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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00401
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 03-22-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00401
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Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7B INDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 12th Issue Thursday, March 22, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews OBITUARIES William ‘Bill’ Blount Jonnie Davis McKenzie William E. ‘Bill’ Mills Jr. Dorothy Harrell Robertson Deborah Atkins Sanders Mary Frances Whaley Wiggins St. Patrick’s, 14A PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENNew management team at Wakulla Springs Lodge Members of Wakulla 2020 appointedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe committee members that will be charged with prioritizing road projects for the county under the Wakulla 2020 plan have been appointed. The committee is made up of 15 members. They are Pat Jones, selected by the Wakulla County School Board; Jared Miller, selected by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce; John Shuff, selected by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce; Kevin Vaughn, selected by the Wakulla County Economic Development Council; Jackie Lawhon, selected by the City of Sopchoppy; Zoe Mans“ eld, selected by the City of St. Marks; Tim Jordan, selected by the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council; Michael Weltman representing Wakulla Station; Paige Killeen selected by the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Committee; Byron Price representing Shell Point; Andrea Carter representing Medart; Skip Young representing the Crawfordville Town Plan area; Linda Langston representing Smith Creek; R.H. Carter, director of the Senior Center or his designee; and Billy Mills representing the county at large. Each committee member is appointed for one year, or until the business of the committee has been completed. The advisory committee will review and prioritize projects, make recommendations to the county commission and assist in developing the ballot language for the half-cent sales option to fund the projects. The half-cent sales tax referendum will be placed on the ballot and allow the voters to decide whether the Wakulla 2020 initiative should move forward. The initiative started as a way to implement the Crawfordville Town Plan, which including improving Highway 319 and expanding intersections to improve traf“ c ” ow. Since that time, several community leaders and organizations have been looking for ways to fund the plan, as well as other transportation projects that the county does not have the money to do. The Wakulla 2020 idea is based on what was done in Tallahassee with Blueprint 2000. In 1989, Tallahassee and Leon County voters approved a local option one-cent sales tax to provide funding for transportation projects and law enforcement facility improvements. Continued on Page 3A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt has been nearly nine months since Cape Leisure Corp. took over the operation of the 27-room hotel, restaurant, soda fountain and gift shop at Wakulla Springs Lodge. And although they have seen the departure of the former general manager and sales manager since that time, Daniel LeBlanc, president of Cape Leisure, feels the lodge is on the right track. LeBlanc hired a new management team, which is led by Manager Derek Adams and his Assistant Manager Jeff True. Im real excited about the team,Ž LeBlanc said. After former Manager Jon Steele, left, LeBlanc said they brought in someone from their corporate of“ ce to run the lodge while they looked for the perfect “ t. During that time, the sales manager also left. Continued on Page 2A New Manager Derek Adams and Assistant Manager Jeff True. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA former county employee has “ led a civil rights complaint in federal court against the Wakulla County Commission and former County Administrator Benjamin Pingree. Richard LarryŽ Noles was chief building inspector for the county from Feb. 3, 2007, to Oct. 20, 2009. He was “ red on Oct. 20, 2009 by then Assistant County Administrator Lindsay Stevens. Noles “ led the complaint on Feb. 15 alleging that he has been a victim of retaliation and constitutional rights violations from the defendants or employees of the defendants.Ž According to Noles termination letter, the county received various complaints regarding licensing violations and other violations of county policies, as well as receiving several complaints from staff. Noles was suspended on Oct. 13, 2009, while an investigation into the complaints occurred. He was then “ red a week later. Two complaints were filed against Noles with the Department of Business and Professional Regulation in 2009. One alleged that Noles performed mechanical and plumbing inspections after his license had expired and the other alleged that he performed electrical inspections without a license. The “ rst complaint was dismissed on Dec. 28, 2010, by the Florida Division of Administration Hearing and a judge found insufficient evidence to prosecute. No discipline was imposed regarding the second complaint and both have been closed. The civil rights complaint states that an appeal hearing was held on Nov. 18, 2009, and Noles requested an attorney to be present in his defense, but was not allowed one, while the county had four attorneys present. This was an unconstitutional act to deprive Plaintiff of Due Process,Ž the complaint states. Noles also claims that the county disapproved his choice for a third member on the appeals board because his selection was a deputy sheriff. The appeal hearing proceeded without a 3-member board, it states. The defendants failed to comply with the Wakulla County Personnel and Policy Manual, approved by the County on Oct. 1, 2007, pursuant to process and procedures required to terminate employees from public employment with the County,Ž the complaint states. Noles is asking for his job back as chief building inspector with an increase in salary that matches the cost of living allowance that was received by Pingree. He is also seeking compensation for “ ve years of salary and DROP bene“ ts missed. He also requested monetary damages for humiliation, embarrassment, mental distress and anguish, as well as punitive damages. He also asked that his personnel “ le be purged. The complaint is being handled by the countys insurance provider, Florida Association of Counties Trust.Former building inspector “ les civil rights lawsuitPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA wild“ re, believed to have been caused by a lightning-strike, burned land near Natural Bridge and caused a smoke advisory to be issued. See the story on Page 12A. Fire! Fire! W a k u l l a C o u n t y Wakulla County S e n i o r C i t i z e n s Senior Citizens C e l e b r a t e L i f e Celebrate Life See Page 1B

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Continued from Page 1A They are still currently looking for a sales manager with hotel marketing experience, LeBlanc said. Adams was hired almost two months ago and True started a little over a month ago. It gave us the opportunity to mix and match candidates,Ž LeBlanc said. Adams, who is originally from Michigan, has a restaurant background, having worked at hotels and country clubs. Most recently, he served as the director of food and beverage at Killearn County Club in Tallahassee for the last two years. The opportunity to work at the lodge almost fell in his lap, he said. He admits he had to GPS the lodge, but once he arrived, he saw what a beautiful place it was. All I saw was its potential,Ž Adams said. Adams said he is still in awe of the history and pure elegance of the lodge, as well as its true Southern fare.Ž You dont see that in many places,Ž he said. True has been in Wakulla County for seven years and said he has always loved Wakulla Springs and also liked the fact that it was a green hotel. He worked at the Inn at Wildwood, which was also a green hotel, but chose to step away from that situation after the bank took it over. When he saw Cape Leisure had positions available, he decided to apply. This was my chance,Ž True said. Adams said he is excited about being on the ground floor of this project. Currently, the staff is training and getting to know the ins and outs of the lodge. Two months ago, you had a completely different management staff,Ž Adams said. The lodge has unique challenges because it is in a state park, Adams said. He has been working closely with Park Manager Brian Fugate. Its weird to have a second boss, so to speak,Ž Adams said. He said he has looked to Fugate for insight since he ran the lodge prior to Cape Leisure taking it over. Once holes are “ lled in, such as the hiring of a sales manager, summer and permanent restaurant staff and “ nishing training, they can really begin to focus on long term goals. LeBlanc said, We dont feel like were there yet.Ž Adams said they are still in the growing stage. True said he is doing research and learning all the history of the springs and lodge, which helps when interacting with guests. The most recent question was about Henry the pole vaulting “ sh. He added that it is fun to interact with guests who have been coming to the lodge for the last 50 years. We want to keep building on that and have repeat customers,Ž True said. Currently, the lodge is doing very well, LeBlanc said. Were outperforming our projections every month,Ž he said. There are no drastic plans for the lodge, just minor improvements, LeBlanc said. Its almost like a living history project,Ž he said. They plan to keep with the traditions and history of the lodge and be very conservative with any changes. Were not looking to disrupt the way of life at Wakulla Springs,Ž Adams said. They are looking for subtle ways to create a better environment, he added. One of the bigger projects is the addition of a snack bar and shop near the outside restrooms. They plan to sell soda, water, ice cream, suntan lotion, snacks, picnic supplies and possibly rent tubes and bicycles. The project is expected to be completed by July. Its another way for us to have an amenity for our guests,Ž Adams said. They also plan to polish all the marble ” oors, which Adams has been told could take anywhere from a month to six months. The ” oors were done six to seven years ago, and major rehab is due again, LeBlanc said. Simple things like that make a difference,Ž LeBlanc said. Adams said they plan to go from top to bottom cleaning up the place. To put a shine and luster to everything,Ž he said. They are also making minor changes in the restaurant, including new uniforms, new tablecloths and music being played at night. Adams said they also plan to improve the menu and possibly add some more Southern options. They will also look at revamping their banquet menus that are offered for special events, such as a wedding reception, and purchase new tables, china and silverware to be used at those events. We want to create an atmosphere like no other,Ž Adams said. And the backdrop of the springs and the lodge is something you wont “ nd anywhere else, he said. Their goal is to have the changes completed by December, Adams said. LeBlanc said once he feels the staff is ready, they will amp up advertising and marketing the lodge. They are also in the process of setting up a way for people to make reservations online. He plans to use tricks of the trade that were successful at Natural Bridge of Virginia, another park his company operates. This property is larger than Wakulla Springs, but has similarities, he said. Both are in a small rural setting with a larger city close by. Adams said a year from now, all the changes and improvements will have been made. We are very ambitious with our changes and expectations,Ž Adams said. Cape Leisure Corp. took over the concessions at Wakulla Springs on July 1, 2011. The company entered into a 5-year agreement with the state, which still owns the property. The lodge was built in 1937 by entrepreneur Ed-ward Ball and has been kept mostly in its original condition, with some improvements. The State of Florida eventually purchased the site in 1986 and had been operating the lodge up until July 1. As a cost-saving measure, the state sought out a private vendor to run the concessions and Cape Leisure was chosen. Cape Leisure pays the state a monthly fee and monthly commission based on gross sales for all its operations. Cape Leisures other clients include the National Historic Landmark Ribault Club at Fort George Island in Jacksonville, Anastasia State Park in St. Augustine, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Jetty Park in Cape Canaveral and Natural Bridge of Virginia. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comNew management at Wakulla SpringsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe county is on a tight deadline with making renovations to the Wakulla County Community Center. At the Wakulla County Commission meeting on March 19, the commission voted to proceed with the “ nal design and permitting for the project. The county received $392,000 in legislative appropriation and has until summer 2013 to spend all those funds or they will be lost. Preble-Rish will begin the design and permitting of the site and buildings on March 19 and it is scheduled to be completed on April 30. The county will advertise for bids on the project on June 4 and a contractor will be selected on July 16. Renovations will then begin on July 19 and will be completed on Dec. 31. The hope is that programs can be offered at the community center starting on Jan. 1, 2013. The current design only calls for renovations of the building that was the former sanctuary and building of an open ” oor plan gymnasium. The building that will be renovated will be utilized by the YMCA. It will feature a free weight room and cardio room, “ tness class, kid zone and restrooms and showers. A covered walkway will join this building with the other building that is not scheduled to be remodeled. That building is broken up into several of“ ces. Alan Wise with PrebleRish said the main entrance is located on the south side of the building and after renovations, the main entrance will be located on the north side with access to the gymnasium or YMCA facilities. The open gymnasium will be about 7,300 square feet, depending on the budget, and will be fairly simple with a concrete ” oor. At the meeting, the commission also approved the memorandum of understanding with the YMCA. County Administrator David Edwards said the contract is non-binding, but it is a mutual acknowledgment of the county and the YMCAs commitment to moving forward with the renovations and providing programs for the county. Once construction is complete, Edwards said they will enter into a formal contract. The YMCA will provide programming services and operational support for the community center. The YMCA will utilize the building on the west side upon completion of the renovations, offer design and planning input to the expansion of the new multiuse space and incorporate this space into program activities, utilize the second building to incorporate additional programs, and offer assistance in planning and future expansion of other enhancements to common grounds.COUNTY COMMISSIONMoving quickly ahead with community center plansRelay for Life will hold its Lion Painting Festival on April 7Special to The NewsSaturday, March 24, at 8 p.m., the band QuantaŽ will be performing at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy. Bluesy, soulful and jazzy Americana at its best, QuantaŽ offers unique and surprising instrumental combinations of piano, sax, vocal, guitar and percussion. QuantaŽ features Richard Bertram on tenor and alto sax, bass, bongos and rhythm; Jack Quine on keyboards, guitar and vocals; and Andy Moorer, an award winning sound engineer and composer, will play “ vestringed banjo. The three musicians performing are scientists, engineers and mathematicians in some capacity, and quanta was the last band name left on the list after crossing all the others out. For reservations, call (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com.Special to The NewsRelay for Life of Wakulla will host a Lion Painting Festival on Saturday, April 7. The festival will center around painting the concrete lion statue in Azalea Park. Many of this years Relay for Life teams will be on-site hosting activities and fundraisers. Survivors and caregivers can register for the Relay and pick up an invitation to the Survivor Dinner which will be held on April 17. There will be arts, crafts, food and other great items for sale at the festival. Relay for Life will be at the Wakulla High School track Friday, April 20 with activities and entertainment going all night long until noon on Saturday, April 21. Please contact Event Chair Kristin Dow at kdv6@mail.com or 926-8854 for further information.Youth Coalition to host town hall meeting on April 3Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is hosting a Getting to OutcomesŽ town hall meeting to increase awareness about the negative consequences of underage drinking and discuss steps that can be taken to prevent underage drinking. Presenters will include members of peer groups, law enforcement and community service providers. The meeting will be Tuesday, April 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the War Eagle Caf at Wakulla High School. Appetizers will be served from 5:30 to 6 p.m. For additional information, contact Stacy Harvey at 510-0219. This event is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and is in collaboration with the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking.Quanta to perform at Posh on Saturday Quanta is Richard Bertram and Jack Quine. Lots of friendly visitors attending:•Wakulla ROTC •Wakulla EMS •Wakulla Fire & Rescue •Smokey the Bear •Capital City Bank Star •McDonald’s Character •McGruff the Crime Dog •the Sonic Character and a MoonwalkC.H.A.T. of Wakulla will receive donations of: towels, doggie treats, pet toys, and/or a loving home for your new best friend. ADOPT A PET booth for anyone who might be interested in adopting a pet. Saturday, March 31 at Hudson Park Registration: 9:30 – 10:30am Egg Hunt: 11:00amAge Groups: 0-3 years old, 4-6 Years old and 7-10 years old Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 C apital C ircle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comIn the front-page story in last weeks paper, Budget de“ cit looms,Ž it was incorrectly stated that the county could face a budget de“ cit of around $240,000 this year. Early estimates show that property taxes are expected to decrease by 3 to 5 percent for the 2012-13 “ scal year, not the current year. If there is a shortfall, the county would need to look at alternative revenue sources or expenditure reductions to make up that difference. It was also not mentioned that the county has been building its reserves and is in a better position than previous years. We regret the error. Continued from Page 1A Then in 2000, the voters approved an extension until 2019 to fund stormwater and ” ood control projects, greenspace acquisition and parks/recreation improvements and additional transportation projects. John Shuff, the chamber appointee on the committee, said Wakullas version of the initiative will be on a much smaller scale and will focus on transportation and road projects, which is what is allowed with this certain sales tax option. Shuff said the tax is estimated to generate about $20 million over the next 15 years, and with a bonding “ nances and costs, it would leave them with an estimated total of $14 million. The committee will also seek out grant funding in hopes of doubling that to $28 million. Shuff said he hopes to get the committee together as soon as possible. The committee is tasked with meeting on a monthly basis, but can meet as often as it likes.Members of Wakulla 2020 committee are appointedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe city of St. Marks is moving forward with its Community Development Block Grant for streetscape improvements. The city commission approved the design, which includes the addition of a sidewalk on both sides of Port Leon Drive from Pine Street to Riverside Drive. At the end of Riverside Drive, there will be an imprint of a lighthouse in the center of the road. Money will also be spent on lighting and landscaping, which includes a 4-foot median in certain points of the road, which would have owers and other plants to help with beauti cation. Engineer Joe Hope, with Hydro Engineering, developed the plans and the grant is being administered by Fred Fox. Bids will go out for the project in April, said City Manager Zoe Mans eld. The city was awarded the $600,000 grant in June 2011. The money is to be used for economic revitalization for the city. The next commission meeting is April 12 at 7 p.m. at city hall. CITY OF ST. MARKSStreetscape design is approved By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSopchoppy city Commissioners were excited to hear about the possibility of a new business opening in the city at its March 12 meeting. Good Samaritan Thrift Store plans to open in the old Sopchoppy Hardware store. Good Samaritan Chapel and Community Center currently runs two other thrift stores, one in Woodville Commons and another in the TownSouth Shopping Center in Tallahassee. Pastor Glenn Burns said if the commission approves the proposed business, they plan to open over the July 4 weekend. I would love to see life,Ž Commissioner Lara Edwards said of the hardware store. Burns said they want to move quickly and have been successful with their other locations. Our ministry has grown double,Ž Burns said. The store competes with Goodwill stores, but Beth Burns said it is set up like a Cracker Barrel gift shop. They will sell antiques, collectibles, clothes, childrens toys, etc. Its for people who cant afford to go to Wal-mart,Ž Beth Burns said. Those who cant afford to purchase items can volunteer and be compensated with items from the store, she said. We know theres a need here,Ž Beth Burns said. They also plan to go out into the community and provide outreach services. The thrift store will also help the building owner sell the tools and hardware supplies that are currently in the building so they can utilize all the space. The space will be maximized,Ž Glenn Burns said. Mayor Colleen Skipper said, Im excited.Ž Vice Mayor Richard Harden said it is sad to see all the empty buildings in Sopchoppy and said the commission needed to continue to support local merchants. The commission was in agreement that this was a good thing for the city and gave the Burns its full support. In other news: € The city approved the engineering services agreement with Baskerville Donovan for the stormwater grant project. The city was awarded a $600,000 Community Development Block Grant which will be used to improve drainage at Gulf Street and Park Avenue. The environmental review is expected to be completed by April 13 and the funds will be released May 5 so that the project can be started, said City Clerk Jackie Lawhon. The city also discussed the possibility of applying for another grant to proceed with phase 2 of the stormwater project, which would look at a couple sections to the west and north. The deadline for the grant is in November. The “ rst phase must be completed and closed out before it could apply for another grant. The city would also be eligible to apply for another grant in 2013. The idea to apply for another grant will come back before the commission at the April meeting. € The ability for customers to pay their water bill with a credit card is now available. There is a $3 convenience fee charged to those who pay with a credit card. Deputy City Clerk Linda Langston said so far, it has been working well, and there are more customers than they thought are taking advantage of that option. Langston said they have informed customers of the option on their water bills. The next commission meeting will be April 9 at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.CITY OF SOPCHOPPYNew thrift store opening creates stirSpecial to The NewsMembers of NAMI Wakulla will present an in-person annual report Monday, March 26, along with a thank you to Wakulla County residents for supporting the free services and education in mental health. We have decided to present our annual report in-person and open to the public, so that the people of Wakulla County may attend and perhaps hear about a program they could benefit from,Ž said Susie Tooke, president of NAMI Wakulla. In addition, we are opening our doors to people interested in joining NAMI Wakulla, and working along with us so that we may deal with mental illness in Wakulla County in more effective ways,Ž Tooke said. The annual meeting will include a review of the education programs NAMI Wakulla has presented free to the public since March 2011, along with a report of support groups that have met, new groups that have formed, and a host of other services NAMI Wakulla has developed in the past year. NAMI Wakullas in-person report will also offer a detailed account of the fundraising events the group, an affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, has sponsored over the past year. This report will also offer details of future events on the planning table. The Wakulla County community is invited to attend this public meeting and enjoy light refreshments while learning more about the advances NAMI Wakulla has made in the county in its third year of existence. We especially want to thank our community for its overwhelming support for NAMI Wakulla this past year,Ž Tooke said. New board members for the coming year will be announced at the general public meeting following an annual board meeting. NAMI Wakullas public meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club, 64 Ochlockonee Street, behind the Centennial Bank. NAMI Wakulla to o er public reportCorrection CHECK PRESENTATION: Daniel Stevens of the Florida Forestry Service presents School Board Chairman Mike Scott with a check for $11,659 at last weeks school board meeting. The money represents 15 percent of timber sales from the Wakulla State Forest. WILLIAM SNOWDEN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Planning Commission proposes to consider the following applications. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, April 9, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, May 7, 2012 at 5:00 PM unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.MARCH 22, 2012 **OFFICIAL** N O T I C E O F G E N E R A L E L E C T I O N I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that a GENERALELECTION will be held in WAKULLA County, State of Florida, on the SIXTH day of NOVEMBER, 2012, A.D., to ll or retain the following of ces: President and Vice-President United States Senator Representative in Congress State Attorney: Judicial Circuit 2 Public Defender: Judicial Circuit 2 State Senator State Representative Supreme Court: Retention of Three Justices First District Court of Appeal: Retention of Four Judges Circuit Judge, Second Judicial Circuit: Groups 1, 2, 3 and 12 Clerk of the Circuit Court Sheriff Property Appraiser Tax Collector Superintendent of Schools Supervisor of Elections School Board: Districts 2 and 4 County Commissioner: Districts 1, 3 and 5 Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation District: Groups 1, 2, 3 and 5 000AUL3 JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Questions about gate at Shell Point • Man picks up weapons charges after search • Jonnie Davis McKenzie obituary •Tammy Kay Roberts Harvey obituary • Frank Earl McIntyre obituary € WakullaStory is a great tale, well told •Board will accept grant only if there’s no cost to county • Meta Gwen Rabitaille obituary€ thewakullanews. com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Get involved by running for elected o ceEditor, The News: The 2012 election will soon be here. Select the of“ ce you want to run for, then go to the Supervisor of Elections of“ ce to pick up your Candidate Packet.Ž Some positions up for re-election are: County Commissioners = $30,937 (District 1: Alan Brock, District 3: Mike Stewart, District 5: Lynn Artz), School Board members = $25,647 (District 2: Mike Scott, District 4: Greg Thomas). The only requirements for these positions are that you must be at least 18 years old, a resident of the county and a registered voter. You can qualify by getting 178 petitions signed or by paying a fee. The “ rst deadline for qualifying is May 7, 2012. All incumbents, including our senators and representatives, not just the positions listed above, should re-read the directions for “ lling out the Form 6Ž report (Full and Public Financial Disclosure), recheck their information for the past “ ve years and “ le corrected 6X forms with the Ethics Commission, if they made any mistakes. Voters want honest of“ cials. Lets keep them honest by checking their disclosure forms. The information is available to the public at disclosurepublicrecordsrequest@ leg.state.” .us … just ask for the Form 6 and 6XŽ reports for any or all years an of“ cial has been in of“ ce. Donna Sanford Crawfordville Editor, The News: The fourth annual Jesus River Festival was held on Saturday March 10 at the Sopchoppy City Park, and by all accounts it was a great success. It is estimated that almost 400 people were entertained by seven Christian musical groups, three youth dance and drama performances, blessed by preachers from four local churches, enjoyed the free food and childrens programs. The weather was great and everything went off without a hitch. The Jesus River Festival Organizing Committee would like to thank all the churches, ministries, business and individuals that donated their time and resources. We could not have held the festival without your help. We are already working on Jesus River Festival 2013. Anyone wishing to participate in next years event can reach us through our website, jesusriverfest.com. We look forward to serving you next year. Jesus River Festival Organizing CommitteeJesus River Festival appreciates supportBy PAMELA JOYTask Force chairThe Recycle Task Force held their final meeting in February … but recycling efforts will continue. The committee was formed by county commissioners and comprised of volunteer citizens and county staff to propose and pursue ways to increase recycling county-wide. The committee completed many of their original goals and restructured to form subcommittees for future work and to coordinate with Waste Pro, who now manages recycle and waste collections for the county. A few highlights of committee accomplishments: € Considerable data was gathered to determine collection sites and materials already being collected within the county. € Recycle centers for aluminum, plastic and cardboard were set up in all county of“ ces that did not already have them, and all types of cartridges from printers, copiers and fax machines are also being collected for recycle. € Mobile recycling collection units were initially set up in Sopchoppy and Shell Point, and are now being used at county events … three mobile units are available, courtesy of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. € The committee included representatives from schools and the jail, and additional measures were added to existing efforts for recycling cardboard and large steel cans. € The committee supported the proposal to bring Waste Pro to the county by presentations to the BOCC. € All county parks have been set up with additional containers to collect recyclables, and better signs. € Several articles were submitted and printed in The Wakulla News to report on and encourage recycling efforts in the County. The county is partnering with the UF/UFIS Extension Of“ ce and KWCB to educate citizens and promote recycling at local events and possibly within the schools. A ” yer is currently available that lists items that can be placed in the home recycling bins. Additionally, small businesses and citizens can drop off recycling at Public Works, 340 Trice Lane, or at the extension of“ ce at 84 Cedar Avenue, or at Waste Pro, 159 County Landfill Road, on Fridays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., or Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Watch for more articles in The Wakulla News, as we work to create public awareness and encourage all of our citizens to recycle. We will soon be including statistics showing how much more the county is recycling since Waste Pro placed recycle bins at each home and other collection sites. Its phenomenal how much more the citizens of our county are recycling! Keep up the good work and help KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL!Pamela Joy was chair of the countys Recycle Task Force.Editor, The News: The spate of Lynn Artz-bashing hosted by your opinion page can only be evaluated through some knowledge of 21st Century Wakulla County history. Ms. Artz got her initiation on the last day of August 2004 in her “ rst run for the Commission. Readers who were here will recall how, at the close of that primary election day, the results were totaled and announced, save one precinct. And then somewhere near 9 p.m. night fell on Ms. Artzs 128-vote margin, and her defeat by 3 votes went into the books. Now holding a seat, Ms. Artz shows no desire to help the powerful further consolidate their power (were that possible), nor to gather any to herself. She seems only to wish to help the county by her studious ways and independent assessments. Those interests who can with impunity do things like appropriating public property in the county for partisan electioneering, and who are blessed with such luck in last-precinct cliffhangers, do not like Ms. Artz now any more than when she “ rst ran. Thus I think we all understand that every day for her can become Aug. 31, 2004. But I still say, You go, Lynn.Ž Oh, and lest a newcomer wonder, the wake of the 2004 business did feature one arrest … Ms. Artz. David Roddenberry SopchoppyArtz is studious and independentEditor, The News: On behalf of the Leon County Humane Society, Nancy Gabrielson and myself, I wish to thank everyone who helped with this years Friends Furr Life Pet Food Drive, Crawfordville Animal Hospital and Ashley Feed Store for being the donation drop sites. To all of the pastors who announced this event at their churches. And especially to the family that gave over $100 in pet food at the Crawfordville drop site, God bless you. (You know who you are.) This year was another great success, serving many of the seniors in our county. Kathryn Wilson Crawfordville Editor, The News: The community center (then called the recreation center) began its struggle to be eight to 10 years ago. It started with plans for a swimming pool with site proposals near Wakulla High School, the playing “ eld at the former Crawfordville Elementary School and other locations. No agreement could be reached on the site. When the new Crawfordville Elementary School was built, I suggested to the Wakulla County Commission that the old Crawfordville School would be an ideal site. There you have a gym, cafeteria, auditorium and a large playing “ eld. To me, this sounded too good to be true. Two school board members seemed to like the idea, by Superintendent David Miller told me and one commissioner that this was school property and wold not be used for other purposes. When I brought up Sopchoppy using the old school for community activities, I was told that was a different situation. After the election four years ago, a new commissioner told me that the area near the county maintenance facility on Trice Lane was the current site choice. No interest was expressed in the old Crawfordville School, although this person favored creating a true town center for Crawfordville. Later, the county purchased the two church buildings at the corner of Trice Lane and Upper Bridge Road for the community center. In my view, both buildings are unsuited for medium to large gathers with their small, cut-up rooms. Building a minimal gym for $390,000 may be a pipe dream. Minimal lighting makes no sense if future upgrades are in the plan. The former Crawfordville Elementary School educated most of our county of“ cials for years. The alumni are a prideful bunch. Among that group is Superintendent Miller, who has developed one of the premier school systems in the state. Some would expect that he would be a cooperative part of the community center movement. The school system gets 58 cents of every county tax dollar, plus funds from the state. They had enough surplus money to do an expensive renovation of the old school. How expensive few know. The county commission meetings are sold out, but few bother to attend school board meetings. Perhaps the newly appointed group to study the community center could explore working out a 99year lease to use the school auditorium, gymnasium, cafeteria sections and some of the portable buildings. After all, we the taxpayers are the owners of all county property and our votes select the managers. Royce Jackson Crawfordville Editor, The News: Each Thursday I look forward to receiving my weekly edition of The Wakulla News. However, there was an article in last weeks edition that caused me to pause and actually to question the reasoning of the paper. In the March 8 Green Scene, page 3B, there was an article entitled What caused the solar company Solyndra to fail?Ž Being a citizen who is fiscally conservative and very concerned about the overbearing debt our country is rapidly accumulating, I have been following with interest the numerous failures resulting from the way our national government has invested billions of dollars of taxpayers money. Solyndra was a big failure totaling over one half billion dollars of the peoples money. Unfortunately there is much evidence to indicate that the very politicians and government employees who made the $535 million dollar loan understood that the company was not a good investment even before they gave the loan. Today there are congressional investigations being conducted that are trying to answer such questions as why was the original loan made in spite of analysts warnings that it was not a good investment and whether a 2011 agreement was legal between George Kaiser, a venture capitalist and presidential campaign donor, and the Department of Energy. This agreement ensured that Mr. Kaiser would be repaid $75 million while taxpayers, to date, have not had their investment returned. My concern with the question asked by Walt Bottone from somewhere in New Jersey and who, when Googled, is identi“ ed as a maker of solar components and then answered by an environmental magazine writer is twofold: First, do these two people have a bias and what is there business experience? A more important question in my mind is why was $535 million taxpayer dollars used in the “ rst place to fund a company that was destined to fail? Development of alternative energy sources should be encouraged but as even the unidenti“ ed EarthTalk reporter indicates, the dollar cost will continue to be extremely expensive. Is it right to do it on the back of the American taxpayer? Cynthia Webster CrawfordvilleRecycle Task Force ends, recycling e orts will continueArticle on Solyndra was questionable Support of Friends Furr Life appreciated School was ideal as community center ank you, poll workers, for what you doEditor, The News: Wakulla County Elections along with the Florida Senate and the State of Florida would like to thank all Election Team Members (poll workers) for their outstanding service and dedication to the elections process. These citizens are important parts of the election process and are commended for their service. Thanks for all you do. Buddy Wells Wakulla Supervisor of Elections Florida Senate Resolution A resolution commending those who serve as election day of“ cials at polling places throughout Florida for their outstanding service and dedication. Whereas freedom is best maintained and nurtured through the democratic process, which requires fair and open elections that accurately re” ect the intent of the electorate, and Whereas the supervisors of elections have long relied upon election ay of“ cials to assist them in administering elections, and Whereas those seeking to become election of“ cials are extraordinarily committed in attending training sessions to learn policies, procedures and responsibilities to ensure that voting is administered in a fair, nondiscriminatory and transparent manner, and Whereas election day of“ cials are responsible for administering all activities at polling places in Florida, and have remained willing, positive, and innovative throughout the many changes in election procedures, policies and voting equipment, and Whereas election day officials have served as ambassadors of the supervisors of elections and have contributed to the high level of integrity in the election process in Florida, Now Therefore, Be it resolved by the Senate of the State of Florida: That the Senate commends those who serve as election day of“ cials at polling places throughout Florida for their outstanding service and dedication.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 – Page 5A  Make A Difference Day is March 24VolunteerWAKULLA is holding its fth annual Make A Difference Day on Saturday, March 24, at Hudson Park. This year's event will be different for previous years: a community picnic for the citizens of Wakulla County will be held, and many of the organizations in the County will be setting up booths to make people aware of services available, as well as opportunities to volunteer in the county. At this time, there are more than 25 organizations signed up. There will be a free lunch for all, entertainment and door prizes.  Deadline to RSVP for Chamber luncheon is March 26The Wakulla Chamber will hold its March Networking Luncheon at the UF/ IFAS Extension office, catered by Hamaknockers Restaurant on Wednesday, March 28. The cost is $12 per person and lunch will be served buffet style. The deadline for reservations is Monday, March 26. Easter Egg Hunt coming up on March 31The Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department will holds its annual Easter Egg Hunt on March 31 at Hudson Park with registration from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., and the hunt beginning at 11 a.m. Age groups are birth to 3 years old, 4-6 years old and 7-10 years old. A drawing from each age group will win an Easter basket. Also attending will be Wakulla ROTC, Wakulla EMS, Wakulla Fire & Rescue, Smokey Bear,Capital City Bank Star, McDonald's character, McGruff the Crime Dog, the Sonic character. There will also be a moonwalker. Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment of Wakulla will have an adopt-a-pet booth at the park. CHAT is asking for donations of pet items, including towels, treats and pet toys. For more information, go the website www.wcprd.com or call (850 926-7227. Lifewalk set for March 31 at Wakulla SpringsWakulla Pregnancy Center is having it's 6th Annual LIFEWALK Sat. March 31 at Wakulla Springs State Park. There will be balloons and face painting for the kids, baked goods, a silent auction and entertainment from local youth groups. Marcia McNaney from the Pregnancy and Family Resource Alliance will share what's going on with legislation. It will be a great time, so join us March 31 as we walk for life. TCC to hold job fair in Tallahassee on April 4On Wednesday, April 4, the TCC Career Center is hosting its Spring Job Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom. The event is an opportunity for job-seekers to stand out in the pool of applicants and will connect students with representatives from local businesses looking to ll part-time, full-time and seasonal positions, as well as internships. Job-seekers are encouraged to dress in professional attire in order to make a good rst-impression with potential employers and have copies of their resume available. Employers looking to meet many candidates face-to-face in a short amount of time should attend. Employer registration and details are available online at tcc-csm. symplicity.com/events or by calling (850) 201-9970. Space is limited. The TCC Career Center, located on the second oor of the Student Union, offers a variety of services related to career planning, preparation and placement, including professional development workshops, internships and resume/cover letter assistance.  Jam 4 Camp is scheduled for April 28Wakulla County 4-H will present the second Annual Jam 4 Camp Fundraiser at Hudson Park on Saturday, April 28, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. This event is free to vendors and bands who wish to participate. This event is open to the public and raises money for 4-H camp scholarships for Wakulla County youth by collecting donations from Sponsors, band "votes," vendor contributions, T-shirt sales and a silent auction. The ve bands participating will play at one hour intervals and collect votes in the form of dollars raised. Youth and their parents are also invited to sign up for all 4-H Camps this day. Camps will ll up fast and spaces are limited, so it is best to arrive early and stay and enjoy the day. For more information, please contact Sherri Kraeft at 926-3931. More information can also be found at the website wakulla.ifas.u .edu/4-h. Staff ReportsBriefsLighthouse challenge comes to the Florida Panhandle WILLIAM SNOWDENJAWS OF LIFE IN ACTION: Wakulla County “ re“ ghters gave a demonstration of extrication techniques at the St. Patricks Day Festival, showing the crowd how they cut into a car to rescue the occupants in a wreck. The car was donated by Wakulla Towing.Special to The NewsThe Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge, to be held on Saturday, April 21 and Sunday, April 22, will celebrate the “ ve lighthouses in Northwest Florida … Cape St. George Light, Crooked River Lighthouse, St. Marks Lighthouse, Cape San Blas Lighthouse and Pensacola Lighthouse. The Lighthouse Challenge will bring lighthouse enthusiasts from all over the country to meet the challengeŽ of visiting the “ ve historic lighthouses. For the price of a Challenge ticket, participants will be able to climb a total of more than 500 steps into the maritime history of the Florida Panhandle. Climb 131 stairs to the top of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse and take in panoramic views of the Gulf of Mexico and St. Joe Bay. Make the trek up 92 wooden stairs and an eightrung ladder into the lantern room of the Cape St. George Light, for spectacular views of the Gulf and the bridge to the island over beautiful Apalachicola Bay. Climb 138 stairs up the Crooked River Lighthouse in Carrabelle to the open-air gallery offering breath-taking vistas of the wooded area around the lighthouse and the Gulf beyond. The St. Marks Lighthouse, which reaches 82 feet over Apalachee Bay, will not be open for climbing, but Challenge participants will be able to enter the base of the lighthouse and visit the Keepers House. New to the Lighthouse Challenge in 2012 is the Pensacola Lighthouse. For a real challenge, climb 177 stairs to the top of the distinctive black and white tower to see the magnificent first order Fresnel lens and views of Pensacola Bay and the Naval Air Station. The Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge, timed to commemorate Florida Lighthouse Day on April 21, is intended to raise awareness about northwest Floridas lighthouses and encourage support for the efforts to preserve these historic structures. Visitors to the “ ve lighthouses during the two-day event will receive a complimentary commemorative souvenir at each lighthouse, with a sixth souvenir and a Florida Lighthouse Association Completion Certi“ cate awarded to participants who visit all “ ve. Tickets will be priced at $10 per person, and you must be at least 44 inches tall to participate. Each admission includes one commemorative tote bag (while supplies last) and one raf” e ticket, and entitles participants to visit the “ ve lighthouses at no charge. Hours for the Challenge are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both Saturday and Sunday. There is an additional entry fee at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. WANTEDHELP ROUND-UP THE FOLLOWING NOTORIOUS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTES REWARD San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey... William ‘Bill’ Blount Jonnie Davis McKenzie William E. ‘Bill’ Mills Jr. Dorothy Harrell Robertson Deborah Atkins Sanders Mary Frances Whaley WigginsChurch briefsRevival set at Greater Mount Trial Jonnie Davis McKenzieJonnie Davis McKenzie, 90, of Tallahassee, passed away on Thursday, March 15. She was born in Panacea, on Aug. 28, 1921, to John Green Davis and Mary Dea Robison Davis Rudd. She grew up in and around Sopchoppy and graduated from Sopchoppy High School in 1941. She married Ruben Oreal on Aug. 2, 1941. She won her wings as an airplane spotter during World War II. She worked for 13 years at the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles before retiring in 1983. She lived to garden and gardened to live … even up to just two years before her death. She loved to go “ shing with her family in tow on the banks and in the waters of the Sopchoppy, Wacissa and Aucilla rivers, as well as on the St. George bridge and on the island. Many were the weekends spent in canoes on the Wakulla and St. Marks rivers. Jonnie enjoyed teaching her grandchildren how to have fun as well as how to really enjoy life. She was an avid reader and crossword puzzle solver. She always tried to learn and experience as much as possible before she lost her eyesight. She loved to create beautiful beadwork and had myriad interests and skills. She often said, had she not been blind, shed have been out on the highway traveling. She loved cooking for her family and cooked enough to feed the entire neighborhood. She was a member of Heritage Assembly of God Church. Graveside services were held Monday, March 19, at 11 a.m. at Grimes Cemetery (in the 800 block of Oak Park Road) in Sopchoppy. In lieu of ” owers, the family requests donations be made to the charity of your choice or the Building Fund at Heritage Assembly of God Church, 298 Crossway Road, Tallahassee FL 32305. Survivors include her loving sons, Michael ButchŽ McKenzie and Timothy TreeŽ (Jesse) McKenzie; daughters, Angie (Ray) Mote, Kathleen (Paul) Connell, Sherry L. Houser and Tina Jarvis; six grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren; sisters, Nolie Maxie and Pearl Harper; sister-in-law, Ethel McCoy; and numerous nieces, nephews and lifelong friends. The family would like to extend their heartfelt thanks to the staff at Big Bend Hospice for their support and compassion for Jonnie and the entire family. She was predeceased by her parents; her husband, Ruben Oreal McKenzie; son, Dennis Oreal McKenzie; granddaughter, Daphne Godwin; grandson, Benjamin David Houser; daughter-inlaw, Linda H. McKenzie; and son-in-law, Ray D. Jarvis. Beggs Funeral Homes Inc, 3322 Apalachee Parkway in Tallahassee, 942-2929, was handling funeral arrangements. William Bill Blount William BillŽ Blount, 53, of Tallahassee, went to be with the Lord on Friday, March 16, at The Big Bend Hospice House in Tallahassee. He was born in Tallahassee on Jan. 5, 1959, to Ethel M. McCoy and Malcolm Blount. He served as an E4 in the U.S. Army and was Honorably Discharged in the 1970s. He enjoyed riding motorcycles. Survivors include his loving mother, Ethel M. McCoy; father, Malcolm Blount; daughter, Nicole M. Blount; and granddaughter, Alyssa B. Seiter; and numerous other relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his stepfather, Clarence J. McCoy. The family would like to extend their heartfelt thanks to the staff at Big Bend Hospice for their support and compassion for Bill and his family. The family requests memorial donations be made in Bills name to Big Bend Hospice at 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee FL 32308. Dorothy Harrell RobertsonDorothy Harrell Robertson, 73, of Crawfordville, passed away on Thursday, March 15, at Capital Regional Medical Center, Tallahassee. Memorial services were held on Sunday, March 18, at the graveside in Greenwood Cemetery, Cairo, Ga. The Rev. Ronald Barrett of“ ciated. The family received friends at the funeral home on Saturday, March 17. She was born on July 24, 1938, in Cairo, Ga., to the late Dan E. and Thelma A. Pyles Harrell. She retired as a District Engineering Secretary for Centel of Florida. She was an accomplished pianist and contributed her talents to various Christian venues. She was a member of the Anglican Church of Medart. Survivors include her former husband, Floyd D. Robertson of Sopchoppy; son and daughter-in-law, David B. and Belinda Robertson of Crawfordville; daughter, Linda K. Harris of Tallahassee; grandchildren, Kelli M. Keech (Stacey) of Tallahassee and Amy M. Weeks of Crawfordville. Guests may sign the online register at www.clarkfuneral.com. Come hear this powerful man of God, Pastor Joseph L. Brown of Neighborhood Evangelistic Ministries in Panama City, as he breaks the bread of life with us at Greater Mount Trial Primitive Church in Sopchoppy. The revival will be held March 21, 22 and 23 at the church located at 1418 Sopchoppy Highway. For more information, call the church at (850) 9622534. Bene t to be held at MacedoniaMacedonia Church of Christ will host a benefit program for Flossie Denmark on Sat-urday, March 24 at 7 p.m. The public is invited.More obituaries appear on Page 7AMary Frances Whaley WigginsMary Frances Whaley Wiggins, 87, died on March 12, at St. Raphaels Hospital in New Haven, Conn. She was born Nov. 4, 1924, to Taylor Whaley and Dorothy Sellers Whaley in Wakulla County, and attended Sopchoppy High School where she was a cheerleader, played basketball and acted in school plays. On Feb. 21, 1943, she married Marvin Lee Wiggins, who preceded her in death. During World War II, she was a civilian employee at the Naval Air Station Miami repairing spark plugs for Naval aircraft. There she developed a more ef“ cient refurbishing process that was adopted by the entire facility. She was a bookkeeper and the of“ ce manager for the family business, Wiggins Construction Company, based in Albany, Ga. A lifelong Baptist, she was a charter member of Sunnyside Baptist Church in Albany where she served as church treasurer, taught Sunday School and was active in the Womans Missionary Union. After retirement she was a member of the First Baptist Church of Sopchoppy and Lake Ellen Baptist Church of Medart. She was also a disaster relief volunteer with Campers on Mission. She enjoyed traveling throughout the United States, and was active in the Good Sam Club. Funeral services were held at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church on Monday, March 19 at 3 p.m., followed by burial at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. The family received friends at the church before the service, beginning at 1:30 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the West Sopchoppy Cemetery Committee, P.O. Box 37, Sopchoppy FL, 32358, or to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee FL, 32308. Survivors include her three sons and daughters-inlaw, Dyrall Wiggins and Laura Coker Wiggins of Warner Robins, Ga., David Wiggins and Carol Inlow Wiggins of Albany, and Timothy Lee Wiggins and Angela Shelley Wiggins of North Haven, Conn. She also is survived by grandchildren, Jacob Wiggins and Melissa Hat“ eld Wiggins of Byron, Ga., Kathleen Wiggins Fowler and Brad Fowler of Kathleen, Ga., Andrew Wiggins of Gainesville, Sarah Wiggins Bailey and Bo Bailey of Macon, Ga., Jeff Wiggins and Kristi Kavanaugh Wiggins of Dawson, Ga., and Colby Wiggins and Carmen Hall Wiggins of Leesburg, Ga. She also is survived by nine great-grandchildren, Colby Fowler, Chance Fowler, Iron Wiggins, Legend Wiggins, Lydia Wiggins, Mason Wiggins, Elizabeth Doyle, Madison Doyle and Chloe Wiggins; and by many devoted nieces and nephews, and numerous cousins. She was preceded in death by sisters, Cornelia Whaley Harden and Nursie Whaley; and by brothers, T.D. Whaley, Henry K. Whaley, Doris Whaley, Albert Whaley, Evans Whaley, William Whaley and Frank Whaley. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is in charge of arrangements.

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William E. ‘Bill’ Mills Jr.William E. BillŽ Mills Jr., 78, of Sandy Springs, Ga., and Wakulla County, died peacefully on March 15 after a two year battle with ALS. He was born in Geneva, Ala., the son of William Earl Mills Sr. and Flora Clark, and was raised near Panama City. After graduating from Bay County High School, he served in the U.S. Air Force 93rd Bombardment Wing as a hydraulic engineer on some of the very “ rst B-52 bombers. He then attended Florida State University where he earned a business degree in advertising. It was at FSU where he met his beloved wife, Eloise Baumer. While at FSU, Bill was a member of the Flying High Circus, and he and Eloise were lifelong supporters of their alma mater. The family later established a needs-based scholarship in their name for FSU communications students, which continues to help students pursue their educational goals today. In 2010, Bill and Eloise were formally recognized as Distinguished Alumni by the university for their post-graduate achievements. Bill moved to Atlanta in 1958, where he began his advertising and marketing career with the Retail Credit Corp. (now Equifax) and ultimately served as the companys director of advertising. He then served as vice president of marketing for the John H. Harland Company, as well as advertising manager for Citizens & Southern National Bank, partner in Sibley, Sheehan & Mills Public Relations and as copywriter for Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey. A sought-after expert on marketing, Bill was published numerous times in industry publications and lectured regularly on the profession. In 1977, Bill and Eloise founded the William Mills Agency, the nations largest public relations and marketing “ rm serving the “ nancial services industry. Under their direction and later, their sons, William and Scott, the agency has ” ourished to become one of Atlantas largest public relations firms, and was formally recognized by Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin on the occasion of its 30th anniversary. Bill was also a committed member of his church, Second-Ponce de Leon Baptist Church in Atlanta, where he was a former president of the EEE Sunday School class. He played active leadership roles in several civic organizations, including Kiwanis, the Atlanta Farmers Club and was a member of the Wakulla County Mens Club, where he furthered his reputation as a raconteur of the highest order. He was also a perennial “ xture in the annual Peachtree Road Race and completed the worlds largest 10K race 35 times. The visitation was held on Sunday, March 18, at H.M. Patterson and Son, Arlington Chapel, 173 Allen Road NE, in Sandy Springs, Ga. After a private family interment at Georgia National Cemetery, a public memorial service was held on Monday, March 19, at the Chapel of Second-Ponce de Leon Baptist Church at 2715 Peachtree Road NE in Atlanta. Immediately following, family and friends were invited to Bill and Eloises home for a celebration of Bills life. A memorial service will be held in Florida at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Bill & Eloise Mills ScholarshipŽ at Florida State Universitys College of Communication & Information at https://one.fsu. edu/community/SSLPage. aspx?pid=809, select from the drop down menu Designate a FundŽ and enter Bill & Eloise Mills #1753Ž or mailed to FSU Foundation Fund #1753Ž, PO Box 3062739, 2010 Levy Avenue, Tallahassee FL 32301-2739. Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Eloise B. Mills; sons, William Earl Mills III and his wife Alecia P. Mills, and Martin Scott Mills and his wife Kim H. Mills; granddaughters, Ryan Denea Parris Mills and Kristin Taylor Parris Mills; grandson, Van Tyler Mills; great-granddaughter, Ashton Taylor Parris Crawford; sister, Joan Sears of Ft. Lauderdale; and brothers, Galen McEachin of Panama City, Richard McEachin (Susan) of Freeport, Michael McEachin (Mary) of Panama City and Joel McEachin (Debra) of Jacksonville; in addition to countless other family and friends that he touched deeply through the example of his rich life. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunity ObituariesContinued from Page 6ADeborah Atkins SandersDeborah Atkins Sanders, 47, passed away on Sunday, March 18. She was born Oct. 28, 1964. Visitation was held Tuesday, March 20, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Wednesday, March 21, at 4 p.m. at Alga Sanders Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308. Survivors include her husband, Sam Jack Sanders of Sopchoppy, and her parrot, Sidney; her father and mother, Charles and Bobbie Sue Atkins of Havana; one brother, Charles NathanŽ Akins (Danni); and two nieces, Rebecca and Elizabeth of Tallahassee; two step-daughters, Melissa Lopez and Crystal Sanders; seven step-grandchildren, Alejandre, Angelica, Samantha, Chelsea, Aldaberto, Adrian and Ana, all of Bristol; her grandmother, Violet Jackson; uncles, Steve Jackson (Debbie), Gary Atkins (Sandy) of New York and Alga Sanders (Tammy) of Sopchoppy; aunts, Seena Barley and Kathe Broyles (Aldon) all of Tennessee; and nephew, Tommy Sanders and niece, Kathy Sanders both of Sopchoppy; as well as a host of other cousins and friends. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, FL is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Happy “ rst birthdayAvery G. LewisAvery Grace Lewis will celebrate her “ rst birthday on April 3. She is the daughter of Heather and Michael Lewis of Tallahassee. Her maternal grandparents are Denise Dilmore of Tallahassee and Scott Smith. Her paternal grandparents are Pam and Kenny Lewis of Tallahassee. Her maternal greatgrandparents are Edna and Buddy Dilmore of Tallahassee. Her paternal greatgrandparents are Ruth and Cecil Roddenberry of Tallahassee. Avery G. Lewis, at right. Brayden M. BrittBrayden Michael Britt will celebrate his first birthday on March 26. He is the son of Michelle Boccumini and Michael Britt of Wakulla County. His maternal grandparents are Joyce Boccumini, Dean Boccumini and Paul Smith of Wakulla County. His paternal grandparents are Gail Kent and Danny Watkins of Leon and Shane Britt of Lakeland. Brayden M. Britt, at right. Birth announcementsDanny and Frederika FreddyŽ Kelly of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Bailey Preston Kelly, on Jan. 18 at 3:06 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 8 pounds, 10 ounces and was 20 inches long. His paternal grandparents are Conway and Michelle Kelly of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are Gary and Dawna Schlickelman of Odessa, Mo., and the late Antje Schlickelman. His paternal great-grandparents are Thomas and Sarah Kelly of Havana, Jim and Joan Schooley of Ocala, the late Michael DiGiacomo. His maternal great-grandparents are the late Fred and Lorna Schlickelman of Odessa, Mo., and the late Er nst and Analiese Wilrodt of Hamburg, Germany. Christopher and Shannon Core of Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughter, Rhian Savannah Core, on March 8 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She weighed 6 pounds, 11 ounces and was 19 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Lora and Geary Boston of Crawfordville. Her paternal grandparents are Shirley Core of Sopchoppy and the late Tommy Core. She as a brother, Dalton, 8, and two sisters, Gracie, 6, and Makayla, 4.Rhian S. Core Bailey P. Kelly FRONT PORCH CREATIONS FLORIST 850926-7192 850926-7192 House SPECIAL Eve ry FRIDAY MUG BO UQUE T www.FrontPorchCreationsFlowers.com $12 99 Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. PREPAID MONTHLY PLANS Modern Communications nationwide pre-paid cellular pagep l us U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT $4000 PERMO.DATACHARGESMAYAPPLY ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Promise began traveling on July 3, 2011, and has been busy ever since. Within a few months they released their debut project, self titled Promise, and quickly established themselves as an upcoming trio worth keeping an eye on. In fact, popular Southern Gospel Music website AbsoluteGospel.com named them in the Top Ten Groups To Watch in 2012! join us to enjoy this popular trio atCHRISTIAN WORSHIP CENTER 850-556-9230UPCOMING EVENTS: Homecoming Revival Special Singing Pastor Mike Montague FOUR FAMILY SERVING YOUR FAMILY Direct Cremation $995.00 Traditional Funeral Starting at $4995.00(Includes: Metal 20 Gauge Steel Casket (4 colors to choose from), Vault, Open and Close of Grave, Graveside or Church Service with one night of visitation, Register Book and Memorial Folders).Dedicated to serving you and your family in your time of need, Providing the most affordable services in the area.Family Owned and Operated H. M. “Hank” Forbes Jr. Licensed Funeral Director/Owner Dana Forbes Hawke Forbes 1171 South 6th Street Macclenny, Florida 32063Ph: 850-559-3380 • 904-259-4600Forbes Funeral Home Submit your Special Event and we will include it in The Wakulla News Week in WakullaContact: jjensen@thewakullanews.net(850) 926-7102fax (850) 926-3815

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolMohr named outstanding educatorSpecial to The NewsProject Learning Tree (PLT), the environmental education program of the American Forest Foundation, announces that Brooke Mohr, a teacher at Medart Elementary School in Crawfordville, was named one of five 2012 National PLT Outstanding Educators. Mohr will be honored at PLTs 26th International Coordinators Conference, in Deadwood, S.D., May 14-17. Every year PLT provides more than 30,000 educators with the tools and on-theground training they need to incorporate environmental education and service-learning into their curriculum. PLT activities use trees and forests as windowsŽ on the world to help teachers strengthen their teaching of core subjects, take their students outdoors to learn, and grow stewardship in the next generation. PLTs Outstanding Educators are selected for their commitment to environmental education, their exemplary use of PLT, and their exceptional teaching skills. Mohr has taught for more than 25 years in almost every elementary grade, as well as gifted instruction and early intervention for at-risk students. For the past 12 years, she has used PLTs environmental education activities in her classroom to teach science, reading, math, and other core subjects to all types of students. Mohr was introduced to PLT while teaching at Shadeville Elementary School. She moved to Medart Elementary in 2004 and led training workshops to enroll the school in the Florida PLT Schools program which helps individual schools establish an ongoing commitment to environmental education through regular use of PLT activities. She then worked with the Wakulla School District to train teachers at two more elementary schools that resulted in Wakulla County becoming the first county in Florida to have all of its elementary schools designated as Florida PLT Schools, and the majority of its youth exploring and learning outdoors through PLT. Mohr coordinates an annual school-wide PLT WeekŽ during which each class participates in various activities surrounding a central theme. Mohr forges partnerships with agencies and local organizations, and she invites parents and guest speakers to help make students aware of their community and surrounding environment, and their role as stewards of it. By teaching our students to care about the environment, we can make positive changes for our future,Ž says Mohr. If children are aware of the environment, the natural resources it provides, and what it needs to remain healthy, theyll begin to understand their responsibility for it.Ž Robin Will, ranger at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, who works with Mohr on many PLT activities, noted, Mrs. Mohr exempli“ es an outstanding educator with her dedication, creativity, student and partner engagement plans, and commitment to caring for the environment.Ž Mohr shares her experiences about the effectiveness of PLT on student learning with other educators across the state. Mohr became a National Board Certi“ ed Teacher in 2006, is a member of the Florida PLT Steering Committee, and was named Florida PLT Educator of the Year in 2011. Mohr is invited to participate in the World Forestry Centers International Educators Institute, July 8-14, in Portland, Oregon.Payne helps children master basic skillsSpecial to The NewsShelia Ann Payne has been working in the Early Childhood Education “ eld for over 16 years. She has been involved in the growth and development of children from 6 weeks old to 5 years old. Currently she is employed by Wakulla Christian School as the director of the schools VPK program and the lead 4K teacher. When she works with young children she is helping them develop socially, emotionally and physically. There are several programs and styles of teaching which help children develop and master these basic skills. In her class, Payne teaches from the A Beka curriculum. This curriculum incorporates God into every subject. It emphasizes beautiful penmanship, basic arithmetic and the importance of phonics. Payne said she believes a child who can read at an early age will have a head start in life. By the end of each school year, her class is able to write words and their names in cursive, as well as read simple sentences. This prepares each child to begin elementary school the following year. Payne said she feels blessed to be a part of the education “ eld, as well as a crucial part of each childs life and developmental journey. She knows she is making a difference in the community. Wakulla Christian School is an accredited, private Christian school offering 3K through 7th grade. For further information, contact the school of“ ce at (850) 926-5583.Special to The NewsMarch Teachers of the Month are Crawfordville Elementary Schools Miranda Bowen and Riversprings Middle Schools Jennifer Thaxton. The Employee of the Month is Wakulla Education Pre-K CDA Rene Lawhon. Miranda Bowen, Marchs Teacher of the Month, has been teaching at Crawfordville Elementary School since August 2004. Bowen graduated from Wakulla High School, Flagler College with her bachelors degree and Florida State University with her masters degree. Bowen had the opportunity of serving as a teacher intern at Crawfordville Elementary. Prior to teaching, she worked as clerk for the Florida Department of Agriculture. Bowen said, I have always been impressed by the professionalism exhibited by the educators in the Wakulla County School District and when a position became available at Crawfordville Elementary School, I applied and got the job.Ž Bowen enjoys getting to know her students and walking along with them as they dive into learning. She adds, Every student comes in at a different place in their educational journey and helping them to make that journey the most exciting and rewarding voyage possible is the most incredible feeling imaginable.Ž Bowen is also the School Advisory Council chair. She also serves as a member on committees such as school safety, professional behavior system, reading literacy and Brogan Education partner. Crawfordville Elementary School Principal Angela Walker adds, It is an honor and privilege to work with a teacher with such dedication, sel” ess devotion to the profession and such an impeccable work ethic. Mrs. Bowen is one of the “ rst teachers to arrive each morning and one of the last to leave each day. She helps her colleagues by “ nding materials, locating web-sites, connecting to classroom mimio boards, correcting problems with a projector or wanting more knowledge about trainings or teaching approaches. Her classroom is engaging, challenging, full of technology, interactive, orderly and exciting. Mrs. Bowens contribution to our schools success is above and beyond what is expected and certainly what is required. I am fortunate to work with her at our school each day.Ž Jennifer Thaxton, Riversprings Middle Schools Media Specialist, is a RMS Bear charter member, as she was part of the team that opened the school in August 2000. She has dedicated 14 years of service to the district. As the media specialist Thaxton gets to know all of the students in the school. She notes, I love it when the students run into the library because they absolutely must have the next book in the series. I enjoy watching the students as they grow and mature from 6th graders to 8th graders. I also work with an amazing faculty and enjoy collaborating with my peers.Ž RMS Principal Dod Walker shares, Mrs. Thaxton is a true leader at Riversprings. She taught 8th grade for several years and moved into the media specialist position in 2008. This move allowed her to ” ourish as a leader, impacting all students and faculty at RMS. It is only “ tting that the Media Center be located at the center of campus because she is a large part of the heart and soul of Riversprings. I am proud and honored to work with her.Ž She also serves as a mentor teacher trainer, alternative certi“ cation mentor and assessor, assistant school level test coordinator and school newspaper sponsor. Rene Lawhon, Wakulla Educational Centers Pre-K CDA, has dedicated more than 22 years to the youngest students in Wakulla County. She began her career with the District by serving in the WEC daycare and as the Readimobile teacher. In August 2003 she transferred into a CDA position at Pre-K. Wakulla Education Center Pre-K Principal applauds Mrs. Lawhons accomplishments. She shares, Ms. Rene continues to leave a lasting impression on the lives of students.Ž She shared examples of students running up to Ms. Rene shouting, Miss Rene, Miss Rene, do you remember me? I was in your class. Do you remember when you took us bowling and on a “ eld trip skating?Ž Lawhon states, I love the pre-k children because they still love you back. They have a sparkle in their eye every day and sincere excitement when we cook green eggs or have worm races. We are giving them experiences they will never forget. When I leave school each day I am blessed by more little fellows waiting on me around the house. At least one or all of my sons or grandsons will be there when I get home with something exciting to tell me. My life may seem simple to some, but I love my students at school, my husband and my wonderful family.Ž Lawhon also serves on the WEC PRE-K PTA, Special Olympics and Family Fun Day Committees and as the Pre-K Volunteer Coordinator.By CADET ENSIGN AZZARITO Public Affairs Of“ cerEach year, the Wakulla High School NJROTC unit hosts a golf tournament to support the cadets in all the activities they do in the unit and also for the community. This year, the golf tournament will be Monday, April 2. The tournament will be a shot gun start and begin at 8 a.m. The golf tournament will be at the Wildwood Golf Course in Crawfordville, located near the high school. Entry fees are $75 dollars for individuals (50 is tax deductible) and $300 for a team of four. All proceeds go to the NJROTC unit, offering every cadet an equal opportunity regardless of economic status, to participate fully in all unit activities, such as orientation trips to military bases, “ eld meet competitions and traditionrich social events. These activities help the cadets to further develop the friendships they have with other cadets in the unit and to further instill unit camaraderie among all. So come out on April 2 and help support the Wakulla NJROTC War Eagle Navy. NJROTC golf tournament is April 2 Miranda Bowen Jennifer Thaxton Rene LawhonTeachers and employee of the month Enroll Now forALGEBRA 1:END OF COURSE EXAM PREPGrades 8 & 9 FCAT MATH PREP Grade 8 FCAT ENGLISH & READING PREP For Grades 8, 9, 10 AP LANG EXAM REVIEWONE-ON-ONE INSTRUCTION OR SMALL GROUPS AVAILABLE. CLASSES BEGIN THE WEEK AFTER SPRING BREAK AND MEET TWICE PER WEEK (1 HOUR EACH CLASS) UNTIL THE RESPECTIVE EXAM.Call Melisa Taylor to register today. 3119B Crawfordville Hwy850-926-2179 MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012 M a n a t e e T i m e s Adver sing Networks of Florida Statewide advertising—one low price Reach a wide audience (866)742-1373 Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? 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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles were down by six runs at one point on Monday, March 19, to the Robert F. Munroe Bobcats, but rallied back in the bottom of the sixth to tie it at 9-9. But in the seventh inning, Munroe benefited on a couple of past balls to advance runners and added on three runs. It looked like Wakulla could pull off another rally in the bottom of the inning but the effort fell short and the War Eagles went down 12-9 to go 6-6 on the year. Munroe is a non-conference opponent. The War Eagles have done well so far against conference opponents, defeating Suwannee 3-2 back on March 13, and walloping Rickards a week earlier by a score of 13-3 The score was 9-5 in the bottom of the sixth when the War Eagles started a rally with a couple of base hits to get runners on “ rst and second. A past ball loaded the bases with nobody out. Munroe made a pitching change, and a wild pitch allowed a run to score from third. DeQuan Simmons hit a double down the “ rst base line that scored two runs. The Munroe left “ elder made a diving catch to take away a hit from Bailey Metcalf. Jake Walker had a solid hit, but was out at “ rst, but moved Simmons to third with two outs. Dalton Norman brought Simmons home with a bouncing ground ball that tied the game. In the top of the seventh, the War Eagles couldnt put away the Bobcats. The “ rst out was a long fly to the wall, the next batter walked, then stole second on a 2-1 pitch. There was another walk, then a wild pitch that moved those runners to second and third. Dillon Norman made a great play at third to throw the runner out at home, but the Bobcats bene“ ted with some past balls that moved up runners. In the bottom of the inning, the War Eagles couldnt get the rally going. The War Eagles were scheduled to travel to Perry to take on Taylor County on Tuesday, March 20. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Thursday, March 15, the freshmen and sophomore WHS track team members traveled to Tallahassee to compete in the 13th Annual Chiles Freshman-Sophomore Championships. The local team joined 10 other teams from Georgia and the Florida Panhandle in what turned out to be an extremely competitive meet. The WHS ladies team found themselves in a tight battle for the overall title with Bainbridge, Lincoln and Chiles high schools, with the lead changing several times before “ nally being settled late in the meet. Bainbridge ended up “ nishing “ rst, Lincoln second and WHS third. Individually, the girls were led once again by sophomore Madi Harris, who “ nished the night with wins in both the 1600 and 800 meter runs. Not only did Harris win the 1600 meters, but she did so in outstanding fashion, setting a new meet record and lowering her current school record by covering the distance in 5:22.89, cutting almost 7 seconds off the old meet record and 3 seconds off her school record. This was only the second 1600-meter race she has run. An hour or so later she again stepped on the track for the 800 meters and finished “ rst in that event, almost 3 seconds ahead of her nearest pursuer. Sophomore Amber Stewart who has been battling persistent injuries, returned to the 300-meter hurdles for the “ rst time this season and emerged victorious, winning the event by almost 4 seconds. The girls 4x800 meter relay team of Lydia Wiedeman, Marty Wiedeman, Lili Broadway and Tyler Kinard also won their event. The strength of the girls team at this meet was centered with middle distance runners and the “ eld event competitors. Sophomore Taylor Vaughn had a good night in the hurdle events, placing second in the 100 meter hurdles and fourth in the 300 meter hurdles. Others scoring points for the WHS team included; Savanna Strickland (8th, 400), Lydia Wiedeman (3rd, 800), Alexandra Cotes (8th, 800), Marty Wiedeman (3rd, 1600), Kasey James (5th, 1600/4th 3200), Lili Broadway (8th, 1600), Rachel Woofter (8th, 3200), Amber Stewart (8th, long jump), Shelby Alsup (5th, shot put/8th discus) and Ashley Carr (6th, discus). The girls 4x400 meter relay team ended up competiting without Madi Harris, but ran an excellent race and “ nished in third place. The team members included Marty and Lydia Wiedeman, Savanna Strickland and Lili Broadway. For the boys, freshman Kaedretis Keaton continued his string of excellent performances by jumping 3906.50Ž in the triple jump, winning the event by 3 inches. The 4x800 meter relay team of Aaron Smith, Gabe Hutchins, David Sloan and J.P. Piotroski also had a solid outing, finishing in second place to Lincoln High School. Freshman Logan Hay also had a good night by placing “ fth in the shot put and sixth in the discus. Others scoring points for the local team included Vonte Ervin (6th, 200 meters/ 6th, long jump), Kaedretis Keaton (8th, 400), Mitchell Atkinson (6th, 800), David Sloan (7th, 800), Nathan Green (8th, 800) and the 4x400 meter relay team (6th, Kaedretis Keaton, Cody Ochat, Vonte Ervin, Andre Henderson ). The boys team “ nished in seventh place. Overall, we have a young team on both the boys and girls side and this meet gave our kids a chance to compete head-to-head with their peers and it was a fun meet,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. We had 39 athletes entered in the meet and all but one of them showed up, which is rather remarkable considering that their spring break began that day as soon as school was out. Im pretty proud of these kids for showing up and competing like they did.Ž GODBY HOME MEET On Tuesday, March 13, Godby High School in Tallahassee hosted their annual home meet, but the weather had different ideas. Very early in the meet, a lightening storm north of the facility postponed the meet, then resulted in its cancellation. A few of the WHS athletes got to compete before the meet was called off and, in fact, the WHS girls team was tied with Lincoln High School for “ rst place among the 10 teams attending at that point. The boys team was in eighth place. The WHS girls 4x800 relay team won again with the team made up of Marty Wiedeman, Lydia Wiedeman, Norma Woodcock and Raychel Gray Taylor Vaughn had a good outing in the 100meter hurdles, with a solid third place “ nish and Loquana Webster nabbed an eighth place “ nish in the shotput. The boys 4x800 meter relay team of Aaron Smith, Gabe Hutchins, David Sloan and J.P. Piotrowski ran to a eighth place “ nish and were the only scorers for the team. The next competition for the full team will be at the Chiles Championship Meet on Saturday, March 31. TRACKFreshman-sophomore meet is held at ChilesWILLIAM SNOWDENHunter DeRoss was starting pitcher for the War Eagles, and delivers a strike here.BASEBALLWar Eagles fall to MunroeWAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS:Thursday, March 22 SOFTBALL: Franklin at Wakulla, 7 p.m. WEIGHTLIFTING: District quali“ er at Maclay, TBA. Tuesday, March 27 BASEBALL: Leon at Wakulla, JV 4 p.m., Varsity 7 p.m. SOFTBALL: Wakulla at Rickards at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 29 WEIGHTLIFTING: Chiles High School at 3 p.m. BASEBALL: Wakulla at FAMU, varsity only, 4 p.m. PLAYERPITCHLEAGUEAGE DETERMINING DATES: April 30th for Player Pitch COST: $45 Per ChildINSURANCE:$10 Per Child or Proof of Health Insurance must be provided. AGES:7 & 8 Division … A player must be 7 prior to 4/30/12 and can turn 9 on or after 4/30/12.Player pitch is a league that builds on previous pitching machine league experience. Although not required it is encouraged that players have experienced some type of live pitching. The league will start shortly after the pitching machine regular season. There will be a 4 team minimum requirement for each division to be established.WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT2012 MID SPRING SPORTS REGISTRATION YOUTH SOCCERAGE DETERMINING DATES: September 1st for Soccer COST: $40 Per ChildINSURANCE:$10 Per Child or Proof of Health Insurance must be provided. AGES:04 & UNDER DIVISION … Players must be 03 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 05 on or after 9/1/12 06 & UNDER DIVISION … Players must be 05 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 07 on or after 9/1/12 08 & UNDER DIVISION … Players must be 07 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 09 on or after 9/1/12 10 & UNDER DIVISION … Players must be 09 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 11 on or after 9/1/12 12 & UNDER DIVISION … Players must be 11 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 13 on or after 9/1/12There will be a 4 team minimum requirement for each division to be established.REGISTRATION DATES AND TIMES:Monday 3/26/12 to Friday 3/30/12; 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM Saturday 3/31/12; 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM Monday 4/2/12 to Thursday 4/4/12; 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Thursday, 4/5/12; 6:00 PM (County Of“ces will be Closed on Good Friday, 4/6/12)REGISTRATION PLACE: Medart Recreation Park (Off U.S. 98) All players (Player Pitch and Soccer) must provide proof of health insuranceor purchase a policy for an additional $10.00. All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching any of the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. For more information call 926-7227 or visit www.WCPRD.com D’Arcy Brazier • Owner Serving Wakulla & Surrounding Counties for over 35 years60 Holiday Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327 509–2148 FOREIGN CAR REPAIR DOWN HOME TOYOTA • HONDA Specializing In Specializing In NISSAN • SUBARU Lic # MV15601www.DownHomeForeignCarRepair.com 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsCan you believe this weather? So far we havent had the strong March winds that we typically get and the afternoon sea breeze hasnt been terribly strong. The water temperature is in the middle 60s in the morning and jumps into the 70s by afternoon. The only thing I havent seen that would be unusual is a tarpon and I would not be surprised to see one of those or hearing of someone else seeing one before the end of the month. I have seen or heard of everything else being caught. I just got off the phone with Jimmy at Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks and he said things are heating up down there. He says “ shing is gonna get a lot better but its not bad right now. Sid Stringer took a party out “ shing the West Flats and caught a nice cooler full of trout using live shrimp. Jimmy said the Mirrodine by Mirrolure is also producing a lot of “ sh. Big and Little Pass are producing plenty of trout and reds and the Wakulla Beach area is producing some nice catches. Capt. Randy Peart said he tried to troll up some kings last week and was unsuccessful but did catch and release 12 grouper up to 14 pounds trolling in 20 feet of water. He also “ shed down around Gray Mare Rock and caught a bunch of nice trout. He took a doctor for a half-day trip to the Econ“ na and they caught 12 reds and a bunch of big trout. Capt. Luke Frazier over at AMS in Medart said he and Scott Harper went out of Panacea last week and “ shed the flats for trout. They kept four trout and threw back about 30, had one big Spanish and caught two reds. The next day Scott, Rich Brown and Luke went out of Lanark Village and “ shed southeast of Dog Island in 38 feet of water and caught 70 sea bass. Most were around 15-inches long but said he caught one that was 18-inches long, which was the largest he had ever seen. They “ shed grubs on the bottom tipped with squid. Dr. Phil Sharp caught some nice trout on the ” ats using a four-inch pear colored Gulp under a ” oat and also caught some ” ounder. He is down all week and hopes to catch a cobia. Mike Pearson of Tifton, who has a house at Shell Point, took his wife Kelly out on Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning and using Gulps they brought home 14 trout over the two days. Bill Birdwell of Shell Point said he “ shed with a friend down east of the lighthouse and they caught some big reds, the smallest being around 27 inches. They were sight casting throwing gold spoons. Randy Mims from Shell Point went out on Saturday morning and “ shed the St. Marks Reef. He caught a 40-inch red on a Gulp and had a big cobia up to the boat but it straightened out the hook and got away. On Tuesday and Wednesday, I “ shed with Dr. David Saint, his wife Rhonda and their son, Brandon. It is so much fun “ shing with folks who love to “ sh and they did. Rhonda got so excited when she got a “ sh and got so upset when she lost one. In the two days we caught lots of trout, four reds over 25 inches, four nice Spanish and six black drum to about 22 inches which Rhonda caught. We also caught about four or “ ve sharks, some blues and about 25 small reds. We caught everything on live shrimp. Last week I was talking with Mike Falk Jr. and he was asking if I had been catching anything on the ” ats yet. He said his 5-year-old son Carson was bugging him to go “ shing. He said hell get in the backyard at home and cast a plug with the hooks taken off all afternoon. When they go to Wal-Mart his daughter heads to the toy department and he goes to sporting goods to look at fishing rods. Of course coming from that family, what would you expect? Mike called me on Sunday and he said Carson had already caught three trout by himself using a cork and Gulp being dragged behind the boat. They ended the afternoon catching over 25 trout. Plenty of trout are being caught at Keaton Beach using pin“ sh, live shrimp and the Gulp and the ” ats at Lanark are producing quite a few trout and there are plenty of reds to be caught. Some pompano are showing up over at St. George and plenty of trout are being caught in the bay and some big reds are being caught in the cut. April 14 is the Kevins Red Trout Shootout hosted out of C Quarters Marina in Carrabelle and the Panacea Rock the Dock Tournament is April 28 and 29 at Rock Landing in Panacea. Remember to leave that ” oat plan with some and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Water’s warming up and sh are bitingWomen who want a lifelong hobby that teaches appreciation for Floridas marine environment in a laid-back learning atmosphere should attend the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions (FWC) Womens Fishing Clinic in Panama City. Besides being fun, the clinic is free. The FWC encourages women in the area to register soon for the March 31 Womens Fishing Clinic. The clinic is from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. at St. Andrews State Park. Advance registration is required, and classes are capped at 25 participants. This clinic enables women to learn the basics of environmental stewardship, “ shing ethics, angling skills and safety. Participants will complete skill stations such as knot tying, casting, rod rigging, cast net throwing, “ sh handling and more. Fishing equipment and bait will be provided during the clinic, but participants can bring their own gear such as rods and reels, tackle and cast nets. All participants must bring their own lunch and refreshments. This event includes a catch-and-release activity, so participants who wish to practice “ shing from a nearby pier must have a valid recreational saltwater “ shing license unless exempt. Learn more about how to obtain your recreational saltwater license at MyFWC.com/License. Licenses can be purchased online or by calling 888-FISH-FLORIDA. Please email Jennifer Saranzak at Jennifer.Saranzak@ MyFWC.com or call 352-543-9219, ext. 216, to register and for more information on the clinic.Free “ shing clinic for women o ered in Panama CityBeachgoers can help monitor spawning horseshoe crabsFrom FWC NewsAs spring arrives, horseshoe crabs converge along sandy beaches throughout the state to mate. Biologists with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are asking the public for help pinpointing the sites where these horseshoe crabs spawn. Beachgoers are likely to have the best luck spotting mating horseshoe crabs around high tide, just before, during or after a full or new moon. The conditions around the new moon on March 22 and the full moon on April 6 will create ideal opportunities to view the spawning behavior of horseshoe crabs. The FWC asks people to report sightings through one of several convenient options. Go to MyFWC. com/Contact and click on the Submit a Horseshoe Crab SurveyŽ link, then Florida Horseshoe Crab Spawning Beach Survey.Ž You can also email “ ndings to horseshoe@MyFWC. com or call the FWC at 866252-9326. Observers should note the number of horseshoe crabs they see and whether those horseshoe crabs are mating. Mating crabs pair up,Ž with the smaller male on top of the larger female. Other male crabs may be present around the couple. If possible, the observer should specify roughly how many horseshoe crabs are mating adults and how many are juveniles (4 inches wide or smaller). Biologists also want to know the date, time, location, habitat type and environmental conditions … such as tides and moon phase … when a sighting occurs. Through December 2011, the FWC has received 2,350 reports since the survey program began in April 2002. Horseshoe crabs, often called living fossils,Ž have been around for approximately 450 million years and are an important part of a marine ecosystem. Their eggs are a vital food source for animals and birds, such as the red knot. Pharmaceutical companies use horseshoe crab blood to make sure that intravenous drugs and vaccine injections are bacteriafree. The Florida scrub-jay is a 12-inch-long, blue and gray, crestless jay. It lacks the white wing spots and tail feather tips of the more common and widespread blue jay. NATUREFWC Facts IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 26 o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED FISH LIMIT IS NOW At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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If you are at all like me, everything around you is covered in a “ ne dust of yellow. While it is hard on those of us with allergies, it is a great sign that spring has sprung and it is time to get back out on the water! This year is hitting many especially hard with the intense blooming of everything at once. This strange weather we have been seeing lately, it seems important to go over a few safety measures sent to me by Mark Rosen. It is not at all uncommon this time of year to have a lovely day come to an end to awaken to a thick coat of fog. It is not only frustrating, but can be extremely dangerous if you are not prepared. Here are some suggestions to add to your knowledge of safety on the water. € If you “ nd yourself in situations of reduced visibility, always slow down and turn on your navigation lights. This can be in times of darkness, rain and fog. Have a lookout to keep watch. Use a sound-producing device such as a horn, bell or whistle to alert others to your location every two minutes. € Take a moment to stop and listen, if you cannot see others, they cannot see you. It is hard to hear the sound of another boater over the motor. Use your navigation equipment to maintain safe passage in the channels and avoid collisions with sand and oyster bars. € If you lose your way, stop and drop anchor. Call for help on Channel 16 if you feel you are in danger. € Turn your navigation lights on at dusk and leave them on until sunrise. Jet skis have no navigation lights, so they should not be out on the water between dusk to sunrise. € Make sure someone who cares knows where you will be boating, where you are launching and when you will return. File a ” oat plan. For a good example, check out sioscuba. ucsd.edu/docs/USCGFloatPlan-3.pdf. If the plan changes, contact your family and or friends to let them know. € Especially with our tricky channel, examine your anchor, chain and line before you need it. You may have to anchor if you lose power. With our currents and the many hazards just outside the channel, this can be your best chance for minimizing damage to your boat. € Check that you have a life jacket for each person, readily at hand, and a throw cushion as required by the Coast Guard. If you have an in” atable life jacket, it must be worn. € If alcohol is aboard, one person must be designated as the driver. Even out on the water, driving while intoxicated is illegal. In Florida, a vessel operator is presumed to be under the in” uence if their bloodor breath-alcohol level is at or above .08. Any person under 21 years of age who is found to have a breath-alcohol level of .02 or higher and operates or is in actual physical control of a vessel is in violation of Florida law (http://myfwc.com/boating/boatingregulations). € You should have a GPS, either hand-held or mounted and registered with the proper federal agency listed on the instruction sheet. Also recommended is a VHF radio, either mounted or hand-held. This list could go on and on, and I am sure I will revisit it in weeks to come. If you are concerned about having all the required and recommended safety equipment, please contact a member of Flotilla 12 to set up a free vessel safety check. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCalappa granulate: The Shameface Crab When I am offshore diving, whether in search of a meal or adventure, I am always watching the sea ” oor for creatures of interest. No, they do not need to be food for me, wonderful entertainment is always appreciated. The Shameface Crab, Calappa granulate, one of many species found around the world, is certainly entertaining. But most divers never see this crab, which can get to be 9 millimeters long and 12 millimeters wide. The claws pull up in front of his face, which is where this crab gets its name as it hides behind its claws. But during the day, it is usually buried in the sand showing only the eyes and the tips on its claws, waiting for a meal, such as a hermit crab, to stroll by. At night this crab is digging in the sand in search of mollusks or sea shells to eat. Now the last time I tried to eat a mollusk, I had a hard time getting past that hard shell. I can steam the critter or shuck it with a knife, but this crab is not so capable. Or is it? The right hand claw is a perfect can opener. Once pulled from the sand, a shelled creature is manipulated into place such that the modi“ ed claw is inserted into any opening and locked down like a vice-grip. The shell is crushed and its contents immediately available to the crab. Next time you are out diving and you “ nd spiraled shells (gastropods) that have been peeled open, this is the work of the Shamefaced Crab. You Tube even has a short clip on the internet showing a Shamefaced Crab opening a cockle shell … www.youtube. com/watch?v=D0uhtT45Nhc. You might think those poor hermit crabs havent a chance, but they do. Over time and a process of natural selection, hermit crabs that carry anemones (related to jelly“ sh) on their shells are rejected by the Shameface Crab. Imagine putting an oyster to your mouth only to be stung by a jelly“ sh hanging on the shell. It has the same effect on the crab. The crab soon gives up the anemone-carrying hermit crab in preference to one without the sting. Folks who study these creatures have even observed hermit crabs searching for and placing anemones on their backs. It seems that for every adaptation in nature there is a counter-adaptation. For those who dont dive (yet), visit the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea, where you can see and even brie” y pick up one of these Shameface Crabs and inspect it at close quarters. In cooperation with Gulf Specimen Marine Lab we are placing two 100-gallon display aquariums in our facility at Wakulla Diving Center this summer, to show off many of these creatures of interest. That way divers can get better acquainted with these and other seldom-seen creatures while they get their cylinders “ lled. Come to the coast and share in the excitement. Feeding times will be posted! Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 1:55 AM 3.3 ft. 2:29 AM 3.2 ft. 3:02 AM 3.1 ft. 3:35 AM 2.9 ft. 4:10 AM 2.8 ft. 4:50 AM 2.5 ft. 5:39 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:50 AM 0.4 ft. 8:14 AM 0.6 ft. 8:38 AM 0.7 ft. 9:04 AM 0.9 ft. 9:31 AM 1.1 ft. 10:01 AM 1.3 ft. 10:36 AM Low 3.5 ft. 1:53 PM 3.6 ft. 2:16 PM 3.6 ft. 2:39 PM 3.6 ft. 3:01 PM 3.6 ft. 3:25 PM 3.4 ft. 3:51 PM 3.3 ft. 4:22 PM High -0.1 ft. 8:19 PM -0.2 ft. 8:51 PM -0.2 ft. 9:22 PM -0.2 ft. 9:53 PM -0.1 ft. 10:27 PM 0.1 ft. 11:05 PM 0.3 ft. 11:55 PM Low Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 1:52 AM 3.3 ft. 2:26 AM 3.3 ft. 2:59 AM 3.2 ft. 3:32 AM 3.0 ft. 4:07 AM 2.8 ft. 4:47 AM 2.6 ft. 5:36 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:47 AM 0.5 ft. 8:11 AM 0.6 ft. 8:35 AM 0.7 ft. 9:01 AM 0.9 ft. 9:28 AM 1.2 ft. 9:58 AM 1.4 ft. 10:33 AM Low 3.6 ft. 1:50 PM 3.7 ft. 2:13 PM 3.7 ft. 2:36 PM 3.7 ft. 2:58 PM 3.6 ft. 3:22 PM 3.5 ft. 3:48 PM 3.4 ft. 4:19 PM High -0.1 ft. 8:16 PM -0.2 ft. 8:48 PM -0.3 ft. 9:19 PM -0.2 ft. 9:50 PM -0.1 ft. 10:24 PM 0.1 ft. 11:02 PM 0.3 ft. 11:52 PM Low Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 2:31 AM 3.0 ft. 3:05 AM 3.0 ft. 3:38 AM 2.9 ft. 4:11 AM 2.7 ft. 4:46 AM 2.6 ft. 5:26 AM High 0.3 ft. 8:54 AM 0.4 ft. 9:18 AM 0.5 ft. 9:42 AM 0.6 ft. 10:08 AM 0.8 ft. 10:35 AM 1.0 ft. 11:05 AM 0.1 ft. 12:09 AM Low 3.3 ft. 2:29 PM 3.4 ft. 2:52 PM 3.4 ft. 3:15 PM 3.4 ft. 3:37 PM 3.3 ft. 4:01 PM 3.2 ft. 4:27 PM 2.4 ft. 6:15 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:23 PM -0.2 ft. 9:55 PM -0.2 ft. 10:26 PM -0.2 ft. 10:57 PM -0.1 ft. 11:31 PM 1.2 ft. 11:40 AM Low 3.1 ft. 4:58 PM High Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:47 AM 2.4 ft. 2:21 AM 2.4 ft. 2:54 AM 2.3 ft. 3:27 AM 2.2 ft. 4:02 AM 2.1 ft. 4:42 AM 1.9 ft. 5:31 AM High 0.2 ft. 8:01 AM 0.3 ft. 8:25 AM 0.4 ft. 8:49 AM 0.5 ft. 9:15 AM 0.6 ft. 9:42 AM 0.8 ft. 10:12 AM 1.0 ft. 10:47 AM Low 2.7 ft. 1:45 PM 2.7 ft. 2:08 PM 2.7 ft. 2:31 PM 2.7 ft. 2:53 PM 2.7 ft. 3:17 PM 2.6 ft. 3:43 PM 2.5 ft. 4:14 PM High -0.1 ft. 8:30 PM -0.2 ft. 9:02 PM -0.2 ft. 9:33 PM -0.1 ft. 10:04 PM -0.0 ft. 10:38 PM 0.1 ft. 11:16 PM Low Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 1:39 AM 2.5 ft. 2:13 AM 2.5 ft. 2:46 AM 2.4 ft. 3:19 AM 2.3 ft. 3:54 AM 2.1 ft. 4:34 AM 2.0 ft. 5:23 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:29 AM 0.4 ft. 7:53 AM 0.5 ft. 8:17 AM 0.7 ft. 8:43 AM 0.8 ft. 9:10 AM 1.0 ft. 9:40 AM 1.3 ft. 10:15 AM Low 2.8 ft. 1:37 PM 2.8 ft. 2:00 PM 2.8 ft. 2:23 PM 2.8 ft. 2:45 PM 2.8 ft. 3:09 PM 2.7 ft. 3:35 PM 2.6 ft. 4:06 PM High -0.1 ft. 7:58 PM -0.2 ft. 8:30 PM -0.2 ft. 9:01 PM -0.2 ft. 9:32 PM -0.1 ft. 10:06 PM 0.1 ft. 10:44 PM 0.3 ft. 11:34 PM Low Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 2:00 AM 2.3 ft. 2:44 AM 2.2 ft. 3:27 AM 2.2 ft. 4:12 AM 2.1 ft. 5:00 AM 2.1 ft. 5:54 AM 2.0 ft. 6:57 AM High 0.7 ft. 7:22 AM 0.9 ft. 7:41 AM 1.0 ft. 7:59 AM 1.1 ft. 8:19 AM 1.2 ft. 8:44 AM 1.3 ft. 9:15 AM 1.4 ft. 9:54 AM Low 2.3 ft. 1:34 PM 2.4 ft. 1:48 PM 2.5 ft. 2:07 PM 2.6 ft. 2:30 PM 2.7 ft. 2:59 PM 2.7 ft. 3:33 PM 2.6 ft. 4:12 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:42 PM 0.1 ft. 8:14 PM -0.0 ft. 8:45 PM -0.0 ft. 9:17 PM -0.0 ft. 9:53 PM 0.0 ft. 10:36 PM 0.1 ft. 11:34 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 22 March 28First March 30 Full April 6 Last April 13 New March 22Major Times 1:21 AM 3:21 AM 1:42 PM 3:42 PM Minor Times 7:21 AM 8:21 AM 8:08 PM 9:08 PM Major Times 2:04 AM 4:04 AM 2:25 PM 4:25 PM Minor Times 7:53 AM 8:53 AM 9:02 PM 10:02 PM Major Times 2:47 AM 4:47 AM 3:09 PM 5:09 PM Minor Times 8:26 AM 9:26 AM 9:55 PM 10:55 PM Major Times 3:31 AM 5:31 AM 3:54 PM 5:54 PM Minor Times 9:02 AM 10:02 AM 10:49 PM 11:49 PM Major Times 4:17 AM 6:17 AM 4:40 PM 6:40 PM Minor Times 9:41 AM 10:41 AM 11:42 PM 12:42 AM Major Times 5:04 AM 7:04 AM 5:28 PM 7:28 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:22 AM 11:22 AM Major Times 5:52 AM 7:52 AM 6:17 PM 8:17 PM Minor Times 12:33 AM 1:33 AM 11:09 AM 12:09 PM Best Better Better++ Good Average Average Average6:38 am 6:50 pm 6:21 am 7:09 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:36 am 6:50 pm 6:53 am 8:02 pm 6:35 am 6:51 pm 7:27 am 8:56 pm 6:34 am 6:52 pm 8:02 am 9:50 pm 6:33 am 6:52 pm 8:41 am 10:42 pm 6:31 am 6:53 pm 9:23 am 11:34 pm 6:30 am 6:53 pm 10:09 am --:--2% 4% 10% 16% 22% 28% 34% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org L.P.T.( 850 ) 528-4985PROFESSIONAL POOL MAINTENANCE poolproblems?atthelowestratesweoffermaintenanceandservice!Servicing Swimming Pools and Spas for over 10 yearsTitus Langston850528-4985Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) ANTIQUES CARRIE’SCOVEC ARRIE’SC OVE …NEW ARRIVALS…DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PETSTOP New & Vintage JEWELRY$1-$100 The Waku l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office participated in two searches on Monday, March 19 that resulted in locating a missing elderly man and a second search that located two missing boaters, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. € The wife of Walter Lee Powers Jr., 80, of Crawfordville, Joicelyn Powers, reported that her husband was missing at 4:41 p.m. Mrs. Powers reported that her husband left with his dog on a golf cart and was overdue. She said she was unable to locate her husband on their 120 acres off River Plantation Road and he could be affected by a medical condition. Sheriffs of“ ce investigators began canvassing the property and after 45 minutes Powers was located coming from a woodline into an open “ eld. He appeared weary, disoriented and had small abrasions on his arms. Deputy Will Hudson assisted Powers and Sgt. Danny Harrell drove him back to his home where he was assessed and cleared by EMS personnel. Later, Powers golf cart and dog were located off a trail by Detective Josh Langston, Detective Rob Giddens and Detective Derek Lawhon. The family was alerted about the Project Lifesaver Program which is a service that provides elderly citizens with a bracelet that emits a continuous low frequency signal that is tracked by law enforcement by using a directional locating device. Deputy Scott Powell, Captain Cliff Carroll and Deputy Sean Wheeler also assisted in the search which was wrapped up at 6:25 p.m. € In an unrelated case also reported Monday, March 19, two Tallahassee boaters were reported missing after “ shing in the Gulf of Mexico over the weekend. Randall Myers of Tallahassee reported that his son, Reid Alan Myers, 26, and his friend, Robert Michael Seeders, 34, both of Tallahassee, starting “ shing on Friday and the last time Myers spoke to his son was Saturday, March 17. The father became concerned when his son did not show up at work on Monday morning. The U.S. Coast Guard was noti“ ed and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission began a search for the missing boaters. After an unsuccessful search of the Shell Point area, the boaters vehicle and trailer was located at the Mashes Sands Boat Ramp in Ochlockonee Bay by Deputy Ben Steinle. FWC investigators located the boaters near K Tower approximately 20 miles off of Shell Point. They had run out of gas. The two men were uninjured and were transported back to the shore by the FWC. FWC and the Coast Guard were supported by multiple search vessels and aircraft.Special to The NewsOn Feb. 29, Lt. Jesse Evans retired from the Florida Highway Patrol after serving the people of the State of Florida for more than 30 years. Lt. Evans began his career with the Florida Highway Patrol on Feb. 15, 1982, when he entered the Florida Highway Patrol Academy. After completing the academy, his first duty assignment was to Moore Haven, Glades County, Fla. In November 1984, he was promoted to traffic homicide investigator, and transferred to Naples, Fla. After spending a few short months in Naples, he transferred to Wewahitchka. In May 1989, he left Wewahitchka and transferred to Crawfordville. He was assigned to work the road and Traf“ c Homicides within Wakulla and Franklin counties. In May 2002, he was promoted to sergeant, and assigned squads in both the Tallahassee and Quincy districts, encompassing Wakulla County. In April, 2007, Sgt. Evans transferred to the Neil Kirkman Building in Tallahassee, which serves as General Headquarters for the Florida Highway Patrol. While there he served in Inspections, Accreditations and Public Affairs. In May 2010, he was promoted to lieutenant, and transferred back to the “ eld at Troop H Headquarters in Tallahassee. There he served as the troop training coordinator, and troop evidence custodian. Upon retirement, Lt. Evans was promoted to captain, and will continue to serve the citizens and visitors of this Great State as a member of the Florida Highway Patrol Reserves. Friends and family wishing to attend the retirement party of Capt. Jesse Evans, please contact his son-inlaw Matt at trooperkirkland@gmail.com or his daughter Jessica at jessicaekirkland@gmail.com. The event will be held at the Wakulla Shrine Club on Saturday, March 31, at 4:30 p.m. Staff ReportFlorida Forestry Service requested assistance from Wakulla County Fire-Rescue to control a “ re burning on private land in the far north east section of the county on Sunday, March 18. The 200-acre wildfire near Jim French Road and the Natural Bridge area north of Wakulla Station was reportedly contained on Sunday, but continued to smolder leading to a smoke advisory being issued for the area. The very rough terrain at the site of the “ re was mostly accessible by forestry service tractor plows but WCFR brush trucks were asked to monitor the road on one section to prevent the “ re from escaping while their units worked the head, according to Fire Chief Mike Morgan. Tractors were brought in from four counties and WCFR assisted until enough units could be deployed by the forestry service. At one point command requested a helicopter as the “ re started running to the west after it jumped a previous “ re line. Before the air drops could begin the “ re was contained. County units were released around 3:30 p.m. and the forestry service was expected to be working the “ re for a couple of days. One forestry service “ re“ ghter was transported by Wakulla EMS for treatment due to a possible heat related condition. After working the “ re until dark on Sunday, additional equipment was brought in by the Forestry Service on Monday to assure containment during anticipated low humidity conditions this week. A smoke advisory was issued on Sunday. There are no structures threatened. The “ re is believed to have started as a result of a lightning strike. Residents in the area were told to expect lingering smoky conditions. Two searches on Monday: missing elderly man and two boaters foundPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWild re burns land near Natural Bridge SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEvans retires from highway patrol Capt. Jesse EvansHIGH SPEED CRASH AND BURN: On Sunday, March 18, at 2 a.m. in the area of Bloxham Cutoff near Shadeville Road, a sheriffs deputy arrived to “ nd a heavily damaged SUV under the sign for Savannahs Buffet at the rear entrance. Before the deputy could approach the vehicle it burst into ” ames. As “ re“ ghters approached this vehicle a rear window strut exploded and landed at least 10 feet from the vehicle. No one was in the SUV. A search of the area turned up no signs of the occupants of the vehicle. CAR FLIPS ON OLD PLANK: Shortly after noon on Friday, March 16, a report of a vehicle overturned with entrapment on Old Plank Road just south of Commerce Boulevard was received and dispatched by WCSO. Rescue3 arrived “ rst and found the victim had been removed. They treated and transported the lone occupant. The vehicle apparently struck three separate guy wires for utility poles before becoming airborne. Fire“ ghters look over a smoldering area of a 200-acre wild“ re on Sunday. You’re Invited! H K Please join Anne and me for the Of icial Kick-Off of the H K C C C Bring your family and friends.We’ll have great food, entertainment by Grant Peeples and an opportunity for me to explain how I would represent your interests on the Commission. “I look forward to seeing you there.”F M 30 7:00 PM Political advertisement paid for and approved by Howard Kessler, NPA, for County Commissioner.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 – Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn March 8, Maxine Fink of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. Deputy Mike Crum received a complaint about someone living in the crawl space of a mobile home owned by Fink. Someone entered the mobile home through the bottom of the trailer. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Damage to the home was estimated at $400 and approximately $250 worth of copper was stolen from the air conditioning unit. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: € On March 8, Decory Doster of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone punctured his vehicle tire in six places. Damage was estimated at $150. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On March 8, a cashier at the Stop N Save on Spring Creek Highway reported an illegal dumping. A suspect dumped “ ve large plastic bags of garbage in the stores dumpster. Evidence was collected at the scene. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated. € On March 8, Thomas Ledford of Crawfordville reported a telephone fraud where a man posed as his relative and stated that he had been involved in an accident. Ledford was not fooled by the scam which included the caller telling him that he had been involved in a traf“ c crash with a Spanish diplomat. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On March 8, Donald Shemwell of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft. The victim was having work done at his home when he observed a worker in areas of the home where he did not belong. The victim reported the theft of jewelry, towels, medications, personal items and currency, valued at $2,560. A suspect has been identified. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € On March 8, Curtis Mixon reported a fraud involving his Social Security bene“ ts. The victim discovered that someone changed the financial institution where his bene“ ts were being sent. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On March 8, Jennie V. Jones of Crawfordville reported the theft of coins and a kitchen mixer from her home. The value of the missing items is $430. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € On March 8, Deputy Mike Zimba responded to a traffic crash at Brooks Concrete in Panacea involving Jenevieve Padgette Ezell, 35, of Panacea. Ezell crashed her Chevy Tahoe into a brick perimeter wall of the establishment. The air bag deployed and the victim reported injuries. Wakulla EMS transported the victim to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for treatment. The case investigation continues pending blood test results. € On March 8, Debra Fults of Panacea reported a criminal mischief at the Tarpines subdivision. Someone placed chewing gum in the locking mechanism of her community mailbox. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. € On March 9, Thomas Stewart of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A suspect, who has been identi“ ed, obtained credit in the victims name without permission. The victim discovered that there was a past due account in his name in Central Florida. The accumulated bill is more than $23,000. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. € On March 8, Dustin Ryan McKinney, 21, was arrested for battery in the Wakulla County Jail after striking a 33-year-old jail inmate in the head with his fist. The altercation arose over the use of a television. Sgt. Andy Curles, Correctional Of“ cer Turelle Farmer, Deputy William Lord and Deputy Lisa Hummel investigated and broke up the altercation. € On March 9, Michael Antonio Gavin, 23, of Crawfordville honked the horn of his vehicle twice at Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy Cole Wells at the Wakulla County Courthouse parking area. Deputy Wells had previous knowledge that Gavin did not have a valid driver license. A check with the Communications Division determined that Gavins license was suspended and he was arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. € On March 9, Amanda Will of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a Yorkshire terrier from her home. A suspect has been identi“ ed. The dog is valued at $450. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On March 9, a 33-yearold Crawfordville woman was arrested for cruelty toward a child, abuse without great harm, for knocking down her 5-year-old son and stomping on his torso inside the Sopchoppy Express Lane. The woman told detectives that the child was not behaving while inside the store. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Detective Erika Buckley, Deputy Sean Wheeler and Detective Josh Langston investigated. € On March 9, Lisa Barwick of Panacea reported a fraud as she attempted to “ le her tax return. Someone used the victims Social Security number and last name. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On March 9, Deputy Scott Powell conducted a traf“ c stop on Shadeville Highway after reportedly observing the car had no tag. The deputy pulled the car over, which had two men inside. It was reportedly determined that Terrell Lamar Brown, 25, of Crawfordville was operating the vehicle with a suspended license. He was arrested for driving while his license was suspended or revoked, third or subsequent conviction. The passenger was released and the vehicle was turned over to the owner. € On March 9, Douglas Bongiovani of Crawfordville reported the theft of a dog. The bulldog, valued at $100, was removed from the property while the victim was away. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On March 10, Peter Thomas of Tallahassee reported a theft of boat batteries from Shell Point. Two batteries, valued at $150 were stolen. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On March 10, William May“ eld of Panacea reported the theft of two marine batteries, valued at $150. The victim also reported the theft of approximately 75 gallons of fuel. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On March 10, Carolyn Luke of Crawfordville was involved in a traf“ c crash caused by a deer at Smith Creek Highway and Jack Langston Road. Luke reportedly swerved to miss the deer and struck a tree. She suffered injuries to her head and legs but refused EMS treatment. The vehicle suffered front end damage. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On March 11, Mary Jane Strother, 44, of Crawfordville was arrested for aggravated battery in connection with a domestic disturbance involving a kitchen knife and a 53-yearold male victim. The victim suffered injuries to his face and arm. The knife was thrown into a wooded area but was recovered by Deputy Scott Powell. Wakulla EMS recommended stitches for the injury to the victims arm but he refused EMS transportation. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Will Hudson also investigated. € On March 11, Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated a counterfeit note at the Highway 267 Stop N Save. A 42-year-old Tallahassee man cashed his paycheck in Capitola and received $100 bills. He attempted to purchase gasoline and was informed the note was counterfeit. The note was a real $5 bill that was bleached and reprinted with $100 information. The bill will be turned over to the U.S. Secret Service. € On March 11, Jessica Pagel of Crawfordville reported the theft of her cellular telephone, valued at $350. The victim identi“ ed a person of interest. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € On March 11, Russell Gibson of Crawfordville reported locating a bicycle located on his property line. No reports of stolen bicycles were received by Dispatch and the bike was taken to the WCSO Impound Yard by PSO Nancy Watts. The bike is valued at $25. € On March 12, Dominique Hawkins of Wal-Mart reported a retail theft after allegedly observing a white male and a white female attempt to remove items from the store without paying for them. The suspects were stopped at the entrance and dropped the merchandise. They jumped into a green Honda Civic and drove northbound on U.S. Highway 319. The merchandise included perfume, sunglasses and booster cables, valued at $72. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € On March 12, Herbert Hawkins of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le his taxes when he discovered that someone already used his Social Security number. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € On March 13, a clerk at Murphy Oil in Crawfordville reported a retail theft of gasoline. A motorist pulled up to the pumps and pumped $35 worth of fuel and left the parking lot without paying for the gas. The driver and two other men were also panhandling in the parking lot for money. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated. € On March 13, Lisa Barwick of Panacea reported the theft of medications from her home. Several pills from her medication bottle were missing. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. € On March 13, Deputy Nick Gray investigated a hit-and-run complaint from a property owner on Ace High Stables Road in Crawfordville. At the scene, Deputy Gray recovered a number of car parts and observed damage to a telephone box. A BOLO was sent over the radio for a black Nissan and the Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce stopped the vehicle for Deputy Gray to continue his investigation. The damage to the vehicle matched the missing vehicle parts collected by Deputy Gray. Amber Dale Christie, 27, of Crawfordville was issued a traf“ c citation for failure to report a traffic crash involving property damage. € On March 13, Regina Proctor of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le her tax return and discovered someone had already used her Social Security number. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € On March 13, Terrie Neal of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. The victim was unable to “ le her tax return because someone had used her husbands Social Security number on a joint return. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On March 13, a 17year-old Crawfordville victim reported a criminal mischief. The victim parked his vehicle at the Dollar General store next to Wakulla High School and walked to campus. When he returned at the end of the day he discovered that someone broke one of his car windows. Damage was estimated at $200. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € On March 14, Silvius Thomas of Crawfordville reported the theft of an air line for a torch. The property is valued at $350 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. € On March 14, Clara Bottorf of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run accident. The victim was driving eastbound on Highway 267 when an unidenti“ ed vehicle traveling westbound crossed the center line and struck the victims mirror. Damage was estimated at $100 but there were no injuries. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On March 14, Steve De“ baugh of Crawfordville found a vehicle tag owned by Mark John Manning of Tallahassee in the area of Magnolia Ridge. Deputy Rachel Oliver was unable to locate the owner and the tag was turned over to the property division. € On March 13, a 30year-old Crawfordville man was arrested for cruelty toward a child, abuse without great harm, after the 5year-old child was observed by school personnel with severe bruises on his buttocks and lower back. The father admitted using his belt to discipline the child which reportedly caused the extreme wounds. Detective Erika Buckley investigated. The suspect is a registered sexual offender. € On March 14, a citizen approached Lt. Brad Taylor about turning in a wallet that was found at the Medart Dollar General store. Lt. Taylor located a Georgia driver license as well as some personal items owned by Ronald William Albury of Pelham, Ga. The wallet was turned over to the property division. € On March 14, Michael James Labig, 22, of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash. Labig was attempting to pass another motorist on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road when he observed a vehicle coming toward him in the opposite direction. In an attempt to avoid the other vehicle, Labig lost control of his vehicle, crossed the oncoming lane and crashed into several trees. Damage was estimated at $3,500. The driver declined EMS treatment at the scene. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On March 14, Levi Workowski of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of a glass mug, U.S. currency and a window screen, valued at $220. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On March 14, Admiral Barwick of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. The victim reported that someone cut the tires on his vehicle and trailer while he was “ shing. Two individuals of interest were identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 784 calls for service during the past week including 15 residential and business alarms; 59 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 29 E-911 calls; 52 investigations; 11 loud music/noise complaints; 40 medical emergencies; 220 business and residential security checks; 20 special details; 11 subpoena services; 12 suspicious vehicles; 11 thefts; 10 traf“ c crashes with no injuries; 47 traffic stops; and 12 reckless vehicles. Dustin R. McKinney HAVE FUN H AVE F UN DREAM GIRL fromset all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com St. Patrick’s Day Parade PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN More photos online at thewakullanews.com e Lions Clubs annual St. Patricks Day Festival was held Saturday, March 17, and featured a parade down Crawfordville Highway and a festival at Hudson Park.

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W a k u l l a C o u n t y S e n i o r C i t i z e n s C e l e b r a t e L i f e Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012Lawmakers return to take up redistricting Weekly Roundup, Page 6B Savvy Senior: Exercises to ease arthritis painAARP: Tax tips for 50+ taxpayers Page 4B By DIANE LANTER and TAMARA BYRNES February 2012 was a busy month, so we were happy to have the extra day for more activities. We saw many versions of plaid clothing on the “ rst Tuesday. It was fun to see just how much plaid everyone had in their closets and was willing to wear. The Epilepsy Foundation and Covenant Hospice presented very informative programs about the services that are available to the seniors. Shelley Swenson with the extension of“ ce and one of her interns talked to the seniors about healthy eating and passed out samples of chicken salad and fruit salad made with a yogurt dressing. We all changed our minds about yogurt, mmmmm-good.Ž Red was the color for Valentines Day and it was seen from all four corners of the dining room. It was the time of year for our Valentine Glamour Shots. Jo Ann Palmer photographed all the seniors and the pictures turned out spectacular. Thank you so much, Jo Ann, for making the day a special memory day for all. Chef Mary had Valentine cupcakes for everyone to take home, and those are always a treat. Colleen Skipper celebrated Black History Month with us on Feb. 23. She spoke about her younger years working in the school system, her involvement with Sopchoppy government and her current job as administrative coordinator with the Wakulla County administration. Theresa Jones and Trey Crump played the piano for Colleen and her sisters, Glenda and Chinesta, who entertained us with their beautiful voices. The celebration was enlightening and inspiring. Thanks, Colleen, for giving us a day to remember. Continued on Page 3B Recent articles have discussed CELEBRATING LIFE in the Senior Center and health education, health screenings, exercise and some lifestyles that will help you age successfully. This month I planned to write about fundraising. Walking is my favorite exercise and I walk almost every day. This is my private, quiet time that I examine my thoughts and formulate my plans. As I began to organize my thoughts for soliciting contributions from our friends and neighbors, the joy of this process begin to decline. This became an unpleasant task. I have learned to overcome unpleasant tasks by relying on my sense of gratitude. This sounds too simple but it really works. An attitude of gratitude does result in a feeling of internal peace. Our friends and neighbors in Wakulla County have provided tremendous support for our Senior Citizens services. Its been about a year since a friend asked how she could help as a volunteer. I suggested that she consider helping with fundraising. The next time I heard from her, she had established a fundraising committee and planned several activities to raise funds. They included: € Food For LifeŽ Senior Meal Club, € Spring Fling Dance, € Creation and sales of Senior Cookbooks, € Senior Prom, € Elvis an evening of musicŽ (sponsored by Centennial Bank), € and sales of Chef Marys cranberry sauce. These activities produced more than $23,500. At “ rst, I thought how they were helping me and the board. Then I realized that the ones bene“ ting from this effort was our senior citizens. Then I was reminded how wonderful it is to live in Wakulla County. The Food For Life Senior Meal Club is an ongoing activity in which everyone can participate at anytime. St. Marks Powder has this activity in their payroll deductions. Any of their employees can have this deducted from their paycheck each payday. We receive a check from them every month. Nineteen (19) Wakulla Senior Center employees have this activity deducted from their paycheck every pay period. Continued on Page 3BAttitude of gratitude R.H. CarterWakulla County Senior Center SPECIAL TO THE NEWSIn February seniors enjoyed Valentine’s Day, Black History Month and plaid Red was the color for Valentines Day, and it was seen from all four corners of the dining room. SMALL ENGINE REPAIR 3Y Where you get MOW for Your Money! NP-0000653372 AreYouHard OfHearing? Amajornamebrandhearingaidprovider wishestoeldtestaremarkablenewdigital hearinginstrumentinthearea.Thisoffer isfreeofchargeandyouareunderno obligation. Theserevolutionary100%Digitalinstruments usethelatesttechnologytocomfortablyand almostinvisiblyhelpyouhearmoreclearly. ThistechnologysolvesthestoppedupearsŽ, andheadinabarrelŽsensationsomepeople experience. Ifyouwishtoparticipate,youwillbe requiredtohaveyourhearingtestedinour ofce FREEOFCHARGE todetermine candidacyandreviewyourresultswiththe hearinginstrumentswithourhearingcare specialist. Attheendofthisevaluation,youmay keepyourinstrument,ifyousodesire,at atremendoussavingforparticipatinginthiseldtest.Specialtestingwillbe donetodeterminetheincreasedtsofthistechnology. tsofhearingaidsvarybytypeanddegreeofhearingloss,noise environment,accuracyofhearingtest,andpropert. Thisisawonderful opportunitytodetermineifhearinghelpisavailableforyourhearingloss andgethearinghelpataveryordableprice.CALLNOWIFYOUWISHTOBE INCLUDEDINTHISFIELDTESTNOWThroughMarch 29, 2012 Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. The Log Cabin Barry Building

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, March 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the Senior Center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend.  LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. They will host “Iron Jawed Angels,” a production about the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution on Aug. 19, 1920. Contact Anne Ahrendt at 5280895 or Rachel Pienta at 321-3582 for more information. Friday, March 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, March 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY will meet at the library at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, March 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, March 26  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the Senior Center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, March 27  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 28  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the Senior Center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the Senior Center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 29  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the Senior Center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 30  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the Senior Center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Special EventsThursday, March 22  FREE LECTURE SERIES on “USS Narcissus and Florida’s Underwater Archaeological Preserves” by Franklin Price, underwater archaeologist, and “Florida’s Panhandle Shipwreck Trail: Dive into the Emerald Coast” by Lindsay Smith, underwater archaeologist, will be held at TCC Wakulla Center at 6:30 p.m. For more information, contact FPAN outreach coordinator, Barbara Hines at bhines@uwf. edu or at (850) 877-2206. Saturday, March 24  FIFTH ANNUAL MAKE A DIFFERENCE DAY will be held by VolunteerWakulla from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hudson Park. There will be booths set up for services offered in the county, as well as places to volunteer. There will also be free food and door prizes every 30 minutes after 11 a.m. For more information, call 745-0060 or visit www. volunteerwakulla.org.  HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 340 Trice Lane. They will be collecting paint, oil, chemicals, electronics, solvents, cleaners, gas, fuel, batteries, uorescent bulbs and acids. Monday, March 26  NAMI WAKULLA’S ANNUAL MEETING will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club behind Centennial Bank. The annual meeting will include a review of the education programs NAMI Wakulla has presented free to the public since March 2011, along with a report of support groups that have met, new groups that have formed, and a host of other services NAMI Wakulla has developed in the past year. The Wakulla County community is invited to attend this meeting and enjoy light refreshments. New board members will be announced. Wednesday, March 28  CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held from noon to 1:15 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. The cost is $12. Lunch will be served buffet style by Hamaknockers. The menu will include pulled pork, chicken, ribs, wings, beans, cole slaw, potato salad and macaroni and cheese. Thursday, March 29  FREE LECTURE SERIES on “The Page-Ladson and Wakulla Spring Sites Yield Evidence of the First Ice-Age Floridians” by James Dunbar, retired archaeologist with the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research, at 6:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. For more information, contact FPAN outreach coordinator, Barbara Hines, at bhines@uwf.edu or at (850) 877-2206.Upcoming EventsSaturday, March 31  LIFE WALK by the Wakulla Pregnancy Center will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park. Registration is at 9 a.m., and the walk starts at 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 210-1276.  EASTER EGG HUNT will be held at Hudson Park at 11 a.m. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. The age groups range from infant to 10 years old. A drawing will be held and one child from each age group will win an Easter basket. Wakulla ROTC, Wakulla EMS, Wakulla Fire & Rescue, Smokey the Bear, Capital City Bank Star, McDonald Character, McGruff the Crime Dog, the Sonic Character and a Moonwalkers will be in attendance. CHAT of Wakulla will also be there accepting donations of pet items. The event is sponsored by Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. Call 926-7227 for more information. Sunday, April 1  FIRST SUNDAY at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Landy Luther as he presents “Welcome to St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge” at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. St. Vincent Island is an undeveloped barrier island just offshore of Apalachicola, and is administratively part of St. Marks Refuge. The island is a haven for endangered and threatened species. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, “Nature’s Classroom.” Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Tuesday, April 3  TOWN HALL MEETING will be hosted by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth from 6 to 8 p.m. at Wakulla High School’s War Eagle Cafe. The meeting’s purpose is to increase awareness about the negative consequences of underage drinking and discuss steps that can be taken to prevent underage drinking. Appetizers will be served from 5:30 to 6 p.m. For additional information, contact Stacy Harvey at 510-0219. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Lecture on Florida’s underwater archaeology at 6:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. Make A Difference Day at Hudson Park from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. NAMI Wakulla’s annual meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club. Chamber networking luncheon at noon at the extension of ce. ThursdaySaturdayMondayWednesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, March 22  WAKULLA COUNTY AIRPORT COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 2 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room, Monday, March 26  WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. Call (850) 926-7415 for more information. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim DirectorSt. Patricks Day Parade Wed like to thank everyone who came to the St. Patricks Day events last Saturday. For the “ rst time, the library had a ” oat in the parade! The ” oat was decorated and manned by participants in our weekly childrens programs and funded by the Friends of the Library. Id like to give special thanks to Leilania Nichols, our childrens coordinator, who with the help of some great children got the ” oat up and running. The Friends of the Library also had a table at Hudson Park with information on the library, the Friends, and library T-shirts and tote bags for sale. Wed like to thank all who stopped by and said hi. Keep a lookout for the Friends of the Library at this Saturdays Make a Difference Day as well! Friday Night Movie Our Friday Night Movie this week is the multiAcademy Award nominated spy thriller based on the best seller Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, SpyŽ by John Le Carre. This R-rated “ lm (for violence, some sexuality, and language) tells the tale about retired MI-6 agent George Smiley being pulled out of retirement in order to “ nd a Soviet spy in British Intelligence during the Cold War. Starring Gary Oldman, who was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar for this role, Colin Firth (last years Best Actor winner), among others, this old schoolŽ spy thriller is sure to keep you on the edge of your seats and more than lives up to its classic source material. Capital City Bank will once again be on hand with popcorn and water for small donations to the Friends of the Library. Because of Good Friday and our April Book Extravaganza, this will be the last movie for four weeks so please come out and join us. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing and because of the rating we ask that any minors be accompanied by an adult. Did you knowƒƒ? With our new automation system, you can place holds, make lists and renew items from the comfort of your own computer? Just go to our website www.wakullalibrary.org, click on the Library Catalog tab and log into your account with your Library Card number along with the last four digits of the number as your password. The catalog should say Wilderness Coast Public Libraries (the library cooperative were a member of) at the top. If it says E-Library please give us a call. You can make lists of favorite books, books youve read, etc for either the public or yourself. Just be sure if you want the list to be private that you choose private from the drop down menu otherwise anyone who uses the catalog can see it. We have also begun sending out e-mail reminders about due dates, holds available, and overdue notices. These emails will also have a Wilderness Coast address. I will be telling you about more things you can do with our new system in the coming weeks. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 – Page 3B Commitment to support the Senior Citizens Meal Program. Select Sponsorship Level ( ) monthly contributions Red ____________ $10 per month White ___________$20 per month Blue ____________ $30 per month Silver ___________ Other amount (You may mail your check annually) Name: _________________________________ Address: _______________________________ _______________________________________ Email (optional): _________________________ Phone: (______)_________________________ Signature: ______________________________ Date: __________ Note: (1) Direct Deposit available for monthly payment. (2) Personal payment may be arranged monthly, annually, etc. (3) All contributions are tax deductible.Continued from Page 1B We regularly receive contributions from our community. Most are donated for senior services. There are some identi“ ed uses requested such as the food program, transportation, etc. We always accommodate special requests. Some donate in honor of a friend, family member or someone deceased. We always advise those honored or in the case of someone deceased, a family member of the donation in their honor. These contributions are necessary for us to maintain our current level of services. The love and generosity of our community continues to meet our senior services needs and creates an attitude of gratitude. The fundraising committees next event is a Spring FlingŽ dance on April 21 at 7 p.m. It features the Tallahassee Swing Band with music from the 1940s to the 60s. We will provide hot hors doeurves. Tickets are $15 per person and $25 per couple. You may set up regular payments to our Meal Club and/ or purchase tickets to the Spring Fling Dance by calling Shelly at 926-7145 ext. 221.Carter: Keeping an attitude of gratitudeSenior Food for Life Club MembershipContinued from Page 1B The Wild Wakulla WigglersŽ line dancers, stepped their way into our hearts once again, with their fast music and happy feet. We always look forward to watching them and clapping along with their songs. The Wigglers have practice every Monday at 1:30 p.m. and Wednesday at 2 p.m. If you would like to join them, come by and check it out. On the last Friday of the month, local clay artist, Nancy Jefferson taught a class to the seniors. This class was offered through the Healing Arts of Wakulla County (HAWC) program. This was a real treat for the seniors and everyone asked when Nancy would be back. Nancy returned March 16, for another exciting clay experience. Our queen for the year is Diane Hamilton and our volunteer of the year is Virginia Davis. They represent our Senior Center and can be seen in all of the local parades. Thank you to Donnie Sparkman and the wonderful group of men who sponsored a Fish Fry for our senior citizens. It was a big success. It was also Lemon Pie Day. Chef Mary served 120 seniors. Remember, Zumba classes are on Monday and Wednesday at 6 p.m. For more information call 926-7145. In February seniors enjoyed Valentines Day, Black History Month, and plaid R.H. Carter introduces Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper, above, who was the Senior Centers speaker at its Black History program. Colleen Skipper, below, sings with her sisters Glenda and Chinesta. Seniors working with clay under the direction of artist Nancy Jefferson. Senior Citizens Queen Diane Hamilton, at left, has been making appearances at the local parades. 713-001499 Rock Landing Road OPEN: THURSDAY ............. 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .............................. 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday .................. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. SUNDAY ...........................11 A.M. 9 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear Savvy Senior, Can exercise help seniors with arthritis? I have osteoarthritis and have read that certain exercises can help ease the pain, but I dont know where to start, and I certainly dont want to make it any worse than it already is. What can you tell me? Sedentary Sally Dear Sally, Lots of seniors who have arthritis believe that exercise will worsen their condition, but thats not true. Study after study has shown that exercise is actually one of the best treatments for osteoarthritis. Proper and careful exercises can help reduce joint pain and stiffness, strengthen muscles around the joints and increase ” exibility. It also helps manage other chronic conditions that are common among seniors with arthritis, such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity. Here are some tips to help you get moving. Exercises for Arthritis Determining exactly which types of exercises are best for you, depends on the form and severity of your arthritis, and which joints are involved. Its best to work with your doctor or a physical therapist to help you develop an exercise program that works for you. The different types of exercises that are most often recommended to seniors with arthritis include: € Range-of-motion exercises: These are gentle stretching exercises that can relieve stiffness as well as improve your ability to move your joints through their normal range of motion. These exercises should be done daily. € Strengthening exercise: Calisthenics, weight training and working with resistance bands are recommended (two or more days a week) to maintain and improve your muscle strength, which helps support and protect your joints. € Aerobic exercises: Low-impact activities like walking, cycling, swimming or water aerobics are all recommended three to “ ve times per week to help improve cardiovascular health, control weight, and improve your overall function. Its also important to keep in mind that when you “ rst start exercising, you need to go slow to give your body time to adjust. If you push yourself too hard you can aggravate your joint pain, however, some muscle soreness or joint achiness in the beginning is normal. To help you manage your pain start by warming up with some simple stretches or range of motion exercises for “ ve to 10 minutes before you move on to strengthening or aerobic exercises. Another tip is to apply heat to the joints youll be working before you exercise, and use cold packs after exercising to reduce in” ammation. If youre experiencing a lot of pain while you exercise, you may need to modify the frequency, duration, or intensity of your exercises until the pain improves. Or you may need to try a different activity … for example switching from walking to water aerobics. But if youre having severe, sharp or constant pain, or large increases in swelling or your joints feel hot or red, you need to stop and see your doctor. Exercise Resources To help you exercise at home, there are a number arthritis exercise DVDs you can purchase to guide you through a wide variety of activities. Collage Video (collagevideo.com, 800-819-7111) sells several at prices ranging between $10 and $25, as does the Arthritis Foundation Store at afstore.org or 800-283-7800. Also see go4life.niapublications. org, a resource created by the National Institute on Aging that offers a free exercise DVD and book that provides illustrated examples of exercises you can do to improve your condition. You can order your free copies online or by calling 800-222-2225. If you need some motivation or dont like exercising alone, ask your doctor about exercise programs in your area for people with arthritis. Hospitals and clinics sometimes offer special programs, as do local health clubs and senior centers. The Arthritis Foundation also conducts exercise and aquatic programs for people with arthritis in many communities throughout the U.S. Contact your local branch (see arthritis.org/ chaptermap.php, or call 800-283-7800 for contact information) to “ nd out what may be available near you. Send your senior questions to Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy SeniorŽ book.By JESSICA EDMONDSON The good news this year is that youve got a couple of extra days. Rather than “ ling your taxes by April 15, the IRS tax “ ling deadline is Tuesday, April 17. But thats not the only change. Before “ ling your taxes, AARP has a few tips that older taxpayers may be able to use to cut taxes and to gain a bigger refund. Tax tips for older taxpayers: € If you turned 65 before Jan. 1, 2012, youre eligible to take a higher than normal standard deduction: Single $7,250; married $13,900; head of household $9,950; qualifying widow/widower $12,750. € If your adjusted gross income, untaxed interest and half your Social Security bene“ t add up to less than $25,000 ($32,000 if married and “ ling jointly or qualifying widow), youll pay no taxes on your Social Security income. € If youre in a tax bracket of 15 percent or lower, youll pay no federal taxes on long-term capital gains you racked up during the year. € If you work while paying a home health aide to take care of your spouse or dependent, you may be able to claim a credit of up to $3,000 in dependent (or spouse) care expenses. € If you pay all or some of your parents medical bills, you can deduct those as health care expenses. € If you contributed after-tax income to your retirement account, a percentage of your annual distribution may be tax-free. € If your stay at an assisted living facility or nursing home is related to medical care, you may be able to deduct the cost. If you bought hearing aids and batteries, arti“ cial teeth and prescription drugs, you may be able to deduct some of the medical expenses. If you made certain energy-ef“ cient improvements to your home, you may get a tax credit for expenses such as installing a new roof or new windows or exterior doors. Some of these tips come with restrictions that may apply to you, so consult with a tax adviser or visit www. aarp.org/money/taxes/ for more information. Also, check out AARP Foundation Tax-Aide, a free program that offers tax services to low income and senior taxpayers, to make sure that you are taking advantage of every deduction and credit available to you. Resources: AARPs 10 Tax Tips Everyone Over 50 Should Know: www.aarp.org/money/taxes/info-02-2012/tax-tips-youshould-know.html. Find an AARP Tax-Aide location here: www.aarp.org/ money/taxes/aarp_taxaide. For general tax information, the IRS has a number of free guides and forms online that can help: www.irs. gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=164871,00.html. By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior Exercises to help ease arthritis pain AARP FLORIDATax tips for 50+ taxpayersSpecial to The NewsThe Florida State University College of Medicine, one of the nations leading educators in geriatric medicine, now also has the nations top geriatrician of 2012. Dr. Niharika Suchak, an associate professor in the Department of Geriatrics has been named Clinician of the Year by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS). She will receive the award in May at the groups annual scienti“ c meeting. I cannot imagine another clinician more deserving of this award than Dr. Suchak,Ž said Barbara Resnick, president of the AGS. She has an innate ability to guide patients and their families through the maze of complex medical decision-making and considers the patients individual needs, which is essential when caring for older adults.Ž Teaching students how to care for older adults is a key part of the College of Medicines mission. Florida State has one of the few medical schools in the country with a separate geriatrics department. In addition, it integrates geriatrics throughout its fouryear curriculum, because all physicians … not just geriatricians … are likely to provide care for older patients. For that reason, all students, no matter what specialty they want to pursue, complete a full rotation in geriatrics. Geriatrics faculty have a strong presence in all of the doctoring courses,Ž Suchak said. The doctoring continuum is the strong thread that holds together the education received by the medical students throughout their four-year curriculum. I expect geriatrics to continue to lead the way in the evolution of innovative educational methods that maintain a focus on compassionate and advanced patient-centered health care.Ž Suchak received her medical degree at the Armed Forces Medical College in Pune, India, and completed her residency and fellowship training at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore. She has a masters degree in clinical epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene & Public Health. She is certi“ ed by the American Board of Internal Medicine in internal medicine, geriatric medicine, and hospice and palliative medicine. Suchak was intensely involved in graduate and postgraduate medical education in geriatrics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and later at the Hackensack University Medical Center (in af“ liation with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey). Dr. Kenneth BrummelSmith, the department chair who brought Suchak to Florida State in March 2011, was not surprised by this latest honor. We knew we were getting a gem when we recruited Dr. Suchak from New Jersey,Ž Brummel-Smith said. ŽIt was the “ rst time that each reference began their letter by saying, I really hate to be writing this letter because we dont want to lose her. In fact, two of the letters lamented that their biggest regret was that they would be losing the doctor who took care of their parents! We couldnt be happier having her at FSU and are very proud of her accomplishments.Ž Suchak said she was deeply humbledŽ to receive the AGS award. I wish to share this recognition with my family, my mentors, my colleagues, my trainees, and foremost the patients, families and caregivers that I have had the privilege to serve,Ž she said. A patient-physician relationship is a sacred relationship, and I am very grateful for the trust that my patients have placed in me. I will continue to work hard to earn the honor that this award signi“ es to our community,Ž she said. Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advocates who protect the rights of elders residing in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. The programs local councils are seeking additional volunteers to identify, investigate and resolve residents concerns. Special training and certi“ cation is provided. All interested individuals who care about protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents … who often have no one else to advocate for them … are encouraged to call toll-free (888) 831-0404 or visit the programs website at http://ombudsman. my” orida.com.Volunteer opportunityFSU professor named top geriatrics clinician FSUDr. Niharika Suchak T he Wak u lla Ne ws F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Dr. Mark McCoyFebruary 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromYou dont “nd this type of thing in larger cities. is is a great advertising! More people need to advetise like this.Ž…Dr. Mark McCoy OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 – Page 5B TheWakulla News PER COPY75¢75¢ 3 QUARTERS COIN RETURN By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTwo people are dead and a third is recovering after an apparent home invasion in Wakulla Station on Wednesday, March 30. The suspect in the murders is 24-year-old Andrew Michael Wilson, the father of a 1year-old child who lived in the home. Wilson was arrested in Stewart County, Ga., and was later transported back to Wakulla County, where he is being held without bond on two counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. The childs mother, Gabrielle McKenzie, 19, is currently in a Tallahassee hospital where she was being treated with a cut throat. The dead men are John Robert McKenzie, 62, and Patrick Lee Pittman, 24. While an autopsy is pending, the sheriff said the mens injuries are consistent with knife wounds. The child was injured and suffered some bruising in the attack and was found covered in blood by deputies and was inconsolable. The child was released to a family member. The murders took place in a single-wide mobile home on Field Loop Road, in an area off Bloxham Cutoff in Wakulla Station. Wakulla Sheriff David Harvey said evidence indicates it was a premeditated attack: Wilson apparently parked about a quarter-mile from the home and went inside sometime in the early morning hours. Investigators at the scene found a bloodtrail and footprints leading from the home to where they believe Wilson parked his car. Wilsons “ ngers were partially severed in the attack … its not clear if the wound was from a knife or, as some investigators speculated, whether one of the victims may have bitten Wilsons “ ngers. It has been con“ rmed by investigators that it was Pittman who made the 911 call to the sheriffs of“ ce around 3:30 a.m. that brought deputies to the scene. Wilson was identi“ ed as a suspect by Gabrielle McKenzie, who spoke his name, the sheriff said. After issuing a BOLO (Be On the Lookout alert) Wilson was picked up after he wrecked his vehicle in south Georgia. Sheriff Harvey said it is believed Wilson was on his way to Columbus, Ga., where he reportedly has some connections. The sheriff also speculated that the wreck may have been due to blood loss from his hand injuries. Continued on Page 10A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 14th Issue Thursday, April 7, 2011 Two Sections 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews Please see Page 12ADouble murder in Wakulla Station MURDER SCENE: Sheriff David Harvey briefs reporters on Wednesday near the McKenzie home where the killings occurred. The booking photo of suspect Andrew Wilson, right.WILLIAM SNOWDEN WAKULLA SHERIFFS OFFICE By JENNIFER RAYMONDjraymond@thewakullanews.netAn outpouring of support has been shown by those in thecommunitytopeople Bene“ t set to help Gabrielle McKenziePlease help meVICTIMS: Patrick Pittman, above, with 1-year-old Layne. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netGabrielle McKenzie had a court order to keep Andrew Wilson away from her. She went to court in February and got an injunction against Wilson, and it was extended in March, complaining that her former boyfriend and fatheroftheir1-year-old In two-page handwritten “ ling with the court, McKenzie claimed that Wilson was threatening to kill her, as well as her dad and any new man in her life. He told me if he ever caught me with another man he would kill he and I,Ž she wrote. Word for word, he said: I will slit his fxxxxxx throat and blow your fxxxxxx head off. He hasalsothreatenedmy Chamber hosts boil Art on the Terrace is held Please see Page 10BLooking for a copy of Youre In Luck!Find Your Copy Today at These Rack and Dealer Locations. IN CRAWFORDVILLE The Wakulla News Of ce Ace Hardware Beef O’Brady’s CVS Pharmacy Dollar General Dux Liquors El Jalisco Food Mart Hamaknocker’s Hardee’s Karol’s Korner Petro Lee’s Liquor/ Sky Box Sports Bar Lindy’s Chicken Lube Expert Michele’s Convenience Store Ming Tree Myra Jeans Savannah’s Senior Center Stop N Save Tasty Takeout Victor’s American Grille Walgreen’s Wal-Mart Winn Dixie IN MEDART Dollar General Inland Store Petro Wakulla Co Public Library Wildwood Inn IN PANACEA Big Top Supermarket Crum’s Mini Mall Dollar General IN OCHLOCKONEE BAY Angelo’s Mashes Sands BP IN CARRABELLE Carrabelle IGA IN SOPCHOPPY Express Lane Lou’s Bait and Tackle Sally’s Sopchoppy Grocery IN SPRING CREEK Spring Creek Restaurant IN SHELL POINT C21/Florida Coastal Properties IN WOODVILLE Ace Hardware Bert Thomas Grocery Dollar General Gulf Coast Lumber IGA Grocery Store IN ST. MARKS Bo Lynn’s Express Lane IN WAKULLA STATION Dollar General Savannah’s Stop N Save Wakulla Station BP AND ELSEWHERE Glenda’s Country Store Mack’s Country Meats Spring Creek Restaurant Stop N Save (Bloxham Cutoff/H’way 319) Stop N Save (H’way 98/ Spring Creek Road) Wakulla Springs Lodge IN TALLAHASSEE Circle K (Capital Circle & C’ville Highway) Publix (Capital Circle & C’ville Highway) By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 15 … Septic tank legislation, state permitting changes and millions of dollars for Everglades restoration and land-buying capped off a relatively under-the-radar session for environmental issues. Despite being overshadowed by insurance, redistricting and higher education issues, to name a few, environmental groups say they had better session than last, with both legislative leaders and Gov. Rick Scott both being more amendable to their input. I found a greater willingness on the part of leadership to work on compromises on many of these issues,Ž said Janet Bowman, legislative director for the Nature Conservancy. The governor, too, had much greater outreach this session and we worked well with his of“ ce on a number of issues.Ž Atop the list, the $70 billon budget includes $30 million for Everglades restoration. A priority of the governor, money for the states share of clean-up efforts was earmarked early in the process, and both chambers went along. Not so with Florida Forever. The states latest rendition of a decades long land-buying effort was under the knife as lawmakers attempted to “ ll a $1.4 billion hole in the state budget. In the end, however, lawmakers found $8 million to put toward managing and lease arrangements, though the state wont purchase any new land for now. It wasnt a lot of money, but it was a strong recommitment to the programs,Ž said Eric Draper of Florida Audubon. Among the most closely watched water issues was a repeal of a statewide septic tank inspection program that critics said was too expensive. The measure, included in a Department of Health agency bill, would still allow inspections in counties that have “ rst magnitude springs. But Kurt Spitzer, executive director of the Florida Stormwater Association, said the group is concerned the bill may prevent cities and counties that already have ordinances in place from keeping them on the books. It seems to go a little further than we had wished and limits the ability of local governments to establish rules on their own,Ž Spitzer said. WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS Stung last year by a bill that stripped them of more than $200 million in funding, Florida water management districts got a bit of a reprieve this year as lawmakers restored some of the regional boards ability to bring in revenue, and laid off deeper cuts. Lawmakers passed SB 1986, which lifted revenue caps in exchange for requiring heightened legislative oversight. Specifically, the bill would require an annual review, but would allow districts to again determine their appropriate funding levels. In addition, the final version rolled back some of the oversight provisions that were envisioned in earlier drafts and relaxed some stricter requirements that environmental groups found too onerous. The lifting of the water managements caps was very encouraging,Ž Bowman said. There seems to be a recognition that the water management districts needed to have the revenue available to meet regional and statewide needs.Ž STREAMLINED ENVIRO PERMITTING A wide-ranging bill (HB 503) that makes a number of changes in the environmental permitting process, including prohibiting local governments from making a development permit conditional on having some other state permit, passed the Legislature the day before lawmakers called it quits. The bill, sponsored in the House by Rep. Jimmy Patronis, R-Panama City, deregulated certain injection wells and set a time limit on some permit applications. The bill also removes agency approval requirements for small stormwater projects and extends deadlines for certain environmental resource permits. Other issues that didnt pass included: € HB 695, a measure that would let land management agencies enter into public-private partnerships with businesses to develop oil and gas on some onshore state lands under certain conditions. € SB 604, a measure to restrict local laws regulating urban fertilizer application was killed before hitting the Senate ” oor.Legislative session wrap up: Environmental issues Gov. Rick Scott said Tuesday he hopes that a state worker drug testing bill he signed late Monday doesn’t end up being challenged in court, but said, “we’ll see what happens.” Scott on Monday signed legislation that would permit, though not require, state agencies to randomly drug test some employees. “Most private companies now drug screen their employees,… we need to be doing the same thing with your tax dollars,” Scott said in an interview Tuesday morning on NewsTalk 1370 WCOA in Pensacola. “I hope it doesn’t go to the courts … but we’ll see what happens.” Previous efforts to drug test government workers without suspicion have led to court challenges that they may violate the Fourth Amendment protection against illegal search and seizure. Scott ordered drug testing of government employees last year, but was rebuffed by the courts. – News Service of FloridaScott hopes new drug testing law stands

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 5 Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2 Goto http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 16… Sharkeys restaurant had just gone back to regular hours in the Capitol when lawmakers returned again this week to redraw political boundaries stricken a week earlier by the states highest court. Though likely not to draw the crowds that kept the 10th Floor coffee bar pumping espresso at a Neapolitan clip, the special session on reapportionment did its part to extend the capitols busy season, assuring another week of more people in suits than kids in school groups. The mission? Redraw at least a handful of state Senate districts that the Florida Supreme Court said did not adhere to a constitutional amendment meant to ensure that the most political of processes … the redrawing of political boundaries … was done in a non-political manner. While the House apparently accomplished the task with Solomon-like effect, the 40-member Senates plan was rejected in a 5-2 ruling by the court. While Republican leaders returned to fight another day, former state Sen. Nancy Argenziano dropped her lance midweek after a circuit judge ruled she cannot run for Congress as a Democrat The quotable former Republican had challenged her exclusion from what is already a crowded “ eld of Democrats hoping to unseat freshman Republican U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland. Other than that, the capital city was largely quiet following a legislative session that brought a smile to the face of Gov. Rick Scott, whose wish list was largely “ lled. REDISTRICTING BEGINS Following an expected course of action, the Florida Senate began looking Wednesday for ways to respond to the Florida Supreme Courts decision to throw out the upper chambers redistricting maps, opening an extraordinary session to repair the plan. Unlike the House, which received the high courts blessing, the Senate plan did not comply with provisions of Amendment 5, which requires lawmakers to draw compact districts that favor no party or candidate. Senate leaders said the court affirmed the lions share of the Senate map by speci“ cally citing just eight districts in its ruling. Changes could be narrowly aimed at “ xing those districts … though minor changes in a districts lines, by necessity, affect neighboring districts. Still, the Senate said it will try to hone in mostly on the eight problem areas. If you know that 32 seats have met the criteria, why upset those 32 if you possibly can (avoid it)?Ž said Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island. Critics, however, said that might not prove possible. There is no such thing as tweaking the map,Ž said Florida Democratic Party chairman Rod Smith. Along with the physical lines, the numbering of the districts is also a disputed factor. All 40 Senate districts are up for re-election this year, meaning that some senators will be elected to two-year terms and some to four-year terms. Because of that, the districts can be numbered in such a way that most members of the chamber could serve for up to 10 years … longer than the constitutional, eight-year term limit for lawmakers. The question now is how to allocate the numbers … in other words, how many and which should get an extra two years. Justices said that was a problem with the plan too. Adopting a renumbering system that signi“ cantly advantages incumbents by increasing the length of time that they may serve by two years most assuredly favors incumbents,Ž Justice Barbara Pariente wrote, referring to one of the things the new amendments proscribe, helping out current seatholders. Further, purposefully manipulating the numbering of the districts in order to allow incumbents to serve in excess of eight years would also appear to frustrate the intent of the voters when the term limits amendment was adopted,Ž Pariente wrote. But in his dissent, Chief Justice Charles Canady said the majority was reaching … noting that the length of the terms doesnt actually make it easier for any member of the Senate to win re-election. ŽThe numbering of the Senate districts is totally unrelated to any advantage incumbent senators will obtain vis-a-vis challenger candidates,Ž Canady wrote. The session was barely noticeable this week … because lawmakers didnt really do much. The new version of the Senate maps will be drawn up by staff this weekend, with a discussion of it and vote on it planned for Tuesday in the Senate Reapportionment Committee. With a floor vote in the Senate planned by the end of the week, the House would then be able to follow suit with a pro forma vote on the new plan by the end of the month. COURT: ARGENZIANO CANT RUN AS A DEMOCRAT For at least one candidate, the upcoming decision over whether the state drew Congressional boundaries in a fair way will have little effect because the former Republican found out this week she cant run in the party with which she now identi“ es. Argenziano wanted to join a Democratic primary field that now includes state Rep. Leonard Bembry, former Sen. Al Lawson, attorney Alvin Peters and environmental activist Jay Liles in the bid to unseat Southerland. Argenziano, a political moderate who has done well with independent voters, had hoped she could do well in a race in which a plurality would be enough to advance into the general election. She sued over a state elections law overhaul last year that requires candidates who want to run as a member of one party to have not been a member of another party for at least one year before qualifying … about 17 months before an election. Circuit Court Judge James Shelfer said Argenziano did not prove that she had a fundamental rightŽ to run as a Democrat … something that would have required the state to prove that the elections law was constitutional. And she had not proven the law was unconstitutional. After having some time to think, following the ruling, Argenziano said she would not continue to “ ght the law. ŽThe cost to appeal is too much, as well as the time involved,Ž she wrote on her Facebook page. Shell likely still run as a member of the Independent Party. While Argenziano continues to think about a new job, many Floridians have already found one. Statistics released this week show the states unemployment rate in January fell to its lowest level in three years. The 9.6 percent rate was 0.3 percentage points lower than December and a hefty 1.3 points below January 2011. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Contrary to what Senator (Don) Gaetz suggests, the score is not 32-8. The score is 0-1.Ž Florida Democratic Chairman Rod Smith talking about the Republican way of looking at its loss in the Supreme Court over the district maps, versus the Democrats perspective. STORY OF THE WEEK: Lawmakers returned for an extraordinary session to redraw state Senate maps after the chambers initial attempt got shot down by the Supreme Court.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Lawmakers return to take up redistrictingBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 19 – A pair of Republican senators led alternative redistricting plans Monday to the one sponsored by Senate Reapportionment Chairman Don Gaetz, setting up a potential intraparty battle over the future of the chamber. The maps, by Sens. Jack Latvala of Clearwater and Miguel Diaz de la Portilla of Miami, would have the effect of helping allies – even though to do so intentionally would be a violation of the anti-gerrymandering Fair Districts standards approved by voters in a November 2010 referendum. One of the major changes in Latvala’s map would be to keep Senate Majority Leader Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, and Sen. David Simmons, R-Maitland, in separate districts. The Florida Supreme Court sharply criticized “an odd-shaped appendage” springing from one Central Florida district that appeared aimed at keeping the two from facing each other. Latvala’s plan would shift surrounding districts to make the appendage shorter and less pronounced. The Clearwater senator is an ally of Gardiner in Gardiner’s bid to become Senate president in 2014, reportedly in return for Latvala assuming the of ce in 2016, and Simmons is also a Gardiner supporter. Diaz de la Portilla’s plan, meanwhile, would shift the lines of Senate District 35 -where his brother, Alex Diaz de la Portilla, has led to run. The district is currently represented by Democratic Sen. Gwen Margolis of North Miami Beach, though she could end up in another district under Diaz de la Portilla’s plan. The lines would slice North Miami Beach in two. That map would increase the Hispanic voting-age population of District 35 to 66.2 percent when black Hispanics are factored out -an increase from the Gaetz plan, which puts the district at a shade less than 49 percent non-black Hispanics in voting-age population. It would also go from a district that Democrat Alex Sink carried by almost 21 percent in the gubernatorial election to one Sink carried by almost 7 percent. One issue for Diaz de la Portilla’s plan is that it appears to have districts that are not contiguous and would not assign all of the state’s population to a district. Any redistricting plan in Florida would have to consist of 40 contiguous districts and could not leave out any portion of the state. Neither Latvala or Diaz de la Portilla returned calls Monday seeking comment on their plans. The Senate Reapportionment Committee is set to meet Tuesday and approve a plan for the full Senate to consider by the end of the week. The House would take up that map next week.Latvala, Diaz de la Portilla le competing maps

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(850) 4433300 WATER. BIRDS FISHING2/1, w/covered deck over looking private dock, newly refurbished, completely furnished or neg unfurnished $900 rent + utility fee (850) 5241026 Auctions Estates Auction: Spinal Surgical Center Inventory Sells Regardless of Price, March 29, 10am 100 Coy Burgess Loop, DeFuniak Springs 13% BP. Ewald Realty & Auction, AB2473/AU1340 (407)275-6853 www. EwaldAuctions.com Commercial Real Estate WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-4215039 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 9263546 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 9267291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5154-0322 Vs. Ashley Ciara Evans 2011-CA-000189 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000189 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SHILLING, and JAMES M. FOX, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-189-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the plaintiff, and ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SCHILLING and JAMES M. FOX, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT AŽ Lots 32,33, and 34 of the West Side of the Town of Sopchoppy, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida Published two (2) times March 15 & 22, 2012 The Wakulla News 5154-0322 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices L o o k i n g f o r Looking for t h e l a t e s t the latest L o c a l N e w s ? Local News? LOCAL NEWS The Wak ulla Newswww.th ew akullanews.com

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets.Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month.2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 415 Mashes Sands Rd. on Ochlockonee Bay 3 Bdr./ 2 ba $825. Pets with Deposit No smoking. 6 River Cove Bay view 2 Bdr. 1 ba Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Island 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres – $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 47 Jasmine 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre $1,200 Mo. Available April 1. No Smoking/Small Pets w/approval 20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 917 Jessica 3BR/2BA Woodville/Leon County $800 Mo. Pets ok w/approvalAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 5160-0329 Vs, Andrew M. Baker No. 11-252-CA Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-252-CA CENTENNIAL BANK,as successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW M. BAKER, a married man, the Unknown Spouse of Andrew M. Baker, and any and all Others Claiming Interests, By, Under, Through or Against ANDREW M. BAKER Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 7, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerks Office, of the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 11:00 a.m the following described property: See Exhibit AŽ attached hereto and made a part hereof. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim with sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON March 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court (Seal) /s/ by Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ Lots 5 and 6, Block 11Ž of Panacea Mineral Springs, Unit 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat Book 1 Page 5, of the Public Records of Waklla County, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 24-5S-02W-057-03130-000) and: Lot 55, Block 22Ž of Wakulla Gardens, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 00-00-035-008-07819-000) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22, 29 2012 5158-0329 5159-0329 Vs, Larry W. Shiver No. 11-345-CA Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-345-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK Plaintiff, vs. LARRY W. SHIVER, a single man, and any and all Others Claiming interests By, Under, Through or Against LARRY W. SH IVER, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 7, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerks Office, of the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 11:00 a.m the following described property: See Exhibit AŽ attached hereto and made a part hereof. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim with sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON March 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court (Seal) /s/ by Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ LOTS ONE AND TWO (1 & 2) OF DARSEY VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS SHOWN ON PAGE 76 OF PLAT BOOK NO. 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING A SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN TRACT NUMBERED ONE OF AN UNRECORDED PLAT OF INDIAN SUMMER LOCATED IN THE NW 1/4 SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: 12-5S-03W-194-00734-A01 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22,29 2012 5158-0329 Vs, Spears Small Engines Case No. 11-167-CA Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-167-CA CENTENNIAL BANK,as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. SPEARS SMALL ENGINES, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, ESTATE OF LEASTON LAMAR SPEARS, DAVID SPEARS AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, and all Others Claiming By and Through Named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 7, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerks Office, of the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 11:00 a.m the following described property: See Exhibit AŽ attached hereto and made a part hereof. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim with sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON March 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court (Seal) /s/ by Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ Commercial Building/Engine repair and Tire Store Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Begin at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Block AŽ isolated in the Town of Crawfordville, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Deed Book C & DŽ, Page 572 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 24 seconds East 76.27 feet to a concrete monument on the maintained right-of-way boundary of a county graded road, thence run South 89 degrees 39 minutes 36 seconds West along said maintained right-of-way boundary 123.41 feet to a concrete monument thence run North 00 degress 20 minutes 24 seconds West 7.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run West 75.00 feet to the Easterly right-of-way boundary of Tallahassee street, thence run North along said right-of-way boundary 110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run East 45.50 to a concrete monument, thence run North 9.50 feet to a concrete monument on the East boundary of said Block AŽ isolated, thence run South along said East boundary 49.50 feet to the Point of Beginning. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22, 29 2012 5158-0329 5152-0322 Vs. Herndon, Linda 65-2010-CA-000243-cancel and reschedule foreclosure sale PUBLIC NOTICE 5155-0322 Vs. Charles Allen 11-CA-000230 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-CA-000230 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ESTATE OF CHARLES ALLEN PATRICK, deceased, CHARLES A. A.J.Ž PATRICK, JR., TYLER SHAYNE PATRICK, LISA DOREEN PORTER, a/k/a LISA DOREEN PATRICK, U.S. DEPT. OF JUSTICE, WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-230-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and ESTATE OF CHARLES ALLEN PATRICK, deceased, CHARLES A. A.J.Ž PATRICK, JR., TYLER SHAYNE PATRICK, LISA DOREEN PORTER, a/k/a LISA DOREEN PATRICK, U.S. DEPT. OF JUSTICE, WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT AŽ Lot 18, Block AŽ, Northwood Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 91 to 97, of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with 1985 EATO Doublewide Mobile Home ID Numbers: 11417921A & 11417921B, Title Numbers: 41329335 & 41309172 Published two (2) times -March 15, 22, 2012 in The Wakulla County, Florida 5154-0322 5156-0322 Vs. Joseph D. Olah 11-126-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-126-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH D. OLAH, JR. and KRISTINE P. OLAH, husband and wife; UNKNOWN TENANTS; et. al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-126-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and JOSEPH D. OLAH, JR., KRISTINE P. OLAH, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT AŽ Commence at a concrete monument (marked #2919)being used as the Southeast Corner of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida said point also lying on the Easterly boundary of a 20.00 foot roadway easement (Redwood Lane) and run North along said Right-of-Way boundary 247.85 feet and iron rod and cap (marked #7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North along said Right-of-way boundary 367.16 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #4261), thence leaving said Right-of-way boundary run North 89 degrees40 minutes 43 seconds West 338.18 feet to an iron rod, thence run South 524.73 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 65 degrees 16 minutes 18 seconds East 372.14 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 3.46 acres, more or less. SUBJECT to and together with a 20.00 foot wide roadway easement lying over and across the Easterly 20.00 feet portion thereof. AND ALSO SUBJECT to a 100.00 foot wide powerline easement lying over and across the Southerly 100.00 feet, more or less thereof, or as designated by the powerline thereon. TOGETHER with one SUPRE MH 1974 ID G9150A & G9150B located thereon. Published two (2) times -March 15, 22, 2012 in The Wakulla News 5156-0322 5157-0329 Vs. Diane Curlee 11-311-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-311-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. HALE SMALL ENGINE REPAIR, INC. a Florida corporation, TROY A. HALE, DIANE M. CURLEE, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, FLORIDA OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT, INC., a Florida corporation, and UNKNOWN TENANTS #1 Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-311-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and HALE SMALL ENGINE REPAIR, a Florida Corporation, TROY A. HALE, DIANE M. CURLEE, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, FLORIDA OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT, INC. and UNKNOWN TENANTS #1, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBIT AŽ Commence at the Northwest corner of Lot 72 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and run North 72 degrees 22 minutes 19 seconds East along the North boundary of said Lot 72 a distance of 25.00 feet to a re-rod(marked #6475) lying on the Easterly right-of-way boundary of Trice Lane thence leaving said right-of-way boundary continue North 72 degrees 22 minutes 19 seconds East along the North boundary of said Lot 72 (as monumented) a distance of 1399.33 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 72 degrees 22 minutes 19 seconds East along said North boundary (as monumented) 178.81 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 17 degrees 58 minutes 08 seconds East 728.39 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Northerly right-of-way boundary of State Road No: 61, thence run South 70 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds West along said Northerly right-of-way boundary 178.81 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 17 degrees 58 minutes 19 seconds West 733.29 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 3.00 acres, more or less. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. (SEAL) DATED this 7th day of March, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of the Circuit Court /s/By Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22 and 29, 2012 5157-0329 IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2010-CA-000243 Division NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. LINDA K. HERNDON, et al. Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgement of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 25, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakull County, Florida described as: ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND IN WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 515, PAGE 774, ID#10-55-03W-000-00621-001, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS METES AND BOUNDS PROPERTY. COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 0223Ž WEST 660.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 4225Ž EAST 1388.01 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 27 DEGREES 1514Ž WEST 1199.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 27 DEGREES 1514ŽWEST 774.47 FEET TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUT H 26 DEGREES 0835Ž WEST 552.64FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SOUTHWESTERLY ALONGSAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1482.69 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 4756ŽFOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 150.06 FEET, THE CHORE OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 19 DEGREES 0233Ž WEST 150.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 4702ŽEAST 673.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. and commonly known as: 295 CURTIS MILL RD, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the hghest and bidder, for cash, Sales are held in Lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on April 12, 2012 at 11a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 8th day of March, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court /s/Desiree D.Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, March 15 & 22nd, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5150-0322 Weitzel, Joseph 11-77-PR Notice to Cred PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 11-77-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT JOSEPH WEITZEL Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS and NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION TO ALL CREDITORS and TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS The administration of the estate of ROBERT JOSEPH WEITZEL whose date of death was November 14, 2011, File Number 11-77-PR, is pending in the Circuit court of Wakulla County, Florida, probate division, whose address is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors have only those periods of time established in Florida Statutes 733.702 and 733.710 to file their claims against the estate. All creditors and all interested persons are required to file with the court. WITHIN 90 DAYS OF THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE (1) all claims against the estate ; (2) any objection that challenges the qualifications of the personal representative, venue or jurisdiction of the court; and (3) any written defenses to the Petition for Administration. You must file the original of your claim, objection or defense with the Clerk of the Court at the above address either before or immediately after service on the personal representatives attorney whose name and address are at the end of this notice. ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. FAILURE TO SERVE AND FILE TIMELY WRITTEN DEFENSES AS REQUIRED MAY RESULT IN A JUDGMENT OR ORDER FOR THE RELIEF DEMANDED, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO YOU. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 15, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Charlotte D. Weitzel 140 Dorothy Loop Crawfordville, FL 32327 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 – Page 9BThe meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Renee Lawhon was recognized as Employee of the Month and Miranda Bowen and Jennifer Thaxton were recognized as Teachers of the Month. All were congratulated and presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. Daniel Stevens from the Florida Forest Service presented the Superintendent and School Board with a check from the sale of timber in Wakulla County. Diane Perez, a member of the Florida Council for AdvancEd Florida, presented the district with an Accreditation Plaque. All board members and the Superintendent were in attendance. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. A public hearing was opened regarding the School Board Member Voting Districts. The audience was given the chance to speak. After a short discussion the hearing was closed. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the agenda. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the following consent items: 1. Approved the Minutes of the Meeting held on February 21 and February 23, 2012. 2. Approved the following Employment of Personnel: Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) Baggett, TimothyMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Coxetter, CatherineMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Gay, JenniferRMSCustodian … Time Limited02/22/12-06/30/12 Gray KatherineRMSSecretary … Time Limited02/27/12-06/30/12 Green, TerriMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Johnson, JessicaMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Lawhon, LauraMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Lawhon, MichelleMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Nichols, AngelaMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Roddenberry, DeborahMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Ryan, RachelMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Tomaini, DennyTransportationOf“ce Assistan02/01/12-05/30/12 Watson, KendallMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Bishop, JessicaWHSHead Varsity Girls Soccer Coach2011-2012 Gregg, DonaldWHSAssistant Varsity Boys Soccer Coach2011-2012 Reed, NickWHSAssistant JV Girls Soccer Coach2011-2012 PS-Professional Service Contract AC-Annual Contract 10 Month Employee Mabrey, JacquelineSECESE EBD Teacher03/01/12-06/04/12AC 3. Approved the following Retirement Letters: Mary Beth Mims/effective April 1, 2012 and enter DROP Jonele Bird/effective July 1, 2012 and enter DROP Linda Camp/effective June 29, 2012 and exit DROP Jennie King/effective July 1, 2012 Annette Allen/effective March 1, 2012 and enter DROP Glinda Raker/effective March 1, 2012 and enter DROP Linda Leckinger/effective February 1, 2012 and enter DROP 4. Approve a Letter of Resignation on Mary Hunter/effective March 19, 2012. 5. Approved Illness in the Line of Duty/FMLA. 6. Approved a Leave of Absence on Classie Franklin from January 5, 2012 to February 8, 2012. 7. Approved the February “nancial statement. 8. Approved Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve for advertising the proposed school board member voting districts. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the D.O.E. Florida Inventory of School Houses (F.I.S.H.) Certi“cations of Facilities Data. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Guaranteed Maximum Price for Wakulla Middle School HVAC renovations with Childers Construction … Bid #11/12-05. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve Bike Florida to use buses for their annual spring tour. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the exemption to the Ms. Willie Glen Act.Ž Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2012-2013 Wakulla County School Board Calendar. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the 2012 VPK, ESE, High School and Middle School Summer Schedules (Calendar). Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the 2011-2014 Apalachee Center and Wakulla County Schools Service Agreement. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Contract for ELL Training. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Exceptional Student Education Policies and Procedures. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. An executive session was held immediately after the board meeting to discuss issues pertaining to collective bargaining. Superintendent Miller, Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott, Mr. Thomas, Beth ODonnell, Randy Beach and Karen Wells were in attendance.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON MARCH 12, 2012MARCH 22, 2012 Seasonal Employment PARKS and RECREATION DEPARTMENT Applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 23, 2012. 5151-0322 Mcelveen, Victoria K, Case # 12-17CP Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-17 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF VICTORIA KATHLEEN MCELVEEN Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Victoria Kathleen McElveen, deceased, File 12-17 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims Attorney for Personal Representative Aaron N. Bauldee, P.A. 4755 Knollwood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Phone: 850-559-1191, Florida Bar No. 0020513 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla County Times March 15 & 22nd, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5153-0322 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON MARCH 31, 2012 at 10:00a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: MICHAEL SIMMONS MARY LOUIS E SLOAN STEPHEN BOND BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF MARCH 31,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. March 15 and 22nd 2012 5162-0329 03/22-03/29 Notice of Sale-Wakulla Realty PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Wakulla Realty will hold a sale by sealed bid on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at 2655-B U.S. Highway 319 of the contents of Mini-warehouse containing personal property of: Deborah Rudell Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is March 15, 2012. Personal Representative: Daniel E. Wiggins 227 15th Street NW Ruskin, FL 33570 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 15 & 22, 2012 Cleotha Randolph Before the sale date of April 3, 2012, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 535, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 or by paying in person at 2655 U.S. Highway 319, Crawfordville, Florida. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22, and 29 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Selling Something? 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When__doornot ...?" 9.Nurserydenizens 10.Levelsofsociety 11.Methodofscoring ingolf 12.1997PeterFonda role 13.Hardyheroine 18.Worm-__ (decrepit) 23.WeaponinClue 25.IsraeliauthorOz 26.Ruinations 28.Templereading 29.Guttersite 30.Laughloudly 31.Shopper'said 32.Pancake topper 33.Sootystuff 34.Touchofcolor 37.ReoorEssex 38.BatMasterson's weapon 40.Venetianhoncho 41.Memory malfunction 43.Gunpowder ingredients,toBrits 44.Like the stereotypicallocker room 46.Omega, tothe Greekalphabet 47.Scrapetogeth er 48.GeorgeW.Bush, to theTexas Rangers,once 49.Putback to000, say 50.Mata__ 51.Opposed to,in dialect 52. "Don'tbet__!" 56. "All theThingsYou __"(Kerntune) 57. "Great Expectations"hero American Prole Hometown Content 2/26/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 12 3 4 5 167 829 9 178 35 6142 1 98 213 75431 200 9 HtCtt 162 7398 4 5 985164237 437852196 594 321768 823697514 671485923 316 978452 248513679 759246381 F O L I C C A R T H A R I O H A I R O L E O A G I N A N N I E L A M P B L A C K L O T A M O S N I T R E S E A T E N D O G E M A R R O W M O T O R C A R A B N E R T I N C T A R E R A J A T O R A H O N I T I S A B A N E S E N D E R N E W B O R N S S M E L L Y R O P E L A P S E S T R A T A C A N E P I P M A T C H P L A Y R A I S E U L E E E A V E O W N E R T E S S R O A R R E S E T • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com The Wakul la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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By MARK UNDERWOODSpecial to The NewsIf youve ever wondered what people who live to be 100 have in common, science may have some answers. When you read stories about groups of people living “ t and healthy beyond a hundred years, you cant help but wonder, what are they doing? Now, science is unlocking clues that may help us understand the mysteries behind longevity. New research is centered on areas called Blue Zones, geographical areas in the world where many residents consistently live to be 100 or older. Sardinia, Italy is one such area where many centenarians can be found. So is it just good luck that people live to be 100? Here are some starting points to consider in your own journey to long life. Is this Shangri-La? The chances of “ nding long living, healthy adults in the worlds Blue Zones are 20 times greater than in other places. They also have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and dementia. It turns out where people live the longest on earth, they share something in common. Their secret to a long life is no secret at all. Residents in Blue Zone communities have a consistent regimen of good eating, interests and activities, constant learning, daily exercise and social interaction. I want to live in a Blue Zone! Here are a few simple steps you and your family can take to improve the chances of living a long life. The key ingredient for maximizing your success is consistency. That means everyday you need to be active and eat a healthy diet „ not just on weekdays. The only element you cant change is your genetics. Since we cant ask for do-over in this category, lets move on to things we can control and help improve our chances of living to 100. Follow these steps toward creating a Blue Zone in your house: Work it „ often! All centenarians in the Blue Zones of the world are active participants in the world around them. The phrase use it or lose itŽ can be life changing and life saving, particularly when it comes to exercise. The key is to “ nd an activity that you enjoy such as running, biking or swimming and youll be much more likely to incorporate it into a regular activity. MAINTAIN SOCIAL NETWORKS Avoid being isolated. Keep a circle of close, good friends. The Australia Longitudinal Study on Aging, a study that has followed nearly 1,500 people over 70 years old for 10 years, says friends may be more important than you think. The study found that social networks like strong friendships can prolong your life. If you have good friends who you share inner secrets with, and you chat with them often, this close-knit interaction impacts you in a healthy way. MOM WAS RIGHT, EAT YOUR VEGGIES Many communities identi“ ed within the Blue Zones have a mostly plantbased diet. They eat veggies every day, many times a day. In Japan, fish is the main meat consumed at home. Omega fatty acids are good for the brain and body, and fish and legumes have all the nutrients you need to put you on your path to become a centenarian. Eating the right foods can also help to combat the adverse affects of oxidation and damage of brain cells. EAT LESS, EAT RIGHT There is a concept in Okinawa that is the opposite of supersizing the meal. They are known for a practice called, Hara hachi buŽ … which translates roughly to 80% belly.Ž Eat just a little bit less than whatever full is for you. You will get the nutrients you need while lowering your caloric intake. Moderation here may keep your metabolism in top shape. LEARN TO RELAX Its also important to try to relax more often and allow the toxic effects of stress to dissipate. Blue Zone communities share an understanding of the importance for rest and relaxation. Centenarians have found effective ways to de-stress and keep their minds active. Start building a Blue Zone in your house today. If you live right, eat right, exercise, laugh often and continue the joys of learning, youre on your way to reaping the rewards of a richly “ lled, long life. Visit www.TheGoodNewsAboutAging.com for more articles and tips for healthy aging.Mark Underwood is a neuroscience researcher, president and co-founder of Quincy Bioscience, a biotech company located in Madison, Wis. Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT AGINGTips to reach 100 by creating your own Blue ZoneScientists are studying places known as Blue Zones, areas where many residents consistently live to be 100 or older to look at the factors that contribute to longevity Call 866.610.7768Espaol 866.960.7085 Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV NO CONTRACT! FREE HD WHEN YOU PICK 2. FOR 12 MONTHS CenturyLinkTM PrismTM.Interactive TV you control … any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. Now you have a better TV choice.[ CenturyLinkTM PrismTMpaired with the perfect partner – Internet or Voice. ] Prism Project … Demonstrations are with non-Prism’ TV customers using basic CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV service with standard featur es in High Definition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/11 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional acto rs, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. Offer ends 5/31/12. Offer is available to new, first-time CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV residential customers only. The Pick Two bundl e offer applies to a qualifying PrismTM TV programming package and choice of High-Speed Internet or a qualifying CenturyLink calling plan with no term commitment and free HD service for twelve (12) months. 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TD-SPAD0301135458_0 GREYHOUNDRACINGOPENSFRIDAY,MARCH23RDYOUBETIT’SFUN!SIMULCASTBETTINGALSOAVAILABLEDaniaJai-Alai•Jacksonville•DerbyLane TurfClubDining-GreatFood!|OpenMonday-Saturday7pm-11pm Monticello,Fl•850-997-2561 LIVE Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of



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Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 6B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 7BINDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 12th Issue Thursday, March 22, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe WakullanewsOBITUARIES William Bill Blount Jonnie Davis McKenzie William E. Bill Mills Jr. Dorothy Harrell Robertson Deborah Atkins Sanders Mary Frances Whaley Wiggins St. Patricks, 14A PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENNew management team at Wakulla Springs Lodge Members of Wakulla 2020 appointedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe committee members that will be charged with prioritizing road projects for the county under the Wakulla 2020 plan have been appointed. The committee is made up of 15 members. They are Pat Jones, selected by the Wakulla County School Board; Jared Miller, selected by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce; John Shuff, selected by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce; Kevin Vaughn, selected by the Wakulla County Economic Development Council; Jackie Lawhon, selected by the City of Sopchoppy; Zoe Mans eld, selected by the City of St. Marks; Tim Jordan, selected by the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council; Michael Weltman representing Wakulla Station; Paige Killeen selected by the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Committee; Byron Price representing Shell Point; Andrea Carter representing Medart; Skip Young representing the Crawfordville Town Plan area; Linda Langston representing Smith Creek; R.H. Carter, director of the Senior Center or his designee; and Billy Mills representing the county at large. Each committee member is appointed for one year, or until the business of the committee has been completed. The advisory committee will review and prioritize projects, make recommendations to the county commission and assist in developing the ballot language for the half-cent sales option to fund the projects. The half-cent sales tax referendum will be placed on the ballot and allow the voters to decide whether the Wakulla 2020 initiative should move forward. The initiative started as a way to implement the Crawfordville Town Plan, which including improving Highway 319 and expanding intersections to improve traf c ow. Since that time, several community leaders and organizations have been looking for ways to fund the plan, as well as other transportation projects that the county does not have the money to do. The Wakulla 2020 idea is based on what was done in Tallahassee with Blueprint 2000. In 1989, Tallahassee and Leon County voters approved a local option one-cent sales tax to provide funding for transportation projects and law enforcement facility improvements. Continued on Page 3A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt has been nearly nine months since Cape Leisure Corp. took over the operation of the 27-room hotel, restaurant, soda fountain and gift shop at Wakulla Springs Lodge. And although they have seen the departure of the former general manager and sales manager since that time, Daniel LeBlanc, president of Cape Leisure, feels the lodge is on the right track. LeBlanc hired a new management team, which is led by Manager Derek Adams and his Assistant Manager Jeff True. Im real excited about the team, LeBlanc said. After former Manager Jon Steele, left, LeBlanc said they brought in someone from their corporate of ce to run the lodge while they looked for the perfect t. During that time, the sales manager also left. Continued on Page 2A New Manager Derek Adams and Assistant Manager Jeff True. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA former county employee has led a civil rights complaint in federal court against the Wakulla County Commission and former County Administrator Benjamin Pingree. Richard Larry Noles was chief building inspector for the county from Feb. 3, 2007, to Oct. 20, 2009. He was red on Oct. 20, 2009 by then Assistant County Administrator Lindsay Stevens. Noles led the complaint on Feb. 15 alleging that he has been a victim of retaliation and constitutional rights violations from the defendants or employees of the defendants. According to Noles termination letter, the county received various complaints regarding licensing violations and other violations of county policies, as well as receiving several complaints from staff. Noles was suspended on Oct. 13, 2009, while an investigation into the complaints occurred. He was then red a week later. Two complaints were filed against Noles with the Department of Business and Professional Regulation in 2009. One alleged that Noles performed mechanical and plumbing inspections after his license had expired and the other alleged that he performed electrical inspections without a license. The rst complaint was dismissed on Dec. 28, 2010, by the Florida Division of Administration Hearing and a judge found insufficient evidence to prosecute. No discipline was imposed regarding the second complaint and both have been closed. The civil rights complaint states that an appeal hearing was held on Nov. 18, 2009, and Noles requested an attorney to be present in his defense, but was not allowed one, while the county had four attorneys present. This was an unconstitutional act to deprive Plaintiff of Due Process, the complaint states. Noles also claims that the county disapproved his choice for a third member on the appeals board because his selection was a deputy sheriff. The appeal hearing proceeded without a 3-member board, it states. The defendants failed to comply with the Wakulla County Personnel and Policy Manual, approved by the County on Oct. 1, 2007, pursuant to process and procedures required to terminate employees from public employment with the County, the complaint states. Noles is asking for his job back as chief building inspector with an increase in salary that matches the cost of living allowance that was received by Pingree. He is also seeking compensation for ve years of salary and DROP bene ts missed. He also requested monetary damages for humiliation, embarrassment, mental distress and anguish, as well as punitive damages. He also asked that his personnel le be purged. The complaint is being handled by the countys insurance provider, Florida Association of Counties Trust.Former building inspector les civil rights lawsuitPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA wild re, believed to have been caused by a lightning-strike, burned land near Natural Bridge and caused a smoke advisory to be issued. See the story on Page 12A. Fire! Fire! Wakulla County Wakulla County Senior Citizens Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Celebrate LifeSee Page 1B

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Continued from Page 1A They are still currently looking for a sales manager with hotel marketing experience, LeBlanc said. Adams was hired almost two months ago and True started a little over a month ago. It gave us the opportunity to mix and match candidates, LeBlanc said. Adams, who is originally from Michigan, has a restaurant background, having worked at hotels and country clubs. Most recently, he served as the director of food and beverage at Killearn County Club in Tallahassee for the last two years. The opportunity to work at the lodge almost fell in his lap, he said. He admits he had to GPS the lodge, but once he arrived, he saw what a beautiful place it was. All I saw was its potential, Adams said. Adams said he is still in awe of the history and pure elegance of the lodge, as well as its true Southern fare. You dont see that in many places, he said. True has been in Wakulla County for seven years and said he has always loved Wakulla Springs and also liked the fact that it was a green hotel. He worked at the Inn at Wildwood, which was also a green hotel, but chose to step away from that situation after the bank took it over. When he saw Cape Leisure had positions available, he decided to apply. This was my chance, True said. Adams said he is excited about being on the ground floor of this project. Currently, the staff is training and getting to know the ins and outs of the lodge. Two months ago, you had a completely different management staff, Adams said. The lodge has unique challenges because it is in a state park, Adams said. He has been working closely with Park Manager Brian Fugate. Its weird to have a second boss, so to speak, Adams said. He said he has looked to Fugate for insight since he ran the lodge prior to Cape Leisure taking it over. Once holes are lled in, such as the hiring of a sales manager, summer and permanent restaurant staff and nishing training, they can really begin to focus on long term goals. LeBlanc said, We dont feel like were there yet. Adams said they are still in the growing stage. True said he is doing research and learning all the history of the springs and lodge, which helps when interacting with guests. The most recent question was about Henry the pole vaulting sh. He added that it is fun to interact with guests who have been coming to the lodge for the last 50 years. We want to keep building on that and have repeat customers, True said. Currently, the lodge is doing very well, LeBlanc said. Were outperforming our projections every month, he said. There are no drastic plans for the lodge, just minor improvements, LeBlanc said. Its almost like a living history project, he said. They plan to keep with the traditions and history of the lodge and be very conservative with any changes. Were not looking to disrupt the way of life at Wakulla Springs, Adams said. They are looking for subtle ways to create a better environment, he added. One of the bigger projects is the addition of a snack bar and shop near the outside restrooms. They plan to sell soda, water, ice cream, suntan lotion, snacks, picnic supplies and possibly rent tubes and bicycles. The project is expected to be completed by July. Its another way for us to have an amenity for our guests, Adams said. They also plan to polish all the marble oors, which Adams has been told could take anywhere from a month to six months. The oors were done six to seven years ago, and major rehab is due again, LeBlanc said. Simple things like that make a difference, LeBlanc said. Adams said they plan to go from top to bottom cleaning up the place. To put a shine and luster to everything, he said. They are also making minor changes in the restaurant, including new uniforms, new tablecloths and music being played at night. Adams said they also plan to improve the menu and possibly add some more Southern options. They will also look at revamping their banquet menus that are offered for special events, such as a wedding reception, and purchase new tables, china and silverware to be used at those events. We want to create an atmosphere like no other, Adams said. And the backdrop of the springs and the lodge is something you wont nd anywhere else, he said. Their goal is to have the changes completed by December, Adams said. LeBlanc said once he feels the staff is ready, they will amp up advertising and marketing the lodge. They are also in the process of setting up a way for people to make reservations online. He plans to use tricks of the trade that were successful at Natural Bridge of Virginia, another park his company operates. This property is larger than Wakulla Springs, but has similarities, he said. Both are in a small rural setting with a larger city close by. Adams said a year from now, all the changes and improvements will have been made. We are very ambitious with our changes and expectations, Adams said. Cape Leisure Corp. took over the concessions at Wakulla Springs on July 1, 2011. The company entered into a 5-year agreement with the state, which still owns the property. The lodge was built in 1937 by entrepreneur Edward Ball and has been k ept mostly in its original condition, with some improvements. The State of Florida eventually purchased the site in 1986 and had been operating the lodge up until July 1. As a cost-saving measure, the state sought out a private vendor to run the concessions and Cape Leisure was chosen. Cape Leisure pays the state a monthly fee and monthly commission based on gross sales for all its operations. Cape Leisures other clients include the National Historic Landmark Ribault Club at Fort George Island in Jacksonville, Anastasia State Park in St. Augustine, Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Jetty Park in Cape Canaveral and Natural Bridge of Virginia. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comNew management at Wakulla SpringsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe county is on a tight deadline with making renovations to the Wakulla County Community Center. At the Wakulla County Commission meeting on March 19, the commission voted to proceed with the nal design and permitting for the project. The county received $392,000 in legislative appropriation and has until summer 2013 to spend all those funds or they will be lost. Preble-Rish will begin the design and permitting of the site and buildings on March 19 and it is scheduled to be completed on April 30. The county will advertise for bids on the project on June 4 and a contractor will be selected on July 16. Renovations will then begin on July 19 and will be completed on Dec. 31. The hope is that programs can be offered at the community center starting on Jan. 1, 2013. The current design only calls for renovations of the building that was the former sanctuary and building of an open oor plan gymnasium. The building that will be renovated will be utilized by the YMCA. It will feature a free weight room and cardio room, tness class, kid zone and restrooms and showers. A covered walkway will join this building with the other building that is not scheduled to be remodeled. That building is broken up into several of ces. Alan Wise with PrebleRish said the main entrance is located on the south side of the building and after renovations, the main entrance will be located on the north side with access to the gymnasium or YMCA facilities. The open gymnasium will be about 7,300 square feet, depending on the budget, and will be fairly simple with a concrete oor. At the meeting, the commission also approved the memorandum of understanding with the YMCA. County Administrator David Edwards said the contract is non-binding, but it is a mutual acknowledgment of the county and the YMCAs commitment to moving forward with the renovations and providing programs for the county. Once construction is complete, Edwards said they will enter into a formal contract. The YMCA will provide programming services and operational support for the community center. The YMCA will utilize the building on the west side upon completion of the renovations, offer design and planning input to the expansion of the new multiuse space and incorporate this space into program activities, utilize the second building to incorporate additional programs, and offer assistance in planning and future expansion of other enhancements to common grounds.COUNTY COMMISSIONMoving quickly ahead with community center plansRelay for Life will hold its Lion Painting Festival on April 7Special to The NewsSaturday, March 24, at 8 p.m., the band Quanta will be performing at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy. Bluesy, soulful and jazzy Americana at its best, Quanta offers unique and surprising instrumental combinations of piano, sax, vocal, guitar and percussion. Quanta features Richard Bertram on tenor and alto sax, bass, bongos and rhythm; Jack Quine on keyboards, guitar and vocals; and Andy Moorer, an award winning sound engineer and composer, will play vestringed banjo. The three musicians performing are scientists, engineers and mathematicians in some capacity, and quanta was the last band name left on the list after crossing all the others out. For reservations, call (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com.Special to The NewsRelay for Life of Wakulla will host a Lion Painting Festival on Saturday, April 7. The festival will center around painting the concrete lion statue in Azalea Park. Many of this years Relay for Life teams will be on-site hosting activities and fundraisers. Survivors and caregivers can register for the Relay and pick up an invitation to the Survivor Dinner which will be held on April 17. There will be arts, crafts, food and other great items for sale at the festival. Relay for Life will be at the Wakulla High School track Friday, April 20 with activities and entertainment going all night long until noon on Saturday, April 21. Please contact Event Chair Kristin Dow at kdv6@mail.com or 926-8854 for further information.Youth Coalition to host town hall meeting on April 3Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is hosting a Getting to Outcomes town hall meeting to increase awareness about the negative consequences of underage drinking and discuss steps that can be taken to prevent underage drinking. Presenters will include members of peer groups, law enforcement and community service providers. The meeting will be Tuesday, April 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the War Eagle Caf at Wakulla High School. Appetizers will be served from 5:30 to 6 p.m. For additional information, contact Stacy Harvey at 510-0219. This event is supported by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and is in collaboration with the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Prevention of Underage Drinking.Quanta to perform at Posh on Saturday Quanta is Richard Bertram and Jack Quine. Lots of friendly visitors attending:Wakulla ROTC Wakulla EMS Wakulla Fire & Rescue Smokey the Bear Capital City Bank Star McDonalds Character McGruff the Crime Dog the Sonic Character and a MoonwalkC.H.A.T. of Wakulla will receive donations of: towels, doggie treats, pet toys, and/or a loving home for your new best friend. ADOPT A PET booth for anyone who might be interested in adopting a pet. Saturday, March 31 at Hudson Park Registration: 9:30 10:30am Egg Hunt: 11:00amAge Groups: 0-3 years old, 4-6 Years old and 7-10 years old Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 Capital Circle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comIn the front-page story in last weeks paper, Budget de cit looms, it was incorrectly stated that the county could face a budget de cit of around $240,000 this year. Early estimates show that property taxes are expected to decrease by 3 to 5 percent for the 2012-13 scal year, not the current year. If there is a shortfall, the county would need to look at alternative revenue sources or expenditure reductions to make up that difference. It was also not mentioned that the county has been building its reserves and is in a better position than previous years. We regret the error. Continued from Page 1A Then in 2000, the voters approved an extension until 2019 to fund stormwater and ood control projects, greenspace acquisition and parks/recreation improvements and additional transportation projects. John Shuff, the chamber appointee on the committee, said Wakullas version of the initiative will be on a much smaller scale and will focus on transportation and road projects, which is what is allowed with this certain sales tax option. Shuff said the tax is estimated to generate about $20 million over the next 15 years, and with a bonding nances and costs, it would leave them with an estimated total of $14 million. The committee will also seek out grant funding in hopes of doubling that to $28 million. Shuff said he hopes to get the committee together as soon as possible. The committee is tasked with meeting on a monthly basis, but can meet as often as it likes.Members of Wakulla 2020 committee are appointedBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe city of St. Marks is moving forward with its Community Development Block Grant for streetscape improvements. The city commission approved the design, which includes the addition of a sidewalk on both sides of Port Leon Drive from Pine Street to Riverside Drive. At the end of Riverside Drive, there will be an imprint of a lighthouse in the center of the road. Money will also be spent on lighting and landscaping, which includes a 4-foot median in certain points of the road, which would have owers and other plants to help with beauti cation. Engineer Joe Hope, with Hydro Engineering, developed the plans and the grant is being administered by Fred Fox. Bids will go out for the project in April, said City Manager Zoe Mans eld. The city was awarded the $600,000 grant in June 2011. The money is to be used for economic revitalization for the city. The next commission meeting is April 12 at 7 p.m. at city hall. CITY OF ST. MARKSStreetscape design is approved By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSopchoppy city Commissioners were excited to hear about the possibility of a new business opening in the city at its March 12 meeting. Good Samaritan Thrift Store plans to open in the old Sopchoppy Hardware store. Good Samaritan Chapel and Community Center currently runs two other thrift stores, one in Woodville Commons and another in the TownSouth Shopping Center in Tallahassee. Pastor Glenn Burns said if the commission approves the proposed business, they plan to open over the July 4 weekend. I would love to see life, Commissioner Lara Edwards said of the hardware store. Burns said they want to move quickly and have been successful with their other locations. Our ministry has grown double, Burns said. The store competes with Goodwill stores, but Beth Burns said it is set up like a Cracker Barrel gift shop. They will sell antiques, collectibles, clothes, childrens toys, etc. Its for people who cant afford to go to Wal-mart, Beth Burns said. Those who cant afford to purchase items can volunteer and be compensated with items from the store, she said. We know theres a need here, Beth Burns said. They also plan to go out into the community and provide outreach services. The thrift store will also help the building owner sell the tools and hardware supplies that are currently in the building so they can utilize all the space. The space will be maximized, Glenn Burns said. Mayor Colleen Skipper said, Im excited. Vice Mayor Richard Harden said it is sad to see all the empty buildings in Sopchoppy and said the commission needed to continue to support local merchants. The commission was in agreement that this was a good thing for the city and gave the Burns its full support. In other news: The city approved the engineering services agreement with Baskerville Donovan for the stormwater grant project. The city was awarded a $600,000 Community Development Block Grant which will be used to improve drainage at Gulf Street and Park Avenue. The environmental review is expected to be completed by April 13 and the funds will be released May 5 so that the project can be started, said City Clerk Jackie Lawhon. The city also discussed the possibility of applying for another grant to proceed with phase 2 of the stormwater project, which would look at a couple sections to the west and north. The deadline for the grant is in November. The rst phase must be completed and closed out before it could apply for another grant. The city would also be eligible to apply for another grant in 2013. The idea to apply for another grant will come back before the commission at the April meeting. The ability for customers to pay their water bill with a credit card is now available. There is a $3 convenience fee charged to those who pay with a credit card. Deputy City Clerk Linda Langston said so far, it has been working well, and there are more customers than they thought are taking advantage of that option. Langston said they have informed customers of the option on their water bills. The next commission meeting will be April 9 at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.CITY OF SOPCHOPPYNew thrift store opening creates stirSpecial to The NewsMembers of NAMI Wakulla will present an in-person annual report Monday, March 26, along with a thank you to Wakulla County residents for supporting the free services and education in mental health. We have decided to present our annual report in-person and open to the public, so that the people of Wakulla County may attend and perhaps hear about a program they could benefit from, said Susie Tooke, president of NAMI Wakulla. In addition, we are opening our doors to people interested in joining NAMI Wakulla, and working along with us so that we may deal with mental illness in Wakulla County in more effective ways, Tooke said. The annual meeting will include a review of the education programs NAMI Wakulla has presented free to the public since March 2011, along with a report of support groups that have met, new groups that have formed, and a host of other services NAMI Wakulla has developed in the past year. NAMI Wakullas in-person report will also offer a detailed account of the fundraising events the group, an affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, has sponsored over the past year. This report will also offer details of future events on the planning table. The Wakulla County community is invited to attend this public meeting and enjoy light refreshments while learning more about the advances NAMI Wakulla has made in the county in its third year of existence. We especially want to thank our community for its overwhelming support for NAMI Wakulla this past year, Tooke said. New board members for the coming year will be announced at the general public meeting following an annual board meeting. NAMI Wakullas public meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club, 64 Ochlockonee Street, behind the Centennial Bank. NAMI Wakulla to o er public reportCorrection CHECK PRESENTATION: Daniel Stevens of the Florida Forestry Service presents School Board Chairman Mike Scott with a check for $11,659 at last weeks school board meeting. The money represents 15 percent of timber sales from the Wakulla State Forest. WILLIAM SNOWDEN NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Planning Commission proposes to consider the following applications. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, April 9, 2012, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, May 7, 2012 at 5:00 PM unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.MARCH 22, 2012 **OFFICIAL**N O T I C E O F G E N E R A L E L E C T I O N I, Ken Detzner, Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that a GENERALELECTION will be held in WAKULLA County, State of Florida, on the SIXTH day of NOVEMBER, 2012, A.D., to ll or retain the following of ces: President and Vice-President United States Senator Representative in Congress State Attorney: Judicial Circuit 2 Public Defender: Judicial Circuit 2 State Senator State Representative Supreme Court: Retention of Three Justices First District Court of Appeal: Retention of Four Judges Circuit Judge, Second Judicial Circuit: Groups 1, 2, 3 and 12 Clerk of the Circuit Court Sheriff Property Appraiser Tax Collector Superintendent of Schools Supervisor of Elections School Board: Districts 2 and 4 County Commissioner: Districts 1, 3 and 5 Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation District: Groups 1, 2, 3 and 5 000AUL3 JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Questions about gate at Shell Point Man picks up weapons charges after search Jonnie Davis McKenzie obituary Tammy Kay Roberts Harvey obituary Frank Earl McIntyre obituary WakullaStory is a great tale, well told Board will accept grant only if theres no cost to county Meta Gwen Rabitaille obituary thewakullanews. com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Get involved by running for elected o ceEditor, The News: The 2012 election will soon be here. Select the of ce you want to run for, then go to the Supervisor of Elections of ce to pick up your Candidate Packet. Some positions up for re-election are: County Commissioners = $30,937 (District 1: Alan Brock, District 3: Mike Stewart, District 5: Lynn Artz), School Board members = $25,647 (District 2: Mike Scott, District 4: Greg Thomas). The only requirements for these positions are that you must be at least 18 years old, a resident of the county and a registered voter. You can qualify by getting 178 petitions signed or by paying a fee. The rst deadline for qualifying is May 7, 2012. All incumbents, including our senators and representatives, not just the positions listed above, should re-read the directions for lling out the Form 6 report (Full and Public Financial Disclosure), recheck their information for the past ve years and le corrected 6X forms with the Ethics Commission, if they made any mistakes. Voters want honest of cials. Lets keep them honest by checking their disclosure forms. The information is available to the public at disclosurepublicrecordsrequest@ leg.state. .us just ask for the Form 6 and 6X reports for any or all years an of cial has been in of ce. Donna Sanford Crawfordville Editor, The News: The fourth annual Jesus River Festival was held on Saturday March 10 at the Sopchoppy City Park, and by all accounts it was a great success. It is estimated that almost 400 people were entertained by seven Christian musical groups, three youth dance and drama performances, blessed by preachers from four local churches, enjoyed the free food and childrens programs. The weather was great and everything went off without a hitch. The Jesus River Festival Organizing Committee would like to thank all the churches, ministries, business and individuals that donated their time and resources. We could not have held the festival without your help. We are already working on Jesus River Festival 2013. Anyone wishing to participate in next years event can reach us through our website, jesusriverfest.com. We look forward to serving you next year. Jesus River Festival Organizing CommitteeJesus River Festival appreciates supportBy PAMELA JOYTask Force chairThe Recycle Task Force held their final meeting in February but recycling efforts will continue. The committee was formed by county commissioners and comprised of volunteer citizens and county staff to propose and pursue ways to increase recycling county-wide. The committee completed many of their original goals and restructured to form subcommittees for future work and to coordinate with Waste Pro, who now manages recycle and waste collections for the county. A few highlights of committee accomplishments: Considerable data was gathered to determine collection sites and materials already being collected within the county. Recycle centers for aluminum, plastic and cardboard were set up in all county of ces that did not already have them, and all types of cartridges from printers, copiers and fax machines are also being collected for recycle. Mobile recycling collection units were initially set up in Sopchoppy and Shell Point, and are now being used at county events three mobile units are available, courtesy of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. The committee included representatives from schools and the jail, and additional measures were added to existing efforts for recycling cardboard and large steel cans. The committee supported the proposal to bring Waste Pro to the county by presentations to the BOCC. All county parks have been set up with additional containers to collect recyclables, and better signs. Several articles were submitted and printed in The Wakulla News to report on and encourage recycling efforts in the County. The county is partnering with the UF/UFIS Extension Of ce and KWCB to educate citizens and promote recycling at local events and possibly within the schools. A yer is currently available that lists items that can be placed in the home recycling bins. Additionally, small businesses and citizens can drop off recycling at Public Works, 340 Trice Lane, or at the extension of ce at 84 Cedar Avenue, or at Waste Pro, 159 County Landfill Road, on Fridays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., or Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Watch for more articles in The Wakulla News, as we work to create public awareness and encourage all of our citizens to recycle. We will soon be including statistics showing how much more the county is recycling since Waste Pro placed recycle bins at each home and other collection sites. Its phenomenal how much more the citizens of our county are recycling! Keep up the good work and help KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL!Pamela Joy was chair of the countys Recycle Task Force.Editor, The News: The spate of Lynn Artz-bashing hosted by your opinion page can only be evaluated through some knowledge of 21st Century Wakulla County history. Ms. Artz got her initiation on the last day of August 2004 in her rst run for the Commission. Readers who were here will recall how, at the close of that primary election day, the results were totaled and announced, save one precinct. And then somewhere near 9 p.m. night fell on Ms. Artzs 128-vote margin, and her defeat by 3 votes went into the books. Now holding a seat, Ms. Artz shows no desire to help the powerful further consolidate their power (were that possible), nor to gather any to herself. She seems only to wish to help the county by her studious ways and independent assessments. Those interests who can with impunity do things like appropriating public property in the county for partisan electioneering, and who are blessed with such luck in last-precinct cliffhangers, do not like Ms. Artz now any more than when she rst ran. Thus I think we all understand that every day for her can become Aug. 31, 2004. But I still say, You go, Lynn. Oh, and lest a newcomer wonder, the wake of the 2004 business did feature one arrest Ms. Artz. David Roddenberry SopchoppyArtz is studious and independentEditor, The News: On behalf of the Leon County Humane Society, Nancy Gabrielson and myself, I wish to thank everyone who helped with this years Friends Furr Life Pet Food Drive, Crawfordville Animal Hospital and Ashley Feed Store for being the donation drop sites. To all of the pastors who announced this event at their churches. And especially to the family that gave over $100 in pet food at the Crawfordville drop site, God bless you. (You know who you are.) This year was another great success, serving many of the seniors in our county. Kathryn Wilson Crawfordville Editor, The News: The community center (then called the recreation center) began its struggle to be eight to 10 years ago. It started with plans for a swimming pool with site proposals near Wakulla High School, the playing eld at the former Crawfordville Elementary School and other locations. No agreement could be reached on the site. When the new Crawfordville Elementary School was built, I suggested to the Wakulla County Commission that the old Crawfordville School would be an ideal site. There you have a gym, cafeteria, auditorium and a large playing eld. To me, this sounded too good to be true. Two school board members seemed to like the idea, by Superintendent David Miller told me and one commissioner that this was school property and wold not be used for other purposes. When I brought up Sopchoppy using the old school for community activities, I was told that was a different situation. After the election four years ago, a new commissioner told me that the area near the county maintenance facility on Trice Lane was the current site choice. No interest was expressed in the old Crawfordville School, although this person favored creating a true town center for Crawfordville. Later, the county purchased the two church buildings at the corner of Trice Lane and Upper Bridge Road for the community center. In my view, both buildings are unsuited for medium to large gathers with their small, cut-up rooms. Building a minimal gym for $390,000 may be a pipe dream. Minimal lighting makes no sense if future upgrades are in the plan. The former Crawfordville Elementary School educated most of our county of cials for years. The alumni are a prideful bunch. Among that group is Superintendent Miller, who has developed one of the premier school systems in the state. Some would expect that he would be a cooperative part of the community center movement. The school system gets 58 cents of every county tax dollar, plus funds from the state. They had enough surplus money to do an expensive renovation of the old school. How expensive few know. The county commission meetings are sold out, but few bother to attend school board meetings. Perhaps the newly appointed group to study the community center could explore working out a 99year lease to use the school auditorium, gymnasium, cafeteria sections and some of the portable buildings. After all, we the taxpayers are the owners of all county property and our votes select the managers. Royce Jackson Crawfordville Editor, The News: Each Thursday I look forward to receiving my weekly edition of The Wakulla News. However, there was an article in last weeks edition that caused me to pause and actually to question the reasoning of the paper. In the March 8 Green Scene, page 3B, there was an article entitled What caused the solar company Solyndra to fail? Being a citizen who is fiscally conservative and very concerned about the overbearing debt our country is rapidly accumulating, I have been following with interest the numerous failures resulting from the way our national government has invested billions of dollars of taxpayers money. Solyndra was a big failure totaling over one half billion dollars of the peoples money. Unfortunately there is much evidence to indicate that the very politicians and government employees who made the $535 million dollar loan understood that the company was not a good investment even before they gave the loan. Today there are congressional investigations being conducted that are trying to answer such questions as why was the original loan made in spite of analysts warnings that it was not a good investment and whether a 2011 agreement was legal between George Kaiser, a venture capitalist and presidential campaign donor, and the Department of Energy. This agreement ensured that Mr. Kaiser would be repaid $75 million while taxpayers, to date, have not had their investment returned. My concern with the question asked by Walt Bottone from somewhere in New Jersey and who, when Googled, is identi ed as a maker of solar components and then answered by an environmental magazine writer is twofold: First, do these two people have a bias and what is there business experience? A more important question in my mind is why was $535 million taxpayer dollars used in the rst place to fund a company that was destined to fail? Development of alternative energy sources should be encouraged but as even the unidenti ed EarthTalk reporter indicates, the dollar cost will continue to be extremely expensive. Is it right to do it on the back of the American taxpayer? Cynthia Webster CrawfordvilleRecycle Task Force ends, recycling e orts will continueArticle on Solyndra was questionable Support of Friends Furr Life appreciated School was ideal as community center ank you, poll workers, for what you doEditor, The News: Wakulla County Elections along with the Florida Senate and the State of Florida would like to thank all Election Team Members (poll workers) for their outstanding service and dedication to the elections process. These citizens are important parts of the election process and are commended for their service. Thanks for all you do. Buddy Wells Wakulla Supervisor of Elections Florida Senate Resolution A resolution commending those who serve as election day of cials at polling places throughout Florida for their outstanding service and dedication. Whereas freedom is best maintained and nurtured through the democratic process, which requires fair and open elections that accurately re ect the intent of the electorate, and Whereas the supervisors of elections have long relied upon election ay of cials to assist them in administering elections, and Whereas those seeking to become election of cials are extraordinarily committed in attending training sessions to learn policies, procedures and responsibilities to ensure that voting is administered in a fair, nondiscriminatory and transparent manner, and Whereas election day of cials are responsible for administering all activities at polling places in Florida, and have remained willing, positive, and innovative throughout the many changes in election procedures, policies and voting equipment, and Whereas election day officials have served as ambassadors of the supervisors of elections and have contributed to the high level of integrity in the election process in Florida, Now Therefore, Be it resolved by the Senate of the State of Florida: That the Senate commends those who serve as election day of cials at polling places throughout Florida for their outstanding service and dedication.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 Page 5A Make A Difference Day is March 24VolunteerWAKULLA is holding its fth annual Make A Difference Day on Saturday, March 24, at Hudson Park. This years event will be different for previous years: a community picnic for the citizens of Wakulla County will be held, and many of the organizations in the County will be setting up booths to make people aware of services available, as well as opportunities to volunteer in the county. At this time, there are more than 25 organizations signed up. There will be a free lunch for all, entertainment and door prizes. Deadline to RSVP for Chamber luncheon is March 26The Wakulla Chamber will hold its March Networking Luncheon at the UF/ IFAS Extension office, catered by Hamaknockers Restaurant on Wednesday, March 28. The cost is $12 per person and lunch will be served buffet style. The deadline for reservations is Monday, March 26. Easter Egg Hunt coming up on March 31The Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department will holds its annual Easter Egg Hunt on March 31 at Hudson Park with registration from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., and the hunt beginning at 11 a.m. Age groups are birth to 3 years old, 4-6 years old and 7-10 years old. A drawing from each age group will win an Easter basket. Also attending will be Wakulla ROTC, Wakulla EMS, Wakulla Fire & Rescue, Smokey Bear,Capital City Bank Star, McDonalds character, McGruff the Crime Dog, the Sonic character. There will also be a moonwalker. Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment of Wakulla will have an adopt-a-pet booth at the park. CHAT is asking for donations of pet items, including towels, treats and pet toys. For more information, go the website www.wcprd.com or call (850 926-7227. Lifewalk set for March 31 at Wakulla SpringsWakulla Pregnancy Center is having its 6th Annual LIFEWALK Sat. March 31 at Wakulla Springs State Park. There will be balloons and face painting for the kids, baked goods, a silent auction and entertainment from local youth groups. Marcia McNaney from the Pregnancy and Family Resource Alliance will share whats going on with legislation. It will be a great time, so join us March 31 as we walk for life. TCC to hold job fair in Tallahassee on April 4On Wednesday, April 4, the TCC Career Center is hosting its Spring Job Fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Union Ballroom. The event is an opportunity for job-seekers to stand out in the pool of applicants and will connect students with representatives from local businesses looking to ll part-time, full-time and seasonal positions, as well as internships. Job-seekers are encouraged to dress in professional attire in order to make a good rst-impression with potential employers and have copies of their resume available. Employers looking to meet many candidates face-to-face in a short amount of time should attend. Employer registration and details are available online at tcc-csm. symplicity.com/events or by calling (850) 201-9970. Space is limited. The TCC Career Center, located on the second oor of the Student Union, offers a variety of services related to career planning, preparation and placement, including professional development workshops, internships and resume/cover letter assistance. Jam 4 Camp is scheduled for April 28Wakulla County 4-H will present the second Annual Jam 4 Camp Fundraiser at Hudson Park on Saturday, April 28, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. This event is free to vendors and bands who wish to participate. This event is open to the public and raises money for 4-H camp scholarships for Wakulla County youth by collecting donations from Sponsors, band votes, vendor contributions, T-shirt sales and a silent auction. The ve bands participating will play at one hour intervals and collect votes in the form of dollars raised. Youth and their parents are also invited to sign up for all 4-H Camps this day. Camps will ll up fast and spaces are limited, so it is best to arrive early and stay and enjoy the day. For more information, please contact Sherri Kraeft at 926-3931. More information can also be found at the website wakulla.ifas.u .edu/4-h. Staff ReportsBriefsLighthouse challenge comes to the Florida Panhandle WILLIAM SNOWDENJAWS OF LIFE IN ACTION: Wakulla County re ghters gave a demonstration of extrication techniques at the St. Patricks Day Festival, showing the crowd how they cut into a car to rescue the occupants in a wreck. The car was donated by Wakulla Towing.Special to The NewsThe Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge, to be held on Saturday, April 21 and Sunday, April 22, will celebrate the ve lighthouses in Northwest Florida Cape St. George Light, Crooked River Lighthouse, St. Marks Lighthouse, Cape San Blas Lighthouse and Pensacola Lighthouse. The Lighthouse Challenge will bring lighthouse enthusiasts from all over the country to meet the challenge of visiting the ve historic lighthouses. For the price of a Challenge ticket, participants will be able to climb a total of more than 500 steps into the maritime history of the Florida Panhandle. Climb 131 stairs to the top of the Cape San Blas Lighthouse and take in panoramic views of the Gulf of Mexico and St. Joe Bay. Make the trek up 92 wooden stairs and an eightrung ladder into the lantern room of the Cape St. George Light, for spectacular views of the Gulf and the bridge to the island over beautiful Apalachicola Bay. Climb 138 stairs up the Crooked River Lighthouse in Carrabelle to the open-air gallery offering breath-taking vistas of the wooded area around the lighthouse and the Gulf beyond. The St. Marks Lighthouse, which reaches 82 feet over Apalachee Bay, will not be open for climbing, but Challenge participants will be able to enter the base of the lighthouse and visit the Keepers House. New to the Lighthouse Challenge in 2012 is the Pensacola Lighthouse. For a real challenge, climb 177 stairs to the top of the distinctive black and white tower to see the magnificent first order Fresnel lens and views of Pensacola Bay and the Naval Air Station. The Florida Panhandle Lighthouse Challenge, timed to commemorate Florida Lighthouse Day on April 21, is intended to raise awareness about northwest Floridas lighthouses and encourage support for the efforts to preserve these historic structures. Visitors to the ve lighthouses during the two-day event will receive a complimentary commemorative souvenir at each lighthouse, with a sixth souvenir and a Florida Lighthouse Association Completion Certi cate awarded to participants who visit all ve. Tickets will be priced at $10 per person, and you must be at least 44 inches tall to participate. Each admission includes one commemorative tote bag (while supplies last) and one raf e ticket, and entitles participants to visit the ve lighthouses at no charge. Hours for the Challenge are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. both Saturday and Sunday. There is an additional entry fee at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. WANTEDHELP ROUND-UP THE FOLLOWING NOTORIOUS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTES REWARD San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWere Here to Share the Journey... William Bill Blount Jonnie Davis McKenzie William E. Bill Mills Jr. Dorothy Harrell Robertson Deborah Atkins Sanders Mary Frances Whaley WigginsChurch briefsRevival set at Greater Mount Trial Jonnie Davis McKenzieJonnie Davis McKenzie, 90, of Tallahassee, passed away on Thursday, March 15. She was born in Panacea, on Aug. 28, 1921, to John Green Davis and Mary Dea Robison Davis Rudd. She grew up in and around Sopchoppy and graduated from Sopchoppy High School in 1941. She married Ruben Oreal on Aug. 2, 1941. She won her wings as an airplane spotter during World War II. She worked for 13 years at the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles before retiring in 1983. She lived to garden and gardened to live even up to just two years before her death. She loved to go shing with her family in tow on the banks and in the waters of the Sopchoppy, Wacissa and Aucilla rivers, as well as on the St. George bridge and on the island. Many were the weekends spent in canoes on the Wakulla and St. Marks rivers. Jonnie enjoyed teaching her grandchildren how to have fun as well as how to really enjoy life. She was an avid reader and crossword puzzle solver. She always tried to learn and experience as much as possible before she lost her eyesight. She loved to create beautiful beadwork and had myriad interests and skills. She often said, had she not been blind, shed have been out on the highway traveling. She loved cooking for her family and cooked enough to feed the entire neighborhood. She was a member of Heritage Assembly of God Church. Graveside services were held Monday, March 19, at 11 a.m. at Grimes Cemetery (in the 800 block of Oak Park Road) in Sopchoppy. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be made to the charity of your choice or the Building Fund at Heritage Assembly of God Church, 298 Crossway Road, Tallahassee FL 32305. Survivors include her loving sons, Michael Butch McKenzie and Timothy Tree (Jesse) McKenzie; daughters, Angie (Ray) Mote, Kathleen (Paul) Connell, Sherry L. Houser and Tina Jarvis; six grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren; sisters, Nolie Maxie and Pearl Harper; sister-in-law, Ethel McCoy; and numerous nieces, nephews and lifelong friends. The family would like to extend their heartfelt thanks to the staff at Big Bend Hospice for their support and compassion for Jonnie and the entire family. She was predeceased by her parents; her husband, Ruben Oreal McKenzie; son, Dennis Oreal McKenzie; granddaughter, Daphne Godwin; grandson, Benjamin David Houser; daughter-inlaw, Linda H. McKenzie; and son-in-law, Ray D. Jarvis. Beggs Funeral Homes Inc, 3322 Apalachee Parkway in Tallahassee, 942-2929, was handling funeral arrangements. William Bill Blount William Bill Blount, 53, of Tallahassee, went to be with the Lord on Friday, March 16, at The Big Bend Hospice House in Tallahassee. He was born in Tallahassee on Jan. 5, 1959, to Ethel M. McCoy and Malcolm Blount. He served as an E4 in the U.S. Army and was Honorably Discharged in the 1970s. He enjoyed riding motorcycles. Survivors include his loving mother, Ethel M. McCoy; father, Malcolm Blount; daughter, Nicole M. Blount; and granddaughter, Alyssa B. Seiter; and numerous other relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his stepfather, Clarence J. McCoy. The family would like to extend their heartfelt thanks to the staff at Big Bend Hospice for their support and compassion for Bill and his family. The family requests memorial donations be made in Bills name to Big Bend Hospice at 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee FL 32308. Dorothy Harrell RobertsonDorothy Harrell Robertson, 73, of Crawfordville, passed away on Thursday, March 15, at Capital Regional Medical Center, Tallahassee. Memorial services were held on Sunday, March 18, at the graveside in Greenwood Cemetery, Cairo, Ga. The Rev. Ronald Barrett of- ciated. The family received friends at the funeral home on Saturday, March 17. She was born on July 24, 1938, in Cairo, Ga., to the late Dan E. and Thelma A. Pyles Harrell. She retired as a District Engineering Secretary for Centel of Florida. She was an accomplished pianist and contributed her talents to various Christian venues. She was a member of the Anglican Church of Medart. Survivors include her former husband, Floyd D. Robertson of Sopchoppy; son and daughter-in-law, David B. and Belinda Robertson of Crawfordville; daughter, Linda K. Harris of Tallahassee; grandchildren, Kelli M. Keech (Stacey) of Tallahassee and Amy M. Weeks of Crawfordville. Guests may sign the online register at www.clarkfuneral.com. Come hear this powerful man of God, Pastor Joseph L. Brown of Neighborhood Evangelistic Ministries in Panama City, as he breaks the bread of life with us at Greater Mount Trial Primitive Church in Sopchoppy. The revival will be held March 21, 22 and 23 at the church located at 1418 Sopchoppy Highway. For more information, call the church at (850) 9622534. Bene t to be held at MacedoniaMacedonia Church of Christ will host a benefit program for Flossie Denmark on Sat-urday, March 24 at 7 p.m. The public is invited.More obituaries appear on Page 7AMary Frances Whaley WigginsMary Frances Whaley Wiggins, 87, died on March 12, at St. Raphaels Hospital in New Haven, Conn. She was born Nov. 4, 1924, to Taylor Whaley and Dorothy Sellers Whaley in Wakulla County, and attended Sopchoppy High School where she was a cheerleader, played basketball and acted in school plays. On Feb. 21, 1943, she married Marvin Lee Wiggins, who preceded her in death. During World War II, she was a civilian employee at the Naval Air Station Miami repairing spark plugs for Naval aircraft. There she developed a more ef- cient refurbishing process that was adopted by the entire facility. She was a bookkeeper and the of ce manager for the family business, Wiggins Construction Company, based in Albany, Ga. A lifelong Baptist, she was a charter member of Sunnyside Baptist Church in Albany where she served as church treasurer, taught Sunday School and was active in the Womans Missionary Union. After retirement she was a member of the First Baptist Church of Sopchoppy and Lake Ellen Baptist Church of Medart. She was also a disaster relief volunteer with Campers on Mission. She enjoyed traveling throughout the United States, and was active in the Good Sam Club. Funeral services were held at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church on Monday, March 19 at 3 p.m., followed by burial at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. The family received friends at the church before the service, beginning at 1:30 p.m. Memorial contributions may be made to the West Sopchoppy Cemetery Committee, P.O. Box 37, Sopchoppy FL, 32358, or to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee FL, 32308. Survivors include her three sons and daughters-inlaw, Dyrall Wiggins and Laura Coker Wiggins of Warner Robins, Ga., David Wiggins and Carol Inlow Wiggins of Albany, and Timothy Lee Wiggins and Angela Shelley Wiggins of North Haven, Conn. She also is survived by grandchildren, Jacob Wiggins and Melissa Hat- eld Wiggins of Byron, Ga., Kathleen Wiggins Fowler and Brad Fowler of Kathleen, Ga., Andrew Wiggins of Gainesville, Sarah Wiggins Bailey and Bo Bailey of Macon, Ga., Jeff Wiggins and Kristi Kavanaugh Wiggins of Dawson, Ga., and Colby Wiggins and Carmen Hall Wiggins of Leesburg, Ga. She also is survived by nine great-grandchildren, Colby Fowler, Chance Fowler, Iron Wiggins, Legend Wiggins, Lydia Wiggins, Mason Wiggins, Elizabeth Doyle, Madison Doyle and Chloe Wiggins; and by many devoted nieces and nephews, and numerous cousins. She was preceded in death by sisters, Cornelia Whaley Harden and Nursie Whaley; and by brothers, T.D. Whaley, Henry K. Whaley, Doris Whaley, Albert Whaley, Evans Whaley, William Whaley and Frank Whaley. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is in charge of arrangements.

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William E. Bill Mills Jr.William E. Bill Mills Jr., 78, of Sandy Springs, Ga., and Wakulla County, died peacefully on March 15 after a two year battle with ALS. He was born in Geneva, Ala., the son of William Earl Mills Sr. and Flora Clark, and was raised near Panama City. After graduating from Bay County High School, he served in the U.S. Air Force 93rd Bombardment Wing as a hydraulic engineer on some of the very rst B-52 bombers. He then attended Florida State University where he earned a business degree in advertising. It was at FSU where he met his beloved wife, Eloise Baumer. While at FSU, Bill was a member of the Flying High Circus, and he and Eloise were lifelong supporters of their alma mater. The family later established a needs-based scholarship in their name for FSU communications students, which continues to help students pursue their educational goals today. In 2010, Bill and Eloise were formally recognized as Distinguished Alumni by the university for their post-graduate achievements. Bill moved to Atlanta in 1958, where he began his advertising and marketing career with the Retail Credit Corp. (now Equifax) and ultimately served as the companys director of advertising. He then served as vice president of marketing for the John H. Harland Company, as well as advertising manager for Citizens & Southern National Bank, partner in Sibley, Sheehan & Mills Public Relations and as copywriter for Liller, Neal, Battle and Lindsey. A sought-after expert on marketing, Bill was published numerous times in industry publications and lectured regularly on the profession. In 1977, Bill and Eloise founded the William Mills Agency, the nations largest public relations and marketing rm serving the nancial services industry. Under their direction and later, their sons, William and Scott, the agency has ourished to become one of Atlantas largest public relations firms, and was formally recognized by Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin on the occasion of its 30th anniversary. Bill was also a committed member of his church, Second-Ponce de Leon Baptist Church in Atlanta, where he was a former president of the EEE Sunday School class. He played active leadership roles in several civic organizations, including Kiwanis, the Atlanta Farmers Club and was a member of the Wakulla County Mens Club, where he furthered his reputation as a raconteur of the highest order. He was also a perennial xture in the annual Peachtree Road Race and completed the worlds largest 10K race 35 times. The visitation was held on Sunday, March 18, at H.M. Patterson and Son, Arlington Chapel, 173 Allen Road NE, in Sandy Springs, Ga. After a private family interment at Georgia National Cemetery, a public memorial service was held on Monday, March 19, at the Chapel of Second-Ponce de Leon Baptist Church at 2715 Peachtree Road NE in Atlanta. Immediately following, family and friends were invited to Bill and Eloises home for a celebration of Bills life. A memorial service will be held in Florida at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the Bill & Eloise Mills Scholarship at Florida State Universitys College of Communication & Information at https://one.fsu. edu/community/SSLPage. aspx?pid=809, select from the drop down menu Designate a Fund and enter Bill & Eloise Mills #1753 or mailed to FSU Foundation Fund #1753, PO Box 3062739, 2010 Levy Avenue, Tallahassee FL 32301-2739. Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Eloise B. Mills; sons, William Earl Mills III and his wife Alecia P. Mills, and Martin Scott Mills and his wife Kim H. Mills; granddaughters, Ryan Denea Parris Mills and Kristin Taylor Parris Mills; grandson, Van Tyler Mills; great-granddaughter, Ashton Taylor Parris Crawford; sister, Joan Sears of Ft. Lauderdale; and brothers, Galen McEachin of Panama City, Richard McEachin (Susan) of Freeport, Michael McEachin (Mary) of Panama City and Joel McEachin (Debra) of Jacksonville; in addition to countless other family and friends that he touched deeply through the example of his rich life. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 Page 7AhappeningsCommunity ObituariesContinued from Page 6ADeborah Atkins SandersDeborah Atkins Sanders, 47, passed away on Sunday, March 18. She was born Oct. 28, 1964. Visitation was held Tuesday, March 20, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Wednesday, March 21, at 4 p.m. at Alga Sanders Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL 32308. Survivors include her husband, Sam Jack Sanders of Sopchoppy, and her parrot, Sidney; her father and mother, Charles and Bobbie Sue Atkins of Havana; one brother, Charles Nathan Akins (Danni); and two nieces, Rebecca and Elizabeth of Tallahassee; two step-daughters, Melissa Lopez and Crystal Sanders; seven step-grandchildren, Alejandre, Angelica, Samantha, Chelsea, Aldaberto, Adrian and Ana, all of Bristol; her grandmother, Violet Jackson; uncles, Steve Jackson (Debbie), Gary Atkins (Sandy) of New York and Alga Sanders (Tammy) of Sopchoppy; aunts, Seena Barley and Kathe Broyles (Aldon) all of Tennessee; and nephew, Tommy Sanders and niece, Kathy Sanders both of Sopchoppy; as well as a host of other cousins and friends. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, FL is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Happy rst birthdayAvery G. LewisAvery Grace Lewis will celebrate her rst birthday on April 3. She is the daughter of Heather and Michael Lewis of Tallahassee. Her maternal grandparents are Denise Dilmore of Tallahassee and Scott Smith. Her paternal grandparents are Pam and Kenny Lewis of Tallahassee. Her maternal greatgrandparents are Edna and Buddy Dilmore of Tallahassee. Her paternal greatgrandparents are Ruth and Cecil Roddenberry of Tallahassee. Avery G. Lewis, at right. Brayden M. BrittBrayden Michael Britt will celebrate his first birthday on March 26. He is the son of Michelle Boccumini and Michael Britt of Wakulla County. His maternal grandparents are Joyce Boccumini, Dean Boccumini and Paul Smith of Wakulla County. His paternal grandparents are Gail Kent and Danny Watkins of Leon and Shane Britt of Lakeland. Brayden M. Britt, at right. Birth announcementsDanny and Frederika Freddy Kelly of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Bailey Preston Kelly, on Jan. 18 at 3:06 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 8 pounds, 10 ounces and was 20 inches long. His paternal grandparents are Conway and Michelle Kelly of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are Gary and Dawna Schlickelman of Odessa, Mo., and the late Antje Schlickelman. His paternal great-grandparents are Thomas and Sarah Kelly of Havana, Jim and Joan Schooley of Ocala, the late Michael DiGiacomo. His maternal great-grandparents are the late Fred and Lorna Schlickelman of Odessa, Mo., and the late Er nst and Analiese Wilrodt of Hamburg, Germany. Christopher and Shannon Core of Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughter, Rhian Savannah Core, on March 8 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She weighed 6 pounds, 11 ounces and was 19 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Lora and Geary Boston of Crawfordville. Her paternal grandparents are Shirley Core of Sopchoppy and the late Tommy Core. She as a brother, Dalton, 8, and two sisters, Gracie, 6, and Makayla, 4.Rhian S. Core Bailey P. Kelly FRONT PORCH CREATIONS FLORIST 850926-7192850926-7192 House SPECIAL Eve ry FRIDAY MUG BO UQUE T www.FrontPorchCreationsFlowers.com $12 99 Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. PREPAID MONTHLY PLANS Modern Communicationsnationwide pre-paid cellular pagep l us U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT$4000 PERMO.DATACHARGESMAYAPPLY ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Promise began traveling on July 3, 2011, and has been busy ever since. Within a few months they released their debut project, self titled Promise, and quickly established themselves as an upcoming trio worth keeping an eye on. 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Hank Forbes Jr. Licensed Funeral Director/Owner Dana Forbes Hawke Forbes 1171 South 6th Street Macclenny, Florida 32063Ph: 850-559-3380 904-259-4600Forbes Funeral Home Submit your Special Event and we will include it in The Wakulla News Week in WakullaContact: jjensen@thewakullanews.net(850) 926-7102fax (850) 926-3815

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolMohr named outstanding educatorSpecial to The NewsProject Learning Tree (PLT), the environmental education program of the American Forest Foundation, announces that Brooke Mohr, a teacher at Medart Elementary School in Crawfordville, was named one of five 2012 National PLT Outstanding Educators. Mohr will be honored at PLTs 26th International Coordinators Conference, in Deadwood, S.D., May 14-17. Every year PLT provides more than 30,000 educators with the tools and on-theground training they need to incorporate environmental education and service-learning into their curriculum. PLT activities use trees and forests as windows on the world to help teachers strengthen their teaching of core subjects, take their students outdoors to learn, and grow stewardship in the next generation. PLTs Outstanding Educators are selected for their commitment to environmental education, their exemplary use of PLT, and their exceptional teaching skills. Mohr has taught for more than 25 years in almost every elementary grade, as well as gifted instruction and early intervention for at-risk students. For the past 12 years, she has used PLTs environmental education activities in her classroom to teach science, reading, math, and other core subjects to all types of students. Mohr was introduced to PLT while teaching at Shadeville Elementary School. She moved to Medart Elementary in 2004 and led training workshops to enroll the school in the Florida PLT Schools program which helps individual schools establish an ongoing commitment to environmental education through regular use of PLT activities. She then worked with the Wakulla School District to train teachers at two more elementary schools that resulted in Wakulla County becoming the first county in Florida to have all of its elementary schools designated as Florida PLT Schools, and the majority of its youth exploring and learning outdoors through PLT. Mohr coordinates an annual school-wide PLT Week during which each class participates in various activities surrounding a central theme. Mohr forges partnerships with agencies and local organizations, and she invites parents and guest speakers to help make students aware of their community and surrounding environment, and their role as stewards of it. By teaching our students to care about the environment, we can make positive changes for our future, says Mohr. If children are aware of the environment, the natural resources it provides, and what it needs to remain healthy, theyll begin to understand their responsibility for it. Robin Will, ranger at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, who works with Mohr on many PLT activities, noted, Mrs. Mohr exempli- es an outstanding educator with her dedication, creativity, student and partner engagement plans, and commitment to caring for the environment. Mohr shares her experiences about the effectiveness of PLT on student learning with other educators across the state. Mohr became a National Board Certi ed Teacher in 2006, is a member of the Florida PLT Steering Committee, and was named Florida PLT Educator of the Year in 2011. Mohr is invited to participate in the World Forestry Centers International Educators Institute, July 8-14, in Portland, Oregon.Payne helps children master basic skillsSpecial to The NewsShelia Ann Payne has been working in the Early Childhood Education eld for over 16 years. She has been involved in the growth and development of children from 6 weeks old to 5 years old. Currently she is employed by Wakulla Christian School as the director of the schools VPK program and the lead 4K teacher. When she works with young children she is helping them develop socially, emotionally and physically. There are several programs and styles of teaching which help children develop and master these basic skills. In her class, Payne teaches from the A Beka curriculum. This curriculum incorporates God into every subject. It emphasizes beautiful penmanship, basic arithmetic and the importance of phonics. Payne said she believes a child who can read at an early age will have a head start in life. By the end of each school year, her class is able to write words and their names in cursive, as well as read simple sentences. This prepares each child to begin elementary school the following year. Payne said she feels blessed to be a part of the education eld, as well as a crucial part of each childs life and developmental journey. She knows she is making a difference in the community. Wakulla Christian School is an accredited, private Christian school offering 3K through 7th grade. For further information, contact the school of ce at (850) 926-5583.Special to The NewsMarch Teachers of the Month are Crawfordville Elementary Schools Miranda Bowen and Riversprings Middle Schools Jennifer Thaxton. The Employee of the Month is Wakulla Education Pre-K CDA Rene Lawhon. Miranda Bowen, Marchs Teacher of the Month, has been teaching at Crawfordville Elementary School since August 2004. Bowen graduated from Wakulla High School, Flagler College with her bachelors degree and Florida State University with her masters degree. Bowen had the opportunity of serving as a teacher intern at Crawfordville Elementary. Prior to teaching, she worked as clerk for the Florida Department of Agriculture. Bowen said, I have always been impressed by the professionalism exhibited by the educators in the Wakulla County School District and when a position became available at Crawfordville Elementary School, I applied and got the job. Bowen enjoys getting to know her students and walking along with them as they dive into learning. She adds, Every student comes in at a different place in their educational journey and helping them to make that journey the most exciting and rewarding voyage possible is the most incredible feeling imaginable. Bowen is also the School Advisory Council chair. She also serves as a member on committees such as school safety, professional behavior system, reading literacy and Brogan Education partner. Crawfordville Elementary School Principal Angela Walker adds, It is an honor and privilege to work with a teacher with such dedication, sel ess devotion to the profession and such an impeccable work ethic. Mrs. Bowen is one of the rst teachers to arrive each morning and one of the last to leave each day. She helps her colleagues by nding materials, locating web-sites, connecting to classroom mimio boards, correcting problems with a projector or wanting more knowledge about trainings or teaching approaches. Her classroom is engaging, challenging, full of technology, interactive, orderly and exciting. Mrs. Bowens contribution to our schools success is above and beyond what is expected and certainly what is required. I am fortunate to work with her at our school each day. Jennifer Thaxton, Riversprings Middle Schools Media Specialist, is a RMS Bear charter member, as she was part of the team that opened the school in August 2000. She has dedicated 14 years of service to the district. As the media specialist Thaxton gets to know all of the students in the school. She notes, I love it when the students run into the library because they absolutely must have the next book in the series. I enjoy watching the students as they grow and mature from 6th graders to 8th graders. I also work with an amazing faculty and enjoy collaborating with my peers. RMS Principal Dod Walker shares, Mrs. Thaxton is a true leader at Riversprings. She taught 8th grade for several years and moved into the media specialist position in 2008. This move allowed her to ourish as a leader, impacting all students and faculty at RMS. It is only tting that the Media Center be located at the center of campus because she is a large part of the heart and soul of Riversprings. I am proud and honored to work with her. She also serves as a mentor teacher trainer, alternative certi cation mentor and assessor, assistant school level test coordinator and school newspaper sponsor. Rene Lawhon, Wakulla Educational Centers Pre-K CDA, has dedicated more than 22 years to the youngest students in Wakulla County. She began her career with the District by serving in the WEC daycare and as the Readimobile teacher. In August 2003 she transferred into a CDA position at Pre-K. Wakulla Education Center Pre-K Principal applauds Mrs. Lawhons accomplishments. She shares, Ms. Rene continues to leave a lasting impression on the lives of students. She shared examples of students running up to Ms. Rene shouting, Miss Rene, Miss Rene, do you remember me? I was in your class. Do you remember when you took us bowling and on a eld trip skating? Lawhon states, I love the pre-k children because they still love you back. They have a sparkle in their eye every day and sincere excitement when we cook green eggs or have worm races. We are giving them experiences they will never forget. When I leave school each day I am blessed by more little fellows waiting on me around the house. At least one or all of my sons or grandsons will be there when I get home with something exciting to tell me. My life may seem simple to some, but I love my students at school, my husband and my wonderful family. Lawhon also serves on the WEC PRE-K PTA, Special Olympics and Family Fun Day Committees and as the Pre-K Volunteer Coordinator.By CADET ENSIGN AZZARITO Public Affairs Of cerEach year, the Wakulla High School NJROTC unit hosts a golf tournament to support the cadets in all the activities they do in the unit and also for the community. This year, the golf tournament will be Monday, April 2. The tournament will be a shot gun start and begin at 8 a.m. The golf tournament will be at the Wildwood Golf Course in Crawfordville, located near the high school. Entry fees are $75 dollars for individuals (50 is tax deductible) and $300 for a team of four. All proceeds go to the NJROTC unit, offering every cadet an equal opportunity regardless of economic status, to participate fully in all unit activities, such as orientation trips to military bases, eld meet competitions and traditionrich social events. These activities help the cadets to further develop the friendships they have with other cadets in the unit and to further instill unit camaraderie among all. So come out on April 2 and help support the Wakulla NJROTC War Eagle Navy. NJROTC golf tournament is April 2 Miranda Bowen Jennifer Thaxton Rene LawhonTeachers and employee of the month Enroll Now forALGEBRA 1:END OF COURSE EXAM PREPGrades 8 & 9 FCAT MATH PREP Grade 8 FCAT ENGLISH & READING PREP For Grades 8, 9, 10 AP LANG EXAM REVIEWONE-ON-ONE INSTRUCTION OR SMALL GROUPS AVAILABLE. CLASSES BEGIN THE WEEK AFTER SPRING BREAK AND MEET TWICE PER WEEK (1 HOUR EACH CLASS) UNTIL THE RESPECTIVE EXAM.Call Melisa Taylor to register today. 3119B Crawfordville Hwy850-926-2179 MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012 M a n a t e e T i m e s Adversing Networks of Florida Statewide advertisingone low price Reach a wide audience (866)742-1373 Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? 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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles were down by six runs at one point on Monday, March 19, to the Robert F. Munroe Bobcats, but rallied back in the bottom of the sixth to tie it at 9-9. But in the seventh inning, Munroe benefited on a couple of past balls to advance runners and added on three runs. It looked like Wakulla could pull off another rally in the bottom of the inning but the effort fell short and the War Eagles went down 12-9 to go 6-6 on the year. Munroe is a non-conference opponent. The War Eagles have done well so far against conference opponents, defeating Suwannee 3-2 back on March 13, and walloping Rickards a week earlier by a score of 13-3 The score was 9-5 in the bottom of the sixth when the War Eagles started a rally with a couple of base hits to get runners on rst and second. A past ball loaded the bases with nobody out. Munroe made a pitching change, and a wild pitch allowed a run to score from third. DeQuan Simmons hit a double down the rst base line that scored two runs. The Munroe left elder made a diving catch to take away a hit from Bailey Metcalf. Jake Walker had a solid hit, but was out at rst, but moved Simmons to third with two outs. Dalton Norman brought Simmons home with a bouncing ground ball that tied the game. In the top of the seventh, the War Eagles couldnt put away the Bobcats. The rst out was a long fly to the wall, the next batter walked, then stole second on a 2-1 pitch. There was another walk, then a wild pitch that moved those runners to second and third. Dillon Norman made a great play at third to throw the runner out at home, but the Bobcats bene ted with some past balls that moved up runners. In the bottom of the inning, the War Eagles couldnt get the rally going. The War Eagles were scheduled to travel to Perry to take on Taylor County on Tuesday, March 20. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Thursday, March 15, the freshmen and sophomore WHS track team members traveled to Tallahassee to compete in the 13th Annual Chiles Freshman-Sophomore Championships. The local team joined 10 other teams from Georgia and the Florida Panhandle in what turned out to be an extremely competitive meet. The WHS ladies team found themselves in a tight battle for the overall title with Bainbridge, Lincoln and Chiles high schools, with the lead changing several times before nally being settled late in the meet. Bainbridge ended up nishing rst, Lincoln second and WHS third. Individually, the girls were led once again by sophomore Madi Harris, who nished the night with wins in both the 1600 and 800 meter runs. Not only did Harris win the 1600 meters, but she did so in outstanding fashion, setting a new meet record and lowering her current school record by covering the distance in 5:22.89, cutting almost 7 seconds off the old meet record and 3 seconds off her school record. This was only the second 1600-meter race she has run. An hour or so later she again stepped on the track for the 800 meters and finished rst in that event, almost 3 seconds ahead of her nearest pursuer. Sophomore Amber Stewart, who has been battling persistent injuries, returned to the 300-meter hurdles for the rst time this season and emerged victorious, winning the event by almost 4 seconds. The girls 4x800 meter relay team of Lydia Wiedeman, Marty Wiedeman, Lili Broadway and Tyler Kinard, also won their event. The strength of the girls team at this meet was centered with middle distance runners and the eld event competitors. Sophomore Taylor Vaughn had a good night in the hurdle events, placing second in the 100 meter hurdles and fourth in the 300 meter hurdles. Others scoring points for the WHS team included; Savanna Strickland (8th, 400), Lydia Wiedeman (3rd, 800), Alexandra Cotes (8th, 800), Marty Wiedeman (3rd, 1600), Kasey James (5th, 1600/4th 3200), Lili Broadway (8th, 1600), Rachel Woofter (8th, 3200), Amber Stewart (8th, long jump), Shelby Alsup (5th, shot put/8th discus) and Ashley Carr (6th, discus). The girls 4x400 meter relay team ended up competiting without Madi Harris, but ran an excellent race and nished in third place. The team members included Marty and Lydia Wiedeman, Savanna Strickland and Lili Broadway. For the boys, freshman Kaedretis Keaton continued his string of excellent performances by jumping 39.50 in the triple jump, winning the event by 3 inches. The 4x800 meter relay team of Aaron Smith, Gabe Hutchins, David Sloan and J.P. Piotroski also had a solid outing, finishing in second place to Lincoln High School. Freshman Logan Hay also had a good night by placing fth in the shot put and sixth in the discus. Others scoring points for the local team included Vonte Er vin (6th, 200 meters/ 6th, long jump), Kaedretis Keaton (8th, 400), Mitchell Atkinson (6th, 800), David Sloan (7th, 800), Nathan Green (8th, 800) and the 4x400 meter relay team (6th, Kaedretis Keaton, Cody Ochat, Vonte Ervin, Andre Henderson). The boys team nished in seventh place. Overall, we have a young team on both the boys and girls side and this meet gave our kids a chance to compete head-to-head with their peers and it was a fun meet, said Coach Paul Hoover. We had 39 athletes entered in the meet and all but one of them showed up, which is rather remarkable considering that their spring break began that day as soon as school was out. Im pretty proud of these kids for showing up and competing like they did. GODBY HOME MEET On Tuesday, March 13, Godby High School in Tallahassee hosted their annual home meet, but the weather had different ideas. Very early in the meet, a lightening storm north of the facility postponed the meet, then resulted in its cancellation. A few of the WHS athletes got to compete before the meet was called off and, in fact, the WHS girls team was tied with Lincoln High School for rst place among the 10 teams attending at that point. The boys team was in eighth place. The WHS girls 4x800 relay team won again with the team made up of Marty Wiedeman, Lydia Wiedeman, Norma Woodcock and Raychel Gray Taylor Vaughn had a good outing in the 100meter hurdles, with a solid third place nish and Loquana Webster nabbed an eighth place nish in the shotput. The boys 4x800 meter relay team of Aaron Smith, Gabe Hutchins, David Sloan and J.P. Piotrowski ran to a eighth place nish and were the only scorers for the team. The next competition for the full team will be at the Chiles Championship Meet on Saturday, March 31. TRACKFreshman-sophomore meet is held at ChilesWILLIAM SNOWDENHunter DeRoss was starting pitcher for the War Eagles, and delivers a strike here.BASEBALLWar Eagles fall to MunroeWAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS:Thursday, March 22 SOFTBALL: Franklin at Wakulla, 7 p.m. WEIGHTLIFTING: District quali er at Maclay, TBA. Tuesday, March 27 BASEBALL: Leon at Wakulla, JV 4 p.m., Varsity 7 p.m. SOFTBALL: Wakulla at Rickards at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 29 WEIGHTLIFTING: Chiles High School at 3 p.m. BASEBALL: Wakulla at FAMU, varsity only, 4 p.m. PLAYERPITCHLEAGUEAGE DETERMINING DATES: April 30th for Player Pitch COST: $45 Per ChildINSURANCE:$10 Per Child or Proof of Health Insurance must be provided. AGES:7 & 8 Division A player must be 7 prior to 4/30/12 and can turn 9 on or after 4/30/12.Player pitch is a league that builds on previous pitching machine league experience. Although not required it is encouraged that players have experienced some type of live pitching. The league will start shortly after the pitching machine regular season. There will be a 4 team minimum requirement for each division to be established.WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT2012 MID SPRING SPORTS REGISTRATION YOUTH SOCCERAGE DETERMINING DATES: September 1st for Soccer COST: $40 Per ChildINSURANCE:$10 Per Child or Proof of Health Insurance must be provided. AGES:04 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 03 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 05 on or after 9/1/12 06 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 05 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 07 on or after 9/1/12 08 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 07 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 09 on or after 9/1/12 10 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 09 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 11 on or after 9/1/12 12 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 11 prior to 9/1/12 and may turn 13 on or after 9/1/12There will be a 4 team minimum requirement for each division to be established.REGISTRATION DATES AND TIMES:Monday 3/26/12 to Friday 3/30/12; 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM Saturday 3/31/12; 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM Monday 4/2/12 to Thursday 4/4/12; 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Thursday, 4/5/12; 6:00 PM (County Ofces will be Closed on Good Friday, 4/6/12)REGISTRATION PLACE: Medart Recreation Park (Off U.S. 98) All players (Player Pitch and Soccer) must provide proof of health insuranceor purchase a policy for an additional $10.00. All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching any of the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. For more information call 926-7227 or visit www.WCPRD.com DArcy Brazier Owner Serving Wakulla & Surrounding Counties for over 35 years60 Holiday Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327 509 FOREIGN CAR REPAIR DOWN HOME TOYOTA HONDA Specializing In Specializing In NISSAN SUBARULic # MV15601www.DownHomeForeignCarRepair.com 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs.

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsCan you believe this weather? So far we havent had the strong March winds that we typically get and the afternoon sea breeze hasnt been terribly strong. The water temperature is in the middle 60s in the morning and jumps into the 70s by afternoon. The only thing I havent seen that would be unusual is a tarpon and I would not be surprised to see one of those or hearing of someone else seeing one before the end of the month. I have seen or heard of everything else being caught. I just got off the phone with Jimmy at Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks and he said things are heating up down there. He says shing is gonna get a lot better but its not bad right now. Sid Stringer took a party out shing the West Flats and caught a nice cooler full of trout using live shrimp. Jimmy said the Mirrodine by Mirrolure is also producing a lot of sh. Big and Little Pass are producing plenty of trout and reds and the Wakulla Beach area is producing some nice catches. Capt. Randy Peart said he tried to troll up some kings last week and was unsuccessful but did catch and release 12 grouper up to 14 pounds trolling in 20 feet of water. He also shed down around Gray Mare Rock and caught a bunch of nice trout. He took a doctor for a half-day trip to the Econ na and they caught 12 reds and a bunch of big trout. Capt. Luke Frazier over at AMS in Medart said he and Scott Harper went out of Panacea last week and shed the flats for trout. They kept four trout and threw back about 30, had one big Spanish and caught two reds. The next day Scott, Rich Brown and Luke went out of Lanark Village and shed southeast of Dog Island in 38 feet of water and caught 70 sea bass. Most were around 15-inches long but said he caught one that was 18-inches long, which was the largest he had ever seen. They shed grubs on the bottom tipped with squid. Dr. Phil Sharp caught some nice trout on the ats using a four-inch pear colored Gulp under a oat and also caught some ounder. He is down all week and hopes to catch a cobia. Mike Pearson of Tifton, who has a house at Shell Point, took his wife Kelly out on Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning and using Gulps they brought home 14 trout over the two days. Bill Birdwell of Shell Point said he shed with a friend down east of the lighthouse and they caught some big reds, the smallest being around 27 inches. They were sight casting throwing gold spoons. Randy Mims from Shell Point went out on Saturday morning and shed the St. Marks Reef. He caught a 40-inch red on a Gulp and had a big cobia up to the boat but it straightened out the hook and got away. On Tuesday and Wednesday, I shed with Dr. David Saint, his wife Rhonda and their son, Brandon. It is so much fun shing with folks who love to sh and they did. Rhonda got so excited when she got a sh and got so upset when she lost one. In the two days we caught lots of trout, four reds over 25 inches, four nice Spanish and six black drum to about 22 inches which Rhonda caught. We also caught about four or ve sharks, some blues and about 25 small reds. We caught everything on live shrimp. Last week I was talking with Mike Falk Jr. and he was asking if I had been catching anything on the ats yet. He said his 5-year-old son Carson was bugging him to go shing. He said hell get in the backyard at home and cast a plug with the hooks taken off all afternoon. When they go to Wal-Mart his daughter heads to the toy department and he goes to sporting goods to look at fishing rods. Of course coming from that family, what would you expect? Mike called me on Sunday and he said Carson had already caught three trout by himself using a cork and Gulp being dragged behind the boat. They ended the afternoon catching over 25 trout. Plenty of trout are being caught at Keaton Beach using pin sh, live shrimp and the Gulp and the ats at Lanark are producing quite a few trout and there are plenty of reds to be caught. Some pompano are showing up over at St. George and plenty of trout are being caught in the bay and some big reds are being caught in the cut. April 14 is the Kevins Red Trout Shootout hosted out of C Quarters Marina in Carrabelle and the Panacea Rock the Dock Tournament is April 28 and 29 at Rock Landing in Panacea. Remember to leave that oat plan with some and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Waters warming up and sh are bitingWomen who want a lifelong hobby that teaches appreciation for Floridas marine environment in a laid-back learning atmosphere should attend the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions (FWC) Womens Fishing Clinic in Panama City. Besides being fun, the clinic is free. The FWC encourages women in the area to register soon for the March 31 Womens Fishing Clinic. The clinic is from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. at St. Andrews State Park. Advance registration is required, and classes are capped at 25 participants. This clinic enables women to learn the basics of environmental stewardship, shing ethics, angling skills and safety. Participants will complete skill stations such as knot tying, casting, rod rigging, cast net throwing, sh handling and more. Fishing equipment and bait will be provided during the clinic, but participants can bring their own gear such as rods and reels, tackle and cast nets. All participants must bring their own lunch and refreshments. This event includes a catch-and-release activity, so participants who wish to practice shing from a nearby pier must have a valid recreational saltwater shing license unless exempt. Learn more about how to obtain your recreational saltwater license at MyFWC.com/License. Licenses can be purchased online or by calling 888-FISH-FLORIDA. Please email Jennifer Saranzak at Jennifer.Saranzak@ MyFWC.com or call 352-543-9219, ext. 216, to register and for more information on the clinic.Free shing clinic for women o ered in Panama CityBeachgoers can help monitor spawning horseshoe crabsFrom FWC NewsAs spring arrives, horseshoe crabs converge along sandy beaches throughout the state to mate. Biologists with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are asking the public for help pinpointing the sites where these horseshoe crabs spawn. Beachgoers are likely to have the best luck spotting mating horseshoe crabs around high tide, just before, during or after a full or new moon. The conditions around the new moon on March 22 and the full moon on April 6 will create ideal opportunities to view the spawning behavior of horseshoe crabs. The FWC asks people to report sightings through one of several convenient options. Go to MyFWC. com/Contact and click on the Submit a Horseshoe Crab Survey link, then Florida Horseshoe Crab Spawning Beach Survey. You can also email ndings to horseshoe@MyFWC. com or call the FWC at 866252-9326. Observers should note the number of horseshoe crabs they see and whether those horseshoe crabs are mating. Mating crabs pair up, with the smaller male on top of the larger female. Other male crabs may be present around the couple. If possible, the observer should specify roughly how many horseshoe crabs are mating adults and how many are juveniles (4 inches wide or smaller). Biologists also want to know the date, time, location, habitat type and environmental conditions such as tides and moon phase when a sighting occurs. Through December 2011, the FWC has received 2,350 reports since the survey program began in April 2002. Horseshoe crabs, often called living fossils, have been around for approximately 450 million years and are an important part of a marine ecosystem. Their eggs are a vital food source for animals and birds, such as the red knot. Pharmaceutical companies use horseshoe crab blood to make sure that intravenous drugs and vaccine injections are bacteriafree. The Florida scrub-jay is a 12-inch-long, blue and gray, crestless jay. It lacks the white wing spots and tail feather tips of the more common and widespread blue jay. NATUREFWC Facts IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED FISH LIMIT IS NOW At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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If you are at all like me, everything around you is covered in a ne dust of yellow. While it is hard on those of us with allergies, it is a great sign that spring has sprung and it is time to get back out on the water! This year is hitting many especially hard with the intense blooming of everything at once. This strange weather we have been seeing lately, it seems important to go over a few safety measures sent to me by Mark Rosen. It is not at all uncommon this time of year to have a lovely day come to an end to awaken to a thick coat of fog. It is not only frustrating, but can be extremely dangerous if you are not prepared. Here are some suggestions to add to your knowledge of safety on the water. If you nd yourself in situations of reduced visibility, always slow down and turn on your navigation lights. This can be in times of darkness, rain and fog. Have a lookout to keep watch. Use a sound-producing device such as a horn, bell or whistle to alert others to your location every two minutes. Take a moment to stop and listen, if you cannot see others, they cannot see you. It is hard to hear the sound of another boater over the motor. Use your navigation equipment to maintain safe passage in the channels and avoid collisions with sand and oyster bars. If you lose your way, stop and drop anchor. Call for help on Channel 16 if you feel you are in danger. Turn your navigation lights on at dusk and leave them on until sunrise. Jet skis have no navigation lights, so they should not be out on the water between dusk to sunrise. Make sure someone who cares knows where you will be boating, where you are launching and when you will return. File a oat plan. For a good example, check out sioscuba. ucsd.edu/docs/USCGFloatPlan-3.pdf. If the plan changes, contact your family and or friends to let them know. Especially with our tricky channel, examine your anchor, chain and line before you need it. You may have to anchor if you lose power. With our currents and the many hazards just outside the channel, this can be your best chance for minimizing damage to your boat. Check that you have a life jacket for each person, readily at hand, and a throw cushion as required by the Coast Guard. If you have an in atable life jacket, it must be worn. If alcohol is aboard, one person must be designated as the driver. Even out on the water, driving while intoxicated is illegal. In Florida, a vessel operator is presumed to be under the in uence if their bloodor breath-alcohol level is at or above .08. Any person under 21 years of age who is found to have a breath-alcohol level of .02 or higher and operates or is in actual physical control of a vessel is in violation of Florida law (http://myfwc.com/boating/boatingregulations). You should have a GPS, either hand-held or mounted and registered with the proper federal agency listed on the instruction sheet. Also recommended is a VHF radio, either mounted or hand-held. This list could go on and on, and I am sure I will revisit it in weeks to come. If you are concerned about having all the required and recommended safety equipment, please contact a member of Flotilla 12 to set up a free vessel safety check. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCalappa granulate: The Shameface Crab When I am offshore diving, whether in search of a meal or adventure, I am always watching the sea oor for creatures of interest. No, they do not need to be food for me, wonderful entertainment is always appreciated. The Shameface Crab, Calappa granulate, one of many species found around the world, is certainly entertaining. But most divers never see this crab, which can get to be 9 millimeters long and 12 millimeters wide. The claws pull up in front of his face, which is where this crab gets its name as it hides behind its claws. But during the day, it is usually buried in the sand showing only the eyes and the tips on its claws, waiting for a meal, such as a hermit crab, to stroll by. At night this crab is digging in the sand in search of mollusks or sea shells to eat. Now the last time I tried to eat a mollusk, I had a hard time getting past that hard shell. I can steam the critter or shuck it with a knife, but this crab is not so capable. Or is it? The right hand claw is a perfect can opener. Once pulled from the sand, a shelled creature is manipulated into place such that the modi ed claw is inserted into any opening and locked down like a vice-grip. The shell is crushed and its contents immediately available to the crab. Next time you are out diving and you nd spiraled shells (gastropods) that have been peeled open, this is the work of the Shamefaced Crab. You Tube even has a short clip on the internet showing a Shamefaced Crab opening a cockle shell www.youtube. com/watch?v=D0uhtT45Nhc. You might think those poor hermit crabs havent a chance, but they do. Over time and a process of natural selection, hermit crabs that carry anemones (related to jelly sh) on their shells are rejected by the Shameface Crab. Imagine putting an oyster to your mouth only to be stung by a jelly sh hanging on the shell. It has the same effect on the crab. The crab soon gives up the anemone-carrying hermit crab in preference to one without the sting. Folks who study these creatures have even observed hermit crabs searching for and placing anemones on their backs. It seems that for every adaptation in nature there is a counter-adaptation. For those who dont dive (yet), visit the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea, where you can see and even brie y pick up one of these Shameface Crabs and inspect it at close quarters. In cooperation with Gulf Specimen Marine Lab we are placing two 100-gallon display aquariums in our facility at Wakulla Diving Center this summer, to show off many of these creatures of interest. That way divers can get better acquainted with these and other seldom-seen creatures while they get their cylinders lled. Come to the coast and share in the excitement. Feeding times will be posted! Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 1:55 AM 3.3 ft. 2:29 AM 3.2 ft. 3:02 AM 3.1 ft. 3:35 AM 2.9 ft. 4:10 AM 2.8 ft. 4:50 AM 2.5 ft. 5:39 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:50 AM 0.4 ft. 8:14 AM 0.6 ft. 8:38 AM 0.7 ft. 9:04 AM 0.9 ft. 9:31 AM 1.1 ft. 10:01 AM 1.3 ft. 10:36 AM Low 3.5 ft. 1:53 PM 3.6 ft. 2:16 PM 3.6 ft. 2:39 PM 3.6 ft. 3:01 PM 3.6 ft. 3:25 PM 3.4 ft. 3:51 PM 3.3 ft. 4:22 PM High -0.1 ft. 8:19 PM -0.2 ft. 8:51 PM -0.2 ft. 9:22 PM -0.2 ft. 9:53 PM -0.1 ft. 10:27 PM 0.1 ft. 11:05 PM 0.3 ft. 11:55 PM Low Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 1:52 AM 3.3 ft. 2:26 AM 3.3 ft. 2:59 AM 3.2 ft. 3:32 AM 3.0 ft. 4:07 AM 2.8 ft. 4:47 AM 2.6 ft. 5:36 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:47 AM 0.5 ft. 8:11 AM 0.6 ft. 8:35 AM 0.7 ft. 9:01 AM 0.9 ft. 9:28 AM 1.2 ft. 9:58 AM 1.4 ft. 10:33 AM Low 3.6 ft. 1:50 PM 3.7 ft. 2:13 PM 3.7 ft. 2:36 PM 3.7 ft. 2:58 PM 3.6 ft. 3:22 PM 3.5 ft. 3:48 PM 3.4 ft. 4:19 PM High -0.1 ft. 8:16 PM -0.2 ft. 8:48 PM -0.3 ft. 9:19 PM -0.2 ft. 9:50 PM -0.1 ft. 10:24 PM 0.1 ft. 11:02 PM 0.3 ft. 11:52 PM Low Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 2:31 AM 3.0 ft. 3:05 AM 3.0 ft. 3:38 AM 2.9 ft. 4:11 AM 2.7 ft. 4:46 AM 2.6 ft. 5:26 AM High 0.3 ft. 8:54 AM 0.4 ft. 9:18 AM 0.5 ft. 9:42 AM 0.6 ft. 10:08 AM 0.8 ft. 10:35 AM 1.0 ft. 11:05 AM 0.1 ft. 12:09 AM Low 3.3 ft. 2:29 PM 3.4 ft. 2:52 PM 3.4 ft. 3:15 PM 3.4 ft. 3:37 PM 3.3 ft. 4:01 PM 3.2 ft. 4:27 PM 2.4 ft. 6:15 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:23 PM -0.2 ft. 9:55 PM -0.2 ft. 10:26 PM -0.2 ft. 10:57 PM -0.1 ft. 11:31 PM 1.2 ft. 11:40 AM Low 3.1 ft. 4:58 PM High Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:47 AM 2.4 ft. 2:21 AM 2.4 ft. 2:54 AM 2.3 ft. 3:27 AM 2.2 ft. 4:02 AM 2.1 ft. 4:42 AM 1.9 ft. 5:31 AM High 0.2 ft. 8:01 AM 0.3 ft. 8:25 AM 0.4 ft. 8:49 AM 0.5 ft. 9:15 AM 0.6 ft. 9:42 AM 0.8 ft. 10:12 AM 1.0 ft. 10:47 AM Low 2.7 ft. 1:45 PM 2.7 ft. 2:08 PM 2.7 ft. 2:31 PM 2.7 ft. 2:53 PM 2.7 ft. 3:17 PM 2.6 ft. 3:43 PM 2.5 ft. 4:14 PM High -0.1 ft. 8:30 PM -0.2 ft. 9:02 PM -0.2 ft. 9:33 PM -0.1 ft. 10:04 PM -0.0 ft. 10:38 PM 0.1 ft. 11:16 PM Low Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 1:39 AM 2.5 ft. 2:13 AM 2.5 ft. 2:46 AM 2.4 ft. 3:19 AM 2.3 ft. 3:54 AM 2.1 ft. 4:34 AM 2.0 ft. 5:23 AM High 0.3 ft. 7:29 AM 0.4 ft. 7:53 AM 0.5 ft. 8:17 AM 0.7 ft. 8:43 AM 0.8 ft. 9:10 AM 1.0 ft. 9:40 AM 1.3 ft. 10:15 AM Low 2.8 ft. 1:37 PM 2.8 ft. 2:00 PM 2.8 ft. 2:23 PM 2.8 ft. 2:45 PM 2.8 ft. 3:09 PM 2.7 ft. 3:35 PM 2.6 ft. 4:06 PM High -0.1 ft. 7:58 PM -0.2 ft. 8:30 PM -0.2 ft. 9:01 PM -0.2 ft. 9:32 PM -0.1 ft. 10:06 PM 0.1 ft. 10:44 PM 0.3 ft. 11:34 PM Low Thu Mar 22, 12 Fri Mar 23, 12 Sat Mar 24, 12 Sun Mar 25, 12 Mon Mar 26, 12 Tue Mar 27, 12 Wed Mar 28, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 2:00 AM 2.3 ft. 2:44 AM 2.2 ft. 3:27 AM 2.2 ft. 4:12 AM 2.1 ft. 5:00 AM 2.1 ft. 5:54 AM 2.0 ft. 6:57 AM High 0.7 ft. 7:22 AM 0.9 ft. 7:41 AM 1.0 ft. 7:59 AM 1.1 ft. 8:19 AM 1.2 ft. 8:44 AM 1.3 ft. 9:15 AM 1.4 ft. 9:54 AM Low 2.3 ft. 1:34 PM 2.4 ft. 1:48 PM 2.5 ft. 2:07 PM 2.6 ft. 2:30 PM 2.7 ft. 2:59 PM 2.7 ft. 3:33 PM 2.6 ft. 4:12 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:42 PM 0.1 ft. 8:14 PM -0.0 ft. 8:45 PM -0.0 ft. 9:17 PM -0.0 ft. 9:53 PM 0.0 ft. 10:36 PM 0.1 ft. 11:34 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 22 March 28First March 30 Full April 6 Last April 13 New March 22Major Times 1:21 AM 3:21 AM 1:42 PM 3:42 PM Minor Times 7:21 AM 8:21 AM 8:08 PM 9:08 PM Major Times 2:04 AM 4:04 AM 2:25 PM 4:25 PM Minor Times 7:53 AM 8:53 AM 9:02 PM 10:02 PM Major Times 2:47 AM 4:47 AM 3:09 PM 5:09 PM Minor Times 8:26 AM 9:26 AM 9:55 PM 10:55 PM Major Times 3:31 AM 5:31 AM 3:54 PM 5:54 PM Minor Times 9:02 AM 10:02 AM 10:49 PM 11:49 PM Major Times 4:17 AM 6:17 AM 4:40 PM 6:40 PM Minor Times 9:41 AM 10:41 AM 11:42 PM 12:42 AM Major Times 5:04 AM 7:04 AM 5:28 PM 7:28 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:22 AM 11:22 AM Major Times 5:52 AM 7:52 AM 6:17 PM 8:17 PM Minor Times 12:33 AM 1:33 AM 11:09 AM 12:09 PM Best Better Better++ Good Average Average Average6:38 am 6:50 pm 6:21 am 7:09 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:36 am 6:50 pm 6:53 am 8:02 pm 6:35 am 6:51 pm 7:27 am 8:56 pm 6:34 am 6:52 pm 8:02 am 9:50 pm 6:33 am 6:52 pm 8:41 am 10:42 pm 6:31 am 6:53 pm 9:23 am 11:34 pm 6:30 am 6:53 pm 10:09 am --:--2% 4% 10% 16% 22% 28% 34% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org L.P.T.( 850 ) 528-4985PROFESSIONAL POOL MAINTENANCEpoolproblems?atthelowestratesweoffermaintenanceandservice!Servicing Swimming Pools and Spas for over 10 yearsTitus Langston850528-4985Commercial Residential Licensed & Insured Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) ANTIQUES CARRIESCOVEC ARRIESC OVENEW ARRIVALSDOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PETSTOP New & Vintage JEWELRY$1-$100 The Wakul la News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office participated in two searches on Monday, March 19 that resulted in locating a missing elderly man and a second search that located two missing boaters, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. The wife of Walter Lee Powers Jr., 80, of Crawfordville, Joicelyn Powers, reported that her husband was missing at 4:41 p.m. Mrs. Powers reported that her husband left with his dog on a golf cart and was overdue. She said she was unable to locate her husband on their 120 acres off River Plantation Road and he could be affected by a medical condition. Sheriffs of ce investigators began canvassing the property and after 45 minutes Powers was located coming from a woodline into an open eld. He appeared weary, disoriented and had small abrasions on his arms. Deputy Will Hudson assisted Powers and Sgt. Danny Harrell drove him back to his home where he was assessed and cleared by EMS personnel. Later, Powers golf cart and dog were located off a trail by Detective Josh Langston, Detective Rob Giddens and Detective Derek Lawhon. The family was alerted about the Project Lifesaver Program which is a service that provides elderly citizens with a bracelet that emits a continuous low frequency signal that is tracked by law enforcement by using a directional locating device. Deputy Scott Powell, Captain Cliff Carroll and Deputy Sean Wheeler also assisted in the search which was wrapped up at 6:25 p.m. In an unrelated case also reported Monday, March 19, two Tallahassee boaters were reported missing after shing in the Gulf of Mexico over the weekend. Randall Myers of Tallahassee reported that his son, Reid Alan Myers, 26, and his friend, Robert Michael Seeders, 34, both of Tallahassee, starting shing on Friday and the last time Myers spoke to his son was Saturday, March 17. The father became concerned when his son did not show up at work on Monday morning. The U.S. Coast Guard was noti ed and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission began a search for the missing boaters. After an unsuccessful search of the Shell Point area, the boaters vehicle and trailer was located at the Mashes Sands Boat Ramp in Ochlockonee Bay by Deputy Ben Steinle. FWC investigators located the boaters near K Tower approximately 20 miles off of Shell Point. They had run out of gas. The two men were uninjured and were transported back to the shore by the FWC. FWC and the Coast Guard were supported by multiple search vessels and aircraft.Special to The NewsOn Feb. 29, Lt. Jesse Evans retired from the Florida Highway Patrol after serving the people of the State of Florida for more than 30 years. Lt. Evans began his career with the Florida Highway Patrol on Feb. 15, 1982, when he entered the Florida Highway Patrol Academy. After completing the academy, his first duty assignment was to Moore Haven, Glades County, Fla. In November 1984, he was promoted to traffic homicide investigator, and transferred to Naples, Fla. After spending a few short months in Naples, he transferred to Wewahitchka. In May 1989, he left Wewahitchka and transferred to Crawfordville. He was assigned to work the road and Traf c Homicides within Wakulla and Franklin counties. In May 2002, he was promoted to sergeant, and assigned squads in both the Tallahassee and Quincy districts, encompassing Wakulla County. In April, 2007, Sgt. Evans transferred to the Neil Kirkman Building in Tallahassee, which serves as General Headquarters for the Florida Highway Patrol. While there he served in Inspections, Accreditations and Public Affairs. In May 2010, he was promoted to lieutenant, and transferred back to the eld at Troop H Headquarters in Tallahassee. There he served as the troop training coordinator, and troop evidence custodian. Upon retirement, Lt. Evans was promoted to captain, and will continue to serve the citizens and visitors of this Great State as a member of the Florida Highway Patrol Reserves. Friends and family wishing to attend the retirement party of Capt. Jesse Evans, please contact his son-inlaw Matt at trooperkirkland@gmail.com or his daughter Jessica at jessicaekirkland@gmail.com. The event will be held at the Wakulla Shrine Club on Saturday, March 31, at 4:30 p.m. Staff ReportFlorida Forestry Service requested assistance from Wakulla County Fire-Rescue to control a re burning on private land in the far north east section of the county on Sunday, March 18. The 200-acre wildfire near Jim French Road and the Natural Bridge area north of Wakulla Station was reportedly contained on Sunday, but continued to smolder leading to a smoke advisory being issued for the area. The very rough terrain at the site of the re was mostly accessible by forestry service tractor plows but WCFR brush trucks were asked to monitor the road on one section to prevent the re from escaping while their units worked the head, according to Fire Chief Mike Morgan. Tractors were brought in from four counties and WCFR assisted until enough units could be deployed by the forestry service. At one point command requested a helicopter as the re started running to the west after it jumped a previous re line. Before the air drops could begin the re was contained. County units were released around 3:30 p.m. and the forestry service was expected to be working the re for a couple of days. One forestry service re- ghter was transported by Wakulla EMS for treatment due to a possible heat related condition. After working the re until dark on Sunday, additional equipment was brought in by the Forestry Service on Monday to assure containment during anticipated low humidity conditions this week. A smoke advisory was issued on Sunday. There are no structures threatened. The re is believed to have started as a result of a lightning strike. Residents in the area were told to expect lingering smoky conditions. Two searches on Monday: missing elderly man and two boaters foundPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWild re burns land near Natural Bridge SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEvans retires from highway patrol Capt. Jesse EvansHIGH SPEED CRASH AND BURN: On Sunday, March 18, at 2 a.m. in the area of Bloxham Cutoff near Shadeville Road, a sheriffs deputy arrived to nd a heavily damaged SUV under the sign for Savannahs Buffet at the rear entrance. Before the deputy could approach the vehicle it burst into ames. As re ghters approached this vehicle a rear window strut exploded and landed at least 10 feet from the vehicle. No one was in the SUV. A search of the area turned up no signs of the occupants of the vehicle. CAR FLIPS ON OLD PLANK: Shortly after noon on Friday, March 16, a report of a vehicle overturned with entrapment on Old Plank Road just south of Commerce Boulevard was received and dispatched by WCSO. Rescue3 arrived rst and found the victim had been removed. They treated and transported the lone occupant. The vehicle apparently struck three separate guy wires for utility poles before becoming airborne. Fire ghters look over a smoldering area of a 200-acre wild re on Sunday. Youre Invited! H KPlease join Anne and me for the Of icial Kick-Off of theH K C C C Bring your family and friends.Well have great food, entertainment by Grant Peeples and an opportunity for me to explain how I would represent your interests on the Commission. I look forward to seeing you there.F M 30 7:00 PMPolitical advertisement paid for and approved by Howard Kessler, NPA, for County Commissioner.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn March 8, Maxine Fink of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. Deputy Mike Crum received a complaint about someone living in the crawl space of a mobile home owned by Fink. Someone entered the mobile home through the bottom of the trailer. A suspect has been identi- ed. Damage to the home was estimated at $400 and approximately $250 worth of copper was stolen from the air conditioning unit. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: On March 8, Decory Doster of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone punctured his vehicle tire in six places. Damage was estimated at $150. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On March 8, a cashier at the Stop N Save on Spring Creek Highway reported an illegal dumping. A suspect dumped ve large plastic bags of garbage in the stores dumpster. Evidence was collected at the scene. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated. On March 8, Thomas Ledford of Crawfordville reported a telephone fraud where a man posed as his relative and stated that he had been involved in an accident. Ledford was not fooled by the scam which included the caller telling him that he had been involved in a traf c crash with a Spanish diplomat. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On March 8, Donald Shemwell of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft. The victim was having work done at his home when he observed a worker in areas of the home where he did not belong. The victim reported the theft of jewelry, towels, medications, personal items and currency, valued at $2,560. A suspect has been identified. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. On March 8, Curtis Mixon reported a fraud involving his Social Security bene ts. The victim discovered that someone changed the financial institution where his bene ts were being sent. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On March 8, Jennie V. Jones of Crawfordville reported the theft of coins and a kitchen mixer from her home. The value of the missing items is $430. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. On March 8, Deputy Mike Zimba responded to a traffic crash at Brooks Concrete in Panacea involving Jenevieve Padgette Ezell, 35, of Panacea. Ezell crashed her Chevy Tahoe into a brick perimeter wall of the establishment. The air bag deployed and the victim reported injuries. Wakulla EMS transported the victim to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for treatment. The case investigation continues pending blood test results. On March 8, Debra Fults of Panacea reported a criminal mischief at the Tarpines subdivision. Someone placed chewing gum in the locking mechanism of her community mailbox. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. On March 9, Thomas Stewart of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A suspect, who has been identi ed, obtained credit in the victims name without permission. The victim discovered that there was a past due account in his name in Central Florida. The accumulated bill is more than $23,000. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. On March 8, Dustin Ryan McKinney, 21, was arrested for battery in the Wakulla County Jail after striking a 33-year-old jail inmate in the head with his fist. The altercation arose over the use of a television. Sgt. Andy Curles, Correctional Of cer Turelle Farmer, Deputy William Lord and Deputy Lisa Hummel investigated and broke up the altercation. On March 9, Michael Antonio Gavin, 23, of Crawfordville honked the horn of his vehicle twice at Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy Cole Wells at the Wakulla County Courthouse parking area. Deputy Wells had previous knowledge that Gavin did not have a valid driver license. A check with the Communications Division determined that Gavins license was suspended and he was arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. On March 9, Amanda Will of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a Yorkshire terrier from her home. A suspect has been identi ed. The dog is valued at $450. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On March 9, a 33-yearold Crawfordville woman was arrested for cruelty toward a child, abuse without great harm, for knocking down her 5-year-old son and stomping on his torso inside the Sopchoppy Express Lane. The woman told detectives that the child was not behaving while inside the store. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Detective Erika Buckley, Deputy Sean Wheeler and Detective Josh Langston investigated. On March 9, Lisa Barwick of Panacea reported a fraud as she attempted to le her tax return. Someone used the victims Social Security number and last name. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. On March 9, Deputy Scott Powell conducted a traf c stop on Shadeville Highway after reportedly observing the car had no tag. The deputy pulled the car over, which had two men inside. It was reportedly determined that Terrell Lamar Brown, 25, of Crawfordville was operating the vehicle with a suspended license. He was arrested for driving while his license was suspended or revoked, third or subsequent conviction. The passenger was released and the vehicle was turned over to the owner. On March 9, Douglas Bongiovani of Crawfordville reported the theft of a dog. The bulldog, valued at $100, was removed from the property while the victim was away. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On March 10, Peter Thomas of Tallahassee reported a theft of boat batteries from Shell Point. Two batteries, valued at $150 were stolen. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On March 10, William May eld of Panacea reported the theft of two marine batteries, valued at $150. The victim also reported the theft of approximately 75 gallons of fuel. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On March 10, Carolyn Luke of Crawfordville was involved in a traf c crash caused by a deer at Smith Creek Highway and Jack Langston Road. Luke reportedly swerved to miss the deer and struck a tree. She suffered injuries to her head and legs but refused EMS treatment. The vehicle suffered front end damage. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On March 11, Mary Jane Strother, 44, of Crawfordville was arrested for aggravated battery in connection with a domestic disturbance involving a kitchen knife and a 53-yearold male victim. The victim suffered injuries to his face and arm. The knife was thrown into a wooded area but was recovered by Deputy Scott Powell. Wakulla EMS recommended stitches for the injury to the victims arm but he refused EMS transportation. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Will Hudson also investigated. On March 11, Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated a counterfeit note at the Highway 267 Stop N Save. A 42-year-old Tallahassee man cashed his paycheck in Capitola and received $100 bills. He attempted to purchase gasoline and was informed the note was counterfeit. The note was a real $5 bill that was bleached and reprinted with $100 information. The bill will be turned over to the U.S. Secret Service. On March 11, Jessica Pagel of Crawfordville reported the theft of her cellular telephone, valued at $350. The victim identi ed a person of interest. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. On March 11, Russell Gibson of Crawfordville reported locating a bicycle located on his property line. No reports of stolen bicycles were received by Dispatch and the bike was taken to the WCSO Impound Yard by PSO Nancy Watts. The bike is valued at $25. On March 12, Dominique Hawkins of Wal-Mart reported a retail theft after allegedly observing a white male and a white female attempt to remove items from the store without paying for them. The suspects were stopped at the entrance and dropped the merchandise. They jumped into a green Honda Civic and drove northbound on U.S. Highway 319. The merchandise included perfume, sunglasses and booster cables, valued at $72. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. On March 12, Herbert Hawkins of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attem pted to le his taxes when he discovered that someone already used his Social Security number. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. On March 13, a clerk at Murphy Oil in Crawfordville reported a retail theft of gasoline. A motorist pulled up to the pumps and pumped $35 worth of fuel and left the parking lot without paying for the gas. The driver and two other men were also panhandling in the parking lot for money. A suspect has been identi ed. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell investigated. On March 13, Lisa Barwick of Panacea reported the theft of medications from her home. Several pills from her medication bottle were missing. Deputy Taff Stokley investigated. On March 13, Deputy Nick Gray investigated a hit-and-run complaint from a property owner on Ace High Stables Road in Crawfordville. At the scene, Deputy Gray recovered a number of car parts and observed damage to a telephone box. A BOLO was sent over the radio for a black Nissan and the Leon County Sheriffs Of ce stopped the vehicle for Deputy Gray to continue his investigation. The damage to the vehicle matched the missing vehicle parts collected by Deputy Gray. Amber Dale Christie, 27, of Crawfordville was issued a traf c citation for failure to report a traffic crash involving property damage. On March 13, Regina Proctor of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to le her tax return and discovered someone had already used her Social Security number. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. On March 13, Terrie Neal of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. The victim was unable to le her tax return because someone had used her husbands Social Security number on a joint return. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On March 13, a 17year-old Crawfordville victim reported a criminal mischief. The victim parked his vehicle at the Dollar General store next to Wakulla High School and walked to campus. When he returned at the end of the day he discovered that someone broke one of his car windows. Damage was estimated at $200. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. On March 14, Silvius Thomas of Crawfordville reported the theft of an air line for a torch. The property is valued at $350 and a suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. On March 14, Clara Bottorf of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run accident. The victim was driving eastbound on Highway 267 when an unidenti ed vehicle traveling westbound crossed the center line and struck the victims mirror. Damage was estimated at $100 but there were no injuries. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On March 14, Steve De baugh of Crawfordville found a vehicle tag owned by Mark John Manning of Tallahassee in the area of Magnolia Ridge. Deputy Rachel Oliver was unable to locate the owner and the tag was turned over to the property division. On March 13, a 30year-old Crawfordville man was arrested for cruelty toward a child, abuse without great harm, after the 5year-old child was observed by school personnel with severe bruises on his buttocks and lower back. The father admitted using his belt to discipline the child which reportedly caused the extreme wounds. Detective Erika Buckley investigated. The suspect is a registered sexual offender. On March 14, a citizen approached Lt. Brad Taylor about turning in a wallet that was found at the Medart Dollar General store. Lt. Taylor located a Georgia driver license as well as some personal items owned by Ronald William Albury of Pelham, Ga. The wallet was turned over to the property division. On March 14, Michael James Labig, 22, of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash. Labig was attempting to pass another motorist on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road when he observed a vehicle coming toward him in the opposite direction. In an attempt to avoid the other vehicle, Labig lost control of his vehicle, crossed the oncoming lane and crashed into several trees. Damage was estimated at $3,500. The driver declined EMS treatment at the scene. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On March 14, Levi Workowski of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of a glass mug, U.S. currency and a window screen, valued at $220. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On March 14, Admiral Barwick of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. The victim reported that someone cut the tires on his vehicle and trailer while he was shing. Two individuals of interest were identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 784 calls for service during the past week including 15 residential and business alarms; 59 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 29 E-911 calls; 52 investigations; 11 loud music/noise complaints; 40 medical emergencies; 220 business and residential security checks; 20 special details; 11 subpoena services; 12 suspicious vehicles; 11 thefts; 10 traf c crashes with no injuries; 47 traffic stops; and 12 reckless vehicles. Dustin R. McKinney HAVE FUN H AVE F UN DREAM GIRL fromset all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor SLD NURSERYANDTREE FARM Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSt. Patricks Day Parade PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENMore photos online at thewakullanews.com e Lions Clubs annual St. Patricks Day Festival was held Saturday, March 17, and featured a parade down Crawfordville Highway and a festival at Hudson Park.

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Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012Lawmakers return to take up redistrictingWeekly Roundup, Page 6BSavvy Senior: Exercises to ease arthritis painAARP: Tax tips for 50+ taxpayers Page 4B By DIANE LANTER and TAMARA BYRNES February 2012 was a busy month, so we were happy to have the extra day for more activities. We saw many versions of plaid clothing on the rst Tuesday. It was fun to see just how much plaid everyone had in their closets and was willing to wear. The Epilepsy Foundation and Covenant Hospice presented very informative programs about the services that are available to the seniors. Shelley Swenson with the extension of ce and one of her interns talked to the seniors about healthy eating and passed out samples of chicken salad and fruit salad made with a yogurt dressing. We all changed our minds about yogurt, mmmmm-good. Red was the color for Valentines Day and it was seen from all four corners of the dining room. It was the time of year for our Valentine Glamour Shots. Jo Ann Palmer photographed all the seniors and the pictures turned out spectacular. Thank you so much, Jo Ann, for making the day a special memory day for all. Chef Mary had Valentine cupcakes for everyone to take home, and those are always a treat. Colleen Skipper celebrated Black History Month with us on Feb. 23. She spoke about her younger years working in the school system, her involvement with Sopchoppy government and her current job as administrative coordinator with the Wakulla County administration. Theresa Jones and Trey Crump played the piano for Colleen and her sisters, Glenda and Chinesta, who entertained us with their beautiful voices. The celebration was enlightening and inspiring. Thanks, Colleen, for giving us a day to remember. Continued on Page 3B Recent articles have discussed CELEBRATING LIFE in the Senior Center and health education, health screenings, exercise and some lifestyles that will help you age successfully. This month I planned to write about fundraising. Walking is my favorite exercise and I walk almost every day. This is my private, quiet time that I examine my thoughts and formulate my plans. As I began to organize my thoughts for soliciting contributions from our friends and neighbors, the joy of this process begin to decline. This became an unpleasant task. I have learned to overcome unpleasant tasks by relying on my sense of gratitude. This sounds too simple but it really works. An attitude of gratitude does result in a feeling of internal peace. Our friends and neighbors in Wakulla County have provided tremendous support for our Senior Citizens services. Its been about a year since a friend asked how she could help as a volunteer. I suggested that she consider helping with fundraising. The next time I heard from her, she had established a fundraising committee and planned several activities to raise funds. They included: Food For Life Senior Meal Club, Spring Fling Dance, Creation and sales of Senior Cookbooks, Senior Prom, Elvis an evening of music (sponsored by Centennial Bank), and sales of Chef Marys cranberry sauce. These activities produced more than $23,500. At rst, I thought how they were helping me and the board. Then I realized that the ones bene ting from this effort was our senior citizens. Then I was reminded how wonderful it is to live in Wakulla County. The Food For Life Senior Meal Club is an ongoing activity in which everyone can participate at anytime. St. Marks Powder has this activity in their payroll deductions. Any of their employees can have this deducted from their paycheck each payday. We receive a check from them every month. Nineteen (19) Wakulla Senior Center employees have this activity deducted from their paycheck every pay period. Continued on Page 3BAttitude of gratitude R.H. CarterWakulla County Senior Center SPECIAL TO THE NEWSIn February seniors enjoyed Valentines Day, Black History Month and plaid Red was the color for Valentines Day, and it was seen from all four corners of the dining room. SMALL ENGINE REPAIR 3Y Where you get MOW for Your Money! NP-0000653372 AreYouHard OfHearing? Amajornamebrandhearingaidprovider wishestoeldtestaremarkablenewdigital hearinginstrumentinthearea.Thisoffer isfreeofchargeandyouareunderno obligation. Theserevolutionary100%Digitalinstruments usethelatesttechnologytocomfortablyand almostinvisiblyhelpyouhearmoreclearly. Thistechnologysolvesthestoppedupears, andheadinabarrelsensationsomepeople experience. Ifyouwishtoparticipate,youwillbe requiredtohaveyourhearingtestedinour ofce FREEOFCHARGE todetermine candidacyandreviewyourresultswiththe hearinginstrumentswithourhearingcare specialist. 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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, March 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the Senior Center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. They will host Iron Jawed Angels, a production about the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution on Aug. 19, 1920. Contact Anne Ahrendt at 5280895 or Rachel Pienta at 321-3582 for more information. Friday, March 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, March 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY will meet at the library at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, March 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, March 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the Senior Center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, March 27 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the Senior Center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE D ANCING will be held at the Senior Center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the Senior Center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 30 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the Senior Center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Special EventsThursday, March 22 FREE LECTURE SERIES on USS Narcissus and Floridas Underwater Archaeological Preserves by Franklin Price, underwater archaeologist, and Floridas Panhandle Shipwreck Trail: Dive into the Emerald Coast by Lindsay Smith, underwater archaeologist, will be held at TCC Wakulla Center at 6:30 p.m. For more information, contact FPAN outreach coordinator, Barbara Hines at bhines@uwf. edu or at (850) 877-2206. Saturday, March 24 FIFTH ANNUAL MAKE A DIFFERENCE DAY will be held by VolunteerWakulla from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hudson Park. There will be booths set up for services offered in the county, as well as places to volunteer. There will also be free food and door prizes every 30 minutes after 11 a.m. For more information, call 745-0060 or visit www. volunteerwakulla.org. HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 340 Trice Lane. They will be collecting paint, oil, chemicals, electronics, solvents, cleaners, gas, fuel, batteries, uorescent bulbs and acids. Monday, March 26 NAMI WAKULLAS ANNUAL MEETING will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club behind Centennial Bank. The annual meeting will include a review of the education programs NAMI Wakulla has presented free to the public since March 2011, along with a report of support groups that have met, new groups that have formed, and a host of other services NAMI Wakulla has developed in the past year. The Wakulla County community is invited to attend this meeting and enjoy light refreshments. New board members will be announced. Wednesday, March 28 CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held from noon to 1:15 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. The cost is $12. Lunch will be served buffet style by Hamaknockers. The menu will include pulled pork, chicken, ribs, wings, beans, cole slaw, potato salad and macaroni and cheese. Thursday, March 29 FREE LECTURE SERIES on The Page-Ladson and Wakulla Spring Sites Yield Evidence of the First Ice-Age Floridians by James Dunbar, retired archaeologist with the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research, at 6:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. For more information, contact FPAN outreach coordinator, Barbara Hines, at bhines@uwf.edu or at (850) 877-2206.Upcoming EventsSaturday, March 31 LIFE WALK by the Wakulla Pregnancy Center will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park. Registration is at 9 a.m., and the walk starts at 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 210-1276. EASTER EGG HUNT will be held at Hudson Park at 11 a.m. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. The age groups range from infant to 10 years old. A drawing will be held and one child from each age group will win an Easter basket. Wakulla ROTC, Wakulla EMS, Wakulla Fire & Rescue, Smokey the Bear, Capital City Bank Star, McDonald Character, McGruff the Crime Dog, the Sonic Character and a Moonwalkers will be in attendance. CHAT of Wakulla will also be there accepting donations of pet items. The event is sponsored by Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. Call 926-7227 for more information. Sunday, April 1 FIRST SUNDAY at the Refuge Presentation Series will feature Landy Luther as he presents Welcome to St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. St. Vincent Island is an undeveloped barrier island just offshore of Apalachicola, and is administratively part of St. Marks Refuge. The island is a haven for endangered and threatened species. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, Natures Classroom. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Tuesday, April 3 TOWN HALL MEETING will be hosted by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth from 6 to 8 p.m. at Wakulla High Schools War Eagle Cafe. The meetings purpose is to increase awareness about the negative consequences of underage drinking and discuss steps that can be taken to prevent underage drinking. Appetizers will be served from 5:30 to 6 p.m. For additional information, contact Stacy Harvey at 510-0219. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Lecture on Floridas underwater archaeology at 6:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. Make A Difference Day at Hudson Park from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. NAMI Wakullas annual meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club. Chamber networking luncheon at noon at the extension of ce. ThursdaySaturdayMondayWednesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, March 22 WAKULLA COUNTY AIRPORT COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 2 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room, Monday, March 26 WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. Call (850) 926-7415 for more information. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim DirectorSt. Patricks Day Parade Wed like to thank everyone who came to the St. Patricks Day events last Saturday. For the rst time, the library had a oat in the parade! The oat was decorated and manned by participants in our weekly childrens programs and funded by the Friends of the Library. Id like to give special thanks to Leilania Nichols, our childrens coordinator, who with the help of some great children got the oat up and running. The Friends of the Library also had a table at Hudson Park with information on the library, the Friends, and library T-shirts and tote bags for sale. Wed like to thank all who stopped by and said hi. Keep a lookout for the Friends of the Library at this Saturdays Make a Difference Day as well! Friday Night Movie Our Friday Night Movie this week is the multiAcademy Award nominated spy thriller based on the best seller Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy by John Le Carre. This R-rated lm (for violence, some sexuality, and language) tells the tale about retired MI-6 agent George Smiley being pulled out of retirement in order to nd a Soviet spy in British Intelligence during the Cold War. Starring Gary Oldman, who was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar for this role, Colin Firth (last years Best Actor winner), among others, this old school spy thriller is sure to keep you on the edge of your seats and more than lives up to its classic source material. Capital City Bank will once again be on hand with popcorn and water for small donations to the Friends of the Library. Because of Good Friday and our April Book Extravaganza, this will be the last movie for four weeks so please come out and join us. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing and because of the rating we ask that any minors be accompanied by an adult. Did you know? With our new automation system, you can place holds, make lists and renew items from the comfort of your own computer? Just go to our website www.wakullalibrary.org, click on the Library Catalog tab and log into your account with your Library Card number along with the last four digits of the number as your password. The catalog should say Wilderness Coast Public Libraries (the library cooperative were a member of) at the top. If it says E-Library please give us a call. You can make lists of favorite books, books youve read, etc for either the public or yourself. Just be sure if you want the list to be private that you choose private from the drop down menu otherwise anyone who uses the catalog can see it. We have also begun sending out e-mail reminders about due dates, holds available, and overdue notices. These emails will also have a Wilderness Coast address. I will be telling you about more things you can do with our new system in the coming weeks. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 Page 3B Commitment to support the Senior Citizens Meal Program. Select Sponsorship Level () monthly contributions Red ____________ $10 per month White ___________$20 per month Blue ____________ $30 per month Silver ___________ Other amount (You may mail your check annually) Name: _________________________________ Address: _______________________________ _______________________________________ Email (optional): _________________________ Phone: (______)_________________________ Signature: ______________________________ Date: __________ Note: (1) Direct Deposit available for monthly payment. (2) Personal payment may be arranged monthly, annually, etc. (3) All contributions are tax deductible.Continued from Page 1B We regularly receive contributions from our community. Most are donated for senior services. There are some identi ed uses requested such as the food program, transportation, etc. We always accommodate special requests. Some donate in honor of a friend, family member or someone deceased. We always advise those honored or in the case of someone deceased, a family member of the donation in their honor. These contributions are necessary for us to maintain our current level of services. The love and generosity of our community continues to meet our senior services needs and creates an attitude of gratitude. The fundraising committees next event is a Spring Fling dance on April 21 at 7 p.m. It features the Tallahassee Swing Band with music from the 1940s to the s. We will provide hot hors doeurves. Tickets are $15 per person and $25 per couple. You may set up regular payments to our Meal Club and/ or purchase tickets to the Spring Fling Dance by calling Shelly at 926-7145 ext. 221.Carter: Keeping an attitude of gratitudeSenior Food for Life Club MembershipContinued from Page 1B The Wild Wakulla Wigglers line dancers, stepped their way into our hearts once again, with their fast music and happy feet. We always look forward to watching them and clapping along with their songs. The Wigglers have practice every Monday at 1:30 p.m. and Wednesday at 2 p.m. If you would like to join them, come by and check it out. On the last Friday of the month, local clay artist, Nancy Jefferson taught a class to the seniors. This class was offered through the Healing Arts of Wakulla County (HAWC) program. This was a real treat for the seniors and everyone asked when Nancy would be back. Nancy returned March 16, for another exciting clay experience. Our queen for the year is Diane Hamilton and our volunteer of the year is Virginia Davis. They represent our Senior Center and can be seen in all of the local parades. Thank you to Donnie Sparkman and the wonderful group of men who sponsored a Fish Fry for our senior citizens. It was a big success. It was also Lemon Pie Day. Chef Mary served 120 seniors. Remember, Zumba classes are on Monday and Wednesday at 6 p.m. For more information call 926-7145. In February seniors enjoyed Valentines Day, Black History Month, and plaid R.H. Carter introduces Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper, above, who was the Senior Centers speaker at its Black History program. Colleen Skipper, below, sings with her sisters Glenda and Chinesta. Seniors working with clay under the direction of artist Nancy Jefferson. Senior Citizens Queen Diane Hamilton, at left, has been making appearances at the local parades. 713-001499 Rock Landing Road OPEN: THURSDAY ............. 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .............................. 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday .................. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. SUNDAY ...........................11 A.M. 9 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comDear Savvy Senior, Can exercise help seniors with arthritis? I have osteoarthritis and have read that certain exercises can help ease the pain, but I dont know where to start, and I certainly dont want to make it any worse than it already is. What can you tell me? Sedentary Sally Dear Sally, Lots of seniors who have arthritis believe that exercise will worsen their condition, but thats not true. Study after study has shown that exercise is actually one of the best treatments for osteoarthritis. Proper and careful exercises can help reduce joint pain and stiffness, strengthen muscles around the joints and increase exibility. It also helps manage other chronic conditions that are common among seniors with arthritis, such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity. Here are some tips to help you get moving. Exercises for Arthritis Determining exactly which types of exercises are best for you, depends on the form and severity of your arthritis, and which joints are involved. Its best to work with your doctor or a physical therapist to help you develop an exercise program that works for you. The different types of exercises that are most often recommended to seniors with arthritis include: Range-of-motion exercises: These are gentle stretching exercises that can relieve stiffness as well as improve your ability to move your joints through their normal range of motion. These exercises should be done daily. Strengthening exercise: Calisthenics, weight training and working with resistance bands are recommended (two or more days a week) to maintain and improve your muscle strength, which helps support and protect your joints. Aerobic exercises: Low-impact activities like walking, cycling, swimming or water aerobics are all recommended three to ve times per week to help improve cardiovascular health, control weight, and improve your overall function. Its also important to keep in mind that when you rst start exercising, you need to go slow to give your body time to adjust. If you push yourself too hard you can aggravate your joint pain, however, some muscle soreness or joint achiness in the beginning is normal. To help you manage your pain start by warming up with some simple stretches or range of motion exercises for ve to 10 minutes before you move on to strengthening or aerobic exercises. Another tip is to apply heat to the joints youll be working before you exercise, and use cold packs after exercising to reduce in ammation. If youre experiencing a lot of pain while you exercise, you may need to modify the frequency, duration, or intensity of your exercises until the pain improves. Or you may need to try a different activity for example switching from walking to water aerobics. But if youre having severe, sharp or constant pain, or large increases in swelling or your joints feel hot or red, you need to stop and see your doctor. Exercise Resources To help you exercise at home, there are a number arthritis exercise DVDs you can purchase to guide you through a wide variety of activities. Collage Video (collagevideo.com, 800-819-7111) sells several at prices ranging between $10 and $25, as does the Arthritis Foundation Store at afstore.org or 800-283-7800. Also see go4life.niapublications. org, a resource created by the National Institute on Aging that offers a free exercise DVD and book that provides illustrated examples of exercises you can do to improve your condition. You can order your free copies online or by calling 800-222-2225. If you need some motivation or dont like exercising alone, ask your doctor about exercise programs in your area for people with arthritis. Hospitals and clinics sometimes offer special programs, as do local health clubs and senior centers. The Arthritis Foundation also conducts exercise and aquatic programs for people with arthritis in many communities throughout the U.S. Contact your local branch (see arthritis.org/ chaptermap.php, or call 800-283-7800 for contact information) to nd out what may be available near you. Send your senior questions to Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy Senior book.By JESSICA EDMONDSON The good news this year is that youve got a couple of extra days. Rather than ling your taxes by April 15, the IRS tax ling deadline is Tuesday, April 17. But thats not the only change. Before ling your taxes, AARP has a few tips that older taxpayers may be able to use to cut taxes and to gain a bigger refund. Tax tips for older taxpayers: If you turned 65 before Jan. 1, 2012, youre eligible to take a higher than normal standard deduction: Single $7,250; married $13,900; head of household $9,950; qualifying widow/widower $12,750. If your adjusted gross income, untaxed interest and half your Social Security bene t add up to less than $25,000 ($32,000 if married and ling jointly or qualifying widow), youll pay no taxes on your Social Security income. If youre in a tax bracket of 15 percent or lower, youll pay no federal taxes on long-term capital gains you racked up during the year. If you work while paying a home health aide to take care of your spouse or dependent, you may be able to claim a credit of up to $3,000 in dependent (or spouse) care expenses. If you pay all or some of your parents medical bills, you can deduct those as health care expenses. If you contributed after-tax income to your retirement account, a percentage of your annual distribution may be tax-free. If your stay at an assisted living facility or nursing home is related to medical care, you may be able to deduct the cost. If you bought hearing aids and batteries, arti cial teeth and prescription drugs, you may be able to deduct some of the medical expenses. If you made certain energy-ef cient improvements to your home, you may get a tax credit for expenses such as installing a new roof or new windows or exterior doors. Some of these tips come with restrictions that may apply to you, so consult with a tax adviser or visit www. aarp.org/money/taxes/ for more information. Also, check out AARP Foundation Tax-Aide, a free program that offers tax services to low income and senior taxpayers, to make sure that you are taking advantage of every deduction and credit available to you. Resources: AARPs 10 Tax Tips Everyone Over 50 Should Know: www.aarp.org/money/taxes/info-02-2012/tax-tips-youshould-know.html. Find an AARP Tax-Aide location here: www.aarp.org/ money/taxes/aarp_taxaide. For general tax information, the IRS has a number of free guides and forms online that can help: www.irs. gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=164871,00.html. By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior Exercises to help ease arthritis pain AARP FLORIDATax tips for 50+ taxpayersSpecial to The NewsThe Florida State University College of Medicine, one of the nations leading educators in geriatric medicine, now also has the nations top geriatrician of 2012. Dr. Niharika Suchak, an associate professor in the Department of Geriatrics has been named Clinician of the Year by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS). She will receive the award in May at the groups annual scienti c meeting. I cannot imagine another clinician more deserving of this award than Dr. Suchak, said Barbara Resnick, president of the AGS. She has an innate ability to guide patients and their families through the maze of complex medical decision-making and considers the patients individual needs, which is essential when caring for older adults. Teaching students how to care for older adults is a key part of the College of Medicines mission. Florida State has one of the few medical schools in the country with a separate geriatrics department. In addition, it integrates geriatrics throughout its fouryear curriculum, because all physicians not just geriatricians are likely to provide care for older patients. For that reason, all students, no matter what specialty they want to pursue, complete a full rotation in geriatrics. Geriatrics faculty have a strong presence in all of the doctoring courses, Suchak said. The doctoring continuum is the strong thread that holds together the education received by the medical students throughout their four-year curriculum. I expect geriatrics to continue to lead the way in the evolution of innovative educational methods that maintain a focus on compassionate and advanced patient-centered health care. Suchak received her medical degree at the Armed Forces Medical College in Pune, India, and completed her residency and fellowship training at Union Memorial Hospital in Baltimore. She has a masters degree in clinical epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene & Public Health. She is certi ed by the American Board of Internal Medicine in internal medicine, geriatric medicine, and hospice and palliative medicine. Suchak was intensely involved in graduate and postgraduate medical education in geriatrics at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City and later at the Hackensack University Medical Center (in af liation with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey). Dr. Kenneth BrummelSmith, the department chair who brought Suchak to Florida State in March 2011, was not surprised by this latest honor. We knew we were getting a gem when we recruited Dr. Suchak from New Jersey, Brummel-Smith said. It was the rst time that each reference began their letter by saying, I really hate to be writing this letter because we dont want to lose her. In fact, two of the letters lamented that their biggest regret was that they would be losing the doctor who took care of their parents! We couldnt be happier having her at FSU and are very proud of her accomplishments. Suchak said she was deeply humbled to receive the AGS award. I wish to share this recognition with my family, my mentors, my colleagues, my trainees, and foremost the patients, families and caregivers that I have had the privilege to serve, she said. A patient-physician relationship is a sacred relationship, and I am very grateful for the trust that my patients have placed in me. I will continue to work hard to earn the honor that this award signi es to our community, she said. Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of dedicated advocates who protect the rights of elders residing in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. The programs local councils are seeking additional volunteers to identify, investigate and resolve residents concerns. Special training and certi cation is provided. All interested individuals who care about protecting the health, safety, welfare and rights of long-term care facility residents who often have no one else to advocate for them are encouraged to call toll-free (888) 831-0404 or visit the programs website at http://ombudsman. my orida.com.Volunteer opportunityFSU professor named top geriatrics clinician FSUDr. Niharika Suchak T he Wak u lla News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringDr. Mark McCoyFebruary 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromYou dont nd this type of thing in larger cities. is is a great advertising! More people need to advetise like this.Dr. Mark McCoy OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 Page 5B TheWakulla News PER COPY75 75 3 QUARTERS COIN RETURN By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTwo people are dead and a third is recovering after an apparent home invasion in Wakulla Station on Wednesday, March 30. The suspect in the murders is 24-year-old Andrew Michael Wilson, the father of a 1year-old child who lived in the home. Wilson was arrested in Stewart County, Ga., and was later transported back to Wakulla County, where he is being held without bond on two counts of murder and one count of attempted murder. The childs mother, Gabrielle McKenzie, 19, is currently in a Tallahassee hospital where she was being treated with a cut throat. The dead men are John Robert McKenzie, 62, and Patrick Lee Pittman, 24. While an autopsy is pending, the sheriff said the mens injuries are consistent with knife wounds. The child was injured and suffered some bruising in the attack and was found covered in blood by deputies and was inconsolable. The child was released to a family member. The murders took place in a single-wide mobile home on Field Loop Road, in an area off Bloxham Cutoff in Wakulla Station. Wakulla Sheriff David Harvey said evidence indicates it was a premeditated attack: Wilson apparently parked about a quarter-mile from the home and went inside sometime in the early morning hours. Investigators at the scene found a bloodtrail and footprints leading from the home to where they believe Wilson parked his car. Wilsons ngers were partially severed in the attack its not clear if the wound was from a knife or, as some investigators speculated, whether one of the victims may have bitten Wilsons ngers. It has been con rmed by investigators that it was Pittman who made the 911 call to the sheriffs of ce around 3:30 a.m. that brought deputies to the scene. Wilson was identi ed as a suspect by Gabrielle McKenzie, who spoke his name, the sheriff said. After issuing a BOLO (Be On the Lookout alert) Wilson was picked up after he wrecked his vehicle in south Georgia. Sheriff Harvey said it is believed Wilson was on his way to Columbus, Ga., where he reportedly has some connections. The sheriff also speculated that the wreck may have been due to blood loss from his hand injuries. Continued on Page 10A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 14th Issue Thursday, April 7, 2011 Two Sections 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews Please see Page 12ADouble murder in Wakulla Station MURDER SCENE: Sheriff David Harvey briefs reporters on Wednesday near the McKenzie home where the killings occurred. The booking photo of suspect Andrew Wilson, right.WILLIAM SNOWDEN WAKULLA SHERIFFS OFFICE By JENNIFER RAYMONDjraymond@thewakullanews.netAn outpouring of support has been shown by those in thecommunitytopeople Bene t set to help Gabrielle McKenziePlease help meVICTIMS: Patrick Pittman, above, with 1-year-old Layne. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netGabrielle McKenzie had a court order to keep Andrew Wilson away from her. She went to court in February and got an injunction against Wilson, and it was extended in March, complaining that her former boyfriend and fatheroftheir1-year-old In two-page handwritten ling with the court, McKenzie claimed that Wilson was threatening to kill her, as well as her dad and any new man in her life. He told me if he ever caught me with another man he would kill he and I, she wrote. Word for word, he said: I will slit his fxxxxxx throat and blow your fxxxxxx head off. He hasalsothreatenedmy Chamber hosts boil Art on the Terrace is held Please see Page 10BLooking for a copy ofYoure In Luck!Find Your Copy Today at These Rack and Dealer Locations.IN CRAWFORDVILLE The Wakulla News Ofce Ace Hardware Beef OBradys CVS Pharmacy Dollar General Dux Liquors El Jalisco Food Mart Hamaknockers Hardees Karols Korner Petro Lees Liquor/ Sky Box Sports Bar Lindys Chicken Lube Expert Micheles Convenience Store Ming Tree Myra Jeans Savannahs Senior Center Stop N Save Tasty Takeout Victors American Grille Walgreens Wal-Mart Winn Dixie IN MEDART Dollar General Inland Store Petro Wakulla Co Public Library Wildwood Inn IN PANACEA Big Top Supermarket Crums Mini Mall Dollar General IN OCHLOCKONEE BAY Angelos Mashes Sands BP IN CARRABELLE Carrabelle IGA IN SOPCHOPPY Express Lane Lous Bait and Tackle Sallys Sopchoppy Grocery IN SPRING CREEK Spring Creek Restaurant IN SHELL POINT C21/Florida Coastal Properties IN WOODVILLE Ace Hardware Bert Thomas Grocery Dollar General Gulf Coast Lumber IGA Grocery Store IN ST. MARKS Bo Lynns Express Lane IN WAKULLA STATION Dollar General Savannahs Stop N Save Wakulla Station BP AND ELSEWHERE Glendas Country Store Macks Country Meats Spring Creek Restaurant Stop N Save (Bloxham Cutoff/Hway 319) Stop N Save (Hway 98/ Spring Creek Road) Wakulla Springs Lodge IN TALLAHASSEE Circle K (Capital Circle & Cville Highway) Publix (Capital Circle & Cville Highway)By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 15 Septic tank legislation, state permitting changes and millions of dollars for Everglades restoration and land-buying capped off a relatively under-the-radar session for environmental issues. Despite being overshadowed by insurance, redistricting and higher education issues, to name a few, environmental groups say they had better session than last, with both legislative leaders and Gov. Rick Scott both being more amendable to their input. I found a greater willingness on the part of leadership to work on compromises on many of these issues, said Janet Bowman, legislative director for the Nature Conservancy. The governor, too, had much greater outreach this session and we worked well with his of ce on a number of issues. Atop the list, the $70 billon budget includes $30 million for Everglades restoration. A priority of the governor, money for the states share of clean-up efforts was earmarked early in the process, and both chambers went along. Not so with Florida Forever. The states latest rendition of a decades long land-buying effort was under the knife as lawmakers attempted to ll a $1.4 billion hole in the state budget. In the end, however, lawmakers found $8 million to put toward managing and lease arrangements, though the state wont purchase any new land for now. It wasnt a lot of money, but it was a strong recommitment to the programs, said Eric Draper of Florida Audubon. Among the most closely watched water issues was a repeal of a statewide septic tank inspection program that critics said was too expensive. The measure, included in a Department of Health agency bill, would still allow inspections in counties that have rst magnitude springs. But Kurt Spitzer, executive director of the Florida Stormwater Association, said the group is concerned the bill may prevent cities and counties that already have ordinances in place from keeping them on the books. It seems to go a little further than we had wished and limits the ability of local governments to establish rules on their own, Spitzer said. WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS Stung last year by a bill that stripped them of more than $200 million in funding, Florida water management districts got a bit of a reprieve this year as lawmakers restored some of the regional boards ability to bring in revenue, and laid off deeper cuts. Lawmakers passed SB 1986, which lifted revenue caps in exchange for requiring heightened legislative oversight. Specifically, the bill would require an annual review, but would allow districts to again determine their appropriate funding levels. In addition, the final version rolled back some of the oversight provisions that were envisioned in earlier drafts and relaxed some stricter requirements that environmental groups found too onerous. The lifting of the water managements caps was very encouraging, Bowman said. There seems to be a recognition that the water management districts needed to have the revenue available to meet regional and statewide needs. STREAMLINED ENVIRO PERMITTING A wide-ranging bill (HB 503) that makes a number of changes in the environmental permitting process, including prohibiting local governments from making a development permit conditional on having some other state permit, passed the Legislature the day before lawmakers called it quits. The bill, sponsored in the House by Rep. Jimmy Patronis, R-Panama City, deregulated certain injection wells and set a time limit on some permit applications. The bill also removes agency approval requirements for small stormwater projects and extends deadlines for certain environmental resource permits. Other issues that didnt pass included: HB 695, a measure that would let land management agencies enter into public-private partnerships with businesses to develop oil and gas on some onshore state lands under certain conditions. SB 604, a measure to restrict local laws regulating urban fertilizer application was killed before hitting the Senate oor.Legislative session wrap up: Environmental issues Gov. Rick Scott said Tuesday he hopes that a state worker drug testing bill he signed late Monday doesnt end up being challenged in court, but said, well see what happens. Scott on Monday signed legislation that would permit, though not require, state agencies to randomly drug test some employees. Most private companies now drug screen their employees, we need to be doing the same thing with your tax dollars, Scott said in an interview Tuesday morning on NewsTalk 1370 WCOA in Pensacola. I hope it doesnt go to the courts but well see what happens. Previous efforts to drug test government workers without suspicion have led to court challenges that they may violate the Fourth Amendment protection against illegal search and seizure. Scott ordered drug testing of government employees last year, but was rebuffed by the courts. News Service of FloridaScott hopes new drug testing law stands

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com5Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2Goto http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click Continue. By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 16 Sharkeys restaurant had just gone back to regular hours in the Capitol when lawmakers returned again this week to redraw political boundaries stricken a week earlier by the states highest court. Though likely not to draw the crowds that kept the 10th Floor coffee bar pumping espresso at a Neapolitan clip, the special session on reapportionment did its part to extend the capitols busy season, assuring another week of more people in suits than kids in school groups. The mission? Redraw at least a handful of state Senate districts that the Florida Supreme Court said did not adhere to a constitutional amendment meant to ensure that the most political of processes the redrawing of political boundaries was done in a non-political manner. While the House apparently accomplished the task with Solomon-like effect, the 40-member Senates plan was rejected in a 5-2 ruling by the court. While Republican leaders returned to fight another day, former state Sen. Nancy Argenziano dropped her lance midweek after a circuit judge ruled she cannot run for Congress as a Democrat The quotable former Republican had challenged her exclusion from what is already a crowded eld of Democrats hoping to unseat freshman Republican U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland. Other than that, the capital city was largely quiet following a legislative session that brought a smile to the face of Gov. Rick Scott, whose wish list was largely lled. REDISTRICTING BEGINS Following an expected course of action, the Florida Senate began looking Wednesday for ways to respond to the Florida Supreme Courts decision to throw out the upper chambers redistricting maps, opening an extraordinary session to repair the plan. Unlike the House, which received the high courts blessing, the Senate plan did not comply with provisions of Amendment 5, which requires lawmakers to draw compact districts that favor no party or candidate. Senate leaders said the court affirmed the lions share of the Senate map by speci cally citing just eight districts in its ruling. Changes could be narrowly aimed at xing those districts though minor changes in a districts lines, by necessity, affect neighboring districts. Still, the Senate said it will try to hone in mostly on the eight problem areas. If you know that 32 seats have met the criteria, why upset those 32 if you possibly can (avoid it)? said Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island. Critics, however, said that might not prove possible. There is no such thing as tweaking the map, said Florida Democratic Party chairman Rod Smith. Along with the physical lines, the numbering of the districts is also a disputed factor. All 40 Senate districts are up for re-election this year, meaning that some senators will be elected to two-year terms and some to four-year terms. Because of that, the districts can be numbered in such a way that most members of the chamber could serve for up to 10 years longer than the constitutional, eight-year term limit for lawmakers. The question now is how to allocate the numbers in other words, how many and which should get an extra two years. Justices said that was a problem with the plan too. Adopting a renumbering system that signi cantly advantages incumbents by increasing the length of time that they may serve by two years most assuredly favors incumbents, Justice Barbara Pariente wrote, referring to one of the things the new amendments proscribe, helping out current seatholders. Further, purposefully manipulating the numbering of the districts in order to allow incumbents to serve in excess of eight years would also appear to frustrate the intent of the voters when the term limits amendment was adopted, Pariente wrote. But in his dissent, Chief Justice Charles Canady said the majority was reaching noting that the length of the terms doesnt actually make it easier for any member of the Senate to win re-election. The numbering of the Senate districts is totally unrelated to any advantage incumbent senators will obtain vis-a-vis challenger candidates, Canady wrote. The session was barely noticeable this week because lawmakers didnt really do much. The new version of the Senate maps will be drawn up by staff this weekend, with a discussion of it and vote on it planned for Tuesday in the Senate Reapportionment Committee. With a floor vote in the Senate planned by the end of the week, the House would then be able to follow suit with a pro forma vote on the new plan by the end of the month. COURT: ARGENZIANO CANT RUN AS A DEMOCRAT For at least one candidate, the upcoming decision over whether the state drew Congressional boundaries in a fair way will have little effect because the former Republican found out this week she cant run in the party with which she now identi es. Argenziano wanted to join a Democratic primary field that now includes state Rep. Leonard Bembry, former Sen. Al Lawson, attorney Alvin Peters and environmental activist Jay Liles in the bid to unseat Southerland. Argenziano, a political moderate who has done well with independent voters, had hoped she could do well in a race in which a plurality would be enough to advance into the general election. She sued over a state elections law overhaul last year that requires candidates who want to run as a member of one party to have not been a member of another party for at least one year before qualifying about 17 months before an election. Circuit Court Judge James Shelfer said Argenziano did not prove that she had a fundamental right to run as a Democrat something that would have required the state to prove that the elections law was constitutional. And she had not proven the law was unconstitutional. After having some time to think, following the ruling, Argenziano said she would not continue to ght the law. The cost to appeal is too much, as well as the time involved, she wrote on her Facebook page. Shell likely still run as a member of the Independent Party. While Argenziano continues to think about a new job, many Floridians have already found one. Statistics released this week show the states unemployment rate in January fell to its lowest level in three years. The 9.6 percent rate was 0.3 percentage points lower than December and a hefty 1.3 points below January 2011. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Contrary to what Senator (Don) Gaetz suggests, the score is not 32-8. The score is 0-1. Florida Democratic Chairman Rod Smith talking about the Republican way of looking at its loss in the Supreme Court over the district maps, versus the Democrats perspective. STORY OF THE WEEK: Lawmakers returned for an extraordinary session to redraw state Senate maps after the chambers initial attempt got shot down by the Supreme Court.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Lawmakers return to take up redistrictingBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 19 A pair of Republican senators led alternative redistricting plans Monday to the one sponsored by Senate Reapportionment Chairman Don Gaetz, setting up a potential intraparty battle over the future of the chamber. The maps, by Sens. Jack Latvala of Clearwater and Miguel Diaz de la Portilla of Miami, would have the effect of helping allies even though to do so intentionally would be a violation of the anti-gerrymandering Fair Districts standards approved by voters in a November 2010 referendum. One of the major changes in Latvalas map would be to keep Senate Majority Leader Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, and Sen. David Simmons, R-Maitland, in separate districts. The Florida Supreme Court sharply criticized an odd-shaped appendage springing from one Central Florida district that appeared aimed at keeping the two from facing each other. Latvalas plan would shift surrounding districts to make the appendage shorter and less pronounced. The Clearwater senator is an ally of Gardiner in Gardiners bid to become Senate president in 2014, reportedly in return for Latvala assuming the of ce in 2016, and Simmons is also a Gardiner supporter. Diaz de la Portillas plan, meanwhile, would shift the lines of Senate District 35 -where his brother, Alex Diaz de la Portilla, has led to run. The district is currently represented by Democratic Sen. Gwen Margolis of North Miami Beach, though she could end up in another district under Diaz de la Portillas plan. The lines would slice North Miami Beach in two. That map would increase the Hispanic voting-age population of District 35 to 66.2 percent when black Hispanics are factored out -an increase from the Gaetz plan, which puts the district at a shade less than 49 percent non-black Hispanics in voting-age population. It would also go from a district that Democrat Alex Sink carried by almost 21 percent in the gubernatorial election to one Sink carried by almost 7 percent. One issue for Diaz de la Portillas plan is that it appears to have districts that are not contiguous and would not assign all of the states population to a district. Any redistricting plan in Florida would have to consist of 40 contiguous districts and could not leave out any portion of the state. Neither Latvala or Diaz de la Portilla returned calls Monday seeking comment on their plans. The Senate Reapportionment Committee is set to meet Tuesday and approve a plan for the full Senate to consider by the end of the week. The House would take up that map next week.Latvala, Diaz de la Portilla le competing maps

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Your new career starts now! *0 Tuition Cost*No Credit Check* Great Pay & Benefits, Short employment commitment required call (866)297-8916 www.joinCRST .com General Help 25 Driver Trainees Needed!Learn to drive for TMCTransportation Earn $750 per week! No experience needed! local CDL Training! Job ready in 3 weeks! (888)3681964 BUSY Automotive ShopWanted full time shop help. Clean-cut, motivated, self starter. Automotive experience helpful, but not required. Apply in person 2235 Crawfordville Hwy. or Fax Resume (850) 9264647 General Help PAWN SHOP ASSISTANTHigh School Grad or GED, Retail Sales Experience helpful, but not essential, Full time, Send Resume to EMPLOYMENT PO Box 1206 Crawfordville Florida 32326 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction Can you Dig It? Heavy Equipment School, 3 wk training program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Trackhoes. Local Job placement asset. Start digging dirt Now. (877)9949904 Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SHEV certified. Call (877) 206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Mobile Homes For Rent MEDART2BR 2 BA Large Lot, quiet neighborhood $650 month and $650 deposit, 2 miles South of Crawfordville, on US 319 850-926-5192 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEMobile homes for rent or option to purchase with owner financing. 3/2 Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. 2/2 Wakulla Gardens $595 + deposit. Owner will carry to qualified tenant with down pyt. Call 850-5244090 North Wakulla County2 or 3 BR/1BA mobile home w/upgrades on pond. $625/mo. $500deposit. Revell Realty 850-9622212 SOPCHOPPY3br/1ba, Covered screen porch, large wooded lot,$475/mo (incl garbage) + a dep (850) 566-4124 Real Estate For Rent HOME ON ACREAGEHome on 3 acres. 2BR/2BA. porch, storage building, large oak trees, conveniently located near post office and Walgreens $625/mo 850-251-1253 Br enda Hicks Realty Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA W/2 car garage. 1.25 acres, payed sub-division in Wakulla Station, 20-mins. to Tallahassee, fenced backyard, $875/mo. plus security/cleaning deposit. Avail. April 1st Please Call (850) 566-5165 (850) 9266115 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEGeorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $875, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 4433300 WATER. BIRDS FISHING2/1, w/covered deck over looking private dock, newly refurbished, completely furnished or neg unfurnished $900 rent + utility fee (850) 5241026 Auctions Estates Auction: Spinal Surgical Center Inventory Sells Regardless of Price, March 29, 10am 100 Coy Burgess Loop, DeFuniak Springs 13% BP. Ewald Realty & Auction, AB2473/AU1340 (407)275-6853 www. EwaldAuctions.com Commercial Real Estate WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-4215039 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 9263546 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 9267291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5154-0322 Vs. Ashley Ciara Evans 2011-CA-000189 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000189 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SHILLING, and JAMES M. FOX, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-189-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the plaintiff, and ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SCHILLING and JAMES M. FOX, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT A Lots 32,33, and 34 of the West Side of the Town of Sopchoppy, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida Published two (2) times March 15 & 22, 2012 The Wakulla News 5154-0322 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wak ulla Newswww.th ew akullanews.com

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets.Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month.2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 415 Mashes Sands Rd. on Ochlockonee Bay 3 Bdr./ 2 ba $825. Pets with Deposit No smoking. 6 River Cove Bay view 2 Bdr. 1 ba Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Island 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 47 Jasmine 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre $1,200 Mo. Available April 1. No Smoking/Small Pets w/approval 20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 917 Jessica 3BR/2BA Woodville/Leon County $800 Mo. Pets ok w/approvalAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate5160-0329 Vs, Andrew M. Baker No. 11-252-CA Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-252-CA CENTENNIAL BANK,as successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK Plaintiff, vs. ANDREW M. BAKER, a married man, the Unknown Spouse of Andrew M. Baker, and any and all Others Claiming Interests, By, Under, Through or Against ANDREW M. BAKER Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 7, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerks Office, of the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 11:00 a.m the following described property: See Exhibit A attached hereto and made a part hereof. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim with sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON March 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court (Seal) /s/ by Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Lots 5 and 6, Block of Panacea Mineral Springs, Unit 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat Book 1 Page 5, of the Public Records of Waklla County, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 24-5S-02W-057-03130-000) and: Lot 55, Block of Wakulla Gardens, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 00-00-035-008-07819-000) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22, 29 2012 5158-0329 5159-0329 Vs, Larry W. Shiver No. 11-345-CA Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-345-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK Plaintiff, vs. LARRY W. SHIVER, a single man, and any and all Others Claiming interests By, Under, Through or Against LARRY W. SH IVER, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 7, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerks Office, of the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 11:00 a.m the following described property: See Exhibit A attached hereto and made a part hereof. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim with sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON March 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court (Seal) /s/ by Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A LOTS ONE AND TWO (1 & 2) OF DARSEY VILLAGE, A SUBDIVISION AS SHOWN ON PAGE 76 OF PLAT BOOK NO. 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND BEING A SUBDIVISION LOCATED IN TRACT NUMBERED ONE OF AN UNRECORDED PLAT OF INDIAN SUMMER LOCATED IN THE NW 1/4 SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL IDENTIFICATION NUMBER: 12-5S-03W-194-00734-A01 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22,29 2012 5158-0329 Vs, Spears Small Engines Case No. 11-167-CA Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-167-CA CENTENNIAL BANK,as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK Plaintiff, vs. SPEARS SMALL ENGINES, INC., a dissolved Florida corporation, ESTATE OF LEASTON LAMAR SPEARS, DAVID SPEARS AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, and all Others Claiming By and Through Named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 7, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerks Office, of the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida on Thursday, April 12, 2012, at 11:00 a.m the following described property: See Exhibit A attached hereto and made a part hereof. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim with sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON March 15, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court (Seal) /s/ by Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commercial Building/Engine repair and Tire Store Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Begin at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Block A isolated in the Town of Crawfordville, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Deed Book C & D, Page 572 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 00 degrees 20 minutes 24 seconds East 76.27 feet to a concrete monument on the maintained right-of-way boundary of a county graded road, thence run South 89 degrees 39 minutes 36 seconds West along said maintained right-of-way boundary 123.41 feet to a concrete monument thence run North 00 degress 20 minutes 24 seconds West 7.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run West 75.00 feet to the Easterly right-of-way boundary of Tallahassee street, thence run North along said right-of-way boundary 110.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run East 45.50 to a concrete monument, thence run North 9.50 feet to a concrete monument on the East boundary of said Block A isolated, thence run South along said East boundary 49.50 feet to the Point of Beginning. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22, 29 2012 5158-0329 5152-0322 Vs. Herndon, Linda 65-2010-CA-000243-cancel and reschedule foreclosure sale PUBLIC NOTICE 5155-0322 Vs. Charles Allen 11-CA-000230 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-CA-000230 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ESTATE OF CHARLES ALLEN PATRICK, deceased, CHARLES A. A.J. PATRICK, JR., TYLER SHAYNE PATRICK, LISA DOREEN PORTER, a/k/a LISA DOREEN PATRICK, U.S. DEPT. OF JUSTICE, WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-230-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and ESTATE OF CHARLES ALLEN PATRICK, deceased, CHARLES A. A.J. PATRICK, JR., TYLER SHAYNE PATRICK, LISA DOREEN PORTER, a/k/a LISA DOREEN PATRICK, U.S. DEPT. OF JUSTICE, WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT A Lot 18, Block A, Northwood Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 91 to 97, of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with 1985 EATO Doublewide Mobile Home ID Numbers: 11417921A & 11417921B, Title Numbers: 41329335 & 41309172 Published two (2) times -March 15, 22, 2012 in The Wakulla County, Florida 5154-0322 5156-0322 Vs. Joseph D. Olah 11-126-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-126-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH D. OLAH, JR. and KRISTINE P. OLAH, husband and wife; UNKNOWN TENANTS; et. al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-126-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and JOSEPH D. OLAH, JR., KRISTINE P. OLAH, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT A Commence at a concrete monument (marked #2919)being used as the Southeast Corner of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida said point also lying on the Easterly boundary of a 20.00 foot roadway easement (Redwood Lane) and run North along said Right-of-Way boundary 247.85 feet and iron rod and cap (marked #7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North along said Right-of-way boundary 367.16 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #4261), thence leaving said Right-of-way boundary run North 89 degrees40 minutes 43 seconds West 338.18 feet to an iron rod, thence run South 524.73 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 65 degrees 16 minutes 18 seconds East 372.14 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 3.46 acres, more or less. SUBJECT to and together with a 20.00 foot wide roadway easement lying over and across the Easterly 20.00 feet portion thereof. AND ALSO SUBJECT to a 100.00 foot wide powerline easement lying over and across the Southerly 100.00 feet, more or less thereof, or as designated by the powerline thereon. TOGETHER with one SUPRE MH 1974 ID G9150A & G9150B located thereon. Published two (2) times -March 15, 22, 2012 in The Wakulla News 5156-0322 5157-0329 Vs. Diane Curlee 11-311-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-311-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. HALE SMALL ENGINE REPAIR, INC. a Florida corporation, TROY A. HALE, DIANE M. CURLEE, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, FLORIDA OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT, INC., a Florida corporation, and UNKNOWN TENANTS #1 Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-311-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and HALE SMALL ENGINE REPAIR, a Florida Corporation, TROY A. HALE, DIANE M. CURLEE, FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, FLORIDA OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT, INC. and UNKNOWN TENANTS #1, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: EXHIBIT A Commence at the Northwest corner of Lot 72 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and run North 72 degrees 22 minutes 19 seconds East along the North boundary of said Lot 72 a distance of 25.00 feet to a re-rod(marked #6475) lying on the Easterly right-of-way boundary of Trice Lane thence leaving said right-of-way boundary continue North 72 degrees 22 minutes 19 seconds East along the North boundary of said Lot 72 (as monumented) a distance of 1399.33 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 72 degrees 22 minutes 19 seconds East along said North boundary (as monumented) 178.81 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 17 degrees 58 minutes 08 seconds East 728.39 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Northerly right-of-way boundary of State Road No: 61, thence run South 70 degrees 48 minutes 00 seconds West along said Northerly right-of-way boundary 178.81 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 17 degrees 58 minutes 19 seconds West 733.29 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 3.00 acres, more or less. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. (SEAL) DATED this 7th day of March, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of the Circuit Court /s/By Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22 and 29, 2012 5157-0329 IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2010-CA-000243 Division NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. LINDA K. HERNDON, et al. Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgement of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 25, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakull County, Florida described as: ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND IN WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 515, PAGE 774, ID#10-55-03W-000-00621-001, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS METES AND BOUNDS PROPERTY. COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 WEST 660.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 42 EAST 1388.01 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 27 DEGREES 15 WEST 1199.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 27 DEGREES 15WEST 774.47 FEET TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUT H 26 DEGREES 08 WEST 552.64FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SOUTHWESTERLY ALONGSAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1482.69 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 47FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 150.06 FEET, THE CHORE OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 19 DEGREES 02 WEST 150.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 47EAST 673.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. and commonly known as: 295 CURTIS MILL RD, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the hghest and bidder, for cash, Sales are held in Lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on April 12, 2012 at 11a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 8th day of March, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court /s/Desiree D.Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, March 15 & 22nd, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5150-0322 Weitzel, Joseph 11-77-PR Notice to Cred PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 11-77-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT JOSEPH WEITZEL Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS and NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION TO ALL CREDITORS and TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS The administration of the estate of ROBERT JOSEPH WEITZEL whose date of death was November 14, 2011, File Number 11-77-PR, is pending in the Circuit court of Wakulla County, Florida, probate division, whose address is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors have only those periods of time established in Florida Statutes 733.702 and 733.710 to file their claims against the estate. All creditors and all interested persons are required to file with the court. WITHIN 90 DAYS OF THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE (1) all claims against the estate ; (2) any objection that challenges the qualifications of the personal representative, venue or jurisdiction of the court; and (3) any written defenses to the Petition for Administration. You must file the original of your claim, objection or defense with the Clerk of the Court at the above address either before or immediately after service on the personal representatives attorney whose name and address are at the end of this notice. ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. FAILURE TO SERVE AND FILE TIMELY WRITTEN DEFENSES AS REQUIRED MAY RESULT IN A JUDGMENT OR ORDER FOR THE RELIEF DEMANDED, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO YOU. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 15, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Charlotte D. Weitzel 140 Dorothy Loop Crawfordville, FL 32327 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 Page 9BThe meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Renee Lawhon was recognized as Employee of the Month and Miranda Bowen and Jennifer Thaxton were recognized as Teachers of the Month. All were congratulated and presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. Daniel Stevens from the Florida Forest Service presented the Superintendent and School Board with a check from the sale of timber in Wakulla County. Diane Perez, a member of the Florida Council for AdvancEd Florida, presented the district with an Accreditation Plaque. All board members and the Superintendent were in attendance. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. A public hearing was opened regarding the School Board Member Voting Districts. The audience was given the chance to speak. After a short discussion the hearing was closed. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the agenda. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the following consent items: 1. Approved the Minutes of the Meeting held on February 21 and February 23, 2012. 2. Approved the following Employment of Personnel: Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) Baggett, TimothyMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Coxetter, CatherineMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Gay, JenniferRMSCustodian Time Limited02/22/12-06/30/12 Gray KatherineRMSSecretary Time Limited02/27/12-06/30/12 Green, TerriMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Johnson, JessicaMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Lawhon, LauraMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Lawhon, MichelleMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Nichols, AngelaMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Roddenberry, DeborahMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Ryan, RachelMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Tomaini, DennyTransportationOfce Assistan02/01/12-05/30/12 Watson, KendallMESA/S Remediation Teacher02/29/12-04/11/12 Bishop, JessicaWHSHead Varsity Girls Soccer Coach2011-2012 Gregg, DonaldWHSAssistant Varsity Boys Soccer Coach2011-2012 Reed, NickWHSAssistant JV Girls Soccer Coach2011-2012 PS-Professional Service Contract AC-Annual Contract 10 Month Employee Mabrey, JacquelineSECESE EBD Teacher03/01/12-06/04/12AC 3. Approved the following Retirement Letters: Mary Beth Mims/effective April 1, 2012 and enter DROP Jonele Bird/effective July 1, 2012 and enter DROP Linda Camp/effective June 29, 2012 and exit DROP Jennie King/effective July 1, 2012 Annette Allen/effective March 1, 2012 and enter DROP Glinda Raker/effective March 1, 2012 and enter DROP Linda Leckinger/effective February 1, 2012 and enter DROP 4. Approve a Letter of Resignation on Mary Hunter/effective March 19, 2012. 5. Approved Illness in the Line of Duty/FMLA. 6. Approved a Leave of Absence on Classie Franklin from January 5, 2012 to February 8, 2012. 7. Approved the February nancial statement. 8. Approved Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve for advertising the proposed school board member voting districts. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the D.O.E. Florida Inventory of School Houses (F.I.S.H.) Certications of Facilities Data. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Guaranteed Maximum Price for Wakulla Middle School HVAC renovations with Childers Construction Bid #11/12-05. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve Bike Florida to use buses for their annual spring tour. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the exemption to the Ms. Willie Glen Act. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2012-2013 Wakulla County School Board Calendar. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the 2012 VPK, ESE, High School and Middle School Summer Schedules (Calendar). Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the 2011-2014 Apalachee Center and Wakulla County Schools Service Agreement. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Contract for ELL Training. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Exceptional Student Education Policies and Procedures. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. An executive session was held immediately after the board meeting to discuss issues pertaining to collective bargaining. Superintendent Miller, Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott, Mr. Thomas, Beth ODonnell, Randy Beach and Karen Wells were in attendance.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON MARCH 12, 2012MARCH 22, 2012 Seasonal Employment PARKS and RECREATION DEPARTMENT Applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, March 23, 2012. 5151-0322 Mcelveen, Victoria K, Case # 12-17CP Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-17 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF VICTORIA KATHLEEN MCELVEEN Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Victoria Kathleen McElveen, deceased, File 12-17 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims Attorney for Personal Representative Aaron N. Bauldee, P.A. 4755 Knollwood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Phone: 850-559-1191, Florida Bar No. 0020513 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla County Times March 15 & 22nd, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5153-0322 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON MARCH 31, 2012 at 10:00a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: MICHAEL SIMMONS MARY LOUIS E SLOAN STEPHEN BOND BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF MARCH 31,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. March 15 and 22nd 2012 5162-0329 03/22-03/29 Notice of Sale-Wakulla Realty PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Wakulla Realty will hold a sale by sealed bid on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at 2655-B U.S. Highway 319 of the contents of Mini-warehouse containing personal property of: Deborah Rudell Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is March 15, 2012. Personal Representative: Daniel E. Wiggins 227 15th Street NW Ruskin, FL 33570 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 15 & 22, 2012 Cleotha Randolph Before the sale date of April 3, 2012, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 535, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 or by paying in person at 2655 U.S. Highway 319, Crawfordville, Florida. Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News March 22, and 29 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Selling Something? 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Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 12 3 4 5 167 829 9 178 35 6142 1 98 213 75431 00 9 HtCtt 162 7398 4 5 985164237 437852196 594 321768 823697514 671485923 316 978452 248513679 759246381 F O L I C C A R T H A R I O H A I R O L E O A G I N A N N I E L A M P B L A C K L O T A M O S N I T R E S E A T E N D O G E M A R R O W M O T O R C A R A B N E R T I N C T A R E R A J A T O R A H O N I T I S A B A N E S E N D E R N E W B O R N S S M E L L Y R O P E L A P S E S T R A T A C A N E P I P M A T C H P L A Y R A I S E U L E E E A V E O W N E R T E S S R O A R R E S E T High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com The Wakulla News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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By MARK UNDERWOODSpecial to The NewsIf youve ever wondered what people who live to be 100 have in common, science may have some answers. When you read stories about groups of people living t and healthy beyond a hundred years, you cant help but wonder, what are they doing? Now, science is unlocking clues that may help us understand the mysteries behind longevity. New research is centered on areas called Blue Zones, geographical areas in the world where many residents consistently live to be 100 or older. Sardinia, Italy is one such area where many centenarians can be found. So is it just good luck that people live to be 100? Here are some starting points to consider in your own journey to long life. Is this Shangri-La? The chances of nding long living, healthy adults in the worlds Blue Zones are 20 times greater than in other places. They also have lower rates of cancer, heart disease and dementia. It turns out where people live the longest on earth, they share something in common. Their secret to a long life is no secret at all. Residents in Blue Zone communities have a consistent regimen of good eating, interests and activities, constant learning, daily exercise and social interaction. I want to live in a Blue Zone! Here are a few simple steps you and your family can take to improve the chances of living a long life. The key ingredient for maximizing your success is consistency. That means everyday you need to be active and eat a healthy diet not just on weekdays. The only element you cant change is your genetics. Since we cant ask for do-over in this category, lets move on to things we can control and help improve our chances of living to 100. Follow these steps toward creating a Blue Zone in your house: Work it often! All centenarians in the Blue Zones of the world are active participants in the world around them. The phrase use it or lose it can be life changing and life saving, particularly when it comes to exercise. The key is to nd an activity that you enjoy such as running, biking or swimming and youll be much more likely to incorporate it into a regular activity. MAINTAIN SOCIAL NETWORKS Avoid being isolated. Keep a circle of close, good friends. The Australia Longitudinal Study on Aging, a study that has followed nearly 1,500 people over 70 years old for 10 years, says friends may be more important than you think. The study found that social networks like strong friendships can prolong your life. If you have good friends who you share inner secrets with, and you chat with them often, this close-knit interaction impacts you in a healthy way. MOM WAS RIGHT, EAT YOUR VEGGIES Many communities identi ed within the Blue Zones have a mostly plantbased diet. They eat veggies every day, many times a day. In Japan, fish is the main meat consumed at home. Omega fatty acids are good for the brain and body, and fish and legumes have all the nutrients you need to put you on your path to become a centenarian. Eating the right foods can also help to combat the adverse affects of oxidation and damage of brain cells. EAT LESS, EAT RIGHT There is a concept in Okinawa that is the opposite of supersizing the meal. They are known for a practice called, Hara hachi bu which translates roughly to % belly. Eat just a little bit less than whatever full is for you. You will get the nutrients you need while lowering your caloric intake. Moderation here may keep your metabolism in top shape. LEARN TO RELAX Its also important to try to relax more often and allow the toxic effects of stress to dissipate. Blue Zone communities share an understanding of the importance for rest and relaxation. Centenarians have found effective ways to de-stress and keep their minds active. Start building a Blue Zone in your house today. If you live right, eat right, exercise, laugh often and continue the joys of learning, youre on your way to reaping the rewards of a richly lled, long life. Visit www.TheGoodNewsAboutAging.com for more articles and tips for healthy aging.Mark Underwood is a neuroscience researcher, president and co-founder of Quincy Bioscience, a biotech company located in Madison, Wis. Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 22, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 THE GOOD NEWS ABOUT AGINGTips to reach 100 by creating your own Blue ZoneScientists are studying places known as Blue Zones, areas where many residents consistently live to be 100 or older to look at the factors that contribute to longevity Call 866.610.7768Espaol 866.960.7085Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV NO CONTRACT! 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TD-SPAD0301135458_0 GREYHOUNDRACINGOPENSFRIDAY,MARCH23RDYOUBETITSFUN!SIMULCASTBETTINGALSOAVAILABLEDaniaJai-AlaiJacksonvilleDerbyLane TurfClubDining-GreatFood!|OpenMonday-Saturday7pm-11pm Monticello,Fl850-997-2561 LIVE Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of