchoppy, riders were treated to a bit of worm gruntin by the Revells. More than 600 bicyclists took part in the more than 400 mile tour. The tour included multiple days in Wakulla County including a segment from Tallahassee to Wakulla Springs State Park and the finishing days through the heart of Wakulla County. On Saturday, March 24, the tour began with several ride options including one that took place on the St. Marks Rail Trail. On Sunday, March 25, off duty Wakulla County Sheriffs Office deputies provided traf“ c control at Wakulla Springs State Park as the tour traveled from Tallahassee to Quincy by way of the state park and Highway 267. On Monday, March 26 the tour went from Quincy to Wewahitchka before heading to Apalachicola in Franklin County for Tuesday, March 27 and Wednesday, March 28. On Thursday, March 29, the riders came to Wakulla County and used U.S. Highway 319 to pass through Sopchoppy on the way to Medart. On Friday, March 30, the riders left Medart and returned to Tallahassee after an optional stop in St. Marks. In total, the bicycles traveled more than 400 miles depending on what extra ride options they selected in Tallahassee and Apalachicola.… Keith Blackmar and Jo Ann Palmer contributed to this report.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBike Florida tours Wakulla County, stays at Wildwood Inn WILLIAM SNOWDENTents along the cart path on the “ rst hole at Wildwood.KEITH BLACKMARRiders on the route from Apalachicola to Medart. JO ANN PALMERTaking a break at the rest stop at Ochlockonee River State Park. JO ANN PALMER More photos online at thewakullanews.com  eres not too many places in the Americas where you can say pre-Clovis people stood, Dunbar said. But the Page-Ladson and Wakulla Springs sites are two of those places. 000ARJA Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.)

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A Merritt said he would be OK with restricting it to isolated wetlands. Ill take what I can get,Ž Merritt said. Merritt also wanted to allow planning staff to approve variances within the 40-foot buffer. Currently, those must come before the county commission. Stewart agreed with this idea and said there needs to be speci“ c guidelines for the planning director. Brock also felt it was a good idea. Artz stressed again that she didnt feel like this issue was a high priority and that staff should be spending a lot of time on it. Merritt disagreed and felt it was a problem that needed to be addressed. Merritt said he would bring something back before the board at the next meeting. Merritt has not be quiet about his feelings of the wetlands ordinance. He has said before that he would like to get rid of the wetlands ordinance entirely and has proposed several changes to the board since he took of“ ce. In September, he proposed removing the 75foot wetlands buffer in the Comprehensive Plan and addressing issues in an ordinance, but that motion failed.Board discusses wetlands issue, but no decision is reachedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe rain didnt keep the walkers and supporters away from the Wakulla Pregnancy Centers sixth Annual LifeWalk at Wakulla Springs State Park held this past Saturday, March 31. Holding umbrellas and wearing rain coats and rain boots, about 100 people showed up for the event, which is the centers largest fundraiser. Prior to participants making the loop around the park, they could buy a baked good at the bake sale or bid on an item at the silent auction and the children could grab a balloon or get their face painted. Wakulla Pregnancy Center board members thanked the crowd for attending and introduced Pastor Jeff McFalls, who performed the opening prayer. Following the walk, participants heard from guest speaker, Marcia MacNaney of Parents and Family Resource Alliance, who told the group what is going on with the legislature. The goal of the walk is to show support for the sanctity of life and collect money to support the center. The Wakulla Pregnancy Center is an Evangelical Christian ministry that exists to assist women and their families during unplanned pregnancies. Their free, con“ dential services include pregnancy tests, information on pregnancy, abortion, parenting and adoption, non-diagnostic ultrasounds, assistance with maternity and baby needs and post-abortion Bible study groups. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWith the end of its lease coming up, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Road Patrol and Criminal Investigation Divisions, or sheriffs annex, moved into the Wakulla County Community Center in October 2011. At that time, the Wakulla County Commission explained that this would only be a temporary solution. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce is not large enough to hold all divisions, so a building was being leased to house these two divisions. The owner, the Apalachee Center, informed the sheriff that the lease for this building expired Aug. 1, 2011, and could not be renewed. The building was needed to be vacated by Oct. 1, 2011. At the Sept. 6, 2011, county commission meeting, the commission agreed to move the divisions that were located in the annex building to the community center. They also agreed to look at costs to build an annex building or rent another space. Since the divisions have been moved to the community center, this has hindered the ability of the YMCA to provide youth programs. Previously, the YMCA told the county that the sheriffs annex was taking up more space than they originally thought and they would wait until they the sheriffs of“ ce was moved out of the community center to start offering programs. The county commission agreed the best solution was to transfer the sheriffs annex to a new site adjacent to the sheriffs complex where a new of“ ce facility can be built. The county commission approved the task order from Preble-Rish, the countys engineering consultant, to perform engineering design and permitting related to site improvements, including drive isles, parking, water, sewer, stormwater and required landscaping. The cost is $13,550. County Administrator David Edwards said 41 percent of these funds will come from impact fees and the rest will come from the one-cent sales tax fund. Commissioner Randy Merritt said this task order is just for the site and not the building itself. In the proposed building layout, the building is approximately 6,500 square feet with 14 offices, two conference rooms and restrooms. The estimated cost of the building is $350,000. Commissioner Lynn Artz said she wants to make sure the engineer works with Dan Ard with Talquin Electric to ensure the building is energy ef“ cient. She added that she had a concern with the lack of trees in the layout, as well as the placement of the building on the property. The placement of the building affects energy, she said. The commission voted unanimously to proceed with the new annex and approve the task order.COUNTY COMMISSIONBoard moves ahead with plans for new sheriff’s annexBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County recently received $549,000 for the State Housing Initiatives Partnership Program, which is used for home rehabilitation and down payment assistance for low-income families. County Administrator David Edwards said the county must spend $199,166 by June 30. This is money left over from the 2009-10 funding. There will be an application workshop on April 12 from 10 a.m. to noon in the county commission chambers for interested members in the community. Applications will be available beginning April 5 at the county commission administration building, 3093 Crawfordville Highway, between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. There is no SHIP waiting list and anyone who has applied before will have to apply again. Edwards said. The deadline to apply is May 11 at 2 p.m. Hand deliver applications to the county commission administration building. The eligible programs are homebuyer purchase assistance and owner-occupied rehabilitation. The homebuyer purchase assistance programs provides down payment assistance and principle reduction to “ rst-time homebuyers. The maximum amount that can be given per unit is $15,000. The owner-occupied rehabilitation program provides money for repairs or improvements needed for safety and sanitary rehabilitation or correction of code violations. The maximum amount that will be awarded per unit is $35,000. Applicants are limited to assistance once every 10 years. For more information, contact Meridian Community Services Group, who administers the program for the county, at (850) 8771908.Additional SHIP funds available PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENLifeWalk-ers on a drizzly morning, above. The mascot, below, gave out hugs.Sixth annual LifeWalk is held at Wakulla Springs will be received until 10:00 a.m. on Monday, April 16, 2012. WBE/MBE/DBE Firms are encouraged to participate. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any person with a quali“ed disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this of“ce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). APRIL 5, 2012 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA)Wakulla County Housing Authority Announces the Availability of State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Funds for the State Fiscal Years 2009/2010 and 2011/2012 The Wakulla County Housing Authority announces approximately $199,166 of FY 2009-2010 funding and $350,000 of FY 2011-2012 funding (which includes 10% administration costs) available through the State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) program to be used for the following Local Housing Assistance Plan strategies: Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation and Homebuyer Purchase Assistance. Please note that funding for rehabilitation will only be used to support existing housing. The strategies are as follows: The purpose of this strategy is to provide down payment assistance and principle reduction to “rsttime homebuyers that are eligible under the SHIP guidelines. The maximum amount of SHIP funds that may be awarded per unit is $15,000. Potential homebuyers will be required to qualify for a mortgage through a “nancial institution. Up to $15,000 may be applied towards securing the home. Homebuyers may not have claimed homestead exemption in the last three years. Funds will be awarded on a “rst come, “rst ready-to-close basis. The purpose of this strategy is to provide repairs or improvements needed for safety and sanitary rehabilitation and/or correction of code violations. The maximum amount of SHIP funds that may be awarded per unit is $35,000. The homeowner must claim homestead exemption and the home must be occupied by the owner in order to be considered for rehabilitation. Applicants are limited to assistance once every (10) years. Applications will be considered on a “rst come, “rst served basis. The Wakulla County Housing Authority will conduct an application workshop on regarding SHIP “nancial assistance on Thursday, April 12, 2012 from 10am-12pm in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Commission Chambers located at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Any question regarding the SHIP application will be addressed at this workshop. Please note that there is currently no SHIP Waiting List. SHIP Applications will be available beginning Thursday, April 5, 2012 between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, Monday thru Friday at the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 or via online at www. mywakulla.com. Applications will NOT be accepted prior to Monday, May 7, 2012. Applications are due no later than Friday, May 11, 2012 by 2:00pm. No applications will be accepted after the designated time. Applications submitted via mail WILL NOT be accepted. All applications must be handdelivered to the following address by 2:00pm on May 11, 2012: Any person with a quali“ed disability requiring special accommodations shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed abov e at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this of“ce by using the Florid a Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD).Questions regarding the SHIP program and application process should be directed to Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., at (850)877-1908. EQUAL HOUSING APRIL 5, 2012A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION **OFFICIAL** N O T I C E O F G E N E R A L E L E C T I O N I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that a GENERALELECTION will be held in WAKULLA County, State of Florida, on the SIXTH day of NOVEMBER, 2012, A.D., to ll or retain the following of ces: President and Vice-President United States Senator Representative in Congress State Attorney: Judicial Circuit 2 Public Defender: Judicial Circuit 2 State Senator State Representative Supreme Court: Retention of Three Justices First District Court of Appeal: Retention of Four Judges Circuit Judge, Second Judicial Circuit: Groups 1, 2, 3 and 12 Clerk of the Circuit Court Sheriff Property Appraiser Tax Collector Superintendent of Schools Supervisor of Elections School Board: Districts 2 and 4 County Commissioner: Districts 1, 3 and 5 Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation District: Groups 1, 2, 3 and 5

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Webpage opposing cave diving misleads • From the Dock for April 5 • Wakulla’s housing problem •Briefs: Easter Egg Hunt, Light It Up Blue, TCC Job Fair, digital photo class, AARP driving class • Evans retires from highway patrol • First phase of Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail is done • Boy’s quick thinking saves Shell Point home € thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Bristols Veterans Memorial Park is funEditor, The News:I want to start off by telling you that you do a wonderful job with the newspaper. At the beginning of March we had my stepsons 5th birthday party in Bristol at the Veterans Memorial Park. They run the only true steam train in the state of Florida. We had the best time and they were the nicest people. Everyone who is involved with the railroad is a volunteer. I would like to say thank you to all of the family and friends who made it (we had over 30 people come!) and a special thanks to the people who volunteer and run the park. I think that there are lots of children who would really enjoy visiting a place this and the parents dont know its there. Thank you very much for your time. Amber and Jonathan AllenWakulla County SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe steam train at Veterans Memorial Park in Bristol. Editor, The News:With the thump of rotor blades and a distinctive whistling sound to it, soldiers at a forward operating base in remote southern Afghanistan turn their heads to a familiar direction and smile. These aircraft are bringing the FOBs mail run to them and that means care packages from home like one soldier from Panacea who has been waiting eagerly. Spc. Randall Taylor Jr., the oldest son of WCSOs Capt. Randall Taylor Sr., has been waiting on this as he has a package from his father on the way and it has arrived. The usual snacks and other items are in this package, but the most important item to him in it is the new running shoes his dad is sending him.Randall Taylor rukia8492@hotmail.com anks, Make A Di erence Day supportersEditor, The News: Thanks to all who came out for Make A Difference Day. We had more than 20 local organizations participate. I would like to give special recognition to the following VolunteerWAKULLA members: Jim Boileau for manning the tickettable all day; Nancy Culp for providing the entertainment and booth traf“ c control; Cecile Degrove for the great photos, (check them out on VolunteerWAKULLAs Facebook page); Gail Hickman for her outstanding job of putting together all the food and door prizes, as well a serving lunch; Beth Mims for helping to serve lunch and the great poster; Chuck Hickman, Ramon Medina and Rick Thornburg for all the runs to get ice, water and more food; David Moody and Royce Phillips for manning the grill and putting out some great food; and Scott Nelson for providing door prizes and getting us a sign from the U.S. Forest Service to advertise the event. All of you did so much more than I can mention here, you made the day a success and I thank you. I also want to thank the entertainers who volunteered their time to our event: The Wakulla Wild Wigglers, Sharon Fox, Kevin Norton and the Gangsta Grannies. Volunteers are the heart of our community and nothing re” ects this more than the hard work done by these “ ne people. Pam Mueller President VolunteerWAKULLASoldiers appreciate packages from home Editor, The News: An open letter to Wakulla Chamber of Commerce President Amy Geiger: Dear Amy, The onus should not be on the consumer to support a business, but rather on the business to earn their patronage. Implementing Economic GardeningŽ requires moving beyond the realm of rhetoric to the realm of practicality. Access to capital and relief from regulatory costs are essential to small business. Incentives should be in balance with mandates and the Chamber should be there to make sure government is reminded of that. Grassroots involvement is an American tradition. With the internet, ordinary citizens have access to the same technical information that Chamber of“ cials do. The difference is that you have the ear of government and the responsibility to act on our behalf. Wakulla County is special and we are looking to you to be the special person who Lifts us up where we belong.Ž James Kish CrawfordvillePHOTO BY SGT. JUAN CAMPOSArmy Spc. Randall Taylor Jr. of Panacea opens the care package his father has sent him. Spc. Taylor is with the 25th IDs 2nd Squadron, 6th Air Cavalry and is deployed to a remote Forward Operating Base in southern Afghanistan.Chamber must look out for businessBy RITA HANEY It is a sad and often dispiriting experience when someone we love dies. When death is by their own hand, we have deeper sorrow. What could I have done? What did I do? Why? Why? And why? again. It must be said when someone is determined to end their own life … for whatever reason … there really may be no way to stop them. This said, there are often clues. Phrases may catch your attention such as I do not want to keep experiencing (whatever the experience),Ž I wish I could disappear,Ž I dont want to be here anymore,Ž or some phrase or similar sayings that resonates just slightly off key. You can say, Are you thinking of killing yourself?Ž If not, the answer will be a surprised No!Ž or some form of negation to your question which seems genuine. If not, it is time to listen, suggest professional help, or if the person seems determined and is resistant, a forced stay in the hospital may bring relief. Again there is no guarantee that you, a professional or another loved one will be able to help. Since many people who attempt suicide are ambivalent, kindness and attention may be a blessing. Many people feel going to a therapist is a weakness or a waste of time. Often, however, life becomes unmanageable and we are stuck. Like a vehicle stuck in sand, we need help to pull ourselves out. Another clue to suicidal behavior is often mistaken for a sign of recovery. A friend or family member, who has been depressed, suddenly appears to be returning to normal; if this behavior is coupled with giving away possessions, for example, a young man gives away his prized sports jacket or a grandmother begins giving away gifts from her deceased husband, or some similar behavior may be a signal the friend or family member has made up their mind to commit suicide. Being direct is the key. Asking the direct question, Are you thinking of killing yourself?Ž is the best approach, possibly opening the door for help and support. There is no age limit to suicide. Young children, older adults and every age inbetween are in the statistics of attempted and completed suicides. Spring, not Christmas, has the highest rate of suicide. According to some research, the increased sunshine provides the energy for the depressed, dispirited person to actually commit the act. My own thoughts tend to the universal belief of spring as a time of renewal, or resurrection … trees bud, ” owers begin to bloom, the grass is greener and yet the suicidal person does not feels this. If spring brings instead continued disappointment, regret or sadness and not a reawakening as may have been hoped, suicide may become a viable alternative to despair. The use of alcohol or drugs can also increase the feelings of sadness and depression. Alcohol is a depressant, and drugs such as cocaine and crack require continued used to keep the high.Ž When the high evaporates the user crashes and plunges into rapid mood swings. Taking the time to listen to people we love is the key. Today it seems we are all so busy communicating through electronic devices we do not take the time to hear and be heard. If you or a loved one is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available in the Crawfordville area: € A Time to Change Counseling Services, 926-1900 € NAMI Wakulla, 926-1033 € Apalachee Center, 926-5900 € Rita Haney, LCSW, 926-2039 € Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce (emergency 911).Rita Haney, MSW, LCSW is a counselor in Crawfordville. She can be reached at 926-2039. By MARJ LAW The bolt-action .22 is a sweet youth ri” e. Its easy to shoot. When you pull up the bolt and slide it towards your body, it makes two satisfying clack noises. To make shooting the .22 even easier and more fun, you can add a 4x scope to it. All of a sudden, your target looks up close and personal! Now, youve got the advantage of easy use, and sight as well as sound. When you add the low cost of bullets, the bolt action .22 is a great beginners ri” e. However, now that youre a big person, you “ nd you crave more challenge than your old .22. There are plenty of bolt action ri” es that are more advanced and still give that familiar clack clack. But wait! Theres more! Go to your favorite gun shop and you might just find something relatively new and exciting in bolt action. Sig Sauer now makes a bolt action ri” e with BlaserŽ action. With Blaser action, you dont pull the bolt up and to you. Instead, you slide the bolt to you in a one step maneuver. Clack. This action should revolutionize your target practice. Why? When you use traditional bolt ri” es, the up and over action causes you to rotate your ri” e slightly. This means you temporarily lose perfect sight of your target and you have to reacquire your sight picture before you shoot. With the Blaser action, you can retain your sight picture even while you pull the bolt. This should help with accuracy, as there is less ri” e movement. It should also help with the speed of getting off your rounds. These Sig Sauer rifles come in several calibers including the 300, the 308 and the 338. As you can guess were not talking bargain basement pricing. But then, now that were big people, were entitled to window shop and drool over big people guns.Marj Law is retired as the director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. Now she enjoys spending time on the gun range and writes about shooting. Feeling suicidal? There’s helpHome on the RangeMoving beyond bolt-action

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 – Page 5A  Free digital photo class set at refuge on April 7The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge will present its monthly free digital photo class on Saturday, April 7, from 9 a.m. to noon. Weather permitting, there will be a photo tour following the class (bring a lunch). The class is free for adults and families are welcome. The class includes the basics of photography, including how to get better results from your digital camera using presets. Other topics include aperture, shutter speed, ISO settings, and composition. Included in the class are photos of refuge plants and animals. Digital photo classes are held the “ rst Saturday of each month in the new Natures Classroom, adjacent to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center. Registration is required. Call (850) 9256121 to reserve a seat. The class is taught by Ranger Barney Parker, former FSU photography instructor  AARP Driver Safety Class will be held April 24There will be an AARP Driver safety class held at the Wakulla Public Library in Crawfordville. This program is offered to seniors age 50 and older. It is a classroom setting and no driving is done. The program discusses how age related physical changes can effect the way seniors drive. The class is a one-day session and a discount will be given by the drivers insurance company for three years following the class. The cost for AARP members is $12 Non members $14 Seniors can register by calling (850) 926-4605. The class schedule is as follows: April 24, June 26, Aug. 28, and Oct. 23. Still time to get a team entered for Relay for LifeRelay for Life Event Chair Kristin Dow announced this week that the 2012 Wakulla Relay for Life is still accepting teams for the April 20-21 event. We currently have registered 22 teams, 129 participants and raised more than $10,000 toward our fundraising goal,Ž Dow said. However, there is still time to become part of this annual event.Ž To register a team, visit the website at relayforlife.org/wakulla” or “ nd us on Facebook. Community members are also invited to join us at the Lion Painting Festival on Saturday, April 7, at Azalea Park. This years Relay for Life will be April 20-21 at the Wakulla High School Track. The event begins at 6 p.m. Admission is free and open to all.  Brent Thurmond to speak on the Forbes PurchaseIf youve ever heard or been curious about what has been referred to as the Forbes Purchase then you will want to attend the Wakulla County Historical Society monthly presentation at Wakulla County Library on Tuesday, April 10 at 7 p.m. Wakulla Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond, who is also a board member of the historical society, will be presenting an informative history of the Forbes Purchase and how it played an important part in the early history of Wakulla County, as well as the surrounding Big Bend area. Thurmond has deep roots in Wakulla County and is an accomplished historian who has spent an extensive amount of time researching the Forbes Purchase. He will give an informative history of who John Forbes was, how the land was initially acquired when Florida was controlled by Spain and held through the time when Florida was purchased by Britain and then sold to the early pioneer settlers of Wakulla County. Many of the descendants of John Forbes still reside in Wakulla County and many of the descendants of the early settlers still own the family homesteads that were originally acquired from John Forbes Company. All are invited to attend to learn and explore an interesting part of Wakulla County history.  Resurfacing work continues on U.S. 319 in CrawfordvilleMotorists traveling U.S. Highway 319 between Wakulla-Arran Road and Bloxham Cutoff in Wakulla County can expect intermittent nighttime lane closures Sunday, April 1 through Friday, April 6 from 6:30 p.m. until 6 a.m. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL.– Staff ReportsBriefsSPECIAL TO THE NEWSAnna Lopez of the Quilters Guild with her quilt.Special to The NewsNAMI Wakullas newest support group for Wakulla County residents with mental illness is going strong. The group, which began in January, meets in the mornings from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Library on Crawfordville Highway and is free and open to all who have been diagnosed with a mental illness. NAMI Wakulla is very happy to be offering a daytime and a nighttime support group in Wakulla County,Ž said Susie Tooke, president of NAMI Wakulla. NAMI Wakulla, an af“ liate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, also has a weekly support group from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday at the NAMI Wakulla office at 2154-C Crawfordville Highway. For more information, call NAMI Wakulla headquarters at 926-1033. By CATHY FRANKPresident, Wakulla County Historical SocietyThe Wakulla County Historical Societys Museum and Archives upcoming exhibit will be quilts, antique sewing machines and equipment used in the countys early years. These tools were used to create clothing and utilitarian items needed around the home place. Also on display will be antique model cars and antique dish wares. A fabric vendor will be available on April 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for the exhibition kick-off day of fun. Refreshments will be served to visitors during this event as will a silent auction and a drawing for an Opportunity Quilt.Ž The winners will be announced June 30 at 4 p.m. The Museum and Archives will be opened Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Quilters Guild will be present on Saturdays for demonstrations. Come by and vote for The Peoples Choice AwardŽ or place a bid on a quilt. Sewing machine repair service will be available on Friday, April 6. A fee will be charged for service. For more information call the Museum and Archives at (850) 926-1110 or Anna Lopez, Quilters Guild President at 294-0832.Quilt show at Historical Society New support group going strongSpecial to The NewsBecause veterans from all U.S. con” icts sacri“ ced to assure freedom for us all, and because it may be the last chance to give them a heros welcome home, Big Bend Hospice launched the Valor Program to honor veterans in their “ nal days. The Valor Program was piloted in Wakulla County in 2011. It is designed so that Big Bend Hospice volunteers and staff can honor patients who are veterans with a brief ceremony, certi“ cate of appreciation and “ nal salute. After careful planning and a dress rehearsal, the “ rst Valor ceremony took place in the home of one of our Crawfordville patients, a Vietnam veteran. Arriving with a framed certi“ cate, a ” ag lapel pin for the patient and displaying an American ” ag, the Valor team led the patient and his wife in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. Several members of the patients hospice clinical team shared in this special moment with the patient. The two veteran volunteers, also Vietnam veterans, spoke from the heart as they thanked the patient for his service in Vietnam and assured him that he is appreciated for what he sacri“ ced. At the end of the ceremony, the two volunteers saluted the patient. Weakly, but proudly, he returned the salute. After participating in the “ rst Valor ceremony, Mike Compton, one of the Valor volunteers, expressed his support for the program. There are a minimum of at least two times an individual should have earned dignity and honor „ once while serving their country and the other in dying,Ž said Compton. I wanted to be part of the Big Bend Hospice Valor Program to show them honor for both and to show that they truly are appreciated for their service.Ž Not everyone who participates as a Valor volunteer must be a veteran; but there will always be one or two veterans in each Valor team. Billy Mills, the other Valor volunteer in Wakulla County, expressed the importance of this practice. There is a common bond among U.S. servicemen that cannot be explained unless you have been there,Ž he said. I volunteered for the Valor Program in order to show my deep-felt gratitude to these men and women who served their country. Everyone likes to be appreciated and told, Thank you. I am proud and honored to be part of this program.Ž The Valor ceremony was very meaningful to Pam Allbritton, Community Resource Coordinator on the Wakulla/Franklin team. As the ceremony progressed,Ž Allbritton said, the patients wife kissed me and hugged me with tears in her eyes and simply said, Thank you for everything. After the ceremony the patient was asked if he would like for our volunteers to sit at his side for a picture and he stated, No, I can stand, and he stood between our volunteers with pride. Our volunteers stayed at the home and shared military stories and again thanked the patient for his service.Ž To “ nd out how to become a member of the Valor volunteer team in the Wakulla/Franklin area, please call Allbritton at (850) 926-9308.Big Bend Hospice honors veterans with ceremony for their valor NEW!! New courses at the TCC Wakulla CenterMove your career forward with free or low-cost trainingUpcoming opportunities in manufacturing and healthcare:Manufacturing EssentialsApril 23 … June 275:30 … 9:30 p.m. | Mondays and Wednesdays$350 or FREE to those who are unemployed Home Care AidMay 8 … August 76 … 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $299Medical Billing and CodingMay 15 … August 146 … 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays $810 (includes cost of national certification exam)Medical Administrative SpecialistMay 22 … July 126 … 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $420REGISTER TODAY! workforce.tcc.fl.edu/Wakulla | 922-6290 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. 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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesArthur T. Anderson Bonnie Marie Linton Mobley Frances Lowe WaldbyEaster servicesMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY SERVICES8:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study(One block So. of Courthouse)850-926-7896 office www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Arthur T. Anderson, 59, of Crawfordville died Saturday, March 31, in Tallahassee. He was born on Dec. 4, 1952, in Quincy. He was employed by St. Marks Powder. He served in the U.S. Army. Visitation was held Wednesday, April 4, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services will be Thursday, April 5, at 11 a.m. at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Marilyn Nazworth Anderson; two sons, Adron Thomas Anderson (Skye) and Brandon Lee Anderson, both of Crawfordville; sisters, Marian Rudd (Tillman) and Patsy McNeely (Ed) both of Sopchoppy and Dianne Anderson, of Tallahassee; brother, Alvin Anderson, of Tallahassee; a stepmother, Vergie Anderson of Smith Creek; and four grandsons. He was preceded in death by his father, Otha Anderson; and his mother, Bernice Langston Anderson, who passed away a month after his birth. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Tenebrae Service will be held at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church on Thursday, April 5, at 7 p.m. This service will take us from the Upper Room where Jesus celebrated the Passover with His disciples and instituted The Lords Supper. The service moves onward to the Garden of Gethsemane, eventually leading us to the Cruci“ xion. This service is very powerful in its complete experience. Everyone is invited to attend this service. Contact us at 962-2511 for information. Wakulla United Methodist Church will hold a Maundy service on Thursday, April 5, at 7 p.m. All are welcome to this service of Easter preparation. Call 850 421-5741 for more information. Church-wide Easter Celebration Service will be held Saturday, April 7, at 11 a.m., followed by covered dish lunch, egg hunt and games. Bring covered dish, hot dogs will be provided. Wakulla United Methodist Church is located at 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Call 850 421-5741 for more information. Pioneer Baptist Church will host a community wide Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 7, at 2 p.m. Eggs will be hidden in three age groups: birth to 3 year olds, Pre-K to 2nd grade and 3rd grade to 5th grade. Complimentary refreshments will be available following the egg hunt. The egg hunt is free and the community is invited. Pioneer Baptist Church is located four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the Spring Creek Highway and Dr. MLK Jr. Memorial Road intersection. We look forward to seeing your family. For more information, please call 878-5224. First Baptist Church of St. Marks, First Baptist Church of Crawfordville and Pioneer Baptist Church of Crawfordville will jointly host an Easter Sunrise Service at the San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park in St. Marks. The service will be south of the old fort at the con” uence of the Wakulla and St. Marks rivers. The service begins at 7 a.m. and the gates of the park open at 6:30 a.m. The park location is 148 Old Fort Road in St. Marks. There are no park entrance admission fees to attend the service. Worship includes music, a devotion, and celebrating the Lords Supper together. Following the service, light complimentary refreshments will be available. In the event of rain, the service will be held in the sanctuary of the First Baptist Church of St. Marks. Everyone is invited to come and share in this beautiful worship service. For more information, call 878-5224. Pastor Derrick Nelson and his congregation at Rocky Mount P.B. Church will conduct the annual Easter Day Service at Zion Hill P.B. Church in Sopchoppy, Pastor Ervin Donaldson Jr. The services will be held Sunday, April 8, at 3 p.m. All are invited to attend. For more information, contact Mother Dora Rosier at (850) 962-4651. Journey to the Cross,Ž sponsored by Grace Baptist Churchs Live Out Loud Youth Ministry, will be held at the church on Thursday, April 5, through Saturday, April 7, beginning at 6 p.m. nightly until 8:30 p.m. Take a 30-minute walk through the last week of Jesus life, burial and Resurrection. Each station has something different to offer. The church is located at 803 Crawfordville Highway, just north of Bloxham Cutoff. For information, call (850) 926-3217 and leave a message and your call will be returned.Tenebrae Service at Sopchoppy UMCSunrise Service is set for Sunday, April 8, at 7 a.m. at Mashes Sands Beach. Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church is pleased to announce that a community-wide sunrise service will be conducted on Easter Sunday at Mashes Sands Beach in Panacea. The Sunrise Service will begin at 7 a.m. Everyone regardless of faith heritage is invited to attend. Contact us at 984-0127 for information.Community-wide sunrise service Wakulla UMC Easter celebration Multi-church sunrise service in St. Marks Easter service at Zion Hill P.B, ‘Journey to the Cross’ at Grace Baptist Easter Egg hunt on SaturdayBonnie Marie Linton Mobley, 79, a longtime resident of Tallahassee, passed away on March 28. She was raised in St. Marks and always had a great passion for the Lord and was a member of Southwood Baptist Church. She was totally dedicated to her family, children and grandchildren. She also had a passion for the love of nature and of animals of all kinds. She graduated from Crawfordville High School and attended college at Florida State University for approximately three and a half years majoring in accounting while working at Lewis State Bank, where she spent most of her career. She also owned a business and worked several years in the construction industry. The funeral services will be performed by Culleys Meadowood Funeral Home, 700 Timberlane Road in Tallahassee, with a viewing held on Wednesday, April 4, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Funeral Services will be held at the same location at 2 p.m. on Thursday, April 5. There will not be any graveside service, only a “ nal GoodbyeŽ prayer at the Roselawn Cemetery on Piedmont Road in Tallahassee. Memorial Contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include her children, Luther E. SnipesŽ Council Jr. (Brenda), Andy Lowe (Debbie) and George C. Mobley Jr.; nine grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren and two greatgreat-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, George Mobley, to whom she was married to for 34 years; her step-daughter Jane Mobley Lowe; and her “ rst husband, Luther Council Sr.Arthur T. Anderson Bonnie Marie Linton Mobley Obituaries continue on Page 7ABy ETHEL SKIPPER Easter sunrise service will be held at Skipper Temple Church of Christ on Easter morning at 6 a.m. Come looking for a victory time. You are welcome to fellowship with us. If Christ had not risen from the dead, all our living would be in vain. But now is Christ risen, and become the “ rst fruits of them that slept. For since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead. For in Adam all die, even in Christ shall all be made alive. Only through love can Christians be truly fruitful. We must learn this truth in this life in order to be ready for the Life Eternal. A county-wide sunrise service will be Easter morning at 5:50 a.m. at Pilgrim Rest P.B. Church, Elder O. Walker, host pastor. There will be a city-wide revival on Wednesday, April 11, at 6 p.m. featuring Dr. Marvin Sapp. It will be held at Disciples of Jesus, 228 Augusta Ave. in Thomasville. For information, contact Renita Dixon at (229) 5163878 or (229) 977-1503. Happy belated birthday in March to Mother Eva Johnson, Mother Bobbery Rosier, Deacon Merddie Rosier, Mother Alberta Hines and all March birthday people.More Easter sunrise services planned

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunityFrances Lowe Waldby, 90, of Tallahassee, passed away Wednesday, March 28. Frances and her twin brother Fred were born in Elon College, N.C., on March 30, 1921. She attended the University of North Carolina Womens College where she received a degree in English and a masters in library science. While working at the Georgia Tech library, she met her future husband, the late Robert E. Gibson. They married in 1948 and settled in Bartow. The family brie” y relocated to St. Petersburg before making Tallahassee their home in 1965, where Robert practiced law and Frances began her career as a stockbroker. In 1973, Frances married Thomas Lewis, a retired FSU professor. They enjoyed an active retirement until Toms death in 1994. She began her work as a Pink Lady at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, where she volunteered for more than 20 years. In 1995, she married Hubert Odell Waldby, also a retired professor from FSU. They spent many wonderful years together playing bridge, golf and traveling. Frances was a member of Trinity Methodist for almost 40 years. Frances had a winning smile and a great sense of humor. She loved people and cherished time spent with her children and granddaughter. Independent to the end, this spirited lady was an inspiration to many. She was valedictorian of her high school class, learned to ” y a plane at age 39, became a stockbroker before many women ventured into the field, and raised three monkeys along with four kids. By loving example, she showed her family there were no limits to their aspirations. A memorial service was held on Sunday, April 1, with interment at Culleys MeadowWood Memorial Park in Tallahassee. The family is grateful for the loving care and support received from the nurses and staff at Big Bend Hospice and Westminster Oaks Health Care. A remembrance donation may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308. Frances is survived by her loving husband, Odell; four children, Lynda Gibson of Crawfordville and friend Charley Ingle, Debbie Gibson of Tallahassee, Gordon Gibson of Orlando and Renee Gibson and husband Alex Allen of Annandale, N.J.; stepdaughter, Debbie Larios and husband Steve of Nashville, Tenn.; and granddaughter, Lorin Brand of Tallahassee. She will be greatly missed by all who loved her. Continued from Page 6AFrances Lowe WaldbyObituaries Harvest Hawk gives Marines peace of mindBY CPL. ISAAC LAMBERTHDefense Video and Imagery Distribution System NewsKANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan A modi“ ed KC-130J ” ies over Afghanistan ready to unleash a tremendous amount of “ repower for the Marines it supports. Equipped to “ re Hell“ re and Grif“ n missiles, the aircraft known as the Harvest Hawk, provides close-air-support (CAS) for Marines conducting ground operations. We can give the commander on the ground peace of mind knowing he has these assets in the sky,Ž said Capt. Dusty Cook, a pilot for the Harvest Hawk. Cook, a native of East Bernard, Texas, said the aircraft has several elements that distinguish it from other CAS platforms, and have made it highly successful. He explained that Hell“ re and Grif“ n missiles are ready for every mission along with a sophisticated camera which both guides them and scans for insurgent activity. When you put all these things together you get a very deadly system,Ž he said. We give the ground commander more precision munitions than any other plane, next to a bomber. Helicopters and “ ghters [planes] are good, but they do not carry the number of missiles we do and cannot stay in the sky the amount of time that we can.Ž Cook said the aircrafts extended ” ight time allows it to stay aloft long after other attack aircraft have left because of the need to refuel, giving ground forces precision “ re power for extended periods of time. Cpl. Tom Wicklow, a crew chief with the Harvest Hawk, said another key element to the success of the plane is the tremendous coordination between Marines on the ground and the crew in the air. Were all in contact with whats going on,Ž said Wicklow of Morristown, N.J. When the guys on the ground call us, its put on the internal communication system so everyone can hear and understand what is going on,Ž he said. When you hear those gun shots in the background and the Marines returning “ re with the urgency in their voices, it really gets the blood pumping knowing that their lives depend on you,Ž Wicklow added. When a commander on the ground needs air support, a Joint Terminal Attack Controller (JTAC) sends the request to the Direct Air Support Center (DASC), which then puts the JTAC in direct contact with the Harvest Hawk. The pilots and Fire Control Of“ cers (FCOs) of the Harvest Hawk crew have served with ground units as JTACs and understand “ rsthand the need for ef“ cient and accurate communication. This unique pairing adds a new dynamic to the battle“ eld. Additionally, the FCOs who control the weapon systems on the plane have ” own in other CAS platforms. They have been speci“ cally selected because of their experience with AV-8B Harriers, F/A-18 Hornets or AH-1W Cobras. Capt. Michael Wyrsch, an AV-8B Harrier pilot and an FCO for the Harvest Hawk, explained that his experiences as an attack pilot have been very bene“ cial. Giving close-air-support helped me understand what the guys on the ground are looking for,Ž said Wyrsch of Silver Spring, Md. Cook said the Harvest Hawk can still perform the duties of a regular KC-130J, such as battle“ eld illumination and tanking, however, its primary mission is to support ground forces with the aircrafts sensor and deadly weapons. Cook said the main mission of the Harvest Hawk is not air refueling or battlefield illumination, it is to unleash massive amounts of “ repower whenever and wherever ground troops need it.Capt. Jason Dale (left) of Versailles, Ky., and Capt. Joshua Mallow of Crawfordville, Fla., and 2003 Wakulla High School graduate, Harvest Hawk pilots with Marine Aerial Refueler Squadron 352, make “ nal preparations for the take off of the Harvest Hawk at Kandahar Air“ eld, Afghanistan, March 26. Staffed with of“ cers who have experience conducting close-air-support and equipped with Hell“ re and Grif“ n missiles, the converted KC-130J is fully equipped for air-to-ground engagements. CPL. ISAAC LAMBERTHOptimist Club Oratorical Contest winners announcedBy TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar“ eld@thewakullanews.netWakulla Countys Coastal Optimist Club held its annual Oratorical Contest for middle and high school students on March 29 at Poseys Up the Creek. There were six participants, four girls and two boys. Alexander Lewis, a junior at Wakulla High, is in AVID and wants to be an ImagineerŽ at Disney. Herbert Franklin, an eighth grader at Riversprings, wants to become an engineer in business design. Caylee Cox, an eighth grader at Riversprings, has interest in the medical “ eld. Danielle Gray, a junior at Wakulla High and in AVID, wants to be a photographer and own her own business. Dixie Johnston, a seventh grader at Wakulla Middle, wants to become a lawyer. Kayla Taff, a seventh grader at Wakulla Middle, loves musical instruments with an interest in the clarinet. First place winners were Cox for the girls and Franklin for the boys. They received $100. Second place winners were Gray and Lewis. They received $75. Johnston and Taff placed third. They received $50. All received certi“ cates and Optimist pens. First and second place will go to the District Level Competition. Oratorical Contest “ rst place winners are Caylee Cox and Herbert Franklin. Second and third place winners are Danielle Gray, Alexander Lewis, Dixie Johnston and Kayla Taff. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals TheAntiques Mall g o DUBREJA PLAZA94 COTTONWOOD STREET, CRAWFORDVILLEFL o o CALL 850926-TRIM( 8746 ) for your next appointment g o Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing g litzNc lip

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolStudents excel at Brain Brawl Special to The NewsShadeville Elementary held its annual “ fth grade Brain Brawl competition on Friday, March 2. The Brain Brawl is sponsored by the Coastal Optimist Club in an effort to support and encourage students to stretch their minds and to provide an opportunity for students to shine academically. Under the direction of Shadevilles outstanding “ fth grade team of teachers, Linda Davis (chairman), Kerry Adams, Suzie McCord, Sholi Roberts and Debbie Marsh, the students first battled it out in the classrooms to earn a seat on one of the two teams. Team A members included Tia Nicholson (captain), Nathan McKown, Hayden Lenk, and Hunter Busen. Team B members included: Hunter Redfern (captain), Logan Hicks, Tori Hatch and Jackson Allbritton. Also competing in the alternate positions were Emily Shirah and Devin DeRoche. When all was said and done, the last questions answered and points awarded the members of Team A had earned the right to wear the medallions held by blue ribbons. Team B also earned beautiful medallions held with red ribbons. Hunter Busen was awarded the medal for high scorer on Team A and Logan Hicks was awarded the medal for high scorer on Team B. Hicks also earned the coveted medallion held by gold ribbon for providing the most correct answers throughout the contest. It was an exciting afternoon watching these students show what they knowŽ in reading, math, science, social studies, geography and current events. They are proud of each of the members of this years Brain Brawl Team. Team A wins the Brain Brawl at Shadeville Elementary. Team A members are Tia Nicholson, Nathan McKown, Hayden Lenk and Hunter Busen. Team B includes Hunter Redfern, Logan Hicks, Tori Hatch and Jackson Allbritton.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversink Odyssey of the Mind team members Justin Stafford, Kate Bowyer, Aaron Sloan, Celestia Walker, Travis Morgan, Giselle Almanzor, Megan Crombie, Ashiera Preston, Nicholas Weaver and reporters Abigail Gray and Makenna Roddenberry.Special to The NewsOn Saturday, March 3, seven fourth and “ fth graders from Riversink Elementary School competed in the Emerald Coast Odyssey of the Mind Tournament in Crestview, Fla. Team members included fourth graders Travis Morgan, Ashiera Preston and Aaron Sloan and “ fth graders Giselle Almanzor, Kate Bowyer, Justin Stafford and Celestia Walker. Coaches were Riversink teachers Nicholas Weaver and Megan Crombie. The team has been working all year to build a tower out of 1/8 inch thick balsa wood that was as light, yet as strong as possible. The team built and tested several towers throughout the year, including one that weighed only 22 grams but supported 235 pounds of weight. The otters placed second in the amount of weight the tower could hold at the contest. They also had to write and perform a play that included mathematics in it, as well as solve problems throughout the day of the competition. Overall they came in third place and earned the bronze medal to take home to Riversink. Abigail Gray and Makenna Roddenberry, members of the Riversink newspaper staff, The Otter Side of the Story, also came with the team to do on location reporting for Riversink.Riversink team places third in Odyssey of the Mind TournamentCast of Riversprings Middle Schools Next Victim, Please thanks supportersSpecial to The NewsOn March 15 and 16, the Riversprings Theatre Troupe performed the Soderman/ Ferguson play, Next Victim, PleaseŽ directed by Nancy Commander and Mina Sutton. Desmond Maxwell played the part of Colonel Maxwell Murdock who has called his family together to discuss his will. The play twists and turns as family members plan and execute their plots to offŽ their siblings, aunts and uncles, and “ nd themselves the victims. Hannah Hart and Cori Chaganis were wonderful in their roles as the Colonels sisters, while Elijah Mullens, as the brother-in-law added a quiet humor to his role. Ashton Boddye, Jenna Francks, Sheleen Burton and Jason Paris were excellent in their roles as the Colonels conniving off-spring and Yesenia Reyes was perfect in her role as the humble, yet greedy daughterin-law. Playing the parts of the funny grandchildren were Emily Lawrence and Kaylee Meyers. Jada Walker, the bumbling detective, stole the show with her ad-libbed one-liners. Butler Higgins and Fi“ the maid, played by Nic Samlal and Paige Pearson, were superior in their roles. Alyssa Cacciatore and Sarah Stephens were the maids and Ian Potter was on lights and sound. They would like to thank their parents for all of their support, the Samlal family for running the concession and Wakulla High School students, Emily Davis, Sami Chaganis and Samantha Tomlinson for their help. Thanks also to Mr. Tully, Mrs. Hudson, Mr. Rossow, Mr. Williams and Coach Smith, as well as Mr. Walker, Ms. Baggett, Mr. Miller and the School Board. They also thank the community for their support of the arts. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCast members Desmond Maxwell, Hannah Hart and Cori Chaganis, Elijah Mullens, Ashton Boddye, Jenna Francks, Sheleen Burton, Jason Paris, Yese nia Reyes, Emily Lawrence, Kaylee Meyers. Jada Walker, Nic Samlal, Paige Pearson, Alyssa Cacciatore, Sarah Stephens and Ian Potter. San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOyst ers Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Special to The NewsFrom Little League to the Major League and at all levels in between, baseball and softball season is in full swing … and with that comes the risk of injury. Tens of thousands of players will require medical attention for injuries that include strains, sprains, fractures and concussions, while countless others will experience aches and pains that go unreported. The most common injuries are mild soft tissue injuries such as ligament sprains and muscle strains, along with cuts, bruises and contusions,Ž said Jeremiah Nieves, M.D., of the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (www.kessler-rehab.com). We also see more serious ligament tears and cartilage damage in the knee caused by the start-and-stop motion of play, as well as overuse injuries, such as tendonitis, in the shoulder, elbow and wrist. Each year, thousands of players also wind up with fractures,Ž said Dr. Nieves. And “ nally, despite protective equipment, players of all ages are at risk of experiencing eye injuries and concussions.Ž Although baseball and softball are considered non-contact sports, players typically sustain the more serious injuries because of contact with a ball, bat or another player. According to Mark Brinn, P.T., director of outpatient rehabilitation services at Kessler Institute, Injuries cant be avoided,Ž said Brinn, but can be minimized. Sports, like baseball and softball, demand agility, speed, skill and coordination, and good overall conditioning can help players stay in the game throughout the season.Ž PREPARING TO PLAY Kessler Institute suggests the following guidelines: Ideally, conditioning should begin long before the season starts to help players build core strength, ” exibility and endurance. Trying to get in shape too quickly can lead to acute muscle strains and other injuries. Prior to taking the “ eld for practice or a game, perform a minimum of 10 minutes of warm-up activities such as jogging, jumping-jacks, skipping, hopping or push-ups to increase body temperature and blood ” ow. Follow the warm-up activities by stretching all parts of the body, particularly the shoulders, back and hamstrings. Players should move into each stretch gently and avoid producing any pain. After stretching, do a few minutes of simple calisthenics such as arm circles, neck rolls and hip rotations. Finish your warm-up by playing soft-toss at a short distance. Gradually increase your distance and the intensity in which you are completing your throws. In addition, players, coaches and trainers are advised to observe basic rules for equipment use and technique, including: € Make sure that helmets, face guards and other protective equipment fit properly and are worn correctly. € Provide instruction in proper sliding techniques and other on-“ eld skills. € Follow established pitching guidelines particularly for youth baseball and softball. € Ensure that players stay well-hydrated and follow a balanced diet during the season. GETTING BACK IN THE GAME Despite the best preparation, players will still experience injuries. Brinn suggests that players listen to their bodies, as well as to their physicians and trainers, before considering resuming play. For example, a player with a joint injury should have full range of motion, no pain or swelling, and be at full strength before returning to the “ eld. Any player who has sustained a concussion should undergo post-injury imPACT testing and a neuropsychology evaluation to be cleared for play. Injuries should always be evaluated by a medical professional and treated accordingly,Ž said Brinn. Whether that means simply icing the injury and getting some rest or participating in a program of physical and/ or occupational therapy, this will allow a player to optimize recovery and return to play in the best possible time frame.ŽKessler Institute for Rehabilitation is one of only five federally-designated Model Systems in the nation for the treatment and research of both spinal cord and brain injuries. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The NewsThe Ladies of Wildwood Golf Course are planning the “ fth Annual Rally for the Cure Breast Cancer tournament bene“ ting the Susan G. Komen Foundation. Through our generous sponsors and entry fees, we have sent $36,000 to the foundation from the first four tournaments. The tournament will be held on Saturday, April 14, at Wildwood Golf Course. The survivors celebration begins at 8:20 a.m. followed with an 18-hole scramble, lunch and awards ceremony. Kick-off party will be held Friday, April 13, at Wildwood restaurant featuring music by Trafton Harvey. Donation of $5 is suggested. If you would like to enter a team, make a donation or have a tee sign, please contact Karen Waters, chairperson, at (850) 926-1222 or email karen.wildwood@ aol.com. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe WHS track teams competed Saturday in the 13th Annual Chiles Capital City Track and Field Classic hosted by Chiles High School in Tallahassee. The local teams joined 12 other teams in this highly competitive meet, with the girls team placing sixth overall and the boys ninth. Senior Cora Atkinson ran an excellent race in the 3200-meter run, running relaxed in second place until about a half mile to go when she took over the lead and powered her way to the win becoming the lone event winner for the WHS teams. On paper, the girls 800-meter run promised to be one of the highlights of the entire meet, as local track star Madison Harris looked to be facing the best girls the Chiles team, one of the prominent girls programs in the state, had to offer. Multiple times state champion, senior Lily Williams, was expected to compete, along with all the other top middle distance girls from Chiles and that indicated that a blistering fast race would take place and it did. Williams took the lead immediately and tried to just power away from everyone. Harris was the only one who went with her and they separated themselves from the rest of the “ eld. Harris held on, running one step behind, until the last 250 meters, when Williams was able to open a small gap between them, which she held to the end. Williams ran a blistering fast race, “ nishing in the outstanding time of 2:11.22, which was a new meet record by 2 seconds and Harris “ nished second in 2:15.97, which is a new WHS school record. Other local tracksters who had outstanding individual performances included freshman Kasey James (3rd, 3200 meters), senior Stanley Linton (3rd, 3200), freshman Kaedretis Keaton (4th, triple jump with a new personal record of 4100Ž), sophomore Marty Wiedeman (5th, 1600), senior Alexis Collins (6th, 100), senior Emily McCullers (6th, long jump), freshman Lili Broadway (8th, 1600) and junior Raychel Gray (8th, 3200 ). Although not scoring for the team, J.P Piotroski and Jamal Gavin had outstanding individual efforts. Piotroski ran an outstanding anchor leg on the 4x800 relay team and also broke the 5:00 minute barrier in the 1600 meters, running 4:58. Gavin set a new personal best in the discus, recording a throw of 10206. The local relay teams also made their presence known, with the boys and girls 4x800 meter teams leading the way with second place “ nishes. The girls continued their string of excellent performances and ran to their second fastest time of the season. In the boys race, Gabe Hutchins who was running the third leg, had just taken over second place and was headed down the home stretch when he tripped and fell hard on the track. Recovering quickly, he jumped up and took off after the Florida High runner who had passed him and was able to close the gap and put anchor runner J.P. Piortroski only a few steps behind Florida Highs anchor runner. Piotroski closed that gap within the “ rst 100 meters and the runners battled over the next 500 meters until he was able to make a “ nal move with about 150 meters to go that the Florida High runner could not match, assuring the local team the second place “ nish. The boys 4x100 meter relay team had a strong showing, “ nishing in 4th place. Other WHS relay teams scoring at the meet included the girls 4x100 team (6th) and the girls 4x400 team (5th). I was relatively pleased with the way the kids performed,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. A few had a really good day, but I though we were a little ” at overall, which is somewhat to be expected since we just came off spring break. That interruption always causes us some problems, but our kids know what they have to do and should be ready for Districts next week,Ž he said. The girls 800 meters was a great race! Madi showed once again why she is one of the best 800 meter runners in the state. She is fearless and will not back down in any competition! If you beat her, you are going to earn it.Ž The local team will compete next at the Gadsden County Small School Open Track Meet on Thursday, April 5.TRACKAtkinson, Harris come through againFWC News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will host its second annual Run WildŽ 6-K race Saturday, April 7 at Elinor Klapp-Phipps Park in Tallahassee. Registration begins at 7 a.m., and the race starts at 8 a.m. We encourage anyone to come out to support Floridas wildlife,Ž said Capt. Rett Boyd, event organizer and statewide coordinator of the FWCs Investigations Section. You dont have to be a runner to participate. Well have a live bald eagle, the FWCs manatee mascot and informational booths as well.Ž The event will raise money for the Wildlife Alert Reward Program, a non-pro“ t program offering rewards in exchange for information leading to the arrest of those who violate the states “ sh and wildlife laws and boaters operating vessels under the in” uence of drugs or alcohol. The program was created in 1979 to enlist the publics help in reporting violations and getting involved in the conservation and protection of Floridas valuable natural resources. The race will be at Millers Landing Road, Gate B.Ž Participants can register online or at Capital City Runners at 1866 Thomasville Road. Registration is $18 the day of the race.RUNNINGFWC to host Wildlife Alert raceRally for the Cure Golf Tournament will be April 14WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS:Wednesday, April 4 BASEBALL: Wakulla vs. Ponte Vedra at Lincoln. Varsity only, 4 p.m. Thursday, April 5 BASEBALL: Wakulla at Lincoln. JV at 4 p.m. Varsity at 7 p.m. SOFTBALL: Wakulla at Lincoln at 7 p.m. WEIGHTLIFTING: District quali“ er at Wakulla High School. TBA. Friday, April 6 SOFTBALL: Wakulla at Florida High at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 10 BASEBALL: Wakulla at Godby. JV at 4 p.m. Varsity at 7 p.m. SOFTBALL: Wakulla at Chiles at 6 p.m.Tips for preventing baseball, softball injuries D’Arcy Brazier • Owner Serving Wakulla & Surrounding Counties for over 35 years60 Holiday Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327 509–2148 FOREIGN CAR REPAIR DOWN HOME TOYOTA • HONDA Specializing In Specializing In NISSAN • SUBARU Lic # MV15601www.DownHomeForeignCarRepair.com Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 C apital C ircle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926–8116 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY

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FWC News Grab your “ shing rods and tackle box. Its almost time … April 7 … to take advantage of the “ rst of four license-free fishing days scheduled for this summer in Florida, according to Gov. Rick Scott, who highlighted the good news at a recent Cabinet meeting in Tallahassee. Fishing is a great way to enjoy Floridas beautiful outdoors, great weather and a wonderful day with family and friends,Ž Scott said. License-free “ shing days are the perfect opportunity to discover the fun and excitement of fishing and Floridas great outdoors.Ž The days are perfect chances for parents, who dont yet have a license, to take youth “ shing, or for avid anglers to introduce a friend to the recreational pursuit without having to purchase a license. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission spread out the opportunities this year so more people will be able to head for their favorite lakes and rivers or saltwater destinations on designated days. Instead of providing one weekend for freshwater “ shing and one weekend for saltwater fishing, the Commissioners decided at their meeting in February to break up the days. You wont need a recreational fishing license on the special days listed below. Florida residents and nonresidents, mark these Saturdays on your calendar for 2012: € April 7 Freshwater € June 2 … Saltwater € June 9 … Freshwater € Sept. 1 … Saltwater The April 7 date occurs during a productive freshwater “ shing period when the weather is usually comfortable. Plus its Easter weekend, and many people like to “ ll the weekend with a variety of activities with family or friends. The June 2 free saltwater “ shing day coincides with the “ rst weekend of Gulf red snapper season and National Fishing and Boating Week, which means there will be lots of other related activities going on too. The June 9 date for freshwater “ shing also coincides with the last day of National Fishing and Boating Week. Last year, 38 states had at least one license-free “ shing day during this annual event. Sept. 1 is the Saturday of Labor Day Weekend, when lots of people have time to recreate and celebrate the traditional end-of-summer holiday. In addition, bay scallops, lobster and snook will be open for harvest on this date. All other bag limit, season and size restrictions apply on these dates. The license-free fishing designation applies only to recreational fishing, not commercial. To make your free “ shing day successful, check out MyFWC.com/Fishing for “ shing tips, locations and rules. Those who venture out may discover why Florida is the Fishing Capital of the World and feel as if they are part of the sports business engine that propels a $7.5 billion economic impact and sustains 80,000 jobs. Fishing, however, is much more than a money-generating sport. Nature-based recreation can make people happier and healthier. And its fun and relaxing. Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, the wind did “ nally blow and because the land temperature is so warm right now every afternoon we are getting the sea breezes like we typically get in the summer. Its hard to believe its just the “ rst of April and we are having temperatures pushing 90 degrees. Lets just hope it doesnt get a lot warmer. The weather has sure brought out the fishermen: Coming back from Clearwater on Sunday afternoon, I passed over the 98 bridge on the Wakulla River and there must have been 50 trucks and trailers there. Everyone is out enjoying this beautiful weather. I went down to Clearwater to see my brother this weekend and we did a little wade “ shing down around St. Pete but didnt do any good. The water down there is beautiful and its very pretty. But they can have it all. The traf“ c was unbelievable. Every other car was pulling a boat and I have never seen so many boats on the water. It looked like opening day of scallop season at St. Marks. Problem is, its like that all the time. We are very, very fortunate to live where we do. I went out one day last week and “ shed and saw two other boats and I like that. If you ever get tired of “ shing and living here just head down that way for a few days. Youll be back. I just talked to Bucky at Shell Island Fish Camp and he said they are getting awfully busy. The “ sh are biting and the people are coming in to “ sh. He “ shed Thursday and Sunday and caught a lot of trout and quite a few oversize reds. He likes to “ sh the 5 or 6-inch jerk shad, corks and top water plugs. He said he “ shed to the East but most folks this weekend were “ shing to the West. Capt. Sid Stringer and Kenny Daniels took the Mark Colburn party from Georgia and both came in with limits of trout. Dr. Phil Sharp went Sunday with a friend and looked for cobia all morning but said they didnt see any. They went to the Rotary, Buoy 24, Buoy 4 and the buoys off the St. Marks Lighthouse. They were heading in and decided to stop on the ” ats and trout “ sh for a while. He doesnt “ sh that area much but they stopped in about four feet of water and in 30 minutes caught eight nice trout on the Gulp under a Cajun Thunder. Capt. David Fife has been catching a lot of reds in the Shell Point, Oyster Bay area. David typically uses live mudminnows on the bottom. He said he is also catching a few nice ” ounder. Capt. Luke over at AMS said one of his buddies “ shed the Clam Bar off the Ochlockonee and did good on trout and then came in and “ shed one of the deep holes around the bars and caught some nice silver trout. The word from St. George is the pompano are here and being caught in big numbers. The best area has been around the Bob Sikes Cut and .25-ounce Nylures tipped with sand” eas or small pieces of shrimp are best baits. There are also plenty of Spanish being caught and a neighbor was telling me a friend of his watched a guy catch a 42-pound king “ shing from the jetties. Lots of fish are being caught out of the Econ“ na and Aucilla and the bite is on at Keaton Beach. Lots of trout being caught on everything and the Steinhatchee Reef is producing big catches of sheepshead. Lots of reds are being caught and plenty are oversized. On Wednesday, I “ shed with Shuford Davis and Steve Reznik. We started up in a creek and did absolutely nothing and moved out towards the ” ats. We ended the day with 21 Spanish, two ” ounder, nine trout and a 40-pound cobia. Everything including the cobia was caught on live shrimp. On Friday, I “ shed with Dr. Steve Starbeck and his wife. We started in the early morning high tide looking for reds but could not get a bite on my favorite spot. We “ shed a couple of other spots and caught some small reds but couldnt catch a keeper. We “ shed the ” ats and caught some trout and Spanish and when the tide got low and started in I decided to go back and try for reds again. It wasnt a very low low so I hoped the bar would still be exposed. Sometimes you make the right decisions. First cast we caught a keeper red and sat there for two more hours catching and releasing reds. We kept two and threw back four more that we could have kept, including the largest red ever caught on my boat in close. Steves wife landed a 34-inch red that hit a shrimp on the bottom. The Kevins Red Trout Shootout is April 14 and the Panacea Rock the Dock Tournament is April 28 and 29. Gag grouper season opened Sunday in state waters but it is still closed in federal waters. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing!This warm weather has brought out the shermen From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Special to The NewsThe Florida Park Service has named the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park the top community service organization in the state. The 2011 Outstanding Citizen Support Organization of the Year Award was presented to the Friends organization at a ceremony on March 10 in Apalachicola. This award demonstrates the outstanding volunteers and members that make up Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park,Ž said Brian Fugate, park manager of Wakulla Springs State Park. We are fortunate to have a committed group of people who work tirelessly to protect and enhance our park every day.Ž The Florida Park Service honors community service organizations annually. Friends of Wakulla Springs was selected because of a large body of accomplishments over the past few years that include donations and grants that have helped fund an ongoing boat restoration campaign, renovations to the lodge roof and waterfront boat ticket of“ ce, an interpretive display at the park, preservation of the lodge lobby and construction of Sally Ward Bridge. It was also selected because of impressive volunteer participation and community partnerships related to the annual Wakulla Wildlife Festival and Friends 5K Run. Most of the 53 state parks managed by the Florida Park Service have Friends organizations, so to be named the best in the state is quite an honor,Ž said Ron Piasecki, president of the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. We are also fortunate to have solid park leadership in Brian Fugate, who was named District 1 Employee of the Year.Ž The Friends of Wakulla Springs recently established a Friends Endowment Fund to ensure the organizations mission to conserve, protect and enhance the natural, historical, cultural and recreational resources of Wakulla Springs State Park for present and future generations will continue for years to come. Volunteers are currently organizing the 2012 Wakulla Wildlife Festival, scheduled for April 20-21. For more information on the festival, visit www.wakullawildlifefestival.org.Friends of Wakulla Springs named No. 1 citizen support groupFour license-free “ shing days start April 7Beachgoers should be aware of nesting birdsFWC NewsWith nesting season under way for shorebirds like the snowy plover, black skimmer and American oystercatcher, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission asks beachgoers to take care not to disturb their nests. Here are some simple things you can do to help nesting shorebirds: € Keep your distance. If birds become agitated or leave their nests, you are too close! A general rule is to stay at least 300 feet from a nest. € Respect posted areas. Some shorebird nesting areas are posted with symbolic fencing,Ž which consists of signs on posts connected by twine marked with ” agging tape. € Never intentionally force birds to ” y. When birds are chased or disturbed, they use energy they need for nesting and migration. T~n~T Hide-a-way, Inc.invites you to ourDEMO DAYNative Watercraft and Liquid Logic KayaksSaturday, April 7, 2012 10 A.M. … 4 P.M.Visit T~n~T Hideaway on the Wakulla River & Hwy. 98 and try out our new retail line of kayaks. WATERCRAFT’ Native WaterCraft Ultimate and Red sh Mariner Propel Drive Liquidlogic Mist, Intuit, Marvel Tandem Call (850) 925-6412 for more info or visit our website www.tnthideaway.comSales Representative On Site ASHLEY FEEDSTORE8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROADfor more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY& RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other services www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Underwater WakullaBy Travis KerstingThey say that April showers bring May ” owers, and I hope that is the case for us this year. We need the rain more than the ” owers, but they are a de“ nite bonus. The warm weather has really made things bloom early and given many of us spring fever. The other possible issue we may face this year is the warmer weather that has kept the waters warmer. This may lead to more intense storms in the coming months. In future columns, I will be going over hurricane preparedness and how to keep yourself safe if we are to have a storm head our way. It never hurts to revisit what we know. In that same spirit, I have been thinking about the importance of Navigation Rules and how they apply to us. Many have grown up on the water and have learned to boat just like we learned to read and write, but there is a method to the madness of why we do what we do on the water. Over the weeks, I will be highlighting a Navigation Rule of the week. It is required that boaters have a copy of the navigation rules, published by the United States Coast Guard, on-board in order to pass the vessel safety check provided as a complimentary service by the Coast Guard Auxiliary. In the introduction of the Navigation Rules, it is explained that This manual contains the International Regulations for Prevention of Collisions at Sea, 1972 (72 COLREGS). It also contains the Inland Navigation Rules, which were enacted by law on 24 December 1980 and became effective for all Inland waters except the Great Lakes on 24 December 1981. The Inland Rules became effective on the Great Lakes on 1 March 1983. Some differences do remain between the International and Inland Rules. The side-by-side presentation of the Rules in this publication will allow mariners to determine those differences.Ž Coastal rules apply to waters outside of established navigational lines of demarcation while the inland rules apply to the waters inside the lines of demarcation including rivers, lakes and other navigable waterways. Just like driving a vehicle, these rules are there to protect boaters and provide a common language for all out on the water. Coastal Rule No. 1a: These Rules shall apply to all vessels upon the high seas and in all waters connected therewith navigable by seagoing vessels.Ž The rule further states that These Rules apply to all vessels upon the inland waters of the United States, and to vessels of the United States on the Canadian waters of the Great Lakes to the extent that there is no con” ict with Canadian law.Ž Both go on to further explain that unless there is imminent danger, the rules must be followed. However, all steps must be taken to avoid a collision, even breaking the rules. One last piece of information, Flotilla 12 will be moving our monthly meeting for April to April 14 due to Easter. We will be meeting at the Crawfordville Fire Station. Details next week on the exact time. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Knowing your navigation rules is important to being prepared and safe when out on the water. Does every person who visits the Grand Canyon actually hike its entire length? Does every person who wants to dive at Wakulla Springs want to dive to the limits of its exploration? The answer to both of those questions is NO and for very similar reasons. Many people do not care to spend the time and money required, nor undertake the rigorous effort required to hike the entire length of the 275-plus mile long canyon. Most are perfectly happy just driving to its edge and gazing over it from one or two spots. Facilities suitable for a far larger number of people rim viewing to a localized area is designed to be easily monitored and maintained. Wakulla Springs State Park is no different. They have just such a rimŽ facility at the waters edge, with docks, anchored rafts, towers and boats, accommodating large numbers of curious visitors. But until now, visitors interested in viewing the underwater wonders of the park have been restricted to a select few who must enter through a costly private permit holder. To dive the cavernŽ zone, that which is still illuminated by natural sunlight allows visitors to duck under the ledge for a better view. Cavern diving is less expensive or equipment intensive than cave diving. The cavern at Wakulla dwarfs that of most Florida caves and is a highly appealing recreational level site. However, visiting the cavern still requires an individual be cavern certi“ ed so they are aware and familiar with the dangers of an overhead environment. Cavern diving is the scuba equivalent to hiking down just below the rim of the Grand Canyon, gazing at it from the protection of the upper walls. Most cave diving visitors breathe Nitrox or Air and are limited to recreational depths of 130 feet. In Wakulla Springs, these depths are still in the zone of light, well outside of the dark part of the cave. Because of the sheer size of the spring, such a dive in Wakulla is spectacular. Hikers in Grand Canyon are still on short rim trails in this analogy. Depending upon who you ask, depths below recreational diving limits require the use of a gas mixture of helium, nitrogen and oxygen called Trimix.Ž Helium is added to dilute the other two gases of oxygen and nitrogen, which may, if left undiluted, become toxic and narcotic respectively the deeper you go. Trimix, however, is expensive. As most open circuit divers know, the deeper you go, the more gas you breathe. Standard open circuit scuba diving would need to carry a lot of breathing gas for a two hour dive below 200 feet in Wakulla. The breathing gas bill alone to do this dive would be around $200. That doesnt include the training costs for full cave training, typically $1,500 to $2,000, and trimix training, an additional $1,200 to $1,500. A diver will have invested in the range of $6,000 to $15,000 in equipment before they enter the water. All of that to do the equivalent of a one day hiking trip in the Grand Canyon! Unlike the Grand Canyon, short of a well-funded group of divers like the WKPP, its doubtful many will hikeŽ the full length of Wakullas underwater world any time soon. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed Apr 11, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 1:51 AM 3.7 ft. 2:40 AM 3.7 ft. 3:27 AM 3.6 ft. 4:13 AM 3.3 ft. 5:01 AM 3.0 ft. 5:50 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:55 AM 0.5 ft. 8:30 AM 0.7 ft. 9:04 AM 0.9 ft. 9:37 AM 1.1 ft. 10:09 AM 1.4 ft. 10:43 AM -0.5 ft. 12:16 AM Low 3.7 ft. 2:05 PM 3.9 ft. 2:33 PM 4.0 ft. 3:03 PM 4.1 ft. 3:34 PM 4.1 ft. 4:06 PM 3.9 ft. 4:41 PM 2.7 ft. 6:45 AM High -0.3 ft. 8:25 PM -0.7 ft. 9:08 PM -0.9 ft. 9:51 PM -1.0 ft. 10:36 PM -0.8 ft. 11:24 PM 1.6 ft. 11:20 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:20 PM High Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed Apr 11, 12 Date 3.6 ft. 1:48 AM 3.8 ft. 2:37 AM 3.8 ft. 3:24 AM 3.6 ft. 4:10 AM 3.4 ft. 4:58 AM 3.1 ft. 5:47 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:52 AM 0.5 ft. 8:27 AM 0.7 ft. 9:01 AM 1.0 ft. 9:34 AM 1.2 ft. 10:06 AM 1.5 ft. 10:40 AM -0.6 ft. 12:13 AM Low 3.8 ft. 2:02 PM 3.9 ft. 2:30 PM 4.1 ft. 3:00 PM 4.2 ft. 3:31 PM 4.2 ft. 4:03 PM 4.0 ft. 4:38 PM 2.8 ft. 6:42 AM High -0.4 ft. 8:22 PM -0.8 ft. 9:05 PM -1.0 ft. 9:48 PM -1.0 ft. 10:33 PM -0.9 ft. 11:21 PM 1.7 ft. 11:17 AM Low 3.8 ft. 5:17 PM High Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed A p r 11, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 2:27 AM 3.4 ft. 3:16 AM 3.4 ft. 4:03 AM 3.3 ft. 4:49 AM 3.1 ft. 5:37 AM High 0.3 ft. 8:59 AM 0.4 ft. 9:34 AM 0.6 ft. 10:08 AM 0.8 ft. 10:41 AM 1.0 ft. 11:13 AM -0.7 ft. 12:28 AM -0.5 ft. 1:20 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:41 PM 3.6 ft. 3:09 PM 3.7 ft. 3:39 PM 3.8 ft. 4:10 PM 3.8 ft. 4:42 PM 2.8 ft. 6:26 AM 2.5 ft. 7:21 AM High -0.3 ft. 9:29 PM -0.7 ft. 10:12 PM -0.9 ft. 10:55 PM -0.9 ft. 11:40 PM 1.2 ft. 11:47 AM 1.4 ft. 12:24 PM Low 3.7 ft. 5:17 PM 3.4 ft. 5:56 PM High Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed Apr 11, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 1:43 AM 2.8 ft. 2:32 AM 2.8 ft. 3:19 AM 2.7 ft. 4:05 AM 2.5 ft. 4:53 AM 2.3 ft. 5:42 AM High 0.2 ft. 8:06 AM 0.3 ft. 8:41 AM 0.5 ft. 9:15 AM 0.7 ft. 9:48 AM 0.8 ft. 10:20 AM 1.0 ft. 10:54 AM -0.4 ft. 12:27 AM Low 2.8 ft. 1:57 PM 2.9 ft. 2:25 PM 3.0 ft. 2:55 PM 3.1 ft. 3:26 PM 3.1 ft. 3:58 PM 3.0 ft. 4:33 PM 2.0 ft. 6:37 AM High -0.2 ft. 8:36 PM -0.5 ft. 9:19 PM -0.7 ft. 10:02 PM -0.7 ft. 10:47 PM -0.6 ft. 11:35 PM 1.1 ft. 11:31 AM Low 2.8 ft. 5:12 PM High Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed Apr 11, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 1:35 AM 2.9 ft. 2:24 AM 2.9 ft. 3:11 AM 2.8 ft. 3:57 AM 2.6 ft. 4:45 AM 2.4 ft. 5:34 AM 2.1 ft. 6:29 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:34 AM 0.5 ft. 8:09 AM 0.7 ft. 8:43 AM 0.9 ft. 9:16 AM 1.1 ft. 9:48 AM 1.3 ft. 10:22 AM 1.5 ft. 10:59 AM Low 2.9 ft. 1:49 PM 3.0 ft. 2:17 PM 3.1 ft. 2:47 PM 3.2 ft. 3:18 PM 3.2 ft. 3:50 PM 3.1 ft. 4:25 PM 2.9 ft. 5:04 PM High -0.3 ft. 8:04 PM -0.7 ft. 8:47 PM -0.9 ft. 9:30 PM -1.0 ft. 10:15 PM -0.8 ft. 11:03 PM -0.5 ft. 11:55 PM Low Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed A p r 11, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:47 AM 2.6 ft. 2:51 AM 2.6 ft. 3:53 AM 2.5 ft. 4:55 AM 2.5 ft. 5:59 AM 2.3 ft. 7:07 AM 2.2 ft. 8:20 AM High 0.7 ft. 7:18 AM 0.9 ft. 7:54 AM 1.2 ft. 8:27 AM 1.4 ft. 8:59 AM 1.5 ft. 9:31 AM 1.6 ft. 10:06 AM 1.7 ft. 10:52 AM Low 2.4 ft. 1:35 PM 2.6 ft. 1:57 PM 2.7 ft. 2:22 PM 2.9 ft. 2:52 PM 3.0 ft. 3:27 PM 3.0 ft. 4:08 PM 2.8 ft. 4:57 PM High 0.1 ft. 7:38 PM -0.1 ft. 8:21 PM -0.3 ft. 9:07 PM -0.4 ft. 9:56 PM -0.4 ft. 10:51 PM -0.3 ft. 11:54 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 5 April 11First April 28 Full April 6 Last April 13 New April 20Major Times 12:09 AM 2:09 AM 12:35 PM 2:35 PM Minor Times 6:12 AM 7:12 AM 7:03 PM 8:03 PM Major Times 1:02 AM 3:02 AM 1:30 PM 3:30 PM Minor Times 6:53 AM 7:53 AM 8:11 PM 9:11 PM Major Times 1:58 AM 3:58 AM 2:27 PM 4:27 PM Minor Times 7:37 AM 8:37 AM 9:22 PM 10:22 PM Major Times 2:56 AM 4:56 AM 3:27 PM 5:27 PM Minor Times 8:25 AM 9:25 AM 10:31 PM 11:31 PM Major Times 3:57 AM 5:57 AM 4:28 PM 6:28 PM Minor Times 9:19 AM 10:19 AM 11:39 PM 12:39 AM Major Times 4:59 AM 6:59 AM 5:29 PM 7:29 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:16 AM 11:16 AM Major Times 6:00 AM 8:00 AM 6:29 PM 8:29 PM Minor Times 12:40 AM 1:40 AM 11:18 AM 12:18 PM Better Best Better Better Average Average Average7:21 am 7:58 pm 7:03 pm 6:13 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:20 am 7:59 pm 8:12 pm 6:54 am 7:18 am 7:59 pm 9:22 pm 7:38 am 7:17 am 8:00 pm 10:32 pm 8:26 am 7:16 am 8:01 pm 11:39 pm 9:19 am 7:15 am 8:01 pm --:-10:17 am 7:14 am 8:02 pm 12:41 am 11:19 am88% 96% 96% 88% 81% 73% 65% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. 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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 2, … There will be delays in the processing of new court cases and new dockets with a smaller amount of money going to the states clerks of courts under the budget passed last month by lawmakers. Lawmakers are expected to send the proposed new budget (HB 5001) soon to Gov. Rick Scott, including a 7 percent cut in the budget for the clerks, which comes on top of a more than 15 percent hit the clerks took a couple years ago. While some activities will take precedence … criminal matters and certain civil cases that have statutory time frames for when things must be processed … clerks say there will be inevitable delays for many people who use the court system, from people in foreclosures, to those seeking a divorce, or those battling over small claims. In the “ rst quarter, we could be as much as 10 days behind, and as you go forward you end up at the end of the year some 40 days behind,Ž said Karen Rushing, clerk of court in Sarasota County. And some days, there may not be anyone at the court clerks of“ ce to help you. Were seriously talking about reduced hours,Ž Rushing said. A number of other clerks say theyre contemplating closing of“ ces early to hit the budget requirement. Statewide, the hit is just over $30 million. The previous cuts have already reduced staff, but thats the largest cost in the system, so thats where cuts will have to occur to meet the required reduction, said Ken Burke, clerk of court in Pinellas County, and president of the Florida Association of Court Clerks & Comptrollers. The effects will be broadly felt, Burke said. Foreclosures, obviously, will be affected,Ž Burke said. Another one thats going to be especially frustrating is landlord-tenant issues. Normal business litigation, small claims, all those types of (cases) where people are looking to the courts for a remedy.Ž Once the Legislature sends the budget to Scott he has 15 days to sign it, but has line item veto power. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA Wakulla County man found guilty of trying to steal beer from Wal-Mart was sentenced to four years in prison. It took less than 15 minutes for the six-person jury to return a guilty verdict against Jamie Deibert for grand theft after his oneday trial on Thursday, March 29. Since Deibert had been previously convicted of a felony, Senior Circuit Judge William Gary went ahead with sentencing Deibert. Prosecutor Lorena Vollrath-Bueno showed a surveillance video from Aug. 26 of Deibert and another man, Garland Landers, entering the store, each grabbing a shopping cart, and then heading to the beer aisle where they loaded up 18 cases of beer. The two men then attempted to walk past the cashiers without paying. When confronted by a Wal-Mart employee, the two men ran from the store to Landers truck in the parking lot. A sheriffs deputy was waved down and pursued the truck until it started speeding and forcing other cars off the road in an attempt to escape. But the deputy recognized the truck as belonging to Landers … he had given the man a ticket a week earlier for driving without a tag. Meanwhile, Landers and Deibert apparently ditched the truck and went to Landers house … and called the sheriffs of“ ce to make a report that the truck had been stolen earlier in the day. Already suspecting Landers and Deibert of trying to steal the beer at Wal-Mart, deputies went to the home and took the report of the stolen car … which then added another felony charge of making a false report to law enforcement. Landers took a plea deal for the charges and was sentenced to six months in jail followed by two years of felony drug offender probation. He has already been released from the jail sentence, but is reportedly back in jail on a violation of probation. Assistant Public Defender Matt Ream defended Deibert at trial, and contended the man had done nothing wrong. The area where Deibert and Landers were confronted by an employee was past the cashiers, Ream said, but there is still merchandise for sale there … ice, newspapers and other items. You can lawfully be there with the stores property,Ž he said. Ream contended that Deibert was going into the area to get ice. As for the charge of making a false report, Ream conceded to that, but said Deibert was not doing anything more than protecting his friend.Ž Deibert had an extensive criminal record going back to 2001 with numerous drug and alcohol charges, mostly misdemeanors. He was convicted of felonies in Georgia for aggravated battery and aggravated assault in 2003, and was on probation in Volusia County for aggravated assault with a “ rearm, drug possession and false imprisonment. In other court matters this week: € Becky Smith was found not guilty of planning a robbery of the Murphy Oil station at Wal-Mart back in March 2009. Smith was not alleged to have taken part in the robbery, which only resulted in the theft of a couple of cell phones, but she had just been fired from the store a few days before the robbery. At about 5 a.m. that day, a man entered the gas station with a shotgun, obviously familiar with the stores routines. When it was apparent the clerk on duty couldnt open the safe, the man took two cell phones … one belonging to the store and the other to the clerk. Daniel Brown was later charged with the robbery, along with Jessica Watson … who is the daughter of Smiths boyfriend, now her husband. Smith went to trial on Tuesday, March 27, on a charge of armed robbery with a “ rearm and conspiracy. Her attorney, Cliff Davis, noted that Brown and Watson, who are in the Wakulla County Jail, had managed to communicate through letters and jail trustees … with the implication that the pair had conspired to implicate Smith with a role in the robbery. The jury was out for 30 minutes before returning a not guilty verdict. € Centennial Bank “ led a lawsuit to foreclose on Southpoint Industries, the Panacea restaurant supply store, claiming the bank is owed nearly $700,000 in defaulted loans. According to the lawsuit, Wakulla Bank issued a note back in November 2006 as well as a line of credit to George Black, owner of the company, back in 2009. Black died last year. Centennial, which took over for Wakulla Bank last year, claims in the lawsuit that, as of July 2011, the promissory note is in default and, as of March 14, the bank is owed $604,152 of which more than $572,000 is principal. Payments have failed to be made on the line of credit since August 2011 and, as of March 14, the bank is owed more than $68,679. The lawsuit is filed against Southpoint and Rebecca Black as successor trusteee to the George Thomas Black Revocable Trust. € Centennial Bank, as successor to Gulf State Bank, “ led a lawsuit against Spears Small Engines claiming the company defaulted on a note and mortgage of more than $307,000. The lawsuit also notes that the State of Florida is seeking more than $26,000 in unpaid sales tax from the company. It also notes there are unpaid taxes on the property of $6,946 for the years 2008 and 2009, and that the 2010 taxes are likely unpaid as well. €Lynda Hutcheson was found guilty in a trial on Friday, March 30, of criminal use of personal identi“ cation information, grand theft and exploitation of the elderly. Hutchesons 100-year-old grandmother testified at the trial that she lost more than $18,000 as Hutcheson withdrew money from her account, reportedly to buy drugs. Hutcheson is to be sentenced by Judge William Gary in April. She faces a minimum-mandatory sentence of three years for the ID theft charge.Court shortsCut in clerks budget will cause delaysTax of ce employees have a scuf eBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTwo female employees at the county tax collectors of“ ce apparently got into an argument recently and it reached the point where one of the women was waiting outside the of“ ce in her car for the other woman, threatening to beat up the other woman and run over her. The employee, Laura Bess Rogers, who felt threatened, apparently did not contact the sheriffs office to file criminal charges, but she did describe the events in seeking to have a temporary injunction imposed against the other employee, Janel Raker Stringer. The request for an injunction was denied by Circuit Judge Charles Dodson because there were not multiple incidents of violence to justify an injunction. Its not clear from the court “ le what started the disagreement, but it escalated to where Stringer allegedly threatened to beat up Rogers, according to the petition. Tax Collector Cheryll Olah and the two employees were locking up the of“ ce, and Stringer apparently went outside to her vehicle and parked next to Rogers car, according to the petition. Olah went to talk to Stringer, who reportedly said that she was going to beat the other employee up and run over her. Olah told the employee to leave the property. Asked about the incident, Olah con“ rmed that there was a disagreement between employees, but stressed it was after hours and did not involve the public. We did have a confrontation,Ž Olah said, but she said the issue has been resolved and both employees were reprimanded for their roles. By TODD SCHROEDERFlorida Forest ServiceThis time of year it is common for severe weather to impact the area. We often experience heavy rains and frequent lightning strikes. Fires caused by lightning may go undetected initially because the burning is occurring beneath the surface of the ground burning hot and eventually making its way to the surface and causing a wild“ re. Recently two wildfires were credited to lightning strikes in our area: One of these wild“ res burned across 82 acres of swampland; last week equipment use caused a wildfire in Midway that burned 7.5 acres and threatened several homes. The week of April 913 is Wildfire Awareness Week where Floridians are reminded of the devastation caused by the wild“ res in 1998 throughout the state. Almost 80 percent of all wild“ res in Florida are caused by human carelessness. In the Tallahassee area, the No. 1 cause of wild“ res is due to escaped debris burning. When burning yard waste outdoors these guidelines should be followed: Your “ re must be contained in an 8-foot diameter pile or non-combustible barrel and must be located at least 25 feet from your house and any forestland, 50 feet from a paved public road and 150 feet from other occupied buildings. Avoid burning on windy days or when humidity is below 30 percent. Stay With It.Ž Never leave your “ re unattended. Make sure it is dead out before leaving. Homeowners can increase their wild“ re awareness by doing the following: € Clean rooftops and gutters of pine needles and branches that may easily catch “ re. € Clear at least 30 feet around your home where nothing can burn so your home becomes more defendable in the event of wild“ re. € Keep your yard mowed and clear of all dead debris.Be aware of the risk of wild“ re TheNews Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408 Special Offer New Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County Only ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover r r s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Phone#_____________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 4/30/2012877-401-6408Get 10 Months for $20.12straight to your mailbox This is not a trick NO FOOLIN’ www.thewakullanews.com Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 – Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn March 22, a 78-yearold Sopchoppy man struck three highway signs with his motor vehicle in the Medart area. Deputy Mike Zimba conducted a traf“ c stop at Wakulla High School and the man struck a support pole in the high school parking lot. Deputy Zimba determined that the motorist was a diabetic and had not eaten in some time. The driver did not remember hitting any signs and felt weak and dizzy. The motorist was assisted by a relative who brought him something to eat. The motorists vehicle suffered $500 worth of damage and the road signs suffered $300 worth of damage. There was no damage to the pole at the high school due to the slow speed of the vehicle. The man was not charged due to suffering from a medical condition. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On March 22, Justin Ward of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim stated that someone entered his shed and removed an electric leaf blower. The equipment was valued at $10. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On March 22, Anna Hinsey of Crawfordville reported the theft of a telephone from her home. The victim found the box empty when she went to look for the phone. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On March 22, Michael Porter of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft. Electrical motors and tools, valued at $7,170, were reported missing. A fence was cut to enter the property. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On March 22, Deputy Clint Beam investigated a traf“ c crash on Tiger Hammock Road. An overturned vehicle was observed on the side of the road near Shadeville Highway but nobody was with the vehicle. Two individuals of interest have been identified as the case investigation continues. € On March 22, Robert Moore of Crawfordville reported the theft of his wallet. The wallet was taken from the victims vehicle. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On March 22, Janith Turner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims Social Security number to “ le a tax return. Sgt. Mike Helms investigated. € On March 22, Dolly Mitchell of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department reported the theft of a fire extinguisher from Hudson Park. The unit is valued at $106. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On March 22, Lt. Steve Ganey investigated a dog bite on Klickitat Drive in Crawfordville involving a 10-year-old female. The victim and her mother were cleaning a shed when they disturbed a nest of wasps. The wasps attacked the family dog that leaped forward and attacked the juvenile. The child suffered deep lacerations to her lip, nose, and eye. EMS treated the child at the scene and transported her to the emergency room. The Animal Control Unit was contacted and took possession of the mixed bulldog. € On March 23, Lucas Degennaro of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to file his tax return and was informed that someone had already used his Social Security number. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € On March 23, Deputy Ben Steinle investigated a traf“ c crash at 1321 Coastal Highway in Panacea. Claudeane Virginia Frank, 19, of Tampa was driving westbound on the highway when she began to slow down. Richard Eugene Gilbert, 62, of Suwanee, Ga., was riding a motorcycle behind Frank and failed to observe her slowing down. The motorcycle struck the rear of Franks vehicle causing disabling damage to the motorcycle. Gilbert suffered a broken leg and was treated by EMS personnel. There were no injuries to Frank or her passenger, Emily B. Gwynn, 22, of Tallahassee. € On March 23, Sherry Bramblett of the Wakulla County Health Department reported the theft of currency. A cash box was determined to be missing and was recovered with less than $100 cash missing from it. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On March 23, David Thompson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft as a suspect, who has been identi“ ed, sold his belongings at yard sales. The victim attempted to collect his belongings from a Crawfordville residence and discovered that the items, valued at $5,742, were gone. The suspect admitted selling the items. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On March 23, Kevin James of Apalachicola reported a residential burglary in Sopchoppy. The home is being renovated following a “ re and $5,160 worth of copper, air conditioning units, steel cookers, hot water heater, air conditioning handler and a central air conditioning unit, was stolen. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On March 23, Armando Lara of Crawfordville reported a traffic crash on Wakulla Arran Road. The victim swerved to avoid hitting a deer and struck a tree. No injuries were reported and vehicle damage was estimated at $2,500. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € On March 23, Richard Bramblett of Crawfordville reported the theft of a wood chipper from his garage. The chipper is valued at $450. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On March 23, Charles Sanders of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a wallet from his home. A suspect has been identified. The wallet and contents are valued at $1,400. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On March 23, Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated the theft of “ shing equipment from the Newport boat ramp. A 16-year-old male reported that he left his “ shing equipment next to a tree while he loaded his kayak. After realizing he left the equipment, he returned to the ramp and the equipment was missing. The equipment is valued at $870. € On March 24, a 17year-old female reported the theft of a bicycle from a Crawfordville home. The bike is valued at $80. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On March 24, Merritt Taylor of Panacea reported a residential burglary. The victim noticed a forced entry as windows were broken out. The victim is working to determine the value of items that were taken from the home. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On March 25, a structure “ re was reported by a motorist on Roberts-Williams Road in Crawfordville. An uninhabited trailer was on “ re when Wakulla “ re“ ghters arrived on the scene. The “ re was suspicious in nature and the State Fire Marshal was called to investigate. Deputy Cole Wells and Detective Rob Giddens investigated. € On March 25, Richard Vanmunster of Panacea reported a grass fire on Mashes Sands Road. A small grass “ re spread to a privacy fence. Vanmunster was burning leaves earlier in the day and the “ re started up again after being put out. The Wakulla County Fire Department put out the blaze. The “ re damaged the victims fence. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On March 25, Patricia Tadlock reported a criminal mischief in St. Marks. Someone spread lipstick and polish on the victims walls and sidewalk. Damage was estimated at $600. Other victims in the area reported similar incidents. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. € On March 25, Debra Vaillancourt of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. A suspect, who was identi“ ed, took the victims vehicle from her home and it was involved in a traf“ c accident in Leon County. The suspect was arrested for DUI in Leon County and charges in Wakulla County are pending. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € On March 25, Lisa Lynn Ross, 43, of Tallahassee was issued a notice to appear in court for contributing to the delinquency of a minor. FWC Of“ cer Charles Mallow investigated a report of an adult exhorting juveniles to jump off the lower Wakulla River Bridge. Two female juveniles jumped and had difficulty swimming and had to be picked up by a river boater. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On March 26, Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated a hit-and-run involving property damage owned by Talquin Electric Cooperative. On Summerwind Circle North, a motorist struck a power pole and broke it in half. Vehicle parts were recovered at the scene. Damage to the power pole was estimated between $1,500 and $2,000. € On March 26, Robert Lowther of St. George Island reported a criminal mischief. Someone tore down the fence at his Panacea residence. Evidence suggested that a motorist caught the fence on a trailer hitch and pulled the fence down by driving away. Damage was estimated at $100. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. € On March 23, Everett Nutting Jr. of Crawfordville reported recovering a wallet on the side of the road near Crawfordville Highway and Oak Ridge Road. The wallet contained identi“ cation for a man in Tallahassee. The owner was located and said he would retrieve the wallet. The wallet was turned over to the property custodian. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € On March 26, Anne English of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported unauthorized withdrawals of money from her account. The total amount of the theft was $857. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On March 26, John Bookout of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Several items were reported missing from the yard and sheds on the property. The property included tools, saws, generator, air compressor and more, valued at $1,801. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On March 27, Gloria Jones of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the home and moved items but nothing has been reported missing. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On March 27, Janet Creel of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Medications were taken from the victims home. The stolen property is valued at $500 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € On March 27, Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated a fight involving two boys in Crawfordville. The “ ght resulted in injuries to both combatants, who are related. Sgt. Mitchell treated the boys until they could be checked by EMS staff. They were turned over to their mother and no charges were “ led. € On March 27, Michael Jones of Crawfordville reported a “ re involving a hot water heater. Firefighters contained the fire to the water heater and the incident was contained before it could spread to the home. Two juveniles were inside the home at the time smoke was observed. They left the home and contacted a parent. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € On March 27, Harry Menendez of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Two unauthorized charges appeared on the victims bank statement totaling $690. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € On March 27, Ray Gray of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Someone removed aluminum siding, doors, windows, appliances and wiring from a rental home. The property was valued at $1,200. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. € On March 23, a 49year-old Carrabelle woman who attempted to send money overseas by using a Crawfordville mailing business requested to speak to a deputy. Detective Matt Helms had spoken to the woman in February when he urged the victim to reconsider sending money at that time since he believed she was about to become a victim of a fraud. The victim lost $3,000 as well as a package she sent to someone she believed to be in the military. A telephone she sent was traced to Ghana and there was a $2,400 charge on her phone bill. Verizon Wireless and the FBI are investigating. € On March 24, a small sinkhole opened up next to Maxson Road west of Spring Creek Highway in the Wakulla Gardens region of Crawfordville. The hole was four feet wide and three feet deep but did not impact the road itself. Wakulla County Public Works “ lled in the hole and the sinkhole was recorded in the state sinkhole data base. € On March 28, Heather Hawkins-Heierman of Crawfordville reported a fraud as she observed an unauthorized charge on her bank account. The transaction occurred through a debit card and the monetary loss was $939. € On March 28, Detective Derek Lawhon was escorting a Leon County Sheriffs Office detective investigating a case in Wakulla County when the two detectives discovered a marijuana plant in plain view next to a door at the home they were investigating. The plant was seized as evidence but no charges have been “ led. € On March 28, Jennifer Sutton of Panacea reported a grand theft in Crawfordville. A punching bag was stolen from the Bridlewood Apartment complex. The bag and stand are valued at $350. € On March 28, Joyce Hope of Crawfordville reported fraudulent charges on her bank account. Four charges were observed from South Florida for a total of $1,926. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 722 calls for service during the past week. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA YARD SALEAPRIL 6 & 7 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS! BIGHOP INTOAPRILS www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Easter Egg Hunt CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Hannah Crook, 3, shows off her Easter basket after the egg hunt on Saturday, March 31, at Azalea Park; boys investigate a “ re engine; waiting for a turn on the moon bounce; kids are set loose; a mom helps with the hunt. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN More photos online at thewakullanews.net VisitWakullaThe Natural Place to Be in FloridaThank You to our Sponsors FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALONTake advantage of Spring/ Summer RatesAsk for our monthly specials! FEATHER LOCKS are here!! 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) We offer ”exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT HAIRSALO N Boo k You r Pr om Appoint mentNOW !10% OFFW/THIS ADEXP. 5/1/12 Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida

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By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentThe Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce understands that in order to have a strong economic environment, you must have a community that supports, nurtures and encourages growth and innovative thinking. We are blessed to have leaders, business owners, educators, as well as private citizens who recognize we all share in the responsibility of creating economic success and stability … in addition to creating a healthy environment for our children. The Chamber is taking an active approach in the countys future. Mission: The Chambers mission is to provide a forum to facilitate and build relationships among business owners. Our goal is to promote, improve and enhance the business community we serve. Area We Serve: The Chamber serves all of Wakulla County. What is the Chamber doing for our community and members? The Chamber responds to inquiries about our business community and its opportunities. € We greet newcomers to our community and guide them to our businesses and any needed resources. € We engage the business community in the public education process and actively seek input from our membership. € We provide an informational gathering center for the business community. € We are the focal point for social gatherings of the business community where an exchange of ideas and services can take place. € We are a voice to keep our elected of“ cials aware of the communitys feelings on issues affecting our business community. € We continue to be a rallying point and instrument for the promotion of plans, ideas and projects that sustain an environment conducive to free enterprise and economic growth. € We provide networking opportunities through monthly luncheons and evening mixers. By attending these events, Chamber members stay connected. The Chamber hosts ribbon cuttings and groundbreaking ceremonies with photos published in the Chamber newsletter and our local newspaper, as well as other media outlets. In addition, we focus on one business each month with the monthly Spotlight on Business column. We honor our businesses for their outstanding achievements and contributions to the community at our annual Business Excellence Awards Banquet. This year, more than 80 nominations were received … and applications have been sent to those businesses that were nominated. Continued on Page 3B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Chamber hosts its 2nd annual Low Country BoilBy PETRA SHUFFSpecial to The NewsThe Chamber held its second Annual Low Country Boil on Saturday, March 10, presented by Capital City Bank, The Wakulla News and Waste Pro. Superlube held a special fundraiser a week prior, donating $3 from every oil change to the coffers. A special thanks to Superlube; and Becca and Chuck Daugherty and Petra Shuff for manning the grills on a stormy Saturday. Our special events committee, led by Pam Allbritton, began preparations in January, and had been working diligently since then to bring this community event to Wakulla County and the surrounding area. The weekly planning sessions and phone calls promoting the boil, selling sponsorships and tickets, resulted in a sold-out event a few days before the deadline. More than 320 people checked in, and quickly filled up the arena at 3Y Ranch. We had visitors come from Live Oak, and as far away as Chicago to experience our boil. Cooking for that many people was made a lot easier this year by Mike Bettinger, who didnt hesitate to offer his help and gigantic pot. Thanks Mike! JBs Zydeco Zoo was again a crowd pleaser, and the fiery Cajun and rock tunes kept people on the dance ” oor, which was assembled by our cook crew the evening before. I think it is safe to say that everyone had a great time! A special thank you goes to local AVID students for lending a hand with set up and clean up, NROTC for their help getting everyone parked and Mary Katherine Westmark for taking pictures. We want to thank the following sponsors for their support and making this event a success: PREMIER SPONSORS: Capital City Bank, The Wakulla News and Waste Pro. CORPORATE SPONSORS: Wakulla Insurance … a division of Roger, Gunter, Vaughn Insurance, Progress Energy, Student Housing Solutions/Bridlewood Apartments, Wakulla.com, Royal Restrooms, Lamar Advertising, Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association, Tri-Eagle Budweiser, Wal-Mart and a special thank you to 3Y Ranch for furnishing our venue. AMBASSADOR SPONSORS: Shields Marina and Dry Storage, Best Western Plus, St. Marks Powder, Frances Casey Lowe Esq., Rainbow International, Refreshment Services Pepsi, WAVE 94, Mike Bettinger, Comprehensive Energy Solutions Heating and Air, Alan Brock … chairman, Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners, Wakulla L.P. Gas. TABLE SPONSORS: Centennial Bank, Crawfordville Auto and Tire, Ochlockonee Bay Volunteer Fire Department, Democratic Executive Committee, Ed Gardner O.D., Inspired Technologies, Maurice Langston and friends, Synovus Mortgage Corporation, Wakulla Realty. $100 Sponsors: Alvin Peters for Congress, Ameris Bank, Angies Marine Supplies, Auto Trim Signs and Design, Ben Withers, Blue Water Realty, Brick Launcher LLC, Brooks Concrete, Carroll Appraisal, Commissioner Jerry Moore, Cook Insurance Agency, Costco, The Donut Hole, Hydra Engineering, John and Petra Shuff, Keith Key Heating and Air, Kimberly Moore, Lisas Listings, Lube Xpert, Mikes Marine, Quill Turk, State Rep. Leonard Bembry, Stewardship Drycleaners, Super Lube, Sights and Sounds, Talquin Electric, Two Blondes Liquors & Gifts, Wildwood Country Club. We are looking forward to next year, and if you have any suggestions for improvement, please give us a shout. Presidents MessageChamber is there for local business SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Spotlight: Printing on DemandMarch luncheon Business, Page 3B Workforce Plus offers program on employment law Page 4B All eyes are on the Supreme Court and the health care lawsuit Weekly Roundup, Page 5B Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011…2012.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, April 13 Friday, April 27 Friday, May 11 Friday, May 25 Friday, June 8 Friday, June 22 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, April 5  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 6  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, April 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, April 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at 7 p.m. in the library. Tuesday, April 10  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, April 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a last 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Hwy. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350.Special EventsThursday, April 5  WORKFORCE plus’ Training Academy class on Microsoft Word will be offered from 2 to 4 p.m. at 3278 G Crawfordville Highway. Training Academy is a no-cost service where students learn to use Microsoft programs such as Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. Pre-registration is required. To register or to learn more, visit www.wfplus.org or call 1-866-WFP-JOB1.  LANDSCAPING FOR BIRDS CLASS will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. Topics covered include selecting growing the plants birds like, designing a yard setting to observe birds, and yard features that encourage birds to visit. Call (850) 926-3931 for more information. Friday, April 6  CHELSEA DIX KESSLER AND FRANK LINDAMOOD will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. This concert is a fundraising show to raise money to send them into the recording studio. Tickets are $10. For reservations, email poshjava@ gmail.com or call (850) 962-1010. This duo will perform original and traditional Old Time, Gospel, and Bluegrass music with vocals, ddle, banjo and guitar. Saturday, April 7  RELAY FOR LIFE will host a Lion Painting Festival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Azalea Park in Crawfordville. There will be food, entertainment, vendors, and painting the lion. For more information, contact Kristin Dow at kdv6@embarqmail. com or call 926-8854.  FREE DIGITAL PHOTO CLASS at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge from 9 a.m. to noon. The class is free for adults and families are welcome. The class includes the basics of photography, including how to get better results from your digital camera using presets. Digital photo classes are held in the “Nature’s Classroom” adjacent to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center. Registration is required, call 925-6121. The class is taught by Ranger Barney Parker, former FSU photography instructor.  DEMO DAY FOR NATIVE WATERCRAFT AND LIQUID LOGIC KAYAKS will be held at T-n-T Hide-a-way, on the Wakulla River and Highway 98, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 925-6412 for visit www.tnthideaway.com. Monday, April 9  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, April 10  DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will hold a public meeting at 12:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. April is Sexual Violence Awareness Month so a video, “A View from the Shadow,” will be shown which portrays the suffering of children and their families who have been sexually abused by someone they all trusted. There will also be guest speakers from the Child Protection Team, Michelle Harkness and Kendra Walker. Lunch will be provided. Call 926-9005 for more information. Thursday, April 12  WAKULLA COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. The duties and responsibilities of elected Soil and Water Conservation District Of cials will be the topic. Join committee members and representatives of both the Wakulla and Leon County Soil and Water Conservation Districts. The meeting is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m.Upcoming EventsFriday, April 13  RIBBON CUTTING for First Bank, Senior Products Division at 11:45 a.m. at the chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville.  SPRING PRODUCTION “FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO” will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae in the auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a show on Saturday night and Sunday afternoon. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission. “Final Flick at The Flamingo” by Susan Solburg roughly parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre and how it was the best teenage hang-out ever invented.  THE SARAH MAC BAND will perform at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. For reservations, contact poshjava@gmail.com or phone (850) 962-1010. Saturday, April 14  SOPCHOPPY WORM GRUNTIN’ FESTIVAL will be held in downtown Sopchoppy from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. There will be several arts and craft vendors. There will be music, demonstrations, worm gruntin’ contest, crowning of king and queen, horseshoe championship, bait casting contest, hula hoop contest and worm grunters ball. There is no cost. For more information, visit www.wormgruntinfestival.com or call 962-4138, during the daytime only.  HEIDE’S 16TH ANNUAL ROSE SALE will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Highway. Proceeds bene t homeless animals and CHAT of Wakulla. Heirloom roses in a 3 gallon container will be sold for $7 each. For more information, call 926-3849 or 926-0890. Roses will also be sold on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m.  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or email carriejstevens@ comcast.net. Children need to bring their favorite train and a good wholesome snack and drink.  FIFTH ANNUAL RALLY FOR THE CURE BREAST CANCER GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held at Wildwood Golf Course. This event is being sponsored by Capital City Bank and will bene t the Susan G. Komen Foundation. For more information, contact Karen Waters, Human Resource Director, Wildwood Golf and Inn at Wildwood, at karen.wildwood@aol.com or by phone at 926-1222 or 926-4653.  GROW MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES CLASS on Bugs and Water will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Learn to identify the good and bad insects that visit the garden and orchard. Call (850) 926-3931 for more information.  SPRING PRODUCTION “FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO” will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at the auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a show on Sunday afternoon. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission. “Final Flick at The Flamingo” by Susan Solburg roughly parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre and how it was the best teenage hang-out ever invented. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Landscaping for birds class at the extension of ce at 7 p.m. Chelsea Dix Kessler and Frank Lindamood perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Relay for Life Paint the Lion Party from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Azalea Park. Free digital photo class at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge from 9 a.m. to noon. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsMonday, April 9  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL Interim DirectorEaster weekend closing/AARP Tax Prep The library will be closed this Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7 for the Easter weekend. You can still drop off items that are due in our drop box outside. AARP will still be doing their free tax preparation in our Main Meeting Room from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday. You can only enter through the door at the south end of the building as the main part of the library will be closed. We will reopen on Tuesday, April 10. We wish all of our patrons a safe and happy long weekend. Movies based on books/Books based on movies The opening of the “ lm, Hunger GamesŽ on March 23 has caused a run of all three books in the Hunger GamesŽ trilogy at the library. This brought to mind all the great books we have that have been the basis for some classic movies and TV shows. For instance, one of my favorite shows, HBOs Game of ThronesŽ is based upon George R.R. Martins A Song Ice and FireŽ series. Five of an eventual seven books have been printed, all of which we have at WCPL. Like the TV show Bones? Then you should check out (pun intended) the series of Kathy Reichs books that the show is based upon. If youve enjoyed the Denzel Washington “ lm of a few years back, The Bone Collector,Ž did you realize that the book it was based on is only the “ rst in a bestselling series by Jeffrey Deaver? And lets not get started on all the Star WarsŽ books which continue the story from the “ lms. Great “ lms back to the early days of movies have been based on books. Many childrens “ lms have also been based on books and vice versa. Come by and take a look at our collection and “ nd out what was left out of the “ lm or how the story continues! Special Movie Showing Even though the library will be closed on Friday, April 6 for Good Friday, due to popular demand, we will be showing the acclaimed “ lm based upon the bestselling childrens novel, WarhorseŽ by Michael Morpurgo that evening. There will be a special start time of 6 p.m. for this “ lm. This “ lm directed by Hollywood legend Steven Spielberg, tells the tale of how at the outbreak of World War I, Joey, young Alberts beloved horse is sold to the cavalry and shipped to France. His rider Captain Nicholls is killed while riding Joey. The horse is soon caught up in the war; death, disease and fate take him on an extraordinary odyssey, serving on both sides before “ nding himself alone in no mans land. But Albert cannot forget Joey and, still not old enough to enlist in the British Army, he embarks on a dangerous mission to “ nd the horse and bring him home to Devon. Doors will open at 5:45 p.m. for this PG-13 (for violence) rated “ lm. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 – Page 3B S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight on Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from The Chamber held a ribbon cutting for new member LKR Communication & Translations LLC on March 7. LKR is owned by Catherine R. Cameron, who has been a resident of Wakulla County since 1976. She recently retired from the League of Southeastern Credit Unions in Tallahassee after 18 years as a bi-lingual operations assistant and previously had retired from the IBM Corporation in Tallahassee, where she was also a bi-lingual administrative specialist. LKR will be available for Spanish-English document translations, conference calls, telephone excellence trainings, and telephone voiceover recordings. You can reach LKR Communication & Translations at (850) 509-7129. Tell us about your business: We are a full service commercial printing business. Been in business in Crawfordville since 2005. More than 30 years of printing experience. What services, products do you offer? We offer all types of printing, including business cards, ” yers, brochures, carbonless forms, invitations, post cards, door hangers, full color posters up to 42-inches wide, as well as engineering plans. We also do outdoor signs and banners, screen printed Tshirts, color and black-and-white copy service, fax and rubber stamps. Free pickup and delivery. We have recently added custom rhinestones on shirts to our list of services. What sets your business apart from the competition? We are the only full service printer in the county. What should the community/customer expect when they visit your business? Competitive prices and one-on-one customer service directly from the owner of the business. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 2006. Why did you join the Chamber? The local Chamber is voice of the business community. Joining just makes good business sense. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? Networking and bulk rate mailing. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Local support for local businesses is critical to their success. Nobody likes having to drive to Tallahassee for goods and services but without local support, businesses in Wakulla County will not thrive. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Call 926-4000, email dave@printingondemand.info, or visit in person at 2650-5 Crawfordville Highway (next to Pizza Hut), or fax 926-4060.Business: Printing On Demand Name of owner: David Dill SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChamber members at the LKR ribbon cutting.Ribbon cutting held for LKR Translations Luncheon catered by HamaknockersBy PETRA SHUFFSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Extension Office graciously offered the space for the Chambers networking luncheon held Wednesday, March 28. Hamaknockers catered an outstanding buffet style lunch of superb ribs, moist tender chicken, and scrumptious pork barbecue sandwiches, accompanied by macaroni and cheese, potato salad and slaw. Jim and Candy Lowe, you certainly pulled out all the stops for us and deserve special applause! Jim, who gets quite inventive marketing his restaurant, told the attending crowd of 45 about a new gift card for purchase. The card can be purchased at Hamaknockers, and can be recharged either at the restaurant or online. A special savings comes with this card: Preload $25 and you will get a 5 percent discount, preload $50 and you will get a 10 percent discount, and $100 preloaded will get you a whopping 20 percent discount on your dining pleasure. He then surprised everyone with a $5 gift card. What a great marketing strategy! A special thanks to Brandi Blue of The Donut Hole for supplying the wonderful assortment of desserts! Ed Stauffer, one of our newest members in attendance, introduced his business, Capital City Maintenance. Ed specializes in landscaping and lawn care, and pressure steam cleaning for residential and commercial properties. Ed had also offered his expertise to the Chambers landscaping committee upon joining just last month! Thank you, Ed! Susan Schatzman won the $45 cash prize. Again, we would like to thank our members for bringing 14 items for our raf” e. Included were lotions donated by Graphic Visions, greeting cards, greenŽ shopping bags courtesy of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, a Spanish-English Dictionary from our new member LKR Communication and Translations, a travel coffee mug donated by Relay for Life, a beautiful and fun wall hanging donated by Lionel and Marianne Dazevedo, a gift certi“ cate for free service from Critter Control, an 1/8-page ad from The Wakulla News, a beautiful Easter ” ower basket from Mary at Cook Insurance and a rain barrel donated by the Extension Of“ ce. Upcoming events shared: € Les Harrison, the new director of the extension of“ ce, introduced himself, happy to be serving our community and working together. He praised his team consisting of Cathy Frank, Sherri Kraeft and Shelley Swenson, who will be offering a series of gardening classes, camps and business workshops. To learn more about these, or to register, visit www.wakulla.ifas.ufl.edu. He also informed about several featured videos, ranging from making bees wax candles to coral ardisia, a series of gardening workshops and many more. € Sherri Kraeft, local 4-H Agent, described “ ve different camps offered by 4-H, and invited everyone to join the second annual Jam 4 Camp, to be held at Hudson Park Saturday, April 28. More information again can be found on www.wakulla. ifas.u” .edu. € Cathy Frank told us about a Quilt Exhibit at the Wakulla County Historical Society, and silent auction to be held Friday, April 6. € Kristin Dow spread the word about the 11th annual Relay for Life that will be held at the Wakulla High School Track April 20-21. Relay for Life is a fundraiser of the American Cancer Society. It is a place where we celebrateŽ with those who have survived cancer, rememberŽ loved ones who have run out of time while science seeks a cure and “ ght backŽ together against a disease that has already taken too much. Relay takes place overnight for 18 straight hours because cancer never sleeps and for one night, neither do we. There are games, food, activities and entertainment including fundraising opportunities all presented in a family-friendly environment for the entire community. For more information contact Kristin Dow, event chair, 926-8854, kdv6@mail. com or visit relayforlife. org/wakulla” and visit us on facebook … Relay For Life of Wakulla. € Tammie Nason, with our local Southeast Eye Specialists, introduced their new optometrist, Sagar Amin, O.D. Dr. Amin promised to take care of your eye care needs any time you would like to visit the of“ ce at 2140 Crawfordville Highway. Continued from Page 1B If your business or organization had the honor of being nominated, please make sure your application is returned by April 16 to give our judges ample time for review. The Chamber provides its members and their employees opportunities to enhance their skills through online education through the Burt Poole Scholarship Program. We also offer brown bag luncheons geared speci“ cally to the business needs of our community. The Wakulla County Chamber truly believes that every business has a role in making our community great. We need to ensure businesses have an opportunity to thrive in every way and we provide them with the tools necessary to meet that objective. We are a voice for our businesses and that is one of the biggest bene“ ts we offer. Thank you for allowing me the time to tell you about our role in the community. Yours in service, Amy Geiger PresidentGeiger: Chamber is there for local business SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChamber ChatterNew members: Welcome Spring Creek Restaurant – specializing in seafood; Southern Storage Solutions – specializing in storage buildings; The UPS Store No. 6044 – specializing in shipping/mailing; and FSM Associates LLC – specializing in lobbying. Upcoming luncheon: April 25 at Spring Creek Restaurant. Upcoming ribbon cutting: First Bank Senior Products Division – at the Chamber of ce, Friday, April 13 at 11:45 a.m. Upcoming after hours networking: Join us for “Underwater Wakulla” hosted by Wakulla Diving Center Thursday, April 19th from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Address: 2784 Coastal Highway, Medart. Refreshments will be served. RSVP to the Chamber of ce at 926-1848.Brown Bag Lunch SeriesThe Wakulla County Chamber is partnering with Workforce Plus to bring you the Brown Bag Lunch Series, quarterly 90-minute workshops that offer employers tools and techniques necessary to lead an ef“ cient and effective workplace. Registration is free but required. Seating is limited. € Employee Retention … April 18, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. This workshop explores why employees leave, how to improve the hiring process and identifying good hiring tips. How much is retention CO$TING your business? € Con” ict Management … July 18, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. This workshop identi“ es the causes of con” ict and how to handle it in a sensible, fair and ef“ cient manner. Its not a question of ifŽ con” ict happens but rather whenŽ it occurs. € Creating a Culture of Team Success … Oct. 17, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. According to MIT Information Services and Technology, teamwork is People working together in a committed way to achieve a common goal or mission. The work is interdependent and team members share responsibility and hold themselves accountable for attaining the results.Ž Call (850) 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@ embarqmail.com. Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM • Interior Remodeling • Doors • Floors • Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling • Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsAccording to Paul Reynolds, creator of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, by the time they reach their retirement years, half of all working men in the United State will probably have a period of self-employment of one or more years; one in four may have engaged in self-employment of six or more years.Ž Participating in a new business creation is a common activity among U.S. workers over the course of their lives. Do you have goods, services and talents that you feel would be marketable to others? Do you know how to assemble a business plan, how to market and brand your product? Consider attending the series offered by the FAMU Small Business Development Center and the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension. Three sessions will be held in the series. Interested persons can attend any and all of the sessions held on April 17, April 24 and May 1 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Extension Of“ ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, in Crawfordville. The session topics are: Starting Your Business, Writing a Business Plan, and Marketing and Branding Your Business. The series is free. Call 926-3931 or e-mail sswenson@u” .edu to indicate your intent. By JASON ALDERMAN If youre worried you wont be able to pay your income taxes by this years April 17 “ ling date, dont panic. But dont ignore the deadline and certainly dont wait for the IRS to reach out to you “ rst. Acting quickly not only gives you more repayment options, it can also signi“ cantly lower penalties you might owe the government. By not “ ling your 2011 federal tax return or asking for an extension by April 17, the penalty on any taxes you owe increases dramatically … usually an additional 5 percent of taxes owed for each full or partial month youre late, plus interest, up to a maximum penalty of 25 percent. But “ le your return/extension on time and the penalty drops tenfold to 0.5 percent. Eventually, the IRS could even place a tax lien on your assets and future earnings. IRS tax repayment alternatives include: Pay by credit card. You will be charged a small convenience fee that is tax-deductible if you itemize expenses. Just be sure you can pay off your credit card balance within a few months, or the interest accrued might exceed the penalty. Short-term extension. If you can pay the full amount within 120 days, call the IRS at 800-8291040 and ask whether you qualify for a short-term extension. If granted, youll still owe interest but will avoid an application fee. Installment agreement. If you need longer, an installment agreement will let you pay your bill in monthly installments for up to “ ve years. If you owe $10,000 or less, youre guaranteed an installment agreement provided you have filed and paid all taxes for the previous “ ve years and havent had an installment agreement within that time. If you owe $25,000 or less and are in good standing, youll still likely qualify for a streamlined installment agreement. Over $25,000 you still may qualify, but may be required to “ le a detailed Collection Information Statement. Theres a $105 fee to enter an installment agreement. Its reduced to $52 if you set up a direct debit installment plan (or $43 for low-income “ lers). For rules and to apply, see the Online Payment Agreement ApplicationŽ at www. irs.gov or submit IRS Form 9465. Offer in Compromise. Under certain dire “ nancialhardship circumstances, the IRS may allow taxpayers with annual incomes of up to $100,000 to negotiate a reduction in the amount they owe through an Offer in Compromise. If youre unable to make payments on your installment agreement or offer in compromise, call the IRS immediately for alternative payment options, which could include reducing the monthly payment to re” ect your current “ nancial condition. Nothing beats staying current on your taxes, but if you fear you may fall behind, explore these options before the penalties start snowballing.Jason Alderman directs Visas “ nancial education programs. Special to The NewsThe U.S. Department of Labor and the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity released “ gures relating to Februarys unemployment numbers today. The overall unemployment rate in the Workforce Plus tri-county area of Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla is 7.4 percent, not seasonally adjusted. The unemployment data numbers re” ect an unemployment decrease of 0.3 percent since January as well as a decrease of 0.6 percent over the year. Leon and Wakulla counties both saw a decrease of 0.4 percent over the month, while Gadsden experienced a higher decrease at 0.5 percent. The Tallahassee metro area, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla and Jefferson counties, had the third lowest unemployment rate in the state behind the Crestview-Ft Walton Beach-Destin and Gainesville metro areas. Our area continues to see job growth in industries such as Information, Financial Activities, Education and Health Services, Professional and Business Services and Other Services. Florida saw its lowest unemployment rate in three years at 9.4 percent, seasonally adjusted. This “ gure represents 869,000 jobless out of the 9,295,000 labor force. The U.S. unemployment rate was 8.3 percent in February. Floridas annual job growth rate has continued to increase for the past 19 months, while the unemployment rate has decreased over the month for the past eight months. Florida is seeing job growth over the year in seven industries: trade, transportation and utilities; private education and health services; professional and business services; leisure and hospitality; “ nancial; manufacturing; and other services. Unemployment numbers are a re” ection of the overall health of the local economy, which is driven in large part by the health of area employers. That is why Workforce Plus, the leading employment and workforce authority for Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla counties, offers the Power Hour Lunch and Learn Seminar at no cost to local businesses. More than our way of giving back to the community, Power Hour is one of our responses to the need for ongoing support to businesses and employers,Ž said Kimberly A. Moore, CEO of Workforce Plus. Workforce Plus serves the multi-faceted needs of thousands of employers at no cost through its Business and Employer Services department. With Power Hour, we offer the resources needed for businesses to grow, accelerate their development and boost their bottom line.Ž Florida employers are swamped with thousands of employment lawsuits every year. Litigation is far more common than you think, because few employers arm themselves with the know-how necessary to keep their businesses and employees safe. The next Power Hour, The Employment Law Update for the Employer,Ž will provide practical steps on complying with current employment laws and avoid potential lawsuits. The seminar will take place Thursday, April 26, from 11:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. at Regions Bank on Capital Circle Northeast. Lunch is provided. Space is limited and registration is required. To register, email wfp@wfplus.org with your name and company/organization. This business luncheon is provided at no cost to attendees through a sponsorship from Regions Bank. To learn more about Power Hour other opportunities available through the Business and Employer Services department at Workforce Plus, visit www.wfplus.org or call (850) 414-6085 or toll free at (866) WFP-JOB1. For TTY/ TTD use Florida Relay Service 711. By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 30 … The states unemployment rate dipped in February to 9.4 percent, the lowest since February 2009, the state labor agency reported Friday. The rate was 0.2 percentage points lower than in January, and nearly a point and a half lower than a year ago. The Department of Economic Opportunity said, however, there remained 869,000 people looking for work out of a state labor force of just under 9.3 million, and Floridas rate remains well above the nations jobless rate of 8.3 percent. The state had more than 10,000 more jobs in February than it did in January, and DEO said the states number of jobs is up 1 percent over a year earlier. February was also a strong month for job creation nationally, and a number of economists have noted that its hard to separate how much of the job growth in any one location is rooted in the economic policies there versus just being part of the overall improving national economy. Job growth in the nation as a whole, however, has outpaced the recovery in Florida. While Florida has seen 1 percent job growth over the year, the state is actually holding the country as a whole back … the nation has seen 1.5 percent job growth in the same time period. Still, Gov. Rick Scott, who came into of“ ce promising to put creating jobs “ rst, trumpeted the latest numbers. Floridas drop in its unemployment rate and increase in private sector job creation continues to prove our state is de“ nitely headed in the right direction,Ž Scott said in a statement. The signing of my 2012 Jobs and Economic Development Package represents a signi“ cant step towards ensuring Florida is the best place in the nation to create, attract and retain jobs.Ž DEO said that 346,000 people claimed bene“ ts this past month, down from a peak of 735,000 collecting unemployment in February of 2010. The slow economic recovery is starting to be noticed in state tax collections as well. Legislative economists reported this past week that corporate income tax collections are up and that general revenue collection was higher than expected in February. For the “ scal year, general-revenue collections are $74.6 million above earlier estimates, economists said. Transportation, trade and utilities led the job growth in Florida in February, followed by the private education industry and the health care sector. Construction, however, typically a mainstay of the Florida economy, remains sluggish. The construction industry lost jobs year over year, with construction jobs down 5.1 percent from February of 2011. The drop in private construction jobs was due in part to cut backs in state government spending, DEO said. But the slow housing market remains the main culprit. Monroe County, which is the Florida Keys, continued to have the states most robust employment picture, with only 5.4 percent unemployment. Walton and Okaloosa counties in the Panhandle, both of which have large numbers of military personnel, and Alachua County, home to the University of Florida, also had low unemployment rates, all 7 percent or lower. Despite Alachua Countys relatively low unemployment rate, Gainesville was one of the few metro areas that saw a net job loss in the month. Others were Pensacola and Port St. Lucie. Flagler County continued to struggle with the states highest out-of-work rate at 12.7 percent. Also above 12 percent in unemployment in February was Hernando County. The Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater area created the most new jobs during the period, creating just under 21,000, a 1.9 percent increase. Workforce Plus offers Power Hour programs for local employersEntrepreneurship series is availableCant pay your taxes? Try these tips State unemployment drops again METRO GRAPHICS LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 – Page 5BBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 30 … First, the usual disclaimer: Its notoriously difficult to predict how the U.S. Supreme Court … or many other courts, for that matter … will decide complicated cases. But landmark Supreme Court hearings this week added fuel to the arguments of Attorney General Pam Bondi and other Florida Republicans that the 2010 federal health overhaul is unconstitutional. The Florida GOP has played a leading role in fighting the law, known as the Affordable Care Act. Former Attorney General Bill McCollum filed the constitutional challenge immediately after President Obama signed the law, and Bondi, who was elected in 2010, has become one of the overhauls most-visible critics. Conservative justices this week appeared to go along with the Republicans argument that the acts socalled individual mandateŽ is unconstitutional. That part of the law would require almost all Americans to have health insurance in 2014 or pay a penalty. Perhaps most-worrisome to the Obama administration was that Justice Anthony Kennedy, widely considered a key swing vote, seemed to have doubts about Congress authority to impose such a requirement. I understand that we must presume laws are constitutional, but, even so, when you are changing the relation of the individual to the government in this ƒ unique way, do you not have a heavy burden of justi“ cation to show authorization under the Constitution? Kennedy asked U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli. But more-liberal justices appeared to go along with the administrations argument that Congress had the power under the constitutions Commerce Clause. They said the cost of providing health care to the uninsured ultimately gets shifted to other people through higher insurance premiums. Those (uninsured) people are in commerce,Ž Justice Elena Kagan said. They are making decisions that are affecting the price that everybody pays for this service.Ž Other parts of the hearings, however, were more dif“ cult to parse. A particularly complicated question, for example, centers on whether the Supreme Court should throw out the entire 2,700-page law if it “ nds the individual mandate unconstitutional. Florida of“ cials also are watching closely to see whether justices will uphold part of the law that would lead to a major expansion of Medicaid. The Obama administration argues that Congress has always had the power to expand Medicaid eligibility. But Florida says the law is unconstitutionally coercive because it includes the possibility that states would lose billions of dollars in federal Medicaid funding if they dont go along with the expansion. Bondi, who attended the three days of hearings and made the rounds of media interviews, repeatedly expressed con“ dence that justices will side with the laws opponents. As the states have argued all along, if the federal government can compel citizens to purchase health insurance they do not want, then it can force us to purchase anything,Ž she said after the individual mandate arguments. A DIFFERENT KIND OF COURT BATTLE Back home in Tallahassee, Republican lawmakers this week approved a newly drawn Senate redistricting plan. To which the Florida Democratic Party had a pithy response: Well see you in court, party spokeswoman Brannon Jordan said immediately after the House gave “ nal approval Tuesday. The vote was the second time lawmakers have approved a Senate redistricting plan this year --and the second time judges will determine whether the map is constitutional. Earlier this month, the Florida Supreme Court upheld the Legislatures plan to revamp House districts. But it rejected the Senate maps, forcing lawmakers to again bring out their Etch A Sketches and draw new lines. While senators approved the revised map last week, some Republican House members were irked. Miami-Dade GOP House members voted against the plan because they said it didnt create a fourth Senate district that likely would be won by a Hispanic. Democrats, meanwhile, kept pounding Senate Republican leaders about creating districts that would shield incumbents from the possibility of running against each other. It kind of reminds me of the gang that couldnt shoot straight, said Rep. Franklin Sands, D-Weston. STAND YOUR GROUND UNDER FIRE The National Rifle Association has long been a powerful force in Tallahassee. But as the Sanford shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin continues to create a national furor, NRA lobbyist Marion Hammer and her legislative allies face growing pressure to revamp the states stand your groundŽ law. Theres a critical and urgent need to look at the law, and at least clarify it, or explain it, said Rep. Darryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg. Some black lawmakers have called for holding a special legislative session to deal with the law. While that appears unlikely, Rep. Dennis Baxley, an Ocala Republican who was an original sponsor of stand your ground in 2005, acknowledged that it might need to be clari“ ed. Theres nothing in the statute that provides for any kind of aggressive action, in terms of pursuit and confront, Baxley said. So I think thats been some misapplication of this statute. If anything could come out of this very tragic circumstance, it could be some clari“ cation of when this applies and how.Ž Stand your ground, which was backed by the NRA, has drawn widespread attention since neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman shot and killed Martin last month. Zimmerman, who has not been charged in the death, contends that he “ red in self-defense. The law allows people who feel threatened in public to stand their ground and use force to defend themselves, eliminating a prior responsibility to try to retreat. Questions in the Martin case center, at least in part, on whether Zimmerman pursued the teen before shooting him. Gov. Rick Scott wants to wait until the conclusion of the Martin investigation before addressing the stand-your-ground law. He has appointed an outside prosecutor, Angela Corey, to head the investigation and also has announced that a task force will later look at issues such as stand your ground. We still dont know the effect the stand-your-ground law might have in this case, so it would be premature to begin evaluating facts when more facts are yet to emerge, Scott spokesman Lane Wright said. Gov. Scott believes we need to be thoughtful and thorough as we deal with this awful tragedy, and for those reasons he will not interfere with the investigation or prematurely expedite the work of the task force.Ž QUOTE OF THE WEEK: In other words, the federal government is here saying, we are giving you a boatload of money, Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan said as Florida and other states challenged the constitutionality of a Medicaid expansion in the federal health overhaul. ƒ theres no matching funds requirement, there are no extraneous conditions attached to it, its just a boatload of federal money for you to take and spend on poor peoples health care. It doesnt sound coercive to me, I have to tell you.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: The U.S. Supreme Court heard three days of arguments in the Florida-led challenge to the federal Affordable Care Act. Justices are expected to announce their decisions in June.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)All eyes are on the Supreme CourtBy KYLE CHENEYSTATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE STATE HOUSE, BOSTON, March 30 … The nations only African-American governor, Deval Patrick of Massachusetts, this week questioned the reaction by Florida law enforcement to the shooting of Trayvon Martin, whose death last month has exploded into a national debate about racial profiling and selfdefense laws. Patrick is just the latest black politician around the nation to voice support for Martin … or at least acknowledge the troubling aspects of the case, from U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush of Illinois, who was escorted from the ” oor of Congress for wearing a hoodie in support of Martin, to New York city councilmen and New York state assemblymen who donned the same symbolic jacket, to President Obama, who said if he had a son hed look like Trayvon. White politicians have also joined in the outrage … former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm posted a picture of herself in a hoodie on her Facebook page. But Patrick has an additional insight into issues involving race, rights and justice … Patrick headed the civil rights division of the Justice Department under President Bill Clinton. Describing a sad, murkyŽ set of facts surrounding the shooting, Patrick praised the Obama administrations Department of Justice for investigating the shooting. I think its a really important thing that DOJ, civil rights division has gotten involved, and a troubling thing that law enforcement in Florida has not,Ž he said during a radio interview on WTKK. Martin was killed last month by a volunteer neighborhood watchman, George Zimmerman, while walking unarmed and wearing a hooded sweatshirt. Zimmerman has reportedly claimed that he deemed Martin suspicious and tracked him to determine where he was going. Zimmerman also claimed that the two began scuf” ing and that he “ red his weapon in self-defense. Police never charged Zimmerman, after prosecutors said they had no reason to doubt his claim that he was acting in selfdefense, and the decision shined a spotlight on Floridas self-defense statute … known as Stand Your Ground … in which residents are permitted to use deadly force if they feel they are under physical threat. Questions have emerged about whether Zimmerman, who is of Hispanic descent, racially profiled Martin, and whether police did the same by opting against charging Zimmerman. Its been moving, what the response has been, sort of across demographics,Ž Patrick said. The senselessness of this, the notion that you could look a certain way, be dressed a certain way, and be in a certain neighborhood and place your life in jeopardy on account of that is not who we want to be in this country.Ž How we layer assumptions on people is … thats an unfortunate part of life. And when you add in race, it feels particularly unfair,Ž Patrick continued. Asked by WTKK host Jim Braude whether he thinks Florida police erred in not charging Zimmerman, Patrick said, I know how important it is to review the evidence and talk to the folks and make a judgment and not just pop off based on what you read in the newspapers or see in the news.Ž Patrick added that he would veto a bill in Massachusetts similar to Floridas Stand your Ground law. Well, I dont think that bill is going to move and if it were to move, its not going to get past my desk,Ž he said. We dont need a stand your ground bill, and I dont entirely understand what the argument was for it in Florida.Ž Patrick said the shooting didnt appear to involve self-defense issues. The other part of the Trayvon case I would say that is troubling is that it didnt seem to have anything to do with standing your ground,Ž he said. It seemed more to do with a kid being in the wrong place at the wrong time or frankly in a perfectly appropriate place but being assumed to be in the wrong place and being stalked by a guy with a gun.Ž Patrick said this week it would be a tributeŽ to the Martin family if Massachusetts lawmakers passed a bill to crack down on racial pro“ ling in traf“ c stops. Those comments came on the same day that a handful of Massachusetts lawmakers donned hoodies to express solidarity with the Martin family and decry some commentary in the wake of the shooting that Martins hoodie was partly to blame for the incident.Trayvon Martin case drawing attention around countryThe second draft of new maps for the state Senate were submitted Friday to the U.S. Justice Department for “preclearance” under the Voting Rights Act. In a memo contained with the ling, the state argued that the plan easiliy complies with the act. “There cannot be any serious issue concerning discriminatory purpose in the covered counties,” the memo says. “The minority districts there largely followed the districts recommended by civil-rights groups and materially preserved the ability of minority voters in those counties to elect their preferred candidates.” The submission should give the Justice Department the full 60 days it has under the Voting Rights Act to review the proposal before candidate qualifying begins. Any changes to Florida elections law must be considered by the federal agency or a federal court before going into effect in ve counties with a history of racial discrimination. Maps for the House were submitted March 13.… News Service of FloridaSenate maps submitted to feds George ZimmermanTrayvon Martin Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain THG-11909 Wound Won t Heal?Very Aordable Therapeutic Cold Lasers Horse wound before and 6 weeks after Cold Laser Therapy1-800-742-8433www.vetrolaser.com Ask for Dr. Daniel Kamen, D.C. -Author of The Well Adjusted Horse Muscles Tendons Joints Pain Animal use onlyI noticed a tremendous decrease in post-operative inammation.Ž -Glen R., Veterinarian, New York No Dx or Clinical Outcomes Implied. Consult Licensed Veterinarian. Not Sold Where Prohibited. Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: 1) Eggs should be cooked before being dyed. Fact or Fiction? 2) Eggs may be boiled on the stovetop or in the microwave. Fact or Fiction? 3) Eggs should be pricked right before cooking. Fact or Fiction? 4) Eggs should be boiled in a single layer in the pan for even cooking. Fact or Fiction? 5) Eggs should be removed from the heat once they reach a full boil and allowed to cook in the hot water remaining. Fact or Fiction? 6) Clean hands are a must when dyeing eggs. Fact or Fiction? 7) Eggs can be decorated in many ways. Fact or Fiction? 8) Hands should be washed after handling eggs. Fact or Fiction? 9) Eggs that will be eaten later should be refrigerated once dyed. Fact or Fiction? 10) Easter eggs will remain good for a year. Fact or Fiction?Fact or Fiction?Egg Dyeing Challenge Answers: 1) Fact, 2) Fiction, the intense heat of microwaving could make eggs explode, 3) Fiction, germs could enter any holes in the shells, 4) Fact, 5) Fact, 6) Fact, oil and dirt from hands could get onto the eggshells and keep the dye from seeping into them, 7) Fact, 8) Fact, 9) Fact, 10) Fiction, they should be eaten soon after Easter Dyeing Easter eggs can be loads of fun with the right preparations. Here are some questions about dyeing Easter eggs. How many can you answer correctly? 1) F L __ W __ R P __ T 2) G R A __ __ 3) T I __ E S __ I N __ 4) B I __ __ B A __ H 5) W H __ __ L B A __ __ O W 6) L A __ N C __ A I __ 7) S __ N D __ O X Answers: 1) Flower Pot, 2) Grass, 3) Tire Swing, 4) Birdbath, 5) Wheelbarrow, 6) Lawn Chair, 7) SandboxHunting for Easter eggs can be loads of fun. Fill in the blanks to name some of the spots outside where you might find an Easter egg hidden. Name That Spot List 10 words that rhyme with “dye.” 1. ____________ 2. _____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ____________ 6. ____________ 7. __________ 8. ____________ 9. ___________ 10. ___________Some answers: by, cry, dry, eye, fly, fry, hi, lie, my, pieWHAT RHYMES WITH… COLORING PICTURE A: It went through the eggs-it. Q: How did the Easter egg get off the highway? Q: What did the Easter egg do when tickled?A: It cracked up! Jokes and Riddles Jokes and Riddles Every year, the White House holds an Easter egg roll for kids age 12 and younger. Activities range from storytelling to games and egg rolling, of course. The Easter bunny also arrives to greet the crowd. Many people believe First Lady Dolley Madison started the egg roll. She had heard about the Egyptian custom of egg rolling and planned her own event to take place on the Monday after Easter on the grounds of the Capitol building. Egg rolling on the Capitol grounds continued until 1878 when Congress decided there had been too much damage to the grounds and passed a law against it. President William Howard Taft moved the event to the White House lawn and egg rolling has been held there ever since, except during times of war and bad weather. Let ’em Roll

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Call (850) 3086473 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Efficiencies/ Cottages Crawfordville.Cottage on large wooded lot, 2BR/1BA, washer/dryer includedScreened-porch, covered carport, central heat/air. No smoking. $700/mo.+first/last. Small pet ok w/$250/deposit. 850-9263859. Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA W/2 car garage. 1.25 acres, payed sub-division in Wakulla Station, 20-mins. to Tallahassee, fenced backyard, $875/mo. plus security/cleaning deposit. Please Call (850) 566-5165 (850) 9266115 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $850, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. 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Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953 www. sunsetranch es.com Appliance Repair Appliance Repairs.All major appliances. PTAC A/C units, heat-pumps, window/wall a/c units and mini-split A/C units.Call Jerry Payne 850-5285603. Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 9263546 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 9267291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 Fictitious Name Notices 5176-0405 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS NAME Notice under Fictitious NameLaw, pursuant to Section 865-09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to Fictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices engage in business under the fictitious name of: FINE ART IMAGES & PHOTOGRAPHY located at P.O. Box 368, Crawfordville, FL 32326, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahasse, FL Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 27th of March, 2012, /s/ Kathryn V. Deal, owner Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News April 5th, 2012 Misc. Notices 5174-0405 Public Notice Christian radio Station WUJC 91.1, St. Marks will be a holding a public meeting at St. Marks Volunteer Fire Dept ., on 4/5 at 12 noon This is a general meeting that will adMisc. Notices Misc. Notices dress public issues, and any questions or concerns about WUJC. The public is invited to attend. 5138-0405 Vs. Iberiabank v.Shell Point Residences, LLC, Case No.:2011-31-CA. Amended Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices AUCTION FLORIDA PROPERTIES10% BUYER'S PREMIUM Broker Compensation Available55Thurs.,April12,1:00 P.M. EDT Tallahassee,FL Hotel Duval BANK ORDERED Member FDIC All Properties Sell Absolute Live & Online Bidding Proper es in These Counes:Bay, Dixie, Franklin, Gulf, Jackson Wakulla & Washington Coun es, FL Properes Include:Homes, Condos with Ocean Views, Gulf Front, Bay Front and other Residen al Lots; Commercial Buildings, Acreage Tracts & Restaurant. Detailed Informa on johndixon.com 800.479.1763FLAL# AB-0001488 BIG YARD SALE! NO EARL Y BIRDSNO EARL Y BIRDS A Reverse Mortgagemay help you start enjoying life!Learn more. You may be eligible for a special mortgage program under the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008Ž. Call LocallyMichael J. Weltman, MBA, CSA (850) 556-6694NMLS #459867 MyRetirementMortgage.com Come meet Mr. Weltman at the Old Courthouse, Wakulla Chamber Of“ce on April 13, 11:45AM for the Chamber of Commerce Ribbon Cutting Event! SpringYARD & Bake Sale! Fri-April 6 & Sat-April 7 Fri-April 13 & Sat-April 14 Fri-April 20 & Sat April 217AM-Until... Rain or Shine! household items, kitchen appliances, dishes, clothes, books, games, furniture and a little bit of everything!!

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 415 Mashes Sands Rd. on Ochlockonee Bay 3 Bdr./ 2 ba $825. Pets with Deposit No smoking. 6 River Cove Bay view 2 Bdr. 1 ba Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit62 Sylvania Drive -St. Marks 2 Bd/2ba with Sun room. Includes attached In-Law Suite 1 Bd/1ba with kitchen. $1,800 mo. No smoking, No pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3Bd/2Ba MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres – $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Available April 1st. COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.2011-31-CA IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, Plaintiff, vs. SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 12, 2011, entered in Case No. 2011-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, is the Plaintiff, and SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, and all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against any defendant named herein, are the Defendants. The Wakulla County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in Wakulla County, Florida, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, April 26, 2012, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBITS AŽ AND BŽ IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THIS SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. WITNESS, my hand and the seal of this Court on February 21, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND,As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A LOTS 7, 10, AND 11, BLOCK A, AND LOTS 1 THROUGH 5, LOTS 7 THROUGH 10 AND BEACH CLUB LOT, ALL IN BLOCK B, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND ALL OF BLOCK C, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND PHASE 2 MARINA BASIN RESERVATION AREA BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19, SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA, COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 85.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 133.17 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 103.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 08 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.19 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 06 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 13 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 61.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 42.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 20.61 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 23.63 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.66 FEET, TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 902.73 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 114.91 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 51 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 114.83 FEET) TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 73.91 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 34 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 34.93 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 34.61 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 129.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 38.38 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 32.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 63.07 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 110.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 6.13 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 165.37 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.70 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 58.84 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 2.47 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 67.44 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 94.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.08 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.20 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 33.94 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 43.86 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.79 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 70.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 79.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 64 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 159.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 86.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 41.89 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 16.70 FEET, THENCE CONTINUE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID LINE. A DISTANCE OF 50.64 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 22 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 65.42 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 107.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 10.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 168.31 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 156.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 21.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 01 SECOND EAST A DISTANCE OF 47.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 19.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 40.71 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 23.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 17.23 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 101.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.26 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 86 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 74.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.59 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 54.46 FEET, Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices THENCE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 211.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 3.12 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CANALS BEGIN AT AN IRON PIN (LB #732) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 219.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 68.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 15.75 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS FOLLOWS: THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 9.88 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 45.34 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 62.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 135.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 189.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 60.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 60.11 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 60.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 60.21 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 11 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 130.83 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 75.56 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 92.14 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 60.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 52 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 60.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 60.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 06 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECOND WEST 60.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.01 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 117.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 30.16 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 104.63 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 115.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 130.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 44 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 60.01 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 51 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 60.12 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.56 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 23.22 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 04 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 100.03 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 99.61 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREE 12 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 100.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 7.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 543.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 260.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 474.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 121.54 FEET, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 21 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 99.10 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 364.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 275.66 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AND RUN THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 125.05 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1327.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-1Ž BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1198.08 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 43.11 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1167.13 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 875.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-2Ž COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1300.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 510.98 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF UNIT NO. 1 SHELL POINT BEACH AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 24 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 524.15 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH BOUNDARY AND RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 86.02 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 540.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 22 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 209.18 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 207.88 FEET), THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 370.90 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 606.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 227.66 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 226.32 FEET) THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.08 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1113.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 54 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 126.59 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 08 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 126.52 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 79 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 233.41 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 3154.71 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 225.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 1234.99 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP #4261, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 252.34 FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF UNIT 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED. THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 701.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1501.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 34.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 1244.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 43.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL GŽ BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 117 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 491.62 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 RIGHT OF WAY) SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RAForeclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DIUS OF 922.37 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 52 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 07 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 838.76 FEET. (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 23 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 810.15 FEET), THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.13 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1179.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 03 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 29 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 69.46 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 69.45 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 561.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL BŽ BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 6 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO.6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 11.38 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 59 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 77.70 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 71.66 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 78.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 68.91 FEET, THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 30.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 8.44 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 13.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 THENCE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 357.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CŽ COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 92.24 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 64.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 27.54 FEET TO A IRON PIN LB#732, THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 37.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 27.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 53.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 31.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 29.69 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 25.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 23.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 63.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 11.19 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 18.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 17.75 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 32 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 112.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 42 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 45.46 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 46.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 68.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 34 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 53.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 40.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 72.69 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 25.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL DŽ COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 20.04 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 35.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 125.12 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 17 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 40.23 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 43.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 24.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 29 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 40.19 FEET, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 40.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL EŽ COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 8 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 201.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 19.43 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WA TER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 82.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 74.72 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 98.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 27.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 55.73 FEET, THENCE NORTH 22 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 93.65 FEET, THENCE NORTH 33 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 66.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 38 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 71.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 54.73 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 27.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 31.36 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 69.32 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 36.26 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 44 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 33.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 60.58 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 32 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 74.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 56.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 54.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 54.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 55.86 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 37.68 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 71.03 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 64.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 58.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 80 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 3.81 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 106.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 70.26 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 39 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 61.74 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 79.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 11.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 53.06 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 47.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 28 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 66.67 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 55.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 41.17 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 68.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 18.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 60.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 48.54 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 190.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL FŽ BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER (ALSO THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER) OF LOT 24 UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED, AND RUN THENCE ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 324.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 56 SECONDS EAST 220.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 8.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 8.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 95.91 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY AND RUN ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 07 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 18.42 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 – Page 9B 26.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 29.89 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 65 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 31.85 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 37.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST 54.72 FEET, THENCE NORTH 77 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 54.99 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 47.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 56 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 31.43 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 35.33 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 22.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 75.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 65.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 65.38 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 36 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 53.31 FEET, THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 30.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 50.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 51.23 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 72.12 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 166.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXHIBIT B PERSONAL PROPERTY Shell Point Residences, LLC, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; Shell Point Investments, LLC; and Shell Point Reserve, LLC; and Shell Point 12, LLCs right, title and interest in the following described property pursuant to the Mortgage, and as such terms are defined therein: (i) all buildings, structures and improvements of every nature whatsoever now and hereafter on said Premises, (ii) all insurance policies, leases, subleases and other agreements affecting the use, enjoyment or occupancy of the Premises heretofore or hereafter entered into and all accounts, r ents, revenues, issues, profits and all proceeds from the sale or other disposition of such agreements accruing and to accrue from said Premises, (iii) all gas, steam, electric, water and other heating, cooking, refrigerating, lighting, plumbing, ventilating, irrigating and power systems, machines, building materials, appliances, furniture, equipment, goods, inventory, supplies, fixtures and appurtenances and personal property of every nature whatsoever, which now or may hereafter pertain to or be used with, in or on said Premises, even though they may be detached or detachable, (iv) all easements, rights-of-way, licenses, privileges, gores of land, streets, ways, alleys, passages, sewer rights, waters, water rights, permits, development rights and powers and all estates, rights, titles and interests in any way belonging, relating or appertaining to the Premises, (v) all Accounts, Goods, Chattel Paper, Deposit Accounts, Farm Products, Instruments, Documents, General Intangibles, Inventory, Consumer Goods, Equipment, Fixtures and Investment Property, as the foregoing terms are defined in the Uniform Commercial Code, and all contract rights, franchises, books, records, plans, specifications, approvals and actions which now or hereafter relate to, are derived from or are used in connection with the Premises, or the use, operation, maintenance, occupancy or enjoyment thereof or the conduct of any business or activities thereon, (vi) all the tenements, hereditaments, appurtenances, reversions and remainders belonging or pertaining to the Premises, (vii) any and all judgments, awards, settlements, claims, demands, payments, proceeds or other income arising in connection with the Premises, (viii) any items described in those certain UCC-1 Financing Statements of even date herewith between Mortgagor and Mortgagee and (ix) any extensions, additions, increases, substitutions, replacements, parts, accessions, improvements, betterments, proceeds, products and renewals to any of the aforesaid property, whether now existing or hereafter arising, all of the foregoing being included in the term PremisesŽ, it being the intention of Mortgagor and Mortgagee that this Mortgage (which is to be filed for record in the real estate records of the county mentioned above) shall also constitute a security agreement and financing statement as to the Premises herein mortgaged under the Florida Uniform Commercial Code, and that Mortgagee have all rights and remedies of a secured party thereunder. March 1 & 8, 29, & April 5, 2012 5138-0405 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5162-0405 vs. Collene Avery Case No. 2011-2099CA IN THE CIRCUIIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2011-299-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN HE IRS, BENEFICIARIES, AND DEVISEES OF COLLEN C. AVERY, DECEASED; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF COLLEEN C. AVERY; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF PUBLICA TION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, AND DEVISEES OF COLLENE C. AVERY, DECEASED; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF COLLENE C. AVERY; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the followingdescribed real property located in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, and 186, Block 35, of the Town of Sopchoppy, East Side, as shown by map, or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. has been filed against You. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Edward W. Dougherty, Jr., Esquire and April A. Bentley, Esquire, the Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is IGLER & DOUGHERTY, P.A., 2457 Care Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32308, on or before April 25, 2012, and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If the defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. published two (2) times in the Wakulla News March 29, April 5 2012 5164-0405 Vs. Osvaldo Urbay Case # 65-2011-CA-000180 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000180 Division: 5168-0405 vs. Gibson, Tracy R. Case 2008-FC-130 Amended Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2008-FC-130 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L..P. FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. Plaintiff, vs. TRACY R. GIBSON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OFHOUSING ANDD URBAN DEVELOPMENT; STATE EMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 26thday of April, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. lobby of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 8 of a replat of Pelican Bay, subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 3, page 77 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 20th day of March 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later tha seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis Deputy Clerk March29 & April 5, 2012 5168-0405 5171-0412 Vs. Doyle, James. A. Case No. 2011-260-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-260-CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC 7360 S. KYRENE ROAD, TEMPE, AZ 85283 Plaintiff vs. JAMES A. DOYLE, JR., SIMONE C. DOYLE, BENEFICIAL FLORIDA, INC., and CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment For Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT AŽ, TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1995 66 x 28 REDMAN MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBER: 146M8923. Commonly known as: 70 Roberts Williams Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the W akulla County Court house, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy, Crawfor dville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), on the 3rd day of May, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ Commence at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Lot 87 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run North 17 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds West along the East boundary of said Lot 87 (as monumented) # distance of 1605.25 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 72 degrees 20 minutes 39 seconds West 536 feet to the center point of a cul-de-sac having a radius of 50.00 feet said point also lying on the centerline of a 60.00 foot wide roadway and also marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 17 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds East along the centerline 534.22 feet to a point lying on the intersection with the centerline of another 60 foot wide roadway, thence run South 72 degrees 21 minutes 14 seconds West along centerline 536.06 feet to a point, thence leaving said centerline run North 17 degrees 15 minutes 35 seconds West 534.72 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument, thence run North 72 degrees 21 minutes 14 seconds East 536.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 50.00 foot radius cul-de-sac lying over and across the Northeasterly portion thereof. ALSO SUBJECT TO A 60.00 foot wide roadway lying over and across the Easterly and Southerly 30.00 feet thereof. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 5 and 12, 2012 5172-0412 Vs. McClain Kerri; Case No. 11-304-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON f/k/aTheBank of New York Trust Company National Association, as Trustee, Successor Trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, As Trustee, By Its Servicer Associates Housing Finance LLC f/k/a Ford Consumer Finance Company, Inc., By its Duly Authorized Attorney-in-Fact, Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc., Under the Power of Attorney Dated and Executed November 18, 2010 Case Number:11-304-CA Plaintiff, vs. KERRI McCLAIN; GREGORY McCLAIN, et al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of foreclosure dated 5177-0412 vs. Yeomans, Leslie; Case No. 65-2009-CA-000123 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000123 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-C, Plaintif, vs, LESLIE L. YEOMANS; JAMES YEOMANS; CACV OF COLORADO, LLC Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Please publish in THE WAKULLA NEWS ) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 20th, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000123, of the Circuit Court of the second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/ATHE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-C is Plaintiff and LESLIE L. YEOMANS; JAMES YEOMANS; CACV OF COLORADO, LLC; are defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale IN THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, FL 32327 at 11:00 a.m., on the 26th day of April 2012; the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 32, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 111, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, as Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who n eeds any accommodations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 5th and 12th, 2012 5177-0412 5165-0405 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON APRIL 21, 2012 at 10:00a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: DOMINIC ROLLINS BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF APRIL 21 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. March 29, April 5 2012 5165 0405 5175-0412 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida StatuesŽ, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday,April 19, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of 1 Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Kim Jackson Before the sale date of April 19th, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 February 16 & 23, 2012. 5126-0223 Self Storage Notices 5173-0412 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage FaSelf Storage Notices Self Storage Notices cility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, April 21, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Jessica Tucker Brenda Merrill Before the sale date of Saturday, April 21st, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. April 5th & April 12, 2012 5173-0412 FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. OSVALDO URBAY; FRANCISCA LORENZO-URBAY; BUNTING NEIGHBORHOOD PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated March 7th, 2012 entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000180, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein, FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and OSVALDO URBAY; FRANCISCA LORENZO-URBAY; BUNTING NEIGHBORHOOD PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. at lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, FL 32327 on the 12th day of April, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK KŽ, OF SONGBIRD PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 113-116, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of : 23 SWIFT PASS, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on March 19th, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL at least 7 working days before your secheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 29, April 5, 2012 March 8, 2012, entered in Case No.11-304-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, Brent X. Thurmond as the Clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at public sale at the courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Wakulla County in Crawfordville, Florida with the sale commencing at 11:00AM on the 19th day of April 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: Legal Description: Lot 9, Block EŽ, Springwood, Phase 1, A subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 2, pages 74 and 75 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. To include: 2002 Oakwood Home, serial numbers GAFL234A75364CY21 and GAFL234B75364CY21. Address: 64 Springwood Boulevard, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of March, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, April 5th and 12th, 2012 5172-0412 5158-0329 Vs, Spears Small Engines Case No. 11167-CA Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-167-CA CENTENNIAL BANK,as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. SPEARS SMALL ENGINES, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, ESTATE OF LEASTON LAMAR SPEARS, DAVID SPEARS AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, and all Others Claiming By and Through Named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 7, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerk’s Of ce, of the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 11:00 a.m the following described property: See Exhibit “A” attached hereto and made a part hereof. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as the date of the Lis Pendens, must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON March 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court /s/ by Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT “A” Commercial Building/Engine repair and Tire Store Begin at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Block “A” isolated in the Town of Crawfordville, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Deed Book “C & D”, Page 572 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 24 seconds East 76.27 feet to a concrete monument on the maintained right-ofway boundary of a county graded road, thence run South 89 degrees 39 minutes 36 seconds West along said maintained rightof-way boundary 123.41 feet to a concrete monument thence run North 00 degress 20 minutes 24 seconds West 7.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run West 75.00 feet to the Easterly right-of-way boundary of Tallahassee street, thence run North along said right-of-way boundary 110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run East 49.50 to a concrete monument, thence run North 9.50 feet to a concrete monument, thence run East 148.50 feet to a concrete monument on the East boundary of said Block “A” isolated, thence run South along said East boundary 49.50 feet to the Point of Beginning. March 29, 2012 April 5, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Brain Teaser 1 14 17 25 34 39 43 46 61 65 68 2 20 26 55 3 27 56 4 23 40 57 5 35 47 51 21 48 6 15 18 28 44 52 62 66 69 7 24 36 53 8 37 49 58 22 29 41 54 9 16 19 42 63 67 70 10 30 38 50 11 31 45 59 12 32 60 13 33 64ACROSS1.Airlinethat introduced transatlantic service,forshort 6.Numero__(firstrate) 9.Notthese 14.Safehavens 15.Componentof solder 16.Wordstoa hitchhiker 17.Reefmaterial 18.Ramblermfr. 19."Dallas"family name 20.Workingstiff'sstint, perhaps 23.LyricistGershwin 24.Slangyaffirmative 25.Cominginto existence 29.Fertilizeringredient 34.Bunyan's tool 35.Squirrel'ssnack 38.Height:Prefix 39. OfficerCandidate Schoolgrad, perhaps 43.__Nostra 44.Cul-__ (dead-end street) 45.She raisedC ain 46.Exitone'scocoon 49.LouGrantportrayer 51.Easyvictory 54.Before,tobards 55.1955Marilyn Monroe movie,with "The" 61.38thparallelland 62.Chemist'shangout 63."TheHighwayman" poetAlfred 65. Gathertogether 66.Right-anglebend 67.Filmcowboy Gene 68.Irascible 69. Getthepicture 70.Acknowledgedthe nationalanthemDOWN1.DCfund-raisingorg. 2.Datingfrom 3."StoneyEnd" composerLaura 4.HesackedRomein 410 5.Subjecttoabuse 6.BrighamYoung's state 7.Spockportrayer Leonard 8.Whenprom pted 9."Tommy"band 10.Hockeygreat Gordie 11.SheriffTaylor'skid 12.Droptothebottom 13.Chang'sSiamese twin 21. OldTV's"__ Derringer" 22.Sancesound 25.1933-41veepJohn __Garner 26.Self-evidenttruth 27.Touchortaste 28.Sondheim's "Sweeney__" 30.Beachgoer's acquisition 31.PilgrimJohn,who courtedPriscilla 32.MartinorMcQueen 33.Jobofferer 36.Charlotteof "Bananas" 37.AMEXcounterpart 40.Cornunit 41.Onein thekiddie pool,perhaps 42.Ovoidwind instruments 47.__spoon(diner) 48.Foreverandaday seemingly 50.Embark,asona journey 52. "BlackVelvet" singerAlannah__ 53.Familyofearly Americanpainters 55. "You'vegot__ nerve!" 56.Bullpenstats 57.Onepieceofa three-piecesuit 58.Uptothejob 59.Prefixmeaning "cell" 60.Heftysandwich 61.Herriman's"Krazy" feline 64.OneoftheChaplins American Prole Hometown Content 3/11/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 23 4 5647 489 34 26 75 8927 7 94 4563 2718 200 9 HtCtt 718 2936 4 5 592614738 436857912 345 172896 279468351 861935427 157 389264 984526173 623741589 P A C N A N C E K A T A S O F A X I O M S O M E N Y R O S E N S E E R A S A L A R I C E A R V E S T M A L T R E A T G R E A S Y Y A N C Y E O N U T A H T O D D M Y L E S N I M O Y R A E P E A L E O N C U E N Y S E A B L E R A P W A D E R T H E W H O O C A R I N A S H O W E T A N S E T O U T O P I E A L D E N C Y T O S I N K S T E V E H E R O E N G H I R E R S Y D Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic H wy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsYour Better Business Bureau investigates thousands of scams every year. Our new Scam Source (www. bbb.org/scam) is a comprehensive resource on scam investigations by your BBB. Here are nine common scams weve seen this year, and our Scam of the Year. € Top Job Scam: Many job scams are designed to steal your identity. One requires candidates to “ ll out a credit reportŽ or bank information for direct depositŽ when offered a job. There is no job; the online forms are just a way to steal personal data. € Top Sweepstakes and Lottery Scam: Congratulations! Youve won millions! To claim it, you only have to send the company hundreds or thousands. A popular example this year was an email claiming to be from Mark Zuckerberg announcing the recipient won $1 million from Facebook. € Top Social Media/Online Dating Scam: Some links prompt you to upgrade your Flash playerŽ to view videos. Instead, the “ le you download contains a worm that sends out similar links and searches for your personal data. € Top Home Improvement Scam: Traveling contractors move around to keep a step ahead of the law and angry consumers. The worst move in after a natural disaster, taking advantage of desperate homeowners. Start with www.bbb. org/search to find trustworthy contractors. € Top Check Cashing Scam: One check cashing scam begins with someone wanting to buyŽ something youre selling. Scammers send you a check for more than the purchase price, and ask you to wire them the difference. Their check bounces a few days later, leaving you out the money you wired. € Top Phishing Scam: Phishing scams steal personal information through an email that installs a virus on your computer, a phone call or letter. A prevalent email in 2011 claims an electronic transaction did not go through. Clicking the link downloads malware or steals your information. € Top Identity Theft Scam: You get a call in your hotel room in the middle of the night. The front deskŽ claims a problem with the computer requires your credit card number again. The call is actually from someone outside the hotel stealing your information. € Top Financial Scam: Websites claim to offer mortgage relief but ask for an upfront fee. Some helpŽ by doing things you could easily do yourself free, and most leave you in even more debt than before. € Top Sales Scam: Penny auctions are popular because they seem to offer items below retail. But you pay for each bid even if you dont win. Although not all penny auctions are scams, some are being investigated as online gambling. BBB suggests treating them as you would a casino. For additional information and advice you can trust to stay safe from scams, start with bbb.org.Special to The NewsIf youre just beginning to think about your 2011 income tax return, youve got a late start … but its still not too late to cash in on some savings. A lot of the deductions associated with the economic stimulus package will disappear in 2012, so if you want to take advantage of them, youve got only until Dec. 31,Ž says Jessica James, CPA and author of Justice for None (www.AuthorJessicaJames.com), an insider look at IRS tactics in a tax fraud investigation and trial. But, she says, theres still plenty of time for some other measures to ease your share of the tax burden. Now is also a good time to resolve to start earlier in 2012 to minimize that years tax bill. Here are some tips savings: € Contribute to retirement accounts. If you havent already put money into your traditional or ROTH IRA account for 2011, youve got until April 17 to do it. If you have a Keogh or SEP (Simpli“ ed Employee Pension Individual Retirement Arrangement for businesses), and you get a “ ling extension to Oct. 15, youve got until then to make your 2011 deposits. The maximum IRA contribution for 2011 is $5,000, or $6,000 if youre 50 or older by the end of the year. For self-employed people, the maximum for SEPs and Keoghs for 2011 is $49,000. € Dont fear the home office deduction. In the past, many tax “ lers didnt claim a home of“ ce deduction because it was seen as an IRS red ” ag. But the requirements and forms have been clari“ ed so people can do that properly … and not make mistakes that can lead to an audit. Also, the rules have been expanded so more people can claim the deduction. If you use a home of“ ce exclusively for business, even if you dont meet your clients there, youre eligible. For instance, a handyman who does his work other peoples houses can claim the deduction if he does his paperwork at his home of“ ce. Another change is that, in the past, if you claimed 10 percent of your home as an of“ ce, that amount would not be included in the $250,000 tax-free pro“ t from the homes sale thats allowed for an individual by the IRS. Be sure to make your claim reasonable, or it will get questioned; a $25,000 home of“ ce deduction for a business with $50,000 annual gross revenue is not reasonable. € Maximize your Flexible Spending Account. The Health Care Act will limit the maximum you can put into these pre-tax medical expense accounts in 2013. So 2012 is the last year to use an FSA to pay for orthodontics and other large medical expenses using pre-tax earnings. A medical expense ” exible spending account, or FSA, allows you to use before-tax earnings to pay for medical or health care expenses not covered by your health insurance. Assuming a 25 percent tax rate, you avoid $25 in taxes for every $100 you spend from your FSA. € Need to sell an investment? Next year may be the time. The Tax Relief Act maintains the tax rate cap on capital gains and dividends at 15 percent through 2012. In 2013, the cap for capital gains will increase to 20 percent and for dividends, 39.6 percent. The Health Care Act also created a 3.8 percent Medicare tax on investment income, effective in 2013. Given those scheduled increases, plan to take advantage of the rates next year. James is an author pseudonym used because she fears her novel may provoke IRS retaliation. She says that, though she was innocent of any wrongdoing, she was coerced into accepting a plea deal by the IRS, which was bent on amassing adjudications of guilt to justify the investigations expense. She pled guilty to a count of falsifying a tax return and continues to work as a CPA.Looking for 2011 tax relief? There’s still time METRO GRAPHICSBetter Business Bureau names top scams of 2011 We add an important bene“t to our free debit cards. Instant. The bene“t of our free instant-issue debit card is that you can get it today and use it today. Its that easy. And with Centennial Bank, you can also use any ATM in the country, free*. Any ATM at all. Just a few more ways we offer banking that comes to you.*Some restrictions may apply. See bank for details. Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Dr. Mark McCoyFebruary 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromYou dont “nd this type of thing in larger cities. is is a great advertising! More people need to advetise like this.Ž…Dr. Mark McCoy OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much!



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAs part of Florida Archaeology Month, the Florida Public Archaeology Network held several public lectures to encourage people to learn more about archaeology and the history of the state, entitled, Creeks, Conquistadors and Confederates: Archaeology of the Big Bend. One of these lectures featured retired archaeologist with the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research, Jim Dunbar, and his work at two different sites, Wakulla Springs Lodge and PageLadson. The digs performed at these sites yielded evidence of the rst Ice-Age Floridians, dating back to around 14,500 years ago. To know where were going, we have to know where we have been, Dunbar said. For more than 70 years, it was believed that the Clovis period, or early Paleo-indian, which dates back to 13,000 to 13,500 years ago, was the oldest occupation in the Americas, Dunbar said. That theory has now gone away, with several sites all over the Americas dating older than the Clovis, he added. The Wakulla Springs and Page-Ladson sites are two of these sites which date to pre-Clovis. Wakulla Springs has a long archaeological history, with 55 recorded sites on the property and a variety of types represented, including Paleo-indian kill sites, campsites, village areas and a mount/village complex. In the underwater caves, mastodon bones have also been found. In the 1850s, people discovered mastodon bones at Wakulla Springs and started taking them out of the springs. It became a popular thing, Dunbar said. In 1930, a Florida Geological Survey was done at Wakulla Springs and mastodon bones were discovered. The large animal was put back together and now resides at the Florida Museum of Natural History, Dunbar said. In 1935, two different sites proved the evidence of Pleistocene people in the Americas, which was 2 million to 10,000 years ago, and when large animals, such as the mastodon roamed. From 1955 to 1957, divers explored the caves at Wakulla Springs, nding many artifacts. But because the people kept the artifacts, Dunbar said it isnt known what exactly came out of Wakulla Springs. There was great potential being seen at Wakulla Springs, but it never caught re, Dunbar said. Continued on Page 2APublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7BINDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 13th Issue Thursday, April 5, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe WakullanewsOBITUARIES Arthur T. Anderson Bonnie Marie Linton Mobley Frances Lowe Waldby JENNIFER JENSENArchaeologist Jim Dunbar at last weeks lecture on nds from 2008 dig at Wakulla Springs.Dig uncovers evidence of Ice Age humans SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWAKULLA SPRINGS DIG: Watching the progress are Tom Scott of the Florida Geological Survey (now retired), Jim Dunbar of the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research (now retired), W. Jack Rink McMaster of the University Hamilton-Canada and, in the pit, Harley Means of the Florida Geological Survey inspecting the stratigraphy and preparing to take samples.Bike Florida tours Wakulla County, stays at Wildwood Inn By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAlthough Commissioner Randy Merritt does not have the full support of the Wakulla County Commission to allow variances within the 35-foot wetland buffer, some are willing to discuss the possibility. Commissioner Lynn Artz has made it clear she would not support allowing variances within the buffer. Artz said most of the people she has spoken with are happy with the ways things are. They see risk with changes, Artz said. Merritt was proposing establishing a mechanism for people to apply for a variance to develop within the 35-foot buffer, which is the part of the total 75-foot zone that is closest to the wetlands. Commissioner Alan Brock said, At this time, as its written, I dont anticipate supporting it. Commissioner Jerry Moore was on board with Merritt and Commissioner Mike Stewart said he would be willing to discuss it, but was unsure if he would support it. Merrit said, I dont think this 35 feet is touched by God. Brock pointed out that there are several variances for different access already in place, such as those for building a boardwalk or dock. Merritt said this would allow someone to build a home inside the buffer, instead of having to build a smaller home. To not allow someone to build on their own land is a taking of personal property, he said at a previous meeting. Continued on Page 3ABoard discusses wetlands, but no decision reached Commissioner Lynn Artz said most people shes spoken with are happy with the way things are.FILE PHOTO By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netHundreds of tourists on bicycles made their way through Wakulla County last week, stopping off at the Ochlockonee River State Park and the City of Sopchoppy on their way to Wildwood Inn and Country Club, where hundreds of tents were pitched on the golf courses driving range and along the cart path on the rst hole. Bicyclists also camped inside at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, while some took it easier with accommodations at the Inn at Wildwood and Best Western. Several vendors set up, and meals were being served to the bicyclists in the country clubs restaurant. And numerous local of cials made the rounds, welcoming the bicyclists to the county. Tourist Development Council Director Pam Portwood was offering information on Wakulla, and Chamber of Commerce President Amy Geiger introduced herself and welcomed the riders. St. Marks Mayor Chuck Shields and City Manager Zoe Mansfield were also on hand. Bike Florida tourists Ed and Paulette Bernstein from Huntsville, Ala., said they were enjoying themselves. All the people in the little towns are very friendly, said Ed Bernstein. The tour trucks luggage from spot-to-spot while the bicyclists travel 50 to 60 miles a day. Theres outdoor camping, indoor camping or, as the Bernsteins do, theres hotel rooms for those who dont want to rough it after a days ride. The Bernsteins said that they enjoy the scenery as well as meeting other riders. Continued on Page 2AVISIT WAKULLA: A village of tents, left, set up on the driving range at the Wildwood golf course for the Bike Florida tourists. Paulette and Ed Bernstein, below, from Huntsville, Ala., were two of the riders, but said they preferred staying in a hotel after a days ride.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Easter Egg HuntPhotos, Page 14A Happy Easter!

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Continued from Page 1A From 1984 to 1997, Dunbar worked the site at PageLadson. They found tusks with cut marks, int, gourd seeds, and lithics which are artifacts made out of stone. The gourd seeds dated back 14,500 years ago, Dunbar said. In the Aucilla River at Page-Ladson, they found int blades that were not diagnostic of a certain time period, Dunbar said. They also found spearheads. In 1995, Calvin Jones found a large stone blade and Clovis spear points used during the Paleo-indian period while the Wakulla Springs Lodge was being renovated. Dunbar said after nding artifacts at Page-Ladson, they wanted to see if there were any artifacts like what they found somewhere else, some that were diagnostic enough. So, in 2008, Dunbar and his team set out to date the piece Jones had found at Wakulla Springs and also look for other artifacts. The Public Lands Archaeology Program in the Bureau of Archaeological Research was awarded a grant from National Geographic Society. The Wakulla Springs Lodge site was the only known site that yielded a distinctive type of artifact assemblage in an undisturbed context that likely dated back to the rst appearance of humans in Florida. Dunbar said in two different pits, they found diagnostic artifacts. In one pit, the artifact was Clovis related. In the other pit that was at the same depth Jones made his discovery, they found a projectile point that was similar to the ones found at Page-Ladson. What was found was a large Simpson-like preform. This was used to make tools. Dunbar said the people would ake a rock, called int knapping, to form tools. This pre-form was never finished, but looks like it was probably a skinning knife, he said. In that same pit, they found a scraper that was diagnostic with Paleo-indian. All these items were dated and Dunbar said the youngest possible age the Clovis point could be was 12,700 years ago. The youngest possible date of the deeper artifact was 13,500 years ago. Those dates are the youngest possible, Dunbar said. If the median age is taken, that would date them at 14,500 years ago, which is the same age as those artifacts found at Page-Ladson, he said. Theres not too many places in the Americas where you can say pre-Clovis people stood, Dunbar said. The Page-Ladson and Wakulla Springs sites are two of those places. In Florida, they are seeing, for the rst time, evidence that humans were here 14,500 years ago. The Native American culture in the Americas is a lot more diverse than we ever thought to be, Dunbar said. Dunbar said the distribution of sites across the Panhandle suggests a very healthy human population in North Florida during the pre-Clovis time period. Dunbar said he will return to the Page-Ladson site this summer to con rm the dates of the artifacts. During the Ice Age and Pleistocene period, Dunbar said Wakulla Springs looked a lot different than it does today. What Wakulla Springs is today, was probably a sink hole, Dunbar. The water tables were much lower and there was no flowing river and the sink hole acted as a watering hole for animals and prime hunting ground for predators, he said. When the glaciers started receding, environments didnt stay the same. Climates probably changed every 200 to 1,000 years, Dunbar said. Were spoiled today with a constant environment, Dunbar said. The environmental change, stress and ef ciency of hunters were what probably lead to the extinction of the larger animals seen during the Pleistocene period, he said. Florida lost almost 50 percent of its species during this time. They either moved out or became extinct, Dunbar said. The humans got to stay on survivor island, and the big animals didnt, Dunbar said. Dunbar said he hopes to be able to go back to the Wakulla Springs site, but it will depend on research grants. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDig uncovers new evidence of Ice Age humans at Wakulla Springs WORKERS ON DIG: A group shot of those who participated in the 2008 dig, including Phil Gerrell, Rachael Porter, Grayal Farr, Jim Dunbar, Jessi Halligan, Ed Green, Tom Kelley, Micah P. Mones, Madeleine Carr, John Roberts, C. Andrew Hemmings, Kevin Porter, Palmer Carr and David Thulman. Continued from Page 1A They said theyve met riders on this tour who are from Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, California and Canada. Its wonderful, said Paulette Bernstein. She added that she always feels safe on the tours. This was day 6 of the weeklong Forgotten Coast Tour, and featured a ride from Apalachicola to Medart, a 58-mile ride. There were rest stops at Ochlockonee State Park, where Keep Wakulla County Beautiful was on hand to provide water and food. At Posh Java in Sopchoppy, riders were treated to a bit of worm gruntin by the Revells. More than 600 bicyclists took part in the more than 400 mile tour. The tour included multiple days in Wakulla County including a segment from Tallahassee to Wakulla Springs State Park and the finishing days through the heart of Wakulla County. On Saturday, March 24, the tour began with several ride options including one that took place on the St. Marks Rail Trail. On Sunday, March 25, off duty Wakulla County Sheriffs Office deputies provided traf c control at Wakulla Springs State Park as the tour traveled from Tallahassee to Quincy by way of the state park and Highway 267. On Monday, March 26 the tour went from Quincy to Wewahitchka before heading to Apalachicola in Franklin County for Tuesday, March 27 and Wednesday, March 28. On Thursday, March 29, the riders came to Wakulla County and used U.S. Highway 319 to pass through Sopchoppy on the way to Medart. On Friday, March 30, the riders left Medart and returned to Tallahassee after an optional stop in St. Marks. In total, the bicycles traveled more than 400 miles depending on what extra ride options they selected in Tallahassee and Apalachicola. Keith Blackmar and Jo Ann Palmer contributed to this report.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBike Florida tours Wakulla County, stays at Wildwood Inn WILLIAM SNOWDENTents along the cart path on the rst hole at Wildwood.KEITH BLACKMARRiders on the route from Apalachicola to Medart. JO ANN PALMERTaking a break at the rest stop at Ochlockonee River State Park. JO ANN PALMERMore photos online at thewakullanews.com eres not too many places in the Americas where you can say pre-Clovis people stood, Dunbar said. But the Page-Ladson and Wakulla Springs sites are two of those places. 000ARJA Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.)

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1A Merritt said he would be OK with restricting it to isolated wetlands. Ill take what I can get, Merritt said. Merritt also wanted to allow planning staff to approve variances within the 40-foot buffer. Currently, those must come before the county commission. Stewart agreed with this idea and said there needs to be speci c guidelines for the planning director. Brock also felt it was a good idea. Artz stressed again that she didnt feel like this issue was a high priority and that staff should be spending a lot of time on it. Merritt disagreed and felt it was a problem that needed to be addressed. Merritt said he would bring something back before the board at the next meeting. Merritt has not be quiet about his feelings of the wetlands ordinance. He has said before that he would like to get rid of the wetlands ordinance entirely and has proposed several changes to the board since he took of ce. In September, he proposed removing the 75foot wetlands buffer in the Comprehensive Plan and addressing issues in an ordinance, but that motion failed.Board discusses wetlands issue, but no decision is reachedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe rain didnt keep the walkers and supporters away from the Wakulla Pregnancy Centers sixth Annual LifeWalk at Wakulla Springs State Park held this past Saturday, March 31. Holding umbrellas and wearing rain coats and rain boots, about 100 people showed up for the event, which is the centers largest fundraiser. Prior to participants making the loop around the park, they could buy a baked good at the bake sale or bid on an item at the silent auction and the children could grab a balloon or get their face painted. Wakulla Pregnancy Center board members thanked the crowd for attending and introduced Pastor Jeff McFalls, who performed the opening prayer. Following the walk, participants heard from guest speaker, Marcia MacNaney of Parents and Family Resource Alliance, who told the group what is going on with the legislature. The goal of the walk is to show support for the sanctity of life and collect money to support the center. The Wakulla Pregnancy Center is an Evangelical Christian ministry that exists to assist women and their families during unplanned pregnancies. Their free, con dential services include pregnancy tests, information on pregnancy, abortion, parenting and adoption, non-diagnostic ultrasounds, assistance with maternity and baby needs and post-abortion Bible study groups. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWith the end of its lease coming up, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Road Patrol and Criminal Investigation Divisions, or sheriffs annex, moved into the Wakulla County Community Center in October 2011. At that time, the Wakulla County Commission explained that this would only be a temporary solution. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce is not large enough to hold all divisions, so a building was being leased to house these two divisions. The owner, the Apalachee Center, informed the sheriff that the lease for this building expired Aug. 1, 2011, and could not be renewed. The building was needed to be vacated by Oct. 1, 2011. At the Sept. 6, 2011, county commission meeting, the commission agreed to move the divisions that were located in the annex building to the community center. They also agreed to look at costs to build an annex building or rent another space. Since the divisions have been moved to the community center, this has hindered the ability of the YMCA to provide youth programs. Previously, the YMCA told the county that the sheriffs annex was taking up more space than they originally thought and they would wait until they the sheriffs of ce was moved out of the community center to start offering programs. The county commission agreed the best solution was to transfer the sheriffs annex to a new site adjacent to the sheriffs complex where a new of ce facility can be built. The county commission approved the task order from Preble-Rish, the countys engineering consultant, to perform engineering design and permitting related to site improvements, including drive isles, parking, water, sewer, stormwater and required landscaping. The cost is $13,550. County Administrator David Edwards said 41 percent of these funds will come from impact fees and the rest will come from the one-cent sales tax fund. Commissioner Randy Merritt said this task order is just for the site and not the building itself. In the proposed building layout, the building is approximately 6,500 square feet with 14 offices, two conference rooms and restrooms. The estimated cost of the building is $350,000. Commissioner Lynn Artz said she wants to make sure the engineer works with Dan Ard with Talquin Electric to ensure the building is energy ef cient. She added that she had a concern with the lack of trees in the layout, as well as the placement of the building on the property. The placement of the building affects energy, she said. The commission voted unanimously to proceed with the new annex and approve the task order.COUNTY COMMISSIONBoard moves ahead with plans for new sheriffs annexBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County recently received $549,000 for the State Housing Initiatives Partnership Program, which is used for home rehabilitation and down payment assistance for low-income families. County Administrator David Edwards said the county must spend $199,166 by June 30. This is money left over from the 2009-10 funding. There will be an application workshop on April 12 from 10 a.m. to noon in the county commission chambers for interested members in the community. Applications will be available beginning April 5 at the county commission administration building, 3093 Crawfordville Highway, between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. There is no SHIP waiting list and anyone who has applied before will have to apply again. Edwards said. The deadline to apply is May 11 at 2 p.m. Hand deliver applications to the county commission administration building. The eligible programs are homebuyer purchase assistance and owner-occupied rehabilitation. The homebuyer purchase assistance programs provides down payment assistance and principle reduction to rst-time homebuyers. The maximum amount that can be given per unit is $15,000. The owner-occupied rehabilitation program provides money for repairs or improvements needed for safety and sanitary rehabilitation or correction of code violations. The maximum amount that will be awarded per unit is $35,000. Applicants are limited to assistance once every 10 years. For more information, contact Meridian Community Services Group, who administers the program for the county, at (850) 8771908.Additional SHIP funds available PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENLifeWalk-ers on a drizzly morning, above. The mascot, below, gave out hugs.Sixth annual LifeWalk is held at Wakulla Springs will be received until 10:00 a.m. on Monday, April 16, 2012. WBE/MBE/DBE Firms are encouraged to participate. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any person with a qualied disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this ofce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). APRIL 5, 2012 Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA)Wakulla County Housing Authority Announces the Availability of State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Funds for the State Fiscal Years 2009/2010 and 2011/2012 The Wakulla County Housing Authority announces approximately $199,166 of FY 2009-2010 funding and $350,000 of FY 2011-2012 funding (which includes 10% administration costs) available through the State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) program to be used for the following Local Housing Assistance Plan strategies: Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation and Homebuyer Purchase Assistance. Please note that funding for rehabilitation will only be used to support existing housing. The strategies are as follows: The purpose of this strategy is to provide down payment assistance and principle reduction to rsttime homebuyers that are eligible under the SHIP guidelines. The maximum amount of SHIP funds that may be awarded per unit is $15,000. Potential homebuyers will be required to qualify for a mortgage through a nancial institution. Up to $15,000 may be applied towards securing the home. Homebuyers may not have claimed homestead exemption in the last three years. Funds will be awarded on a rst come, rst ready-to-close basis. The purpose of this strategy is to provide repairs or improvements needed for safety and sanitary rehabilitation and/or correction of code violations. The maximum amount of SHIP funds that may be awarded per unit is $35,000. The homeowner must claim homestead exemption and the home must be occupied by the owner in order to be considered for rehabilitation. Applicants are limited to assistance once every (10) years. Applications will be considered on a rst come, rst served basis. The Wakulla County Housing Authority will conduct an application workshop on regarding SHIP nancial assistance on Thursday, April 12, 2012 from 10am-12pm in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Commission Chambers located at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Any question regarding the SHIP application will be addressed at this workshop. Please note that there is currently no SHIP Waiting List. SHIP Applications will be available beginning Thursday, April 5, 2012 between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, Monday thru Friday at the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 or via online at www. mywakulla.com. Applications will NOT be accepted prior to Monday, May 7, 2012. Applications are due no later than Friday, May 11, 2012 by 2:00pm. No applications will be accepted after the designated time. Applications submitted via mail WILL NOT be accepted. All applications must be handdelivered to the following address by 2:00pm on May 11, 2012: Any person with a qualied disability requiring special accommodations shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed abov e at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this ofce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD).Questions regarding the SHIP program and application process should be directed to Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., at (850)877-1908. EQUAL HOUSING APRIL 5, 2012A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION **OFFICIAL**N O T I C E O F G E N E R A L E L E C T I O N I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that a GENERALELECTION will be held in WAKULLA County, State of Florida, on the SIXTH day of NOVEMBER, 2012, A.D., to ll or retain the following of ces: President and Vice-President United States Senator Representative in Congress State Attorney: Judicial Circuit 2 Public Defender: Judicial Circuit 2 State Senator State Representative Supreme Court: Retention of Three Justices First District Court of Appeal: Retention of Four Judges Circuit Judge, Second Judicial Circuit: Groups 1, 2, 3 and 12 Clerk of the Circuit Court Sheriff Property Appraiser Tax Collector Superintendent of Schools Supervisor of Elections School Board: Districts 2 and 4 County Commissioner: Districts 1, 3 and 5 Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation District: Groups 1, 2, 3 and 5

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Webpage opposing cave diving misleads From the Dock for April 5 Wakullas housing problem Briefs: Easter Egg Hunt, Light It Up Blue, TCC Job Fair, digital photo class, AARP driving class Evans retires from highway patrol First phase of Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail is done Boys quick thinking saves Shell Point home thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Bristols Veterans Memorial Park is funEditor, The News:I want to start off by telling you that you do a wonderful job with the newspaper. At the beginning of March we had my stepsons 5th birthday party in Bristol at the Veterans Memorial Park. They run the only true steam train in the state of Florida. We had the best time and they were the nicest people. Everyone who is involved with the railroad is a volunteer. I would like to say thank you to all of the family and friends who made it (we had over 30 people come!) and a special thanks to the people who volunteer and run the park. I think that there are lots of children who would really enjoy visiting a place this and the parents dont know its there. Thank you very much for your time. Amber and Jonathan AllenWakulla County SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe steam train at Veterans Memorial Park in Bristol. Editor, The News:With the thump of rotor blades and a distinctive whistling sound to it, soldiers at a forward operating base in remote southern Afghanistan turn their heads to a familiar direction and smile. These aircraft are bringing the FOBs mail run to them and that means care packages from home like one soldier from Panacea who has been waiting eagerly. Spc. Randall Taylor Jr., the oldest son of WCSOs Capt. Randall Taylor Sr., has been waiting on this as he has a package from his father on the way and it has arrived. The usual snacks and other items are in this package, but the most important item to him in it is the new running shoes his dad is sending him.Randall Taylor rukia8492@hotmail.com anks, Make A Di erence Day supportersEditor, The News: Thanks to all who came out for Make A Difference Day. We had more than 20 local organizations participate. I would like to give special recognition to the following VolunteerWAKULLA members: Jim Boileau for manning the tickettable all day; Nancy Culp for providing the entertainment and booth traf c control; Cecile Degrove for the great photos, (check them out on VolunteerWAKULLAs Facebook page); Gail Hickman for her outstanding job of putting together all the food and door prizes, as well a serving lunch; Beth Mims for helping to serve lunch and the great poster; Chuck Hickman, Ramon Medina and Rick Thornburg for all the runs to get ice, water and more food; David Moody and Royce Phillips for manning the grill and putting out some great food; and Scott Nelson for providing door prizes and getting us a sign from the U.S. Forest Service to advertise the event. All of you did so much more than I can mention here, you made the day a success and I thank you. I also want to thank the entertainers who volunteered their time to our event: The Wakulla Wild Wigglers, Sharon Fox, Kevin Norton and the Gangsta Grannies. Volunteers are the heart of our community and nothing re ects this more than the hard work done by these ne people. Pam Mueller President VolunteerWAKULLASoldiers appreciate packages from home Editor, The News: An open letter to Wakulla Chamber of Commerce President Amy Geiger: Dear Amy, The onus should not be on the consumer to support a business, but rather on the business to earn their patronage. Implementing Economic Gardening requires moving beyond the realm of rhetoric to the realm of practicality. Access to capital and relief from regulatory costs are essential to small business. Incentives should be in balance with mandates and the Chamber should be there to make sure government is reminded of that. Grassroots involvement is an American tradition. With the internet, ordinary citizens have access to the same technical information that Chamber of cials do. The difference is that you have the ear of government and the responsibility to act on our behalf. Wakulla County is special and we are looking to you to be the special person who Lifts us up where we belong. James Kish CrawfordvillePHOTO BY SGT. JUAN CAMPOSArmy Spc. Randall Taylor Jr. of Panacea opens the care package his father has sent him. Spc. Taylor is with the 25th IDs 2nd Squadron, 6th Air Cavalry and is deployed to a remote Forward Operating Base in southern Afghanistan.Chamber must look out for businessBy RITA HANEY It is a sad and often dispiriting experience when someone we love dies. When death is by their own hand, we have deeper sorrow. What could I have done? What did I do? Why? Why? And why? again. It must be said when someone is determined to end their own life for whatever reason there really may be no way to stop them. This said, there are often clues. Phrases may catch your attention such as I do not want to keep experiencing (whatever the experience), I wish I could disappear, I dont want to be here anymore, or some phrase or similar sayings that resonates just slightly off key. You can say, Are you thinking of killing yourself? If not, the answer will be a surprised No! or some form of negation to your question which seems genuine. If not, it is time to listen, suggest professional help, or if the person seems determined and is resistant, a forced stay in the hospital may bring relief. Again there is no guarantee that you, a professional or another loved one will be able to help. Since many people who attempt suicide are ambivalent, kindness and attention may be a blessing. Many people feel going to a therapist is a weakness or a waste of time. Often, however, life becomes unmanageable and we are stuck. Like a vehicle stuck in sand, we need help to pull ourselves out. Another clue to suicidal behavior is often mistaken for a sign of recovery. A friend or family member, who has been depressed, suddenly appears to be returning to normal; if this behavior is coupled with giving away possessions, for example, a young man gives away his prized sports jacket or a grandmother begins giving away gifts from her deceased husband, or some similar behavior may be a signal the friend or family member has made up their mind to commit suicide. Being direct is the key. Asking the direct question, Are you thinking of killing yourself? is the best approach, possibly opening the door for help and support. There is no age limit to suicide. Young children, older adults and every age inbetween are in the statistics of attempted and completed suicides. Spring, not Christmas, has the highest rate of suicide. According to some research, the increased sunshine provides the energy for the depressed, dispirited person to actually commit the act. My own thoughts tend to the universal belief of spring as a time of renewal, or resurrection trees bud, owers begin to bloom, the grass is greener and yet the suicidal person does not feels this. If spring brings instead continued disappointment, regret or sadness and not a reawakening as may have been hoped, suicide may become a viable alternative to despair. The use of alcohol or drugs can also increase the feelings of sadness and depression. Alcohol is a depressant, and drugs such as cocaine and crack require continued used to keep the high. When the high evaporates the user crashes and plunges into rapid mood swings. Taking the time to listen to people we love is the key. Today it seems we are all so busy communicating through electronic devices we do not take the time to hear and be heard. If you or a loved one is experiencing suicidal thoughts, help is available in the Crawfordville area: A Time to Change Counseling Services, 926-1900 NAMI Wakulla, 926-1033 Apalachee Center, 926-5900 Rita Haney, LCSW, 926-2039 Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce (emergency 911).Rita Haney, MSW, LCSW is a counselor in Crawfordville. She can be reached at 926-2039. By MARJ LAW The bolt-action .22 is a sweet youth ri e. Its easy to shoot. When you pull up the bolt and slide it towards your body, it makes two satisfying clack noises. To make shooting the .22 even easier and more fun, you can add a 4x scope to it. All of a sudden, your target looks up close and personal! Now, youve got the advantage of easy use, and sight as well as sound. When you add the low cost of bullets, the bolt action .22 is a great beginners ri e. However, now that youre a big person, you nd you crave more challenge than your old .22. There are plenty of bolt action ri es that are more advanced and still give that familiar clack clack. But wait! Theres more! Go to your favorite gun shop and you might just find something relatively new and exciting in bolt action. Sig Sauer now makes a bolt action ri e with Blaser action. With Blaser action, you dont pull the bolt up and to you. Instead, you slide the bolt to you in a one step maneuver. Clack. This action should revolutionize your target practice. Why? When you use traditional bolt ri es, the up and over action causes you to rotate your ri e slightly. This means you temporarily lose perfect sight of your target and you have to reacquire your sight picture before you shoot. With the Blaser action, you can retain your sight picture even while you pull the bolt. This should help with accuracy, as there is less ri e movement. It should also help with the speed of getting off your rounds. These Sig Sauer rifles come in several calibers including the 300, the 308 and the 338. As you can guess were not talking bargain basement pricing. But then, now that were big people, were entitled to window shop and drool over big people guns.Marj Law is retired as the director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. Now she enjoys spending time on the gun range and writes about shooting. Feeling suicidal? Theres helpHome on the RangeMoving beyond bolt-action

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 5A Free digital photo class set at refuge on April 7The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge will present its monthly free digital photo class on Saturday, April 7, from 9 a.m. to noon. Weather permitting, there will be a photo tour following the class (bring a lunch). The class is free for adults and families are welcome. The class includes the basics of photography, including how to get better results from your digital camera using presets. Other topics include aperture, shutter speed, ISO settings, and composition. Included in the class are photos of refuge plants and animals. Digital photo classes are held the rst Saturday of each month in the new Natures Classroom, adjacent to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center. Registration is required. Call (850) 9256121 to reserve a seat. The class is taught by Ranger Barney Parker, former FSU photography instructor AARP Driver Safety Class will be held April 24There will be an AARP Driver safety class held at the Wakulla Public Library in Crawfordville. This program is offered to seniors age 50 and older. It is a classroom setting and no driving is done. The program discusses how age related physical changes can effect the way seniors drive. The class is a one-day session and a discount will be given by the drivers insurance company for three years following the class. The cost for AARP members is $12 Non members $14 Seniors can register by calling (850) 926-4605. The class schedule is as follows: April 24, June 26, Aug. 28, and Oct. 23. Still time to get a team entered for Relay for LifeRelay for Life Event Chair Kristin Dow announced this week that the 2012 Wakulla Relay for Life is still accepting teams for the April 20-21 event. We currently have registered 22 teams, 129 participants and raised more than $10,000 toward our fundraising goal, Dow said. However, there is still time to become part of this annual event. To register a team, visit the website at relayforlife.org/wakulla or nd us on Facebook. Community members are also invited to join us at the Lion Painting Festival on Saturday, April 7, at Azalea Park. This years Relay for Life will be April 20-21 at the Wakulla High School Track. The event begins at 6 p.m. Admission is free and open to all. Brent Thurmond to speak on the Forbes PurchaseIf youve ever heard or been curious about what has been referred to as the Forbes Purchase then you will want to attend the Wakulla County Historical Society monthly presentation at Wakulla County Library on Tuesday, April 10 at 7 p.m. Wakulla Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond, who is also a board member of the historical society, will be presenting an informative history of the Forbes Purchase and how it played an important part in the early history of Wakulla County, as well as the surrounding Big Bend area. Thurmond has deep roots in Wakulla County and is an accomplished historian who has spent an extensive amount of time researching the Forbes Purchase. He will give an informative history of who John Forbes was, how the land was initially acquired when Florida was controlled by Spain and held through the time when Florida was purchased by Britain and then sold to the early pioneer settlers of Wakulla County. Many of the descendants of John Forbes still reside in Wakulla County and many of the descendants of the early settlers still own the family homesteads that were originally acquired from John Forbes Company. All are invited to attend to learn and explore an interesting part of Wakulla County history. Resurfacing work continues on U.S. 319 in CrawfordvilleMotorists traveling U.S. Highway 319 between Wakulla-Arran Road and Bloxham Cutoff in Wakulla County can expect intermittent nighttime lane closures Sunday, April 1 through Friday, April 6 from 6:30 p.m. until 6 a.m. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter @MyFDOT_NWFL. Staff ReportsBriefsSPECIAL TO THE NEWSAnna Lopez of the Quilters Guild with her quilt.Special to The NewsNAMI Wakullas newest support group for Wakulla County residents with mental illness is going strong. The group, which began in January, meets in the mornings from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Library on Crawfordville Highway and is free and open to all who have been diagnosed with a mental illness. NAMI Wakulla is very happy to be offering a daytime and a nighttime support group in Wakulla County, said Susie Tooke, president of NAMI Wakulla. NAMI Wakulla, an af liate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, also has a weekly support group from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday at the NAMI Wakulla office at 2154-C Crawfordville Highway. For more information, call NAMI Wakulla headquarters at 926-1033. By CATHY FRANKPresident, Wakulla County Historical SocietyThe Wakulla County Historical Societys Museum and Archives upcoming exhibit will be quilts, antique sewing machines and equipment used in the countys early years. These tools were used to create clothing and utilitarian items needed around the home place. Also on display will be antique model cars and antique dish wares. A fabric vendor will be available on April 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. for the exhibition kick-off day of fun. Refreshments will be served to visitors during this event as will a silent auction and a drawing for an Opportunity Quilt. The winners will be announced June 30 at 4 p.m. The Museum and Archives will be opened Thursday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Quilters Guild will be present on Saturdays for demonstrations. Come by and vote for The Peoples Choice Award or place a bid on a quilt. Sewing machine repair service will be available on Friday, April 6. A fee will be charged for service. For more information call the Museum and Archives at (850) 926-1110 or Anna Lopez, Quilters Guild President at 294-0832.Quilt show at Historical Society New support group going strongSpecial to The NewsBecause veterans from all U.S. con icts sacri ced to assure freedom for us all, and because it may be the last chance to give them a heros welcome home, Big Bend Hospice launched the Valor Program to honor veterans in their nal days. The Valor Program was piloted in Wakulla County in 2011. It is designed so that Big Bend Hospice volunteers and staff can honor patients who are veterans with a brief ceremony, certi cate of appreciation and nal salute. After careful planning and a dress rehearsal, the rst Valor ceremony took place in the home of one of our Crawfordville patients, a Vietnam veteran. Arriving with a framed certi cate, a ag lapel pin for the patient and displaying an American ag, the Valor team led the patient and his wife in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance. Several members of the patients hospice clinical team shared in this special moment with the patient. The two veteran volunteers, also Vietnam veterans, spoke from the heart as they thanked the patient for his service in Vietnam and assured him that he is appreciated for what he sacri ced. At the end of the ceremony, the two volunteers saluted the patient. Weakly, but proudly, he returned the salute. After participating in the rst Valor ceremony, Mike Compton, one of the Valor volunteers, expressed his support for the program. There are a minimum of at least two times an individual should have earned dignity and honor once while serving their country and the other in dying, said Compton. I wanted to be part of the Big Bend Hospice Valor Program to show them honor for both and to show that they truly are appreciated for their service. Not everyone who participates as a Valor volunteer must be a veteran; but there will always be one or two veterans in each Valor team. Billy Mills, the other Valor volunteer in Wakulla County, expressed the importance of this practice. There is a common bond among U.S. servicemen that cannot be explained unless you have been there, he said. I volunteered for the Valor Program in order to show my deep-felt gratitude to these men and women who served their country. Everyone likes to be appreciated and told, Thank you. I am proud and honored to be part of this program. The Valor ceremony was very meaningful to Pam Allbritton, Community Resource Coordinator on the Wakulla/Franklin team. As the ceremony progressed, Allbritton said, the patients wife kissed me and hugged me with tears in her eyes and simply said, Thank you for everything. After the ceremony the patient was asked if he would like for our volunteers to sit at his side for a picture and he stated, No, I can stand, and he stood between our volunteers with pride. Our volunteers stayed at the home and shared military stories and again thanked the patient for his service. To nd out how to become a member of the Valor volunteer team in the Wakulla/Franklin area, please call Allbritton at (850) 926-9308.Big Bend Hospice honors veterans with ceremony for their valor NEW!! New courses at the TCC Wakulla CenterMove your career forward with free or low-cost trainingUpcoming opportunities in manufacturing and healthcare:Manufacturing EssentialsApril 23 June 275:30 9:30 p.m. | Mondays and Wednesdays$350 or FREE to those who are unemployed Home Care AidMay 8 August 76 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $299Medical Billing and CodingMay 15 August 146 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays $810 (includes cost of national certification exam)Medical Administrative SpecialistMay 22 July 126 9 p.m. | Tuesdays and Thursdays | $420REGISTER TODAY!workforce.tcc.fl.edu/Wakulla | 922-6290 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. 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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesArthur T. Anderson Bonnie Marie Linton Mobley Frances Lowe WaldbyEaster servicesMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY SERVICES8:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study(One block So. of Courthouse)850-926-7896 office www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Arthur T. Anderson, 59, of Crawfordville died Saturday, March 31, in Tallahassee. He was born on Dec. 4, 1952, in Quincy. He was employed by St. Marks Powder. He served in the U.S. Army. Visitation was held Wednesday, April 4, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services will be Thursday, April 5, at 11 a.m. at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville. He is survived by his wife of 40 years, Marilyn Nazworth Anderson; two sons, Adron Thomas Anderson (Skye) and Brandon Lee Anderson, both of Crawfordville; sisters, Marian Rudd (Tillman) and Patsy McNeely (Ed) both of Sopchoppy and Dianne Anderson, of Tallahassee; brother, Alvin Anderson, of Tallahassee; a stepmother, Vergie Anderson of Smith Creek; and four grandsons. He was preceded in death by his father, Otha Anderson; and his mother, Bernice Langston Anderson, who passed away a month after his birth. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Tenebrae Service will be held at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church on Thursday, April 5, at 7 p.m. This service will take us from the Upper Room where Jesus celebrated the Passover with His disciples and instituted The Lords Supper. The service moves onward to the Garden of Gethsemane, eventually leading us to the Cruci xion. This service is very powerful in its complete experience. Everyone is invited to attend this service. Contact us at 962-2511 for information. Wakulla United Methodist Church will hold a Maundy service on Thursday, April 5, at 7 p.m. All are welcome to this service of Easter preparation. Call 850 421-5741 for more information. Church-wide Easter Celebration Service will be held Saturday, April 7, at 11 a.m., followed by covered dish lunch, egg hunt and games. Bring covered dish, hot dogs will be provided. Wakulla United Methodist Church is located at 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Call 850 421-5741 for more information. Pioneer Baptist Church will host a community wide Easter Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 7, at 2 p.m. Eggs will be hidden in three age groups: birth to 3 year olds, Pre-K to 2nd grade and 3rd grade to 5th grade. Complimentary refreshments will be available following the egg hunt. The egg hunt is free and the community is invited. Pioneer Baptist Church is located four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the Spring Creek Highway and Dr. MLK Jr. Memorial Road intersection. We look forward to seeing your family. For more information, please call 878-5224. First Baptist Church of St. Marks, First Baptist Church of Crawfordville and Pioneer Baptist Church of Crawfordville will jointly host an Easter Sunrise Service at the San Marcos de Apalachee Historic State Park in St. Marks. The service will be south of the old fort at the con uence of the Wakulla and St. Marks rivers. The service begins at 7 a.m. and the gates of the park open at 6:30 a.m. The park location is 148 Old Fort Road in St. Marks. There are no park entrance admission fees to attend the service. Worship includes music, a devotion, and celebrating the Lords Supper together. Following the service, light complimentary refreshments will be available. In the event of rain, the service will be held in the sanctuary of the First Baptist Church of St. Marks. Everyone is invited to come and share in this beautiful worship service. For more information, call 878-5224. Pastor Derrick Nelson and his congregation at Rocky Mount P.B. Church will conduct the annual Easter Day Service at Zion Hill P.B. Church in Sopchoppy, Pastor Ervin Donaldson Jr. The services will be held Sunday, April 8, at 3 p.m. All are invited to attend. For more information, contact Mother Dora Rosier at (850) 962-4651. Journey to the Cross, sponsored by Grace Baptist Churchs Live Out Loud Youth Ministry, will be held at the church on Thursday, April 5, through Saturday, April 7, beginning at 6 p.m. nightly until 8:30 p.m. Take a 30-minute walk through the last week of Jesus life, burial and Resurrection. Each station has something different to offer. The church is located at 803 Crawfordville Highway, just north of Bloxham Cutoff. For information, call (850) 926-3217 and leave a message and your call will be returned.Tenebrae Service at Sopchoppy UMCSunrise Service is set for Sunday, April 8, at 7 a.m. at Mashes Sands Beach. Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church is pleased to announce that a community-wide sunrise service will be conducted on Easter Sunday at Mashes Sands Beach in Panacea. The Sunrise Service will begin at 7 a.m. Everyone regardless of faith heritage is invited to attend. Contact us at 984-0127 for information.Community-wide sunrise service Wakulla UMC Easter celebration Multi-church sunrise service in St. Marks Easter service at Zion Hill P.B, Journey to the Cross at Grace Baptist Easter Egg hunt on SaturdayBonnie Marie Linton Mobley, 79, a longtime resident of Tallahassee, passed away on March 28. She was raised in St. Marks and always had a great passion for the Lord and was a member of Southwood Baptist Church. She was totally dedicated to her family, children and grandchildren. She also had a passion for the love of nature and of animals of all kinds. She graduated from Crawfordville High School and attended college at Florida State University for approximately three and a half years majoring in accounting while working at Lewis State Bank, where she spent most of her career. She also owned a business and worked several years in the construction industry. The funeral services will be performed by Culleys Meadowood Funeral Home, 700 Timberlane Road in Tallahassee, with a viewing held on Wednesday, April 4, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Funeral Services will be held at the same location at 2 p.m. on Thursday, April 5. There will not be any graveside service, only a nal Goodbye prayer at the Roselawn Cemetery on Piedmont Road in Tallahassee. Memorial Contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include her children, Luther E. Snipes Council Jr. (Brenda), Andy Lowe (Debbie) and George C. Mobley Jr.; nine grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren and two greatgreat-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, George Mobley, to whom she was married to for 34 years; her step-daughter Jane Mobley Lowe; and her rst husband, Luther Council Sr.Arthur T. Anderson Bonnie Marie Linton Mobley Obituaries continue on Page 7ABy ETHEL SKIPPER Easter sunrise service will be held at Skipper Temple Church of Christ on Easter morning at 6 a.m. Come looking for a victory time. You are welcome to fellowship with us. If Christ had not risen from the dead, all our living would be in vain. But now is Christ risen, and become the rst fruits of them that slept. For since by man came death, by man came also the resurrection of the dead. For in Adam all die, even in Christ shall all be made alive. Only through love can Christians be truly fruitful. We must learn this truth in this life in order to be ready for the Life Eternal. A county-wide sunrise service will be Easter morning at 5:50 a.m. at Pilgrim Rest P.B. Church, Elder O. Walker, host pastor. There will be a city-wide revival on Wednesday, April 11, at 6 p.m. featuring Dr. Marvin Sapp. It will be held at Disciples of Jesus, 228 Augusta Ave. in Thomasville. For information, contact Renita Dixon at (229) 5163878 or (229) 977-1503. Happy belated birthday in March to Mother Eva Johnson, Mother Bobbery Rosier, Deacon Merddie Rosier, Mother Alberta Hines and all March birthday people.More Easter sunrise services planned

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 7AhappeningsCommunityFrances Lowe Waldby, 90, of Tallahassee, passed away Wednesday, March 28. Frances and her twin brother Fred were born in Elon College, N.C., on March 30, 1921. She attended the University of North Carolina Womens College where she received a degree in English and a masters in library science. While working at the Georgia Tech library, she met her future husband, the late Robert E. Gibson. They married in 1948 and settled in Bartow. The family brie y relocated to St. Petersburg before making Tallahassee their home in 1965, where Robert practiced law and Frances began her career as a stockbroker. In 1973, Frances married Thomas Lewis, a retired FSU professor. They enjoyed an active retirement until Toms death in 1994. She began her work as a Pink Lady at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, where she volunteered for more than 20 years. In 1995, she married Hubert Odell Waldby, also a retired professor from FSU. They spent many wonderful years together playing bridge, golf and traveling. Frances was a member of Trinity Methodist for almost 40 years. Frances had a winning smile and a great sense of humor. She loved people and cherished time spent with her children and granddaughter. Independent to the end, this spirited lady was an inspiration to many. She was valedictorian of her high school class, learned to y a plane at age 39, became a stockbroker before many women ventured into the field, and raised three monkeys along with four kids. By loving example, she showed her family there were no limits to their aspirations. A memorial service was held on Sunday, April 1, with interment at Culleys MeadowWood Memorial Park in Tallahassee. The family is grateful for the loving care and support received from the nurses and staff at Big Bend Hospice and Westminster Oaks Health Care. A remembrance donation may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308. Frances is survived by her loving husband, Odell; four children, Lynda Gibson of Crawfordville and friend Charley Ingle, Debbie Gibson of Tallahassee, Gordon Gibson of Orlando and Renee Gibson and husband Alex Allen of Annandale, N.J.; stepdaughter, Debbie Larios and husband Steve of Nashville, Tenn.; and granddaughter, Lorin Brand of Tallahassee. She will be greatly missed by all who loved her. Continued from Page 6AFrances Lowe WaldbyObituaries Harvest Hawk gives Marines peace of mindBY CPL. ISAAC LAMBERTHDefense Video and Imagery Distribution System NewsKANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan A modi ed KC-130J ies over Afghanistan ready to unleash a tremendous amount of repower for the Marines it supports. Equipped to re Hell re and Grif n missiles, the aircraft known as the Harvest Hawk, provides close-air-support (CAS) for Marines conducting ground operations. We can give the commander on the ground peace of mind knowing he has these assets in the sky, said Capt. Dusty Cook, a pilot for the Harvest Hawk. Cook, a native of East Bernard, Texas, said the aircraft has several elements that distinguish it from other CAS platforms, and have made it highly successful. He explained that Hell re and Grif- n missiles are ready for every mission along with a sophisticated camera which both guides them and scans for insurgent activity. When you put all these things together you get a very deadly system, he said. We give the ground commander more precision munitions than any other plane, next to a bomber. Helicopters and ghters [planes] are good, but they do not carry the number of missiles we do and cannot stay in the sky the amount of time that we can. Cook said the aircrafts extended ight time allows it to stay aloft long after other attack aircraft have left because of the need to refuel, giving ground forces precision re power for extended periods of time. Cpl. Tom Wicklow, a crew chief with the Harvest Hawk, said another key element to the success of the plane is the tremendous coordination between Marines on the ground and the crew in the air. Were all in contact with whats going on, said Wicklow of Morristown, N.J. When the guys on the ground call us, its put on the internal communication system so everyone can hear and understand what is going on, he said. When you hear those gun shots in the background and the Marines returning re with the urgency in their voices, it really gets the blood pumping knowing that their lives depend on you, Wicklow added. When a commander on the ground needs air support, a Joint Terminal Attack Controller (JTAC) sends the request to the Direct Air Support Center (DASC), which then puts the JTAC in direct contact with the Harvest Hawk. The pilots and Fire Control Of cers (FCOs) of the Harvest Hawk crew have served with ground units as JTACs and understand rsthand the need for ef cient and accurate communication. This unique pairing adds a new dynamic to the battle eld. Additionally, the FCOs who control the weapon systems on the plane have own in other CAS platforms. They have been speci cally selected because of their experience with AV-8B Harriers, F/A-18 Hornets or AH-1W Cobras. Capt. Michael Wyrsch, an AV-8B Harrier pilot and an FCO for the Harvest Hawk, explained that his experiences as an attack pilot have been very bene cial. Giving close-air-support helped me understand what the guys on the ground are looking for, said Wyrsch of Silver Spring, Md. Cook said the Harvest Hawk can still perform the duties of a regular KC-130J, such as battle eld illumination and tanking, however, its primary mission is to support ground forces with the aircrafts sensor and deadly weapons. Cook said the main mission of the Harvest Hawk is not air refueling or battlefield illumination, it is to unleash massive amounts of repower whenever and wherever ground troops need it.Capt. Jason Dale (left) of Versailles, Ky., and Capt. Joshua Mallow of Crawfordville, Fla., and 2003 Wakulla High School graduate, Harvest Hawk pilots with Marine Aerial Refueler Squadron 352, make nal preparations for the take off of the Harvest Hawk at Kandahar Air eld, Afghanistan, March 26. Staffed with of cers who have experience conducting close-air-support and equipped with Hell re and Grif n missiles, the converted KC-130J is fully equipped for air-to-ground engagements. CPL. ISAAC LAMBERTHOptimist Club Oratorical Contest winners announcedBy TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar eld@thewakullanews.netWakulla Countys Coastal Optimist Club held its annual Oratorical Contest for middle and high school students on March 29 at Poseys Up the Creek. There were six participants, four girls and two boys. Alexander Lewis, a junior at Wakulla High, is in AVID and wants to be an Imagineer at Disney. Herbert Franklin, an eighth grader at Riversprings, wants to become an engineer in business design. Caylee Cox, an eighth grader at Riversprings, has interest in the medical eld. Danielle Gray, a junior at Wakulla High and in AVID, wants to be a photographer and own her own business. Dixie Johnston, a seventh grader at Wakulla Middle, wants to become a lawyer. Kayla Taff, a seventh grader at Wakulla Middle, loves musical instruments with an interest in the clarinet. First place winners were Cox for the girls and Franklin for the boys. They received $100. Second place winners were Gray and Lewis. They received $75. Johnston and Taff placed third. They received $50. All received certi cates and Optimist pens. First and second place will go to the District Level Competition. Oratorical Contest rst place winners are Caylee Cox and Herbert Franklin. Second and third place winners are Danielle Gray, Alexander Lewis, Dixie Johnston and Kayla Taff. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals TheAntiques Mall goDUBREJA PLAZA94 COTTONWOOD STREET, CRAWFORDVILLEFL o o CALL 850926-TRIM( 8746 ) for your next appointment g o Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing Family Haircuts & Styling Hair Coloring, Hightlighting & Extensions Full Body Waxing glitzNc lip

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolStudents excel at Brain Brawl Special to The NewsShadeville Elementary held its annual fth grade Brain Brawl competition on Friday, March 2. The Brain Brawl is sponsored by the Coastal Optimist Club in an effort to support and encourage students to stretch their minds and to provide an opportunity for students to shine academically. Under the direction of Shadevilles outstanding fth grade team of teachers, Linda Davis (chairman), Kerry Adams, Suzie McCord, Sholi Roberts and Debbie Marsh, the students first battled it out in the classrooms to earn a seat on one of the two teams. Team A members included Tia Nicholson (captain), Nathan McKown, Hayden Lenk, and Hunter Busen. Team B members included: Hunter Redfern (captain), Logan Hicks, Tori Hatch and Jackson Allbritton. Also competing in the alternate positions were Emily Shirah and Devin DeRoche. When all was said and done, the last questions answered and points awarded the members of Team A had earned the right to wear the medallions held by blue ribbons. Team B also earned beautiful medallions held with red ribbons. Hunter Busen was awarded the medal for high scorer on Team A and Logan Hicks was awarded the medal for high scorer on Team B. Hicks also earned the coveted medallion held by gold ribbon for providing the most correct answers throughout the contest. It was an exciting afternoon watching these students show what they know in reading, math, science, social studies, geography and current events. They are proud of each of the members of this years Brain Brawl Team. Team A wins the Brain Brawl at Shadeville Elementary. Team A members are Tia Nicholson, Nathan McKown, Hayden Lenk and Hunter Busen. Team B includes Hunter Redfern, Logan Hicks, Tori Hatch and Jackson Allbritton.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversink Odyssey of the Mind team members Justin Stafford, Kate Bowyer, Aaron Sloan, Celestia Walker, Travis Morgan, Giselle Almanzor, Megan Crombie, Ashiera Preston, Nicholas Weaver and reporters Abigail Gray and Makenna Roddenberry.Special to The NewsOn Saturday, March 3, seven fourth and fth graders from Riversink Elementary School competed in the Emerald Coast Odyssey of the Mind Tournament in Crestview, Fla. Team members included fourth graders Travis Morgan, Ashiera Preston and Aaron Sloan and fth graders Giselle Almanzor, Kate Bowyer, Justin Stafford and Celestia Walker. Coaches were Riversink teachers Nicholas Weaver and Megan Crombie. The team has been working all year to build a tower out of 1/8 inch thick balsa wood that was as light, yet as strong as possible. The team built and tested several towers throughout the year, including one that weighed only 22 grams but supported 235 pounds of weight. The otters placed second in the amount of weight the tower could hold at the contest. They also had to write and perform a play that included mathematics in it, as well as solve problems throughout the day of the competition. Overall they came in third place and earned the bronze medal to take home to Riversink. Abigail Gray and Makenna Roddenberry, members of the Riversink newspaper staff, The Otter Side of the Story, also came with the team to do on location reporting for Riversink.Riversink team places third in Odyssey of the Mind TournamentCast of Riversprings Middle Schools Next Victim, Please thanks supportersSpecial to The NewsOn March 15 and 16, the Riversprings Theatre Troupe performed the Soderman/ Ferguson play, Next Victim, Please directed by Nancy Commander and Mina Sutton. Desmond Maxwell played the part of Colonel Maxwell Murdock who has called his family together to discuss his will. The play twists and turns as family members plan and execute their plots to off their siblings, aunts and uncles, and nd themselves the victims. Hannah Hart and Cori Chaganis were wonderful in their roles as the Colonels sisters, while Elijah Mullens, as the brother-in-law added a quiet humor to his role. Ashton Boddye, Jenna Francks, Sheleen Burton and Jason Paris were excellent in their roles as the Colonels conniving off-spring and Yesenia Reyes was perfect in her role as the humble, yet greedy daughterin-law. Playing the parts of the funny grandchildren were Emily Lawrence and Kaylee Meyers. Jada Walker, the bumbling detective, stole the show with her ad-libbed one-liners. Butler Higgins and Fi the maid, played by Nic Samlal and Paige Pearson, were superior in their roles. Alyssa Cacciatore and Sarah Stephens were the maids and Ian Potter was on lights and sound. They would like to thank their parents for all of their support, the Samlal family for running the concession and Wakulla High School students, Emily Davis, Sami Chaganis and Samantha Tomlinson for their help. Thanks also to Mr. Tully, Mrs. Hudson, Mr. Rossow, Mr. Williams and Coach Smith, as well as Mr. Walker, Ms. Baggett, Mr. Miller and the School Board. They also thank the community for their support of the arts. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCast members Desmond Maxwell, Hannah Hart and Cori Chaganis, Elijah Mullens, Ashton Boddye, Jenna Francks, Sheleen Burton, Jason Paris, Yese nia Reyes, Emily Lawrence, Kaylee Meyers. Jada Walker, Nic Samlal, Paige Pearson, Alyssa Cacciatore, Sarah Stephens and Ian Potter. San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOyst ers Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

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Special to The NewsFrom Little League to the Major League and at all levels in between, baseball and softball season is in full swing and with that comes the risk of injury. Tens of thousands of players will require medical attention for injuries that include strains, sprains, fractures and concussions, while countless others will experience aches and pains that go unreported. The most common injuries are mild soft tissue injuries such as ligament sprains and muscle strains, along with cuts, bruises and contusions, said Jeremiah Nieves, M.D., of the Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (www.kessler-rehab.com). We also see more serious ligament tears and cartilage damage in the knee caused by the start-and-stop motion of play, as well as overuse injuries, such as tendonitis, in the shoulder, elbow and wrist. Each year, thousands of players also wind up with fractures, said Dr. Nieves. And nally, despite protective equipment, players of all ages are at risk of experiencing eye injuries and concussions. Although baseball and softball are considered non-contact sports, players typically sustain the more serious injuries because of contact with a ball, bat or another player. According to Mark Brinn, P.T., director of outpatient rehabilitation services at Kessler Institute, Injuries cant be avoided, said Brinn, but can be minimized. Sports, like baseball and softball, demand agility, speed, skill and coordination, and good overall conditioning can help players stay in the game throughout the season. PREPARING TO PLAY Kessler Institute suggests the following guidelines: Ideally, conditioning should begin long before the season starts to help players build core strength, exibility and endurance. Trying to get in shape too quickly can lead to acute muscle strains and other injuries. Prior to taking the eld for practice or a game, perform a minimum of 10 minutes of warm-up activities such as jogging, jumping-jacks, skipping, hopping or push-ups to increase body temperature and blood ow. Follow the warm-up activities by stretching all parts of the body, particularly the shoulders, back and hamstrings. Players should move into each stretch gently and avoid producing any pain. After stretching, do a few minutes of simple calisthenics such as arm circles, neck rolls and hip rotations. Finish your warm-up by playing soft-toss at a short distance. Gradually increase your distance and the intensity in which you are completing your throws. In addition, players, coaches and trainers are advised to observe basic rules for equipment use and technique, including: Make sure that helmets, face guards and other protective equipment fit properly and are worn correctly. Provide instruction in proper sliding techniques and other on- eld skills. Follow established pitching guidelines particularly for youth baseball and softball. Ensure that players stay well-hydrated and follow a balanced diet during the season. GETTING BACK IN THE GAME Despite the best preparation, players will still experience injuries. Brinn suggests that players listen to their bodies, as well as to their physicians and trainers, before considering resuming play. For example, a player with a joint injury should have full range of motion, no pain or swelling, and be at full strength before returning to the eld. Any player who has sustained a concussion should undergo post-injury imPACT testing and a neuropsychology evaluation to be cleared for play. Injuries should always be evaluated by a medical professional and treated accordingly, said Brinn. Whether that means simply icing the injury and getting some rest or participating in a program of physical and/ or occupational therapy, this will allow a player to optimize recovery and return to play in the best possible time frame.Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation is one of only five federally-designated Model Systems in the nation for the treatment and research of both spinal cord and brain injuries. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The NewsThe Ladies of Wildwood Golf Course are planning the fth Annual Rally for the Cure Breast Cancer tournament bene ting the Susan G. Komen Foundation. Through our generous sponsors and entry fees, we have sent $36,000 to the foundation from the first four tournaments. The tournament will be held on Saturday, April 14, at Wildwood Golf Course. The survivors celebration begins at 8:20 a.m. followed with an 18-hole scramble, lunch and awards ceremony. Kick-off party will be held Friday, April 13, at Wildwood restaurant featuring music by Trafton Harvey. Donation of $5 is suggested. If you would like to enter a team, make a donation or have a tee sign, please contact Karen Waters, chairperson, at (850) 926-1222 or email karen.wildwood@ aol.com. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe WHS track teams competed Saturday in the 13th Annual Chiles Capital City Track and Field Classic hosted by Chiles High School in Tallahassee. The local teams joined 12 other teams in this highly competitive meet, with the girls team placing sixth overall and the boys ninth. Senior Cora Atkinson ran an excellent race in the 3200-meter run, running relaxed in second place until about a half mile to go when she took over the lead and powered her way to the win becoming the lone event winner for the WHS teams. On paper, the girls 800-meter run promised to be one of the highlights of the entire meet, as local track star Madison Harris looked to be facing the best girls the Chiles team, one of the prominent girls programs in the state, had to offer. Multiple times state champion, senior Lily Williams, was expected to compete, along with all the other top middle distance girls from Chiles and that indicated that a blistering fast race would take place and it did. Williams took the lead immediately and tried to just power away from everyone. Harris was the only one who went with her and they separated themselves from the rest of the eld. Harris held on, running one step behind, until the last 250 meters, when Williams was able to open a small gap between them, which she held to the end. Williams ran a blistering fast race, nishing in the outstanding time of 2:11.22, which was a new meet record by 2 seconds and Harris nished second in 2:15.97, which is a new WHS school record. Other local tracksters who had outstanding individual performances included freshman Kasey James (3rd, 3200 meters), senior Stanley Linton (3rd, 3200), freshman Kaedretis Keaton (4th, triple jump with a new personal record of 41), sophomore Marty Wiedeman (5th, 1600), senior Alexis Collins (6th, 100), senior Emily McCullers (6th, long jump), freshman Lili Broadway (8th, 1600) and junior Raychel Gray (8th, 3200 ). Although not scoring for the team, J.P Piotroski and Jamal Gavin had outstanding individual efforts. Piotroski ran an outstanding anchor leg on the 4x800 relay team and also broke the 5:00 minute barrier in the 1600 meters, running 4:58. Gavin set a new personal best in the discus, recording a throw of 102. The local relay teams also made their presence known, with the boys and girls 4x800 meter teams leading the way with second place nishes. The girls continued their string of excellent performances and ran to their second fastest time of the season. In the boys race, Gabe Hutchins, who was running the third leg, had just taken over second place and was headed down the home stretch when he tripped and fell hard on the track. Recovering quickly, he jumped up and took off after the Florida High runner who had passed him and was able to close the gap and put anchor runner J.P. Piortroski only a few steps behind Florida Highs anchor runner. Piotroski closed that gap within the rst 100 meters and the runners battled over the next 500 meters until he was able to make a nal move with about 150 meters to go that the Florida High runner could not match, assuring the local team the second place nish. The boys 4x100 meter relay team had a strong showing, nishing in 4th place. Other WHS relay teams scoring at the meet included the girls 4x100 team (6th) and the girls 4x400 team (5th). I was relatively pleased with the way the kids performed, said Coach Paul Hoover. A few had a really good day, but I though we were a little at overall, which is somewhat to be expected since we just came off spring break. That interruption always causes us some problems, but our kids know what they have to do and should be ready for Districts next week, he said. The girls 800 meters was a great race! Madi showed once again why she is one of the best 800 meter runners in the state. She is fearless and will not back down in any competition! If you beat her, you are going to earn it. The local team will compete next at the Gadsden County Small School Open Track Meet on Thursday, April 5.TRACKAtkinson, Harris come through againFWC News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will host its second annual Run Wild 6-K race Saturday, April 7 at Elinor Klapp-Phipps Park in Tallahassee. Registration begins at 7 a.m., and the race starts at 8 a.m. We encourage anyone to come out to support Floridas wildlife, said Capt. Rett Boyd, event organizer and statewide coordinator of the FWCs Investigations Section. You dont have to be a runner to participate. Well have a live bald eagle, the FWCs manatee mascot and informational booths as well. The event will raise money for the Wildlife Alert Reward Program, a non-pro t program offering rewards in exchange for information leading to the arrest of those who violate the states sh and wildlife laws and boaters operating vessels under the in uence of drugs or alcohol. The program was created in 1979 to enlist the publics help in reporting violations and getting involved in the conservation and protection of Floridas valuable natural resources. The race will be at Millers Landing Road, Gate B. Participants can register online or at Capital City Runners at 1866 Thomasville Road. Registration is $18 the day of the race.RUNNINGFWC to host Wildlife Alert raceRally for the Cure Golf Tournament will be April 14WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS:Wednesday, April 4 BASEBALL: Wakulla vs. Ponte Vedra at Lincoln. Varsity only, 4 p.m. Thursday, April 5 BASEBALL: Wakulla at Lincoln. JV at 4 p.m. Varsity at 7 p.m. SOFTBALL: Wakulla at Lincoln at 7 p.m. WEIGHTLIFTING: District quali er at Wakulla High School. TBA. Friday, April 6 SOFTBALL: Wakulla at Florida High at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 10 BASEBALL: Wakulla at Godby. JV at 4 p.m. Varsity at 7 p.m. SOFTBALL: Wakulla at Chiles at 6 p.m.Tips for preventing baseball, softball injuries DArcy Brazier Owner Serving Wakulla & Surrounding Counties for over 35 years60 Holiday Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327 509 FOREIGN CAR REPAIR DOWN HOME TOYOTA HONDA Specializing In Specializing In NISSAN SUBARULic # MV15601www.DownHomeForeignCarRepair.com Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 Capital Circle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY

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FWC News Grab your shing rods and tackle box. Its almost time April 7 to take advantage of the rst of four license-free fishing days scheduled for this summer in Florida, according to Gov. Rick Scott, who highlighted the good news at a recent Cabinet meeting in Tallahassee. Fishing is a great way to enjoy Floridas beautiful outdoors, great weather and a wonderful day with family and friends, Scott said. License-free shing days are the perfect opportunity to discover the fun and excitement of fishing and Floridas great outdoors. The days are perfect chances for parents, who dont yet have a license, to take youth shing, or for avid anglers to introduce a friend to the recreational pursuit without having to purchase a license. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission spread out the opportunities this year so more people will be able to head for their favorite lakes and rivers or saltwater destinations on designated days. Instead of providing one weekend for freshwater shing and one weekend for saltwater fishing, the Commissioners decided at their meeting in February to break up the days. You wont need a recreational fishing license on the special days listed below. Florida residents and nonresidents, mark these Saturdays on your calendar for 2012: April 7 Freshwater June 2 Saltwater June 9 Freshwater Sept. 1 Saltwater The April 7 date occurs during a productive freshwater shing period when the weather is usually comfortable. Plus its Easter weekend, and many people like to ll the weekend with a variety of activities with family or friends. The June 2 free saltwater shing day coincides with the rst weekend of Gulf red snapper season and National Fishing and Boating Week, which means there will be lots of other related activities going on too. The June 9 date for freshwater shing also coincides with the last day of National Fishing and Boating Week. Last year, 38 states had at least one license-free shing day during this annual event. Sept. 1 is the Saturday of Labor Day Weekend, when lots of people have time to recreate and celebrate the traditional end-of-summer holiday. In addition, bay scallops, lobster and snook will be open for harvest on this date. All other bag limit, season and size restrictions apply on these dates. The license-free fishing designation applies only to recreational fishing, not commercial. To make your free shing day successful, check out MyFWC.com/Fishing for shing tips, locations and rules. Those who venture out may discover why Florida is the Fishing Capital of the World and feel as if they are part of the sports business engine that propels a $7.5 billion economic impact and sustains 80,000 jobs. Fishing, however, is much more than a money-generating sport. Nature-based recreation can make people happier and healthier. And its fun and relaxing. Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, the wind did nally blow and because the land temperature is so warm right now every afternoon we are getting the sea breezes like we typically get in the summer. Its hard to believe its just the rst of April and we are having temperatures pushing 90 degrees. Lets just hope it doesnt get a lot warmer. The weather has sure brought out the fishermen: Coming back from Clearwater on Sunday afternoon, I passed over the 98 bridge on the Wakulla River and there must have been 50 trucks and trailers there. Everyone is out enjoying this beautiful weather. I went down to Clearwater to see my brother this weekend and we did a little wade shing down around St. Pete but didnt do any good. The water down there is beautiful and its very pretty. But they can have it all. The traf c was unbelievable. Every other car was pulling a boat and I have never seen so many boats on the water. It looked like opening day of scallop season at St. Marks. Problem is, its like that all the time. We are very, very fortunate to live where we do. I went out one day last week and shed and saw two other boats and I like that. If you ever get tired of shing and living here just head down that way for a few days. Youll be back. I just talked to Bucky at Shell Island Fish Camp and he said they are getting awfully busy. The sh are biting and the people are coming in to sh. He shed Thursday and Sunday and caught a lot of trout and quite a few oversize reds. He likes to sh the 5 or 6-inch jerk shad, corks and top water plugs. He said he shed to the East but most folks this weekend were shing to the West. Capt. Sid Stringer and Kenny Daniels took the Mark Colburn party from Georgia and both came in with limits of trout. Dr. Phil Sharp went Sunday with a friend and looked for cobia all morning but said they didnt see any. They went to the Rotary, Buoy 24, Buoy 4 and the buoys off the St. Marks Lighthouse. They were heading in and decided to stop on the ats and trout sh for a while. He doesnt sh that area much but they stopped in about four feet of water and in 30 minutes caught eight nice trout on the Gulp under a Cajun Thunder. Capt. David Fife has been catching a lot of reds in the Shell Point, Oyster Bay area. David typically uses live mudminnows on the bottom. He said he is also catching a few nice ounder. Capt. Luke over at AMS said one of his buddies shed the Clam Bar off the Ochlockonee and did good on trout and then came in and shed one of the deep holes around the bars and caught some nice silver trout. The word from St. George is the pompano are here and being caught in big numbers. The best area has been around the Bob Sikes Cut and .25-ounce Nylures tipped with sand- eas or small pieces of shrimp are best baits. There are also plenty of Spanish being caught and a neighbor was telling me a friend of his watched a guy catch a 42-pound king shing from the jetties. Lots of fish are being caught out of the Econ na and Aucilla and the bite is on at Keaton Beach. Lots of trout being caught on everything and the Steinhatchee Reef is producing big catches of sheepshead. Lots of reds are being caught and plenty are oversized. On Wednesday, I shed with Shuford Davis and Steve Reznik. We started up in a creek and did absolutely nothing and moved out towards the ats. We ended the day with 21 Spanish, two ounder, nine trout and a 40-pound cobia. Everything including the cobia was caught on live shrimp. On Friday, I shed with Dr. Steve Starbeck and his wife. We started in the early morning high tide looking for reds but could not get a bite on my favorite spot. We shed a couple of other spots and caught some small reds but couldnt catch a keeper. We shed the ats and caught some trout and Spanish and when the tide got low and started in I decided to go back and try for reds again. It wasnt a very low low so I hoped the bar would still be exposed. Sometimes you make the right decisions. First cast we caught a keeper red and sat there for two more hours catching and releasing reds. We kept two and threw back four more that we could have kept, including the largest red ever caught on my boat in close. Steves wife landed a 34-inch red that hit a shrimp on the bottom. The Kevins Red Trout Shootout is April 14 and the Panacea Rock the Dock Tournament is April 28 and 29. Gag grouper season opened Sunday in state waters but it is still closed in federal waters. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing!This warm weather has brought out the shermen From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Special to The NewsThe Florida Park Service has named the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park the top community service organization in the state. The 2011 Outstanding Citizen Support Organization of the Year Award was presented to the Friends organization at a ceremony on March 10 in Apalachicola. This award demonstrates the outstanding volunteers and members that make up Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park, said Brian Fugate, park manager of Wakulla Springs State Park. We are fortunate to have a committed group of people who work tirelessly to protect and enhance our park every day. The Florida Park Service honors community service organizations annually. Friends of Wakulla Springs was selected because of a large body of accomplishments over the past few years that include donations and grants that have helped fund an ongoing boat restoration campaign, renovations to the lodge roof and waterfront boat ticket of ce, an interpretive display at the park, preservation of the lodge lobby and construction of Sally Ward Bridge. It was also selected because of impressive volunteer participation and community partnerships related to the annual Wakulla Wildlife Festival and Friends 5K Run. Most of the 53 state parks managed by the Florida Park Service have Friends organizations, so to be named the best in the state is quite an honor, said Ron Piasecki, president of the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. We are also fortunate to have solid park leadership in Brian Fugate, who was named District 1 Employee of the Year. The Friends of Wakulla Springs recently established a Friends Endowment Fund to ensure the organizations mission to conserve, protect and enhance the natural, historical, cultural and recreational resources of Wakulla Springs State Park for present and future generations will continue for years to come. Volunteers are currently organizing the 2012 Wakulla Wildlife Festival, scheduled for April 20-21. For more information on the festival, visit www.wakullawildlifefestival.org.Friends of Wakulla Springs named No. 1 citizen support groupFour license-free shing days start April 7Beachgoers should be aware of nesting birdsFWC NewsWith nesting season under way for shorebirds like the snowy plover, black skimmer and American oystercatcher, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission asks beachgoers to take care not to disturb their nests. Here are some simple things you can do to help nesting shorebirds: Keep your distance. If birds become agitated or leave their nests, you are too close! A general rule is to stay at least 300 feet from a nest. Respect posted areas. Some shorebird nesting areas are posted with symbolic fencing, which consists of signs on posts connected by twine marked with agging tape. Never intentionally force birds to y. When birds are chased or disturbed, they use energy they need for nesting and migration. T~n~T Hide-a-way, Inc.invites you to ourDEMO DAY-Native Watercraft and Liquid Logic KayaksSaturday, April 7, 2012 10 A.M. 4 P.M.Visit T~n~T Hideaway on the Wakulla River & Hwy. 98 and try out our new retail line of kayaks. WATERCRAFT Native WaterCraft Ultimate and Red sh Mariner Propel Drive Liquidlogic Mist, Intuit, Marvel Tandem Call (850) 925-6412 for more info or visit our website www.tnthideaway.comSales Representative On Site ASHLEY FEEDSTORE8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROADfor more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY& RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other services www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EAR JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Underwater WakullaBy Travis KerstingThey say that April showers bring May owers, and I hope that is the case for us this year. We need the rain more than the owers, but they are a de nite bonus. The warm weather has really made things bloom early and given many of us spring fever. The other possible issue we may face this year is the warmer weather that has kept the waters warmer. This may lead to more intense storms in the coming months. In future columns, I will be going over hurricane preparedness and how to keep yourself safe if we are to have a storm head our way. It never hurts to revisit what we know. In that same spirit, I have been thinking about the importance of Navigation Rules and how they apply to us. Many have grown up on the water and have learned to boat just like we learned to read and write, but there is a method to the madness of why we do what we do on the water. Over the weeks, I will be highlighting a Navigation Rule of the week. It is required that boaters have a copy of the navigation rules, published by the United States Coast Guard, on-board in order to pass the vessel safety check provided as a complimentary service by the Coast Guard Auxiliary. In the introduction of the Navigation Rules, it is explained that This manual contains the International Regulations for Prevention of Collisions at Sea, 1972 (72 COLREGS). It also contains the Inland Navigation Rules, which were enacted by law on 24 December 1980 and became effective for all Inland waters except the Great Lakes on 24 December 1981. The Inland Rules became effective on the Great Lakes on 1 March 1983. Some differences do remain between the International and Inland Rules. The side-by-side presentation of the Rules in this publication will allow mariners to determine those differences. Coastal rules apply to waters outside of established navigational lines of demarcation while the inland rules apply to the waters inside the lines of demarcation including rivers, lakes and other navigable waterways. Just like driving a vehicle, these rules are there to protect boaters and provide a common language for all out on the water. Coastal Rule No. 1a: These Rules shall apply to all vessels upon the high seas and in all waters connected therewith navigable by seagoing vessels. The rule further states that These Rules apply to all vessels upon the inland waters of the United States, and to vessels of the United States on the Canadian waters of the Great Lakes to the extent that there is no con ict with Canadian law. Both go on to further explain that unless there is imminent danger, the rules must be followed. However, all steps must be taken to avoid a collision, even breaking the rules. One last piece of information, Flotilla 12 will be moving our monthly meeting for April to April 14 due to Easter. We will be meeting at the Crawfordville Fire Station. Details next week on the exact time. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Knowing your navigation rules is important to being prepared and safe when out on the water. Does every person who visits the Grand Canyon actually hike its entire length? Does every person who wants to dive at Wakulla Springs want to dive to the limits of its exploration? The answer to both of those questions is NO and for very similar reasons. Many people do not care to spend the time and money required, nor undertake the rigorous effort required to hike the entire length of the 275-plus mile long canyon. Most are perfectly happy just driving to its edge and gazing over it from one or two spots. Facilities suitable for a far larger number of people rim viewing to a localized area is designed to be easily monitored and maintained. Wakulla Springs State Park is no different. They have just such a rim facility at the waters edge, with docks, anchored rafts, towers and boats, accommodating large numbers of curious visitors. But until now, visitors interested in viewing the underwater wonders of the park have been restricted to a select few who must enter through a costly private permit holder. To dive the cavern zone, that which is still illuminated by natural sunlight allows visitors to duck under the ledge for a better view. Cavern diving is less expensive or equipment intensive than cave diving. The cavern at Wakulla dwarfs that of most Florida caves and is a highly appealing recreational level site. However, visiting the cavern still requires an individual be cavern certi ed so they are aware and familiar with the dangers of an overhead environment. Cavern diving is the scuba equivalent to hiking down just below the rim of the Grand Canyon, gazing at it from the protection of the upper walls. Most cave diving visitors breathe Nitrox or Air and are limited to recreational depths of 130 feet. In Wakulla Springs, these depths are still in the zone of light, well outside of the dark part of the cave. Because of the sheer size of the spring, such a dive in Wakulla is spectacular. Hikers in Grand Canyon are still on short rim trails in this analogy. Depending upon who you ask, depths below recreational diving limits require the use of a gas mixture of helium, nitrogen and oxygen called Trimix. Helium is added to dilute the other two gases of oxygen and nitrogen, which may, if left undiluted, become toxic and narcotic respectively the deeper you go. Trimix, however, is expensive. As most open circuit divers know, the deeper you go, the more gas you breathe. Standard open circuit scuba diving would need to carry a lot of breathing gas for a two hour dive below 200 feet in Wakulla. The breathing gas bill alone to do this dive would be around $200. That doesnt include the training costs for full cave training, typically $1,500 to $2,000, and trimix training, an additional $1,200 to $1,500. A diver will have invested in the range of $6,000 to $15,000 in equipment before they enter the water. All of that to do the equivalent of a one day hiking trip in the Grand Canyon! Unlike the Grand Canyon, short of a well-funded group of divers like the WKPP, its doubtful many will hike the full length of Wakullas underwater world any time soon. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday p Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed Apr 11, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 1:51 AM 3.7 ft. 2:40 AM 3.7 ft. 3:27 AM 3.6 ft. 4:13 AM 3.3 ft. 5:01 AM 3.0 ft. 5:50 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:55 AM 0.5 ft. 8:30 AM 0.7 ft. 9:04 AM 0.9 ft. 9:37 AM 1.1 ft. 10:09 AM 1.4 ft. 10:43 AM -0.5 ft. 12:16 AM Low 3.7 ft. 2:05 PM 3.9 ft. 2:33 PM 4.0 ft. 3:03 PM 4.1 ft. 3:34 PM 4.1 ft. 4:06 PM 3.9 ft. 4:41 PM 2.7 ft. 6:45 AM High -0.3 ft. 8:25 PM -0.7 ft. 9:08 PM -0.9 ft. 9:51 PM -1.0 ft. 10:36 PM -0.8 ft. 11:24 PM 1.6 ft. 11:20 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:20 PM High Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed Apr 11, 12 Date 3.6 ft. 1:48 AM 3.8 ft. 2:37 AM 3.8 ft. 3:24 AM 3.6 ft. 4:10 AM 3.4 ft. 4:58 AM 3.1 ft. 5:47 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:52 AM 0.5 ft. 8:27 AM 0.7 ft. 9:01 AM 1.0 ft. 9:34 AM 1.2 ft. 10:06 AM 1.5 ft. 10:40 AM -0.6 ft. 12:13 AM Low 3.8 ft. 2:02 PM 3.9 ft. 2:30 PM 4.1 ft. 3:00 PM 4.2 ft. 3:31 PM 4.2 ft. 4:03 PM 4.0 ft. 4:38 PM 2.8 ft. 6:42 AM High -0.4 ft. 8:22 PM -0.8 ft. 9:05 PM -1.0 ft. 9:48 PM -1.0 ft. 10:33 PM -0.9 ft. 11:21 PM 1.7 ft. 11:17 AM Low 3.8 ft. 5:17 PM High Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed A p r 11, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 2:27 AM 3.4 ft. 3:16 AM 3.4 ft. 4:03 AM 3.3 ft. 4:49 AM 3.1 ft. 5:37 AM High 0.3 ft. 8:59 AM 0.4 ft. 9:34 AM 0.6 ft. 10:08 AM 0.8 ft. 10:41 AM 1.0 ft. 11:13 AM -0.7 ft. 12:28 AM -0.5 ft. 1:20 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:41 PM 3.6 ft. 3:09 PM 3.7 ft. 3:39 PM 3.8 ft. 4:10 PM 3.8 ft. 4:42 PM 2.8 ft. 6:26 AM 2.5 ft. 7:21 AM High -0.3 ft. 9:29 PM -0.7 ft. 10:12 PM -0.9 ft. 10:55 PM -0.9 ft. 11:40 PM 1.2 ft. 11:47 AM 1.4 ft. 12:24 PM Low 3.7 ft. 5:17 PM 3.4 ft. 5:56 PM High Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed Apr 11, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 1:43 AM 2.8 ft. 2:32 AM 2.8 ft. 3:19 AM 2.7 ft. 4:05 AM 2.5 ft. 4:53 AM 2.3 ft. 5:42 AM High 0.2 ft. 8:06 AM 0.3 ft. 8:41 AM 0.5 ft. 9:15 AM 0.7 ft. 9:48 AM 0.8 ft. 10:20 AM 1.0 ft. 10:54 AM -0.4 ft. 12:27 AM Low 2.8 ft. 1:57 PM 2.9 ft. 2:25 PM 3.0 ft. 2:55 PM 3.1 ft. 3:26 PM 3.1 ft. 3:58 PM 3.0 ft. 4:33 PM 2.0 ft. 6:37 AM High -0.2 ft. 8:36 PM -0.5 ft. 9:19 PM -0.7 ft. 10:02 PM -0.7 ft. 10:47 PM -0.6 ft. 11:35 PM 1.1 ft. 11:31 AM Low 2.8 ft. 5:12 PM High Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed Apr 11, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 1:35 AM 2.9 ft. 2:24 AM 2.9 ft. 3:11 AM 2.8 ft. 3:57 AM 2.6 ft. 4:45 AM 2.4 ft. 5:34 AM 2.1 ft. 6:29 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:34 AM 0.5 ft. 8:09 AM 0.7 ft. 8:43 AM 0.9 ft. 9:16 AM 1.1 ft. 9:48 AM 1.3 ft. 10:22 AM 1.5 ft. 10:59 AM Low 2.9 ft. 1:49 PM 3.0 ft. 2:17 PM 3.1 ft. 2:47 PM 3.2 ft. 3:18 PM 3.2 ft. 3:50 PM 3.1 ft. 4:25 PM 2.9 ft. 5:04 PM High -0.3 ft. 8:04 PM -0.7 ft. 8:47 PM -0.9 ft. 9:30 PM -1.0 ft. 10:15 PM -0.8 ft. 11:03 PM -0.5 ft. 11:55 PM Low Thu Apr 5, 12 Fri Apr 6, 12 Sat Apr 7, 12 Sun Apr 8, 12 Mon Apr 9, 12 Tue Apr 10, 12 Wed A p r 11, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:47 AM 2.6 ft. 2:51 AM 2.6 ft. 3:53 AM 2.5 ft. 4:55 AM 2.5 ft. 5:59 AM 2.3 ft. 7:07 AM 2.2 ft. 8:20 AM High 0.7 ft. 7:18 AM 0.9 ft. 7:54 AM 1.2 ft. 8:27 AM 1.4 ft. 8:59 AM 1.5 ft. 9:31 AM 1.6 ft. 10:06 AM 1.7 ft. 10:52 AM Low 2.4 ft. 1:35 PM 2.6 ft. 1:57 PM 2.7 ft. 2:22 PM 2.9 ft. 2:52 PM 3.0 ft. 3:27 PM 3.0 ft. 4:08 PM 2.8 ft. 4:57 PM High 0.1 ft. 7:38 PM -0.1 ft. 8:21 PM -0.3 ft. 9:07 PM -0.4 ft. 9:56 PM -0.4 ft. 10:51 PM -0.3 ft. 11:54 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 5 April 11First April 28 Full April 6 Last April 13 New April 20Major Times 12:09 AM 2:09 AM 12:35 PM 2:35 PM Minor Times 6:12 AM 7:12 AM 7:03 PM 8:03 PM Major Times 1:02 AM 3:02 AM 1:30 PM 3:30 PM Minor Times 6:53 AM 7:53 AM 8:11 PM 9:11 PM Major Times 1:58 AM 3:58 AM 2:27 PM 4:27 PM Minor Times 7:37 AM 8:37 AM 9:22 PM 10:22 PM Major Times 2:56 AM 4:56 AM 3:27 PM 5:27 PM Minor Times 8:25 AM 9:25 AM 10:31 PM 11:31 PM Major Times 3:57 AM 5:57 AM 4:28 PM 6:28 PM Minor Times 9:19 AM 10:19 AM 11:39 PM 12:39 AM Major Times 4:59 AM 6:59 AM 5:29 PM 7:29 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:16 AM 11:16 AM Major Times 6:00 AM 8:00 AM 6:29 PM 8:29 PM Minor Times 12:40 AM 1:40 AM 11:18 AM 12:18 PM Better Best Better Better Average Average Average7:21 am 7:58 pm 7:03 pm 6:13 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:20 am 7:59 pm 8:12 pm 6:54 am 7:18 am 7:59 pm 9:22 pm 7:38 am 7:17 am 8:00 pm 10:32 pm 8:26 am 7:16 am 8:01 pm 11:39 pm 9:19 am 7:15 am 8:01 pm --:-10:17 am 7:14 am 8:02 pm 12:41 am 11:19 am88% 96% 96% 88% 81% 73% 65% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org L.P.T.( 850 ) 528-4985PROFESSIONAL POOL MAINTENANCEpoolproblems?atthelowestratesweoffermaintenanceandservice!Servicing Swimming Pools and Spas for over 10 yearsTitus Langston850528-4985Commercial Residential Licensed & InsuredYouve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 2, There will be delays in the processing of new court cases and new dockets with a smaller amount of money going to the states clerks of courts under the budget passed last month by lawmakers. Lawmakers are expected to send the proposed new budget (HB 5001) soon to Gov. Rick Scott, including a 7 percent cut in the budget for the clerks, which comes on top of a more than 15 percent hit the clerks took a couple years ago. While some activities will take precedence criminal matters and certain civil cases that have statutory time frames for when things must be processed clerks say there will be inevitable delays for many people who use the court system, from people in foreclosures, to those seeking a divorce, or those battling over small claims. In the rst quarter, we could be as much as 10 days behind, and as you go forward you end up at the end of the year some 40 days behind, said Karen Rushing, clerk of court in Sarasota County. And some days, there may not be anyone at the court clerks of ce to help you. Were seriously talking about reduced hours, Rushing said. A number of other clerks say theyre contemplating closing of- ces early to hit the budget requirement. Statewide, the hit is just over $30 million. The previous cuts have already reduced staff, but thats the largest cost in the system, so thats where cuts will have to occur to meet the required reduction, said Ken Burke, clerk of court in Pinellas County, and president of the Florida Association of Court Clerks & Comptrollers. The effects will be broadly felt, Burke said. Foreclosures, obviously, will be affected, Burke said. Another one thats going to be especially frustrating is landlord-tenant issues. Normal business litigation, small claims, all those types of (cases) where people are looking to the courts for a remedy. Once the Legislature sends the budget to Scott he has 15 days to sign it, but has line item veto power. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA Wakulla County man found guilty of trying to steal beer from Wal-Mart was sentenced to four years in prison. It took less than 15 minutes for the six-person jury to return a guilty verdict against Jamie Deibert for grand theft after his oneday trial on Thursday, March 29. Since Deibert had been previously convicted of a felony, Senior Circuit Judge William Gary went ahead with sentencing Deibert. Prosecutor Lorena Vollrath-Bueno showed a surveillance video from Aug. 26 of Deibert and another man, Garland Landers, entering the store, each grabbing a shopping cart, and then heading to the beer aisle where they loaded up 18 cases of beer. The two men then attempted to walk past the cashiers without paying. When confronted by a Wal-Mart employee, the two men ran from the store to Landers truck in the parking lot. A sheriffs deputy was waved down and pursued the truck until it started speeding and forcing other cars off the road in an attempt to escape. But the deputy recognized the truck as belonging to Landers he had given the man a ticket a week earlier for driving without a tag. Meanwhile, Landers and Deibert apparently ditched the truck and went to Landers house and called the sheriffs of ce to make a report that the truck had been stolen earlier in the day. Already suspecting Landers and Deibert of trying to steal the beer at Wal-Mart, deputies went to the home and took the report of the stolen car which then added another felony charge of making a false report to law enforcement. Landers took a plea deal for the charges and was sentenced to six months in jail followed by two years of felony drug offender probation. He has already been released from the jail sentence, but is reportedly back in jail on a violation of probation. Assistant Public Defender Matt Ream defended Deibert at trial, and contended the man had done nothing wrong. The area where Deibert and Landers were confronted by an employee was past the cashiers, Ream said, but there is still merchandise for sale there ice, newspapers and other items. You can lawfully be there with the stores property, he said. Ream contended that Deibert was going into the area to get ice. As for the charge of making a false report, Ream conceded to that, but said Deibert was not doing anything more than protecting his friend. Deibert had an extensive criminal record going back to 2001 with numerous drug and alcohol charges, mostly misdemeanors. He was convicted of felonies in Georgia for aggravated battery and aggravated assault in 2003, and was on probation in Volusia County for aggravated assault with a rearm, drug possession and false imprisonment. In other court matters this week: Becky Smith was found not guilty of planning a robbery of the Murphy Oil station at Wal-Mart back in March 2009. Smith was not alleged to have taken part in the robbery, which only resulted in the theft of a couple of cell phones, but she had just been fired from the store a few days before the robbery. At about 5 a.m. that day, a man entered the gas station with a shotgun, obviously familiar with the stores routines. When it was apparent the clerk on duty couldnt open the safe, the man took two cell phones one belonging to the store and the other to the clerk. Daniel Brown was later charged with the robbery, along with Jessica Watson who is the daughter of Smiths boyfriend, now her husband. Smith went to trial on Tuesday, March 27, on a charge of armed robbery with a rearm and conspiracy. Her attorney, Cliff Davis, noted that Brown and Watson, who are in the Wakulla County Jail, had managed to communicate through letters and jail trustees with the implication that the pair had conspired to implicate Smith with a role in the robbery. The jury was out for 30 minutes before returning a not guilty verdict. Centennial Bank led a lawsuit to foreclose on Southpoint Industries, the Panacea restaurant supply store, claiming the bank is owed nearly $700,000 in defaulted loans. According to the lawsuit, Wakulla Bank issued a note back in November 2006 as well as a line of credit to George Black, owner of the company, back in 2009. Black died last year. Centennial, which took over for Wakulla Bank last year, claims in the lawsuit that, as of July 2011, the promissory note is in default and, as of March 14, the bank is owed $604,152 of which more than $572,000 is principal. Payments have failed to be made on the line of credit since August 2011 and, as of March 14, the bank is owed more than $68,679. The lawsuit is filed against Southpoint and Rebecca Black as successor trusteee to the George Thomas Black Revocable Trust. Centennial Bank, as successor to Gulf State Bank, led a lawsuit against Spears Small Engines claiming the company defaulted on a note and mortgage of more than $307,000. The lawsuit also notes that the State of Florida is seeking more than $26,000 in unpaid sales tax from the company. It also notes there are unpaid taxes on the property of $6,946 for the years 2008 and 2009, and that the 2010 taxes are likely unpaid as well. Lynda Hutcheson was found guilty in a trial on Friday, March 30, of criminal use of personal identi cation information, grand theft and exploitation of the elderly. Hutchesons 100-year-old grandmother testified at the trial that she lost more than $18,000 as Hutcheson withdrew money from her account, reportedly to buy drugs. Hutcheson is to be sentenced by Judge William Gary in April. She faces a minimum-mandatory sentence of three years for the ID theft charge.Court shortsCut in clerks budget will cause delaysTax of ce employees have a scuf eBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTwo female employees at the county tax collectors of ce apparently got into an argument recently and it reached the point where one of the women was waiting outside the of ce in her car for the other woman, threatening to beat up the other woman and run over her. The employee, Laura Bess Rogers, who felt threatened, apparently did not contact the sheriffs office to file criminal charges, but she did describe the events in seeking to have a temporary injunction imposed against the other employee, Janel Raker Stringer. The request for an injunction was denied by Circuit Judge Charles Dodson because there were not multiple incidents of violence to justify an injunction. Its not clear from the court le what started the disagreement, but it escalated to where Stringer allegedly threatened to beat up Rogers, according to the petition. Tax Collector Cheryll Olah and the two employees were locking up the of ce, and Stringer apparently went outside to her vehicle and parked next to Rogers car, according to the petition. Olah went to talk to Stringer, who reportedly said that she was going to beat the other employee up and run over her. Olah told the employee to leave the property. Asked about the incident, Olah con rmed that there was a disagreement between employees, but stressed it was after hours and did not involve the public. We did have a confrontation, Olah said, but she said the issue has been resolved and both employees were reprimanded for their roles. By TODD SCHROEDERFlorida Forest ServiceThis time of year it is common for severe weather to impact the area. We often experience heavy rains and frequent lightning strikes. Fires caused by lightning may go undetected initially because the burning is occurring beneath the surface of the ground burning hot and eventually making its way to the surface and causing a wild re. Recently two wildfires were credited to lightning strikes in our area: One of these wild res burned across 82 acres of swampland; last week equipment use caused a wildfire in Midway that burned 7.5 acres and threatened several homes. The week of April 913 is Wildfire Awareness Week where Floridians are reminded of the devastation caused by the wild res in 1998 throughout the state. Almost 80 percent of all wild res in Florida are caused by human carelessness. In the Tallahassee area, the No. 1 cause of wild res is due to escaped debris burning. When burning yard waste outdoors these guidelines should be followed: Your re must be contained in an 8-foot diameter pile or non-combustible barrel and must be located at least 25 feet from your house and any forestland, 50 feet from a paved public road and 150 feet from other occupied buildings. Avoid burning on windy days or when humidity is below 30 percent. Stay With It. Never leave your re unattended. Make sure it is dead out before leaving. Homeowners can increase their wild re awareness by doing the following: Clean rooftops and gutters of pine needles and branches that may easily catch re. Clear at least 30 feet around your home where nothing can burn so your home becomes more defendable in the event of wild re. Keep your yard mowed and clear of all dead debris.Be aware of the risk of wild re TheNews Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408 Special OfferNew Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County Only ChargeVisa ToMastercard MyDiscover rr s Acct. No._____________________ Exp. Date_______________ Signature_______________ Name_______________________ Phone#_____________________ Address_____________________ City, State___________________ Zip________Enclosed is my check or money order payable toor:Offer available until 4/30/2012877-401-6408Get 10 Months for $20.12straight to your mailbox This is not a trick NO FOOLINwww.thewakullanews.com Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn March 22, a 78-yearold Sopchoppy man struck three highway signs with his motor vehicle in the Medart area. Deputy Mike Zimba conducted a traf c stop at Wakulla High School and the man struck a support pole in the high school parking lot. Deputy Zimba determined that the motorist was a diabetic and had not eaten in some time. The driver did not remember hitting any signs and felt weak and dizzy. The motorist was assisted by a relative who brought him something to eat. The motorists vehicle suffered $500 worth of damage and the road signs suffered $300 worth of damage. There was no damage to the pole at the high school due to the slow speed of the vehicle. The man was not charged due to suffering from a medical condition. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On March 22, Justin Ward of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim stated that someone entered his shed and removed an electric leaf blower. The equipment was valued at $10. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On March 22, Anna Hinsey of Crawfordville reported the theft of a telephone from her home. The victim found the box empty when she went to look for the phone. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On March 22, Michael Porter of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft. Electrical motors and tools, valued at $7,170, were reported missing. A fence was cut to enter the property. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On March 22, Deputy Clint Beam investigated a traf c crash on Tiger Hammock Road. An overturned vehicle was observed on the side of the road near Shadeville Highway but nobody was with the vehicle. Two individuals of interest have been identified as the case investigation continues. On March 22, Robert Moore of Crawfordville reported the theft of his wallet. The wallet was taken from the victims vehicle. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On March 22, Janith Turner of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims Social Security number to le a tax return. Sgt. Mike Helms investigated. On March 22, Dolly Mitchell of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department reported the theft of a fire extinguisher from Hudson Park. The unit is valued at $106. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On March 22, Lt. Steve Ganey investigated a dog bite on Klickitat Drive in Crawfordville involving a 10-year-old female. The victim and her mother were cleaning a shed when they disturbed a nest of wasps. The wasps attacked the family dog that leaped forward and attacked the juvenile. The child suffered deep lacerations to her lip, nose, and eye. EMS treated the child at the scene and transported her to the emergency room. The Animal Control Unit was contacted and took possession of the mixed bulldog. On March 23, Lucas Degennaro of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to file his tax return and was informed that someone had already used his Social Security number. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. On March 23, Deputy Ben Steinle investigated a traf c crash at 1321 Coastal Highway in Panacea. Claudeane Virginia Frank, 19, of Tampa was driving westbound on the highway when she began to slow down. Richard Eugene Gilbert, 62, of Suwanee, Ga., was riding a motorcycle behind Frank and failed to observe her slowing down. The motorcycle struck the rear of Franks vehicle causing disabling damage to the motorcycle. Gilbert suffered a broken leg and was treated by EMS personnel. There were no injuries to Frank or her passenger, Emily B. Gwynn, 22, of Tallahassee. On March 23, Sherry Bramblett of the Wakulla County Health Department reported the theft of currency. A cash box was determined to be missing and was recovered with less than $100 cash missing from it. A suspect has been identi ed. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On March 23, David Thompson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft as a suspect, who has been identi ed, sold his belongings at yard sales. The victim attempted to collect his belongings from a Crawfordville residence and discovered that the items, valued at $5,742, were gone. The suspect admitted selling the items. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On March 23, Kevin James of Apalachicola reported a residential burglary in Sopchoppy. The home is being renovated following a re and $5,160 worth of copper, air conditioning units, steel cookers, hot water heater, air conditioning handler and a central air conditioning unit, was stolen. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On March 23, Armando Lara of Crawfordville reported a traffic crash on Wakulla Arran Road. The victim swerved to avoid hitting a deer and struck a tree. No injuries were reported and vehicle damage was estimated at $2,500. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. On March 23, Richard Bramblett of Crawfordville reported the theft of a wood chipper from his garage. The chipper is valued at $450. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On March 23, Charles Sanders of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a wallet from his home. A suspect has been identified. The wallet and contents are valued at $1,400. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On March 23, Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated the theft of shing equipment from the Newport boat ramp. A 16-year-old male reported that he left his shing equipment next to a tree while he loaded his kayak. After realizing he left the equipment, he returned to the ramp and the equipment was missing. The equipment is valued at $870. On March 24, a 17year-old female reported the theft of a bicycle from a Crawfordville home. The bike is valued at $80. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On March 24, Merritt Taylor of Panacea reported a residential burglary. The victim noticed a forced entry as windows were broken out. The victim is working to determine the value of items that were taken from the home. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On March 25, a structure re was reported by a motorist on Roberts-Williams Road in Crawfordville. An uninhabited trailer was on re when Wakulla re ghters arrived on the scene. The re was suspicious in nature and the State Fire Marshal was called to investigate. Deputy Cole Wells and Detective Rob Giddens investigated. On March 25, Richard Vanmunster of Panacea reported a grass fire on Mashes Sands Road. A small grass re spread to a privacy fence. Vanmunster was burning leaves earlier in the day and the re started up again after being put out. The Wakulla County Fire Department put out the blaze. The re damaged the victims fence. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On March 25, Patricia Tadlock reported a criminal mischief in St. Marks. Someone spread lipstick and polish on the victims walls and sidewalk. Damage was estimated at $600. Other victims in the area reported similar incidents. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. On March 25, Debra Vaillancourt of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. A suspect, who was identi ed, took the victims vehicle from her home and it was involved in a traf c accident in Leon County. The suspect was arrested for DUI in Leon County and c harges in Wakulla County are pending. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. On March 25, Lisa Lynn Ross, 43, of Tallahassee was issued a notice to appear in court for contributing to the delinquency of a minor. FWC Of cer Charles Mallow investigated a report of an adult exhorting juveniles to jump off the lower Wakulla River Bridge. Two female juveniles jumped and had difficulty swimming and had to be picked up by a river boater. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On March 26, Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated a hit-and-run involving property damage owned by Talquin Electric Cooperative. On Summerwind Circle North, a motorist struck a power pole and broke it in half. Vehicle parts were recovered at the scene. Damage to the power pole was estimated between $1,500 and $2,000. On March 26, Robert Lowther of St. George Island reported a criminal mischief. Someone tore down the fence at his Panacea residence. Evidence suggested that a motorist caught the fence on a trailer hitch and pulled the fence down by driving away. Damage was estimated at $100. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. On March 23, Everett Nutting Jr. of Crawfordville reported recovering a wallet on the side of the road near Crawfordville Highway and Oak Ridge Road. The wallet contained identi cation for a man in Tallahassee. The owner was located and said he would retrieve the wallet. The wallet was turned over to the property custodian. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. On March 26, Anne English of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported unauthorized withdrawals of money from her account. The total amount of the theft was $857. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On March 26, John Bookout of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Several items were reported missing from the yard and sheds on the property. The property included tools, saws, generator, air compressor and more, valued at $1,801. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On March 27, Gloria Jones of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the home and moved items but nothing has been reported missing. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On March 27, Janet Creel of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Medications were taken from the victims home. The stolen property is valued at $500 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. On March 27, Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated a fight involving two boys in Crawfordville. The ght resulted in injuries to both combatants, who are related. Sgt. Mitchell treated the boys until they could be checked by EMS staff. They were turned over to their mother and no charges were led. On March 27, Michael Jones of Crawfordville reported a re involving a hot water heater. Firefighters contained the fire to the water heater and the incident was contained before it could spread to the home. Two juveniles were inside the home at the time smoke was observed. They left the home and contacted a parent. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. On March 27, Harry Menendez of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Two unauthorized charges appeared on the victims bank statement totaling $690. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. On March 27, Ray Gray of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Someone removed aluminum siding, doors, windows, appliances and wiring from a rental home. The property was valued at $1,200. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. On March 23, a 49year-old Carrabelle woman who attempted to send money overseas by using a Crawfordville mailing business requested to speak to a deputy. Detective Matt Helms had spoken to the woman in February when he urged the victim to reconsider sending money at that time since he believed she was about to become a victim of a fraud. The victim lost $3,000 as well as a package she sent to someone she believed to be in the military. A telephone she sent was traced to Ghana and there was a $2,400 charge on her phone bill. Verizon Wireless and the FBI are investigating. On March 24, a small sinkhole opened up next to Maxson Road west of Spring Creek Highway in the Wakulla Gardens region of Crawfordville. The hole was four feet wide and three feet deep but did not impact the road itself. Wakulla County Public Works lled in the hole and the sinkhole was recorded in the state sinkhole data base. On March 28, Heather Hawkins-Heierman of Crawfordville reported a fraud as she observed an unauthorized charge on her bank account. The transaction occurred through a debit card and the monetary loss was $939. On March 28, Detective Derek Lawhon was escorting a Leon County Sheriffs Office detective investigating a case in Wakulla County when the two detectives discovered a marijuana plant in plain view next to a door at the home they were investigating. The plant was seized as evidence but no charges have been led. On March 28, Jennifer Sutton of Panacea reported a grand theft in Crawfordville. A punching bag was stolen from the Bridlewood Apartment complex. The bag and stand are valued at $350. On March 28, Joyce Hope of Crawfordville reported fraudulent charges on her bank account. Four charges were observed from South Florida for a total of $1,926. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 722 calls for service during the past week. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAAYARD SALEAPRIL 6 & 7 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS! BIGHOP INTOAPRILS www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comEaster Egg Hunt CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Hannah Crook, 3, shows off her Easter basket after the egg hunt on Saturday, March 31, at Azalea Park; boys investigate a re engine; waiting for a turn on the moon bounce; kids are set loose; a mom helps with the hunt. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENMore photos online at thewakullanews.net VisitWakullaThe Natural Place to Be in FloridaThank You to our Sponsors FULLSERVICEFAMILYSALONTake advantage of Spring/ Summer RatesAsk for our monthly specials! FEATHER LOCKS are here!! 850745-8414 850 745-8414WALK-INSWELCOME!3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree)We offer exible hours starting at 10AM (TUE-FRI) and at 9AM on SAT HAIRSALO N Boo k You r Pr om Appoint mentNOW !10% OFFW/THIS ADEXP. 5/1/12 Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida

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By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentThe Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce understands that in order to have a strong economic environment, you must have a community that supports, nurtures and encourages growth and innovative thinking. We are blessed to have leaders, business owners, educators, as well as private citizens who recognize we all share in the responsibility of creating economic success and stability in addition to creating a healthy environment for our children. The Chamber is taking an active approach in the countys future. Mission: The Chambers mission is to provide a forum to facilitate and build relationships among business owners. Our goal is to promote, improve and enhance the business community we serve. Area We Serve: The Chamber serves all of Wakulla County. What is the Chamber doing for our community and members? The Chamber responds to inquiries about our business community and its opportunities. We greet newcomers to our community and guide them to our businesses and any needed resources. We engage the business community in the public education process and actively seek input from our membership. We provide an informational gathering center for the business community. We are the focal point for social gatherings of the business community where an exchange of ideas and services can take place. We are a voice to keep our elected of cials aware of the communitys feelings on issues affecting our business community. We continue to be a rallying point and instrument for the promotion of plans, ideas and projects that sustain an environment conducive to free enterprise and economic growth. We provide networking opportunities through monthly luncheons and evening mixers. By attending these events, Chamber members stay connected. The Chamber hosts ribbon cuttings and groundbreaking ceremonies with photos published in the Chamber newsletter and our local newspaper, as well as other media outlets. In addition, we focus on one business each month with the monthly Spotlight on Business column. We honor our businesses for their outstanding achievements and contributions to the community at our annual Business Excellence Awards Banquet. This year, more than 80 nominations were received and applications have been sent to those businesses that were nominated. Continued on Page 3B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Taking Care of Business Taking Care of Business Business News from Business News from Chamber hosts its 2nd annual Low Country BoilBy PETRA SHUFFSpecial to The NewsThe Chamber held its second Annual Low Country Boil on Saturday, March 10, presented by Capital City Bank, The Wakulla News and Waste Pro. Superlube held a special fundraiser a week prior, donating $3 from every oil change to the coffers. A special thanks to Superlube; and Becca and Chuck Daugherty and Petra Shuff for manning the grills on a stormy Saturday. Our special events committee, led by Pam Allbritton, began preparations in January, and had been working diligently since then to bring this community event to Wakulla County and the surrounding area. The weekly planning sessions and phone calls promoting the boil, selling sponsorships and tickets, resulted in a sold-out event a few days before the deadline. More than 320 people checked in, and quickly filled up the arena at 3Y Ranch. We had visitors come from Live Oak, and as far away as Chicago to experience our boil. Cooking for that many people was made a lot easier this year by Mike Bettinger, who didnt hesitate to offer his help and gigantic pot. Thanks Mike! JBs Zydeco Zoo was again a crowd pleaser, and the fiery Cajun and rock tunes kept people on the dance oor, which was assembled by our cook crew the evening before. I think it is safe to say that everyone had a great time! A special thank you goes to local AVID students for lending a hand with set up and clean up, NROTC for their help getting everyone parked and Mary Katherine Westmark for taking pictures. We want to thank the following sponsors for their support and making this event a success: PREMIER SPONSORS: Capital City Bank, The Wakulla News and Waste Pro. CORPORATE SPONSORS: Wakulla Insurance a division of Roger, Gunter, Vaughn Insurance, Progress Energy, Student Housing Solutions/Bridlewood Apartments, Wakulla.com, Royal Restrooms, Lamar Advertising, Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association, Tri-Eagle Budweiser, Wal-Mart and a special thank you to 3Y Ranch for furnishing our venue. AMBASSADOR SPONSORS: Shields Marina and Dry Storage, Best Western Plus, St. Marks Powder, Frances Casey Lowe Esq., Rainbow International, Refreshment Services Pepsi, WAVE 94, Mike Bettinger, Comprehensive Energy Solutions Heating and Air, Alan Brock chairman, Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners, Wakulla L.P. Gas. TABLE SPONSORS: Centennial Bank, Crawfordville Auto and Tire, Ochlockonee Bay Volunteer Fire Department, Democratic Executive Committee, Ed Gardner O.D., Inspired Technologies, Maurice Langston and friends, Synovus Mortgage Corporation, Wakulla Realty. $100 Sponsors: Alvin Peters for Congress, Ameris Bank, Angies Marine Supplies, Auto Trim Signs and Design, Ben Withers, Blue Water Realty, Brick Launcher LLC, Brooks Concrete, Carroll Appraisal, Commissioner Jerry Moore, Cook Insurance Agency, Costco, The Donut Hole, Hydra Engineering, John and Petra Shuff, Keith Key Heating and Air, Kimberly Moore, Lisas Listings, Lube Xpert, Mikes Marine, Quill Turk, State Rep. Leonard Bembry, Stewardship Drycleaners, Super Lube, Sights and Sounds, Talquin Electric, Two Blondes Liquors & Gifts, Wildwood Country Club. We are looking forward to next year, and if you have any suggestions for improvement, please give us a shout. Presidents MessageChamber is there for local business SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Spotlight: Printing on DemandMarch luncheon Business, Page 3B Workforce Plus offers program on employment law Page 4B All eyes are on the Supreme Court and the health care la wsuit Weekly Roundup, Page 5B Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943 ) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, April 13 F riday, April 27 Friday, May 11 Friday, May 25 Friday, June 8 Friday, June 22 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, April 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, April 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, April 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at 7 p.m. in the library. Tuesday, April 10 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more inf ormation. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, April 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. LA MESA ESPAOLA se reunir a last 12:30 p.m. para almorzar en La Parrillada, 2000 Crawfordville Hwy. Este es un grupo social que se rene informalmente para practicar el idioma espaol a todo nivel (nativos o principiantes). Todos estn invitados a participar. Para ms informacin llame a Cathy al 509-7129 a Denise al 570-1350.Special EventsThursday, April 5 WORKFORCE plus Training Academy class on Microsoft Word will be offered from 2 to 4 p.m. at 3278 G Crawfordville Highway. Training Academy is a no-cost service where students learn to use Microsoft programs such as Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. Pre-registration is required. To register or to learn more, visit www.wfplus.org or call 1-866-WFP-JOB1. LANDSCAPING FOR BIRDS CLASS will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. Topics covered include selecting growing the plants birds like, designing a yard setting to observe birds, and yard features that encourage birds to visit. Call (850) 926-3931 for more information. Friday, April 6 CHELSEA DIX KESSLER AND FRANK LINDAMOOD will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. This concert is a fundraising show to raise money to send them into the recording studio. Tickets are $10. For reservations, email poshjava@ gmail.com or call (850) 962-1010. This duo will perform original and traditional Old Time, Gospel, and Bluegrass music with vocals, ddle, banjo and guitar. Saturday, April 7 RELAY FOR LIFE will host a Lion Painting Festival from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Azalea Park in Crawfordville. There will be food, entertainment, vendors, and painting the lion. For more information, contact Kristin Dow at kdv6@embarqmail. com or call 926-8854. FREE DIGITAL PHOTO CLASS at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge from 9 a.m. to noon. The class is free for adults and families are welcome. The class includes the basics of photography, including how to get better results from your digital camera using presets. Digital photo classes are held in the Natures Classroom adjacent to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center. Registration is required, call 925-6121. The class is taught by Ranger Barney Parker, former FSU photography instructor. DEMO DAY FOR NATIVE WATERCRAFT AND LIQUID LOGIC KAYAKS will be held at T-n-T Hide-a-way, on the Wakulla River and Highway 98, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 925-6412 for visit www.tnthideaway.com. Monday, April 9 WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, April 10 DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will hold a public meeting at 12:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. April is Sexual Violence Awareness Month so a video, A View from the Shadow, will be shown which portrays the suffering of children and their families who have been sexually abused by someone they all trusted. There will also be guest speakers from the Child Protection Team, Michelle Harkness and Kendra Walker. Lunch will be provided. Call 926-9005 for more information. Thursday, April 12 WAKULLA COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. The duties and responsibilities of elected Soil and Water Conservation District Of cials will be the topic. Join committee members and representatives of both the Wakulla and Leon County Soil and Water Conservation Districts. The meeting is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served at 6:30 p.m.Upcoming EventsFriday, April 13 RIBBON CUTTING for First Bank, Senior Products Division at 11:45 a.m. at the chamber of ce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville. SPRING PRODUCTION FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae in the auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a show on Saturday night and Sunday afternoon. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission. Final Flick at The Flamingo by Susan Solburg roughly parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre and how it was the best teenage hang-out ever invented. THE SARAH MAC BAND will perform at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. For reservations, contact poshjava@gmail.com or phone (850) 962-1010. Saturday, April 14 SOPCHOPPY WORM GRUNTIN FESTIVAL will be held in downtown Sopchoppy from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. There will be several arts and craft vendors. There will be music, demonstrations, worm gruntin contest, crowning of king and queen, horseshoe championship, bait casting contest, hula hoop contest and worm grunters ball. There is no cost. For more information, visit www.wormgruntinfestival.com or call 962-4138, during the daytime only. HEIDES 16TH ANNUAL ROSE SALE will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Highway. Proceeds bene t homeless animals and CHAT of Wakulla. Heirloom roses in a 3 gallon container will be sold for $7 each. For more information, call 926-3849 or 926-0890. Roses will also be sold on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road. RSVP to Carrie Stevens by calling 274-9474 or email carriejstevens@ comcast.net. Children need to bring their favorite train and a good wholesome snack and drink. FIFTH ANNUAL RALLY FOR THE CURE BREAST CANCER GOLF TOURNAMENT will be held at Wildwood Golf Course. This event is being sponsored by Capital City Bank and will bene t the Susan G. Komen Foundation. For more information, contact Karen Waters, Human Resource Director, Wildwood Golf and Inn at Wildwood, at karen.wildwood@aol.com or by phone at 926-1222 or 926-4653. GROW MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES CLASS on Bugs and Water will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Learn to identify the good and bad insects that visit the garden and orchard. Call (850) 926-3931 for more information. SPRING PRODUCTION FINAL FLICK AT THE FLAMINGO will be performed by the Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae at the auditorium at 7:30 p.m. There will also be a show on Sunday afternoon. The cost for students is $4 and for adults $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission. Final Flick at The Flamingo by Susan Solburg roughly parallels her own high school years as it reminisces about the days of the drive-in movie theatre and how it was the best teenage hang-out ever invented. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Landscaping for birds class at the extension of ce at 7 p.m. Chelsea Dix Kessler and Frank Lindamood perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Relay for Life Paint the Lion Party from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Azalea Park. Free digital photo class at St. Marks Wildlife Refuge from 9 a.m. to noon. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsMonday, April 9 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. By SCOTT JOYNERWCPL Interim DirectorEaster weekend closing/AARP Tax Prep The library will be closed this Friday, April 6 and Saturday, April 7 for the Easter weekend. You can still drop off items that are due in our drop box outside. AARP will still be doing their free tax preparation in our Main Meeting Room from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturday. You can only enter through the door at the south end of the building as the main part of the library will be closed. We will reopen on Tuesday, April 10. We wish all of our patrons a safe and happy long weekend. Movies based on books/Books based on movies The opening of the lm, Hunger Games on March 23 has caused a run of all three books in the Hunger Games trilogy at the library. This brought to mind all the great books we have that have been the basis for some classic movies and TV shows. For instance, one of my favorite shows, HBOs Game of Thrones is based upon George R.R. Martins A Song Ice and Fire series. Five of an eventual seven books have been printed, all of which we have at WCPL. Like the TV show Bones? Then you should check out (pun intended) the series of Kathy Reichs books that the show is based upon. If youve enjoyed the Denzel Washington lm of a few years back, The Bone Collector, did you realize that the book it was based on is only the rst in a bestselling series by Jeffrey Deaver? And lets not get started on all the Star Wars books which continue the story from the lms. Great lms back to the early days of movies have been based on books. Many childrens lms have also been based on books and vice versa. Come by and take a look at our collection and nd out what was left out of the lm or how the story continues! Special Movie Showing Even though the library will be closed on Friday, April 6 for Good Friday, due to popular demand, we will be showing the acclaimed lm based upon the bestselling childrens novel, Warhorse by Michael Morpurgo that evening. There will be a special start time of 6 p.m. for this lm. This lm directed by Hollywood legend Steven Spielberg, tells the tale of how at the outbreak of World War I, Joey, young Alberts beloved horse is sold to the cavalry and shipped to France. His rider Captain Nicholls is killed while riding Joey. The horse is soon caught up in the war; death, disease and fate take him on an extraordinary odyssey, serving on both sides before nding himself alone in no mans land. But Albert cannot forget Joey and, still not old enough to enlist in the British Army, he embarks on a dangerous mission to nd the horse and bring him home to Devon. Doors will open at 5:45 p.m. for this PG-13 (for violence) rated lm. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 3B Spotlight on Business Spotlight on Business Business News from Business News from The Chamber held a ribbon cutting for new member LKR Communication & Translations LLC on March 7. LKR is owned by Catherine R. Cameron, who has been a resident of Wakulla County since 1976. She recently retired from the League of Southeastern Credit Unions in Tallahassee after 18 years as a bi-lingual operations assistant and previously had retired from the IBM Corporation in Tallahassee, where she was also a bi-lingual administrative specialist. LKR will be available for Spanish-English document translations, conference calls, telephone excellence trainings, and telephone voiceover recordings. You can reach LKR Communication & Translations at (850) 509-7129. Tell us about your business: We are a full service commercial printing business. Been in business in Crawfordville since 2005. More than 30 years of printing experience. What services, products do you offer? We offer all types of printing, including business cards, yers, brochures, carbonless forms, invitations, post cards, door hangers, full color posters up to 42-inches wide, as well as engineering plans. We also do outdoor signs and banners, screen printed Tshirts, color and black-and-white copy service, fax and rubber stamps. Free pickup and delivery. We have recently added custom rhinestones on shirts to our list of services. What sets your business apart from the competition? We are the only full service printer in the county. What should the community/customer expect when they visit your business? Competitive prices and one-on-one customer service directly from the owner of the business. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 2006. Why did you join the Chamber? The local Chamber is voice of the business community. Joining just makes good business sense. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? Networking and bulk rate mailing. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Local support for local businesses is critical to their success. Nobody likes having to drive to Tallahassee for goods and services but without local support, businesses in Wakulla County will not thrive. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Call 926-4000, email dave@printingondemand.info, or visit in person at 2650-5 Crawfordville Highway (next to Pizza Hut), or fax 926-4060.Business: Printing On Demand Name of owner: David Dill SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChamber members at the LKR ribbon cutting.Ribbon cutting held for LKR Translations Luncheon catered by HamaknockersBy PETRA SHUFFSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Extension Office graciously offered the space for the Chambers networking luncheon held Wednesday, March 28. Hamaknockers catered an outstanding buffet style lunch of superb ribs, moist tender chicken, and scrumptious pork barbecue sandwiches, accompanied by macaroni and cheese, potato salad and slaw. Jim and Candy Lowe, you certainly pulled out all the stops for us and deserve special applause! Jim, who gets quite inventive marketing his restaurant, told the attending crowd of 45 about a new gift card for purchase. The card can be purchased at Hamaknockers, and can be recharged either at the restaurant or online. A special savings comes with this card: Preload $25 and you will get a 5 percent discount, preload $50 and you will get a 10 percent discount, and $100 preloaded will get you a whopping 20 percent discount on your dining pleasure. He then surprised everyone with a $5 gift card. What a great marketing strategy! A special thanks to Brandi Blue of The Donut Hole for supplying the wonderful assortment of desserts! Ed Stauffer, one of our newest members in attendance, introduced his business, Capital City Maintenance. Ed specializes in landscaping and lawn care, and pressure steam cleaning for residential and commercial properties. Ed had also offered his expertise to the Chambers landscaping committee upon joining just last month! Thank you, Ed! Susan Schatzman won the $45 cash prize. Again, we would like to thank our members for bringing 14 items for our raf e. Included were lotions donated by Graphic Visions, greeting cards, green shopping bags courtesy of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, a Spanish-English Dictionary from our new member LKR Communication and Translations, a travel coffee mug donated by Relay for Life, a beautiful and fun wall hanging donated by Lionel and Marianne Dazevedo, a gift certi cate for free service from Critter Control, an 1/8-page ad from The Wakulla News, a beautiful Easter ower basket from Mary at Cook Insurance and a rain barrel donated by the Extension Of ce. Upcoming events shared: Les Harrison, the new director of the extension of ce, introduced himself, happy to be serving our community and working together. He praised his team consisting of Cathy Frank, Sherri Kraeft and Shelley Swenson, who will be offering a series of gardening classes, camps and business workshops. To learn more about these, or to register, visit www.wakulla.ifas.ufl.edu. He also informed about several featured videos, ranging from making bees wax candles to coral ardisia, a series of gardening workshops and many more. Sherri Kraeft, local 4-H Agent, described ve different camps offered by 4-H, and invited everyone to join the second annual Jam 4 Camp, to be held at Hudson Park Saturday, April 28. More information again can be found on www.wakulla. ifas.u .edu. Cathy Frank told us about a Quilt Exhibit at the Wakulla County Historical Society, and silent auction to be held Friday, April 6. Kristin Dow spread the word about the 11th annual Relay for Life that will be held at the Wakulla High School Track April 20-21. Relay for Life is a fundraiser of the American Cancer Society. It is a place where we celebrate with those who have survived cancer, remember loved ones who have run out of time while science seeks a cure and ght back together against a disease that has already taken too much. Relay takes place overnight for 18 straight hours because cancer never sleeps and for one night, neither do we. There are games, food, activities and entertainment including fundraising opportunities all presented in a family-friendly environment for the entire community. For more information contact Kristin Dow, event chair, 926-8854, kdv6@mail. com or visit relayforlife. org/wakulla and visit us on facebook Relay For Life of Wakulla. Tammie Nason, with our local Southeast Eye Specialists, introduced their new optometrist, Sagar Amin, O.D. Dr. Amin promised to take care of your eye care needs any time you would like to visit the of ce at 2140 Crawfordville Highway. Continued from Page 1B If your business or organization had the honor of being nominated, please make sure your application is returned by April 16 to give our judges ample time for review. The Chamber provides its members and their employees opportunities to enhance their skills through online education through the Burt Poole Scholarship Program. We also offer brown bag luncheons geared speci cally to the business needs of our community. The Wakulla County Chamber truly believes that every business has a role in making our community great. We need to ensure businesses have an opportunity to thrive in every way and we provide them with the tools necessary to meet that objective. We are a voice for our businesses and that is one of the biggest bene ts we offer. Thank you for allowing me the time to tell you about our role in the community. Yours in service, Amy Geiger PresidentGeiger: Chamber is there for local business SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChamber ChatterNew members: Welcome Spring Creek Restaurant specializing in seafood; Southern Storage Solutions specializing in storage buildings; The UPS Store No. 6044 specializing in shipping/mailing; and FSM Associates LLC specializing in lobbying. Upcoming luncheon: April 25 at Spring Creek Restaurant. Upcoming ribbon cutting: First Bank Senior Products Division at the Chamber of ce, Friday, April 13 at 11:45 a.m. Upcoming after hours networking: Join us for Underwater Wakulla hosted by Wakulla Diving Center Thursday, April 19th from 5:30 7:30 p.m. Address: 2784 Coastal Highway, Medart. Refreshments will be served. RSVP to the Chamber of ce at 926-1848.Brown Bag Lunch SeriesThe Wakulla County Chamber is partnering with Workforce Plus to bring you the Brown Bag Lunch Series, quarterly 90-minute workshops that offer employers tools and techniques necessary to lead an ef cient and effective workplace. Registration is free but required. Seating is limited. Employee Retention April 18, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. This workshop explores why employees leave, how to improve the hiring process and identifying good hiring tips. How much is retention CO$TING your business? Con ict Management July 18, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. This workshop identi es the causes of con ict and how to handle it in a sensible, fair and ef cient manner. Its not a question of if con ict happens but rather when it occurs. Creating a Culture of Team Success Oct. 17, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. According to MIT Information Services and Technology, teamwork is People working together in a committed way to achieve a common goal or mission. The work is interdependent and team members share responsibility and hold themselves accountable for attaining the results. Call (850) 926-1848 or email wakullacochamber@ embarqmail.com. Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsAccording to Paul Reynolds, creator of the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, by the time they reach their retirement years, half of all working men in the United State will probably have a period of self-employment of one or more years; one in four may have engaged in self-employment of six or more years. Participating in a new business creation is a common activity among U.S. workers over the course of their lives. Do you have goods, services and talents that you feel would be marketable to others? Do you know how to assemble a business plan, how to market and brand your product? Consider attending the series offered by the FAMU Small Business Development Center and the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension. Three sessions will be held in the series. Interested persons can attend any and all of the sessions held on April 17, April 24 and May 1 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, in Crawfordville. The session topics are: Starting Your Business, Writing a Business Plan, and Marketing and Branding Your Business. The series is free. Call 926-3931 or e-mail sswenson@u .edu to indicate your intent. By JASON ALDERMAN If youre worried you wont be able to pay your income taxes by this years April 17 ling date, dont panic. But dont ignore the deadline and certainly dont wait for the IRS to reach out to you rst. Acting quickly not only gives you more repayment options, it can also signi cantly lower penalties you might owe the government. By not ling your 2011 federal tax return or asking for an extension by April 17, the penalty on any taxes you owe increases dramatically usually an additional 5 percent of taxes owed for each full or partial month youre late, plus interest, up to a maximum penalty of 25 percent. But le your return/extension on time and the penalty drops tenfold to 0.5 percent. Eventually, the IRS could even place a tax lien on your assets and future earnings. IRS tax repayment alternatives include: Pay by credit card. You will be charged a small convenience fee that is tax-deductible if you itemize expenses. Just be sure you can pay off your credit card balance within a few months, or the interest accrued might exceed the penalty. Short-term extension. If you can pay the full amount within 120 days, call the IRS at 800-8291040 and ask whether you qualify for a short-term extension. If granted, youll still owe interest but will avoid an application fee. Installment agreement. If you need longer, an installment agreement will let you pay your bill in monthly installments for up to ve years. If you owe $10,000 or less, youre guaranteed an installment agreement provided you have filed and paid all taxes for the previous ve years and havent had an installment agreement within that time. If you owe $25,000 or less and are in good standing, youll still likely qualify for a streamlined installment agreement. Over $25,000 you still may qualify, but may be required to le a detailed Collection Information Statement. Theres a $105 fee to enter an installment agreement. Its reduced to $52 if you set up a direct debit installment plan (or $43 for low-income lers). For rules and to apply, see the Online Payment Agreement Application at www. irs.gov or submit IRS Form 9465. Offer in Compromise. Under certain dire nancialhardship circumstances, the IRS may allow taxpayers with annual incomes of up to $100,000 to negotiate a reduction in the amount they owe through an Offer in Compromise. If youre unable to make payments on your installment agreement or offer in compromise, call the IRS immediately for alternative payment options, which could include reducing the monthly payment to re ect your current nancial condition. Nothing beats staying current on your taxes, but if you fear you may fall behind, explore these options before the penalties start snowballing.Jason Alderman directs Visas nancial education programs. Special to The NewsThe U.S. Department of Labor and the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity released gures relating to Februarys unemployment numbers today. The overall unemployment rate in the Workforce Plus tri-county area of Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla is 7.4 percent, not seasonally adjusted. The unemployment data numbers re ect an unemployment decrease of 0.3 percent since January as well as a decrease of 0.6 percent over the year. Leon and Wakulla counties both saw a decrease of 0.4 percent over the month, while Gadsden experienced a higher decrease at 0.5 percent. The Tallahassee metro area, Gadsden, Leon, Wakulla and Jefferson counties, had the third lowest unemployment rate in the state behind the Crestview-Ft Walton Beach-Destin and Gainesville metro areas. Our area continues to see job growth in industries such as Information, Financial Activities, Education and Health Services, Professional and Business Services and Other Services. Florida saw its lowest unemployment rate in three years at 9.4 percent, seasonally adjusted. This gure represents 869,000 jobless out of the 9,295,000 labor force. The U.S. unemployment rate was 8.3 percent in February. Floridas annual job growth rate has continued to increase for the past 19 months, while the unemployment rate has decreased over the month for the past eight months. Florida is seeing job growth over the year in seven industries: trade, transportation and utilities; private education and health services; professional and business services; leisure and hospitality; nancial; manufacturing; and other services. Unemployment numbers are a re ection of the overall health of the local economy, which is driven in large part by the health of area employers. That is why Workforce Plus, the leading employment and workforce authority for Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla counties, offers the Power Hour Lunch and Learn Seminar at no cost to local businesses. More than our way of giving back to the community, Power Hour is one of our responses to the need for ongoing support to businesses and employers, said Kimberly A. Moore, CEO of Workforce Plus. Workforce Plus serves the multi-faceted needs of thousands of employers at no cost through its Business and Employer Services department. With Power Hour, we offer the resources needed for businesses to grow, accelerate their development and boost their bottom line. Florida employers are swamped with thousands of employment lawsuits every year. Litigation is far more common than you think, because few employers arm themselves with the know-how necessary to keep their businesses and employees safe. The next Power Hour, The Employment Law Update for the Employer, will provide practical steps on complying with current employment laws and avoid potential lawsuits. The seminar will take place Thursday, April 26, from 11:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. at Regions Bank on Capital Circle Northeast. Lunch is provided. Space is limited and registration is required. To register, email wfp@wfplus.org with your name and company/organization. This business luncheon is provided at no cost to attendees through a sponsorship from Regions Bank. To learn more about Power Hour other opportunities available through the Business and Employer Services department at Workforce Plus, visit www.wfplus.org or call (850) 414-6085 or toll free at (866) WFP-JOB1. For TTY/ TTD use Florida Relay Service 711. By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 30 The states unemployment rate dipped in February to 9.4 percent, the lowest since February 2009, the state labor agency reported Friday. The rate was 0.2 percentage points lower than in January, and nearly a point and a half lower than a year ago. The Department of Economic Opportunity said, however, there remained 869,000 people looking for work out of a state labor force of just under 9.3 million, and Floridas rate remains well above the nations jobless rate of 8.3 percent. The state had more than 10,000 more jobs in February than it did in January, and DEO said the states number of jobs is up 1 percent over a year earlier. February was also a strong month for job creation nationally, and a number of economists have noted that its hard to separate how much of the job growth in any one location is rooted in the economic policies there versus just being part of the overall improving national economy. Job growth in the nation as a whole, however, has outpaced the recovery in Florida. While Florida has seen 1 percent job growth over the year, the state is actually holding the country as a whole back the nation has seen 1.5 percent job growth in the same time period. Still, Gov. Rick Scott, who came into of ce promising to put creating jobs rst, trumpeted the latest numbers. Floridas drop in its unemployment rate and increase in private sector job creation continues to prove our state is de nitely headed in the right direction, Scott said in a statement. The signing of my 2012 Jobs and Economic Development Package represents a signi cant step towards ensuring Florida is the best place in the nation to create, attract and retain jobs. DEO said that 346,000 people claimed bene ts this past month, down from a peak of 735,000 collecting unemployment in February of 2010. The slow economic recovery is starting to be noticed in state tax collections as well. Legislative economists reported this past week that corporate income tax collections are up and that general revenue collection was higher than expected in February. For the scal year, general-revenue collections are $74.6 million above earlier estimates, economists said. Transportation, trade and utilities led the job growth in Florida in February, followed by the private education industry and the health care sector. Construction, however, typically a mainstay of the Florida economy, remains sluggish. The construction industry lost jobs year over year, with construction jobs down 5.1 percent from February of 2011. The drop in private construction jobs was due in part to cut backs in state government spending, DEO said. But the slow housing market remains the main culprit. Monroe County, which is the Florida Keys, continued to have the states most robust employment picture, with only 5.4 percent unemployment. Walton and Okaloosa counties in the Panhandle, both of which have large numbers of military personnel, and Alachua County, home to the University of Florida, also had low unemployment rates, all 7 percent or lower. Despite Alachua Countys relatively low unemployment rate, Gainesville was one of the few metro areas that saw a net job loss in the month. Others were Pensacola and Port St. Lucie. Flagler County continued to struggle with the states highest out-of-work rate at 12.7 percent. Also above 12 percent in unemployment in February was Hernando County. The Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater area created the most new jobs during the period, creating just under 21,000, a 1.9 percent increase. Workforce Plus offers Power Hour programs for local employersEntrepreneurship series is availableCant pay your taxes? Try these tips State unemployment drops again METRO GRAPHICS LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 5BBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 30 First, the usual disclaimer: Its notoriously difficult to predict how the U.S. Supreme Court or many other courts, for that matter will decide complicated cases. But landmark Supreme Court hearings this week added fuel to the arguments of Attorney General Pam Bondi and other Florida Republicans that the 2010 federal health overhaul is unconstitutional. The Florida GOP has played a leading role in fighting the law, known as the Affordable Care Act. Former Attorney General Bill McCollum filed the constitutional challenge immediately after President Obama signed the law, and Bondi, who was elected in 2010, has become one of the overhauls most-visible critics. Conservative justices this week appeared to go along with the Republicans argument that the acts socalled individual mandate is unconstitutional. That part of the law would require almost all Americans to have health insurance in 2014 or pay a penalty. Perhaps most-worrisome to the Obama administration was that Justice Anthony Kennedy, widely considered a key swing vote, seemed to have doubts about Congress authority to impose such a requirement. I understand that we must presume laws are constitutional, but, even so, when you are changing the relation of the individual to the government in this unique way, do you not have a heavy burden of justi cation to show authorization under the Constitution? Kennedy asked U.S. Solicitor General Donald Verrilli. But more-liberal justices appeared to go along with the administrations argument that Congress had the power under the constitutions Commerce Clause. They said the cost of providing health care to the uninsured ultimately gets shifted to other people through higher insurance premiums. Those (uninsured) people are in commerce, Justice Elena Kagan said. They are making decisions that are affecting the price that everybody pays for this service. Other parts of the hearings, however, were more dif cult to parse. A particularly complicated question, for example, centers on whether the Supreme Court should throw out the entire 2,700-page law if it nds the individual mandate unconstitutional. Florida of cials also are watching closely to see whether justices will uphold part of the law that would lead to a major expansion of Medicaid. The Obama administration argues that Congress has always had the power to expand Medicaid eligibility. But Florida says the law is unconstitutionally coercive because it includes the possibility that states would lose billions of dollars in federal Medicaid funding if they dont go along with the expansion. Bondi, who attended the three days of hearings and made the rounds of media interviews, repeatedly expressed con dence that justices will side with the laws opponents. As the states have argued all along, if the federal government can compel citizens to purchase health insurance they do not want, then it can force us to purchase anything, she said after the individual mandate arguments. A DIFFERENT KIND OF COURT BATTLE Back home in Tallahassee, Republican lawmakers this week approved a newly drawn Senate redistricting plan. To which the Florida Democratic Party had a pithy response: Well see you in court, party spokeswoman Brannon Jordan said immediately after the House gave nal approval Tuesday. The vote was the second time lawmakers have approved a Senate redistricting plan this year --and the second time judges will determine whether the map is constitutional. Earlier this month, the Florida Supreme Court upheld the Legislatures plan to revamp House districts. But it rejected the Senate maps, forcing lawmakers to again bring out their Etch A Sketches and draw new lines. While senators approved the revised map last week, some Republican House members were irked. Miami-Dade GOP House members voted against the plan because they said it didnt create a fourth Senate district that likely would be won by a Hispanic. Democrats, meanwhile, kept pounding Senate Republican leaders about creating districts that would shield incumbents from the possibility of running against each other. It kind of reminds me of the gang that couldnt shoot straight, said Rep. Franklin Sands, D-Weston. STAND YOUR GROUND UNDER FIRE The National Rifle Association has long been a powerful force in Tallahassee. But as the Sanford shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin continues to create a national furor, NRA lobbyist Marion Hammer and her legislative allies face growing pressure to revamp the states stand your ground law. Theres a critical and urgent need to look at the law, and at least clarify it, or explain it, said Rep. Darryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg. Some black lawmakers have called for holding a special legislative session to deal with the law. While that appears unlikely, Rep. Dennis Baxley, an Ocala Republican who was an original sponsor of stand your ground in 2005, acknowledged that it might need to be clari ed. Theres nothing in the statute that provides for any kind of aggressive action, in terms of pursuit and confront, Baxley said. So I think thats been some misapplication of this statute. If anything could come out of this very tragic circumstance, it could be some clari cation of when this applies and how. Stand your ground, which was backed by the NRA, has drawn widespread attention since neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman shot and killed Martin last month. Zimmerman, who has not been charged in the death, contends that he red in self-defense. The law allows people who feel threatened in public to stand their ground and use force to defend themselves, eliminating a prior responsibility to try to retreat. Questions in the Martin case center, at least in part, on whether Zimmerman pursued the teen before shooting him. Gov. Rick Scott wants to wait until the conclusion of the Martin investigation before addressing the stand-your-ground law. He has appointed an outside prosecutor, Angela Corey, to head t he investigation and also has announced that a task force will later look at issues such as stand your ground. We still dont know the effect the stand-your-ground law might have in this case, so it would be premature to begin evaluating facts when more facts are yet to emerge, Scott spokesman Lane Wright said. Gov. Scott believes we need to be thoughtful and thorough as we deal with this awful tragedy, and for those reasons he will not interfere with the investigation or prematurely expedite the work of the task force. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: In other words, the federal government is here saying, we are giving you a boatload of money, Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan said as Florida and other states challenged the constitutionality of a Medicaid expansion in the federal health overhaul. theres no matching funds requirement, there are no extraneous conditions attached to it, its just a boatload of federal money for you to take and spend on poor peoples health care. It doesnt sound coercive to me, I have to tell you. STORY OF THE WEEK: The U.S. Supreme Court heard three days of arguments in the Florida-led challenge to the federal Affordable Care Act. Justices are expected to announce their decisions in June.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)All eyes are on the Supreme CourtBy KYLE CHENEYSTATE HOUSE NEWS SERVICE STATE HOUSE, BOSTON, March 30 The nations only African-American governor, Deval Patrick of Massachusetts, this week questioned the reaction by Florida law enforcement to the shooting of Trayvon Martin, whose death last month has exploded into a national debate about racial profiling and selfdefense laws. Patrick is just the latest black politician around the nation to voice support for Martin or at least acknowledge the troubling aspects of the case, from U.S. Rep. Bobby Rush of Illinois, who was escorted from the oor of Congress for wearing a hoodie in support of Martin, to New York city councilmen and New York state assemblymen who donned the same symbolic jacket, to President Obama, who said if he had a son hed look like Trayvon. White politicians have also joined in the outrage former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm posted a picture of herself in a hoodie on her Facebook page. But Patrick has an additional insight into issues involving race, rights and justice Patrick headed the civil rights division of the Justice Department under President Bill Clinton. Describing a sad, murky set of facts surrounding the shooting, Patrick praised the Obama administrations Department of Justice for investigating the shooting. I think its a really important thing that DOJ, civil rights division has gotten involved, and a troubling thing that law enforcement in Florida has not, he said during a radio interview on WTKK. Martin was killed last month by a volunteer neighborhood watchman, George Zimmerman, while walking unarmed and wearing a hooded sweatshirt. Zimmerman has reportedly claimed that he deemed Martin suspicious and tracked him to determine where he was going. Zimmerman also claimed that the two began scuf- ing and that he red his weapon in self-defense. Police never charged Zimmerman, after prosecutors said they had no reason to doubt his claim that he was acting in selfdefense, and the decision shined a spotlight on Floridas self-defense statute known as Stand Your Ground in which residents are permitted to use deadly force if they feel they are under physical threat. Questions have emerged about whether Zimmerman, who is of Hispanic descent, racially profiled Martin, and whether police did the same by opting against charging Zimmerman. Its been moving, what the response has been, sort of across demographics, Patrick said. The senselessness of this, the notion that you could look a certain way, be dressed a certain way, and be in a certain neighborhood and place your life in jeopardy on account of that is not who we want to be in this country. How we layer assumptions on people is thats an unfortunate part of life. And when you add in race, it feels particularly unfair, Patrick continued. Asked by WTKK host Jim Braude whether he thinks Florida police erred in not charging Zimmerman, Patrick said, I know how important it is to review the evidence and talk to the folks and make a judgment and not just pop off based on what you read in the newspapers or see in the news. Patrick added that he would veto a bill in Massachusetts similar to Floridas Stand your Ground law. Well, I dont think that bill is going to move and if it were to move, its not going to get past my desk, he said. We dont need a stand your ground bill, and I dont entirely understand what the argument was for it in Florida. Patrick said the shooting didnt appear to involve self-defense issues. The other part of the Trayvon case I would say that is troubling is that it didnt seem to have anything to do with standing your ground, he said. It seemed more to do with a kid being in the wrong place at the wrong time or frankly in a perfectly appropriate place but being assumed to be in the wrong place and being stalked by a guy with a gun. Patrick said this week it would be a tribute to the Martin family if Massachusetts lawmakers passed a bill to crack down on racial pro ling in traf c stops. Those comments came on the same day that a handful of Massachusetts lawmakers donned hoodies to express solidarity with the Martin family and decry some commentary in the wake of the shooting that Martins hoodie was partly to blame for the incident.Trayvon Martin case drawing attention around countryThe second draft of new maps for the state Senate were submitted Friday to the U.S. Justice Department for preclearance under the Voting Rights Act. In a memo contained with the ling, the state argued that the plan easiliy complies with the act. There cannot be any serious issue concerning discriminatory purpose in the covered counties, the memo says. The minority districts there largely followed the districts recommended by civil-rights groups and materially preserved the ability of minority voters in those counties to elect their preferred candidates. The submission should give the Justice Department the full 60 days it has under the Voting Rights Act to review the proposal before candidate qualifying begins. Any changes to Florida elections law must be considered by the federal agency or a federal court before going into effect in ve counties with a history of racial discrimination. Maps for the House were submitted March 13. News Service of FloridaSenate maps submitted to feds George ZimmermanTrayvon Martin Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC.Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain THG-11909 Wound Won t Heal?Very Aordable Therapeutic Cold LasersHorse wound before and 6 weeks after Cold Laser Therapy1-800-742-8433www.vetrolaser.com Ask for Dr. Daniel Kamen, D.C. -Author of The Well Adjusted HorseMuscles Tendons Joints Pain Animal use onlyI noticed a tremendous decrease in post-operative inammation. -Glen R., Veterinarian, New York No Dx or Clinical Outcomes Implied. Consult Licensed Veterinarian. Not Sold Where Prohibited. Give Kids The World Village is a 70-acre, nonprofit resort in Central Florida that provides weeklong, cost free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.ank you to our media partners: WKMG Local 6 and Magic 107.7. givekidstheworld.org/gala

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: 1) Eggs should be cooked before being dyed. Fact or Fiction? 2) Eggs may be boiled on the stovetop or in the microwave. Fact or Fiction? 3) Eggs should be pricked right before cooking. Fact or Fiction? 4) Eggs should be boiled in a single layer in the pan for even cooking. Fact or Fiction? 5) Eggs should be removed from the heat once they reach a full boil and allowed to cook in the hot water remaining. Fact or Fiction? 6) Clean hands are a must when dyeing eggs. Fact or Fiction? 7) Eggs can be decorated in many ways. Fact or Fiction? 8) Hands should be washed after handling eggs. Fact or Fiction? 9) Eggs that will be eaten later should be refrigerated once dyed. Fact or Fiction? 10) Easter eggs will remain good for a year. Fact or Fiction?Fact or Fiction?Egg Dyeing ChallengeAnswers: 1) Fact, 2) Fiction, the intense heat of microwaving could make eggs explode, 3) Fiction, germs could enter any holes in the shells, 4) Fact, 5) Fact, 6) Fact, oil and dirt from hands could get onto the eggshells and keep the dye from seeping into them, 7) Fact, 8) Fact, 9) Fact, 10) Fiction, they should be eaten soon after Easter Dyeing Easter eggs can be loads of fun with the right preparations. Here are some questions about dyeing Easter eggs. How many can you answer correctly? 1) F L __ W __ R P __ T2) G R A __ __3) T I __ E S __ I N __4) B I __ __ B A __ H5) W H __ __ L B A __ __ O W6) L A __ N C __ A I __7) S __ N D __ O XAnswers: 1) Flower Pot, 2) Grass, 3) Tire Swing, 4) Birdbath, 5) Wheelbarrow, 6) Lawn Chair, 7) SandboxHunting for Easter eggs can be loads of fun. Fill in the blanks to name some of the spots outside where you might find an Easter egg hidden. Name That Spot List 10 words that rhyme with dye. 1. ____________ 2. _____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ____________ 6. ____________ 7. __________ 8. ____________ 9. ___________ 10. ___________Some answers: by, cry, dry, eye, fly, fry, hi, lie, my, pieWHAT RHYMES WITH COLORING PICTURE A: It went through the eggs-it.Q: How did the Easter egg get off the highway? Q: What did the Easter egg do when tickled?A: It cracked up! Jokes and Riddles Jokes and Riddles Every year, the White House holds an Easter egg roll for kids age 12 and younger. Activities range from storytelling to games and egg rolling, of course. The Easter bunny also arrives to greet the crowd. Many people believe First Lady Dolley Madison started the egg roll. She had heard about the Egyptian custom of egg rolling and planned her own event to take place on the Monday after Easter on the grounds of the Capitol building. Egg rolling on the Capitol grounds continued until 1878 when Congress decided there had been too much damage to the grounds and passed a law against it. President William Howard Taft moved the event to the White House lawn and egg rolling has been held there ever since, except during times of war and bad weather. Let em Roll

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Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953 www. sunsetranch es.com Appliance Repair Appliance Repairs.All major appliances. PTAC A/C units, heat-pumps, window/wall a/c units and mini-split A/C units.Call Jerry Payne 850-5285603. Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 9263546 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 9267291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 Fictitious Name Notices 5176-0405 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS NAME Notice under Fictitious NameLaw, pursuant to Section 865-09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to Fictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices engage in business under the fictitious name of: FINE ART IMAGES & PHOTOGRAPHY located at P.O. Box 368, Crawfordville, FL 32326, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahasse, FL Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 27th of March, 2012, /s/ Kathryn V. Deal, owner Published one (1) time in The Wakulla News April 5th, 2012 Misc. Notices 5174-0405 Public Notice Christian radio Station WUJC 91.1, St. Marks will be a holding a public meeting at St. Marks Volunteer Fire Dept., on 4/5 at 12 noon. This is a general meeting that will adMisc. Notices Misc. Notices dress public issues, and any questions or concerns about WUJC. The public is invited to attend. 5138-0405 Vs. Iberiabank v.Shell Point Residences, LLC, Case No.:2011-31-CA. Amended Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices AUCTION FLORIDA PROPERTIES10% BUYER'S PREMIUM Broker Compensation Available55Thurs.,April12,1:00 P.M. EDT Tallahassee,FL Hotel Duval BANK ORDEREDMember FDIC All Properties Sell Absolute Live & Online Bidding Proper es in These Counes:Bay, Dixie, Franklin, Gulf, Jackson Wakulla & Washington Coun es, FL Properes Include:Homes, Condos with Ocean Views, Gulf Front, Bay Front and other Residen al Lots; Commercial Buildings, Acreage Tracts & Restaurant. Detailed Informa on johndixon.com 800.479.1763FLAL# AB-0001488 BIG YARD SALE! NO EARL Y BIRDSNO EARL Y BIRDS A Reverse Mortgagemay help you start enjoying life!Learn more. You may be eligible for a special mortgage program under the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008. Call LocallyMichael J. Weltman, MBA, CSA (850) 556-6694NMLS #459867 MyRetirementMortgage.com Come meet Mr. Weltman at the Old Courthouse, Wakulla Chamber Ofce on April 13, 11:45AM for the Chamber of Commerce Ribbon Cutting Event! SpringYARD & Bake Sale! Fri-April 6 & Sat-April 7 Fri-April 13 & Sat-April 14 Fri-April 20 & Sat April 217AM-Until... Rain or Shine! household items, kitchen appliances, dishes, clothes, books, games, furniture and a little bit of everything!!

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 415 Mashes Sands Rd. on Ochlockonee Bay 3 Bdr./ 2 ba $825. Pets with Deposit No smoking. 6 River Cove Bay view 2 Bdr. 1 ba Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit62 Sylvania Drive -St. Marks 2 Bd/2ba with Sun room. Includes attached In-Law Suite 1 Bd/1ba with kitchen. $1,800 mo. No smoking, No pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3Bd/2Ba MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $450 Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,000 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 2422 Ian Drive Tallahassee 2BR/2BA Available April 1st.COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.2011-31-CA IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, Plaintiff, vs. SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 12, 2011, entered in Case No. 2011-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, is the Plaintiff, and SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, and all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against any defendant named herein, are the Defendants. The Wakulla County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in Wakulla County, Florida, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, April 26, 2012, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBITS A AND B IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THIS SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. WITNESS, my hand and the seal of this Court on February 21, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND,As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A LOTS 7, 10, AND 11, BLOCK A, AND LOTS 1 THROUGH 5, LOTS 7 THROUGH 10 AND BEACH CLUB LOT, ALL IN BLOCK B, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND ALL OF BLOCK C, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND PHASE 2 MARINA BASIN RESERVATION AREA BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19, SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA, COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 85.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 133.17 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 103.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 08 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.19 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 06 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 13 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 61.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 42.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 20.61 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 23.63 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.66 FEET, TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 902.73 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 114.91 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 51 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 114.83 FEET) TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 73.91 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 34 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 34.93 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 34.61 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 129.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 38.38 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 32.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 63.07 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 110.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 6.13 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 165.37 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.70 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 58.84 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 2.47 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 67.44 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 94.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.08 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.20 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 33.94 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 43.86 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.79 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 70.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 79.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 64 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 159.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 86.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 41.89 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 16.70 FEET, THENCE CONTINUE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID LINE. A DISTANCE OF 50.64 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 22 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 65.42 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 107.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 10.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 168.31 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 156.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 21.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 01 SECOND EAST A DISTANCE OF 47.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 19.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 40.71 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 23.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 17.23 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 101.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.26 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 86 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 74.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.59 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 54.46 FEET, Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices THENCE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 211.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 3.12 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CANALS BEGIN AT AN IRON PIN (LB #732) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 219.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 68.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 15.75 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS FOLLOWS: THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 9.88 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 45.34 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 62.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 135.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 189.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 60.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 60.11 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 60.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 60.21 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 11 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 130.83 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 75.56 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 92.14 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 60.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 52 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 60.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 60.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 06 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECOND WEST 60.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.01 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 117.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 30.16 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 104.63 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 115.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 130.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 44 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 60.01 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 51 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 60.12 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.56 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 23.22 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 04 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 100.03 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 99.61 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREE 12 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 100.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 7.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 543.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 260.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 474.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 121.54 FEET, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 21 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 99.10 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 364.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 275.66 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AND RUN THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 125.05 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1327.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-1 BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1198.08 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 43.11 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1167.13 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 875.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-2 COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1300.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 510.98 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF UNIT NO. 1 SHELL POINT BEACH AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 24 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 524.15 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH BOUNDARY AND RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 86.02 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 540.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 22 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 209.18 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 207.88 FEET), THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 370.90 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 606.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 227.66 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 226.32 FEET) THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.08 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1113.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 54 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 126.59 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 08 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 126.52 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 79 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 233.41 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 3154.71 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 225.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 1234.99 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP #4261, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 252.34 FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF UNIT 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED. THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 701.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1501.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 34.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 1244.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 43.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL G BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 117 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 491.62 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 RIGHT OF WAY) SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RAForeclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices DIUS OF 922.37 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 52 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 07 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 838.76 FEET. (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 23 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 810.15 FEET), THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.13 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1179.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 03 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 29 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 69.46 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 69.45 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 561.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL B BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 6 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO.6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 11.38 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 59 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 77.70 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 71.66 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 78.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 68.91 FEET, THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 30.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 8.44 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 13.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 THENCE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 357.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL C COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 92.24 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 64.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 27.54 FEET TO A IRON PIN LB#732, THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 37.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 27.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 53.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 31.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 29.69 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 25.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 23.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 63.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 11.19 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 18.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 17.75 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 32 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 112.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 42 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 45.46 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 46.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 68.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 34 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 53.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 40.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 72.69 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 25.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL D COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 20.04 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 35.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 125.12 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 17 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 40.23 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 43.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 24.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 29 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 40.19 FEET, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 40.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL E COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 8 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 201.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 19.43 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WA TER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 82.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 74.72 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 98.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 27.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 55.73 FEET, THENCE NORTH 22 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 93.65 FEET, THENCE NORTH 33 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 66.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 38 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 71.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 54.73 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 27.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 31.36 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 69.32 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 36.26 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 44 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 33.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 60.58 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 32 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 74.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 56.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 54.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 54.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 55.86 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 37.68 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 71.03 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 64.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 58.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 80 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 3.81 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 106.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 70.26 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 39 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 61.74 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 79.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 11.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 53.06 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 47.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 28 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 66.67 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 55.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 41.17 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 68.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 18.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 60.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 48.54 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 190.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL F BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER (ALSO THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER) OF LOT 24 UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED, AND RUN THENCE ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 324.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 56 SECONDS EAST 220.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 8.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 8.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 95.91 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY AND RUN ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 07 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 18.42 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 Page 9B26.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 29.89 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 65 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 31.85 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 37.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST 54.72 FEET, THENCE NORTH 77 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 54.99 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 47.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 56 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 31.43 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 35.33 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 22.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 75.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 65.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 65.38 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 36 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 53.31 FEET, THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 30.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 50.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 51.23 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 72.12 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 166.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXHIBIT B PERSONAL PROPERTY Shell Point Residences, LLC, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; Shell Point Investments, LLC; and Shell Point Reserve, LLC; and Shell Point 12, LLCs right, title and interest in the following described property pursuant to the Mortgage, and as such terms are defined therein: (i) all buildings, structures and improvements of every nature whatsoever now and hereafter on said Premises, (ii) all insurance policies, leases, subleases and other agreements affecting the use, enjoyment or occupancy of the Premises heretofore or hereafter entered into and all accounts, r ents, revenues, issues, profits and all proceeds from the sale or other disposition of such agreements accruing and to accrue from said Premises, (iii) all gas, steam, electric, water and other heating, cooking, refrigerating, lighting, plumbing, ventilating, irrigating and power systems, machines, building materials, appliances, furniture, equipment, goods, inventory, supplies, fixtures and appurtenances and personal property of every nature whatsoever, which now or may hereafter pertain to or be used with, in or on said Premises, even though they may be detached or detachable, (iv) all easements, rights-of-way, licenses, privileges, gores of land, streets, ways, alleys, passages, sewer rights, waters, water rights, permits, development rights and powers and all estates, rights, titles and interests in any way belonging, relating or appertaining to the Premises, (v) all Accounts, Goods, Chattel Paper, Deposit Accounts, Farm Products, Instruments, Documents, General Intangibles, Inventory, Consumer Goods, Equipment, Fixtures and Investment Property, as the foregoing terms are defined in the Uniform Commercial Code, and all contract rights, franchises, books, records, plans, specifications, approvals and actions which now or hereafter relate to, are derived from or are used in connection with the Premises, or the use, operation, maintenance, occupancy or enjoyment thereof or the conduct of any business or activities thereon, (vi) all the tenements, hereditaments, appurtenances, reversions and remainders belonging or pertaining to the Premises, (vii) any and all judgments, awards, settlements, claims, demands, payments, proceeds or other income arising in connection with the Premises, (viii) any items described in those certain UCC-1 Financing Statements of even date herewith between Mortgagor and Mortgagee and (ix) any extensions, additions, increases, substitutions, replacements, parts, accessions, improvements, betterments, proceeds, products and renewals to any of the aforesaid property, whether now existing or hereafter arising, all of the foregoing being included in the term Premises, it being the intention of Mortgagor and Mortgagee that this Mortgage (which is to be filed for record in the real estate records of the county mentioned above) shall also constitute a security agreement and financing statement as to the Premises herein mortgaged under the Florida Uniform Commercial Code, and that Mortgagee have all rights and remedies of a secured party thereunder. March 1 & 8, 29, & April 5, 2012 5138-0405 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5162-0405 vs. Collene Avery Case No. 2011-2099CA IN THE CIRCUIIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2011-299-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN HE IRS, BENEFICIARIES, AND DEVISEES OF COLLEN C. AVERY, DECEASED; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF COLLEEN C. AVERY; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF PUBLICA TION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, AND DEVISEES OF COLLENE C. AVERY, DECEASED; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF COLLENE C. AVERY; AND UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the followingdescribed real property located in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots 181, 182, 183, 184, 185, and 186, Block 35, of the Town of Sopchoppy, East Side, as shown by map, or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. has been filed against You. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Edward W. Dougherty, Jr., Esquire and April A. Bentley, Esquire, the Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is IGLER & DOUGHERTY, P.A., 2457 Care Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32308, on or before April 25, 2012, and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If the defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. published two (2) times in the Wakulla News March 29, April 5 2012 5164-0405 Vs. Osvaldo Urbay Case # 65-2011-CA-000180 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000180 Division: 5168-0405 vs. Gibson, Tracy R. Case 2008-FC-130 Amended Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2008-FC-130 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L..P. FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. Plaintiff, vs. TRACY R. GIBSON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OFHOUSING ANDD URBAN DEVELOPMENT; STATE EMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 26thday of April, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. lobby of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 8 of a replat of Pelican Bay, subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 3, page 77 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 20th day of March 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later tha seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis Deputy Clerk March29 & April 5, 2012 5168-0405 5171-0412 Vs. Doyle, James. A. Case No. 2011-260-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-260-CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC 7360 S. KYRENE ROAD, TEMPE, AZ 85283 Plaintiff vs. JAMES A. DOYLE, JR., SIMONE C. DOYLE, BENEFICIAL FLORIDA, INC., and CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment For Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT A, TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1995 66 x 28 REDMAN MOBILE HOME, SERIAL NUMBER: 146M8923. Commonly known as: 70 Roberts Williams Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at theW akulla County Court house, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy, Crawfor dville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 a.m. (EST), on the 3rd day of May, 2012. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Lot 87 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run North 17 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds West along the East boundary of said Lot 87 (as monumented) # distance of 1605.25 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 72 degrees 20 minutes 39 seconds West 536 feet to the center point of a cul-de-sac having a radius of 50.00 feet said point also lying on the centerline of a 60.00 foot wide roadway and also marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 17 degrees 14 minutes 23 seconds East along the centerline 534.22 feet to a point lying on the intersection with the centerline of another 60 foot wide roadway, thence run South 72 degrees 21 minutes 14 seconds West along centerline 536.06 feet to a point, thence leaving said centerline run North 17 degrees 15 minutes 35 seconds West 534.72 feet to a 3 inch round concrete monument, thence run North 72 degrees 21 minutes 14 seconds East 536.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 50.00 foot radius cul-de-sac lying over and across the Northeasterly portion thereof. ALSO SUBJECT TO A 60.00 foot wide roadway lying over and across the Easterly and Southerly 30.00 feet thereof. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 5 and 12, 2012 5172-0412 Vs. McClain Kerri; Case No. 11-304-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON f/k/aTheBank of New York Trust Company National Association, as Trustee, Successor Trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, As Trustee, By Its Servicer Associates Housing Finance LLC f/k/a Ford Consumer Finance Company, Inc., By its Duly Authorized Attorney-in-Fact, Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc., Under the Power of Attorney Dated and Executed November 18, 2010 Case Number:11-304-CA Plaintiff, vs. KERRI McCLAIN; GREGORY McCLAIN, et al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of foreclosure dated 5177-0412 vs. Yeomans, Leslie; Case No. 65-2009-CA-000123 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000123 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-C, Plaintif, vs, LESLIE L. YEOMANS; JAMES YEOMANS; CACV OF COLORADO, LLC Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE (Please publish in THE WAKULLA NEWS) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 20th, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000123, of the Circuit Court of the second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/ATHE BANK OF NEW YORK AS SUCCESSOR TO JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE CERTIFICATE HOLDERS OF POPULAR ABS, INC. MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-C is Plaintiff and LESLIE L. YEOMANS; JAMES YEOMANS; CACV OF COLORADO, LLC; are defendants. The Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash by electronic sale IN THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, FL 32327 at 11:00 a.m., on the 26th day of April 2012; the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 32, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 111, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with 60 days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of March, 2012. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, as Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, If you are a person with a disability who n eeds any accommodations in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401,at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News April 5th and 12th, 2012 5177-0412 5165-0405Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON APRIL 21, 2012 at 10:00a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: DOMINIC ROLLINS BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF APRIL 21 ,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. March 29, April 5 2012 5165 0405 5175-0412 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statues, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday,April 19, 2012 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of 1 Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Kim Jackson Before the sale date of April 19th, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 February 16 & 23, 2012. 5126-0223 Self Storage Notices 5173-0412 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage FaSelf Storage Notices Self Storage Notices cility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, April 21, 2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Jessica Tucker Brenda Merrill Before the sale date of Saturday, April 21st, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. April 5th & April 12, 2012 5173-0412 FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. OSVALDO URBAY; FRANCISCA LORENZO-URBAY; BUNTING NEIGHBORHOOD PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated March 7th, 2012 entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000180, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein, FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and OSVALDO URBAY; FRANCISCA LORENZO-URBAY; BUNTING NEIGHBORHOOD PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. at lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, FL 32327 on the 12th day of April, 2012, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK K, OF SONGBIRD PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 113-116, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of : 23 SWIFT PASS, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326 If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on March 19th, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL at least 7 working days before your secheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 29, April 5, 2012 March 8, 2012, entered in Case No.11-304-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, Brent X. Thurmond as the Clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at public sale at the courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Wakulla County in Crawfordville, Florida with the sale commencing at 11:00AM on the 19th day of April 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: Legal Description: Lot 9, Block E, Springwood, Phase 1, A subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 2, pages 74 and 75 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. To include: 2002 Oakwood Home, serial numbers GAFL234A75364CY21 and GAFL234B75364CY21. Address: 64 Springwood Boulevard, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 29th day of March, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, April 5th and 12th, 2012 5172-0412 5158-0329 Vs, Spears Small Engines Case No. 11167-CA Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-167-CA CENTENNIAL BANK,as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. SPEARS SMALL ENGINES, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, ESTATE OF LEASTON LAMAR SPEARS, DAVID SPEARS AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, and all Others Claiming By and Through Named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 7, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerks Of ce, of the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 11:00 a.m the following described property: See Exhibit A attached hereto and made a part hereof. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as the date of the Lis Pendens, must le a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON March 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court /s/ by Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commercial Building/Engine repair and Tire Store Begin at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Block A isolated in the Town of Crawfordville, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Deed Book C & D, Page 572 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 24 seconds East 76.27 feet to a concrete monument on the maintained right-ofway boundary of a county graded road, thence run South 89 degrees 39 minutes 36 seconds West along said maintained rightof-way boundary 123.41 feet to a concrete monument thence run North 00 degress 20 minutes 24 seconds West 7.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run West 75.00 feet to the Easterly right-of-way boundary of Tallahassee street, thence run North along said right-of-way boundary 110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run East 49.50 to a concrete monument, thence run North 9.50 feet to a concrete monument, thence run East 148.50 feet to a concrete monument on the East boundary of said Block A isolated, thence run South along said East boundary 49.50 feet to the Point of Beginning. March 29, 2012 April 5, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Brain Teaser 1 14 17 25 34 39 43 46 61 65 68 2 20 26 55 3 27 56 4 23 40 57 5 35 47 51 21 48 6 15 18 28 44 52 62 66 69 7 24 36 53 8 37 49 58 22 29 41 54 9 16 19 42 63 67 70 10 30 38 50 11 31 45 59 12 32 60 13 33 64ACROSS1.Airlinethat introduced transatlantic service,forshort 6.Numero__(firstrate) 9.Notthese 14.Safehavens 15.Componentof solder 16.Wordstoa hitchhiker 17.Reefmaterial 18.Ramblermfr. 19."Dallas"family name 20.Workingstiff'sstint, perhaps 23.LyricistGershwin 24.Slangyaffirmative 25.Cominginto existence 29.Fertilizeringredient 34.Bunyan's tool 35.Squirrel'ssnack 38.Height:Prefix 39. OfficerCandidate Schoolgrad, perhaps 43.__Nostra 44.Cul-__ (dead-end street) 45.She raisedC ain 46.Exitone'scocoon 49.LouGrantportrayer 51.Easyvictory 54.Before,tobards 55.1955Marilyn Monroe movie,with "The" 61.38thparallelland 62.Chemist'shangout 63."TheHighwayman" poetAlfred 65. Gathertogether 66.Right-anglebend 67.Filmcowboy Gene 68.Irascible 69. Getthepicture 70.Acknowledgedthe nationalanthemDOWN1.DCfund-raisingorg. 2.Datingfrom 3."StoneyEnd" composerLaura 4.HesackedRomein 410 5.Subjecttoabuse 6.BrighamYoung's state 7.Spockportrayer Leonard 8.Whenprom pted 9."Tommy"band 10.Hockeygreat Gordie 11.SheriffTaylor'skid 12.Droptothebottom 13.Chang'sSiamese twin 21. OldTV's"__ Derringer" 22.Sancesound 25.1933-41veepJohn __Garner 26.Self-evidenttruth 27.Touchortaste 28.Sondheim's "Sweeney__" 30.Beachgoer's acquisition 31.PilgrimJohn,who courtedPriscilla 32.MartinorMcQueen 33.Jobofferer 36.Charlotteof "Bananas" 37.AMEXcounterpart 40.Cornunit 41.Onein thekiddie pool,perhaps 42.Ovoidwind instruments 47.__spoon(diner) 48.Foreverandaday seemingly 50.Embark,asona journey 52. "BlackVelvet" singerAlannah__ 53.Familyofearly Americanpainters 55. "You'vegot__ nerve!" 56.Bullpenstats 57.Onepieceofa three-piecesuit 58.Uptothejob 59.Prefixmeaning "cell" 60.Heftysandwich 61.Herriman's"Krazy" feline 64.OneoftheChaplinsAmerican Prole Hometown Content 3/11/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 00 9 HtCtt 1 23 4 5647 489 34 26 75 8927 7 94 4563 2718 00 9 HtCtt 718 2936 4 5 592614738 436857912 345 172896 279468351 861935427 157 389264 984526173 623741589 P A C N A N C E K A T A S O F A X I O M S O M E N Y R O S E N S E E R A S A L A R I C E A R V E S T M A L T R E A T G R E A S Y Y A N C Y E O N U T A H T O D D M Y L E S N I M O Y R A E P E A L E O N C U E N Y S E A B L E R A P W A D E R T H E W H O O C A R I N A S H O W E T A N S E T O U T O P I E A L D E N C Y T O S I N K S T E V E H E R O E N G H I R E R S Y D Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic H wy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 5, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsYour Better Business Bureau investigates thousands of scams every year. Our new Scam Source (www. bbb.org/scam) is a comprehensive resource on scam investigations by your BBB. Here are nine common scams weve seen this year, and our Scam of the Year. Top Job Scam: Many job scams are designed to steal your identity. One requires candidates to ll out a credit report or bank information for direct deposit when offered a job. There is no job; the online forms are just a way to steal personal data. Top Sweepstakes and Lottery Scam: Congratulations! Youve won millions! To claim it, you only have to send the company hundreds or thousands. A popular example this year was an email claiming to be from Mark Zuckerberg announcing the recipient won $1 million from Facebook. Top Social Media/Online Dating Scam: Some links prompt you to upgrade your Flash player to view videos. Instead, the le you download contains a worm that sends out similar links and searches for your personal data. Top Home Improvement Scam: Traveling contractors move around to keep a step ahead of the law and angry consumers. The worst move in after a natural disaster, taking advantage of desperate homeowners. Start with www.bbb. org/search to find trustworthy contractors. Top Check Cashing Scam: One check cashing scam begins with someone wanting to buy something youre selling. Scammers send you a check for more than the purchase price, and ask you to wire them the difference. Their check bounces a few days later, leaving you out the money you wired. Top Phishing Scam: Phishing scams steal personal information through an email that installs a virus on your computer, a phone call or letter. A prevalent email in 2011 claims an electronic transaction did not go through. Clicking the link downloads malware or steals your information. Top Identity Theft Scam: You get a call in your hotel room in the middle of the night. The front desk claims a problem with the computer requires your credit card number again. The call is actually from someone outside the hotel stealing your information. Top Financial Scam: Websites claim to offer mortgage relief but ask for an upfront fee. Some help by doing things you could easily do yourself free, and most leave you in even more debt than before. Top Sales Scam: Penny auctions are popular because they seem to offer items below retail. But you pay for each bid even if you dont win. Although not all penny auctions are scams, some are being investigated as online gambling. BBB suggests treating them as you would a casino. For additional information and advice you can trust to stay safe from scams, start with bbb.org.Special to The NewsIf youre just beginning to think about your 2011 income tax return, youve got a late start but its still not too late to cash in on some savings. A lot of the deductions associated with the economic stimulus package will disappear in 2012, so if you want to take advantage of them, youve got only until Dec. 31, says Jessica James, CPA and author of Justice for None (www.AuthorJessicaJames.com), an insider look at IRS tactics in a tax fraud investigation and trial. But, she says, theres still plenty of time for some other measures to ease your share of the tax burden. Now is also a good time to resolve to start earlier in 2012 to minimize that years tax bill. Here are some tips savings: Contribute to retirement accounts. If you havent already put money into your traditional or ROTH IRA account for 2011, youve got until April 17 to do it. If you have a Keogh or SEP (Simpli ed Employee Pension Individual Retirement Arrangement for businesses), and you get a ling extension to Oct. 15, youve got until then to make your 2011 deposits. The maximum IRA contribution for 2011 is $5,000, or $6,000 if youre 50 or older by the end of the year. For self-employed people, the maximum for SEPs and Keoghs for 2011 is $49,000. Dont fear the home office deduction. In the past, many tax lers didnt claim a home of ce deduction because it was seen as an IRS red ag. But the requirements and forms have been clari ed so people can do that properly and not make mistakes that can lead to an audit. Also, the rules have been expanded so more people can claim the deduction. If you use a home of ce exclusively for business, even if you dont meet your clients there, youre eligible. For instance, a handyman who does his work other peoples houses can claim the deduction if he does his paperwork at his home of- ce. Another change is that, in the past, if you claimed 10 percent of your home as an of ce, that amount would not be included in the $250,000 tax-free pro t from the homes sale thats allowed for an individual by the IRS. Be sure to make your claim reasonable, or it will get questioned; a $25,000 home of ce deduction for a business with $50,000 annual gross revenue is not reasonable. Maximize your Flexible Spending Account. The Health Care Act will limit the maximum you can put into these pre-tax medical expense accounts in 2013. So 2012 is the last year to use an FSA to pay for orthodontics and other large medical expenses using pre-tax earnings. A medical expense exible spending account, or FSA, allows you to use before-tax earnings to pay for medical or health care expenses not covered by your health insurance. Assuming a 25 percent tax rate, you avoid $25 in taxes for every $100 you spend from your FSA. Need to sell an investment? Next year may be the time. The Tax Relief Act maintains the tax rate cap on capital gains and dividends at 15 percent through 2012. In 2013, the cap for capital gains will increase to 20 percent and for dividends, 39.6 percent. The Health Care Act also created a 3.8 percent Medicare tax on investment income, effective in 2013. Given those scheduled increases, plan to take advantage of the rates next year. James is an author pseudonym used because she fears her novel may provoke IRS retaliation. She says that, though she was innocent of any wrongdoing, she was coerced into accepting a plea deal by the IRS, which was bent on amassing adjudications of guilt to justify the investigations expense. She pled guilty to a count of falsifying a tax return and continues to work as a CPA.Looking for 2011 tax relief? Theres still time METRO GRAPHICSBetter Business Bureau names top scams of 2011 We add an important benet to our free debit cards. Instant. The benet of our free instant-issue debit card is that you can get it today and use it today. Its that easy. And with Centennial Bank, you can also use any ATM in the country, free*. Any ATM at all. Just a few more ways we offer banking that comes to you.*Some restrictions may apply. See bank for details. Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringDr. Mark McCoyFebruary 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromYou dont nd this type of thing in larger cities. is is a great advertising! More people need to advetise like this.Dr. Mark McCoy OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much!