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Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00400
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 03-15-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00400
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Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThings have improved for women over the years. Young women today have the bene“ ts of the struggles their mothers suffered in striving for equality. Theres still more to be accomplished, according to a group of women gathered together for a panel discussion of Womens Work in Wakulla,Ž organized as a program of the Wakulla County Historical Society on Thursday, March 8. Educator Andrea Carter recounted her experience growing up with the ambition of going into diplomatic service. In college, she was asked if she liked typing because women in the diplomatic corps … thats all they did was type. She immediately changed her major. A big change shes seen in her lifetime is that womens career choices are now unlimited. When she was growing up, women were limited to the choices of teacher, nurse or secretary. Anginita Rosier, who is a Sopchoppy city commissioner, said that nowadays its becoming more common to see women in leadership roles. You can pursue whatever dreams you have, regardless,Ž Rosier said. But historian Madeleine Carr offered a perspective that, of 188 world leaders, only 16 are women. Tammie Bar“ eld, general manager of The Wakulla News, spoke of growing up in a home where there were traditional roles for women, typically serving men. Thats a changing attitude that theres tasks that are womens work,Ž she said. High school drama teacher Susan Solburg said she grew up on a farm where there was just work, not limited to a speci“ c gender. Continued on Page 12APublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 4B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 5B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 5B INDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 11th Issue Thursday, March 15, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyThe Wakullanews OBITUARIES Tammy Kay Roberts Harvey Frank Earl McIntyre Meta Gwen Rabitaille Walter George Rinkel Budget de cit loomsQuestions about gate at Shell Point By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAlthough it is too early to know for sure, early estimates show that the county could face a budget de“ cit of around $240,000 in this “ scal year. Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman told Wakulla County Commissioners at the “ rst budget workshop for 2012-13 that he was estimating ad valorem revenue will come in between 3 to 5 percent lower than anticipated. Sparkman told the commission it was too soon to tell and he would have a better idea of the expected revenues in June. Commissioner Lynn Artz asked Sparkman what his projection was at this time last year. Sparkman told her it was 10 percent and last year, ad valorem revenues came in just under 10 percent. The commissioners all agreed that if the revenues do fall short, they did not want to increase the millage rate to make up for the difference. If ad valorem revenue decreases by 4 percent, for instance, the millage rate would need to be raised to 8.95 to get the same revenue as the current year. Commissioner Randy Merritt said the hope is that revenues from the Public Service Tax, which was implemented in January at 7 percent, will “ ll that hole. Once we get “ rm numbers, it may be a wash,Ž Merritt said. Commissioner Mike Stewart said that would be great if it happened, but they dont know real “ gures right now. Were talking out of our ying yang right now,Ž Stewart said. Stewart said he would like to be able to decrease the millage again this year to make up for the Public Service Tax. We levied a new tax on them,Ž Stewart said. We owe them some kind of relief.Ž Stewart said he would like to lower the millage by the same amount as the tax, but knows that may not be possible. Another area that might have a large impact on the countys budget is the recent ruling on the legality of requiring all state employees to contribute 3 percent to their retirement. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford ruled against the state and found the measure unconstitutional. If her ruling stands, the county would be required to make up the difference. The ruling is expected to be appealed. That would be a very big hit,Ž Merritt said. During the workshop, Deputy County Administrator Tim Barden said there is an estimated 5 percent increase in health insurance. The commission can choose to absorb those increases or pass them on to the employees. Commissioner Lynn Artz suggested the county look at ways to decrease their expenditures in healthcare by improving the health of county employees and reducing lost work days and medical expenses. Continued on Page 3AEmergency assistance availableBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThose in attendance at the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth meeting on March 7 heard some good news: Wakulla County has received funds to help residents with emergency assistance and weatherization, as well as provide prevention based programs for at-risk teens. Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida has earmarked funds to help families in Wakulla County who are about to be evicted from their homes. Catholic Charities has worked hard to focus these dollars for us,Ž said Executive Director Gail Campbell. Wakulla residents who are in need of this type of emergency assistance are asked to call Catholic Charities at (850) 222-2180 during normal business hours. The initial screening for assistance will be done over the phone. If the resident quali“ es, a case manager from Catholic Charities will come to Wakulla County to meet with the client. Also announced at the meeting was the awarding of additional funds for the weatherization program in the county, which is intended to improve the energy ef“ ciency of low-income dwellings and in turn, reduce energy bills for low-income families. The stimulus funding ended in February and states could apply for an extension. Florida was granted that extension, said a representative from Capital Area Community Action Agency, the agency that administers the countys weatherization assistance program. Additional funding was also sought and that too was granted, the representative said. About 20 to 30 more homes will be able to be weatherized with this additional money, the representative said. There is a short window and applications need to be submitted by mid-April. CACAA can be contacted at (850) 926-3122 or at their of“ ce located at 15A Crescent Way in Crawfordville. Continued on Page 2APanel has lively discussion on Womens Work in Wakulla By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netDue to safety concerns, the access gate to Shell Point Beach has been locked, according to Bryan Roddenberry, assistant director of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. Those with sailboats who would normally pull their vessel up to the water to load and unload, will now need to get a code from the county to unlock the gate and gain access. Roddenberry said the old metal gate was replaced with a wood gate about a month ago and was left open, like it always had been, until they received a complaint about unauthorized vehicles on the beach. We are trying to establish some access control to the beach in order to prevent unauthorized vehicles and late night vandals on the beach, which has been reported by citizens,Ž Roddenberry said. Continued on Page 2AWith falling ad valorem revenues, county commissioners are told there could be $240,000 less money next year. ey hope the 7 percent Public Service Tax they passed last year will “ ll the hole Were talking out of our ying yang right now, says one commissioner about the lack of specificity in the budget numbers WILLIAM SNOWDENEducator Andrea Carter makes a point during the panel discussion as Sopchoppy City Commissioner Anginita Rosier, drama teacher Susan Solburg and Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper listen. Other panelists were Tammie Bar“ eld of The Wakulla News, landscape architect Betsy Smith, historian Madeleine Carr and professor Rachel Sutz Pienta. Low Country Boil, Page 8B Low Country Boil, Page 8B JENNIFER JENSENCoalition for Youth member Sherri Kraeft discusses an issue at a meeting last week. Catholic Charities is conducting the screening for emergency assistance, call 222-2180 for help. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe access gate is locked due to safety concerns, according to the county. The lock that was on the gate over the weekend. WakullaStory, Page 1B WakullaStory, Page 1B

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A A chain and key lock was placed on the gate temporarily. A combination lock has now replaced the temporary lock, he said. In an email to a concerned citizen, Roddenberry said the safety concerns relate to County Ordinance Section 23.005, which says it is unlawful to operate any vehicle on park grounds in or on any area not specifically designated as a park road. Roddenberry said he would like to propose making the gate to water access an of“ cial park road,Ž so users can access it at their convenience. The roadŽ would have visible identi“ ers so others do not use the area. For now, those with nonmotorized vessels who wish to gain access to the beach will need to contact parks and recreation for the code. The code will change periodically and Roddenberry said he hopes to establish an email list so users can be noti“ ed when the code is about to change. Roddenberry said there is also a plan to install signage, letting people know how they can gain access. The gate will not be locked during the day on the weekends, he said. We hope the citizens and community will understand the intent of this action is not to deter the proper users of the beach but to prevent the vandals access to the beach,Ž Roddenberry said. Roddenberry said he does not have a timeline on how long the lock will be in place and is open to input and suggestions from citizens on how to address the problems of vandalism and unauthorized vehicles on the beach. For more information, visit www.wcprd.com or call 926-7227.Questions about gate at Shell PointContinued from Page 1A Campbell informed the coalition that the county is in line to receive $12,000 for prevention and support based programs for at-risk teens from the Department of Juvenile Justice. These funds come from the sales of the Invest in Children specialty license plate. The funds go to the Juvenile Crime Prevention and Early Intervention Trust Fund within the Department of Juvenile Justice. The proceeds of the fee fund programs and services that are designed to prevent juvenile delinquency. The department allocates money for programs and services within each county based on that countys proportionate share of the license plate annual use fee collected by the county. The former Wakulla County Juvenile Justice Council merged with the Childrens Coalition to form the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth. To acquire these funds, Campbell said the juvenile justice council must continue to meet with that name and dedicate time to talking speci“ cally about juvenile justice. The coalition members agreed to hold the juvenile justice council meeting inside the coalition meeting on a quarterly basis to ful“ ll the requirement. We are stepping to the music,Ž Campbell said. Campbell suggested they use the money for a Do Good Campaign, which would reward positive behavior. There was also an idea to hold a Ghost Out school assembly to increase student awareness of the problem of drinking and driving, and the number of lives lost in alcohol related crashes. Campbell said right behind that funding is $1.2 million, which would be spread throughout the state. Campbell said the county could be in line to receive $35,000, which would also be used for prevention and support based programs. Coalition members were asked to come up with ideas and “ gure out where there is a need for this type of program. There was a suggestion of an additional resource of“ cer at the school. Currently there is one of“ cer for 1,300 high school students. Juvenile Probation Of“ cer Don Wilson said he would like to start Project Payback in the county. Businesses would partner with the program and offer work sites for juveniles. Wilson said he has notice juveniles in Wakulla County are having a hard time completing sanctions in a timely manner and this would help correct that. Currently there are 43 children in the juvenile justice system in Wakulla County. Kathy Asbell of Refuge House said abuse is often related to juvenile delinquency and wondered if the money might be used to fund a program deals with both issues. The coalition members agreed to come back with ideas and suggestions of programs the additional money could be used for from the Department of Juvenile Justice. The coalition will hold a town hall meeting on April 3 at 5:30 p.m. in the Wakulla High School cafeteria.Emergency assistance availableBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netRepresentatives with the Organization for Arti“ cial Reefs and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission appeared before the St. Marks City Commission on March 8 to ask the city to apply for a permit to reopen the St. Marks Reef area. Tony Murray, board member of OAR, said the reauthorization is necessary so additional material can be placed on the arti“ cial reef. The artificial reef was placed in 1964 and 1965 and has developed a lot since then, Murray said. It is also outside of the original permitted location. So this reauthorization would also increase the area to include where the reef currently is located and where the permit said it should be. There wasnt GPS back then, Murray said, so it was harder to find the exact location. The reef is 17.3 acres and is located about 5 miles out from the St. Marks Lighthouse, Murray said. They are looking at trying to expand the reef to 43 acres. The tires that make up the reef have been underwater for 50 years and are a part of the ecosystem, Murray said. The hope is to create additional “ shing grounds near the shore, Murray said. Which will have an economic impact on the city, he said. OAR was asking the city to submit the application because it must be represented by a city or county. They approached the city instead of the county because St. Marks submitted the “ rst permit application and Murray said St. Marks will bene“ t from it. The commission agreed it was a good idea, but had some concerns regarding liability. If something happened to the reef or if something was placed in the area that was not permitted, the city would be responsible. Keith Millie, of FWC, said during transportation and placement, the contractor would assume liability. However, once the material is placed, the city would hold that liability. A post construction dive would be done to ensure the right material is placed and that it is in the right location, Millie said. A piece of concrete at 500 pounds is not going to move,Ž Millie said.The item was tabled until the April meeting. CITY OF ST. MARKSSt. Marks Reef may expandThe coalition is to receive $12,000 to be spent on at-risk teens. Ideas include a Do Good campaign to reward positive behavior FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATIONSEEKING ITEMS FOR GIANT YARD SALE!Its time to go through those closets....FWMA is preparing for its biannual yard sale that will be held at Nads storage onMarch 15th, 16th, and 17thNads is located at 59 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. All proceeds from this event will be used to care for sick, injured and orphaned wildlife! Donations of yard sale items can be dropped off at Nads storage in number 33 at any time before the sale or can be brought to the sale on Thursday March 15 after 12:00 noon. If you have items but are unable to drop them off or you would like to become a volunteer for our fundraising committee please email Jeff at jeffstudio54@yahoo.com.All donations are tax deductible and greatly appreciated. Thank you so much for helping us help our local wildlife! www.snapper.com LT125 285Z *Additional 1 year of limited warranty coverage is available on select models in stock. Current limited warranty duration is 2 y ears. This promotion extends the product warranty coverage to a total of 3 year s from the date of purchase. Engines are warranted separate ly and are not included in the promotional warranty period described abov e. Qualifying products include: select walk-behind mower s, rear-engine riders, RE200, NXT lawn tractors, LT 300 lawn tractor s, YT400 yard tractors, 150Z, 200Z, 285Z, 300Z and 355Z. Produ cts not eligible for this rebate include: All SE series walk-behind mowers, LT125 lawn tractors, SP X lawn tractors, 400Z, 500Z, pre ssure washers, generators, tillers, chipper shredder, brush c utters, leaf blowers, leaf vac uums, mini cultivators, attachments and ac cessories. Limited warranty applies to residential consumer use only. Qualifying product must be purchased between 3/1/12 and 5/31/12. Completion of product registration by the selling dealer is necessa ry to validate the date of purchase for proof of warranty. N o other warranty or implied warranty by the manufacturer exists except where required by law. This warranty gives you speci“c rights th at vary from state to state. Offer valid only in U.S. and Canada. Refer to the products operators manual for warranty details. 1 YEAR OF ADDITIONAL PRODUCT WARRANTY COVERAGE AT NO ADDITIONAL COST!*TAKEADVANTAGEOF THISOFFER FORATOTALOF 3 YEARSOF WARRANTYCOVERAGESee dealer for details 120055 I $1,999$2,899 2219 Crawfordville Hwy. www.3youtdoorequipment.com NP-0000653372 AreYouHard OfHearing? Amajornamebrandhearingaidprovider wishestoeldtestaremarkablenewdigital hearinginstrumentinthearea.Thisoffer isfreeofchargeandyouareunderno obligation. Theserevolutionary100%Digitalinstruments usethelatesttechnologytocomfortablyand almostinvisiblyhelpyouhearmoreclearly. ThistechnologysolvesthestoppedupearsŽ, andheadinabarrelŽsensationsomepeople experience. Ifyouwishtoparticipate,youwillbe requiredtohaveyourhearingtestedinour of ce FREEOFCHARGE todetermine candidacyandreviewyourresultswiththe hearinginstrumentswithourhearingcare specialist. Attheendofthisevaluation,youmay keepyourinstrument,ifyousodesire,at atremendoussavingforparticipatinginthiseldtest.Specialtestingwillbe donetodeterminetheincreasedtsofthistechnology. tsofhearingaidsvarybytypeanddegreeofhearingloss,noise environment,accuracyofhearingtest,andpropert. Thisisawonderful opportunitytodetermineifhearinghelpisavailableforyourhearingloss andgethearinghelpataveryordableprice.CALLNOWIFYOUWISHTOBE INCLUDEDINTHISFIELDTESTNOWThroughMarch 29, 2012 Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. The Log Cabin Barry Building

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comContinued from Page 1A County Administrator David Edwards said the countys loss ratio is 142 percent and should be between 75 and 80 percent. The loss ratio is what causes the increase in premiums, he said. The countys insurance provider is spending more on medical claims than it receives in insurance payments. Of“ ce of Management and Budget Coordinator Debbie DuBose said the county does not have a very healthy workforce and wellness programs should be implemented. Artz said she would work with staff to try and reduce costs. Many of the directives for this budget are the same as last year, no new services or programs, increased lobbying, expand grants, continue non-reliance on reserves, tie emergency funds to budgeted emergency reserves and attrition whenever possible. County staff also brought forth two alternative revenue options to help with the funds that are still a problem, the sewer and road funds. There is an option for an Environmental Lands Management 5-Cent Gas Tax, which would go towards transportation projects, and the formation of a Governmental Utility Authority. The commission did not make a decision on either of the options. Edwards said the county is also preparing a 5-year plan that will encompass the operating and capital portions of the budget. Edwards said they will go through each department, piece by piece, looking at baseline information, historical data, performance measures, level of service and outcome measures. They will then establish goals and anticipate future operational and capital needs. The budget of each department will be broken down and weekly activities will be looked at as well. The plan will serve as a road map for the county in moving forward by assessing current and future needs, Edwards said. It will serve as a tool, so the county can make better, informed decisions, he added. I want to know about a problem now,Ž Edwards said. They are also looking at the fee structure for services in the county to make sure they are being charged properly, such as park and recreation fees. They are also identifying areas where the county can improve revenues, Edwards said. Once this 5-year plan is complete, Edwards said the budget process will be much easier. Each year, the budget will be done and will only need to be tweaked. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he felt last year no one knew where the county was and the clerk and county staff did not communicate regarding the budget. Moore said it is nice to see that has changed. We dont have individual kingdoms around here,Ž Moore said. There was also some discussion about putting some money into the budget for routine and preventive maintenance, as well as spending money on items that will have long term savings. Sometimes you need to spend a little money in the front to save more in the long term,Ž Artz said. Moore agreed and said if there is a cost of $5,000, but it will save the county $10,000 in the end, it was worth it. Edwards said they are looking at ways to reduce electric costs, as well as gas and security. Everyones eyes are wide open,Ž he said. The next budget workshop will be held on June 21.County budget de“ cit loomsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe county has been awarded a grant for community planning assistance for Wakulla Gardens, but because of potential costs associated with accepting the grant, the Wakulla County Commission chose to only approve the grant if it costs them nothing. If the county accepts the grant, it would be required to pay for lodging, transportation and food for the team that would travel to Wakulla County to help select a strategy and develop a plan of action to correct infrastructure de“ ciencies in Wakulla Gardens. This is one of our countys major problems,Ž Commissioner Lynn Artz said. Artz went after the grant funding for this project and helped submit the application. She has also already received enough donations from citizens and businesses to pay for the teams lodging and food. She estimates the transportation costs will be around $5,000, but wont know for sure until the team is assigned and they know where everyone was traveling from. She was hoping the commission would agreed to pay for the remaining costs, but the other commissioners would not. Commissioner Randy Merritt said if it was free, he would vote for it, but didnt want to spend any more money on another study or plan for the county. Commissioner Jerry Moore agreed and said, We study everything.Ž Artz said the estimated cost of “ xing the infrastructure problems in Wakulla Gardens is $34 million and the commission hasnt been able to “ nd a solution. I dont feel comfortable just walking away and ignoring it,Ž Artz said. Especially if the county is still letting people build new homes in Wakulla Gardens, she said. She felt the planning assistance team might come up with a solution or “ nancing options the commission hasnt considered. Merritt said he didnt feel the team would “ nd a magic solution. Commissioner Mike Stewart said, Im not sure theres going to be a different outcome.Ž All agreed to let Artz try and “ nd some more donations. If there is no cost to the county, the commission agreed to accept the grant. Whats impressive in this county is the people who have already stepped up,Ž Artz said. The planning assistance team would consist of a team leader, two staff from the American Planning Association and “ ve planning experts. Selected projects usually take about 7 months to complete. Project timelines typically consist of three main stages: Organization of materials and preliminary assessment of project site (team brie“ ng book preparation), teams on-site visit (community meetings, media releases, preliminary report) and follow-up and “ nal report. If anyone is interested in donating money or airline miles, contact Artz at (850) 728-7213 or at lartz@ mywakulla.com. In other news: € The county accepted a grant for technical assistance from EPAs Sustainable Communities Building Block Program to help implement the Crawfordville Town Plan. The focus of the assistance is on smart growth zoning for small cities and rural areas. Artz already noti“ ed the commission of the grant being awarded to the county, but it was accepted at the March 5 meeting. € The county commission approved the transmittal of two Comprehensive Plan and Map Text Amendments for two different pieces of land. The “ rst property is located on Sand Lake Road and consists of 229 acres. The owner wanted to change from agriculture to rural 1. This came before county commissioners in 2008, who agreed to submit it to the state, which returned the applications with a list of objections, recommendations and comments. In 2009, the commission voted not to adopt the application. Following that, litigation started between the property owner and the county and was resolved with a settlement agreement. Commissioner Lynn Artz said she opposed it the “ rst time and had the same concerns. The other item that was approved for transmittal was for 26 acres on the east side of Crawfordville Highway, just south of Lisa Drive, to be changed from rural 2 to commercial and rural 3 land uses. A mixed use development with commercial and residential is planned for the property. The commission sent this application to the state back in 2008, the state had some objections with level of service and lack of potable water. In 2009, the commission denied approval of the application. Litigation began and was resolved with a settlement agreement. Thirteen acres of the property is proposed to be changed from rural 2 to rural 3. If approved, 13 residential units would be allowed to be built. The commission voted four to one, with Artz opposing, to transmit the amendment.COUNTY COMMISSION Board will accept grant only if there’s no cost to county Notice of Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment TransmittalCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.MARCH 15, 2012 Public HearingThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, April 9, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, April 16, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, April 9, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, May 7, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.MARCH 15, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on April 2, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.MARCH 15, 2012

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Michael ‘Mike’ David Carter obituary • Heritage Village deal accepted • Tammy Kay Roberts Harvey obituary •Judge Fulford rules against state in pension lawsuit • Plans for community center take shape € Tinsley Floyd obituary • Keep Wakulla County Beautiful is looking for volunteers • Louis Edward Herouart obituary€ thewakullanews. com Follow us on Victim of Domestic or Sexual Violence? Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111 READERS WRITE:Friends of the Library seeks membersEditor, The News: March marks the beginning of the annual membership drive for the Friends of the Wakulla County Library. This year, more than ever, we need our community to support this local treasure. Because of the cuts in the library funding by the state Legislature for the last few years, the money raised by the Friends is desperately needed. I think we all know the valuable services that the public library provides our county! Membership fees are one of our three main ways of supplementing the funding of the childrens programs, purchasing of new computers and other needed materials. The other two are our bi-monthly book giveaways (“ rst Saturday morning of even numbered months, donations accepted) and our September silent auction. Looking for a way to participate in your community? We welcome new active members. Please attend any Friends meeting, the fourth Thursday of the month from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the meeting room to check us out! Membership is available at any level and forms can be picked up at the library or you can contact me at 926-4244. Sue Belford President friendswakullalibrary@gmail.comTom Dickens is a good candidateEditor, The News: On Monday, March 5, at 2 p.m., I, along with others, rallied with Tom Dickens, a candidate for Florida House of Representatives, District 7, which contains Wakulla County. He is an enthusiastic trial attorney, married for over nine years with a 2-yearold son and an impressive military service record. He served on the front line in Iraq, going deep into the countryside and neighborhoods, and managed to come back alive. Educationally, he is just what we need. He teaches biology part-time at TCC. He holds a Masters degree in Biology, and a law degree from FSU. He practices law full-time in personal injury litigation with a prominent Tallahassee law “ rm. After many questions on issues from health care to immigration and jobs, it became apparent to me that his strong suit was education; his commitment to class size reduction, teacher merit rewards and selective, means tested scholarships for students who pursue degrees in critically needed subjects, such as STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), was very convincing. He admits he may not have a war chest, but he is determined to out-work all of his opponents. He has the build of a distance runner, a smile that says, I like peopleŽ and I think he can go the distance. Sincerely, Mike Carter Crawfordville Editor, The News: Some people think improving our county airport is a good idea and others think its a bad idea. Whether you think the improvements are a burden or a great potential economic driver one thing is for sure, the airport is a county airport. The airport infrastructure, as with any county infrastructure, is controlled by the Board of County Commissioners. In the March 1, edition of The Wakulla News, a Letter to the Editor (Another airport scandal in the making?Ž) contained the statement, A single incident in 2009 of standing water on the airstrip caused alarm.Ž Because there was much more involved than a single incident, the Board of County Commissioners at their Dec. 8, 2009, meeting voted unanimously, 5-0, to have the administration review the management of the airport over a four year period of time. It was because of concerns of mismanagement, lapses of timely implementation of grant awards available from the state Department of Transportation for airport improvements, as well as, the lack of adequate maintenance that led to the Boards action. Authorizing this fact-“ nding report did not prejudice me or any of the other commissioners. Just as you maintain your car or home, the County has an obligation to maintain its infrastructure. When the issue of standing water was subsequently identi“ ed, Public Works easily resolved it by simply cleaning some culverts. I am proud to have participated in the unanimous vote and applaud those that voted with me to move forward with that review of the airport. We as a Board did not only address the standing water issue, but brought attention to the management issues that were then properly addressed. Recently, the Board voted to accept a $75,000 no-match 100 percent FDOT grant that may not have been awarded had the Board not taken the corrective actions they did. If the additional infrastructure improvement to the airport, paid for with 100 percent no-match DOT grants is causing turmoil for some in our community, then let the Board determine its future. Let the Board hold workshops and hear from the many groups and citizens of our county. Let the Board study and learn the positives and the negatives of having a county airport. Let the Board learn about the ease or dif“ culty in obtaining permits and funding for a new airport. Let the Board learn as much as they can and then let the Board make a decision in the best interests of the County and its citizens. Howard Kessler, M.D. PanaceaLet Board decide airports future Why does Wakulla have an airport?Editor, The News: Why does Wakulla County have an airport anyway? Wakulla has an airport because of the extreme generosity of a great man who understood the bene“ ts of aviation, the late Fenton Jones, who established the airport many years ago and subsequently donated this asset to Wakulla County with the stipulation it always be an airport. Wakulla has an airport because all of the Boards of County Commissioners since have also understood what Jones knew and have ALL supported having an airport. Wakulla has an airport because FDOT too believes in Joness vision and in the support our BOCC has demonstrated over the years. So much so that FDOT has granted not one, but two significant airport grants, as well as slated additional grants for future improvements. Wakulla does not provide ANY matching funds whatsoever. These grant funds are derived from the aviation fuel tax, so those who use airports are the only ones paying for these improvements. FDOT intensely analyzes the projects they elect to fund. This speaks volumes to the validity and direction set by the many experts whos business it is to implement the Florida Aviation System Plan (FASP). Currently the airport is under-utilized because many pilots avoid turf runways (insurance exclusions play a big role) and airports without services like fuel and maintenance. Our airport has both of these handicaps. There is now a small group, mostly airport neighbors, who wish to halt future improvements already in the pipeline. The claim their property will be taken is simply not true. Rather, they realize that paving the runway and providing services like fuel, maintenance, air tours, ” ight training, etc. will also increase the number of ” ights at the airport. This will, without a doubt, bring much needed revenue to Wakulla. The county would receive lease payments, fuel ” owage fees, tie down fees, hanger rent, etc. Local business would enjoy receiving the disposable income of aviators seeking to enjoy the many wonderful reasons to visit Wakulla. Study after study show that improvements bring more flights and more flights bring more revenue. Not only will these improvements bring money to Wakulla, but they will also enhance safety with an improved runway, better lighting, approach guidance, etc. When my wife and I bought our property here in Wakulla, there were some important things we took into consideration. We wanted to be near the water and close to a general aviation airport. We didnt want to be near a sewer plant, land“ ll, or any number of other land uses that we were personally not willing to live near. We did our due diligence and are very happy with the decision we made. Wakulla has an airport because airports are a very good thing, just as boat ramps, docks, parks, bicycle paths, beaches, roadways, community centers, fire stations, police stations, etc. are very good things. Steven Fults Panacea Editor, The News: Commissioner Lynn Artz should be commended for her recent stance and questioning of the proposed resolution seeking an exemption for Wakulla anglers of gag grouper regulations which came before the county commission a few weeks ago. I greatly appreciate that she went well out of her way to better understand the issue from all sides, as she does for most issues Ive witnessed in her tenure. Artz was very much concerned with the facts and science of the issue, which are quite compelling, and that an exemption from gag regulations could lead to a further deterioration in the overall health of the gag population. Gag is greatly depleted throughout its range, which in the Gulf is mostly the west coast of Florida, and only at a level of about 40 percent of what is considered by scientists as being a healthy population. New regulations in place across the Gulf are meant to reduce “ shing pressure enough to allow the population to return to full health in a few years. With special regulations now in place for Wakulla and other area counties approved by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, there is a high likelihood that the June through October season for the rest of the states anglers and the federally permitted charter boat operators, including those in Wakulla, may be shortened due to the extraŽ catch not factored in for the new regulations. Additionally, the carved-out special season also increases the likelihood that the 2012 prescribed catch level for gag will be exceeded, causing the need for further reductions in season length next year in order to maintain the trajectory towards recovery. Along these lines, Artz was arguing for the long-term view of a healthy gag population and for area “ shermen and our local “ shing economy. While there might be immediate bene“ ts to local “ shermen and supporting businesses, these temporary opportunities may be short-lived. It is one thing to only consider the immediate satisfaction for a quick gain and a few bucks, but quite another to take the longer, more deliberate view in thinking through risks and consequences. I commend Artzs desire to examine the whole picture to make important decisions about a natural public resource. As such, a faster and more robust gag grouper recovery is in the best interest of the local “ shing community and her constituents. Chad Hanson Mysterious WatersArtz tries to understand all sides of issuesEditor, The News: On behalf of the Palaver Tree Theater Co., we would like to say THANK YOU to all who participated in, or attended the performances of WAKULLASTORY: A Hankerin for Headhuntin.Ž Your participation in these productions keep them going, and as always, we couldnt have done it without you. Thank you to the Wakulla County Historical Society for partnering with Palaver Tree Theater in this effort. Last years production was a success, and youve made this years presentation one to remember as well. Wed also like to extend a thanks to Dave, at Printing on Demand for meeting our printing needs and becoming a sponsor; Posh, for allowing us to have our wrap party at your location; Tom Askins and the staff at the Sopchoppy School for use of your space; Wakulla Middle School for use of your music stands; The Wakulla News for allowing us the chance to present the article on Elizabeth Fisher Smith and the story behind this years show; Wakulla.com for being so kind as to help put the word out; to Mike Sherlock for his lighting design, and expertise in keeping a cast of 18 people sane throughout the production; to all the wonderful women who participated on the A Womans Work in Wakulla panel … you were all excellent; and to Herbert Sr. and Rachel Donaldson for their help behind the scenes and for being a steady source of inspiration. To the cast … Team Headhunters! … thanks for all your hard work, believing in the power of the script and for getting the job done. Theres more to come. Finally, my gratitude goes out to the family of Elizabeth and Harold Smith. In particular, Betsy and Randy. It means a lot that you trusted me to work with the language your mother left behind. Even more, thank you for talking to me. It was through conversation with you that I had a better understanding of Mrs. Smith, and could see the quiet signs of whom she may have been, by the impressions left upon her children. I sincerely hope you heard her voice. Herb Donaldson Artistic Director Palaver Tree Theater Co. ank you for support of WakullaStory Constitutional o cers o er great serviceEditor, The News: Last week I stopped by the Supervisor of Elections Office to get clarification on some voting questions I had. Not only was the of“ ce staff that I encountered extremely helpful, but Buddy Wells came out, greeted me, and then invited me into his office to discuss my questions and ensure I was provided the correct answers. After a few calls to the State Elections Office by Wells, and after his researching the Florida Statutes intently, all of my questions were answered. When I expressed my gratitude to Wells, he replied that he was merely doing his job and that he thoroughly enjoyed enlightening the citizens of Wakulla County on voting regulations, etc. After leaving Wells of“ ce, I felt a letter to The Wakulla News highlighting this experience was in order. When I sat down to draft this letter I began to think about two other experiences I recently had with Cheryll Olah, Wakulla County tax collector, and Donnie Sparkman, Wakulla County property appraiser. Both Olah and Sparkman personally provided professional and informative services to my family and me relating to questions we had relevant to each of their respective of“ ces. I would like to openly thank Wells, Olah and Sparkman for their treating the citizens of Wakulla County as the clients they truly are. Now, if we could just get the national chains operating in Wakulla County to understand this philosophy, we would be much better off! Sincerely, Chris Russell Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 – Page 5A  CCOW will hear from David Edwards on local governmentConcerned Citizens of Wakulla will host a forum on the challenges facing local government with Wakulla County Administrator David Edwards on Thursday, March 15, at the public library beginning at 7 p.m. A pre-forum social will be held beginning at 6:30 p.m.  Congressional staff will hold of ce hours in WakullaU.S. Representative Steve Southerland, II announced that his Florida staff will be hosting mobile of ce hours in Wakulla County on Tuesday, March 20. Staff will be available at Sopchoppy City Hall from noon to 4 p.m. to discuss issues of local concern. Residents of Wakulla County and the surrounding area are invited to join Rep. Southerland's Deputy District Director and Constituent Services Specialist to provide input on legislation, ask questions or request assistance with a federal agency on issues including: Social Security, Medicare, Housing and Urban Development, IRS, Veterans Affairs and Immigration. For questions, contact Lori Hutto at (850) 561-3979 or Lori.Hutto@mail.house. gov.  Make A Difference Day is March 24VolunteerWAKULLA is holding its fth annual Make A Difference Day on Saturday, March 24, at Hudson Park. This year's event will be different for previous years: a community picnic for the citizens of Wakulla County will be held, and many of the organizations in the County will be setting up booths to make people aware of services available, as well as opportunities to volunteer in the county. At this time, there are more than 25 organizations signed up. There will be a free lunch for all, entertainment and door prizes.  Easter Egg Hunt coming up on March 31The Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department will holds its annual Easter Egg Hunt on March 31 at Hudson Park with registration from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., and the hunt beginning at 11 a.m. Age groups are birth to 3 years old, 4-6 years old and 7-10 years old. A drawing from each age group will win an Easter basket. Also attending will be Wakulla ROTC, Wakulla EMS, Wakulla Fire & Rescue, Smokey Bear,Capital City Bank Star, McDonald's character, McGruff the Crime Dog, the Sonic character, and a moonwalker. Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment of Wakulla will have an adopt-a-pet booth at the park. CHAT is asking for donations of pet items, including towels, treats and pet toys For more information, go the website www.wcprd.com or call (850 926-7227. Wild About Wakulla Week music video is being madeThe Wild About Wakulla Week Consortium is promoting its slogan "Wild about Wakulla" by making a short music video using the song of the same name recorded by the self-proclaimed "Wakulla's favorite acoustic duo" Hot Tamale. The video is being shot by the Wakulla High School Television Production Program directed by Marc Bowerman, and it's a totally grassroots effort. If all goes as planned, the music video and the song will be premiered by Hot Tamale at their live performance at the Worm Gruntin' Festival in Sopchoppy on Saturday April 14, and then again in St. Marks performing at Shields Marina as part of the event "Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee" on Sunday April 22. Jam 4 Camp is scheduled for April 28Wakulla County 4-H will present the second Annual Jam 4 Camp Fundraiser at Hudson Park on Saturday, April 28, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. This event is free to vendors and bands who wish to participate. This event is open to the public and raises money for 4-H camp scholarships for Wakulla County youth by collecting donations from Sponsors, band "votes," vendor contributions, T-shirt sales and a silent auction. The ve bands participating will play at one hour intervals and collect votes in the form of dollars raised. Youth and their parents are also invited to sign up for all 4-H Camps this day. Camps will ll up fast and spaces are limited, so it is best to arrive early and stay and enjoy the day. For more information, please contact Sherri Kraeft at 926-3931. More information can also be found at the website wakulla.ifas.u .edu/4-h. Staff ReportsBriefsStaff ReportThe Lions Clubs St. Patricks Festival will be held Saturday, March 17 in Hudson Park. The popular event features a parade that gets underway at 10 a.m. The day begins with Breakfast in the Park at 8 a.m., opening introductions at 9 a.m., opening prayer at 9:15 a.m. by John Braley, youth minister at Lake Ellen Baptist Church, the raising of the colors at 9:20, and the National Anthem, sung by John Braley, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. After the parade, the scheduled entertainment includes Taekwondo at 11 a.m., a performance by COAST Charter School at 11: 30 a.m., Aleene Benson, Irish and Scottish fiddle players at noon, then Rick Tittle, John Smith and Ken Muf“ n ManŽ at 12:40 and 1:40 p.m., and the Senior Wigglers line dancers at 1:15 p.m. A prize drawing will be held every 30 minutes starting at noon. The drawing for the $250 grand prize will be held at 2:30 p.m. RESCUE DEMONSTRATION The Wakulla County Fire Department will demonstrate the use of tools for responding to individuals trapped in vehicles. Wakulla Towing and Recovery donated the vehicles that will be used in the demonstration … and has donated cars to Fire-Rescue for years. This demonstration may be of special interest to those individuals who continue to drink or text while driving,Ž said Bill Russell, president of the Wakulla County United Fire“ ghters Association. You will be able to observe the equipment much better in the daylight at Hudson Park rather than if you are upside down in your vehicle on the side of the ride at night.Ž CAR SEAT INSPECTIONS The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce will be taking part in the St. Patricks Day Celebration at Hudson Park by hosting a child car seat inspection and installation event. Led by Lt. Dale Evans, a certi“ ed car seat technician, and a Public Service Of“ cer (PSO), the WCSO will help residents properly install car seats. Car seats will also be given away to low income families free of charge during the event. If you are not a low income family, you can still make a small donation to the car seat fund and receive a car seat at a highly reduced cost. The sheriffs of“ ce will have a static display at Hudson Park from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. which will give everyone an opportunity to view the parade at 10 a.m. Lt. Evans and the PSO will also have some goodies for the children including coloring books. Look for the Car Seat Trailer at Hudson Park and visit with Lt. Evans. His goal is to make sure everyone has a properly installed and safe child seat to Keep Wakulla Safe. Several months ago, Lt. Evans spearheaded a similar program at Beef O Bradys restaurant in Crawfordville.St. Patricks Festival is Saturday FILE PHOTOA scene from last years St. Patricks Parade. Join us on SATURDAY, March 24, 2012 And Make A Difference in YOUR life! 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM Hudson Park Come and see what Wakulla County has to offer. Find a service that you may need! Find a place to Volunteer! Find a place to have fun! Join us for a FREE lunch Door Prizes every 1/2 hour after 11: AM We will have a collection point for canned goods to restock our food pantries. Visit VolunteerWakulla.org or Call 745-0060 to learn how you can become a VOLUNTEER VolunteerWakulla 84 Cedar Ave. www.VolunteerWAKULLA.org Crawfordville, FL 850 745-0060 Door Pr ize s And Free l unch For Everyo ne MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926–8116 LUNCH PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey... Tammy Kay Roberts Harvey Frank Earl McIntyre Meta Gwen Rabitaille Walter George RinkelTammy Kay Roberts Harvey, 41, of Crawfordville passed away Thursday, March 8, in Crawfordville. She was born in Winter Park and was a resident of Crawfordviille for 24 years coming from Madison. She was an Insurance Adjuster. She loved playing kickball with the kids, loved all animals especially horses. She enjoyed spending time at the beach, and St. George Island was a favorite. She had a great sense of humor and was very generous, loving and caring. Family received friends on Saturday, March 10, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850926-3333). Services were held at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 11, at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Crawfordville. Burial followed at the St. Elizabeth Cemetery. Survivors include her husband of 20 years, Bryan Harvey; a son, Bryson Harvey; a daughter, Wynter Harvey; her parents, Kenneth and Mary Kay Roberts; a brother, Todd Roberts; a sister, Kristina Frasher; and many other family and friends. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Tammy Kay Roberts HarveyMeta Gwen Rabitaille, 90, died on Friday, March 2, at Big Bend Hospice. She was born Feb. 25, 1922, in Arran to Butch and Nelly Vause and later moved to Newport. Visitation was held on Sunday, March 4, at Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home, Timberlane Chapel. Funeral services took place on Monday, March 5, at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Tallahassee. Interment followed at Woodville Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers donations can be made to Big Bend Hospice. Survivors include her son, Joe Rabitaille of Shell Point; daughter, Sheila Smith (Brett) of New Smyrna Beach; two sisters, Ruby Nell Anderson and Gladys Strickland of Woodville; two sistersin-law, Pearl Vause and Viola Rabitaille; adopted kids, Frank and Frances Dennard; two grandchildren, as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Arrangements were under the direction of Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home in Tallahassee.Meta Gwen RabitailleWalter George Rinkel, 96, died Thursday, March 8, in Crawfordville. He was married for 61 years to Eloise Taff Rinkel, who preceded him in death in 2002. He was born in Iola, Ill., on Oct. 15, 1915, to Walter M. and Jane E. Rinkel. He retired Aug. 1, 1979, from Florida State University where he worked as a Heavy Equipment Operator. He was of the Baptist faith. Graveside services were held Saturday, March 10, at 11 a.m. at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville. Viewing was held before the service at graveside. Brother David Gray officiated. Memorial donations can be made to Big Bend Hospice, 2889C Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327. Survivors include his daughters, Theresa Grif“ n (and husband Ralph), Sherry Hall (and husband Randy); his son, Walter Darryl Rinkel; and son-in-law, Doug Coleman; six grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Also surviving are three sisters, Virginia Hickey, Betty Yates and Marjorie Warner; and two brothers, Gene Rinkel and Ted Rinkel. He was preceded in death by his eldest daughter, Deanne Coleman; a grandson, Keith Rinkel; as well as his siblings, Vera Gigar, Eva House, Richard, Merle, Lyle and Fenton Rinkel. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com)Walter George RinkelSpecial to The NewsVicar Bert Matlock will be ordained and installed as pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla this Sunday, March 18, at 4 p.m. Vicar Bert began his theological studies at the district level of the Lutheran Church … Missouri Synod in 2003 with the Concordia House of Studies Orlando and continued with pre-seminary classes at Concordia College, Mequon, Wis. He entered the seminary in the Distance Education Leading Toward Ordination (DELTOŽ) program in October 2007, and graduated from Concordia Seminary-St. Louis on Feb. 10, 2012. Vicar Bert is a second careerŽ pastor and has been serving Trinity of Wakulla in a student capacity (vicar) since November 2008. He grew up in Cocoa Beach, graduating from Cocoa Beach High School in 1974, and enlisted in the U.S. Army, serving as a chaplain assistant. In 1977 he completed his enlistment and was employed by the FBI in Washington, D.C. He remained in a reserve status and served in the Washington, D.C. National Guard in the 257th Army Band. In 1978 he joined the Florida Highway Patrol. He held the position of Trooper until being promoted to Sergeant in 1987. In 1992 Vicar Bert served in the aviation section as an airplane and a helicopter pilot. In 1998, Vicar Bert felt the Lords Call and began studying theology. He traveled to Concordia Seminary … St. Louis for a visit and, with much prayer, he felt the Lord wanted him in full-time ministry. He retired from the Florida Highway Patrol in May 2005 with the rank of Captain and began serving Hope Lutheran Church in Pompano Beach. In 2008, he felt that God wanted him to serve His people in Wakulla County. He and his family left South Florida and moved to, as he said, Gods country.Ž Vicar Bert is mar-ried to his beautiful wife Ingrid, who is very active in the ministry at Tr inity. They have two chil-dren, Erik, 10, and Annika, 7. Vicar Bert Matlock to be ordained, installed at Trinity LutheranJesus River Festival is held PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe fourth annual Jesus River Festival was held last Saturday, March 10, at Sopchoppy River Park and featured a gospel quartet, blues band, choir, dance team, contemporary music and inspirational messages. Frank Earl McIntyre, 82, passed away on Saturday, March 10, at his home in Alligator Point. He was born in Hammond, La., and was a resident of Tallahassee before moving to Alligator Point. He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Navy in 1948 where he served as a seaman apprentice. He retired, after 40 years of service, from Centel Phone Company, now known as Century Link. Graveside services will be held at the Smith Family Cemetery, Dolly Drive off of Crawfordville Highway, on Friday, March 16, at 11 a.m. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, 241 John Knox Road, Suite 100, Tallahassee FL 32303. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Cleo Smith McIntyre; three daughters, Earline McIntyre and Sandra Akins of Crawfordville, and Betty Blackman (and husband Jimmy) of Tallahassee; three sons, Ronnie McIntyre (and wife Kayren), Robert McIntyre (and wife Tammy) of Tallahassee, and Raymond McIntyre of Alligator Point; numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild. He was preceded in death by his father, A.T. McIntyre, Sr.; his mother, Phronie Inez McIntyre; a brother, A.T. McIntyre; and his sister, Bobbie June Harris.Frank Earl McIntyre

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunityMcMillans celebrate 60th anniversary Finley and Jean McMillan, circa 1952 Finley and Jean McMillan celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on March 8. Its not only the couples wedding anniversary, but also Jeans birthday and their “ rst child, Brett Derek McMillans birthday. The couple married on her 19th birthday in Honolulu, Hawaii, while Finley was stationed there as an Air Crewman for the U.S. Navy. The couple met the year before at a dance at Brenau College in Gainesville, Ga., where Jean was a student. Finley proposed to Jean via mail, sending a nice engagement ring and a plane ticket with the proposal letter. The couple celebrated their anniversary with family and an outdoor bon“ re and oyster roast. Finley and Jean McMillan and granddaughter DiamondOptimist essay contest winners receive awards Optimist Essay contest winners, Casey Camp and Brittany Evans, are presented their awards, along with teacher Floyd Richardson, and Optimist Club President Larry Massa and member Jo Ann Daniels. Camp received “ rst place, Evans came in second place and Alexander Lewis, who was not present at the meeting, came in third. Camp and Evans both read their speeches at the meeting. The writing topic was How My Positive Outlook Bene“ ts My Community.ŽSPECIAL TO THE NEWSFree computer classes o ered at Workforce plusSpecial to The NewsKnowing what kind of positions are available and combining that knowledge with advanced computer skills through Workforce pluss Training Academy equips job seekers with a winning career strategy. Job seekers can take their career journey to the next level by investing in themselves through Workforce plus Training Academy. Training Academy is a no-cost service where students learn to use Microsoft programs such as Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. These courses are offered at two levels: basic and advanced. Additionally, basic computer skills classes are available for job seekers who need to learn the fundamentals of using computers. Lastly, classes are available in the area of Finance and Credit to help job seekers learn how to manage their credit and protect their identity. Training Academy classes are available at each of“ ce and schedules for each of the locations can be found on the Workforce plus website. Wakulla Training Academy courses take place at 3278 G Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. April 4: Microsoft Word, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. April 11: Microsoft Word 2, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. April 17: Managing Your Credit & Protecting Your Identity, 10 a.m. April 18: Microsoft Excel, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. April 25: Microsoft Excel 2, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Job seekers should be reminded that in order to attend the no-cost Training Academy, pre-registration is required and closes the Wednesday before each class begins. To register visit www.wfplus.org or call 1-866WFP-JOB1. Still serving the Best Tasting Food, Biggest Portions and Best Values in Town!!! To Go!at theirNOWNEW LOCATIONCome by and grab a menu featuring all your favorites: a variety of Sandwiches, Wraps and Burgers. Pork, Beef, Chicken and Fish Dinners!New Hours: 850-421-1150ASK FOR THE BOATERS SPECIALS! Buy ANY Sandwich andget a Second of equal or lesser value1/2 OFF DELIVERY SERVICE COMING SOON!!MAR. 16&17 Mini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012 • Interior Remodeling • Doors • Floors • Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling • Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Pre-K is starting a new program called Blessings in a BackpackŽ to supply local children with nutritious food to eat on the weekends. According to www.BlessingsinaBackpack.org, better test scores, improved reading skills, positive behavior, improved health and increased attendance have all been attributed to the success of this program. On Saturday, Jan. 28, the Crawfordville Winn-Dixie presented a check for $1,000 to Wakulla Pre-K Principal Kim Dutton to cement their partnership in the program. Wakulla Pre-K realizes how important it is for children to get good nutrition and they know how dif“ cult this can be for many of our local families. Many of Wakullas student athletes and past student athletes are on board with the Pre-K in promoting this program, including Florida State University player Nigel Bradham, past FSU player Sam McGrew and past University of Florida player Jim Tart, all of whom graduated from Wakulla High School. Attending the event were past WHS students. Among these were Superintendent of Schools David Miller, Bobby Pearce, principal on special assignment of Wakulla County Schools, Ashley Anderson, Gold Seal UWF Presidents Scholarship, Lori Gallamore, WEC/SEC Pre-K administrative assistant, Meredith Lawrence, WEC Pre-K, Karla Nelson, former WHS cheerleader, 1990 Homecoming Queen, and SEC Pre-K Teacher, the band Country BoyzŽ (formerly known as Tiger HillŽ), made up of local Wakulla County natives Corey Benedict and Bakari Hines handing out posters, CDs, and autographs. Brooke Brown, the current Miss Fort Walton Beach and 2007 Miss Wakulla was there to greet the public and sign autographs, and Detective Josh Langston represented the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. Also attending the event were current Wakulla High School students, Jonathan Chunn, WHS football player and Sunshine State Scholar; Kristine Gallamore, WHS soccer player and scholarship recipient to UWF; Alina McCullers, Wakulla High soccer; Emily McCullers, WHS soccer and cross country and Shelby Alsup, WHS soccer. Our partnership with Winn Dixie to implement Blessings in a Backpack is so important, because hunger does not stop on the weekends,Ž Dutton said. Visit www.BlessingsinaBackpack.org for more information about the program. For more information about how to get involved locally, call the Wakulla Pre-K at 926-8111.Wakulla Pre-K starts Blessings in a Backpack program A representative from Winn-Dixie presents a check to Wakulla Pre-K Principal Kim Dutton to support Blessings in a Backpack.School out of zone reassignment requests are due on March 30By BETH ODONNELL Assistant Superintendent Applications for 2012-2013 school out of zone Reassignment Requests are due in the Wakulla County School District Of“ ce by Friday, March 30, at 4 p.m. This is an application for a child to attend a public school within Wakulla County that he or she is not zoned for. The application must be turned in every year even if it has been granted in the past because class sizes change with students who move into that school zone who must be served “ rst before any other seats are available. Please be advised that approvals for the 2012-2013 school year will be based on seat availability in each grade level due to the Class Size Amendment. A form will need to be “ lled out for each child in the family. Applications made after the deadline of March 30 for students to move to a different school will place students on a waiting list until after the of“ cial student count by the state in October and class sizes can be of“ cially determined to see if there is room in that grade level. Parents and guardians are responsible for transporting students who are granted an out of zone reassignment request. To access the student reassignment request form: Go to www.wakullaschooldistrict.org Click on School InformationŽ on the left Click on Forms and HandbooksŽ Look for the Student Reassignment FormŽ (two page form) Paper copies are also available at the Wakulla County School District Of“ ce. The forms can be brought to the Wakulla County School District office, emailed, or mailed to Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, at mary.odonnell@wcsb.us or P.O. Box 100, Crawfordville, FL 32326. Call herl at 926-0065 for more information. This is only for student reassignment requests to attend public schools within the Wakulla County School District.RMS band members earn superior and excellence awards for solosSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, Feb. 18, the Riversprings Middle School Bear Band had 20 solos performed at the FBA Solo/Ensemble evaluation held at the FSU School of Music. The results were 14 Superiors and six Excellent Awards. The students who received Superiors were Nic Samlal, Kyle Pearson, Paige Pearson, Cori Chaganis, Mattias Gunnarsson, Emma Chason, Jenna Franck, Sheleen Burton, Kyra Townes, Breanna Sykes, Mike King, Shelby Caine, Whitley Kerce and Ellie Schultheis. Students who received Excellents were Hannah Hart with 2, Nic Samlal with 1, Jordan Jones, Robert Hogan and Scott Curry. Congratulations to all these students for doing such a great job and for all their efforts. On March 7, the Riversprings Middle School Symphonic Band participated in the Florida Bandmasters Association Music Performance Assessment at FSU. They performed three compositions in front of an audience and judges. The band also had to perform two unseen songs in the Sight-Reading portion of the MPA. Both performances went very well and the band was awarded a Superior rating. The kids worked very hard for this day and have been meeting the grade assignments in class all year,Ž said Band Director Carmen Williams. I am so proud of all these musicians and so blessed to be able to teach them.ŽRMS Symphonic Band earns superior the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Dr. Mark McCoyFebruary 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromYou dont “nd this type of thing in larger cities. is is a great advertising! More people need to advetise like this.Ž…Dr. Mark McCoy OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winn er!One Meal from Every R estaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! 962-2920 WERE OPENNew Summer HoursTUESDAY SATURDAY 11a.m. 9p.m. SUNDAY 11a.m. 2 p.m. Tuesday Friday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. COUNTRY BUFFETNightly Specials 5 9 P.M. 2209 Sopchoppy Hwy.Sopchoppy Enroll Now forALGEBRA 1:END OF COURSE EXAM PREPGrades 8 & 9 FCAT MATH PREP Grade 8 FCAT ENGLISH & READING PREP For Grades 8, 9, 10 AP LANG EXAM REVIEWONE-ON-ONE INSTRUCTION OR SMALL GROUPS AVAILABLE. CLASSES BEGIN THE WEEK AFTER SPRING BREAK AND MEET TWICE PER WEEK (1 HOUR EACH CLASS) UNTIL THE RESPECTIVE EXAM.Call Melisa Taylor to register today. 3119B Crawfordville Hwy850-926-2179 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSports KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENWill Thomas at his scholarship signing last week. Seated at the table with him are his parents, behind him are his Wakulla coaches and administrators.Will Thomas signs with FAMUBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakullas all-time rushing leader, Will Thomas, signed a scholarship last week with Florida A&M University. After the signing ceremony, Thomas said he was proud to be going to FAMU. I can get an education and play football … a sport I love.Ž Thomas said he expects to start for the Rattlers in some position his freshman year. The signing for Thomas was held on Wednesday, March 7, at the War Eagle Cafe at Wakulla High School. The cafe was packed with students and some teachers in support of Thomas. Athletic Director Mike Smith noted the crowd and said it was good to see the number of people showing up to the signings … including athletes in other sports. Superintendent of Schools David Miller noted that while Thomas is leaving to go to his own alma mater, to remember, Once a War Eagle, always a War Eagle.Ž Head Coach Scott Klees recalled watching Thomas play at the middle school level and thinking he gets hit a lot. Klees noted that while Thomas did get hit a lot, he never missed a game as a War Eagle. Thomas has a punishing and relentless running style … hitting the hole hard and running right at the defense. At one point, Klees asked Thomas: Every time you get the ball, youre gonna get what?Ž Hit,Ž the back responded. His achievement as all-time leading rusher at Wakulla is remarkable in that teams began keying on him by his junior year. And Wakullas offense included several rotating backs who also took hand-offs. One of those backs, Marshane Godbolt, has also accepted a scholarship to FAMU. He also earned the honor of the Big Bend Defensive Player of the Year. Thomas always seems to wear a grin, and is well-liked by other students. Drama teacher Susan Solburg was at the signing, though she had a rehearsal that started at the same time. She said she didnt want to miss it. Hes such a good kid,Ž she said. Thomas signing ceremony also came on his birthday, and the event ended with the students in the cafe spontaneously singing him the Happy Birthday song. After the signing, teammates and friends came over to Thomas to give him a congratulatory hug. e Wakulla High School 2012 track teamBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe WHS track teams attended two meets in the last week and came away with solid results. RICKARDS MEET On Tuesday, March 6, the teams traveled to Rickards High School in Tallahassee to compete in a full-course meet with 12 other schools. Overall, the local teams were competitive with the girls placing third and the boys “ fth. For the girls, sophomore Madison Harris proved once again that she is a force to be reckoned with when she steps onto the 400 meter oval. She made her debut in the open 1600 meter run (metric mile) and did nothing less than run a State Elite Time and set a new school record of 5:25, eclipsing the old mark of 5:35 which was held by Sydney Nutting. Then, running the anchor leg of in the 4x400 meter relay, she took the baton approximately 7 seconds behind the anchor leg of the Rickards team. With only 400 meters to make up the difference, it looked like the WHS relay team would suffer its “ rst loss of the season. However, Harris refused to concede the race and steadily closed the gap. With approximately 100 meters to go, she pulled onto the Rickards girls shoulder and they battled step for step down the “ nal straight-away, neither giving an inch. Harris simply refused to lose and nipped the other runner at the line, giving the WHS girls the victory by .14 of a second. Other girls turning in outstanding performances included Marty Wiedeman (2nd, 1600 meters in 5:48), Cora Atkinson (3rd, 1600 in 5:48), Kasey James (1st, 3200 meters), Raychel Gray (2nd, 3200), Lili Broadway (3rd, 3200) and Emily McCullers (3rd, long jump). The top placing relay teams included the 4x400 meter team placed 1st (A. McCullers, E. McCullers, S. Harris, M.Harris), the 4x800 AŽ Team placed 1st (N. Wodcock, S. Strickland, M. Wiedeman, L. Wiedeman) and the B Team placed 2nd (E. McCullers, C. Atkinson, L. Broadway, S. Harris). Others scoring points for the local team included: R. Gray (7th, 800), S. Harris (7th, 1600), K. James (8th, 1600), T. Kinard (4th, 3200), T. Vaughn (5th, 100 meter hurdles), A. Stewart (8th, long jump), L. House (7th, discus), S. Alsup In two meets, team does wellContinued on Page 12AFOOTBALL CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEƒEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Flor i da Cert i “ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy KATIE TRIPPSave the Manatee Club March signals spring time in Florida … the longer days and warmer weather can create ideal conditions for fishing, kayaking, boating or stand up paddle boarding in Floridas estuaries and other coastal waterways. It is “ tting then that March is also Seagrass Awareness Month because seagrass beds are such an important component of our coastal waterways. According to a recent report by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 2.2 million acres of seagrasses have been documented in Florida waters, providing ecological services worth $20 billion per year. Ecological services include habitat values that cannot be measured by a traditional economic scale … i.e., the value of providing habitat to juvenile sport “ sh or food for manatees and sea turtles. Seagrass beds also provide direct economic bene“ ts to Florida through “ shing charters and ecotourism businesses. The condition of Floridas seagrasses varies in different regions. Seagrasses in the Keys are believed to be stable while those in certain areas of Southwest Florida and the Panhandle are declining. Seagrasses along Floridas east coast have been showing an increasing trend, and South Florida contains nearly 60 percent of the states seagrasses. However, great losses in seagrass abundance in Brevard County in 2011 caused by environmental factors are a reminder that these ecosystems are vulnerable. Seagrasses are found in clear and relatively shallow waters because their growth is fueled by sunlight. Their occurrence in shallow water makes them susceptible to damage by boats that may try to motor through areas without proper clearance, creating prop scarsŽ in the grass beds. A churning propeller cuts not only the blades of the grasses, but uproots and destroys the rhizomes (roots) in the sand and it can take years for the sediment to support regrowth and allow the scars to heal. To prevent prop scarring, boats should stay in marked deep water channels while traveling. Flats boats “ shing in the seagrass beds should use poles and trolling motors to move through the water, to avoid damaging seagrasses with their engines. If boaters become stuck in a shallow area with seagrasses or other submerged resources, they should never use the engine to try to blast free. Instead, they should turn off the engine, shift passenger weight distribution in the boat, and try to move the boat using a long pole or oar. If necessary, one or more passengers can exit the boat and push it to deeper water. Boaters should also use polarized sunglasses to reduce glare and help them see resources like seagrasses located beneath the waters surface. Seagrasses are negatively affected by stormwater runoff and algae blooms that block the suns rays since they need sunlight to grow. Stormwater runoff to coastal waters can be reduced by creating swales and retention ponds and using pervious pavement. Limiting use of fertilizers in landscapes adjacent to coastal waterways can reduce the nutrient loading that contributes to algae blooms. All of us who live and recreate in coastal areas can take steps to make our waters cleaner and protect the seagrasses that are so vitally important to our aquatic ecosystem and economy.Katie Tripp, Ph.D. is director of Science & Conservation for the Save the Manatee Club.March is Seagrass Awareness MonthSeagrasses are grass-like owering plants that live completely submerged in marine and estuarine waters. Although seagrasses occur throughout the coastal areas of Florida, they are most abundant in Florida Bay and from Tarpon Springs northward to Apalachee Bay in the Gulf which are two of the most extensive seagrass beds in continental North America. Seagrasses occur in protected bays and lagoons and also in deeper waters along the continental shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. The depth at which seagrasses occur is limited by water clarity because most species require high levels of light. Florida's approximately 2.2 million acres of seagrasses perform many signi cant functions. They help maintain water clarity by trapping ne sediments and particles with their leaves. They stabilize the bottom with their roots and rhizomes. They provide shelter for shes, crustaceans and shell sh. They and the organisms that grow on them are food for many marine animals and water birds. The canopy of seagrass protects smaller marine animals, including the young of such species as drums, sea bass, snappers and grunts from larger predators. Some animals, such as manatees, urchins, conches and sea turtles, eat seagrass blades. Other animals derive nutrition from eating algae and small animals that live upon seagrass leaves. Bottlenose dolphins and a variety of wading and diving birds also use seagrass beds as feeding grounds. – Source: Florida Department of Environmental Protection DEPFacts about seagrassRefuge pools open to boats on March 15Special to The News St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge will open the pools along Lighthouse Road to hand-launch boats with electric trolling motors on Thursday, March 15. Anglers are reminded that the daily entrance fee is $5 per car or an annual pass is available for $15. Stony Bayou Pool No. 1 is the “ rst large pool on the left traveling south on Lighthouse Road. It is a mixture of salt and freshwater, so “ shing may be very spotty in this pool. A new fishing pier has been constructed in the East River Pool, which is the “ rst pool to the west of Lighthouse Road. Please be careful not to block the pier entrance when parking after unloading boats at the East River boat ramp. Gates will also be opened to access refuge road 316 in the Panacea Unit from March 15 to May 15, leading to ponds in the Otter Lake vicinity. Otter Lake and lakes adjacent to Surf Road are open year round for boating. Outboard motors larger than 10 hp are not allowed on any lake or pond in the Panacea Unit. Fishing is allowed year round from the bank, according to state regulations. The refuge staff appreciates the cooperation of anglers to prevent the invasive exotic weed hydrilla from spreading into refuge waters. For more information and a copy of “ shing regulations, call (850) 925-6121 or visit the website, www.fws. gov/saintmarks/“ shing.Kayak demonstration will be held SundayThe Wilderness Way, Floridas Big Bend kayak out“ tter, will sponsor Kayak Demo Day this Sunday, March 18 from noon to 5 p.m. at Lake Bradford, at Florida State Universitys Reservation. Participants can test-paddle a variety of recreational, touring and “ shing kayaks. Instructors and guides from The Wilderness Way will provide mini-workshops on kayak safety and paddling techniques. Stand Up Paddleboards (SUP) instructors will also offer demonstrations and trials. All event offerings are free with $2 park admission. For more information, please call (850) 877-7200 or visit the website, www.thewildernessway.net. Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! 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Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org I am sure many of you reading this have fond memories of attending a parade in your youth or adult life. There is nothing better than seeing the joy in the eyes of spectators as you pass them or being the lucky one close enough to grab a trinket or candy tossed to the crowd. A debt of gratitude to Norma Hill for sending in the following information: Once again this year the Coast Guard Auxiliary was asked to participate in the Camp Gordon Johnston parade. With the parade beginning at 10:45 a.m. in Carrabelle, Chuck Hickman asked members attending to be there by 9:30 a.m. to get lined up and ready for the parade to begin. Members in attendance were Tim Ashley, Raye Crews, Ann and Ed Gesteland (members of Flotilla 45 08, out of Wisconsin), Mike Harrison, Chuck Hickman, Norma Hill, Phil Hill, Larry Kolk and Dave Rabon. Bruce Connors joined for the set up but had another commitment to attend and was not able to stay for the parade. The weather was good and all went off without a hitch. We had two boats in the parade this year. Chuck Hickmans My GailŽ was towed by Mike Harrison, and Larry Kolk towed his hand-built wooden boat The Georgiana.Ž Many comments were heard along the route from spectators indicating that they thought we had a beautiful boat. Several asked if it was for sale. From Station Panama City, three active duty Coast Guard brought their Safe Boat and were staged between our facilities during the parade. What an honor to be put with them! Along the parade route, we saw many ” ags proudly displayed and several folks dressed in patriotic attire. We also heard many saying, Thank youŽ as we rode along. Young and old seemed to enjoy candy being tossed to them. There was also a military band that played and we also believe that the group of individuals riding their motorcycles with flags along the parade route was the Patriot Guard. After we “ nished our route, the Auxiliary and Coast Guard boats were towed to the Seahawk where they were available for viewing. Auxiliary members set up an information booth and active duty folks provided tours of the Seahawk. This is a great treat for visitors this year as the Seahawk will be returning to Station Panama City soon. Other attractions for the day were tours of the Army ship New Orleans and getting to see the Governor Stone pull into port. For information on this iconic historical landmark, please visit www.governorstone.org. For more information on Camp Gordon Johnson, please visit the Camp Gordon Johnson Associations website at www.campgordonjohnston.com. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonSPECIAL TO THE NEWSChuck Hickmans boat My Gail at the parade. All eyes are on the Suwannee River this week as it rises to within four feet of ” ooding Peacock Springs State Park. In the absence of adequate cave diving training sites here in Wakulla County, we are trans“ xed to the ” ood cycles of surrounding cave systems this time of the year. All last month, the Merritts Mill Pond in Marianna was drained to combat hydrilla infestations. The resulting effect was that several favorite cave sites were inaccessible. Now sites along the Suwannee, such as Little River and Telford, are ” ooded with dark waters. Since I have another out of town cave class underway this week, schedules are changing with frustrations high. But ” ooding our caves with dark water has a healthy nourishing effect. Stagnant water, soaking leaves and other organic material has been stored in our swamps all winter. These swamps “ ll up with the spring rains and over” ow their banks into the many karst windows in the county that empty into the aquifer. Tannins from the leaves cause our Wakulla water to turn brown, draining swamps like Squire Swamp and Sullivan to feed the north/south underground conduit. Since little plant life grows in our lightless caves, residents like the blind craw“ sh, rely upon the bounty of these ” oods to bring food to their table. This is a time of plenty, as I witnessed our cray“ sh mating and carrying eggs at a favorite local cave last week. Extended flooding exposes our otherwise white limestone walls to chemicals that darken the walls with deposits, such as goethite. Greater water ” ow through underground passages expands these tunnels, moves sediment ” oors and displaces residents. When the dark waters recede, and clarity returns, we “ nd a reorganized cave, one with new life, character and charm. Several years ago the Suwannee River was equally swollen, brown with sediments, and promising a nourishing ” ood. I was there with a class, and witnessed the river break its banks and ” ood Peacock caves. We “ rst felt a change in water ” ow while in the cave, from spring to siphon. I quickly ushered my class to the nearest exit and climbed out to witness a small waterfall coming from the river, cascading into the park. Soon the caves were swallowing up churning dark water. The rangers were soon encouraging our departure as the park ” ooded to over 20 feet. Even the roads leading to the park were ” ooded that time. And ” ooded they stayed for several weeks -the park was closed for months. But a newly surfaced road and cleanup crews topside and below when the waters once again turned clear restored the park to its original glory back then. It will happen again no doubt. We will dive there again tomorrow if the creek dont rise, and share this beauty one last time before dark waters visits to nourish residence creatures once more. PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:39 AM 3.3 ft. 1:19 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:55 AM 0.1 ft. 3:27 AM 0.0 ft. 4:42 AM -0.0 ft. 5:37 AM 0.0 ft. 6:19 AM 0.1 ft. 6:54 AM 0.2 ft. 7:23 AM Low 2.1 ft. 8:54 AM 2.3 ft. 10:32 AM 2.5 ft. 11:26 AM 2.8 ft. 12:03 PM 3.1 ft. 12:34 PM 3.3 ft. 1:03 PM 3.4 ft. 1:29 PM High 1.8 ft. 12:22 PM 1.9 ft. 2:34 PM 1.6 ft. 4:40 PM 1.1 ft. 5:47 PM 0.7 ft. 6:33 PM 0.3 ft. 7:11 PM 0.0 ft. 7:46 PM Low 2.9 ft. 6:36 PM 2.7 ft. 9:05 PM 2.8 ft. 10:50 PM 3.0 ft. 11:52 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:36 AM 3.3 ft. 1:16 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:52 AM 0.1 ft. 3:24 AM 0.0 ft. 4:39 AM -0.0 ft. 5:34 AM 0.0 ft. 6:16 AM 0.1 ft. 6:51 AM 0.2 ft. 7:20 AM Low 2.1 ft. 8:51 AM 2.3 ft. 10:29 AM 2.6 ft. 11:23 AM 2.9 ft. 12:00 PM 3.1 ft. 12:31 PM 3.3 ft. 1:00 PM 3.5 ft. 1:26 PM High 2.0 ft. 12:19 PM 2.0 ft. 2:31 PM 1.7 ft. 4:37 PM 1.2 ft. 5:44 PM 0.7 ft. 6:30 PM 0.4 ft. 7:08 PM 0.1 ft. 7:43 PM Low 3.0 ft. 6:33 PM 2.8 ft. 9:02 PM 2.9 ft. 10:47 PM 3.1 ft. 11:49 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 12:28 AM 2.9 ft. 1:15 AM 3.0 ft. 1:55 AM High -0.0 ft. 2:59 AM 0.0 ft. 4:31 AM 0.0 ft. 5:46 AM -0.0 ft. 6:41 AM 0.0 ft. 7:23 AM 0.1 ft. 7:58 AM 0.2 ft. 8:27 AM Low 1.9 ft. 9:30 AM 2.1 ft. 11:08 AM 2.4 ft. 12:02 PM 2.6 ft. 12:39 PM 2.8 ft. 1:10 PM 3.0 ft. 1:39 PM 3.2 ft. 2:05 PM High 1.6 ft. 1:26 PM 1.7 ft. 3:38 PM 1.4 ft. 5:44 PM 1.0 ft. 6:51 PM 0.6 ft. 7:37 PM 0.3 ft. 8:15 PM 0.0 ft. 8:50 PM Low 2.7 ft. 7:12 PM 2.5 ft. 9:41 PM 2.6 ft. 11:26 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:31 AM 2.4 ft. 1:11 AM High -0.0 ft. 2:06 AM 0.0 ft. 3:38 AM 0.0 ft. 4:53 AM -0.0 ft. 5:48 AM 0.0 ft. 6:30 AM 0.1 ft. 7:05 AM 0.1 ft. 7:34 AM Low 1.6 ft. 8:46 AM 1.7 ft. 10:24 AM 1.9 ft. 11:18 AM 2.1 ft. 11:55 AM 2.3 ft. 12:26 PM 2.5 ft. 12:55 PM 2.6 ft. 1:21 PM High 1.3 ft. 12:33 PM 1.4 ft. 2:45 PM 1.2 ft. 4:51 PM 0.8 ft. 5:58 PM 0.5 ft. 6:44 PM 0.2 ft. 7:22 PM 0.0 ft. 7:57 PM Low 2.2 ft. 6:28 PM 2.0 ft. 8:57 PM 2.1 ft. 10:42 PM 2.3 ft. 11:44 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:23 AM 2.5 ft. 1:03 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:34 AM 0.1 ft. 3:06 AM 0.0 ft. 4:21 AM -0.0 ft. 5:16 AM 0.0 ft. 5:58 AM 0.1 ft. 6:33 AM 0.2 ft. 7:02 AM Low 1.6 ft. 8:38 AM 1.8 ft. 10:16 AM 2.0 ft. 11:10 AM 2.2 ft. 11:47 AM 2.4 ft. 12:18 PM 2.6 ft. 12:47 PM 2.7 ft. 1:13 PM High 1.8 ft. 12:01 PM 1.8 ft. 2:13 PM 1.5 ft. 4:19 PM 1.1 ft. 5:26 PM 0.7 ft. 6:12 PM 0.3 ft. 6:50 PM 0.0 ft. 7:25 PM Low 2.3 ft. 6:20 PM 2.1 ft. 8:49 PM 2.2 ft. 10:34 PM 2.4 ft. 11:36 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 12:18 AM 2.3 ft. 1:12 AM High -0.2 ft. 1:55 AM -0.1 ft. 3:14 AM -0.1 ft. 4:18 AM -0.0 ft. 5:11 AM 0.1 ft. 5:54 AM 0.3 ft. 6:29 AM 0.5 ft. 6:58 AM Low 2.5 ft. 6:21 PM 1.9 ft. 11:50 AM 2.0 ft. 12:13 PM 2.0 ft. 12:35 PM 2.1 ft. 12:54 PM 2.1 ft. 1:09 PM 2.2 ft. 1:22 PM High 1.5 ft. 2:21 PM 1.3 ft. 3:54 PM 1.0 ft. 4:57 PM 0.8 ft. 5:47 PM 0.5 ft. 6:29 PM 0.3 ft. 7:07 PM Low 2.3 ft. 7:52 PM 2.2 ft. 9:39 PM 2.2 ft. 11:10 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 15 March 21First March 30 Full April 6 Last April 13 New March 22Major Times 8:08 AM 10:08 AM 8:36 PM 10:36 PM Minor Times 2:49 AM 3:49 AM 1:26 PM 2:26 PM Major Times 9:03 AM 11:03 AM 9:30 PM 11:30 PM Minor Times 3:41 AM 4:41 AM 2:27 PM 3:27 PM Major Times 9:55 AM 11:55 AM 10:20 PM 12:20 AM Minor Times 4:25 AM 5:25 AM 3:27 PM 4:27 PM Major Times 10:45 AM 12:45 PM 11:08 PM 1:08 AM Minor Times 5:06 AM 6:06 AM 4:26 PM 5:26 PM Major Times --:---:-11:31 AM 1:31 PM Minor Times 5:43 AM 6:43 AM 5:24 PM 6:24 PM Major Times --:---:-12:16 PM 2:16 PM Minor Times 6:16 AM 7:16 AM 6:19 PM 7:19 PM Major Times 12:38 AM 2:38 AM 12:59 PM 2:59 PM Minor Times 6:48 AM 7:48 AM 7:14 PM 8:14 PM Average+ Average Average Average Good Better Best6:46 am 6:45 pm 1:49 am 12:27 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:45 am 6:46 pm 2:41 am 1:28 pm 6:44 am 6:47 pm 3:26 am 2:28 pm 6:42 am 6:47 pm 4:07 am 3:27 pm 6:41 am 6:48 pm 4:43 am 4:24 pm 6:40 am 6:48 pm 5:17 am 5:20 pm 6:39 am 6:49 pm 5:49 am 6:15 pm48% 41% 35% 28% 21% 15% 8% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance 000AUL3 HAVE FUN H AVE F UN DREAM GIRL fromset

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(8th, discus), 4x100 meter relay team (6th, A. McCullers, A. Collins, L. Curry, N. Calloway) and the 4x200 meter relay team AŽ (4th, A. McCullers, K. Thigpen, A. Collins, L. Curry). The WHS boys team was once again paced by outstanding middle distance runner, senior Stanley Linton who dominated the 1600 and 3200-meter runs. In the 1600 meters, he took the lead early and opened an 11-second gap on the second place runner, finishing in 4:40. No one was able to keep his pace in the 3200 and he ended up running a State Elite time of 10:01, winning by almost 35 seconds. The only other WHS athlete to place in the top three was freshman triple jumper, Kaedretis Keaton who continued his streak of excellent performances by placing 3rd with a jump of 39 feet, 1 inch. Other boys scoring points for the team included; D. Lindsey (6th, 100 meters), J.P. Piotrowski (8th, 1600 meters), C. James (5th, 3200 meters), the 4x100 meter relay team (4th, D. Lindsey, W. Thomas, T. Holmes, M. Godbolt), the 4x200 meter relay team (4th, D. Lindsey, W. Thomas, D. Hutchinson, M. Godbolt), 4x400 meter relay team (6th, B. Lockwood, T. Holmes, W. Thomas, K. Keaton), and the 4x800 meter relay team (5th, D. Sloan, A. Smith, M. Atkinson, D. Sloan). RUTHERFORD RELAYS On Saturday, March 10, the local tracksters traveled to Panama City to participate in the Rutherford Relays. This meet was added after inclement weather last weekend forced the WHS coaches to cancel the teams attendance at the Jesse Forbes Meet in Tallahassee. The competition was fierce at this meet and proved a good test for the team. The girls team finished 7th of 12 teams and the boys finished in 9th place, even though the teams were without their top girl, Madison Harris, and the top male runner, Stanley Linton. For the girls, the middle distance runners led the way with the top individual performances being turned in by Cora Atkinson in the 3200 meter run and Marty Wiedeman in the 1600. Both girls placed third in their events and ran outstanding times. Atkinson turned in the excellent time of 12:44 in the 3200, which lowered the school record in that event that she set a week and a half ago by 14 seconds. Wiedeman ran an excellent 1600, “ nishing in 5:41 and establishing a new all time personal record. Freshman Lili Broadway also had an excellent 1600, “ nishing in 6th place and covering the distance in 6:08. Freshman Lydia Wiedeman also served notice that she will be a factor whenever she steps on the track by running outstanding legs on two relay teams, the 4x400 meters and the 4x800 meters. The girls 4x800 relay team also turned in another outstanding performance by finishing in second place and lowering the school record in that event by over 14 seconds. The new record now stands at 10:32.68. Other girls and relays scoing points for the team included K. James (7th, 3200), the 4x400 relay team (5th, L. Wiedeman, N. Woodcock, E. McCullers, K. Thigpen), the Sprint Medley (6th, A. Collins, S. Williams, L. Broadway, R. Gray), and the Distance Medley (3rd, K.James, S. Strickland, N. Woodcock, Marty Wiedeman). The boys team struggled without Linton, but still had a solid outing. Individually, the boys were paced by senior Cody James who ran a very strong and con“ dent race and placed 5th in the 3200 meters in a new PR of 11:12. Freshman Kaedretis Keaton placed 7th individually in the triple jump with a solid jump of 37 feet, 10 inches. Freshman Aaron Smith also ran an excellent 1600 meter leg in the Distance Medley, “ nishing in 5:06. The boys relay teams that scored for the team included the 4x100 (7th, B. Lockwood, D. Lindsey, J. Goates, K. Keaton), 4x800 meters (5th, G Hutchins, D. Sloan, J.P. Piotrowski, A. Smith), the Sprint Medley (6th, B.Lockwood, D. Lindsey, A. Pearson, D. Sloan), and the Distance Medley (7th, G. Hutchins, M. Atkinson, J.P. Piortowski, A. Smith). The next competitions will be at the Godby Home Meet on Tuesday, March 13, and the Freshman/Sophomore Meet at Chiles High School on Thursday, March 15. Both begin at 4 p.m. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce arrested a 29-year-old Crawfordville man in connection with the production of methamphetamines at his home, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Lawrence Wilbur Cook II was also charged with two counts of child abuse because chemicals used to produce methamphetamines were near the bedroom occupied by two young children. The investigation began on Feb. 19 when sheriffs of“ ce deputies were called to the suspects home to investigate an unattended death complaint. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell arrived on scene and observed a 31-year-old female victim hanging from a rope in a tree. Investigators attended the victims autopsy and it was determined that no foul play had taken place, but methamphetamine use had taken place during the evening before the victim was discovered. During the course of the death investigation, of“ cers entered the home to get Cook a requested jacket and discovered the home in disarray and a meth lab set up inside. Drug paraphernalia and a white powdery substance, believed to be meth, was inside the home. A cooler was discovered next to the bedroom of two children, ages 6 and 11, and contained indications of a meth cook. Evidence was submitted to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for analysis. Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comA 39-year-old Crawfordville man faces weapons and drug charges in connection with the execution of a search warrant by Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce detectives on Wednesday, March 7, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Todd James Mitchell was arrested on a felony charge of possession of a weapon by a convicted felon and violation of probation, and several misdemeanor charges including knowingly driving while license suspended or revoked, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment. Detectives received a tip that Mitchell had at least two “ rearms despite being a convicted felon. Mitchells probation of“ cer scheduled a search of his home. Detectives provided security for the probation of“ cer and observed Mitchell leaving the residence in a van. Detectives knew Mitchell did not possess a valid driver license and detained him. A loaded .38 caliber revolver was allegedly observed in Mitchells van in plain view. Officers then got a search warrant … and allegedly found spent shell casings, marijuana and eight more guns. Less than 20 grams of marijuana and drug paraphernalia were discovered in the camper trailer.Man picks up weapons charges after search Todd James MitchellMeth lab discovered Lawrence W. Cook IISports: In two meets, team does wellContinued from Page 9A Continued from Page 1A While there was excitement about the recently announced plans of Tallahassee Community College to have expanded offerings when the space opens at Centennial Bank … including for-credit classes … Solburg tempered her enthusiasm for it by saying not all students are cut out for college. She said shed also like to see Lively Vo-Tech offering training in trades to young people. I tell my students, If I ran this zoo,Ž Solburg said, students graduating from high school would have three choices: the military, the Peace Corps or Americorps. Go do something for a few years and then come back.Ž Not only would the experience give those young people some maturity, but they would also likely come back with an appreciation for Wakulla County and what it offers, she said. That young people tend to overlook and take for granted the beauty of Wakulla County when theyre growing up was a point touched on by Betsy Smith, daughter of Magnolia MonthlyŽ author Elizabeth Fisher Smith and a landscape designer in her own right. Dont discount the familiar,Ž Smith said of advice she would give young women. She noted the Green Guide program, which she described as taking appreciation to the point of connoisseurship.Ž People are really willing to payŽ to see what so many Wakulla Countians see everyday, she said. Asked what was the biggest threat to the advances women have made, Solburg quickly answered: Look at the TV.Ž Things women in Wakulla need, according to the panel members: a pediatrician in the county, job training and especially money training and practical skills.Womens panel WANTEDHELP ROUND-UP THE FOLLOWING NOTORIOUS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTES REWARD Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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GULF COAST Lumber & Supply, Inc. GULF COAST Lumber & Supply, Inc.3361 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 926-5559Mon.-Fri. 7AM-6PM• Sat. 7:30AM-5PM Poulan Pro Self Propelled Mower 22Ž Reg. $255 SALE $215 SALE $215 Poulan Pro Tiller HDF 900Reg. $355 SALE $305 SALE $305 T Post $4 75$4 75 Field Fence 47Ž x 330 $13650$136 50 12 Tube Gate $7850$78 50 $4850$48 50 Barbed Wire $697$6 97 4 x 4 x 8#2 PT $1 49$1 49 6 Dog Ear Fence BoardPrices good through 3/31/12 Pr675 Y22 RHP for our awn & arden for our awn & arden Poulan Pro Riding Mower 19.5 HP 42Ž SALE $995 SALE $995 POTTING SOIL40LB............. $175TOP SOIL40LB................... $139MUSHROOM COMPOST40LB.. $395 Reg. $1,155 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 – Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn March 1, a report was “ led of threats against Wal-Mart employees. Seven suspects were interviewed as they walked toward East Ivan Road. One of the subjects began to act suspiciously. A hunting knife was recovered that was determined to have been stolen from the store. The subjects ranged in age from 18 to 41 and were part of the Rainbow group that camps in the Apalachicola National Forest. Deputy Sean Wheeler was unable to determine which subject stole the knife. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On March 1, a retail theft was reported at WalMart. Willis Deamon Williams, 23, of Crawfordville was allegedly observed concealing a web camera in his clothing. The suspect reportedly admitted taking the camera without paying for it. The camera, valued at $44, was recovered during the investigation. Deputy Sean Wheeler issued Williams a notice to appear in court. € On March 1, Cassius Martin of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le his income taxes but was informed that someone had already used his Social Security number. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. € On March 2, Deputy Cole Wells initiated a traf“ c stop against a vehicle with only one operational headlight. In the course of a DUI investigation, the suspect, Travis Allen Durrance, 21, of Sopchoppy, allegedly dropped a bag containing a white powdery substance. Durrance was arrested for possession of one gram of cocaine. € On March 2, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a two vehicle crash at U.S. Highway 319 and Woodland Drive in Crawfordville. Ava Woodall of Crawfordville struck the rear of a vehicle driven by Christopher Lashley of Crawfordville. Lashley was attempting to make a right turn onto Woodland Drive. Woodall was determined to be at fault, but was not cited. The Isuzu driven by Lashley suffered $1,000 in rear end damage and the Toyota driven by Woodall received $6,000 worth of damage and was disabled. There were no injuries. € On March 2, Nancy Speigner of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. A sharp object was used to create a two inch gash on the rear panel of the victims truck. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000. € On March 2, Douglas Hammons of Crawfordville reported a grand theft after his rental property was trashed. Support poles for a carport were damaged, screens were cut, stains and debris were discovered on the carpets, doors were damaged, closet doors were removed and relocated and human waste was left in the bathrooms. Tools were also stolen from a shed. Suspects were identi“ ed. Damage to the home was estimated at $15,000. The stolen property was valued at $500. € On March 2, Deputy Billy Metcalf was responding to a battery case in St. Marks when he observed a van swerving on Highway 363. The van and driver pulled into the Express Lane and Metcalf requested assistance from the Florida Highway Patrol when he realized the driver was extremely intoxicated. Metcalf transported his battery suspect to the Wakulla County Jail and Sgt. Jeremy Johnston arrested Robert Stephen Morgan, 29, of Tallahassee and transported him to jail. FHP Trooper J.M. Greene arrived a short time later and wrote a report as well. Morgan was charged with DUI, driving while license suspended and refusing to sign a citation. € On March 3, Rosanna Brown of Crawfordville reported a weapon offense. The victim discovered an arrow sticking out of the roof of her home. Juveniles were questioned about the arrow and the arrow was recovered. € On March 3, Deputy Mike Zimba stopped a vehicle in Panacea for the driver not wearing a seatbelt. During the investigation, William Lucas DeBaufer, 26, of Panacea gave the deputy a false name. Zimba discovered that DeBaufer did not have a valid driver license and he was charged with knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license was suspended and falsely identifying himself to law enforcement. € On March 3, Deputy Clint Beam responded to a Crawfordville area business where a juvenile with a pocket knife was allegedly making threatening remarks. Witnesses reported that a 13-year-old juvenile did not like the things being said to him by another juvenile and placed the knife near the 14-year-old victim. The 13year-old was charged with aggravated assault and released to his parents. € On March 4, Deputy Clint Beam investigated a one vehicle accident on Beechwood Drive in Crawfordville. A Ford sedan went off the roadway and struck several small bushes before coming to “ nal rest against a tree. A 17-year-old female was issued a criminal citation for operating a motor vehicle without a license. She was not injured in the accident. € On March 2, Dylan T. Bass of Crawfordville was involved in a traf“ c crash at Providence Bible School, 710 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The driver misjudged his speed as he was entering the driveway and damaged sections of the fence. Damage to the fence was estimated at $200 and damage to the victims truck was estimated at $100. € On March 4, Beverly Skelton of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of jewelry from her home. A 12-year-old suspect was identified and the jewelry, valued at $395, was recovered. The juvenile was charged with grand theft and released to the custody of a parent. € On March 5, Leslie C. Rivers of Panacea reported a grand theft. Two firearms were stolen out of the trunk of the victims vehicle. The weapons are valued at $600. € On March 5, Michael Rosselot of Crawfordville and CSG Systems in Crawfordville reported a business burglary. A forced entry was discovered at a building that contained a generator. The victim discovered the theft of $850 worth of diesel fuel. Damage to the generator shed door was estimated at $500. € On March 2, Detectives Lorne Whaley and Rob Giddens assisted the Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce by recovering stolen property from a Woodville Highway residence in Wakulla County. Leon County had a grand theft suspect in custody and when Wakulla detectives went to the home they recovered a stolen motorcycle. The motorcycle had been reported stolen by the Florida State University Police Department. € On March 5, William Donaldson of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Donaldson was repairing broken windows at the Paradise Village mail room when he observed another broken window. Damage was estimated at $50. € On March 5, Daniel Brent Pell of Wakulla County Public Works reported a trespass at the county sewage treatment plant on Lawhon Mill Road. A suspect, who has been identi“ ed, was observed dumping sewage at the plant after operating hours. The suspect climbed the fence and dragged the sewer hose under the fence. He dumped an estimated $1,000 worth of waste. € On March 5, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after two white males were allegedly observed taking items from the store. The two men reportedly got into a Honda and drove north on U.S. Highway 319. The stolen items were valued at $31. The driver of the vehicle was identi“ ed. € On March 6, two 17year-old Crawfordville females were arrested for shoplifting at Wal-Mart after asset protection staff allegedly observed the two juveniles removing clothing, jewelry and personal items from the store without paying for them. One of the juveniles had $79 worth of items and the other had $116 worth of property on them. The teenagers were turned over to relatives. € On March 6, Dorothy A. Hereford of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle accident at Wakulla Arran Road and U.S. Highway 319. The victim was turning left from the highway onto Wakulla Arran Road when her vehicle left the road and struck a utility pole. Damage to the vehicle and the pole was estimated at $150. The driver was not hurt. € On March 6, traffic enforcement was set up on Surf Road for two hours. Fifteen vehicles passed the law enforcement vehicles and only two were six miles or more over the posted speed limit of 35 miles per hour. One of the vehicles was given a verbal warning and the other was issued a traf“ c citation for traveling 18 miles per hour over the speed limit. € On March 7, Sgt. Ray Johnson issued a civil citation for 40 hours of work to a 12-year-old Riversprings Middle School male juvenile who struck a 14-year-old student in the groin. The incident occurred during a physical education class. The mother of the victim took her son to the emergency room to be seen by a doctor. On March 7, Crystal Browning of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims vehicle was keyed while she was at work in Medart. Damage was estimated at more than $800. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 818 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s Report

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com By Bryan DurbinSTAFF WRITERThe International Vintage Guitar Collectors Association will be coming to Tallahassee this week, buying all types of guitars, musical instruments and anything valuable that is related to music culture. Those that attend this event will be able to speak with specialists one-onone and have their items evaluated. Offers will be made to those that have items valuable to collectors, especially pre-1970 guitars. Those that do decide to sell their items will be paid on the spot. If you are like a lot of people, you might have an old vintage guitar lying around the house. If you have ever wondered what its worth, now is your chance to find out and, if you choose, sell it as well. Vintage guitars and other musical items could be worth a great deal, according to Eddie Stambaugh, vice president of the International Vintage Guitar Collectors Association (IVGCA). Collectors are willing to pay quite a lot of money for items they want to add to their collection. If they are rare enough, the right vintage guitar could be worth over $100,000,Ž explains Stambaugh. One 1960 Gibson Les Paul went for just that in July of 2007„$100,000 paid by an avid collector.Ž While that is an extreme example, many rare and valuable guitars are stashed away in attics, closets, basements and garages all across the country. The IVGCA has organized a traveling event in search of all types of guitars, musical instruments and more. Even common guitars can be worth a significant amount due to high collector demands,Ž says Stambaugh. Some of the most popular brands, including Gibson, Fender, Martin and Gretsch always bring big premiums.Ž While the IVGCAs specialty is guitars, they are also examining other instruments and equipment, including drum sets, banjos, flutes, clarinets, amplifiers, pedals, microphones, etc. Any autographed and musician-specific items are also welcome. Stambaugh concludes that you never really know what you have until you have your items evaluated by a specialist, like the ones we have here at IVGCA. Whatever kind of instrument you may have, bring it in to our show. Think about it„you could walk away $100,000 richer!Ž So whether you have one instrument that might be valuable, or a large collection you recently inherited, you can talk to these specialists for free. There is nothing to lose, the event itself is always interesting, and you might walk away with a couple thousand dollars in your pocket. k r HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE SELL GUITARS AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS YESTERDAY at the International Vintage Guitar Collectors Association PAID ADVERTISEMENT BRING THIS EXPRESS CARD IN AND GET EXPRESS SERVICE WHAT WE BUY Vintage & New Guitars Fender Gretsch Gibson Guild Martin PRS Epiphone National Rickenbacker Stage Equipment & PA Gear Vintage & New Amps (example: Marshall) Vintage Microphones Foot PedalsOther Instruments Flutes Trumpets Clarinets Violins Drum Sets Banjos Saxophones Autographed and Musician-Specic Items AND MORE! Above: At a show in St. Clair, Minnesota, a guest brought in a guitar signed by Garth Brooks. During a Garth Brooks concert, the gentleman had been called up to the stage where Brooks signed his guitar and handed it over to him. He walked away from the IVGCA show with over $2,000. Dont miss your chance on cashing in with an autographed guitar. ha t you ha ve u d by a specialist, l ik e at IVGCA. Whatever aw po cket. Tuesday…Saturday March 13th 17th Tuesday…Friday: 9am…6pm Saturday: 9am…4pm Holiday Inn Capitol Center 1355 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Directions: 850.877.3171 Show Info: 217.787.7767 IN TALLAHASSEE

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By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar“ eld@thewakullanews.netThrough WakullaStory 2012 … A Hankerin for Headhuntin,Ž Herb Donaldson cleverly channeled voices from the past as accounted by Elizabeth Fisher Smith, editor of the Magnolia Monthly, and adapted for the stage selections from her published work. WakullaStory 2012 began its presentation around the days of Reconstruction following the Civil War when, according to H. Clay Crawford, No county in Florida, or under the circle of the sun, had a more corrupt set of of“ cials.Ž Those days were complete with conspiracy and murder by Wakullas “ vemember Ku Klux Klan, and the publication of a mystery novel written for teenagers by Kirk Munro entitled Wakulla,Ž about a family that travels on a steamer from Maine down the east coast to the St. Marks Lighthouse. Adventures were encountered during their trip down the coast and after they arrived in the then jungle region where Magnolia once existed. According to the story, during the 1850s, about onethird of Wakullas population were slaves. Abraham Gavin, an antebellum aristocrat, was one of the largest slave owners in Wakulla. Many African Americans in the county took the surname Gavin from him. S.B. Richardson owned 57 slaves; Henry Mash owned 54; H.H. Walker owned 33, just to name a few. There were a couple of slaves who were 100 years old. John L. Crawford, namesake of Crawfordville, owned 13 slaves. There were many more. WakullaStory weaves through 1910, when Walter and Annie Harms began publishing the Sopchoppy ArgosyŽ from a ” atbed press in a shed on their property. The ArgosyŽ was a weekly publication that ran for two years. Then it takes us through the 1920s, when Agnes, Mary and Queen Triplett, all related by marriage to Triplett brothers, were teachers in and around Wakulla County. The February 1965 issue of the Magnolia Monthly was said to have featured an article by Elizabeth Smith concerning House Bill 61726, a bill that was overlooked by the auditors of“ ce. The bill added $100 expense money to the $100 per month the school board members were already receiving in salaries. That caused $11,843.43 to be distributed to the board members, past, present and evidently at least one deceased. According to Smith, Wakulla had raised its school board from $20 to $50 to $100 to $200 per month. Parents strenuously objected to the bill because they wanted the money spent on classroom equipment and repairs. Elizabeth Smiths father, who was a professor of economics, made a hobby out of headhunting, a slang term for the study of a mans ancestry. She said whenever they went on a family picnic, they always ended up in a cemetery, where the children had to write down names, birth and death dates before they could eat. She said from the name on a stone a mans whole life can be reconstructed. Through WakullaStory we find there are three types of cemeteries in Wakulla County … community, church and family. There is one all-black cemetery, the Mount Olive Church Cemetery, where many of those buried were World War I soldiers serving in the Pioneer Battalion. The oldest cemetery in the county, and the most cherished, is the Magnolia Cemetery. Some of the oldest graves in the county are decorated with things like broken glass, pottery or seashells. Elizabeth Smith was opinionated and outspoken through the Magnolia Monthly, which lasted almost two decades. As WakullaStory noted, she did not make the history she accounted, she merely observed it and wrote it down for all of us to remember. The play was performed Friday and Saturday, March 9 and 10, at the Sopchoppy School auditorium. & Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012Conventional wisdom was right, even in an unconventional session Weekly Roundup, Page 7B Plant Society to host walkShipwrecks as topic of science talk Stories, Page 4B Lockinone yearof savings and get our best offers on every package.two years All DIRECTVoffersrequire 24-month agreement.** The CHOICEXTRA’PackageFOR 12 MONTHS AfterRebate 99/MO*39$MORECHANNELS, MOVIESANDSPORTS. OVER205DigitalChannels 4 FREE UPGRADES HD DVR andupto3HD ReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select models only. DIRECTV ON DEMAND 7,000 Shows andMovies HD Included PLUS,FREEFOR 3MONTHS SAVESAVE$39/mo. in1styear! AND$20/mo. in2ndyear! Includes $10/mo.withHD equipmentandAutoBillPay. TheCHOICE’PackageFOR 12 MONTHS After Rebate 99/MO*34$THETVPACKAGETHATBEATSCABLE. OVER150DigitalChannels 4 FREE UPGRADES HDDVRandup to 3HDReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select models only. DIRECTV ON DEMAND 6,000ShowsandMovies HD Included PLUS,FREEFOR3MONTHS SAVESAVE$39/mo. in1styear! AND$20/mo. in2ndyear! Includes $10/mo.withHD equipmentandAutoBillPay. TheENTERTAINMENTP ackageFOR 12 MONTHS AfterRebate 99/MO*29$OURBEST VALUEPACKAGE. OVER140DigitalChannels 4FREE UPGRADES HDDVR andupto3HDReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select modelsonly. HD Included DIRECTVONDEMAND 4,000Showsand Movies PLUS,FREEFOR 3MONTHS SAVESAVE$35/mo.in1styear! AND$20/mo.in2ndyear! Includes $10/mo. withHD equipmentandAutoBillPay. FREE Professional Installation. #1 in Customer Satisfaction Over All Cable and Satellite TVProviders.Among the largest national cable & satellite TV providers. NO Equipmentto Buy. NO Start-UpCosts. 99% Worry-Free Signal Reliability.Based on a Nationwide Study of representative cities. Local Channels Includedinover 97% of the U.S.Withevery package you get: PLUS Lockin 2 years of savings. CALL NOW! Your Local Authorized DIRECTV Dealer 850-926-DISHTHE SIGHTS AND SOUND COOffers end 7/18/12. Credit card required (except in MA & PA). New approved customers only (lease required). $19.95 Handling & D elivery fee may apply. Applicable use tax adjustment may apply on the retail value of the installation. Programming/pricing may vary in certain markets. *BILL CREDIT/PROGRAMMING OFFER: IF BY THE END OF PROMOTIONAL PRICE PERIOD(S) CUSTOMER DOES NOT CONTACT DIRECTV TO CHANGE SERVIC E THEN ALL SERVICES WILL AUTOMATICALLY CONTINUE AT THE THEN-PREVAILING RATES Free SHOWTIME for three months, a value of $38.97. Free HBO, STARZ, SHOWTIME and Cinemax for three months, a value of $135. L IMIT ONE PROGRAMMING OFFER PER ACCOUNT. Featured package names and prices: ENTERTAINMENT $54.99/mo.; CHOICE $63.99/mo.; CHOICE XTRA $68.99/mo. Prices include the following bill credits for 12 months after rebate: $20 for ENTERTAINMENT, $24 for CHOICE and CHOICE XTRA; pl us an additional $5 with online rebate and consent to email alerts. In months 13-24, bill credit will be $10/mo. Eligibility ba sed on ZIP code. Upon DIRECTV System activation, customer will receive rebate redemption instructions (included in customers “rst DIRECTV bill, a separate m ailing, or, in the state of New York, from retailer) and must comply with the terms of the instructions. In order to receive $2 5 monthly credits for the ENTERTAINMENT Package ($29 for CHOICE and CHOICE XTRA) in the “rst 12 months, customer must submit re bate online (valid email address required) and consent to email alerts prior to rebate redemption Rebate begins up to eight weeks after receipt of rebate submission online or by phone. Duration of promotional price varies b ased on redemption date. $10 CREDIT OFFER : Customers activating and maintaining the ENTERTAINMENT Package or above along with an HD Receiver or HD DVR and enrollment in Auto Bill Pay will receive an additional $10 bill credit for 24 months. Account must be in good standingŽ as determined by DIRECTV in its sole discretion to remain eligible for all offers. **24-MO. LEASE AGREEMENT: EARLY CANCELLATION WILL RESULT IN A FEE OF $20/MONTH FOR EACH REMAINING MONTH Must maintain 24 consecutive months of your DIRECTV programming package. Advanced Receiver-DVR fee ($8/mo.) required for DVR lease. Advanced Receiver-HD fee ($10/mo.) required for HD Receiver lease. Advanced Receiver fee ($20/mo.) required for HD DVR a nd TiVo HD DVR from DIRECTV lease. TiVo service fee ($5/mo.) required for TiVo HD DVR from DIRECTV lease. If you have two boxes or one box and an enabled T V, an additional $6/mo. fee applies. For each additional box and/or enabled TV on your account you are charged an additional fe e of $6/mo. per box and/or enabled TV. NON-ACTIVATION CHARGE OF $150 PER RECEIVER MAY APPLY. ALL EQUIPMENT IS LEASED AND MUST BE RETURNED TO DIRECTV UPON CANCELLATION, OR UNRETURNED EQUIPMENT FEES APPLY. VISIT Directv.com OR CALL 1-800-DIRECTV FOR DETAILS Advanced receiver instant rebate requires activation of the ENTERTAINMENT Package or above; OPTIMO MS or above (for DVR Rece iver, MS LATINO); Jadeworld; or any qualifying international service bundle, which shall include the PREFERRED CHOICE programm ing package (valued at $41.99/mo.). Second, third and fourth HD Receiver offer requires activation of the ENTERTAINMENT Package or above or MS ULTRA Package or above and HD DVR as the “rst free receiver upgrade. Home Media Center HD DVR and additional advanced receiver upgrad es available for a charge. INSTALLATION : Standard professional installation in up to four rooms only. Custom installation extra. DIRECTV CINEMA/ON DEMAND : Access to available DIRECTV On Demand programming is based on package selection. Actual number of TV shows and movies will va ry. Additional fees apply for new releases. Some DIRECTV CINEMA and On Demand content requires an HD DVR (HR20 or later) or DVR (R22 or later), DIRECTV CINEMA Connection Kit and broadband Internet service with speeds of 750 kbps or higher and a network router with an available Ethernet port are required. Visit directv.com/cinema for details. To access DIRECTV HD programming, HD equipment required. Number of HD channels based on package selection. Customer satisfactio n ratings based on 2011 American Customer Satisfaction Index. Local channels eligibility based on service address. Not all netw orks available in all markets. Programming, pricing, terms and conditions subject to change at any time. Pricing residential. T axes not included. Receipt of DIRECTV programming subject to DIRECTV Customer Agreement; copy provided at directv. com/legal and in order con“rmation. 2012 DIRECTV. DIRECTV and the Cyclone Design logo, DIRECTV CINEMA, CHOICE and CHOICE XTRA are trademarks of DIRECTV, LLC. All other trademar ks and service marks are the property of their respective owners. WakullaStory is a great tale, well told TAMMIE BARFIELDAfter the Friday night performance, WakullaStory playwright Herb Donaldson accepts a gift from the Historical Societys Murray McLaughlin as the cast of A Hankerin for HeadhuntinŽ looks on.

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, March 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY will hold a public forum at 7 p.m. at the library with guest speaker County Administrator David Edwards. He will discuss the challenges facing county government. Everybody is welcome to attend.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, March 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, March 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  ORDER OF CONFEDERATE ROSE “Mary C. Gwaltney” chapter will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405.  SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS “Wakulla Guards Camp” will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405. Sunday, March 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, March 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, March 20  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend.  LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Contact Anne Ahrendt at 528-0895 or Rachel Pienta at 321-3582 for more information. Friday, March 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Special Events Thursday, March 15  FREE LECTURE on “Adventures in Northwest Florida Archaeology “ by Dr. Nancy White, professor of Archaeology at the University of South Florida, will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. The free lecture is hosted by the Florida Public Archaeology Network, University of West Florida and the Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center.  RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL THEATRE TROUPE will present “Next Victim, Please” at 7 p.m. This is a tongue-in-cheek murder mystery. Admission is free, but donations are graciously accepted. The concession will be open prior to the show and at intermission. Friday, March 16  AISHA IVEY AND AARON O’ROURKE will perform Celtic music at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. This is a pre St. Patrick’s day party, with traditional and original Celtic music. Ivey is a champion ddler and O’Rourke is a talented multi-instrumentalist, his guitar playing lends just the right touch to Irish ddle tunes. For reservations contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Saturday, March 17  ST. PATRICK’S DAY FESTIVAL AND PARADE will be held at Hudson Park by the Crawfordville Lions Club. Breakfast in the park will be held at 8 a.m., followed by opening introductions, raising of the colors, National Anthem and the pledge of allegiance. The parade will start at 10 a.m. There will be several performances throughout the day, including Taekwondo, Coast Charter School, Aleene Benson Irish and Scottish Fiddle Players, Rick Tittle, John Smith and Ken “Muf n Man,” and the Wakulla Wigglers.  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road, from 10 a.m. to noon. All spectrum children and their siblings are invited to this simple “play date.” Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times. Children need to bring their favorite train and a good wholesome snack and drink.  GROW MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES class will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Learn about fertilizer, lime, compost, green manures and application methods. Learn how to produce fruits and vegetables in the back yard. Getting the most fruit and vegetable yields from the least inputs.  ST. PADDY’S DAY FAMILY BASH will be held at Beef O’ Brady’s at 6 p.m. Acoustic duo Hot Tamale will play from 6 to 9 p.m.  WATERS JOURNEY: Following the Water to Wakulla Springs tour will be held from 8 a.m. to noon led by Jim Stevenson, an expert biologist. This a tour of the Wakulla Spring Basin which examines the sources and traces the water journey to the world famous Wakulla Springs. See the actual sinkholes hidden away in the woods where exploration cave divers enter the longest and deepest underwater cave system in the world. Cost of the tour is $18. WATERS JOURNEY is a car caravan/hiking tour. Tour departs from the TCC campus parking lot closest to the intersection of Pensacola Street and Appleyard Drive at 8 a.m. and ends at the tower overlooking the spring at noon. For additional questions or assistance with registration, call 926-3376.  NATIVE PLANT WALK will be held by The Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society in the Apalachicola National Forest. The free, guided walk of about 1.5 hour will follow the Florida National Scenic Trail along the upper Sopchoppy River. Carpooling to go into the Forest will form at 9:30 a.m. at two Wakulla County locations: the Winn-Dixie parking in Crawfordville and the city hall in Sopchoppy. The in-and-back-out walk will begin at the trailhead on Forest Rd. 329 at Sopchoppy River. Participants should carry drinking water. Sign-in, with standard liability release, will be required. For questions, contact David Roddenberry at david_roddenberry@juno. com or 962-4492. Thursday, March 22  FREE LECTURE SERIES on “USS Narcissus and Florida’s Underwater Archaeological Preserves” by Franklin Price, underwater archaeologist, and “Florida’s Panhandle Shipwreck Trail: Dive into the Emerald Coast” by Lindsay Smith, underwater archaeologist, will be held at TCC Wakulla Center at 6:30 p.m. For more information, contact FPAN Outreach Coordinator, Barbara Hines, at bhines@uwf.edu or at (850) 877-2206.Upcoming EventsSaturday, March 24  FIFTH ANNUAL MAKE A DIFFERENCE DAY will be held by VolunteerWakulla from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hudson Park. There will be booth set up for services offered in the county, as well as places to volunteer. There will also be free food and door prizes every 30 minutes after 11 a.m. For more information, call 745-0060 or visit www. volunteerwakulla.org.  HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 340 Trice Lane. They will be collecting paint, oil, chemicals, electronics, solvents, cleaners, gas, fuel, batteries, uorescent bulbs and acids. Thursday, March 29  FREE LECTURE SERIES on The Page-Ladson and Wakulla Spring Sites Yield Evidence of the First Ice-Age Floridians by James Dunbar, retired archaeologist with the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research, at 6:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. For more information, contact FPAN outreach coordinator, Barbara Hines, RPA, at bhines@ uwf.edu or at (850) 877-2206. Saturday, March 31  LIFE WALK by the Wakulla Pregnancy Center will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park. Registration is at 9 a.m., and the walk starts at 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 210-1276.  EASTER EGG HUNT will be held at Hudson Park at 11 a.m. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. The age groups range from infant to children 10 years old. A drawing will be held and one child from each age group will win an Easter basket. The event is sponsored by Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. Call 926-7227 for more information. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Riversprings Middle School Theatre Troupe performance at 7 p.m. Celtic music at Posh Java at 8 p.m. St. Patrick’s Day Festival and Parade at Hudson Park. Wakulla County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, March 15  WAKULLA COUNTY AIRPORT COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 3 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. Monday, March 19  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Celtic music can be heard at Posh Java on Saturday at 8 p.m. with a performance by Aisha Ivey and Aaron ORourke.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 – Page 3B 713-001499 Rock Landing Road OPEN: THURSDAY ............. 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .............................. 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday .................. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. SUNDAY ...........................11 A.M. 9 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95Special to The NewsThe Gadsden Arts Center is pleased to announce its acceptance into the North American Reciprocal Museum (NARM) program. This honor brings Gadsden Arts into a league with more than 500 fine cultural organizations, and offers Gadsden Arts Center members a fantastic new bene“ t. Members at $100 contribution level receive a special NARM membership card that provides free admission and a gift shop discount at over more than member organizations in the United States and Canada. It is truly an honor to be a part of such a large and distinguished network of museums,Ž said Grace Maloy, Executive Director, and a fantastic bene“ t for our members, especially those who travel or spend time elsewhere part of the year.Ž Everyone is welcome to join the Gadsden Arts Center … memberships start at just $10 a year. For more information, visit the Gadsden Arts Center, open Tuesday…Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., call (850) 875-4866, or visit www.gadsdenarts.org.Special to The NewsThe Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society invites the public on a native-plant walk in Apalachicola National Forest on Saturday morning, March 17. The free, guided walk of about 1.5 hour will follow the Florida National Scenic Trail along the upper Sopchoppy River. Carpooling to go into the Forest will form at 9:30 a.m. at two Wakulla County locations: the Winn-Dixie parking lots outer area on US 319 in Crawfordville and the city hall in Sopchoppy three blocks off U.S. 319. The in-and-back-out walk will begin at the trailhead on Forest Road 329 at the Sopchoppy River. Walking will not be strenuous but will be more than a mile. Participants should carry drinking water. Sign-in, with standard liability release, will be required at the trailhead. For questions, contact David Roddenberry of the Sarracenia Chapter at david_roddenberry@juno.com or 850962-4492Special to The NewsThe Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at the Wakulla County Public Library on Tuesday, March 20. There will be a short business meeting followed by a presentation by Sarracenia member Paul Hamilton on climate change. Hamilton will relate his climate change teaching experiences at the Alaska Sealife Center and working with various student and citizen groups. He will identify and explain common areas of confusion regarding this subject. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m., with the program following immediately after club announcements. The program is free and open to the public. Please join us for this timely and interesting program. Come at 6 p.m. to mingle and enjoy refreshments before the meeting and talk get underway.Plant Society will host a walkNative Plant Society will have a program on climate change GADSDEN ARTSThe Gadsden Arts Center in Quincy.Gadsden Arts becomes a North American reciprocal museumBuffs of World War II history wont want to miss a special presentation March 22 by Thomas C. Shirley, a marine biologist from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Shirleys talk, Run Silent, Run Deep: New Life on WWII Shipwrecks in the Gulf of Mexico,Ž begins at 7 p.m. March 22 at the IMAX Theater in the Challenger Learning Center in Kleman Plaza in downtown Tallahassee. Shirley is part of a 10member team of scientists in the U.S. and Canada who last year wrapped up a detailed, one-of-a-kind study of World War II shipwrecks in the northern Gulf of Mexico. In 2004, he and his colleagues collaborated on the study aimed at investigating the biology and archaeology of eight casualties of the war, which include the only German U-boat known to have been sunk during combat in the Gulf. Beginning in 1941, German submarines began an all-out assault on Allied shipping in the Gulf. The campaign reached its zenith in 1942 when U-boats sent a total of 56 vessels … ranging from commercial “ shing boats to tankers … to the bottom, killing dozens of sailors from Texas to the Keys. (The closest World War II casualty to the Big Bend coast is the wreck of the Empire Mica, a 480-foot British tanker that was torpedoed and sunk roughly 38 miles south of Apalachicola in June 1942.) Shirley said that the Minerals Management Service within the U.S. Department of Interior sponsored the project. The MMS, which oversees oil-drilling operations in federal waters in the Gulf, has studied WWII shipwrecks as a means of determining how oil platforms can best be transformed into arti“ cial reefs. In war archives in the U.S. and in Europe, the scientists found original blueprints, photos, and manifests of each of the ships prior to their sinking. They also interviewed survivors, family members and relatives of sailors who were on the vessels, including the wife of the German skipper of the U-166, the U-boat the team studied. The identity of the U166 wasnt con“ rmed until 2001 by a team of marine contractors working for the MMS. Shortly after the sub torpedoed and sank the 375-foot U.S. passenger ship, the Robert E. Lee, it was attacked and sunk with all hands by a Navy patrol boat assigned as an escort for the Lee. Both vessels lie within two miles of each other in 6,500 feet roughly 100 miles south of the coastal town of Houma, La. Shirleys appearance is the second in a series of talks sponsored this spring by the Tallahassee Scienti“ c Society, a local nonprofit group. On April 25, the series will resume with a presentation by Sopchoppys own Joe Hutto, acclaimed naturalist and writer. Last November, the PBS/ BBC NatureŽ television series broadcast My Life as a Turkey,Ž a documentary based on Huttos highly regarded book, Illumination in the FlatwoodsŽ (1995). The series concludes May 24 with a presentation by Janisse Ray, one of the Souths most well known nature writers. Members of the Tallahassee Scientific Society can purchase complete sets of tickets for $20 or individual tickets for $6 each. For more information and to order tickets, visit the societys website at www.tallysci.org or call (850) 877-0224. World War II shipwrecks will be topic of science talk SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMarine biologist Thomas C. Shirley will speak about Gulf shipwrecks in Tallahassee on March 22. Saturday, March 17 at Hudson ParkFESTIVAL & PARADE Sponsored by Crawfordville Lions ClubBreakfast at 8 a.m.Parade at 10 a.m.Live Entertainment at 11 a.m. For vendor information call 926-1269 or 566-1828 For parade information call 926-4440Many Arts and Crafts Booths, Exhibits and Food Booths, Pony Rides, Space Walks and Lots More Entertainment for Kids! PANACEA HATSAFACTHATSEARLE KIRKWOOD850-524-9103UNDERTHEOAK ON US 98 PANACEA Laura M. Mulholland 850-926-23043340 Crawfordville, FL 32327 ART WAREHOUSE Paintings, Sculptures & Carvings Buy Sell

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com There is no denying that Irish eyes are smiling come the month of March. With the widely celebrated and festive Saint Patricks Day arriving mid-month, the parades and shamrocks might overshadow the fact that theres more to Irish heritage than Saint Patricks Day. In fact, the entire month of March is dedicated to IrishAmerican heritage. In 1840, many Irish people emigrated to North America to escape the great potato famine happening in Ireland. Today almost 40 million people claim Irish ancestry, and there are millions of Irish-Americans making contributions to the United States each and every day, with notable Irish-Americans in all walks of life. Here are just a handful of people of Irish heritage who have made strides in their respective disciplines through the years. Charles Carroll III: Carroll was born in Maryland where there were once laws to prohibit Catholics from voting, holding office or worshiping publicly. Carol became a Catholic-rights activist and also served as a U.S. Senator in the “ rst Congress. He holds the title as the only Catholic to have signed the Declaration of Independence. Harry BingŽ Crosby: Crosby was an acclaimed entertainer whose contributions are still valued today, more than three decades after his death. A singer and actor, his trademark smooth, baritone voice helped catapult Crosby to the list of top record sellers for the twentieth century. One of the “ rst people to receive three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Crosby also earned an Academy Award for Best Actor for his role as Father Chuck OMalley in the 1944 motion picture Going My Way.Ž Henry Ford: The American auto industry can give thanks to the eviction of John Ford from Cork in 1847, which enabled the Ford family to move to the States shortly after. Johns son Henry became an automobile pioneer and helped pave the way for the dominance and popularity of the American car. John Hughes: Many people say that Hughes popular teen movies documented their own teenage years. Hughes is best known for a string of quirky, yet spot-on depictions of the average American teenager that helped start the careers of actors who would go on to be known as the Brat Pack.Ž In the 1990s, hits like Home AloneŽ and Curly SueŽ also resonated with audiences and helped solidify Hughes as a leader in family entertainment. He passed away in 2009 from a heart attack. James Hetfield: Fans of the popular heavy metal band Metallica are no strangers to the accomplishments of its front-man Het“ eld. Het“ eld co-founded the band in 1982 and since then has helped make Metallica one of the most renowned bands of this genre. The bands hit Enter SandmanŽ helped further propel the groups popularity both in and outside of its angst-driven heavy metal fan base. Ron Howard: One of Hollywoods most successful directors, Howard can also lay claim to being one of its most successful child actors. Appearing in his “ rst “ lm in 1956 at just 18 months old, Howard went on to memorable roles such as Opie on The Andy Grif“ th ShowŽ and Richie Cunningham on Happy Days.Ž While his role on Happy DaysŽ made him a household name, it was behind the camera where Howards career would truly take off. Howards directorial career has produced several hits, including Splash,Ž Willow,Ž Apollo 13,Ž and A Beautiful Mind,Ž which earned him the Academy Award for Best Director. Bill OReilly: A political commentator and New York-based news reporter, OReilly quickly made a name for himself in television news, rising up the ranks from local news stops in Scranton, PA and eventually landing his own national show, The OReilly Factor,Ž which is consistently among cable news top-rated shows. OReilly holds two masters degrees, one for broadcast journalism from Boston University and another in public policy from Harvard University. This page sponsored in part by: Spotlight on notable Irish-Americans St. Pattricks Day is

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weather weather Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 9267561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfor dville. Found PERSONAL ITEM Found in local business btween 1 & 2 pm. Wed, March 7, call (850) 9261561 to claim Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 122 weekly newspapers, 32 websites, 25 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)7421373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)3747294 Trades/ Skills DRIVERSHometime Choices: Express lanes Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF, 14/ON-7/OFF. WEEKLY, Full and Part time. Dry and Refrigerated, New Trucks! 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Revell Realty 850-9622212 SOPCHOPPY3br/1ba, Covered screen porch, large wooded lot,$475/mo (incl garbage) + a dep (850) 566-4124 Real Estate For Rent HOME ON ACREAGEHome on 3 acres. 2BR/2BA. porch, storage building, large oak trees, conveniently located near post office and Walgreens $625/mo 850-251-1253 Br enda Hicks Realty Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-9264217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished PANECEASmall 3 Bed 1 Bath Nice and clean Small pet allowed $450. mo. (850) 251-7965 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CrawfordvilleGeorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $875, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 4433300 WATER. BIRDS FISHING2/1, w/covered deck over looking private dock, newly refurbished, completely furnished or neg unfurnished $900 rent + utility fee (850) 5241026 Commercial Real Estate WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-4215039 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 9263546 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 9267291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL A Business -Community (ABC) School Program, Wakulla County RFP# 12/13 -01 The School Board of Wakulla County requests interested parties to submit formal sealed bids/proposals for the above referenced bid. SCOPE OF WORK: The School Board of Wakulla is seeking proposals from qualified businesses with operations in Wakulla County, Floridainterested in partnering with the District in A Business-Community (ABC)School Program. The proposal is for the Business to provide the facility, including the associated operating and upkeep expenses, in which the Wakulla County School District (WCSD) will provide an educational program for the children of the business employees for 6.5 hours per day or as consistent with the Wakulla County School Board (WCSB) approved elementary school hours and calendar. A Business-Community (ABC) School is defined as a public school offering instruction to students from kindergarten through third grade in a facility owned or leased and operated by a business. The Department of Education 2012-2013 average class size requirement is eighteen students. Eighteen is also the minimum average class size to achieve the effective, efficient use of the taxpayers educational and fiscal resources. Proposals that commit to meeting the maximum and minimum class size criteria or that proved for reimbursement to the Wakulla County School District for any loss in FTE educational funding revenues resulting from the failure of the business to achieve the minimum enrollment will receive the highest consideration. Students in need of or enrolled in special programs or that require special services can best be served at the Wakulla County Schools that offer those programs and services identified in the students individual educational plan. Parents shall be responsible for providing all transportation to and from school or to the other WCSD facilities during, before and after school for the students enrolled in a Business-Community (ABC). Florida Business Community (ABC) Schools shall comply with the constitutional class size requirements. Facilities to a house a FloridaBusiness-Community (ABC) School must comply with the State Uniform Building Code for Educational Building Construction adopted pursuant to section 1013.37, Florida Statutes, and must meet state and local health, environmental, and safety laws and codes. ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS: This package can be requested by mail at Wakulla County School Board, Post Office box 100, Crawfordville, Fl orida 32326 or by calling 850-926-0065 DOCUMENT COST: $1.50 BID BOND: None PRE/BID PROPOSAL CONFERENCE:: Pre-Proposal Conference Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 10 A.M. Wakulla County School Board Administrative Offices Conference Room 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DUE DATE/TIME: April 10, 2012@ 2:00P.M. Eastern The School Board of Wakulla County, Florida must receive bids no later than said date and time. Bids received after such time will be returned unopened. CONTACT: WILLIAM R. BRISTOL 850-926-0065 published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News March 8, 15, 2012 5148-0315 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 – Page 5B ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. 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Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Classified Ads $10877-676-1403 Rent to own! D/W Mobile Home. $600/month, plus deposit. 850-926-9540 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 L o o k i n g f o r Looking for t h e l a t e s t the latest L o c a l N e w s ? Local News? LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thew aku llanews.co m Please Recycle The Wakulla News Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041

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We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets.Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month.2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 415 Mashes Sands Rd. on Ochlockonee Bay 3 Bdr./ 2 ba $825. Pets with Deposit No smoking. 6 River Cove Bay view 2 Bdr. 1 ba Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit 5149-0315 PUBLIC NOTICE NWFTCA Meeting Notification -Notice is hereby given The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority has scheduled their Board meetings for 2012. March 22, 2012 -10:00am Central Time, City Hall, 9 Harrison Avenue, Panama City, FL April 26, 2012 -10:00am Central Time, City Hall, 222 West Main Street, Penascola, FL July 26, 2012 -10:00am Eastern Time, Robert Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL October 25, 2012 -10:00am Central Time, Walton County Commission Meeting Room-Annex, 31 Coastal Centre Boulevard, Santa Rosa Beach, FL Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Amy Paulk at (850) 415-1040 or by email apaulk@gc inc.com. March 15, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5145-0315 Vs. Atkinson, Johnny Mason 12-4-CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-4-CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE ESTATE OF JOHNNY MASON ATKINSON, SR.., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of JOHNNY MASON A TKINSON, SR.,DECEASED, File Number 12 4 CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate, Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville, Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the estate must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. The date of the first publication of this Notice is March 8, 2012. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Dated this 1st day of March, 2012. Personal Repr esentative: Teresa Ann Broxton 30 Windy Ct. Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attor ney for Personal Repr esentative: SHAWN P. GOLETZ, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No. 0338450 Smith, Thompson, Shaw, Minacci & Colon, P.A. 320 Thomasville Road, Fourth Floor Tallahassee, FL 32309 Tel: (850)893-4105 Fax: (850)893-7229 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News, March 8 and 15, 2012 -5145-0315 5147-0315 Vs.Dicus, Charles, 37 2011 CA 002620 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.37 2011 CA 002620 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES C. DICUS III; MARCIA K. DICUS; CITY OF TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, ET AL Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SER VICE TO: CHARLES C. DICUS III; MARCIA K. DICUS, whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIF IED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property; COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF OAK RIDGE ROAD(STATE ROAD NO. 260-LEON COUNTY NO.2204) AND RUN THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 160.06 FET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 493.80 FEET TO A POINT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 164.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 149.70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 164.50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 149.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE WEST 12 FEET THEREOF SUBJECT TO AN INGRESS, EGRESS EASEMENT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 670, PAGE 179, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH: A 30 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8 TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF OAK RIDGE ROAD AND RUN THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 30.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT -OF-WAY AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 356.38 FEET THENCE NORTH 466.54 FEET THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 466.18 FEET TO A CRIMPED IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 356.93 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME KNOWN AS A 1997 VIN# GAFLV35A12887HH21 AND GAFLV35B12887HH21 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 3010 North Military Trail, Suite 300, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 on or before April 8, 2012 (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed therein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 22nd day of February, 2012 (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE COURT /S/ BY: Elizabeth L. Alford DEPUTY CLERK March 8 & 15, 2012 5152-0322 Vs. Herndon, Linda 65-2010-CA-000243-cancel and reschedule foreclosure sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2010-CA-000243 Division NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. LINDA K. HERNDON, et al. Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgement of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 25, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakull County, Florida described as: ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND IN WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 515, PAGE 774, ID#10-55-03W-000-00621-001, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS METES AND BOUNDS PROPERTY. COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 0223Ž WEST 660.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 4225Ž EAST 1388.01 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 27 DEGREES 1514Ž WEST 1199.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 27 DEGREES 1514ŽWEST 774.47 FEET TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUT H 26 DEGREES 0835Ž WEST 552.64FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SOUTHWESTERLY ALONGSAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1482.69 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 4756ŽFOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 150.06 FEET, THE CHORE OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 19 DEGREES 0233Ž WEST 150.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 4702ŽEAST 673.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. and commonly known as: 295 CURTIS MILL RD, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the hghest and bidder, for cash, Sales are held in Lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on April 12, 2012 at 11a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 8th day of March, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court /s/Desiree D.Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, March 15 & 22nd, 2012 5154-0322 Vs. Ashley Ciara Evans 2011-CA-000189 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000189 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SHILLING, and JAMES M. FOX, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-189-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the plaintiff, and ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SCHILLING and JAMES M. FOX, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT AŽ Lots 32,33, and 34 of the West Side of the Town of Sopchoppy, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida Published two (2) times March 15 & 22, 2012 The Wakulla News 5154-0322 5155-0322 Vs. Charles Allen 11-CA-000230 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-CA-000230 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ESTATE OF CHARLES ALLEN PATRICK, deceased, CHARLES A. A.J.Ž PATRICK, JR., TYLER SHAYNE PATRICK, LISA DOREEN PORTER, a/k/a LISA DOREEN PATRICK, U.S. DEPT. OF JUSTICE, WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-230-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and ESTATE OF CHARLES ALLEN PATRICK, deceased, CHARLES A. A.J.Ž PATRICK, JR., TYLER SHAYNE PATRICK, LISA DOREEN PORTER, a/k/a LISA DOREEN PATRICK, U.S. DEPT. OF JUSTICE, WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT AŽ Lot 18, Block AŽ, Northwood Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 91 to 97, of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with 1985 EATO Doublewide Mobile Home ID Numbers: 11417921A & 11417921B, Title Numbers: 41329335 & 41309172 Published two (2) times -March 15, 22, 2012 in The Wakulla County, Florida 5154-0322 5156-0322 Vs. Joseph D. Olah 11-126-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-126-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH D. OLAH, JR. and KRISTINE P. OLAH, husband and wife; UNKNOWN TENANTS; et. al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-126-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and JOSEPH D. OLAH, JR., KRISTINE P. OLAH, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices (SEAL) EXHIBIT AŽ Commence at a concrete monument (marked #2919)being used as the Southeast Corner of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida said point also lying on the Easterly boundary of a 20.00 foot roadway easement (Redwood Lane) and run North along said Right-of-Way boundary 247.85 feet and iron rod and cap (marked #7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North along said Right-of-way boundary 367.16 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #4261), thence leaving said Right-of-way boundary run North 89 degrees40 minutes 43 seconds West 338.18 feet to an iron rod, thence run South 524.73 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 65 degrees 16 minutes 18 seconds East 372.14 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 3.46 acres, more or less. SUBJECT to and together with a 20.00 foot wide roadway easement lying over and across the Easterly 20.00 feet portion thereof. AND ALSO SUBJECT to a 100.00 foot wide powerline easement lying over and across the Southerly 100.00 feet, more or less thereof, or as designated by the powerline thereon. TOGETHER with one SUPRE MH 1974 ID G9150A & G9150B located thereon. Published two (2) times -March 15, 22, 2012 in The Wakulla News 5156-0322 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5150-0322 Weitzel, Joseph 11-77-PR Notice to Cred PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 11-77-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT JOSEPH WEITZEL Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS and NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION TO ALL CREDITORS and TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS The administration of the estate of ROBERT JOSEPH WEITZEL whose date of death was November 14, 2011 and whose social security number is 286-40-6942, File Number 11-77-PR, is pending in the Circuit court of Wakulla County, Florida, probate division, whose address is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors have only those periods of time established in Florida Statutes 733.702 and 733.710 to file their claims against the estate. All creditors and all interested persons are required to file with the court. WITHIN 90 DAYS OF THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE (1) all claims against the estate ; (2) any objection that challenges the qualifications of the personal representative, venue or jurisdiction of the court; and (3) any written defenses to the Petition for Administration. You must file the original of your claim, objection or defense with the Clerk of the Court at the above address either before or immediately after service on the personal representatives attorney whose name and address are at the end of this notice. ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. FAILURE TO SERVE AND FILE TIMELY WRITTEN DEFENSES AS REQUIRED MAY RESULT IN A JUDG5151-0322 Mcelveen, Victoria K, Case # 12-17CP Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-17 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF VICTORIA KATHLEEN MCELVEEN Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Victoria Kathleen McElveen, deceased, File 12-17 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is March 15, 2012. Personal Representative: Daniel E. Wiggins 227 15th Street NW Ruskin, FL 33570 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News Mar ch 15 & 22, 2012 Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351 RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Island 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres – $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg.14 Windy Court 3BR/2BA Available 4/1/12 $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 47 Jasmine 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre $1,200 Mo. Available April 1. No Smoking/Small Pets w/approval 20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 917 Jessica 3BR/2BA Woodville/Leon County $800 Mo. Pets ok w/approvalAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate

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By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 11 … Going into the once-adecade redistricting session, while starting it with a budget de“ cit, the conventional wisdom was that not much else would get done this year. With the need to cut spending and the difficulty of redrawing political boundaries … always a tough balancing act fraught with more challenge this year because of two new constitutional amendments that said it had to be done without taking party politics into account … the opening of the year came with the promise of acrimony, in-“ ghting, and some painful lessons about who everyones friends were. All that turned out to be true … but not quite in the way most observers expected. In the end, as predicted, lawmakers didnt do a whole lot this session that will resonate through the ages. There will be a new polytechnic university, and sooner than originally thought, which is a pretty big change. And there was a continuation of a move away from harsher penalties for drug crimes and toward more treatment, but that has been subtle, and part of a running continuum of shifting thought. Similarly, Republican lawmakers once again managed to “ nd a way to cut taxes, but again, part of a longrunning effort that changes only incrementally the business climate and tax picture in the state … after all the GOP has been in charge here and cutting taxes fairly steadily for more than a decade. To be sure, hundreds of bills passed and many of them will do very important things. Some were a huge deal to particular constituencies. Those who have bemoaned quiet prayer in public schools as inadequate, saying that more official prayer should be allowed, got a big victory from an inspirational message bill now awaiting the governors signature. And insurance companies, which have wanted to reduce payouts in the personal injury protection no-fault auto insurance system, were successful in “ nally seeing a revamp of that fraud-riddled system pass. For Gov. Rick Scott it was a good session too … though he had a modest agenda. He saw lawmakers put back some of the money they cut from the education budget, which he had demanded they do. And he got the PIP reform he wanted, having made saving money on car insurance his major talking point. He also saw lawmakers OK the tax cut package he wanted passed for small businesses. But mostly, it was a session of declining to do big things. The biggest talk of the session early on was about the prospect for new casino gambling, something that could have brought enormous and long-lasting change in the very character of the state. But in the end, what happens in Las Vegas, stayed in Las Vegas, (and a lot of other places these days) with lawmakers failing to pass any kind of major change in the gaming laws to let people take more chances on the turn of a wheel. Lawmakers also rejected a Senate leadership effort to privatize a large number of prisons, with the Senate narrowly voting against the idea after a cobbled-together coalition of Republicans with different objections joined Democrats in saying it was a bad idea. On several occasions this session, many times on particularly closely-watched issues, the leaders in the Senate couldnt get their agenda passed. That wasnt how they saw it. Senate President Mike Haridopolos said on a number of occasions, that he was all about free will,Ž and that whatever the Senate did was the way it was going to be and that was “ ne with him. Theres one thing that is abundantly clear,Ž Haridopolos said last week about one vote in particular, but really summing up the whole session in the Senate. I didnt twist arms.Ž In addition to losing on prison privatization, Senate leaders also couldnt pass a bill to make it easier for parents to change failing public schools into charter schools. There were others losses for leadership, as well … including on amendments, such as failing to prevent the Senate and House from watering down a bill dealing with shrinking Citizens Property Insurance. It certainly wasnt all losses for Haridopolos and other Senate leaders. Haridopolos wanted to see passage of two high pro“ le claims bills to compensate victims of government negligence or malfeasance … which are always an uphill battle in a Legislature that doesnt like the tort system to begin with. Those were among the few things he actually openly acknowledged were a top priority. They both passed, one paying back a man who spent nearly three decades in prison until being cleared of murder, the other compensating a man with lifelong injuries from being slammed into by a speeding deputy sheriff. Those two compensation bills complicated the end of Haridopolos “ rst session, but he got them passed this year. Two lives may be changed for the better by the cash, a long-lasting effect of Haridopolos persistence. Haridopolos also argued that the public may have misread what was really important to Senate leaders. After the session ended, he said the three things he wanted to pass, aside from the two claims bills, were the governors three big priorities: the increased K-12 education spending, the PIP auto insurance reform and the tax cut and economic development package. Adding those three to the claims bills, he was “ ve-for-“ ve. Meanwhile, on the other side of the Capitol, House Speaker Dean Cannon, was quietly ef“ cient this year. Unlike in his first year, when Cannon took on the judiciary in a big way … and failed to overhaul the Supreme Court … this session he wasnt openly pushing for any major pieces of legislation. In a backward scenario, the House this year was strangely dull, while the Senate insisted on “ nding new ways to muck up the calendar and fight with itself. The House passed measures coming from the Senate, what few measures it received, with little of the in“ ghting on display in the upperŽ chamber. The House was where the gambling measure died in committee, with conservatives in that chamber uninterested in expanding gaming in the state. But unlike in the Senate, where issues supported by leadership got killed a number of times this year, in the House, the death of the gaming bill was a win of sorts for Cannon. Cannon, R-Winter Park, said he wasnt going to work against that measure, but he was open about not supporting it. Whether he had a hand in killing it by referring it to a committee it couldnt pass is open to question, but either way, in the end, Cannons side prevailed. The House also managed to draw a redistricting plan that the Supreme Court said was OK, unlike the Senate, which drew a Senate map that the court found rife with problems. Lawmakers will return next week to try their hand again at redrawing the Senate map. The budget, while controversial, as always when cuts are made, was also far more so at the Senate end of the Capitol. Senate Budget Chairman JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, made it so … when he pushed a plan for cutting university spending that happened to hit hard in particular at the University of South Florida. While he argued there was no connection, it coincided with Alexanders open “ ght with USF over the splitting off of the universitys Lakeland campus into the new Florida Polytechnic. That drama over the higher ed budget dominated discussion of the overall spending plan to the point where hardly anyone noticed the debate over state spending in the House. Critics of the budget on both sides of the Capitol this year complained about local projects, which returned to the spending plan in large numbers after years of austerity. But that debate got little attention, overshadowed as it was by the higher ed “ ght, even though the abundance of local pork-barrel spending also cost Republican votes for the budget in the Senate. Budget writers on both sides of the Capitol will claim victory this year, because they managed to keep true to the central guiding philosophy of the Republican Party … above everything else, dont raise taxes. And they didnt. Thats an accomplishment that hasnt always been easy when the state is required to have a balanced budget. So on that count, Haridopolos and Cannon, and their respective budget chairmen were successful. So you have a couple defeats,Ž Haridopolos said Saturday after ending the session. Im (a person who is) going to push the envelope and Im going to really try to win the debate, and I think even in the couple of setbacks we had, I felt we won the debateƒ. But you dont want to leave anything on the “ eld, and I didnt leave anything on the “ eld.Ž www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 – Page 7B Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration MENT OR ORDER FOR THE RELIEF DEMANDED, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO YOU. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 15, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Charlotte D. Weitzel 140 Dorothy Loop Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative Aaron N. Bauldee, P.A. 4755 Knollwood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Phone: 850-559-1191, Florida Bar No. 0020513 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla County Times March 15 & 22nd, 2012 5153-0322 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON MARCH 31, 2012 at 10:00a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: MICHAEL SIMMONS MARY LOUIS E SLOAN STEPHEN BOND BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF MARCH 31,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. March 15 and 22nd 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5146-0315 (3/24/12 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 24,2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: MARANDA COX JENNIFER WHITING HILL SARAH E. SKIPPER Before the sale date of Saturday, March 24, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. March 8 & 15, 2012 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 38 43 45 52 62 66 69 2 39 63 3 40 57 4 35 58 21 29 46 53 5 15 18 30 47 6 31 44 54 64 67 70 7 32 48 59 8 24 36 60 22 33 41 61 9 16 19 42 55 10 34 37 56 65 68 71 11 25 49 12 26 50 13 27 51ACROSS1.Daddy-o 5.Geishas'sashes 9.__-HawleyTariff Actof1930 14."Ismell__!" 15.Prefixwithcabor cure 16.Barbera'spartner inanimation 17.Sorvinoof "SummerofSam" 18.Friedman'ssubj. 19.Rejoinderto "Ain't!" 20.Diceydoingsat Canaveral? 23.Healingplants 24.Resultofa QB's mistake 25.Ambulanceorg. 28. OneofaHill100: Abbr. 29.Hollidaypartner 33.Brightlycolored seashell 35.PartsofTV broadcasts 37.Sendpacking 38.Alternative toa beerbelly? 43. Gobananas 44.Rudolph'smaster, forsh ort 45. 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Indyservicearea 42.Amtrak'sbullet train 46.Oldcoot 47.HumptyDumpty, e.g. 49.Pianist/politician P aderewski 50.Disgust 51.Catchallcategory 54.Marveledaloud 56.JazzpianistBlake 58.__cava 59.Produce-scale deduction 60."Wetryharder" company 61.Copewith,slangily 62.Needle-nosedfish 63.Bajacheer American Prole Hometown Content 2/12/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 2 32456 789 28 14 7398 9872 856 49623 79 200 9 HtCtt 614 8327 5 9 329475186 578691234 283 167945 745329618 196548372 931 284567 457916823 862753491 P A M P A S C R A M G A R O R I O L E H A V E O L E P A R T O N A G E L I M I T S T A L E A M E N V E N A U S E U P G E E Z E R O P E C A D A E G G B E C K R I G S O O H E D I D O L P O N T E T A R E S I N A I S E N T A V I S U N C P I T H A C K S H I N T O A C E L A M A S C W O U K E U B I E O N T H E R U N I G N A C E O N O M I S C S I C K E N T A O S E T H O T H E R S Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.comWEEKLY ROUNDUPConventional wisdom right, even in unconventional session

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChamber’s annual Low Country Boil PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN More photos online at thewakullanews.com



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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThings have improved for women over the years. Young women today have the bene ts of the struggles their mothers suffered in striving for equality. Theres still more to be accomplished, according to a group of women gathered together for a panel discussion of Womens Work in Wakulla, organized as a program of the Wakulla County Historical Society on Thursday, March 8. Educator Andrea Carter recounted her experience growing up with the ambition of going into diplomatic service. In college, she was asked if she liked typing because women in the diplomatic corps thats all they did was type. She immediately changed her major. A big change shes seen in her lifetime is that womens career choices are now unlimited. When she was growing up, women were limited to the choices of teacher, nurse or secretary. Anginita Rosier, who is a Sopchoppy city commissioner, said that nowadays its becoming more common to see women in leadership roles. You can pursue whatever dreams you have, regardless, Rosier said. But historian Madeleine Carr offered a perspective that, of 188 world leaders, only 16 are women. Tammie Bar eld, general manager of The Wakulla News, spoke of growing up in a home where there were traditional roles for women, typically serving men. Thats a changing attitude that theres tasks that are womens work, she said. High school drama teacher Susan Solburg said she grew up on a farm where there was just work, not limited to a speci c gender. Continued on Page 12APublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 4B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 5B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 5BINDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 11th Issue Thursday, March 15, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyThe WakullanewsOBITUARIES Tammy Kay Roberts Harvey Frank Earl McIntyre Meta Gwen Rabitaille Walter George Rinkel Budget de cit loomsQuestions about gate at Shell Point By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAlthough it is too early to know for sure, early estimates show that the county could face a budget de cit of around $240,000 in this scal year. Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman told Wakulla County Commissioners at the rst budget workshop for 2012-13 that he was estimating ad valorem revenue will come in between 3 to 5 percent lower than anticipated. Sparkman told the commission it was too soon to tell and he would have a better idea of the expected revenues in June. Commissioner Lynn Artz asked Sparkman what his projection was at this time last year. Sparkman told her it was 10 percent and last year, ad valorem revenues came in just under 10 percent. The commissioners all agreed that if the revenues do fall short, they did not want to increase the millage rate to make up for the difference. If ad valorem revenue decreases by 4 percent, for instance, the millage rate would need to be raised to 8.95 to get the same revenue as the current year. Commissioner Randy Merritt said the hope is that revenues from the Public Service Tax, which was implemented in January at 7 percent, will ll that hole. Once we get rm numbers, it may be a wash, Merritt said. Commissioner Mike Stewart said that would be great if it happened, but they dont know real gures right now. Were talking out of our ying yang right now, Stewart said. Stewart said he would like to be able to decrease the millage again this year to make up for the Public Service Tax. We levied a new tax on them, Stewart said. We owe them some kind of relief. Stewart said he would like to lower the millage by the same amount as the tax, but knows that may not be possible. Another area that might have a large impact on the countys budget is the recent ruling on the legality of requiring all state employees to contribute 3 percent to their retirement. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford ruled against the state and found the measure unconstitutional. If her ruling stands, the county would be required to make up the difference. The ruling is expected to be appealed. That would be a very big hit, Merritt said. During the workshop, Deputy County Administrator Tim Barden said there is an estimated 5 percent increase in health insurance. The commission can choose to absorb those increases or pass them on to the employees. Commissioner Lynn Artz suggested the county look at ways to decrease their expenditures in healthcare by improving the health of county employees and reducing lost work days and medical expenses. Continued on Page 3AEmergency assistance availableBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThose in attendance at the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth meeting on March 7 heard some good news: Wakulla County has received funds to help residents with emergency assistance and weatherization, as well as provide prevention based programs for at-risk teens. Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida has earmarked funds to help families in Wakulla County who are about to be evicted from their homes. Catholic Charities has worked hard to focus these dollars for us, said Executive Director Gail Campbell. Wakulla residents who are in need of this type of emergency assistance are asked to call Catholic Charities at (850) 222-2180 during normal business hours. The initial screening for assistance will be done over the phone. If the resident quali es, a case manager from Catholic Charities will come to Wakulla County to meet with the client. Also announced at the meeting was the awarding of additional funds for the weatherization program in the county, which is intended to improve the energy ef ciency of low-income dwellings and in turn, reduce energy bills for low-income families. The stimulus funding ended in February and states could apply for an extension. Florida was granted that extension, said a representative from Capital Area Community Action Agency, the agency that administers the countys weatherization assistance program. Additional funding was also sought and that too was granted, the representative said. About 20 to 30 more homes will be able to be weatherized with this additional money, the representative said. There is a short window and applications need to be submitted by mid-April. CACAA can be contacted at (850) 926-3122 or at their of ce located at 15A Crescent Way in Crawfordville. Continued on Page 2APanel has lively discussion on Womens Work in Wakulla By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netDue to safety concerns, the access gate to Shell Point Beach has been locked, according to Bryan Roddenberry, assistant director of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. Those with sailboats who would normally pull their vessel up to the water to load and unload, will now need to get a code from the county to unlock the gate and gain access. Roddenberry said the old metal gate was replaced with a wood gate about a month ago and was left open, like it always had been, until they received a complaint about unauthorized vehicles on the beach. We are trying to establish some access control to the beach in order to prevent unauthorized vehicles and late night vandals on the beach, which has been reported by citizens, Roddenberry said. Continued on Page 2AWith falling ad valorem revenues, county commissioners are told there could be $240,000 less money next year. ey hope the 7 percent Public Service Tax they passed last year will ll the hole Were talking out of our ying yang right now, says one commissioner about the lack of specificity in the budget numbers WILLIAM SNOWDENEducator Andrea Carter makes a point during the panel discussion as Sopchoppy City Commissioner Anginita Rosier, drama teacher Susan Solburg and Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper listen. Other panelists were Tammie Bar eld of The Wakulla News, landscape architect Betsy Smith, historian Madeleine Carr and professor Rachel Sutz Pienta. Low Country Boil, Page 8B Low Country Boil, Page 8B JENNIFER JENSENCoalition for Youth member Sherri Kraeft discusses an issue at a meeting last week. Catholic Charities is conducting the screening for emergency assistance, call 222-2180 for help. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe access gate is locked due to safety concerns, according to the county. The lock that was on the gate over the weekend. WakullaStory, Page 1B WakullaStory, Page 1B

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A A chain and key lock was placed on the gate temporarily. A combination lock has now replaced the temporary lock, he said. In an email to a concerned citizen, Roddenberry said the safety concerns relate to County Ordinance Section 23.005, which says it is unlawful to operate any vehicle on park grounds in or on any area not specifically designated as a park road. Roddenberry said he would like to propose making the gate to water access an of cial park road, so users can access it at their convenience. The road would have visible identi- ers so others do not use the area. For now, those with nonmotorized vessels who wish to gain access to the beach will need to contact parks and recreation for the code. The code will change periodically and Roddenberry said he hopes to establish an email list so users can be noti ed when the code is about to change. Roddenberry said there is also a plan to install signage, letting people know how they can gain access. The gate will not be locked during the day on the weekends, he said. We hope the citizens and community will understand the intent of this action is not to deter the proper users of the beach but to prevent the vandals access to the beach, Roddenberry said. Roddenberry said he does not have a timeline on how long the lock will be in place and is open to input and suggestions from citizens on how to address the problems of vandalism and unauthorized vehicles on the beach. For more information, visit www.wcprd.com or call 926-7227.Questions about gate at Shell PointContinued from Page 1A Campbell informed the coalition that the county is in line to receive $12,000 for prevention and support based programs for at-risk teens from the Department of Juvenile Justice. These funds come from the sales of the Invest in Children specialty license plate. The funds go to the Juvenile Crime Prevention and Early Intervention Trust Fund within the Department of Juvenile Justice. The proceeds of the fee fund programs and services that are designed to prevent juvenile delinquency. The department allocates money for programs and services within each county based on that countys proportionate share of the license plate annual use fee collected by the county. The former Wakulla County Juvenile Justice Council merged with the Childrens Coalition to form the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth. To acquire these funds, Campbell said the juvenile justice council must continue to meet with that name and dedicate time to talking speci cally about juvenile justice. The coalition members agreed to hold the juvenile justice council meeting inside the coalition meeting on a quarterly basis to ful ll the requirement. We are stepping to the music, Campbell said. Campbell suggested they use the money for a Do Good Campaign, which would reward positive behavior. There was also an idea to hold a Ghost Out school assembly to increase student awareness of the problem of drinking and driving, and the number of lives lost in alcohol related crashes. Campbell said right behind that funding is $1.2 million, which would be spread throughout the state. Campbell said the county could be in line to receive $35,000, which would also be used for prevention and support based programs. Coalition members were asked to come up with ideas and gure out where there is a need for this type of program. There was a suggestion of an additional resource of cer at the school. Currently there is one of cer for 1,300 high school students. Juvenile Probation Of- cer Don Wilson said he would like to start Project Payback in the county. Businesses would partner with the program and offer work sites for juveniles. Wilson said he has notice juveniles in Wakulla County are having a hard time completing sanctions in a timely manner and this would help correct that. Currently there are 43 children in the juvenile justice system in Wakulla County. Kathy Asbell of Refuge House said abuse is often related to juvenile delinquency and wondered if the money might be used to fund a program deals with both issues. The coalition members agreed to come back with ideas and suggestions of programs the additional money could be used for from the Department of Juvenile Justice. The coalition will hold a town hall meeting on April 3 at 5:30 p.m. in the Wakulla High School cafeteria.Emergency assistance availableBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netRepresentatives with the Organization for Arti cial Reefs and Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission appeared before the St. Marks City Commission on March 8 to ask the city to apply for a permit to reopen the St. Marks Reef area. Tony Murray, board member of OAR, said the reauthorization is necessary so additional material can be placed on the arti cial reef. The artificial reef was placed in 1964 and 1965 and has developed a lot since then, Murray said. It is also outside of the original permitted location. So this reauthorization would also increase the area to include where the reef currently is located and where the permit said it should be. There wasnt GPS back then, Murray said, so it was harder to find the exact location. The reef is 17.3 acres and is located about 5 miles out from the St. Marks Lighthouse, Murray said. They are looking at trying to expand the reef to 43 acres. The tires that make up the reef have been underwater for 50 years and are a part of the ecosystem, Murray said. The hope is to create additional shing grounds near the shore, Murray said. Which will have an economic impact on the city, he said. OAR was asking the city to submit the application because it must be represented by a city or county. They approached the city instead of the county because St. Marks submitted the rst permit application and Murray said St. Marks will bene t from it. The commission agreed it was a good idea, but had some concerns regarding liability. If something happened to the reef or if something was placed in the area that was not permitted, the city would be responsible. Keith Millie, of FWC, said during transportation and placement, the contractor would assume liability. However, once the material is placed, the city would hold that liability. A post construction dive would be done to ensure the right material is placed and that it is in the right location, Millie said. A piece of concrete at 500 pounds is not going to move, Millie said.The item was tabled until the April meeting. CITY OF ST. MARKSSt. Marks Reef may expandThe coalition is to receive $12,000 to be spent on at-risk teens. Ideas include a Do Good campaign to reward positive behavior FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATIONSEEKING ITEMS FOR GIANT YARD SALE!Its time to go through those closets....FWMA is preparing for its biannual yard sale that will be held at Nads storage onMarch 15th, 16th, and 17thNads is located at 59 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. All proceeds from this event will be used to care for sick, injured and orphaned wildlife! Donations of yard sale items can be dropped off at Nads storage in number 33 at any time before the sale or can be brought to the sale on Thursday March 15 after 12:00 noon. If you have items but are unable to drop them off or you would like to become a volunteer for our fundraising committee please email Jeff at jeffstudio54@yahoo.com.All donations are tax deductible and greatly appreciated. Thank you so much for helping us help our local wildlife! www.snapper.com LT125 285Z*Additional 1 year of limited warranty coverage is available on select models in stock. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comContinued from Page 1A County Administrator David Edwards said the countys loss ratio is 142 percent and should be between 75 and 80 percent. The loss ratio is what causes the increase in premiums, he said. The countys insurance provider is spending more on medical claims than it receives in insurance payments. Of ce of Management and Budget Coordinator Debbie DuBose said the county does not have a very healthy workforce and wellness programs should be implemented. Artz said she would work with staff to try and reduce costs. Many of the directives for this budget are the same as last year, no new services or programs, increased lobbying, expand grants, continue non-reliance on reserves, tie emergency funds to budgeted emergency reserves and attrition whenever possible. County staff also brought forth two alternative revenue options to help with the funds that are still a problem, the sewer and road funds. There is an option for an Environmental Lands Management 5-Cent Gas Tax, which would go towards transportation projects, and the formation of a Governmental Utility Authority. The commission did not make a decision on either of the options. Edwards said the county is also preparing a 5-year plan that will encompass the operating and capital portions of the budget. Edwards said they will go through each department, piece by piece, looking at baseline information, historical data, performance measures, level of service and outcome measures. They will then establish goals and anticipate future operational and capital needs. The budget of each department will be broken down and weekly activities will be looked at as well. The plan will serve as a road map for the county in moving forward by assessing current and future needs, Edwards said. It will serve as a tool, so the county can make better, informed decisions, he added. I want to know about a problem now, Edwards said. They are also looking at the fee structure for services in the county to make sure they are being charged properly, such as park and recreation fees. They are also identifying areas where the county can improve revenues, Edwards said. Once this 5-year plan is complete, Edwards said the budget process will be much easier. Each year, the budget will be done and will only need to be tweaked. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he felt last year no one knew where the county was and the clerk and county staff did not communicate regarding the budget. Moore said it is nice to see that has changed. We dont have individual kingdoms around here, Moore said. There was also some discussion about putting some money into the budget for routine and preventive maintenance, as well as spending money on items that will have long term savings. Sometimes you need to spend a little money in the front to save more in the long term, Artz said. Moore agreed and said if there is a cost of $5,000, but it will save the county $10,000 in the end, it was worth it. Edwards said they are looking at ways to reduce electric costs, as well as gas and security. Everyones eyes are wide open, he said. The next budget workshop will be held on June 21.County budget de cit loomsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe county has been awarded a grant for community planning assistance for Wakulla Gardens, but because of potential costs associated with accepting the grant, the Wakulla County Commission chose to only approve the grant if it costs them nothing. If the county accepts the grant, it would be required to pay for lodging, transportation and food for the team that would travel to Wakulla County to help select a strategy and develop a plan of action to correct infrastructure de ciencies in Wakulla Gardens. This is one of our countys major problems, Commissioner Lynn Artz said. Artz went after the grant funding for this project and helped submit the application. She has also already received enough donations from citizens and businesses to pay for the teams lodging and food. She estimates the transportation costs will be around $5,000, but wont know for sure until the team is assigned and they know where everyone was traveling from. She was hoping the commission would agreed to pay for the remaining costs, but the other commissioners would not. Commissioner Randy Merritt said if it was free, he would vote for it, but didnt want to spend any more money on another study or plan for the county. Commissioner Jerry Moore agreed and said, We study everything. Artz said the estimated cost of xing the infrastructure problems in Wakulla Gardens is $34 million and the commission hasnt been able to nd a solution. I dont feel comfortable just walking away and ignoring it, Artz said. Especially if the county is still letting people build new homes in Wakulla Gardens, she said. She felt the planning assistance team might come up with a solution or nancing options the commission hasnt considered. Merritt said he didnt feel the team would nd a magic solution. Commissioner Mike Stewart said, Im not sure theres going to be a different outcome. All agreed to let Artz try and nd some more donations. If there is no cost to the county, the commission agreed to accept the grant. Whats impressive in this county is the people who have already stepped up, Artz said. The planning assistance team would consist of a team leader, two staff from the American Planning Association and ve planning experts. Selected projects usually take about 7 months to complete. Project timelines typically consist of three main stages: Organization of materials and preliminary assessment of project site (team brie ng book preparation), teams on-site visit (community meetings, media releases, preliminary report) and follow-up and nal report. If anyone is interested in donating money or airline miles, contact Artz at (850) 728-7213 or at lartz@ mywakulla.com. In other news: The county accepted a grant for technical assistance from EPAs Sustainable Communities Building Block Program to help implement the Crawfordville Town Plan. The focus of the assistance is on smart growth zoning for small cities and rural areas. Artz already noti ed the commission of the grant being awarded to the county, but it was accepted at the March 5 meeting. The county commission approved the transmittal of two Comprehensive Plan and Map Text Amendments for two different pieces of land. The rst property is located on Sand Lake Road and consists of 229 acres. The owner wanted to change from agriculture to rural 1. This came before county commissioners in 2008, who agreed to submit it to the state, which returned the applications with a list of objections, recommendations and comments. In 2009, the commission voted not to adopt the application. Following that, litigation started between the property owner and the county and was resolved with a settlement agreement. Commissioner Lynn Artz said she opposed it the rst time and had the same concerns. The other item that was approved for transmittal was for 26 acres on the east side of Crawfordville Highway, just south of Lisa Drive, to be changed from rural 2 to commercial and rural 3 land uses. A mixed use development with commercial and residential is planned for the property. The commission sent this application to the state back in 2008, the state had some objections with level of service and lack of potable water. In 2009, the commission denied approval of the application. Litigation began and was resolved with a settlement agreement. Thirteen acres of the property is proposed to be changed from rural 2 to rural 3. If approved, 13 residential units would be allowed to be built. The commission voted four to one, with Artz opposing, to transmit the amendment.COUNTY COMMISSION Board will accept grant only if theres no cost to county Notice of Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment TransmittalCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.MARCH 15, 2012 Public HearingThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, April 9, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, April 16, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, April 9, 2012, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, May 7, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.MARCH 15, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on April 2, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.MARCH 15, 2012

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Michael Mike David Carter obituary Heritage Village deal accepted Tammy Kay Roberts Harvey obituary Judge Fulford rules against state in pension lawsuit Plans for community center take shape Tinsley Floyd obituary Keep Wakulla County Beautiful is looking for volunteers Louis Edward Herouart obituary thewakullanews. com Follow us on Victim of Domestic or Sexual Violence? Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111 READERS WRITE:Friends of the Library seeks membersEditor, The News: March marks the beginning of the annual membership drive for the Friends of the Wakulla County Library. This year, more than ever, we need our community to support this local treasure. Because of the cuts in the library funding by the state Legislature for the last few years, the money raised by the Friends is desperately needed. I think we all know the valuable services that the public library provides our county! Membership fees are one of our three main ways of supplementing the funding of the childrens programs, purchasing of new computers and other needed materials. The other two are our bi-monthly book giveaways ( rst Saturday morning of even numbered months, donations accepted) and our September silent auction. Looking for a way to participate in your community? We welcome new active members. Please attend any Friends meeting, the fourth Thursday of the month from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the meeting room to check us out! Membership is available at any level and forms can be picked up at the library or you can contact me at 926-4244. Sue Belford President friendswakullalibrary@gmail.comTom Dickens is a good candidateEditor, The News: On Monday, March 5, at 2 p.m., I, along with others, rallied with Tom Dickens, a candidate for Florida House of Representatives, District 7, which contains Wakulla County. He is an enthusiastic trial attorney, married for over nine years with a 2-yearold son and an impressive military service record. He served on the front line in Iraq, going deep into the countryside and neighborhoods, and managed to come back alive. Educationally, he is just what we need. He teaches biology part-time at TCC. He holds a Masters degree in Biology, and a law degree from FSU. He practices law full-time in personal injury litigation with a prominent Tallahassee law rm. After many questions on issues from health care to immigration and jobs, it became apparent to me that his strong suit was education; his commitment to class size reduction, teacher merit rewards and selective, means tested scholarships for students who pursue degrees in critically needed subjects, such as STEM (science, technology, engineering and math), was very convincing. He admits he may not have a war chest, but he is determined to out-work all of his opponents. He has the build of a distance runner, a smile that says, I like people and I think he can go the distance. Sincerely, Mike Carter Crawfordville Editor, The News: Some people think improving our county airport is a good idea and others think its a bad idea. Whether you think the improvements are a burden or a great potential economic driver one thing is for sure, the airport is a county airport. The airport infrastructure, as with any county infrastructure, is controlled by the Board of County Commissioners. In the March 1, edition of The Wakulla News, a Letter to the Editor (Another airport scandal in the making?) contained the statement, A single incident in 2009 of standing water on the airstrip caused alarm. Because there was much more involved than a single incident, the Board of County Commissioners at their Dec. 8, 2009, meeting voted unanimously, 5-0, to have the administration review the management of the airport over a four year period of time. It was because of concerns of mismanagement, lapses of timely implementation of grant awards available from the state Department of Transportation for airport improvements, as well as, the lack of adequate maintenance that led to the Boards action. Authorizing this fact- nding report did not prejudice me or any of the other commissioners. Just as you maintain your car or home, the County has an obligation to maintain its infrastructure. When the issue of standing water was subsequently identi ed, Public Works easily resolved it by simply cleaning some culverts. I am proud to have participated in the unanimous vote and applaud those that voted with me to move forward with that review of the airport. We as a Board did not only address the standing water issue, but brought attention to the management issues that were then properly addressed. Recently, the Board voted to accept a $75,000 no-match 100 percent FDOT grant that may not have been awarded had the Board not taken the corrective actions they did. If the additional infrastructure improvement to the airport, paid for with 100 percent no-match DOT grants is causing turmoil for some in our community, then let the Board determine its future. Let the Board hold workshops and hear from the many groups and citizens of our county. Let the Board study and learn the positives and the negatives of having a county airport. Let the Board learn about the ease or dif- culty in obtaining permits and funding for a new airport. Let the Board learn as much as they can and then let the Board make a decision in the best interests of the County and its citizens. Howard Kessler, M.D. PanaceaLet Board decide airports future Why does Wakulla have an airport?Editor, The News: Why does Wakulla County have an airport anyway? Wakulla has an airport because of the extreme generosity of a great man who understood the bene ts of aviation, the late Fenton Jones, who established the airport many years ago and subsequently donated this asset to Wakulla County with the stipulation it always be an airport. Wakulla has an airport because all of the Boards of County Commissioners since have also understood what Jones knew and have ALL supported having an airport. Wakulla has an airport because FDOT too believes in Joness vision and in the support our BOCC has demonstrated over the years. So much so that FDOT has granted not one, but two significant airport grants, as well as slated additional grants for future improvements. Wakulla does not provide ANY matching funds whatsoever. These grant funds are derived from the aviation fuel tax, so those who use airports are the only ones paying for these improvements. FDOT intensely analyzes the projects they elect to fund. This speaks volumes to the validity and direction set by the many experts whos business it is to implement the Florida Aviation System Plan (FASP). Currently the airport is under-utilized because many pilots avoid turf runways (insurance exclusions play a big role) and airports without services like fuel and maintenance. Our airport has both of these handicaps. There is now a small group, mostly airport neighbors, who wish to halt future improvements already in the pipeline. The claim their property will be taken is simply not true. Rather, they realize that paving the runway and providing services like fuel, maintenance, air tours, ight training, etc. will also increase the number of ights at the airport. This will, without a doubt, bring much needed revenue to Wakulla. The county would receive lease payments, fuel owage fees, tie down fees, hanger rent, etc. Local business would enjoy receiving the disposable income of aviators seeking to enjoy the many wonderful reasons to visit Wakulla. Study after study show that improvements bring more flights and more flights bring more revenue. Not only will these improvements bring money to Wakulla, but they will also enhance safety with an improved runway, better lighting, approach guidance, etc. When my wife and I bought our property here in Wakulla, there were some important things we took into consideration. We wanted to be near the water and close to a general aviation airport. We didnt want to be near a sewer plant, land ll, or any number of other land uses that we were personally not willing to live near. We did our due diligence and are very happy with the decision we made. Wakulla has an airport because airports are a very good thing, just as boat ramps, docks, parks, bicycle paths, beaches, roadways, community centers, fire stations, police stations, etc. are very good things. Steven Fults Panacea Editor, The News: Commissioner Lynn Artz should be commended for her recent stance and questioning of the proposed resolution seeking an exemption for Wakulla anglers of gag grouper regulations which came before the county commission a few weeks ago. I greatly appreciate that she went well out of her way to better understand the issue from all sides, as she does for most issues Ive witnessed in her tenure. Artz was very much concerned with the facts and science of the issue, which are quite compelling, and that an exemption from gag regulations could lead to a further deterioration in the overall health of the gag population. Gag is greatly depleted throughout its range, which in the Gulf is mostly the west coast of Florida, and only at a level of about 40 percent of what is considered by scientists as being a healthy population. New regulations in place across the Gulf are meant to reduce shing pressure enough to allow the population to return to full health in a few years. With special regulations now in place for Wakulla and other area counties approved by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, there is a high likelihood that the June through October season for the rest of the states anglers and the federally permitted charter boat operators, including those in Wakulla, may be shortened due to the extra catch not factored in for the new regulations. Additionally, the carved-out special season also increases the likelihood that the 2012 prescribed catch level for gag will be exceeded, causing the need for further reductions in season length next year in order to maintain the trajectory towards recovery. Along these lines, Artz was arguing for the long-term view of a healthy gag population and for area shermen and our local shing economy. While there might be immediate bene ts to local shermen and supporting businesses, these temporary opportunities may be short-lived. It is one thing to only consider the immediate satisfaction for a quick gain and a few bucks, but quite another to take the longer, more deliberate view in thinking through risks and consequences. I commend Artzs desire to examine the whole picture to make important decisions about a natural public resource. As such, a faster and more robust gag grouper recovery is in the best interest of the local shing community and her constituents. Chad Hanson Mysterious WatersArtz tries to understand all sides of issuesEditor, The News: On behalf of the Palaver Tree Theater Co., we would like to say THANK YOU to all who participated in, or attended the performances of WAKULLASTORY: A Hankerin for Headhuntin. Your participation in these productions keep them going, and as always, we couldnt have done it without you. Thank you to the Wakulla County Historical Society for partnering with Palaver Tree Theater in this effort. Last years production was a success, and youve made this years presentation one to remember as well. Wed also like to extend a thanks to Dave, at Printing on Demand for meeting our printing needs and becoming a sponsor; Posh, for allowing us to have our wrap party at your location; Tom Askins and the staff at the Sopchoppy School for use of your space; Wakulla Middle School for use of your music stands; The Wakulla News for allowing us the chance to present the article on Elizabeth Fisher Smith and the story behind this years show; Wakulla.com for being so kind as to help put the word out; to Mike Sherlock for his lighting design, and expertise in keeping a cast of 18 people sane throughout the production; to all the wonderful women who participated on the A Womans Work in Wakulla panel you were all excellent; and to Herbert Sr. and Rachel Donaldson for their help behind the scenes and for being a steady source of inspiration. To the cast Team Headhunters! thanks for all your hard work, believing in the power of the script and for getting the job done. Theres more to come. Finally, my gratitude goes out to the family of Elizabeth and Harold Smith. In particular, Betsy and Randy. It means a lot that you trusted me to work with the language your mother left behind. Even more, thank you for talking to me. It was through conversation with you that I had a better understanding of Mrs. Smith, and could see the quiet signs of whom she may have been, by the impressions left upon her children. I sincerely hope you heard her voice. Herb Donaldson Artistic Director Palaver Tree Theater Co. ank you for support of WakullaStory Constitutional o cers o er great serviceEditor, The News: Last week I stopped by the Supervisor of Elections Office to get clarification on some voting questions I had. Not only was the of ce staff that I encountered extremely helpful, but Buddy Wells came out, greeted me, and then invited me into his office to discuss my questions and ensure I was provided the correct answers. After a few calls to the State Elections Office by Wells, and after his researching the Florida Statutes intently, all of my questions were answered. When I expressed my gratitude to Wells, he replied that he was merely doing his job and that he thoroughly enjoyed enlightening the citizens of Wakulla County on voting regulations, etc. After leaving Wells of- ce, I felt a letter to The Wakulla News highlighting this experience was in order. When I sat down to draft this letter I began to think about two other experiences I recently had with Cheryll Olah, Wakulla County tax collector, and Donnie Sparkman, Wakulla County property appraiser. Both Olah and Sparkman personally provided professional and informative services to my family and me relating to questions we had relevant to each of their respective of ces. I would like to openly thank Wells, Olah and Sparkman for their treating the citizens of Wakulla County as the clients they truly are. Now, if we could just get the national chains operating in Wakulla County to understand this philosophy, we would be much better off! Sincerely, Chris Russell Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 Page 5A CCOW will hear from David Edwards on local governmentConcerned Citizens of Wakulla will host a forum on the challenges facing local government with Wakulla County Administrator David Edwards on Thursday, March 15, at the public library beginning at 7 p.m. A pre-forum social will be held beginning at 6:30 p.m. Congressional staff will hold of ce hours in WakullaU.S. Representative Steve Southerland, II announced that his Florida staff will be hosting mobile of ce hours in Wakulla County on Tuesday, March 20. Staff will be available at Sopchoppy City Hall from noon to 4 p.m. to discuss issues of local concern. Residents of Wakulla County and the surrounding area are invited to join Rep. Southerlands Deputy District Director and Constituent Services Specialist to provide input on legislation, ask questions or request assistance with a federal agency on issues including: Social Security, Medicare, Housing and Urban Development, IRS, Veterans Affairs and Immigration. For questions, contact Lori Hutto at (850) 561-3979 or Lori.Hutto@mail.house. gov. Make A Difference Day is March 24VolunteerWAKULLA is holding its fth annual Make A Difference Day on Saturday, March 24, at Hudson Park. This years event will be different for previous years: a community picnic for the citizens of Wakulla County will be held, and many of the organizations in the County will be setting up booths to make people aware of services available, as well as opportunities to volunteer in the county. At this time, there are more than 25 organizations signed up. There will be a free lunch for all, entertainment and door prizes. Easter Egg Hunt coming up on March 31The Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department will holds its annual Easter Egg Hunt on March 31 at Hudson Park with registration from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., and the hunt beginning at 11 a.m. Age groups are birth to 3 years old, 4-6 years old and 7-10 years old. A drawing from each age group will win an Easter basket. Also attending will be Wakulla ROTC, Wakulla EMS, Wakulla Fire & Rescue, Smokey Bear,Capital City Bank Star, McDonalds character, McGruff the Crime Dog, the Sonic character, and a moonwalker. Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment of Wakulla will have an adopt-a-pet booth at the park. CHAT is asking for donations of pet items, including towels, treats and pet toys For more information, go the website www.wcprd.com or call (850 926-7227. Wild About Wakulla Week music video is being madeThe Wild About Wakulla Week Consortium is promoting its slogan Wild about Wakulla by making a short music video using the song of the same name recorded by the self-proclaimed Wakullas favorite acoustic duo Hot Tamale. The video is being shot by the Wakulla High School Television Production Program directed by Marc Bowerman, and its a totally grassroots effort. If all goes as planned, the music video and the song will be premiered by Hot Tamale at their live performance at the Worm Gruntin Festival in Sopchoppy on Saturday April 14, and then again in St. Marks performing at Shields Marina as part of the event Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee on Sunday April 22. Jam 4 Camp is scheduled for April 28Wakulla County 4-H will present the second Annual Jam 4 Camp Fundraiser at Hudson Park on Saturday, April 28, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. This event is free to vendors and bands who wish to participate. This event is open to the public and raises money for 4-H camp scholarships for Wakulla County youth by collecting donations from Sponsors, band votes, vendor contributions, T-shirt sales and a silent auction. The ve bands participating will play at one hour intervals and collect votes in the form of dollars raised. Youth and their parents are also invited to sign up for all 4-H Camps this day. Camps will ll up fast and spaces are limited, so it is best to arrive early and stay and enjoy the day. For more information, please contact Sherri Kraeft at 926-3931. More information can also be found at the website wakulla.ifas.u .edu/4-h. Staff ReportsBriefsStaff ReportThe Lions Clubs St. Patricks Festival will be held Saturday, March 17 in Hudson Park. The popular event features a parade that gets underway at 10 a.m. The day begins with Breakfast in the Park at 8 a.m., opening introductions at 9 a.m., opening prayer at 9:15 a.m. by John Braley, youth minister at Lake Ellen Baptist Church, the raising of the colors at 9:20, and the National Anthem, sung by John Braley, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. After the parade, the scheduled entertainment includes Taekwondo at 11 a.m., a performance by COAST Charter School at 11: 30 a.m., Aleene Benson, Irish and Scottish fiddle players at noon, then Rick Tittle, John Smith and Ken Muf n Man at 12:40 and 1:40 p.m., and the Senior Wigglers line dancers at 1:15 p.m. A prize drawing will be held every 30 minutes starting at noon. The drawing for the $250 grand prize will be held at 2:30 p.m. RESCUE DEMONSTRATION The Wakulla County Fire Department will demonstrate the use of tools for responding to individuals trapped in vehicles. Wakulla Towing and Recovery donated the vehicles that will be used in the demonstration and has donated cars to Fire-Rescue for years. This demonstration may be of special interest to those individuals who continue to drink or text while driving, said Bill Russell, president of the Wakulla County United Fire- ghters Association. You will be able to observe the equipment much better in the daylight at Hudson Park rather than if you are upside down in your vehicle on the side of the ride at night. CAR SEAT INSPECTIONS The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will be taking part in the St. Patricks Day Celebration at Hudson Park by hosting a child car seat inspection and installation event. Led by Lt. Dale Evans, a certi ed car seat technician, and a Public Service Of cer (PSO), the WCSO will help residents properly install car seats. Car seats will also be given away to low income families free of charge during the event. If you are not a low income family, you can still make a small donation to the car seat fund and receive a car seat at a highly reduced cost. The sheriffs of ce will have a static display at Hudson Park from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. which will give everyone an opportunity to view the parade at 10 a.m. Lt. Evans and the PSO will also have some goodies for the children including coloring books. Look for the Car Seat Trailer at Hudson Park and visit with Lt. Evans. His goal is to make sure everyone has a properly installed and safe child seat to Keep Wakulla Safe. Several months ago, Lt. Evans spearheaded a similar program at Beef O Bradys restaurant in Crawfordville.St. Patricks Festival is Saturday FILE PHOTOA scene from last years St. Patricks Parade. Join us on SATURDAY, March 24, 2012 And Make A Difference in YOUR life! 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM Hudson Park Come and see what Wakulla County has to offer. Find a service that you may need! Find a place to Volunteer! Find a place to have fun! Join us for a FREE lunch Door Prizes every 1/2 hour after 11: AM We will have a collection point for canned goods to restock our food pantries. Visit VolunteerWakulla.org or Call 745-0060 to learn how you can become a VOLUNTEER VolunteerWakulla 84 Cedar Ave. www.VolunteerWAKULLA.org Crawfordville, FL 850 745-0060 Door Pr ize s And Free l unch For Everyo ne MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 LUNCH PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWere Here to Share the Journey... Tammy Kay Roberts Harvey Frank Earl McIntyre Meta Gwen Rabitaille Walter George RinkelTammy Kay Roberts Harvey, 41, of Crawfordville passed away Thursday, March 8, in Crawfordville. She was born in Winter Park and was a resident of Crawfordviille for 24 years coming from Madison. She was an Insurance Adjuster. She loved playing kickball with the kids, loved all animals especially horses. She enjoyed spending time at the beach, and St. George Island was a favorite. She had a great sense of humor and was very generous, loving and caring. Family received friends on Saturday, March 10, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850926-3333). Services were held at 3 p.m. on Sunday, March 11, at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Crawfordville. Burial followed at the St. Elizabeth Cemetery. Survivors include her husband of 20 years, Bryan Harvey; a son, Bryson Harvey; a daughter, Wynter Harvey; her parents, Kenneth and Mary Kay Roberts; a brother, Todd Roberts; a sister, Kristina Frasher; and many other family and friends. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Tammy Kay Roberts HarveyMeta Gwen Rabitaille, 90, died on Friday, March 2, at Big Bend Hospice. She was born Feb. 25, 1922, in Arran to Butch and Nelly Vause and later moved to Newport. Visitation was held on Sunday, March 4, at Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home, Timberlane Chapel. Funeral services took place on Monday, March 5, at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Tallahassee. Interment followed at Woodville Cemetery. In lieu of owers donations can be made to Big Bend Hospice. Survivors include her son, Joe Rabitaille of Shell Point; daughter, Sheila Smith (Brett) of New Smyrna Beach; two sisters, Ruby Nell Anderson and Gladys Strickland of Woodville; two sistersin-law, Pearl Vause and Viola Rabitaille; adopted kids, Frank and Frances Dennard; two grandchildren, as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Arrangements were under the direction of Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home in Tallahassee.Meta Gwen RabitailleWalter George Rinkel, 96, died Thursday, March 8, in Crawfordville. He was married for 61 years to Eloise Taff Rinkel, who preceded him in death in 2002. He was born in Iola, Ill., on Oct. 15, 1915, to Walter M. and Jane E. Rinkel. He retired Aug. 1, 1979, from Florida State University where he worked as a Heavy Equipment Operator. He was of the Baptist faith. Graveside services were held Saturday, March 10, at 11 a.m. at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville. Viewing was held before the service at graveside. Brother David Gray officiated. Memorial donations can be made to Big Bend Hospice, 2889C Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327. Survivors include his daughters, Theresa Grif n (and husband Ralph), Sherry Hall (and husband Randy); his son, Walter Darryl Rinkel; and son-in-law, Doug Coleman; six grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Also surviving are three sisters, Virginia Hickey, Betty Yates and Marjorie Warner; and two brothers, Gene Rinkel and Ted Rinkel. He was preceded in death by his eldest daughter, Deanne Coleman; a grandson, Keith Rinkel; as well as his siblings, Vera Gigar, Eva House, Richard, Merle, Lyle and Fenton Rinkel. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com)Walter George RinkelSpecial to The NewsVicar Bert Matlock will be ordained and installed as pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla this Sunday, March 18, at 4 p.m. Vicar Bert began his theological studies at the district level of the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod in 2003 with the Concordia House of Studies Orlando and continued with pre-seminary classes at Concordia College, Mequon, Wis. He entered the seminary in the Distance Education Leading Toward Ordination (DELTO) program in October 2007, and graduated from Concordia Seminary-St. Louis on Feb. 10, 2012. Vicar Bert is a second career pastor and has been serving Trinity of Wakulla in a student capacity (vicar) since November 2008. He grew up in Cocoa Beach, graduating from Cocoa Beach High School in 1974, and enlisted in the U.S. Army, serving as a chaplain assistant. In 1977 he completed his enlistment and was employed by the FBI in Washington, D.C. He remained in a reserve status and served in the Washington, D.C. National Guard in the 257th Army Band. In 1978 he joined the Florida Highway Patrol. He held the position of Trooper until being promoted to Sergeant in 1987. In 1992 Vicar Bert served in the aviation section as an airplane and a helicopter pilot. In 1998, Vicar Bert felt the Lords Call and began studying theology. He traveled to Concordia Seminary St. Louis for a visit and, with much prayer, he felt the Lord wanted him in full-time ministry. He retired from the Florida Highway Patrol in May 2005 with the rank of Captain and began serving Hope Lutheran Church in Pompano Beach. In 2008, he felt that God wanted him to serve His people in Wakulla County. He and his family left South Florida and moved to, as he said, Gods country. Vicar Bert is mar-ried to his beautiful wife Ingrid, who is very active in the ministry at Tr inity. They have two chil-dren, Erik, 10, and Annika, 7. Vicar Bert Matlock to be ordained, installed at Trinity LutheranJesus River Festival is held PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe fourth annual Jesus River Festival was held last Saturday, March 10, at Sopchoppy River Park and featured a gospel quartet, blues band, choir, dance team, contemporary music and inspirational messages. Frank Earl McIntyre, 82, passed away on Saturday, March 10, at his home in Alligator Point. He was born in Hammond, La., and was a resident of Tallahassee before moving to Alligator Point. He was honorably discharged from the U.S. Navy in 1948 where he served as a seaman apprentice. He retired, after 40 years of service, from Centel Phone Company, now known as Century Link. Graveside services will be held at the Smith Family Cemetery, Dolly Drive off of Crawfordville Highway, on Friday, March 16, at 11 a.m. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, 241 John Knox Road, Suite 100, Tallahassee FL 32303. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Cleo Smith McIntyre; three daughters, Earline McIntyre and Sandra Akins of Crawfordville, and Betty Blackman (and husband Jimmy) of Tallahassee; three sons, Ronnie McIntyre (and wife Kayren), Robert McIntyre (and wife Tammy) of Tallahassee, and Raymond McIntyre of Alligator Point; numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild. He was preceded in death by his father, A.T. McIntyre, Sr.; his mother, Phronie Inez McIntyre; a brother, A.T. McIntyre; and his sister, Bobbie June Harris.Frank Earl McIntyre

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 Page 7AhappeningsCommunityMcMillans celebrate 60th anniversary Finley and Jean McMillan, circa 1952 Finley and Jean McMillan celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary on March 8. Its not only the couples wedding anniversary, but also Jeans birthday and their rst child, Brett Derek McMillans birthday. The couple married on her 19th birthday in Honolulu, Hawaii, while Finley was stationed there as an Air Crewman for the U.S. Navy. The couple met the year before at a dance at Brenau College in Gainesville, Ga., where Jean was a student. Finley proposed to Jean via mail, sending a nice engagement ring and a plane ticket with the proposal letter. The couple celebrated their anniversary with family and an outdoor bon re and oyster roast. Finley and Jean McMillan and granddaughter DiamondOptimist essay contest winners receive awards Optimist Essay contest winners, Casey Camp and Brittany Evans, are presented their awards, along with teacher Floyd Richardson, and Optimist Club President Larry Massa and member Jo Ann Daniels. Camp received rst place, Evans came in second place and Alexander Lewis, who was not present at the meeting, came in third. Camp and Evans both read their speeches at the meeting. The writing topic was How My Positive Outlook Bene ts My Community.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFree computer classes o ered at Workforce plusSpecial to The NewsKnowing what kind of positions are available and combining that knowledge with advanced computer skills through Workforce pluss Training Academy equips job seekers with a winning career strategy. Job seekers can take their career journey to the next level by investing in themselves through Workforce plus Training Academy. Training Academy is a no-cost service where students learn to use Microsoft programs such as Microsoft Word, Excel, Access and PowerPoint. These courses are offered at two levels: basic and advanced. Additionally, basic computer skills classes are available for job seekers who need to learn the fundamentals of using computers. Lastly, classes are available in the area of Finance and Credit to help job seekers learn how to manage their credit and protect their identity. Training Academy classes are available at each of ce and schedules for each of the locations can be found on the Workforce plus website. Wakulla Training Academy courses take place at 3278 G Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. April 4: Microsoft Word, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. April 11: Microsoft Word 2, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. April 17: Managing Your Credit & Protecting Your Identity, 10 a.m. April 18: Microsoft Excel, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. April 25: Microsoft Excel 2, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Job seekers should be reminded that in order to attend the no-cost Training Academy, pre-registration is required and closes the Wednesday before each class begins. To register visit www.wfplus.org or call 1-866WFP-JOB1. Still serving the Best Tasting Food, Biggest Portions and Best Values in Town!!! To Go!at theirNOWNEW LOCATIONCome by and grab a menu featuring all your favorites: a variety of Sandwiches, Wraps and Burgers. Pork, Beef, Chicken and Fish Dinners!New Hours: 850-421-1150ASK FOR THE BOATERS SPECIALS! Buy ANY Sandwich andget a Second of equal or lesser value1/2 OFF DELIVERY SERVICE COMING SOON!!MAR. 16&17 Mini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012 Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Pre-K is starting a new program called Blessings in a Backpack to supply local children with nutritious food to eat on the weekends. According to www.BlessingsinaBackpack.org, better test scores, improved reading skills, positive behavior, improved health and increased attendance have all been attributed to the success of this program. On Saturday, Jan. 28, the Crawfordville Winn-Dixie presented a check for $1,000 to Wakulla Pre-K Principal Kim Dutton to cement their partnership in the program. Wakulla Pre-K realizes how important it is for children to get good nutrition and they know how dif cult this can be for many of our local families. Many of Wakullas student athletes and past student athletes are on board with the Pre-K in promoting this program, including Florida State University player Nigel Bradham, past FSU player Sam McGrew and past University of Florida player Jim Tart, all of whom graduated from Wakulla High School. Attending the event were past WHS students. Among these were Superintendent of Schools David Miller, Bobby Pearce, principal on special assignment of Wakulla County Schools, Ashley Anderson, Gold Seal UWF Presidents Scholarship, Lori Gallamore, WEC/SEC Pre-K administrative assistant, Meredith Lawrence, WEC Pre-K, Karla Nelson, former WHS cheerleader, 1990 Homecoming Queen, and SEC Pre-K Teacher, the band Country Boyz (formerly known as Tiger Hill), made up of local Wakulla County natives Corey Benedict and Bakari Hines handing out posters, CDs, and autographs. Brooke Brown, the current Miss Fort Walton Beach and 2007 Miss Wakulla was there to greet the public and sign autographs, and Detective Josh Langston represented the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. Also attending the event were current Wakulla High School students, Jonathan Chunn, WHS football player and Sunshine State Scholar; Kristine Gallamore, WHS soccer player and scholarship recipient to UWF; Alina McCullers, Wakulla High soccer; Emily McCullers, WHS soccer and cross country and Shelby Alsup, WHS soccer. Our partnership with Winn Dixie to implement Blessings in a Backpack is so important, because hunger does not stop on the weekends, Dutton said. Visit www.BlessingsinaBackpack.org for more information about the program. For more information about how to get involved locally, call the Wakulla Pre-K at 926-8111.Wakulla Pre-K starts Blessings in a Backpack program A representative from Winn-Dixie presents a check to Wakulla Pre-K Principal Kim Dutton to support Blessings in a Backpack.School out of zone reassignment requests are due on March 30By BETH ODONNELL Assistant Superintendent Applications for 2012-2013 school out of zone Reassignment Requests are due in the Wakulla County School District Of ce by Friday, March 30, at 4 p.m. This is an application for a child to attend a public school within Wakulla County that he or she is not zoned for. The application must be turned in every year even if it has been granted in the past because class sizes change with students who move into that school zone who must be served rst before any other seats are available. Please be advised that approvals for the 2012-2013 school year will be based on seat availability in each grade level due to the Class Size Amendment. A form will need to be lled out for each child in the family. Applications made after the deadline of March 30 for students to move to a different school will place students on a waiting list until after the of cial student count by the state in October and class sizes can be of cially determined to see if there is room in that grade level. Parents and guardians are responsible for transporting students who are granted an out of zone reassignment request. To access the student reassignment request form: Go to www.wakullaschooldistrict.org Click on School Information on the left Click on Forms and Handbooks Look for the Student Reassignment Form (two page form) Paper copies are also available at the Wakulla County School District Of ce. The forms can be brought to the Wakulla County School District office, emailed, or mailed to Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction, at mary.odonnell@wcsb.us or P.O. Box 100, Crawfordville, FL 32326. Call herl at 926-0065 for more information. This is only for student reassignment requests to attend public schools within the Wakulla County School District.RMS band members earn superior and excellence awards for solosSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, Feb. 18, the Riversprings Middle School Bear Band had 20 solos performed at the FBA Solo/Ensemble evaluation held at the FSU School of Music. The results were 14 Superiors and six Excellent Awards. The students who received Superiors were Nic Samlal, Kyle Pearson, Paige Pearson, Cori Chaganis, Mattias Gunnarsson, Emma Chason, Jenna Franck, Sheleen Burton, Kyra Townes, Breanna Sykes, Mike King, Shelby Caine, Whitley Kerce and Ellie Schultheis. Students who received Excellents were Hannah Hart with 2, Nic Samlal with 1, Jordan Jones, Robert Hogan and Scott Curry. Congratulations to all these students for doing such a great job and for all their efforts. On March 7, the Riversprings Middle School Symphonic Band participated in the Florida Bandmasters Association Music Performance Assessment at FSU. They performed three compositions in front of an audience and judges. The band also had to perform two unseen songs in the Sight-Reading portion of the MPA. Both performances went very well and the band was awarded a Superior rating. The kids worked very hard for this day and have been meeting the grade assignments in class all year, said Band Director Carmen Williams. I am so proud of all these musicians and so blessed to be able to teach them.RMS Symphonic Band earns superior the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringDr. Mark McCoyFebruary 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromYou dont nd this type of thing in larger cities. is is a great advertising! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSports KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENWill Thomas at his scholarship signing last week. Seated at the table with him are his parents, behind him are his Wakulla coaches and administrators.Will Thomas signs with FAMUBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakullas all-time rushing leader, Will Thomas, signed a scholarship last week with Florida A&M University. After the signing ceremony, Thomas said he was proud to be going to FAMU. I can get an education and play football a sport I love. Thomas said he expects to start for the Rattlers in some position his freshman year. The signing for Thomas was held on Wednesday, March 7, at the War Eagle Cafe at Wakulla High School. The cafe was packed with students and some teachers in support of Thomas. Athletic Director Mike Smith noted the crowd and said it was good to see the number of people showing up to the signings including athletes in other sports. Superintendent of Schools David Miller noted that while Thomas is leaving to go to his own alma mater, to remember, Once a War Eagle, always a War Eagle. Head Coach Scott Klees recalled watching Thomas play at the middle school level and thinking he gets hit a lot. Klees noted that while Thomas did get hit a lot, he never missed a game as a War Eagle. Thomas has a punishing and relentless running style hitting the hole hard and running right at the defense. At one point, Klees asked Thomas: Every time you get the ball, youre gonna get what? Hit, the back responded. His achievement as all-time leading rusher at Wakulla is remarkable in that teams began keying on him by his junior year. And Wakullas offense included several rotating backs who also took hand-offs. One of those backs, Marshane Godbolt, has also accepted a scholarship to FAMU. He also earned the honor of the Big Bend Defensive Player of the Year. Thomas always seems to wear a grin, and is well-liked by other students. Drama teacher Susan Solburg was at the signing, though she had a rehearsal that started at the same time. She said she didnt want to miss it. Hes such a good kid, she said. Thomas signing ceremony also came on his birthday, and the event ended with the students in the cafe spontaneously singing him the Happy Birthday song. After the signing, teammates and friends came over to Thomas to give him a congratulatory hug. e Wakulla High School 2012 track teamBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe WHS track teams attended two meets in the last week and came away with solid results. RICKARDS MEET On Tuesday, March 6, the teams traveled to Rickards High School in Tallahassee to compete in a full-course meet with 12 other schools. Overall, the local teams were competitive with the girls placing third and the boys fth. For the girls, sophomore Madison Harris proved once again that she is a force to be reckoned with when she steps onto the 400 meter oval. She made her debut in the open 1600 meter run (metric mile) and did nothing less than run a State Elite Time and set a new school record of 5:25, eclipsing the old mark of 5:35 which was held by Sydney Nutting. Then, running the anchor leg of in the 4x400 meter relay, she took the baton approximately 7 seconds behind the anchor leg of the Rickards team. With only 400 meters to make up the difference, it looked like the WHS relay team would suffer its rst loss of the season. However, Harris refused to concede the race and steadily closed the gap. With approximately 100 meters to go, she pulled onto the Rickards girls shoulder and they battled step for step down the nal straight-away, neither giving an inch. Harris simply refused to lose and nipped the other runner at the line, giving the WHS girls the victory by .14 of a second. Other girls turning in outstanding performances included Marty Wiedeman (2nd, 1600 meters in 5:48), Cora Atkinson (3rd, 1600 in 5:48), Kasey James (1st, 3200 meters), Raychel Gray (2nd, 3200), Lili Broadway (3rd, 3200) and Emily McCullers (3rd, long jump). The top placing relay teams included the 4x400 meter team placed 1st (A. McCullers, E. McCullers, S. Harris, M.Harris), the 4x800 A Team placed 1st (N. Wodcock, S. Strickland, M. Wiedeman, L. Wiedeman) and the B Team placed 2nd (E. McCullers, C. Atkinson, L. Broadway, S. Harris). Others scoring points for the local team included: R. Gray (7th, 800), S. Harris (7th, 1600), K. James (8th, 1600), T. Kinard (4th, 3200), T. Vaughn (5th, 100 meter hurdles), A. Stewart (8th, long jump), L. House (7th, discus), S. Alsup In two meets, team does wellContinued on Page 12AFOOTBALL CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy KATIE TRIPPSave the Manatee Club March signals spring time in Florida the longer days and warmer weather can create ideal conditions for fishing, kayaking, boating or stand up paddle boarding in Floridas estuaries and other coastal waterways. It is tting then that March is also Seagrass Awareness Month because seagrass beds are such an important component of our coastal waterways. According to a recent report by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 2.2 million acres of seagrasses have been documented in Florida waters, providing ecological services worth $20 billion per year. Ecological services include habitat values that cannot be measured by a traditional economic scale i.e., the value of providing habitat to juvenile sport sh or food for manatees and sea turtles. Seagrass beds also provide direct economic bene ts to Florida through shing charters and ecotourism businesses. The condition of Floridas seagrasses varies in different regions. Seagrasses in the Keys are believed to be stable while those in certain areas of Southwest Florida and the Panhandle are declining. Seagrasses along Floridas east coast have been showing an increasing trend, and South Florida contains nearly 60 percent of the states seagrasses. However, great losses in seagrass abundance in Brevard County in 2011 caused by environmental factors are a reminder that these ecosystems are vulnerable. Seagrasses are found in clear and relatively shallow waters because their growth is fueled by sunlight. Their occurrence in shallow water makes them susceptible to damage by boats that may try to motor through areas without proper clearance, creating prop scars in the grass beds. A churning propeller cuts not only the blades of the grasses, but uproots and destroys the rhizomes (roots) in the sand and it can take years for the sediment to support regrowth and allow the scars to heal. To prevent prop scarring, boats should stay in marked deep water channels while traveling. Flats boats shing in the seagrass beds should use poles and trolling motors to move through the water, to avoid damaging seagrasses with their engines. If boaters become stuck in a shallow area with seagrasses or other submerged resources, they should never use the engine to try to blast free. Instead, they should turn off the engine, shift passenger weight distribution in the boat, and try to move the boat using a long pole or oar. If necessary, one or more passengers can exit the boat and push it to deeper water. Boaters should also use polarized sunglasses to reduce glare and help them see resources like seagrasses located beneath the waters surface. Seagrasses are negatively affected by stormwater runoff and algae blooms that block the suns rays since they need sunlight to grow. Stormwater runoff to coastal waters can be reduced by creating swales and retention ponds and using pervious pavement. Limiting use of fertilizers in landscapes adjacent to coastal waterways can reduce the nutrient loading that contributes to algae blooms. All of us who live and recreate in coastal areas can take steps to make our waters cleaner and protect the seagrasses that are so vitally important to our aquatic ecosystem and economy.Katie Tripp, Ph.D. is director of Science & Conservation for the Save the Manatee Club.March is Seagrass Awareness MonthSeagrasses are grass-like owering plants that live completely submerged in marine and estuarine waters. Although seagrasses occur throughout the coastal areas of Florida, they are most abundant in Florida Bay and from Tarpon Springs northward to Apalachee Bay in the Gulf which are two of the most extensive seagrass beds in continental North America. Seagrasses occur in protected bays and lagoons and also in deeper waters along the continental shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. The depth at which seagrasses occur is limited by water clarity because most species require high levels of light. Floridas approximately 2.2 million acres of seagrasses perform many signi cant functions. They help maintain water clarity by trapping ne sediments and particles with their leaves. They stabilize the bottom with their roots and rhizomes. They provide shelter for shes, crustaceans and shell sh. They and the organisms that grow on them are food for many marine animals and water birds. The canopy of seagrass protects smaller marine animals, including the young of such species as drums, sea bass, snappers and grunts from larger predators. Some animals, such as manatees, urchins, conches and sea turtles, eat seagrass blades. Other animals derive nutrition from eating algae and small animals that live upon seagrass leaves. Bottlenose dolphins and a variety of wading and diving birds also use seagrass beds as feeding grounds. Source: Florida Department of Environmental Protection DEPFacts about seagrassRefuge pools open to boats on March 15Special to The News St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge will open the pools along Lighthouse Road to hand-launch boats with electric trolling motors on Thursday, March 15. Anglers are reminded that the daily entrance fee is $5 per car or an annual pass is available for $15. Stony Bayou Pool No. 1 is the rst large pool on the left traveling south on Lighthouse Road. It is a mixture of salt and freshwater, so shing may be very spotty in this pool. A new fishing pier has been constructed in the East River Pool, which is the rst pool to the west of Lighthouse Road. Please be careful not to block the pier entrance when parking after unloading boats at the East River boat ramp. Gates will also be opened to access refuge road 316 in the Panacea Unit from March 15 to May 15, leading to ponds in the Otter Lake vicinity. Otter Lake and lakes adjacent to Surf Road are open year round for boating. Outboard motors larger than 10 hp are not allowed on any lake or pond in the Panacea Unit. Fishing is allowed year round from the bank, according to state regulations. The refuge staff appreciates the cooperation of anglers to prevent the invasive exotic weed hydrilla from spreading into refuge waters. For more information and a copy of shing regulations, call (850) 925-6121 or visit the website, www.fws. gov/saintmarks/ shing.Kayak demonstration will be held SundayThe Wilderness Way, Floridas Big Bend kayak out tter, will sponsor Kayak Demo Day this Sunday, March 18 from noon to 5 p.m. at Lake Bradford, at Florida State Universitys Reservation. Participants can test-paddle a variety of recreational, touring and shing kayaks. Instructors and guides from The Wilderness Way will provide mini-workshops on kayak safety and paddling techniques. Stand Up Paddleboards (SUP) instructors will also offer demonstrations and trials. All event offerings are free with $2 park admission. For more information, please call (850) 877-7200 or visit the website, www.thewildernessway.net. Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! 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Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org I am sure many of you reading this have fond memories of attending a parade in your youth or adult life. There is nothing better than seeing the joy in the eyes of spectators as you pass them or being the lucky one close enough to grab a trinket or candy tossed to the crowd. A debt of gratitude to Norma Hill for sending in the following information: Once again this year the Coast Guard Auxiliary was asked to participate in the Camp Gordon Johnston parade. With the parade beginning at 10:45 a.m. in Carrabelle, Chuck Hickman asked members attending to be there by 9:30 a.m. to get lined up and ready for the parade to begin. Members in attendance were Tim Ashley, Raye Crews, Ann and Ed Gesteland (members of Flotilla 45 08, out of Wisconsin), Mike Harrison, Chuck Hickman, Norma Hill, Phil Hill, Larry Kolk and Dave Rabon. Bruce Connors joined for the set up but had another commitment to attend and was not able to stay for the parade. The weather was good and all went off without a hitch. We had two boats in the parade this year. Chuck Hickmans My Gail was towed by Mike Harrison, and Larry Kolk towed his hand-built wooden boat The Georgiana. Many comments were heard along the route from spectators indicating that they thought we had a beautiful boat. Several asked if it was for sale. From Station Panama City, three active duty Coast Guard brought their Safe Boat and were staged between our facilities during the parade. What an honor to be put with them! Along the parade route, we saw many ags proudly displayed and several folks dressed in patriotic attire. We also heard many saying, Thank you as we rode along. Young and old seemed to enjoy candy being tossed to them. There was also a military band that played and we also believe that the group of individuals riding their motorcycles with flags along the parade route was the Patriot Guard. After we nished our route, the Auxiliary and Coast Guard boats were towed to the Seahawk where they were available for viewing. Auxiliary members set up an information booth and active duty folks provided tours of the Seahawk. This is a great treat for visitors this year as the Seahawk will be returning to Station Panama City soon. Other attractions for the day were tours of the Army ship New Orleans and getting to see the Governor Stone pull into port. For information on this iconic historical landmark, please visit www.governorstone.org. For more information on Camp Gordon Johnson, please visit the Camp Gordon Johnson Associations website at www.campgordonjohnston.com. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonSPECIAL TO THE NEWSChuck Hickmans boat My Gail at the parade. All eyes are on the Suwannee River this week as it rises to within four feet of ooding Peacock Springs State Park. In the absence of adequate cave diving training sites here in Wakulla County, we are trans xed to the ood cycles of surrounding cave systems this time of the year. All last month, the Merritts Mill Pond in Marianna was drained to combat hydrilla infestations. The resulting effect was that several favorite cave sites were inaccessible. Now sites along the Suwannee, such as Little River and Telford, are ooded with dark waters. Since I have another out of town cave class underway this week, schedules are changing with frustrations high. But ooding our caves with dark water has a healthy nourishing effect. Stagnant water, soaking leaves and other organic material has been stored in our swamps all winter. These swamps ll up with the spring rains and over ow their banks into the many karst windows in the county that empty into the aquifer. Tannins from the leaves cause our Wakulla water to turn brown, draining swamps like Squire Swamp and Sullivan to feed the north/south underground conduit. Since little plant life grows in our lightless caves, residents like the blind craw sh, rely upon the bounty of these oods to bring food to their table. This is a time of plenty, as I witnessed our cray sh mating and carrying eggs at a favorite local cave last week. Extended flooding exposes our otherwise white limestone walls to chemicals that darken the walls with deposits, such as goethite. Greater water ow through underground passages expands these tunnels, moves sediment oors and displaces residents. When the dark waters recede, and clarity returns, we nd a reorganized cave, one with new life, character and charm. Several years ago the Suwannee River was equally swollen, brown with sediments, and promising a nourishing ood. I was there with a class, and witnessed the river break its banks and ood Peacock caves. We rst felt a change in water ow while in the cave, from spring to siphon. I quickly ushered my class to the nearest exit and climbed out to witness a small waterfall coming from the river, cascading into the park. Soon the caves were swallowing up churning dark water. The rangers were soon encouraging our departure as the park ooded to over 20 feet. Even the roads leading to the park were ooded that time. And ooded they stayed for several weeks -the park was closed for months. But a newly surfaced road and cleanup crews topside and below when the waters once again turned clear restored the park to its original glory back then. It will happen again no doubt. We will dive there again tomorrow if the creek dont rise, and share this beauty one last time before dark waters visits to nourish residence creatures once more. PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:39 AM 3.3 ft. 1:19 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:55 AM 0.1 ft. 3:27 AM 0.0 ft. 4:42 AM -0.0 ft. 5:37 AM 0.0 ft. 6:19 AM 0.1 ft. 6:54 AM 0.2 ft. 7:23 AM Low 2.1 ft. 8:54 AM 2.3 ft. 10:32 AM 2.5 ft. 11:26 AM 2.8 ft. 12:03 PM 3.1 ft. 12:34 PM 3.3 ft. 1:03 PM 3.4 ft. 1:29 PM High 1.8 ft. 12:22 PM 1.9 ft. 2:34 PM 1.6 ft. 4:40 PM 1.1 ft. 5:47 PM 0.7 ft. 6:33 PM 0.3 ft. 7:11 PM 0.0 ft. 7:46 PM Low 2.9 ft. 6:36 PM 2.7 ft. 9:05 PM 2.8 ft. 10:50 PM 3.0 ft. 11:52 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:36 AM 3.3 ft. 1:16 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:52 AM 0.1 ft. 3:24 AM 0.0 ft. 4:39 AM -0.0 ft. 5:34 AM 0.0 ft. 6:16 AM 0.1 ft. 6:51 AM 0.2 ft. 7:20 AM Low 2.1 ft. 8:51 AM 2.3 ft. 10:29 AM 2.6 ft. 11:23 AM 2.9 ft. 12:00 PM 3.1 ft. 12:31 PM 3.3 ft. 1:00 PM 3.5 ft. 1:26 PM High 2.0 ft. 12:19 PM 2.0 ft. 2:31 PM 1.7 ft. 4:37 PM 1.2 ft. 5:44 PM 0.7 ft. 6:30 PM 0.4 ft. 7:08 PM 0.1 ft. 7:43 PM Low 3.0 ft. 6:33 PM 2.8 ft. 9:02 PM 2.9 ft. 10:47 PM 3.1 ft. 11:49 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 12:28 AM 2.9 ft. 1:15 AM 3.0 ft. 1:55 AM High -0.0 ft. 2:59 AM 0.0 ft. 4:31 AM 0.0 ft. 5:46 AM -0.0 ft. 6:41 AM 0.0 ft. 7:23 AM 0.1 ft. 7:58 AM 0.2 ft. 8:27 AM Low 1.9 ft. 9:30 AM 2.1 ft. 11:08 AM 2.4 ft. 12:02 PM 2.6 ft. 12:39 PM 2.8 ft. 1:10 PM 3.0 ft. 1:39 PM 3.2 ft. 2:05 PM High 1.6 ft. 1:26 PM 1.7 ft. 3:38 PM 1.4 ft. 5:44 PM 1.0 ft. 6:51 PM 0.6 ft. 7:37 PM 0.3 ft. 8:15 PM 0.0 ft. 8:50 PM Low 2.7 ft. 7:12 PM 2.5 ft. 9:41 PM 2.6 ft. 11:26 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:31 AM 2.4 ft. 1:11 AM High -0.0 ft. 2:06 AM 0.0 ft. 3:38 AM 0.0 ft. 4:53 AM -0.0 ft. 5:48 AM 0.0 ft. 6:30 AM 0.1 ft. 7:05 AM 0.1 ft. 7:34 AM Low 1.6 ft. 8:46 AM 1.7 ft. 10:24 AM 1.9 ft. 11:18 AM 2.1 ft. 11:55 AM 2.3 ft. 12:26 PM 2.5 ft. 12:55 PM 2.6 ft. 1:21 PM High 1.3 ft. 12:33 PM 1.4 ft. 2:45 PM 1.2 ft. 4:51 PM 0.8 ft. 5:58 PM 0.5 ft. 6:44 PM 0.2 ft. 7:22 PM 0.0 ft. 7:57 PM Low 2.2 ft. 6:28 PM 2.0 ft. 8:57 PM 2.1 ft. 10:42 PM 2.3 ft. 11:44 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:23 AM 2.5 ft. 1:03 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:34 AM 0.1 ft. 3:06 AM 0.0 ft. 4:21 AM -0.0 ft. 5:16 AM 0.0 ft. 5:58 AM 0.1 ft. 6:33 AM 0.2 ft. 7:02 AM Low 1.6 ft. 8:38 AM 1.8 ft. 10:16 AM 2.0 ft. 11:10 AM 2.2 ft. 11:47 AM 2.4 ft. 12:18 PM 2.6 ft. 12:47 PM 2.7 ft. 1:13 PM High 1.8 ft. 12:01 PM 1.8 ft. 2:13 PM 1.5 ft. 4:19 PM 1.1 ft. 5:26 PM 0.7 ft. 6:12 PM 0.3 ft. 6:50 PM 0.0 ft. 7:25 PM Low 2.3 ft. 6:20 PM 2.1 ft. 8:49 PM 2.2 ft. 10:34 PM 2.4 ft. 11:36 PM High Thu Mar 15, 12 Fri Mar 16, 12 Sat Mar 17, 12 Sun Mar 18, 12 Mon Mar 19, 12 Tue Mar 20, 12 Wed Mar 21, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 12:18 AM 2.3 ft. 1:12 AM High -0.2 ft. 1:55 AM -0.1 ft. 3:14 AM -0.1 ft. 4:18 AM -0.0 ft. 5:11 AM 0.1 ft. 5:54 AM 0.3 ft. 6:29 AM 0.5 ft. 6:58 AM Low 2.5 ft. 6:21 PM 1.9 ft. 11:50 AM 2.0 ft. 12:13 PM 2.0 ft. 12:35 PM 2.1 ft. 12:54 PM 2.1 ft. 1:09 PM 2.2 ft. 1:22 PM High 1.5 ft. 2:21 PM 1.3 ft. 3:54 PM 1.0 ft. 4:57 PM 0.8 ft. 5:47 PM 0.5 ft. 6:29 PM 0.3 ft. 7:07 PM Low 2.3 ft. 7:52 PM 2.2 ft. 9:39 PM 2.2 ft. 11:10 PM HighGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 15 March 21First March 30 Full April 6 Last April 13 New March 22Major Times 8:08 AM 10:08 AM 8:36 PM 10:36 PM Minor Times 2:49 AM 3:49 AM 1:26 PM 2:26 PM Major Times 9:03 AM 11:03 AM 9:30 PM 11:30 PM Minor Times 3:41 AM 4:41 AM 2:27 PM 3:27 PM Major Times 9:55 AM 11:55 AM 10:20 PM 12:20 AM Minor Times 4:25 AM 5:25 AM 3:27 PM 4:27 PM Major Times 10:45 AM 12:45 PM 11:08 PM 1:08 AM Minor Times 5:06 AM 6:06 AM 4:26 PM 5:26 PM Major Times --:---:-11:31 AM 1:31 PM Minor Times 5:43 AM 6:43 AM 5:24 PM 6:24 PM Major Times --:---:-12:16 PM 2:16 PM Minor Times 6:16 AM 7:16 AM 6:19 PM 7:19 PM Major Times 12:38 AM 2:38 AM 12:59 PM 2:59 PM Minor Times 6:48 AM 7:48 AM 7:14 PM 8:14 PM Average+ Average Average Average Good Better Best6:46 am 6:45 pm 1:49 am 12:27 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:45 am 6:46 pm 2:41 am 1:28 pm 6:44 am 6:47 pm 3:26 am 2:28 pm 6:42 am 6:47 pm 4:07 am 3:27 pm 6:41 am 6:48 pm 4:43 am 4:24 pm 6:40 am 6:48 pm 5:17 am 5:20 pm 6:39 am 6:49 pm 5:49 am 6:15 pm48% 41% 35% 28% 21% 15% 8% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance 000AUL3 HAVE FUN H AVE F UN DREAM GIRL fromset

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(8th, discus), 4x100 meter relay team (6th, A. McCullers, A. Collins, L. Curry, N. Calloway) and the 4x200 meter relay team A (4th, A. McCullers, K. Thigpen, A. Collins, L. Curry). The WHS boys team was once again paced by outstanding middle distance runner, senior Stanley Linton who dominated the 1600 and 3200-meter runs. In the 1600 meters, he took the lead early and opened an 11-second gap on the second place runner, finishing in 4:40. No one was able to keep his pace in the 3200 and he ended up running a State Elite time of 10:01, winning by almost 35 seconds. The only other WHS athlete to place in the top three was freshman triple jumper, Kaedretis Keaton who continued his streak of excellent performances by placing 3rd with a jump of 39 feet, 1 inch. Other boys scoring points for the team included; D. Lindsey (6th, 100 meters), J.P. Piotrowski (8th, 1600 meters), C. James (5th, 3200 meters), the 4x100 meter relay team (4th, D. Lindsey, W. Thomas, T. Holmes, M. Godbolt), the 4x200 meter relay team (4th, D. Lindsey, W. Thomas, D. Hutchinson, M. Godbolt), 4x400 meter relay team (6th, B. Lockwood, T. Holmes, W. Thomas, K. Keaton), and the 4x800 meter relay team (5th, D. Sloan, A. Smith, M. Atkinson, D. Sloan). RUTHERFORD RELAYS On Saturday, March 10, the local tracksters traveled to Panama City to participate in the Rutherford Relays. This meet was added after inclement weather last weekend forced the WHS coaches to cancel the teams attendance at the Jesse Forbes Meet in Tallahassee. The competition was fierce at this meet and proved a good test for the team. The girls team finished 7th of 12 teams and the boys finished in 9th place, even though the teams were without their top girl, Madison Harris, and the top male runner, Stanley Linton. For the girls, the middle distance runners led the way with the top individual performances being turned in by Cora Atkinson in the 3200 meter run and Marty Wiedeman in the 1600. Both girls placed third in their events and ran outstanding times. Atkinson turned in the excellent time of 12:44 in the 3200, which lowered the school record in that event that she set a week and a half ago by 14 seconds. Wiedeman ran an excellent 1600, nishing in 5:41 and establishing a new all time personal record. Freshman Lili Broadway also had an excellent 1600, nishing in 6th place and covering the distance in 6:08. Freshman Lydia Wiedeman also served notice that she will be a factor whenever she steps on the track by running outstanding legs on two relay teams, the 4x400 meters and the 4x800 meters. The girls 4x800 relay team also turned in another outstanding performance by finishing in second place and lowering the school record in that event by over 14 seconds. The new record now stands at 10:32.68. Other girls and relays scoing points for the team included K. James (7th, 3200), the 4x400 relay team (5th, L. Wiedeman, N. Woodcock, E. McCullers, K. Thigpen), the Sprint Medley (6th, A. Collins, S. Williams, L. Broadway, R. Gray), and the Distance Medley (3rd, K.James, S. Strickland, N. Woodcock, Marty Wiedeman). The boys team struggled without Linton, but still had a solid outing. Individually, the boys were paced by senior Cody James who ran a very strong and con dent race and placed 5th in the 3200 meters in a new PR of 11:12. Freshman Kaedretis Keaton placed 7th individually in the triple jump with a solid jump of 37 feet, 10 inches. Freshman Aaron Smith also ran an excellent 1600 meter leg in the Distance Medley, nishing in 5:06. The boys relay teams that scored for the team included the 4x100 (7th, B. Lockwood, D. Lindsey, J. Goates, K. Keaton), 4x800 meters (5th, G Hutchins, D. Sloan, J.P. Piotrowski, A. Smith), the Sprint Medley (6th, B.Lockwood, D. Lindsey, A. Pearson, D. Sloan), and the Distance Medley (7th, G. Hutchins, M. Atkinson, J.P. Piortowski, A. Smith). The next competitions will be at the Godby Home Meet on Tuesday, March 13, and the Freshman/Sophomore Meet at Chiles High School on Thursday, March 15. Both begin at 4 p.m. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce arrested a 29-year-old Crawfordville man in connection with the production of methamphetamines at his home, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Lawrence Wilbur Cook II was also charged with two counts of child abuse because chemicals used to produce methamphetamines were near the bedroom occupied by two young children. The investigation began on Feb. 19 when sheriffs of ce deputies were called to the suspects home to investigate an unattended death complaint. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell arrived on scene and observed a 31-year-old female victim hanging from a rope in a tree. Investigators attended the victims autopsy and it was determined that no foul play had taken place, but methamphetamine use had taken place during the evening before the victim was discovered. During the course of the death investigation, of cers entered the home to get Cook a requested jacket and discovered the home in disarray and a meth lab set up inside. Drug paraphernalia and a white powdery substance, believed to be meth, was inside the home. A cooler was discovered next to the bedroom of two children, ages 6 and 11, and contained indications of a meth cook. Evidence was submitted to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for analysis. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comA 39-year-old Crawfordville man faces weapons and drug charges in connection with the execution of a search warrant by Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce detectives on Wednesday, March 7, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Todd James Mitchell was arrested on a felony charge of possession of a weapon by a convicted felon and violation of probation, and several misdemeanor charges including knowingly driving while license suspended or revoked, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment. Detectives received a tip that Mitchell had at least two rearms despite being a convicted felon. Mitchells probation of cer scheduled a search of his home. Detectives provided security for the probation of- cer and observed Mitchell leaving the residence in a van. Detectives knew Mitchell did not possess a valid driver license and detained him. A loaded .38 caliber revolver was allegedly observed in Mitchells van in plain view. Officers then got a search warrant and allegedly found spent shell casings, marijuana and eight more guns. Less than 20 grams of marijuana and drug paraphernalia were discovered in the camper trailer.Man picks up weapons charges after search Todd James MitchellMeth lab discovered Lawrence W. Cook IISports: In two meets, team does wellContinued from Page 9A Continued from Page 1A While there was excitement about the recently announced plans of Tallahassee Community College to have expanded offerings when the space opens at Centennial Bank including for-credit classes Solburg tempered her enthusiasm for it by saying not all students are cut out for college. She said shed also like to see Lively Vo-Tech offering training in trades to young people. I tell my students, If I ran this zoo, Solburg said, students graduating from high school would have three choices: the military, the Peace Corps or Americorps. Go do something for a few years and then come back. Not only would the experience give those young people some maturity, but they would also likely come back with an appreciation for Wakulla County and what it offers, she said. That young people tend to overlook and take for granted the beauty of Wakulla County when theyre growing up was a point touched on by Betsy Smith, daughter of Magnolia Monthly author Elizabeth Fisher Smith and a landscape designer in her own right. Dont discount the familiar, Smith said of advice she would give young women. She noted the Green Guide program, which she described as taking appreciation to the point of connoisseurship. People are really willing to pay to see what so many Wakulla Countians see everyday, she said. Asked what was the biggest threat to the advances women have made, Solburg quickly answered: Look at the TV. Things women in Wakulla need, according to the panel members: a pediatrician in the county, job training and especially money training and practical skills.Womens panel WANTEDHELP ROUND-UP THE FOLLOWING NOTORIOUS HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTES REWARD Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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GULF COAST Lumber & Supply, Inc. GULF COAST Lumber & Supply, Inc.3361 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 926-5559Mon.-Fri. 7AM-6PM Sat. 7:30AM-5PMPoulan Pro Self Propelled Mower 22 Reg. $255 SALE $215 SALE $215 Poulan Pro T iller HDF 900Reg. $355 SALE $305 SALE $305 T Post $4 75$4 75Field Fence 47 x 330 $13650$136 5012 Tube Gate $7850$78 50 $4850$48 50Barbed Wire $697$6 974 x 4 x 8#2 PT $1 49$1 496 Dog Ear Fence BoardPrices good through 3/31/12 Pr675 Y22 RHP for our awn & arden for our awn & arden Poulan Pro Riding Mower 19.5 HP 42 SALE $995 SALE $995 POTTING SOIL40LB............. $175TOP SOIL40LB................... $139MUSHROOM COMPOST40LB.. $395Reg. $1,155 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn March 1, a report was led of threats against Wal-Mart employees. Seven suspects were interviewed as they walked toward East Ivan Road. One of the subjects began to act suspiciously. A hunting knife was recovered that was determined to have been stolen from the store. The subjects ranged in age from 18 to 41 and were part of the Rainbow group that camps in the Apalachicola National Forest. Deputy Sean Wheeler was unable to determine which subject stole the knife. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On March 1, a retail theft was reported at WalMart. Willis Deamon Williams, 23, of Crawfordville was allegedly observed concealing a web camera in his clothing. The suspect reportedly admitted taking the camera without paying for it. The camera, valued at $44, was recovered during the investigation. Deputy Sean Wheeler issued Williams a notice to appear in court. On March 1, Cassius Martin of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to le his income taxes but was informed that someone had already used his Social Security number. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. On March 2, Deputy Cole Wells initiated a traf- c stop against a vehicle with only one operational headlight. In the course of a DUI investigation, the suspect, Travis Allen Durrance, 21, of Sopchoppy, allegedly dropped a bag containing a white powdery substance. Durrance was arrested for possession of one gram of cocaine. On March 2, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a two vehicle crash at U.S. Highway 319 and Woodland Drive in Crawfordville. Ava Woodall of Crawfordville struck the rear of a vehicle driven by Christopher Lashley of Crawfordville. Lashley was attempting to make a right turn onto Woodland Drive. Woodall was determined to be at fault, but was not cited. The Isuzu driven by Lashley suffered $1,000 in rear end damage and the Toyota driven by Woodall received $6,000 worth of damage and was disabled. There were no injuries. On March 2, Nancy Speigner of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. A sharp object was used to create a two inch gash on the rear panel of the victims truck. Damage was estimated at more than $1,000. On March 2, Douglas Hammons of Crawfordville reported a grand theft after his rental property was trashed. Support poles for a carport were damaged, screens were cut, stains and debris were discovered on the carpets, doors were damaged, closet doors were removed and relocated and human waste was left in the bathrooms. Tools were also stolen from a shed. Suspects were identi ed. Damage to the home was estimated at $15,000. The stolen property was valued at $500. On March 2, Deputy Billy Metcalf was responding to a battery case in St. Marks when he observed a van swerving on Highway 363. The van and driver pulled into the Express Lane and Metcalf requested assistance from the Florida Highway Patrol when he realized the driver was extremely intoxicated. Metcalf transported his battery suspect to the Wakulla County Jail and Sgt. Jeremy Johnston arrested Robert Stephen Morgan, 29, of Tallahassee and transported him to jail. FHP Trooper J.M. Greene arrived a short time later and wrote a report as well. Morgan was charged with DUI, driving while license suspended and refusing to sign a citation. On March 3, Rosanna Brown of Crawfordville reported a weapon offense. The victim discovered an arrow sticking out of the roof of her home. Juveniles were questioned about the arrow and the arrow was recovered. On March 3, Deputy Mike Zimba stopped a vehicle in Panacea for the driver not wearing a seatbelt. During the investigation, William Lucas DeBaufer, 26, of Panacea gave the deputy a false name. Zimba discovered that DeBaufer did not have a valid driver license and he was charged with knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license was suspended and falsely identifying himself to law enforcement. On March 3, Deputy Clint Beam responded to a Crawfordville area business where a juvenile with a pocket knife was allegedly making threatening remarks. Witnesses reported that a 13-year-old juvenile did not like the things being said to him by another juvenile and placed the knife near the 14-year-old victim. The 13year-old was charged with aggravated assault and released to his parents. On March 4, Deputy Clint Beam investigated a one vehicle accident on Beechwood Drive in Crawfordville. A Ford sedan went off the roadway and struck several small bushes before coming to nal rest against a tree. A 17-year-old female was issued a criminal citation for operating a motor vehicle without a license. She was not injured in the accident. On March 2, Dylan T. Bass of Crawfordville was involved in a traf c crash at Providence Bible School, 710 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. The driver misjudged his speed as he was entering the driveway and damaged sections of the fence. Damage to the fence was estimated at $200 and damage to the victims truck was estimated at $100. On March 4, Beverly Skelton of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of jewelry from her home. A 12-year-old suspect was identified and the jewelry, valued at $395, was recovered. The juvenile was charged with grand theft and released to the custody of a parent. On March 5, Leslie C. Rivers of Panacea reported a grand theft. Two firearms were stolen out of the trunk of the victims vehicle. The weapons are valued at $600. On March 5, Michael Rosselot of Crawfordville and CSG Systems in Crawfordville reported a business burglary. A forced entry was discovered at a building that contained a generator. The victim discovered the theft of $850 worth of diesel fuel. Damage to the generator shed door was estimated at $500. On March 2, Detectives Lorne Whaley and Rob Giddens assisted the Leon County Sheriffs Of- ce by recovering stolen property from a Woodville Highway residence in Wakulla County. Leon County had a grand theft suspect in custody and when Wakulla detectives went to the home they recovered a stolen motorcycle. The motorcycle had been reported stolen by the Florida State University Police Department. On March 5, William Donaldson of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Donaldson was repairing broken windows at the Paradise Village mail room when he observed another broken window. Damage was estimated at $50. On March 5, Daniel Brent Pell of Wakulla County Public Works reported a trespass at the county sewage treatment plant on Lawhon Mill Road. A suspect, who has been identi- ed, was observed dumping sewage at the plant after operating hours. The suspect climbed the fence and dragged the sewer hose under the fence. He dumped an estimated $1,000 worth of waste. On March 5, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after two white males were allegedly observed taking items from the store. The two men reportedly got into a Honda and drove north on U.S. Highway 319. The stolen items were valued at $31. The driver of the vehicle was identi ed. On March 6, two 17year-old Crawfordville females were arrested for shoplifting at Wal-Mart after asset protection staff allegedly observed the two juveniles removing clothing, jewelry and personal items from the store without paying for them. One of the juveniles had $79 worth of items and the other had $116 worth of property on them. The teenagers were turned over to relatives. On March 6, Dorothy A. Hereford of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle accident at Wakulla Arran Road and U.S. Highway 319. The victim was turning left from the highway onto Wakulla Arran Road when her vehicle left the road and struck a utility pole. Damage to the vehicle and the pole was estimated at $150. The driver was not hurt. On March 6, traffic enforcement was set up on Surf Road for two hours. Fifteen vehicles passed the law enforcement vehicles and only two were six miles or more over the posted speed limit of 35 miles per hour. One of the vehicles was given a verbal warning and the other was issued a traf c citation for traveling 18 miles per hour over the speed limit. On March 7, Sgt. Ray Johnson issued a civil citation for 40 hours of work to a 12-year-old Riversprings Middle School male juvenile who struck a 14-year-old student in the groin. The incident occurred during a physical education class. The mother of the victim took her son to the emergency room to be seen by a doctor. On March 7, Crystal Browning of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims vehicle was keyed while she was at work in Medart. Damage was estimated at more than $800. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 818 calls for service during t he past week.Sheri s Report

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com By Bryan DurbinSTAFF WRITERThe International Vintage Guitar Collectors Association will be coming to Tallahassee this week, buying all types of guitars, musical instruments and anything valuable that is related to music culture. Those that attend this event will be able to speak with specialists one-onone and have their items evaluated. Offers will be made to those that have items valuable to collectors, especially pre-1970 guitars. Those that do decide to sell their items will be paid on the spot. If you are like a lot of people, you might have an old vintage guitar lying around the house. If you have ever wondered what its worth, now is your chance to find out and, if you choose, sell it as well. Vintage guitars and other musical items could be worth a great deal, according to Eddie Stambaugh, vice president of the International Vintage Guitar Collectors Association (IVGCA). Collectors are willing to pay quite a lot of money for items they want to add to their collection. If they are rare enough, the right vintage guitar could be worth over $100,000, explains Stambaugh. One 1960 Gibson Les Paul went for just that in July of 2007$100,000 paid by an avid collector. While that is an extreme example, many rare and valuable guitars are stashed away in attics, closets, basements and garages all across the country. The IVGCA has organized a traveling event in search of all types of guitars, musical instruments and more. Even common guitars can be worth a significant amount due to high collector demands, says Stambaugh. Some of the most popular brands, including Gibson, Fender, Martin and Gretsch always bring big premiums. While the IVGCAs specialty is guitars, they are also examining other instruments and equipment, including drum sets, banjos, flutes, clarinets, amplifiers, pedals, microphones, etc. Any autographed and musician-specific items are also welcome. Stambaugh concludes that you never really know what you have until you have your items evaluated by a specialist, like the ones we have here at IVGCA. Whatever kind of instrument you may have, bring it in to our show. Think about ityou could walk away $100,000 richer! So whether you have one instrument that might be valuable, or a large collection you recently inherited, you can talk to these specialists for free. There is nothing to lose, the event itself is always interesting, and you might walk away with a couple thousand dollars in your pocket. k r HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE SELL GUITARS AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS YESTERDAY at the International Vintage Guitar Collectors Association PAID ADVERTISEMENT BRING THIS EXPRESS CARD IN AND GET EXPRESS SERVICEWHAT WE BUYVintage & New Guitars Fender Gretsch Gibson Guild Martin PRS Epiphone National Rickenbacker Stage Equipment & PA Gear Vintage & New Amps (example: Marshall) Vintage Microphones Foot PedalsOther Instruments Flutes Trumpets Clarinets Violins Drum Sets Banjos Saxophones Autographed and Musician-Specic ItemsAND MORE! Above: At a show in St. Clair, Minnesota, a guest brought in a guitar signed by Garth Brooks. During a Garth Brooks concert, the gentleman had been called up to the stage where Brooks signed his guitar and handed it over to him. He walked away from the IVGCA show with over $2,000. Dont miss your chance on cashing in with an autographed guitar. ha t you ha ve u d by a specialist, l ik e at IVGCA. Whatever aw po cket. TuesdaySaturday March 13th 17th TuesdayFriday: 9ampm Saturday: 9ampm Holiday Inn Capitol Center 1355 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Directions: 850.877.3171 Show Info: 217.787.7767IN TALLAHASSEE

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By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar eld@thewakullanews.netThrough WakullaStory 2012 A Hankerin for Headhuntin, Herb Donaldson cleverly channeled voices from the past as accounted by Elizabeth Fisher Smith, editor of the Magnolia Monthly, and adapted for the stage selections from her published work. WakullaStory 2012 began its presentation around the days of Reconstruction following the Civil War when, according to H. Clay Crawford, No county in Florida, or under the circle of the sun, had a more corrupt set of of cials. Those days were complete with conspiracy and murder by Wakullas vemember Ku Klux Klan, and the publication of a mystery novel written for teenagers by Kirk Munro entitled Wakulla, about a family that travels on a steamer from Maine down the east coast to the St. Marks Lighthouse. Adventures were encountered during their trip down the coast and after they arrived in the then jungle region where Magnolia once existed. According to the story, during the 1850s, about onethird of Wakullas population were slaves. Abraham Gavin, an antebellum aristocrat, was one of the largest slave owners in Wakulla. Many African Americans in the county took the surname Gavin from him. S.B. Richardson owned 57 slaves; Henry Mash owned 54; H.H. Walker owned 33, just to name a few. There were a couple of slaves who were 100 years old. John L. Crawford, namesake of Crawfordville, owned 13 slaves. There were many more. WakullaStory weaves through 1910, when Walter and Annie Harms began publishing the Sopchoppy Argosy from a atbed press in a shed on their property. The Argosy was a weekly publication that ran for two years. Then it takes us through the 1920s, when Agnes, Mary and Queen Triplett, all related by marriage to Triplett brothers, were teachers in and around Wakulla County. The February 1965 issue of the Magnolia Monthly was said to have featured an article by Elizabeth Smith concerning House Bill 61726, a bill that was overlooked by the auditors of ce. The bill added $100 expense money to the $100 per month the school board members were already receiving in salaries. That caused $11,843.43 to be distributed to the board members, past, present and evidently at least one deceased. According to Smith, Wakulla had raised its school board from $20 to $50 to $100 to $200 per month. Parents strenuously objected to the bill because they wanted the money spent on classroom equipment and repairs. Elizabeth Smiths father, who was a professor of economics, made a hobby out of headhunting, a slang term for the study of a mans ancestry. She said whenever they went on a family picnic, they always ended up in a cemetery, where the children had to write down names, birth and death dates before they could eat. She said from the name on a stone a mans whole life can be reconstructed. Through WakullaStory we find there are three types of cemeteries in Wakulla County community, church and family. There is one all-black cemetery, the Mount Olive Church Cemetery, where many of those buried were World War I soldiers serving in the Pioneer Battalion. The oldest cemetery in the county, and the most cherished, is the Magnolia Cemetery. Some of the oldest graves in the county are decorated with things like broken glass, pottery or seashells. Elizabeth Smith was opinionated and outspoken through the Magnolia Monthly, which lasted almost two decades. As WakullaStory noted, she did not make the history she accounted, she merely observed it and wrote it down for all of us to remember. The play was performed Friday and Saturday, March 9 and 10, at the Sopchoppy School auditorium. & Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012Conventional wisdom was right, even in an unconventional session Weekly Roundup, Page 7B Plant Society to host walkShipwrecks as topic of science talk Stories, Page 4B Lockinone yearof savings and get our best offers on every package.two years All DIRECTVoffersrequire 24-month agreement.** The CHOICEXTRAPackageFOR 12 MONTHS AfterRebate 99/MO*39$MORECHANNELS, MOVIESANDSPORTS. OVER205DigitalChannels 4 FREE UPGRADES HD DVR andupto3HD ReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select models only. DIRECTV ON DEMAND 7,000 Shows andMovies HD Included PLUS,FREEFOR 3MONTHS SAVESAVE$39/mo. in1styear! AND$20/mo. in2ndyear! Includes $10/mo.withHD equipmentandAutoBillPay. TheCHOICEPackageFOR 12 MONTHS After Rebate 99/MO*34$THETVPACKAGETHATBEATSCABLE. OVER150DigitalChannels 4 FREE UPGRADES HDDVRandup to 3HDReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select models only. DIRECTV ON DEMAND 6,000ShowsandMovies HD Included PLUS,FREEFOR3MONTHS SAVESAVE$39/mo. in1styear! AND$20/mo. in2ndyear! Includes $10/mo.withHD equipmentandAutoBillPay. TheENTERTAINMENTP ackageFOR 12 MONTHS AfterRebate 99/MO*29$OURBEST VALUEPACKAGE. OVER140DigitalChannels 4FREE UPGRADES HDDVR andupto3HDReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select modelsonly. HD Included DIRECTVONDEMAND 4,000Showsand Movies PLUS,FREEFOR 3MONTHS SAVESAVE$35/mo.in1styear! AND$20/mo.in2ndyear! Includes $10/mo. withHD equipmentandAutoBillPay. FREE Professional Installation. #1 in Customer Satisfaction Over All Cable and Satellite TVProviders.Among the largest national cable & satellite TV providers. NO Equipmentto Buy. NO Start-UpCosts. 99% Worry-Free Signal Reliability.Based on a Nationwide Study of representative cities. Local Channels Includedinover 97% of the U.S.Withevery package you get: PLUS Lockin 2 years of savings. CALL NOW! Your Local Authorized DIRECTV Dealer850-926-DISHTHE SIGHTS AND SOUND COOffers end 7/18/12. Credit card required (except in MA & PA). New approved customers only (lease required). $19.95 Handling & D elivery fee may apply. Applicable use tax adjustment may apply on the retail value of the installation. Programming/pricing may vary in certain markets. *BILL CREDIT/PROGRAMMING OFFER: IF BY THE END OF PROMOTIONAL PRICE PERIOD(S) CUSTOMER DOES NOT CONTACT DIRECTV TO CHANGE SERVIC E THEN ALL SERVICES WILL AUTOMATICALLY CONTINUE AT THE THEN-PREVAILING RATES Free SHOWTIME for three months, a value of $38.97. Free HBO, STARZ, SHOWTIME and Cinemax for three months, a value of $135. L IMIT ONE PROGRAMMING OFFER PER ACCOUNT. Featured package names and prices: ENTERTAINMENT $54.99/mo.; CHOICE $63.99/mo.; CHOICE XTRA $68.99/mo. Prices include the following bill credits for 12 months after rebate: $20 for ENTERTAINMENT, $24 for CHOICE and CHOICE XTRA; pl us an additional $5 with online rebate and consent to email alerts. In months 13-24, bill credit will be $10/mo. Eligibility ba sed on ZIP code. Upon DIRECTV System activation, customer will receive rebate redemption instructions (included in customers rst DIRECTV bill, a separate mailing, or, in the state of New York, from retailer) and must comply with the terms of the instructions. In order to receive $25 monthly credits for the ENTERTAINMENT Package ($29 for CHOICE and CHOICE XTRA) in the rst 12 months, customer must submit rebate online (valid email address required) and consent to email alerts prior to rebate redemption. Rebate begins up to eight weeks after receipt of rebate submission online or by phone. Duration of promotional price varies based on redemption date. $10 CREDIT OFFER: Customers activating and maintaining the ENTERTAINMENT Package or above along with an HD Receiver or HD DVR and enrollment in Auto Bill Pay will receive an additional $10 bill credit for 24 months. Account must be in good standing as determined by DIRECTV in its sole discretion to remain eligible for all offers. **24-MO. LEASE AGREEMENT: EARLY CANCELLATION WILL RESULT IN A FEE OF $20/MONTH FOR EACH REMAINING MONTH Must maintain 24 consecutive months of your DIRECTV programming package. Advanced Receiver-DVR fee ($8/mo.) required for DVR lease. Advanced Receiver-HD fee ($10/mo.) required for HD Receiver lease. Advanced Receiver fee ($20/mo.) required for HD DVR a nd TiVo HD DVR from DIRECTV lease. TiVo service fee ($5/mo.) required for TiVo HD DVR from DIRECTV lease. If you have two boxes or one box and an enabled T V, an additional $6/mo. fee applies. For each additional box and/or enabled TV on your account you are charged an additional fe e of $6/mo. per box and/or enabled TV. NON-ACTIVATION CHARGE OF $150 PER RECEIVER MAY APPLY. ALL EQUIPMENT IS LEASED AND MUST BE RETURNED TO DIRECTV UPON CANCELLATION, OR UNRETURNED EQUIPMENT FEES APPLY. VISIT Directv.com OR CALL 1-800-DIRECTV FOR DETAILS Advanced receiver instant rebate requires activation of the ENTERTAINMENT Package or above; OPTIMO MS or above (for DVR Receiver, MS LATINO); Jadeworld; or any qualifying international service bundle, which shall include the PREFERRED CHOICE programming package (valued at $41.99/mo.). Second, third and fourth HD Receiver offer requires activation of the ENTERTAINMENT Package or above or MS ULTRA Package or above and HD DVR as the rst free receiver upgrade. Home Media Center HD DVR and additional advanced receiver upgrades available for a charge. INSTALLATION: Standard professional installation in up to four rooms only. Custom installation extra. DIRECTV CINEMA/ON DEMAND: Access to available DIRECTV On Demand programming is based on package selection. Actual number of TV shows and movies will va ry. Additional fees apply for new releases. Some DIRECTV CINEMA and On Demand content requires an HD DVR (HR20 or later) or DVR (R22 or later), DIRECTV CINEMA Connection Kit and broadband Internet service with speeds of 750 kbps or higher and a network router with an available Ethernet port are required. Visit directv.com/cinema for details. To access DIRECTV HD programming, HD equipment required. Number of HD channels based on package selection. Customer satisfaction ratings based on 2011 American Customer Satisfaction Index. Local channels eligibility based on service address. Not all networks available in all markets. Programming, pricing, terms and conditions subject to change at any time. Pricing residential. T axes not included. Receipt of DIRECTV programming subject to DIRECTV Customer Agreement; copy provided at directv. com/legal and in order conrmation. DIRECTV. DIRECTV and the Cyclone Design logo, DIRECTV CINEMA, CHOICE and CHOICE XTRA are trademarks of DIRECTV, LLC. All other trademar ks and service marks are the property of their respective owners.WakullaStory is a great tale, well told TAMMIE BARFIELDAfter the Friday night performance, WakullaStory playwright Herb Donaldson accepts a gift from the Historical Societys Murray McLaughlin as the cast of A Hankerin for Headhuntin looks on.

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, March 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY will hold a public forum at 7 p.m. at the library with guest speaker County Administrator David Edwards. He will discuss the challenges facing county government. Everybody is welcome to attend. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, March 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, March 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ORDER OF CONFEDERATE ROSE Mary C. Gwaltney chapter will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405. SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS Wakulla Guards Camp will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405. Sunday, March 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, March 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, March 20 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE D ANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Contact Anne Ahrendt at 528-0895 or Rachel Pienta at 321-3582 for more information. Friday, March 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Special Events Thursday, March 15 FREE LECTURE on Adventures in Northwest Florida Archaeology by Dr. Nancy White, professor of Archaeology at the University of South Florida, will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. The free lecture is hosted by the Florida Public Archaeology Network, University of West Florida and the Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center. RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL THEATRE TROUPE will present Next Victim, Please at 7 p.m. This is a tongue-in-cheek murder mystery. Admission is free, but donations are graciously accepted. The concession will be open prior to the show and at intermission. Friday, March 16 AISHA IVEY AND AARON OROURKE will perform Celtic music at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. This is a pre St. Patricks day party, with traditional and original Celtic music. Ivey is a champion ddler and ORourke is a talented multi-instrumentalist, his guitar playing lends just the right touch to Irish ddle tunes. For reservations contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Saturday, March 17 ST. PATRICKS DAY FESTIVAL AND PARADE will be held at Hudson Park by the Crawfordville Lions Club. Breakfast in the park will be held at 8 a.m., followed by opening introductions, raising of the colors, National Anthem and the pledge of allegiance. The parade will start at 10 a.m. There will be several performances throughout the day, including Taekwondo, Coast Charter School, Aleene Benson Irish and Scottish Fiddle Players, Rick Tittle, John Smith and Ken Muf n Man, and the Wakulla Wigglers. TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road, from 10 a.m. to noon. All spectrum children and their siblings are invited to this simple play date. Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times. Children need to bring their favorite train and a good wholesome snack and drink. GROW MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES class will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Learn about fertilizer, lime, compost, green manures and application methods. Learn how to produce fruits and vegetables in the back yard. Getting the most fruit and vegetable yields from the least inputs. ST. PADDYS DAY FAMILY BASH will be held at Beef O Bradys at 6 p.m. Acoustic duo Hot Tamale will play from 6 to 9 p.m. WATERS JOURNEY: Following the Water to Wakulla Springs tour will be held from 8 a.m. to noon led by Jim Stevenson, an expert biologist. This a tour of the Wakulla Spring Basin which examines the sources and traces the water journey to the world famous Wakulla Springs. See the actual sinkholes hidden away in the woods where exploration cave divers enter the longest and deepest underwater cave system in the world. Cost of the tour is $18. WATERS JOURNEY is a car caravan/hiking tour. Tour departs from the TCC campus parking lot closest to the intersection of Pensacola Street and Appleyard Drive at 8 a.m. and ends at the tower overlooking the spring at noon. For additional questions or assistance with registration, call 926-3376. NATIVE PLANT WALK will be held by The Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society in the Apalachicola National Forest. The free, guided walk of about 1.5 hour will follow the Florida National Scenic Trail along the upper Sopchoppy River. Carpooling to go into the Forest will form at 9:30 a.m. at two Wakulla County locations: the Winn-Dixie parking in Crawfordville and the city hall in Sopchoppy. The in-and-back-out walk will begin at the trailhead on Forest Rd. 329 at Sopchoppy River. Participants should carry drinking water. Sign-in, with standard liability release, will be required. For questions, contact David Roddenberry at david_roddenberry@juno. com or 962-4492. Thursday, March 22 FREE LECTURE SERIES on USS Narcissus and Floridas Underwater Archaeological Preserves by Franklin Price, underwater archaeologist, and Floridas Panhandle Shipwreck Trail: Dive into the Emerald Coast by Lindsay Smith, underwater archaeologist, will be held at TCC Wakulla Center at 6:30 p.m. For more information, contact FPAN Outreach Coordinator, Barbara Hines, at bhines@uwf.edu or at (850) 877-2206.Upcoming EventsSaturday, March 24 FIFTH ANNUAL MAKE A DIFFERENCE DAY will be held by VolunteerWakulla from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hudson Park. There will be booth set up for services offered in the county, as well as places to volunteer. There will also be free food and door prizes every 30 minutes after 11 a.m. For more information, call 745-0060 or visit www. volunteerwakulla.org. HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 340 Trice Lane. They will be collecting paint, oil, chemicals, electronics, solvents, cleaners, gas, fuel, batteries, uorescent bulbs and acids. Thursday, March 29 FREE LECTURE SERIES on The Page-Ladson and Wakulla Spring Sites Yield Evidence of the First Ice-Age Floridians by James Dunbar, retired archaeologist with the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research, at 6:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. For more information, contact FPAN outreach coordinator, Barbara Hines, RPA, at bhines@ uwf.edu or at (850) 877-2206. Saturday, March 31 LIFE WALK by the Wakulla Pregnancy Center will be held at Wakulla Springs State Park. Registration is at 9 a.m., and the walk starts at 9:30 a.m. For more information, call 210-1276. EASTER EGG HUNT will be held at Hudson Park at 11 a.m. Registration is from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. The age groups range from infant to children 10 years old. A drawing will be held and one child from each age group will win an Easter basket. The event is sponsored by Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. Call 926-7227 for more information. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Riversprings Middle School Theatre Troupe performance at 7 p.m. Celtic music at Posh Java at 8 p.m. St. Patricks Day Festival and Parade at Hudson Park. Wakulla County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdayMonday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, March 15 WAKULLA COUNTY AIRPORT COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 3 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. Monday, March 19 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Celtic music can be heard at Posh Java on Saturday at 8 p.m. with a performance by Aisha Ivey and Aaron ORourke.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 Page 3B 713-001499 Rock Landing Road OPEN: THURSDAY ............. 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .............................. 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday .................. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. SUNDAY ...........................11 A.M. 9 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95Special to The NewsThe Gadsden Arts Center is pleased to announce its acceptance into the North American Reciprocal Museum (NARM) program. This honor brings Gadsden Arts into a league with more than 500 fine cultural organizations, and offers Gadsden Arts Center members a fantastic new bene t. Members at $100 contribution level receive a special NARM membership card that provides free admission and a gift shop discount at over more than member organizations in the United States and Canada. It is truly an honor to be a part of such a large and distinguished network of museums, said Grace Maloy, Executive Director, and a fantastic bene t for our members, especially those who travel or spend time elsewhere part of the year. Everyone is welcome to join the Gadsden Arts Center memberships start at just $10 a year. For more information, visit the Gadsden Arts Center, open TuesdaySaturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., call (850) 875-4866, or visit www.gadsdenarts.org.Special to The NewsThe Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society invites the public on a native-plant walk in Apalachicola National Forest on Saturday morning, March 17. The free, guided walk of about 1.5 hour will follow the Florida National Scenic Trail along the upper Sopchoppy River. Carpooling to go into the Forest will form at 9:30 a.m. at two Wakulla County locations: the Winn-Dixie parking lots outer area on US 319 in Crawfordville and the city hall in Sopchoppy three blocks off U.S. 319. The in-and-back-out walk will begin at the trailhead on Forest Road 329 at the Sopchoppy River. Walking will not be strenuous but will be more than a mile. Participants should carry drinking water. Sign-in, with standard liability release, will be required at the trailhead. For questions, contact David Roddenberry of the Sarracenia Chapter at david_roddenberry@juno.com or 850962-4492Special to The NewsThe Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at the Wakulla County Public Library on Tuesday, March 20. There will be a short business meeting followed by a presentation by Sarracenia member Paul Hamilton on climate change. Hamilton will relate his climate change teaching experiences at the Alaska Sealife Center and working with various student and citizen groups. He will identify and explain common areas of confusion regarding this subject. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m., with the program following immediately after club announcements. The program is free and open to the public. Please join us for this timely and interesting program. Come at 6 p.m. to mingle and enjoy refreshments before the meeting and talk get underway.Plant Society will host a walkNative Plant Society will have a program on climate change GADSDEN ARTSThe Gadsden Arts Center in Quincy.Gadsden Arts becomes a North American reciprocal museumBuffs of World War II history wont want to miss a special presentation March 22 by Thomas C. Shirley, a marine biologist from Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Shirleys talk, Run Silent, Run Deep: New Life on WWII Shipwrecks in the Gulf of Mexico, begins at 7 p.m. March 22 at the IMAX Theater in the Challenger Learning Center in Kleman Plaza in downtown Tallahassee. Shirley is part of a 10member team of scientists in the U.S. and Canada who last year wrapped up a detailed, one-of-a-kind study of World War II shipwrecks in the northern Gulf of Mexico. In 2004, he and his colleagues collaborated on the study aimed at investigating the biology and archaeology of eight casualties of the war, which include the only German U-boat known to have been sunk during combat in the Gulf. Beginning in 1941, German submarines began an all-out assault on Allied shipping in the Gulf. The campaign reached its zenith in 1942 when U-boats sent a total of 56 vessels ranging from commercial shing boats to tankers to the bottom, killing dozens of sailors from Texas to the Keys. (The closest World War II casualty to the Big Bend coast is the wreck of the Empire Mica, a 480-foot British tanker that was torpedoed and sunk roughly 38 miles south of Apalachicola in June 1942.) Shirley said that the Minerals Management Service within the U.S. Department of Interior sponsored the project. The MMS, which oversees oil-drilling operations in federal waters in the Gulf, has studied WWII shipwrecks as a means of determining how oil platforms can best be transformed into arti cial reefs. In war archives in the U.S. and in Europe, the scientists found original blueprints, photos, and manifests of each of the ships prior to their sinking. They also interviewed survivors, family members and relatives of sailors who were on the vessels, including the wife of the German skipper of the U-166, the U-boat the team studied. The identity of the U166 wasnt con rmed until 2001 by a team of marine contractors working for the MMS. Shortly after the sub torpedoed and sank the 375-foot U.S. passenger ship, the Robert E. Lee, it was attacked and sunk with all hands by a Navy patrol boat assigned as an escort for the Lee. Both vessels lie within two miles of each other in 6,500 feet roughly 100 miles south of the coastal town of Houma, La. Shirleys appearance is the second in a series of talks sponsored this spring by the Tallahassee Scienti c Society, a local nonprofit group. On April 25, the series will resume with a presentation by Sopchoppys own Joe Hutto, acclaimed naturalist and writer. Last November, the PBS/ BBC Nature television series broadcast My Life as a Turkey, a documentary based on Huttos highly regarded book, Illumination in the Flatwoods (1995). The series concludes May 24 with a presentation by Janisse Ray, one of the Souths most well known nature writers. Members of the Tallahassee Scientific Society can purchase complete sets of tickets for $20 or individual tickets for $6 each. For more information and to order tickets, visit the societys website at www.tallysci.org or call (850) 877-0224. World War II shipwrecks will be topic of science talk SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMarine biologist Thomas C. Shirley will speak about Gulf shipwrecks in Tallahassee on March 22. Saturday, March 17 at Hudson ParkFESTIVAL & PARADE Sponsored by Crawfordville Lions ClubBreakfast at 8 a.m.Parade at 10 a.m.Live Entertainment at 11 a.m. For vendor information call 926-1269 or 566-1828 For parade information call 926-4440Many Arts and Crafts Booths, Exhibits and Food Booths, Pony Rides, Space Walks and Lots More Entertainment for Kids! PANACEA HATSAFACTHATSEARLE KIRKWOOD850-524-9103UNDERTHEOAK ON US 98 PANACEA Laura M. Mulholland 850-926-23043340 Crawfordville, FL 32327 ART WAREHOUSE Paintings, Sculptures & Carvings Buy Sell

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com There is no denying that Irish eyes are smiling come the month of March. With the widely celebrated and festive Saint Patricks Day arriving mid-month, the parades and shamrocks might overshadow the fact that theres more to Irish heritage than Saint Patricks Day. In fact, the entire month of March is dedicated to IrishAmerican heritage. In 1840, many Irish people emigrated to North America to escape the great potato famine happening in Ireland. Today almost 40 million people claim Irish ancestry, and there are millions of Irish-Americans making contributions to the United States each and every day, with notable Irish-Americans in all walks of life. Here are just a handful of people of Irish heritage who have made strides in their respective disciplines through the years. Charles Carroll III: Carroll was born in Maryland where there were once laws to prohibit Catholics from voting, holding office or worshiping publicly. Carol became a Catholic-rights activist and also served as a U.S. Senator in the rst Congress. He holds the title as the only Catholic to have signed the Declaration of Independence. Harry Bing Crosby: Crosby was an acclaimed entertainer whose contributions are still valued today, more than three decades after his death. A singer and actor, his trademark smooth, baritone voice helped catapult Crosby to the list of top record sellers for the twentieth century. One of the rst people to receive three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, Crosby also earned an Academy Award for Best Actor for his role as Father Chuck OMalley in the 1944 motion picture Going My Way. Henry Ford: The American auto industry can give thanks to the eviction of John Ford from Cork in 1847, which enabled the Ford family to move to the States shortly after. Johns son Henry became an automobile pioneer and helped pave the way for the dominance and popularity of the American car. John Hughes: Many people say that Hughes popular teen movies documented their own teenage years. Hughes is best known for a string of quirky, yet spot-on depictions of the average American teenager that helped start the careers of actors who would go on to be known as the Brat Pack. In the 1990s, hits like Home Alone and Curly Sue also resonated with audiences and helped solidify Hughes as a leader in family entertainment. He passed away in 2009 from a heart attack. James Hetfield: Fans of the popular heavy metal band Metallica are no strangers to the accomplishments of its front-man Het eld. Het- eld co-founded the band in 1982 and since then has helped make Metallica one of the most renowned bands of this genre. The bands hit Enter Sandman helped further propel the groups popularity both in and outside of its angst-driven heavy metal fan base. Ron Howard: One of Hollywoods most successful directors, Howard can also lay claim to being one of its most successful child actors. Appearing in his rst lm in 1956 at just 18 months old, Howard went on to memorable roles such as Opie on The Andy Grif th Show and Richie Cunningham on Happy Days. While his role on Happy Days made him a household name, it was behind the camera where Howards career would truly take off. Howards directorial career has produced several hits, including Splash, Willow, Apollo 13, and A Beautiful Mind, which earned him the Academy Award for Best Director. Bill OReilly: A political commentator and New York-based news reporter, OReilly quickly made a name for himself in television news, rising up the ranks from local news stops in Scranton, PA and eventually landing his own national show, The OReilly Factor, which is consistently among cable news top-rated shows. OReilly holds two masters degrees, one for broadcast journalism from Boston University and another in public policy from Harvard University. This page sponsored in part by: Spotlight on notable Irish-Americans St. Pattricks Day is

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weather weather Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 9267561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfor dville. Found PERSONAL ITEM Found in local business btween 1 & 2 pm. Wed, March 7, call (850) 9261561 to claim Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 122 weekly newspapers, 32 websites, 25 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)7421373 Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)3747294 Trades/ Skills DRIVERSHometime Choices: Express lanes Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF, 14/ON-7/OFF. WEEKLY, Full and Part time. Dry and Refrigerated, New Trucks! 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JoinCRST .com Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos.CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. melton truck.com/drive PAWN SHOP ASSISTANTHigh School Grad or GED, Retail Sales Experience helpful, but not essential, Full time, Send Resume to EMPLOYMENT PO Box 1206 Crawfordville Florida 32326 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction Can you Dig It? Heavy Equipment School, 3 wk training program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Trackhoes. Local Job placement asset. Start digging dirt Now. (877)9949904 Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (877)206-5165 w ww.CenturaOnline .com Garage/ Yard Sales Crawfordville Shell PointFri Sat & Sun 9a Gigantic Sale Household, tools, antiques, jewelry, John Deere Mower $800 Dee Shriver 120 Beatty Taff Dr (850) 933-0926 Mobile Homes For Rent Crawfordville2bed/2bath single wide MH on private lot North of Crawfordville $550. mo. 1st, Last & Deposit required 850-9604230 North Wakulla County2 or 3 BR/1BA mobile home w/upgrades on pond. $650/mo. $500deposit. Revell Realty 850-9622212 SOPCHOPPY3br/1ba, Covered screen porch, large wooded lot,$475/mo (incl garbage) + a dep (850) 566-4124 Real Estate For Rent HOME ON ACREAGEHome on 3 acres. 2BR/2BA. porch, storage building, large oak trees, conveniently located near post office and Walgreens $625/mo 850-251-1253 Br enda Hicks Realty Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-9264217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished PANECEASmall 3 Bed 1 Bath Nice and clean Small pet allowed $450. mo. (850) 251-7965 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CrawfordvilleGeorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $875, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 4433300 WATER. BIRDS FISHING2/1, w/covered deck over looking private dock, newly refurbished, completely furnished or neg unfurnished $900 rent + utility fee (850) 5241026 Commercial Real Estate WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-4215039 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 9263546 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 9267291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL A Business -Community (ABC) School Program, Wakulla County RFP# 12/13 -01 The School Board of Wakulla County requests interested parties to submit formal sealed bids/proposals for the above referenced bid. SCOPE OF WORK: The School Board of Wakulla is seeking proposals from qualified businesses with operations in Wakulla County, Floridainterested in partnering with the District in A Business-Community (ABC)School Program. The proposal is for the Business to provide the facility, including the associated operating and upkeep expenses, in which the Wakulla County School District (WCSD) will provide an educational program for the children of the business employees for 6.5 hours per day or as consistent with the Wakulla County School Board (WCSB) approved elementary school hours and calendar. A Business-Community (ABC) School is defined as a public school offering instruction to students from kindergarten through third grade in a facility owned or leased and operated by a business. The Department of Education 2012-2013 average class size requirement is eighteen students. Eighteen is also the minimum average class size to achieve the effective, efficient use of the taxpayers educational and fiscal resources. Proposals that commit to meeting the maximum and minimum class size criteria or that proved for reimbursement to the Wakulla County School District for any loss in FTE educational funding revenues resulting from the failure of the business to achieve the minimum enrollment will receive the highest consideration. Students in need of or enrolled in special programs or that require special services can best be served at the Wakulla County Schools that offer those programs and services identified in the students individual educational plan. Parents shall be responsible for providing all transportation to and from school or to the other WCSD facilities during, before and after school for the students enrolled in a Business-Community (ABC). Florida Business Community (ABC) Schools shall comply with the constitutional class size requirements. Facilities to a house a FloridaBusiness-Community (ABC) School must comply with the State Uniform Building Code for Educational Building Construction adopted pursuant to section 1013.37, Florida Statutes, and must meet state and local health, environmental, and safety laws and codes. ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS: This package can be requested by mail at Wakulla County School Board, Post Office box 100, Crawfordville, Fl orida 32326 or by calling 850-926-0065 DOCUMENT COST: $1.50 BID BOND: None PRE/BID PROPOSAL CONFERENCE:: Pre-Proposal Conference Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 10 A.M. Wakulla County School Board Administrative Offices Conference Room 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DUE DATE/TIME: April 10, 2012@ 2:00P.M. Eastern The School Board of Wakulla County, Florida must receive bids no later than said date and time. Bids received after such time will be returned unopened. CONTACT: WILLIAM R. BRISTOL 850-926-0065 published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News March 8, 15, 2012 5148-0315 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 Page 5B ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. 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Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Classified Ads $10877-676-1403 Rent to own! D/W Mobile Home. $600/month, plus deposit. 850-926-9540 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thew aku llanews.co m Please Recycle The Wakulla News Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041

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We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets.1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. No smoking. No Pets.Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month.2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 415 Mashes Sands Rd. on Ochlockonee Bay 3 Bdr./ 2 ba $825. Pets with Deposit No smoking. 6 River Cove Bay view 2 Bdr. 1 ba Cottage near Ochlockonee Bay and boat ramp.$550.mo. No smoking. Pets with Deposit5149-0315 PUBLIC NOTICE NWFTCA Meeting Notification -Notice is hereby given The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority has scheduled their Board meetings for 2012. March 22, 2012 -10:00am Central Time, City Hall, 9 Harrison Avenue, Panama City, FL April 26, 2012 -10:00am Central Time, City Hall, 222 West Main Street, Penascola, FL July 26, 2012 -10:00am Eastern Time, Robert Moore Administration Building, 1000 Cecil G. Costin Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL October 25, 2012 -10:00am Central Time, Walton County Commission Meeting Room-Annex, 31 Coastal Centre Boulevard, Santa Rosa Beach, FL Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Amy Paulk at (850) 415-1040 or by email apaulk@gc inc.com. March 15, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5145-0315 Vs. Atkinson, Johnny Mason 12-4-CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-4-CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE ESTATE OF JOHNNY MASON ATKINSON, SR.., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of JOHNNY MASON A TKINSON, SR.,DECEASED, File Number 12 4 CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate, Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville, Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the estate must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. The date of the first publication of this Notice is March 8, 2012. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Dated this 1st day of March, 2012. Personal Repr esentative: Teresa Ann Broxton 30 Windy Ct. Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attor ney for Personal Repr esentative: SHAWN P. GOLETZ, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No. 0338450 Smith, Thompson, Shaw, Minacci & Colon, P.A. 320 Thomasville Road, Fourth Floor Tallahassee, FL 32309 Tel: (850)893-4105 Fax: (850)893-7229 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News, March 8 and 15, 2012 -5145-0315 5147-0315 Vs.Dicus, Charles, 37 2011 CA 002620 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.37 2011 CA 002620 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES C. DICUS III; MARCIA K. DICUS; CITY OF TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, ET AL Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SER VICE TO: CHARLES C. DICUS III; MARCIA K. DICUS, whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIF IED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property; COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF OAK RIDGE ROAD(STATE ROAD NO. 260-LEON COUNTY NO.2204) AND RUN THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 160.06 FET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 493.80 FEET TO A POINT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 164.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 149.70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 164.50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 149.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE WEST 12 FEET THEREOF SUBJECT TO AN INGRESS, EGRESS EASEMENT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 670, PAGE 179, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH: A 30 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8 TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF OAK RIDGE ROAD AND RUN THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 30.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT -OF-WAY AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 356.38 FEET THENCE NORTH 466.54 FEET THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 466.18 FEET TO A CRIMPED IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 356.93 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME KNOWN AS A 1997 VIN# GAFLV35A12887HH21 AND GAFLV35B12887HH21 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 3010 North Military Trail, Suite 300, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 on or before April 8, 2012 (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed therein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 22nd day of February, 2012 (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE COURT /S/ BY: Elizabeth L. Alford DEPUTY CLERK March 8 & 15, 2012 5152-0322 Vs. Herndon, Linda 65-2010-CA-000243-cancel and reschedule foreclosure sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2010-CA-000243 Division NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, vs. LINDA K. HERNDON, et al. Defendants, NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgement of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 25, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakull County, Florida described as: ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND IN WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 515, PAGE 774, ID#10-55-03W-000-00621-001, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS METES AND BOUNDS PROPERTY. COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 WEST 660.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 42 EAST 1388.01 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 27 DEGREES 15 WEST 1199.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 27 DEGREES 15WEST 774.47 FEET TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUT H 26 DEGREES 08 WEST 552.64FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SOUTHWESTERLY ALONGSAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1482.69 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 47FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 150.06 FEET, THE CHORE OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 19 DEGREES 02 WEST 150.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 47EAST 673.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. and commonly known as: 295 CURTIS MILL RD, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the hghest and bidder, for cash, Sales are held in Lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on April 12, 2012 at 11a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 8th day of March, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court /s/Desiree D.Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News, March 15 & 22nd, 2012 5154-0322 Vs. Ashley Ciara Evans 2011-CA-000189 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000189 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SHILLING, and JAMES M. FOX, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-189-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the plaintiff, and ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SCHILLING and JAMES M. FOX, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT A Lots 32,33, and 34 of the West Side of the Town of Sopchoppy, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida Published two (2) times March 15 & 22, 2012 The Wakulla News 5154-0322 5155-0322 Vs. Charles Allen 11-CA-000230 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-CA-000230 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ESTATE OF CHARLES ALLEN PATRICK, deceased, CHARLES A. A.J. PATRICK, JR., TYLER SHAYNE PATRICK, LISA DOREEN PORTER, a/k/a LISA DOREEN PATRICK, U.S. DEPT. OF JUSTICE, WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-230-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and ESTATE OF CHARLES ALLEN PATRICK, deceased, CHARLES A. A.J. PATRICK, JR., TYLER SHAYNE PATRICK, LISA DOREEN PORTER, a/k/a LISA DOREEN PATRICK, U.S. DEPT. OF JUSTICE, WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT A Lot 18, Block A, Northwood Subdivision, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Pages 91 to 97, of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with 1985 EATO Doublewide Mobile Home ID Numbers: 11417921A & 11417921B, Title Numbers: 41329335 & 41309172 Published two (2) times -March 15, 22, 2012 in The Wakulla County, Florida 5154-0322 5156-0322 Vs. Joseph D. Olah 11-126-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-126-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH D. OLAH, JR. and KRISTINE P. OLAH, husband and wife; UNKNOWN TENANTS; et. al., Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 5, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-126-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and JOSEPH D. OLAH, JR., KRISTINE P. OLAH, and UNKNOWN TENANTS, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on April, 12, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th of March, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices (SEAL) EXHIBIT A Commence at a concrete monument (marked #2919)being used as the Southeast Corner of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida said point also lying on the Easterly boundary of a 20.00 foot roadway easement (Redwood Lane) and run North along said Right-of-Way boundary 247.85 feet and iron rod and cap (marked #7160) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North along said Right-of-way boundary 367.16 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #4261), thence leaving said Right-of-way boundary run North 89 degrees40 minutes 43 seconds West 338.18 feet to an iron rod, thence run South 524.73 feet to an iron rod and cap (marked #7160), thence run North 65 degrees 16 minutes 18 seconds East 372.14 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 3.46 acres, more or less. SUBJECT to and together with a 20.00 foot wide roadway easement lying over and across the Easterly 20.00 feet portion thereof. AND ALSO SUBJECT to a 100.00 foot wide powerline easement lying over and across the Southerly 100.00 feet, more or less thereof, or as designated by the powerline thereon. TOGETHER with one SUPRE MH 1974 ID G9150A & G9150B located thereon. Published two (2) times -March 15, 22, 2012 in The Wakulla News 5156-0322 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5150-0322 Weitzel, Joseph 11-77-PR Notice to Cred PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 11-77-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF ROBERT JOSEPH WEITZEL Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS and NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION TO ALL CREDITORS and TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS The administration of the estate of ROBERT JOSEPH WEITZEL whose date of death was November 14, 2011 and whose social security number is 286-40-6942, File Number 11-77-PR, is pending in the Circuit court of Wakulla County, Florida, probate division, whose address is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors have only those periods of time established in Florida Statutes 733.702 and 733.710 to file their claims against the estate. All creditors and all interested persons are required to file with the court. WITHIN 90 DAYS OF THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE (1) all claims against the estate ; (2) any objection that challenges the qualifications of the personal representative, venue or jurisdiction of the court; and (3) any written defenses to the Petition for Administration. You must file the original of your claim, objection or defense with the Clerk of the Court at the above address either before or immediately after service on the personal representatives attorney whose name and address are at the end of this notice. ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. FAILURE TO SERVE AND FILE TIMELY WRITTEN DEFENSES AS REQUIRED MAY RESULT IN A JUDG5151-0322 Mcelveen, Victoria K, Case # 12-17CP Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 12-17 CP. IN RE : ESTATE OF VICTORIA KATHLEEN MCELVEEN Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Victoria Kathleen McElveen, deceased, File 12-17 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is March 15, 2012. Personal Representative: Daniel E. Wiggins 227 15th Street NW Ruskin, FL 33570 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq. Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A 3042 Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850)926-8245 Published two (2) times in The Wakulla News Mar ch 15 & 22, 2012 Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351 RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Island 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg.14 Windy Court 3BR/2BA Available 4/1/12 $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 47 Jasmine 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre $1,200 Mo. Available April 1. No Smoking/Small Pets w/approval 20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 917 Jessica 3BR/2BA Woodville/Leon County $800 Mo. Pets ok w/approvalAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate

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By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 11 Going into the once-adecade redistricting session, while starting it with a budget de cit, the conventional wisdom was that not much else would get done this year. With the need to cut spending and the difficulty of redrawing political boundaries always a tough balancing act fraught with more challenge this year because of two new constitutional amendments that said it had to be done without taking party politics into account the opening of the year came with the promise of acrimony, in- ghting, and some painful lessons about who everyones friends were. All that turned out to be true but not quite in the way most observers expected. In the end, as predicted, lawmakers didnt do a whole lot this session that will resonate through the ages. There will be a new polytechnic university, and sooner than originally thought, which is a pretty big change. And there was a continuation of a move away from harsher penalties for drug crimes and toward more treatment, but that has been subtle, and part of a running continuum of shifting thought. Similarly, Republican lawmakers once again managed to nd a way to cut taxes, but again, part of a longrunning effort that changes only incrementally the business climate and tax picture in the state after all the GOP has been in charge here and cutting taxes fairly steadily for more than a decade. To be sure, hundreds of bills passed and many of them will do very important things. Some were a huge deal to particular constituencies. Those who have bemoaned quiet prayer in public schools as inadequate, saying that more official prayer should be allowed, got a big victory from an inspirational message bill now awaiting the governors signature. And insurance companies, which have wanted to reduce payouts in the personal injury protection no-fault auto insurance system, were successful in nally seeing a revamp of that fraud-riddled system pass. For Gov. Rick Scott it was a good session too though he had a modest agenda. He saw lawmakers put back some of the money they cut from the education budget, which he had demanded they do. And he got the PIP reform he wanted, having made saving money on car insurance his major talking point. He also saw lawmakers OK the tax cut package he wanted passed for small businesses. But mostly, it was a session of declining to do big things. The biggest talk of the session early on was about the prospect for new casino gambling, something that could have brought enormous and long-lasting change in the very character of the state. But in the end, what happens in Las Vegas, stayed in Las Vegas, (and a lot of other places these days) with lawmakers failing to pass any kind of major change in the gaming laws to let people take more chances on the turn of a wheel. Lawmakers also rejected a Senate leadership effort to privatize a large number of prisons, with the Senate narrowly voting against the idea after a cobbled-together coalition of Republicans with different objections joined Democrats in saying it was a bad idea. On several occasions this session, many times on particularly closely-watched issues, the leaders in the Senate couldnt get their agenda passed. That wasnt how they saw it. Senate President Mike Haridopolos said on a number of occasions, that he was all about free will, and that whatever the Senate did was the way it was going to be and that was ne with him. Theres one thing that is abundantly clear, Haridopolos said last week about one vote in particular, but really summing up the whole session in the Senate. I didnt twist arms. In addition to losing on prison privatization, Senate leaders also couldnt pass a bill to make it easier for parents to change failing public schools into charter schools. There were others losses for leadership, as well including on amendments, such as failing to prevent the Senate and House from watering down a bill dealing with shrinking Citizens Property Insurance. It certainly wasnt all losses for Haridopolos and other Senate leaders. Haridopolos wanted to see passage of two high pro- le claims bills to compensate victims of government negligence or malfeasance which are always an uphill battle in a Legislature that doesnt like the tort system to begin with. Those were among the few things he actually openly acknowledged were a top priority. They both passed, one paying back a man who spent nearly three decades in prison until being cleared of murder, the other compensating a man with lifelong injuries from being slammed into by a speeding deputy sheriff. Those two compensation bills complicated the end of Haridopolos rst session, but he got them passed this year. Two lives may be changed for the better by the cash, a long-lasting effect of Haridopolos persistence. Haridopolos also argued that the public may have misread what was really important to Senate leaders. After the session ended, he said the three things he wanted to pass, aside from the two claims bills, were the governors three big priorities: the increased K-12 education spending, the PIP auto insurance reform and the tax cut and economic development package. Adding those three to the claims bills, he was ve-for- ve. Meanwhile, on the other side of the Capitol, House Speaker Dean Cannon, was quietly ef cient this year. Unlike in his first year, when Cannon took on the judiciary in a big way and failed to overhaul the Supreme Court this session he wasnt openly pushing for any major pieces of legislation. In a backward scenario, the House this year was strangely dull, while the Senate insisted on nding new ways to muck up the calendar and fight with itself. The House passed measures coming from the Senate, what few measures it received, with little of the in ghting on display in the upper chamber. The House was where the gambling measure died in committee, with conservatives in that chamber uninterested in expanding gaming in the state. But unlike in the Senate, where issues supported by leadership got killed a number of times this year, in the House, the death of the gaming bill was a win of sorts for Cannon. Cannon, R-Winter Park, said he wasnt going to work against that measure, but he was open about not supporting it. Whether he had a hand in killing it by referring it to a committee it couldnt pass is open to question, but either way, in the end, Cannons side prevailed. The House also managed to draw a redistricting plan that the Supreme Court said was OK, unlike the Senate, which drew a Senate map that the court found rife with problems. Lawmakers will return next week to try their hand again at redrawing the Senate map. The budget, while controversial, as always when cuts are made, was also far more so at the Senate end of the Capitol. Senate Budget Chairman JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, made it so when he pushed a plan for cutting university spending that happened to hit hard in particular at the University of South Florida. While he argued there was no connection, it coincided with Alexanders open ght with USF over the splitting off of the universitys Lakeland campus into the new Florida Polytechnic. That drama over the higher ed budget dominated discussion of the overall spending plan to the point where hardly anyone noticed the debate over state spending in the House. Critics of the budget on both sides of the Capitol this year complained about local projects, which returned to the spending plan in large numbers after years of austerity. But that debate got little attention, overshadowed as it was by the higher ed ght, even though the abundance of local pork-barrel spending also cost Republican votes for the budget in the Senate. Budget writers on both sides of the Capitol will claim victory this year, because they managed to keep true to the central guiding philosophy of the Republican Party above everything else, dont raise taxes. And they didnt. Thats an accomplishment that hasnt always been easy when the state is required to have a balanced budget. So on that count, Haridopolos and Cannon, and their respective budget chairmen were successful. So you have a couple defeats, Haridopolos said Saturday after ending the session. Im (a person who is) going to push t he envelope and Im going to really try to win the debate, and I think even in the couple of setbacks we had, I felt we won the debate. But you dont want to leave anything on the eld, and I didnt leave anything on the eld. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 Page 7B Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration MENT OR ORDER FOR THE RELIEF DEMANDED, WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE TO YOU. The date of first publication of this Notice is March 15, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Charlotte D. Weitzel 140 Dorothy Loop Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative Aaron N. Bauldee, P.A. 4755 Knollwood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Phone: 850-559-1191, Florida Bar No. 0020513 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla County Times March 15 & 22nd, 2012 5153-0322 Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON MARCH 31, 2012 at 10:00a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: MICHAEL SIMMONS MARY LOUIS E SLOAN STEPHEN BOND BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF MARCH 31,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. March 15 and 22nd 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5146-0315 (3/24/12 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 24,2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: MARANDA COX JENNIFER WHITING HILL SARAH E. SKIPPER Before the sale date of Saturday, March 24, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. March 8 & 15, 2012 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 38 43 45 52 62 66 69 2 39 63 3 40 57 4 35 58 21 29 46 53 5 15 18 30 47 6 31 44 54 64 67 70 7 32 48 59 8 24 36 60 22 33 41 61 9 16 19 42 55 10 34 37 56 65 68 71 11 25 49 12 26 50 13 27 51ACROSS1.Daddy-o 5.Geishas'sashes 9.__-HawleyTariff Actof1930 14."Ismell__!" 15.Prefixwithcabor cure 16.Barbera'spartner inanimation 17.Sorvinoof "SummerofSam" 18.Friedman'ssubj. 19.Rejoinderto "Ain't!" 20.Diceydoingsat Canaveral? 23.Healingplants 24.Resultofa QB's mistake 25.Ambulanceorg. 28. OneofaHill100: Abbr. 29.Hollidaypartner 33.Brightlycolored seashell 35.PartsofTV broadcasts 37.Sendpacking 38.Alternative toa beerbelly? 43. Gobananas 44.Rudolph'smaster, forsh ort 45. Getevenfor 48.Cigarbutt? 49.Equi-kin 52."Alice"dinerowner 53.Victimofdeflation? 55.Kosher,so to speak 57.Commentatthe meatpacking plant? 62.YankeegreatLefty 64."__Nagila" 65.Lieinthesun 66.Roomydress 67.Ambleror Bogosian 68.Pastrychef,at times 69.Paveover 70.Cubiclefixture 71.PoeticdusksDOWN1.Wheregauchos roam 2.Birdonabaseball cap 3."CoatofMany Colors"singer Dolly 4.Likeuncirculated air 5.Cartelsince1960 6.GuitarwizardJeff 7.Pedestaltopper 8.Ten Command ments mount 9.Religionwithno formaldogma 10.Neitherfem.nor neut. 11.Likeafugitive 12.Lennon'slady 13.Confucianpath 21.Finishoff 22.Dad'sbro 26.Junkdrawerabbr. 27.Clockmaker Thomas 30.Toothpastetube abbr. 31.Fixes,asafight 32.__Vecchio(Arno crosser) 34."TheCaineMutiny" author 35.Sundayclosing 36.FedExedorfaxed 38.Pullanall-nighter 39.Beafflictedwith 40.LittleLeague membership restriction 41. Indyservicearea 42.Amtrak'sbullet train 46.Oldcoot 47.HumptyDumpty, e.g. 49.Pianist/politician P aderewski 50.Disgust 51.Catchallcategory 54.Marveledaloud 56.JazzpianistBlake 58.__cava 59.Produce-scale deduction 60."Wetryharder" company 61.Copewith,slangily 62.Needle-nosedfish 63.BajacheerAmerican Prole Hometown Content 2/12/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 2 32456 789 28 14 7398 9872 856 49623 79 00 9 HtCtt 614 8327 5 9 329475186 578691234 283 167945 745329618 196548372 931 284567 457916823 862753491 P A M P A S C R A M G A R O R I O L E H A V E O L E P A R T O N A G E L I M I T S T A L E A M E N V E N A U S E U P G E E Z E R O P E C A D A E G G B E C K R I G S O O H E D I D O L P O N T E T A R E S I N A I S E N T A V I S U N C P I T H A C K S H I N T O A C E L A M A S C W O U K E U B I E O N T H E R U N I G N A C E O N O M I S C S I C K E N T A O S E T H O T H E R S Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.comWEEKLY ROUNDUPConventional wisdom right, even in unconventional session

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 15, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChambers annual Low Country Boil PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENMore photos online at thewakullanews.com