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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00399
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 03-08-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00399
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Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Green Scene ....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B INDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 10th Issue Thursday, March 8, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read DailyThe Wakullanews OBITUARY Tinsley W. Floyd Crawfordville’s Becky Arbogast plays for Tallahassee Jewels, a women’s tackle football team SPORTS, 9A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA community meeting that was held in February by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth was intended to uncover the assets, needs and the shortfalls of the county regarding social services and “ nd ways to bridge the gap. At the meeting, it was determined that one of the major problems in Wakulla County is food insecurity and addressing that need seems to have fallen to churches. Currently, there are eight churches in the county that operate food pantries. It became clear at the meeting how much help the churches need and how it is everyones responsibility to help them, said WCCY Executive Director Gail Campbell. Campbell said the pantries are trying to provide food to even more people with even less resources. According to Feeding America, the nations leading domestic hunger-relief charity, there are 4,370 people in Wakulla County who live with food insecurity. This equates to 14.4 percent of Wakulla County residents. They dont know where their next meal is coming from,Ž Campbell said. To provide enough food for these families, it would cost around $1.7 million a year, according to Feeding America. Campbell added that pantries were also looking for leadership to help form best practices and gather resources. Since the meeting, the coalition has applied for a Hunger Grant on behalf of the food pantries. If awarded, the money would be used to buy food only and would not pay for any administrative costs. The money would only go to existing food pantries, which would form an alliance to better serve Wakulla County. Campbell said hopefully it can bring all the churches together and open those lines of communication and get all food pantries in a better place. The coalition will assist with the management of the grant. The awarding of the grant will not be announced until October. There was also discussion about a community database for food pantries to keep track of customers to ensure there isnt any overlap between pantries. A software program is being sent to the coalition by Brunie Emmanuel, the project manager for the Fund for Gulf Communities, which is an initiative under Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida that is working in seven other counties affected by the BP oil spill. Emmanuel attended the community meeting to assist Wakulla County in meeting basic human needs and offer solutions. Wakulla County was left out of the Fund for Gulf Communities and Emmanuel said he was unaware the county had been affected. He agreed to help Wakulla County and see if there is any way for it to receive funding in the future. At the community meeting, it was also determined that there was a need for a shelter for women and children, as well as rental assistance and adequate housing for low income families. There was also a decision to coordinate expansion as need dictates to include volunteer “ re departments and possibly use the community center as a distribution site for food. Campbell said the coalition is continuing to look for pathways and resources to “ ll the gaps. Campbell recently met with Emmanuel again to see if any opportunities for grant funding exist for Wakulla County. The grant will be discussed at the next coalition meeting, as well as other things that are being done. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFuture plans for the Wakulla County Community Center are moving forward and the creation of an advisory group that would help with those plans is in the works. Currently, the county is discussing renovations plans for the center, as well as entering into an agreement with Capital Area YMCA to manage the facility and establishing a permanent advisory group for the community center. A small, temporary advisory group was established to review the renovation plans, help with the memorandum of understanding with the YMCA and offer suggestions for developing the permanent advisory group. The temporary group discussed the need for the permanent group to be diverse and have business experience, as well as grant writing and fundraising experience. These people, as well as the county commission, will answer to the community, said Gail Campbell, a member of the temporary advisory group. She said the people who serve on this community center advisory group will determine if the center succeeds or fails. It has such potential,Ž Campbell said of the center. The permanent group would plan activities, programs and services; seek grant funding; obtain community input and involvement; and assist in developing long term plans for the center. The temporary group recommended the group consist of one member selected by the Wakulla County School Board; one member selected by the Chamber of Commerce that has a business or marketing background; one member who has experience in fundraising and resource development; one member from the Senior Citizens Center; By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCircuit Judge Jackie Fulford released her long-awaited order on the legality of a measure passed by the 2011 state legislature requiring all state employees to contribute 3 percent to their retirement. In an 11-page ruling issued on Tuesday, March 6, Judge Fulford ruled against the state, “ nding the measure unconstitutional and ordered the state to immediately stop the withholding and reimburse with interest the amount that had been taken out. The ruling only applies to public employees who were members of the Florida Public Retirement System as of June 30, 2011. Obviously sensitive to charges of judicial activismŽ by Republican lawmakers even before the ruling was released, Fulford stated in her order: At the outset let me state clearly, the role of the judiciary is to interpret the law before it; not make new law.Ž But, she added, This court cannot set aside its constitutional obligations because a budget crisis exists in the State of Florida. To do so would be in direct contravention of this courts oath to follow the law.Ž Fulford noted that the state pension plan was created by the Legislature in 1974 that required no contribution from employees and which provided for a cost of living adjustment. The Legislature declared the rights to the members of the pension plan were contractural. Fulford points to a 1981 Florida Supreme Court case that said the Legislature was not precluded from altering bene“ ts which accrue for future state service,Ž but the judge noted that the ruling did not give the Legislature the power to completely gut and create a new form of pension plan.Ž Fulford found that the 2011 Legislature, faced with a budget shortfall, turned to state employees and ignored the contractual rights given to them by the 1974 Legislature. Fulford ruled that the imposition of a mandatory state employee contribution was unconstitutional for members of FRS prior to July 1, 2011. The ruling is almost certain to be appealed.Heritage Village deal acceptedJudge rules against state in pension lawsuit The county allows Ben Boynton larger lots in his Bloxham Plantation development, and he donates 40 acres for a Heritage Village ParkYouth coalition applies for a Hung er Grant for Wakulla Plans for community center take shape According to Feeding America there are 4,370 people in Wakulla County … or 14.4 percent of residents … who live with food insecurity, meaning they dont know where their next meal is coming from. PREBLE-RISHPlans for community center show an open gym behind the two existing buildings. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn December, the Wakulla County Commission agreed to send revisions to a land use plan to the state for review to help the Wakulla County Historical Society create a place for the old, historic homes and buildings it has acquired. This place will be called the Heritage Village Park and will consist of 40 acres off Zion Church Hill Road. The Heritage Village would be a community of about 10 historic homes that have been donated by Wakulla County families, as well as the old Smith Creek school house and the old lunch room from Crawfordville. The homes were built in the late 1800s and the society wants to move and repair them before they are destroyed or too far gone to be saved. Its a way to preserve our heritage,Ž said Richard Harden, vice president of the historical society. One of the homes, the Ross and Amy Linzy home, was on the property where Wal-mart is located. They acquired that home and had to move it so it wouldnt be destroyed. Another home, the John Archie McLaughlin home, had to be moved because a developer told the society that they had two weeks to move it or it would be destroyed. The society has been looking for property to move the homes to, and until last year, had been unsuccessful. After hearing a presentation by members of the historical society at a county commission meeting, developer Ben Boynton approached them about possibly donating a portion of his property that will be the future home of Bloxham Plantation. Boynton was looking to create larger lots in the subdivision and wanted approval to go from one unit per acre, to one unit per 2 acres. This would reduce the number of units from 133 to 75. Continued on Page 12AFILE PHOTOThe Ross-Linzy House was dismantled in 2008 and is to be reassembled at the Heritage Village Park, which would include historic houses from Wakulla County.Plans include constructing a multi-use gym behind the current buildings. e gym floor would be a concrete slabContinued on Page 12ATHIS YEAR’S SPECIAL OLYMPICS See Page 14A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netCelebration of the Arts was held on March 1 and featured performances from students of all ages. Several hundred people attended the event which was started by the Wakulla Arts Coalition 11 years ago. The person behind the coalition is Diane Perez, the arts coordinator. Perez, who is retiring this year, was honored at the event. Susan Solburg, the treasurer of the coalition, said the coalition was created to provide scholarships in the arts to Wakulla County students. She thanked Perez for having the vision to start the coalition and bringing all those involved in the arts together to form the coalition. Masters of Ceremonies, Ronnie Allen and Danielle Brown-Nelson introduced the acts and kept the crowd entertained during breaks. Those in attendance heard performances by the Wakulla County Elementary Honor Choir, Coast Charter School Stingray Music Ensemble, Wakulla Middle School Drama Group, Wakulla Middle School Jazz Band, Riversprings Middle School Jazz Band, Riversprings Middle School Drama, Wakulla High School Advanced Drama Class, Wakulla High School Concert Band and Wakulla High School Wind Ensemble. Prior to the show, a silent auction was held with artwork by Wakulla County art students.Wakulla’s Celebration of the Arts The Wakulla Middle School jazz band. Wakulla Middle School drama students perform. Riversprings Middle School jazz band performing with a trombone solo. Student artworks being auctioned off before the show. Wakulla County Elementary Honor Choir sings.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN More photos online at thewakullanews.com At right, students from COAST Charter School Stingray Music Ensemble perform for the audience. Drama teacher Susan Solburg, at the microphone, speaks of art teacher Diane Perez, holding the ” owers, who founded the Celebration of the Arts 11 years ago. Perez is retiring at the end of the school year. 2012 Swine Show SponsorsGrand Champion Sponsor ...Vause Mechanical Reserve Champion Sponsor ....................Atkins Showmanship Sponsor............. Centennial Bank Class Winners Sponsor............................ Publix Spirit Award Sponsor ...............Talquin Electric“The Wakulla County Youth Fair Association would like to thank all of our sponsors of the 2012 Swine Show. Without your support our show would not be possible.”F R M Feeds Hicks Heating and Air LLC North Florida Spray Foam, Inc. Allens Excavation, Inc. Charlie Creel for Sheriff Langston for Sheriff Preble-Rish, Inc. Pitmans Custom Construction Capital City Bank Ace Home Center Wharf Express Pepsi Gold Show SponsorsJimmy Johns Buddys Garage, Inc. Welch Land Development ESG … Public Works Gulf Coast Lumber Stone Creek Pizza Silver Show SponsorsSusan Jones, Blue Water Realty Group C 4 Soccer Wakulla Dance Academy Mar-Lu Properties, Inc. Mike Stewart County Commissioner Sunshine State Builders LLC Menagerie Sopchoppy Grocery Ashley Feed Premier Motorcars The Barber Shoppe Studio 88 Dance Productions County Commissioner Randy Merritt White Elephant and Friends Alan Brock, Wakulla County Commissioner Macks Meats Bradleys Country Store Drycleaners Express Lube Expert Bronze Show Sponsors the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Dr. Mark McCoyFebruary 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromYou dont “nd this type of thing in larger cities. is is a great advertising! More people need to advetise like this.Ž…Dr. Mark McCoy OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter agreeing to move forward with developing the language for placing a half-cent tax referendum on the November ballot for the proposed Wakulla 2020 initiative, the Wakulla County Commissions next step was establishing and appointing members to serve on the Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee. After much discussion at its March 5 meeting, the commission decided to table the item and bring it back at its next meeting. The proposed committee consisted of Pat Jones, Wakulla County School Board; Jared Miller, sheriffs of“ ce; a member selected by the Chamber; Kevin Vaughn, Wakulla County Economic Development Council; Jackie Lawhon selected by the City of Sopchoppy; Zoe Mans“ eld selected by the City of St. Marks; Tim Jordan, Wakulla Tourist Development Council; a member selected by the county commission; and a member who resides in the Crawfordville Town Plan, selected by the commission. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he would like to see a member who owns a business or lives in the Crawfordville Town Plan on the committee. Commissioner Mike Stewart felt the proposed committee was not big enough or diverse enough. He suggested the committee include representative from the outlying areas. If were going to ask the people to vote for it, it needs to be right,Ž Stewart said. The commission agreed that it should include Wakulla Station, Medart, Panacea, Spring Creek and Shell Point. Panacea resident and owner of Panacea Discount Liquors, Paige Killeen, said she would also like to see Panacea added. Panacea seems to be the red-headed stepchild,Ž Killeen said. The commission agreed that they would ask Panacea Waterfronts Florida Committee for a recommendation for the Panacea representative. The other representatives would be sought out and the commission would take applications. They also decided to add a representative from the Senior Center. This brought the committee up to 13 members. The commission agreed to move as quickly as possible in getting names for the committee and then approve it. If approved, the committee would review and prioritize proposed projects for the Wakulla 2020 initiative and the Our Town plan and make recommendations to the commission. During the meeting, several commissioners expressed concern that the scope of the initiative was not broad enough. Commissioner Lynn Artz said there should be a broader vision that looks to the future and includes projects dealing with mass transit and bike lanes. Stewart agreed that the focus does not need to solely be on improving Highway 319. Kevin Vaughn, chair of the EDC, said the scope has been expanded to include a number of transportation projects all over the county, including improving Woodville Highway. We do understand that we need public buy-in,Ž Vaughn said. Moore said, Youve got to involve all the people.Ž Vaughn said the first project they would focus on is improving the “ ve main intersections on Highway 319. The idea of Wakulla 2020 came from Blueprint 2000, an initiative in Tallahassee. A citizen group got together to “ nd a way to implement the Crawfordville Town Plan, or Our Town Plan, which focused mainly on Highway 319. It was then determined to expand it to the entire county. To fund the initiative, the voters of Wakulla County would need to approve a half-cent sales tax. John Shuff, past president of the Chamber, said they have estimated that the half-cent sales tax would bring in $1.7 million over the next 15 years and with a bonding stream and debt service estimate, their total estimate is $14 million. The committee would also be charged with seeking grant funding as well.COUNTY COMMISSIONMakeup of Wakulla 2020 committee is discussedCommissioners debate who should be on the committee and name 13 to serve, and ultimately table the matter until the next meeting Panacea seems to be the red-headed stepchild, says one of the communitys residents, complaining that it was left without representation on the 2020 committeeBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 3 … Legislation that would give parents more ability to determine how to make over a failing school was rammed through a Senate committee on Saturday, a likely preview of a contentious ” oor “ ght over charter schools, unions and parental support. By a 13-7 vote, the Senate Budget Committee on Saturday approved SB 1718, the so called parent triggerŽ bill. The most controversial element would allow parents of a failing school to dictate recovery strategies, including the use of forpro“ t charters, if a majority of them sign petitions to do so. Backers say the measure is a response to a recalcitrant school system that is slow to change and deaf to the needs of communities. The bill is being championed by former Gov. Jeb Bush and Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island. What is to be afraid of having parents involved in their childrens education?,Ž asked Senate sponsor Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto, R-Fort Myers. Why? Why do we “ ght so hard against parents standing up to say I would like you to consider this?Ž Critics say the measure represents yet another nail driven at public education and the teacher unions by backers of for-pro“ t charter school companies that lack the same accountability standards of traditional public schools. I have four children who graduated from public schools. They all have masters degrees,Ž said Sen. Gwen Margolis, D-Miami. I dont know what problem you have.Ž The proposal ramps up accountability standards on a number of fronts, but the most controversial measure, by far, deals with failing schools. The provision says once a school earns an F,Ž if improvement doesnt happen within a year, parents could dictate what will happen, if 51 percent of them agree. They still would be limited to certain options laid out in federal law, and the plan would be subject to Department of Education approval. Among their options, parents could force the school district to transfer students to other schools; close the school and reopen it as a charter school with a new governing board running it; or contract with an outside management group to run it … essentially privatize it. Evident Saturday was that the measure is a top priority of Haridopolos and other Senate leaders. Not normally a member of the committee, Senate Majority Leader and incoming Senate President Andy Gardiner, ROrlando, took a high pro“ le role Saturday, as did prospective future presidents Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, and Sen. John Thrasher, RSt. Augustine. Forced to vote on the bill before the meeting adjourned at 10 a.m., some committee members said the haste by which such a controversial measure was being considered was inappropriate and unnecessary. We are playing around with the lives of children in our schools,Ž said Sen. Evelyn Lynn, R-Ormond Beach. And its time to stop.Ž The idea for the parent trigger comes from California, where two years ago that states legislature passed a similar bill giving parents in failing schools a majority vote on whether to turn it into a charter school. When you have parents involved in their childs education, it inures to the success of the child,Ž said Mike Trujillo, a representative of Parent Revolution, which spearheaded California efforts. What this is, is a vehicle by which parents can be involved in their local school community.Ž Union representatives say its too early to tell if the California effort has made any long-term gain. What is apparent is that it has been controversial and litigious, pitting families against each other. There has been so much animosity that it does more damage in the long run than the improvement they thought they were trying to create,Ž said Jeff Wright, public advocacy director for the Florida Education Association. Improvement in a failing school requires the cooperation of parents, the local business community and local government to put forth a matrix of surrounding services from after-school programs to nutritional support and mentoring. Wright said. The bill, as it stands, does none of that. The bill now travels to the Senate ” oor. The House bill, HB 1191, passed earlier on an 80-34 vote.STATE LEGISLATURE Schoolyard “ ght: What can parents do about failing schools? NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing Before the Planning Commission on April 9, 2012 at 7:00p.m. and the Board of County Commissioners on April 16, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any nonEnglish speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.MARCH 8, 2012 The School Board of Wakulla County, FloridaNotice of Advertisement of a Public Hearing on proposed School Board Member voting districts DATE: March 12, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m PLACE: Wakulla County School Board Room 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 32327MARCH 8, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on March 14, 2012, at 5:30pm MARCH 8, 2012

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The Chamber held a ribbon cutting for new member Critter Control on Friday, Feb. 24. Critter Control is ranked No. 1 in wildlife control and No. 18 in pest control in the nation. The Certified Wildlife Specialists and IPM trained technicians focus on ecologically sound pest control and humane animal control solutions for homeowners, property managers, businesses and government. Critter Control also offers a wide range of other services such as home friendly Wash Safe roof, siding and deck cleaning, as well as full attic restoration featuring T.A.P. pest proof insulation. We also offer WDO inspections for real estate agents. The owners of the local franchise are Brandon and Dustin Lynch. Brandon is a Certi“ ed Operator in General Household Pest and Termite Control with the state of Florida. Dustin is a Certi“ ed Wildlife Specialist. They both live in Wakulla County. Call 1-800CRITTER (800-274-8837) or locally at (850) 745-4111.Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Judge will allow net lawsuit to move forward • Underwater Wakulla for March 1 • Michael ‘Mike’ David Carter obituary •Gerald Lee Clevenger obituary • Board may revise septic tank policy € WakullaStory: A Hankerin’ for a Headhuntin’ • Margaret R. Sheotes obituary • Sheriff’s Report for Feb. 23€ thewakullanews. com Follow us onVictim of Domestic or Sexual Violence? Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111Editor, The News: Springtime for Wakulla. On a random guess, readers must imagine immediately that this letter is about the blooms, the birds, the return of bugs and pollen. But you would be wrong. This is a letter about all of the hundreds of volunteers who bring good times to our community. In the spring it is the parades. In the spring we look forward to outdoor activities. We celebrate those during Wild About Wakulla week at the beginning of April. In the spring we also look back. We take a walk into history on the occasion of the founding of Wakulla County in March 1843. We celebrate that with the Founders Day play at the auditorium in Sopchoppy this week. All of this volunteering is for nought if it were not for the incredible free contributions … a kind of volunteering, dont you agree … of The Wakulla News. Generous sponsored advertising, special sections and community involvement make our local newspaper worthy of special recognition. Spring is as good a time as any to say thank you. Madeleine Carr Crawfordville Editor, The News: Let me win, but if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt, the Special Olympic Athlete Oath, was personi“ ed in the County Games held on Friday, March 2, at Wakulla High School. A huge thanks to all of the athletes, as well as their teachers and parents for the effort, sportsmanship and support that enabled this event to focus on the abilities of this special group of students. This years games were staged under the leadership of Sharon Scherbarth and Patricia Bodiford with the support of the Special Olympic Management Team of Ashley Anderson, Sheila Stephens, Joanna Hernandez, Denise Ray, Louis Hernandez and Farrah Donaldson. The management group has worked tirelessly throughout the year to achieve coaches certifications, generate funding, solicit support and most of all encourage the athletes. Many thanks for their efforts. In addition, appreciation is extended to Principal Mike Crouch and the Wakulla High School family for the peer coaches, drum band, cheerleaders, and student /faculty participation as spectators. Finally, it is with deep gratitude that I recognize the following sponsors for their contributions of time, money, food, shoes for athletes, ribbons, tents and other support: Lindys, Winn Dixie, J.D. Johnson, Colleen Skipper, Lynn Artz, Randy Merritt, Lube Express, Bevis/Harvey Young Funeral Home, Wakulla United Methodist Church and Women, Jennifer Young, Terri Hillier, Pepsi, Susan Payne Turner, Kenny Ts, Crawfordville United Methodist Circuit Riders Sunday School Class, Wakulla Mens Club, Pat Jones and Angel Lewis, Tracy Dempsey, Alpha Delta Kappa (Epsilon Chapter), United Way, Crawfordville Rotary Club, teachers and staff at Wakulla Pre-K, Ladies Auxiliary of the Shriners, George and Gloria Dock, Kast Net Restaurant, Dr. Ed Gardner and Judy Hampton, David and Deana Scherbarth, Edgar Metcalf, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, Boy Scouts of America and Sonic. You all make a difference in the lives of our Special Olympic Athletes and encourage them to be winners in their endeavors each day. Sincerely, Tanya EnglishExceptional Student Education and Student ServicesWakulla County School BoardREADERS WRITE:Springtime is a good time to say thanks Support of Special Olympics is appreciatedEditor, The News: Ive never understood Commissioner Atrzs position on most things shes involved with. It seems shes usually opposed to things that are good for, or desired by, her constituents. When the resolution to the FWC regarding the local Grouper seasons was proposed she was the only commissioner who opposed it. When asked why she said, I dont think this can happen and we are misleading people and pandering to the local “ shermen when we know its not going to work.Ž Pandering to the local “ shermen (constituents) is what you were elected to do. Pander: One who ministers to the passions or base desires of others.Ž Then she made the statement that explains everything about her: Im not going to propose something that makes us look stupid and makes us look like we dont have a clue whats going on.Ž In other words shes not going to let anything or anyone taint her self-perceived image that shes smarter than everyone else. Now I get it! Well, Ms. Artz, I wont even address the word stupidŽ in your statement but I can assure you, you dont have a clue whats going on.Ž F.J.Young CrawfordvilleReader says Artz doesnt have a clueBy JO ANN PALMER March will begin a new chapter with Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. Its been my hope that we can expand the understanding of what we mean to Keep Wakulla County Beautiful by getting people involved who have the desire to see us grow as a green community. To help us educate both our children and adults, and get involved with worthwhile projects such as the courthouse block landscape project, clean sweep litter control events and several other upcoming worthwhile projects. Last Monday, we held our first Green DrinksŽ social at the Wildwood Golf Course, where Wendy and her staff prepared a great spread of food, and served what will become our signature drink, the KWCB Green Punch.Ž We had a group of 22 in attendance including commissioners Alan Brock and Jerry Moore, Chamber President Amy Geiger and her husband Sam, Tonya Hobby, the director of the county health departments Tobacco Prevention Program, Margie Callaghan, Riversink fourth grade teacher, and other citizens who came to hear what we are all about. We are looking for citizens interested in getting involved to work on our committees. We are not asking for money, just some of your time. The board members who have served for years, talked about the history of the organization and how the economy has changed peoples behavior. They discussed how many more citizens used to be involved but because of natural attrition, we now need new talents. Last month we adopted updates to our bylaws which included the development of committees. This is where we hope to get people interested again, by giving you an opportunity to decide what your talents are and get involved in that area. We have lots of great ideas and a tremendous need. This is an open invitation for anyone interested in our organization to once again come out and see what we are about. We invite you to our March 8 monthly meeting at the 19th Hole at Wildwood Country Club. Committees meet at 6 p.m., and the board meets at 7 p.m. Our committees are Education, Sponsorship/ Friendship, Community Action and Marketing/Communications. If you see something that interests you, please come out this Thursday, or call me for more information at 745-7111 or email me helpkwcb@gmail.com. Jo Ann Palmer is executive director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful.Editor, The News: On Monday night, March 5, the Wakulla County Commission did a remarkable thing: They unanimously passed a PUD and Comp Plan change for local developer, Ben Boynton. But more importantly, this approval provided for a gift conveyance of approximately 40 acres of land to the Wakulla County Historical Society for development of the Heritage Village Park. This park will allow the Society to move, restore and exhibit a number of old houses that have been donated by Wakulla County families. In addition, the park will enable the historical society to develop a site plan that provides educational programs, interactive exhibits, interpretive paths and a place for re” ection on the history of an earlier time in Wakulla County. This is a great example of a private-public partnership that demonstrates government and the private sector can reach compromise that bene“ ts all. It places a great deal of land in a natural state suitable for passive activities we envision, and also allows a planned development to go forward. Both can help the economy, protect natural resources and preserve our countys heritage. The Wakulla County Historical Society wants to thank Ben Boynton, the county commissioners and all who were involved. We look forward to development of the park. Murray McLaughlin ChairmanHeritage Village CommitteeWakulla County Historical SocietySociety is grateful for Heritage Village site Editor, The News: March is National Social Work Month which makes it an appropriate time for us to salute the valuable and important job that social workers provide all year long. When lifes challenges become overwhelming, many people turn to a social worker for help. Here at Big Bend Hospice, we have 15 social workers who serve as family support counselors, grief counselors and Caring Tree counselors. They work tirelessly with our patients and families to help them cope with the many emotional and practical issues that accompany a life limiting illness. These dedicated professionals assist with everything from coordinating community resources to helping families solve personal and “ nancial problems, to working through the emotional pain of dealing with an impending death. They recognize the family dynamics that are part of any life threatening disease and help patients reach out to conclude the important business of giving and receiving love and asking for and granting forgiveness. Often it is the social worker who will pause to recognize a special occasion in a patients life and make sure that a birthday is celebrated or a caregiver gets a night out. Our wonderful social workers are an important part of our patient care team and our Big Bend Hospice family. The theme for the 2012 National Social Work Month is Social Work Matters.Ž Time and again I have witnessed the powerful results of social workers, both in our organization, in hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities, in recognizing and meeting the needs of the people they serve. On behalf of Big Bend Hospice, we applaud social workers for their caring hearts and their important contributions to our community. Cathy Adkison, RN, BSN, CHPN President and CEO Big Bend Hospice Recognize social workers during March Critter ControlSPECIAL TO THE NEWSAn incorrect headline ran on the ribbon cutting article for a businees, Critter Control, in last weeks Taking Care of Business section. Here is the article as it should have appeared:CorrectionKeep Wakulla County Beautiful is looking for volunteers Interested in helping KWCB? e groups next meeting is ursday, March 8, at the 19th Hole at Wildwood Country Club at 6 p.m. Editor, The News: I live with type 1 diabetes. I would really love it if you will donate to my team and join me in the Junior Diabetes Research Foundations Walk to Cure Diabetes on April 14 at 10 a.m. at Tallahassee Community College. I was diagnosed at 19 months of age. Ive had my “ nger pricked over 15,000 times since my diagnosis. I wear an insulin pump 24 hrs a day except when I have a bath or swim. All the food and drinks I consume are calculated and the carb total is entered into my pump. I encourage YOU to sign up, donate and come to the JDRF Walk. I know that the Walk will be a great experience and I also know that YOU can make a difference. See you at the Walk! Sydney Andrews Crawfordville Pledge for Diabetes Walk on April 14

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Beginning t 8 a.m. on Monday, March 12, the speed limit on State Road 363 (Port Leon Drive) in St. Marks between Pine Street and Riverside Drive has been reduced. The posted speed limit will be 25 mph. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the new speed limit when traveling through the corridor. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow it on twitter @myfdot_nwfl. Motorists traveling State Road 369/U.S. 319 between Wakulla-Arran Road and just north of S.R. 267 (Pinewood Street) in Wakulla County can expect intermittent nighttime lane closures Sunday, March 4, through Friday, March 9, from 6:30 p.m. until 6 a.m. Crews will also work along the shoulders between Wakulla-Arran Road and the Leon County line during daytime hours, causing no lane closures. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow it on twitter @ myfdot_nwfl.… From state DOT www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 5A  Repeal of septic tank inspections passes the HouseOn Wednesday, Feb. 29, the Florida House passed a bill to repeal septic tank inspections. The bill was co-sponsored by Rep. Marti Coley, R-Marianna, and Rep. Chris Dorworth, R-Lake Mary. The bill repeals language passed during the 2010 legislative session that requires individuals and businesses to pay for costly inspections in order to comply with a statewide septic tank evaluation program. “In these tough economic times, we should not add financial hardships on Floridians,” Rep. Coley said. “This bill allows our local counties and municipalities to decide what is best for their citizens regarding septic tank inspections, and if what is best is a ‘no inspection’ policy, then there will be none. I’m committed to making sure that some commonsense is put back into our environmental regulations,” Coley added. The legislation must now be approved by the Florida Senate before becoming available for Gov. Rick Scott to sign into law. WHS Talent Show is Friday, March 9It’s that time of year when talented students perform at the annual Spring Talent Show at Wakulla High School auditorium on Friday, March 9. This year’s lineup promises to be one of the best yet, says director Susan Solburg. “We have two fabulous bands this year – Arrive Alive will be our opening act, actually beginning at 6:30 p.m., and Hammaknockers will be playing in the second part of the show.” Also featured are Out-of-this-World Dancers and also an amazing belly dance routine, a slam poet and a real cool rap group, guitar-playing vocalists, and pianoplaying vocalists, and of course beautiful solo vocalists. Admission is $4 for students, $6 for adults. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. A variety of refreshments will be sold during intermission by our WHS Dramatis Personae members. Proceeds will help pay the rising cost for this year’s State Thespian Trip.  CCOW will hear from David Edwards on local governmentConcerned Citizens of Wakulla will host a forum on the challenges facing local government with Wakulla County Administrator David Edwards on Thursday, March 15, at the public library beginning at 7 p.m. Wakulla County is facing many challenges in these dif cult economic times. County revenues are down, but demands on government services are ever present. Balancing priorities set forth by our Board of County Commissioners within present budget limitations is a daunting challenge. Administrator Edwards will discuss with where the county is and where it is going to meet the many challenges facing our county government. A pre-forum social will be held beginning at 6:30 p.m.  St. Patrick’s Festival set for Saturday, March 17The Lions Club’s annual St. Patrick’s Festival will be held next Saturday, March 17 in Hudson Park with a parade at 10 a.m. The days begins with Breakfast in the Park at 8 a.m., opening introductions at 9 a.m., opening prayer at 9:15 a.m. by John Braley, youth minister at Lake Ellen Baptist Church, the raising of the colors at 9:20, and the National Anthem, sung by John Braley, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. After the parade, the scheduled entertainment includes Taekwondo at 11 a.m., a performance by COAST Charter School at 11: 30 a.m., Aleene Benson, Irish and Scottish ddle players at noon, then Rick Tittle, John Smith and Ken “Muf n Man” at 12:40 and 1:40 p.m., and the Senior Wigglers line dancers at 1:15 p.m. A prize drawing will be held every 30 minutes starting at noon. The drawing for the $250 grand prize will be held at 2:30 p.m. Make A Difference Day is March 24VolunteerWAKULLA is holding its fth annual Make A Difference Day on Saturday, March 24, at Hudson Park. This year’s event will be different for previous years: a community picnic for the citizens of Wakulla County will be held, and many of the organizations in the County will be setting up booths to make people aware of services available, as well as opportunities to volunteer in the county. At this time, there are more than 25 organizations signed up. There will be a free lunch for all, entertainment and door prizes. – Staff Reports WILLIAM SNOWDENAnn Scott reads to Ginnie Browns kindergarten class at Riversink Elementary.Briefs Ann Scott pays a visit to schoolsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netFirst lady Ann Scott visited Riversink and Crawfordville elementary schools last week and read to classes as part of her effort to encourage literacy. Scott visited the schools on Thursday, March 1. In her visit to teacher Ginnie Browns kindergarten class at Riversink, Scott read the book GloriaŽ about a policeman and his dog. Scott talked to the students and answered questions before reading the book. The girls in the class complimented Scotts out“ t and shoes. After she read them the book, the class presented Scott with a bouquet of construction-paper ” owers they had made.Street newsSpeed limit changed on 363 in St. Marks Work continues on Crawfordville Road Big Bend High School Bowl starts Friday in TallahasseeSpecial to The NewsThe 2012 Tallahassee Democrat Big Bend High School Bowl, now celebrating its 35th year, opens with 190 students from around the Big Bend Region starting competition, Friday, March 9 at Tallahassee Community College. Wakulla High School will take a team along with 19 other schools, including Aucilla Christian Academy, Bainbridge High School, Brookwood School, Cottondale High School, Florida State University High School, Franklin County High School, Amos P. Godby High School, Graceville High School, Holmes County High School, John Paul II Catholic High School, Lawton Chiles High School, Leon High School, Lincoln High School, Maclay High School, North Florida Christian Academy High School, James S. Rickards High School, Robert F. Munroe High School, Sacred Heart Home School and Thomasville High School. Teams compete for two days, advancing for doubleelimination competition on Saturday, March 10. During the competition, teams answer questions as quickly as possible about current events, science, math, language arts, social studies and popular culture. On the “ rst day of the tournament, 34 teams from North Florida and South Georgia meet in roundrobin competition. Top winning teams advance to the doubleelimination semi-finals on March 10. The top two teams after the second day then advance to the “ nals at Aquilina Howell Instructional Services Center on Monday, March 12. Thirty-seven members of the community have volunteered their time to act as moderators of the academic challenges. Leon High School is this years high school host, providing student volunteers and refreshments to help out with the competition. The Democrat, the law “ rm Brooks LeBoeuf Bennett Foster and Gwartney and Envision Credit Union donate more than $5,000 in cash scholarships and gift certi“ cates as prizes. The “ rst-place team wins a $2,500 scholarship and the runner-up, $1,250. The high school bowl encourages academic excellence and promotes teamwork among students. dress store50%-60% OFF850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE) The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree All Ladies ApparelThe best Alterations, Furniture Upholstry & Re nishing MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012 Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. PREPAID MONTHLY PLANS Modern Communications nationwide pre-paid cellular pagep l us U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT $4000 PERMO.DATACHARGESMAYAPPLY FRONT PORCH CREATIONS FLORIST 850926-7192 850926-7192 House SPECIAL Eve ry FRIDAY MUG BO UQUE T www.FrontPorchCreationsFlowers.com $12 99 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta ANTIQUES CARRIE’SCOVEC ARRIE’SC OVE …NEW ARRIVALS…926-50133338 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. New Jewelry & Bed LinensMore Antiques on the Way

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By ETHEL SKIPPER Growth is a natural and expected part of life. From a physical perspective, growth requires little effort. However, from a spiritual perspective, growth toward maturity requires great effort. Bible study, prayer, meditation, introspection and re” ection are several tools by which we position ourselves for growth. The key to growth is to make intentional effort to prepare our hearts to receive the truth, and then to walk out that truth through obedience in our life. The Mills-Allen-Rosier-Simmons 2012 Family Reunion: It is about that time again when we come back home where we first started, where the original roots are. The spot will be in Tallahassee, Buckhorn Community in Florida. If you have not registered yet, its time to visit our website, marsreunion2012.com. Our community observed Black History Month in February, to commemorate the signi“ cant events and achievements of the African-American population in the United States. The tradition has been celebrated since 1976. It was Dr. Carter Woodson who started the Negro History Week … which grew into Black History Month … in order to focus peoples attention on the role and contribution of African-American history. Skipper Temple Church of Christ had their Black History Celebration on Saturday, Feb. 25, to fellowship and give thanks to the Lord. We have history all around us … some we can see as they make history, and feel their joy and hurt too, as they tell their story. U.S. Navy Willie F. Skipper Sr., an original Black History poem written by William Green, U.S. Army Meriddie Rosier Sr., elected of“ cial Anginita Rosier, Black History message Elder Rodney Smith. On Sunday, Feb. 26, a Black History presentation by Colleen Q. Skipper, mayor of Sopchoppy, and Black History from the youth on how it all began, with Felicia Green, Jamal Green, Lenard White, Gary Clary, Kellen Johnson and Mother Eva Johnson. St. Nora P.B. Church observed their Black History Celebration that Sunday as well. New Destiny Church of Christ had a celebration honoring their pastor, Dr. Elmira P. Davis, on Feb. 25 at Tallahassee Community Colleges Workforce Development Center. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituaryMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey... Buckhorn NewsSpiritual growth is a part of lifeTinsley W. Floyd, 70, passed away Saturday, Feb. 18, at Centre Pointe Health Care in Tallahassee. He graduated from E.C. Glass High School, Lynchburg, Va., in 1959. He went to college at East Tennessee State, was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity and graduated in 1964. He taught economics at Florida A&M University for nine years and Tallahassee Community College for 26 years. A loyal sports enthusiast, he was inducted into the Tallahassee Community College Athletic Hall of Fame in 2007. Memorial Services were held on Saturday, Feb. 25, at Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home, Timberlane Chapel in Tallahassee. There was a reception to follow immediately in the MeadowWood Room. In lieu of ” owers, memorial contributions may be made in Tinsley Floyds memory to the TCC Athletic Book Scholarship Fund, TCC Foundation, 444 Appleyard Dr., Tallahassee FL 32304. Survivors include his wife, Kay; “ ve sisters, Louise Sawyer, Mae Guthrie (A.T.), Katie Faulcone, Sammie Fowler (Larry) and Edna Fogle. Tinsley was a wonderful husband and outstanding teacher but most of all he was known as a great friend.Tinsley W. FloydWakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station has several upcoming events: Saturday, March 17, at noon will be the United Methodist Womens St. Pattys Day Luncheon and Fellowship. On March 28 at 6 p.m. the church will hold its Wednesday night dinner, sponsored by the United Methodist Women in the Alford Building at the church. Wakulla United Methodist Church is located at 1584 Old Woodville Road, For more information, call (850) 421-5741. Church briefsUpcoming events at Wakulla UMCBy the REV. JAMES L. SNYDER I “ nd it quite amusing that some of the brightest and richest people in our country do not seem to have a clue as to what they are doing. Most do not have the common sense that God gave to a caterpillar. As Abraham Lincoln used to say, common sense is not as common as it used to be. Amen, to that one. The “ nancial experts are telling us that we need to buy gold or silver to safeguard our investments. I am way ahead of the game. Several years ago, I got a gold tooth. Fortunately, for me, I got it before the “ nancial crisis in our country. I cannot tell you what a remarkable feeling it is to walk around with your fortune in your mouth. I hear about all of the investment schemes that are supposed to make me rich. I have a sneaking suspicion that the only people getting rich are those with the investment schemes. They want us to buy stocks and bonds and futures. I never heard of anything so silly in all my life. What would I do with stocks, bonds and futures, whatever in the world they are, in my portfolio. I have no idea what a portfolio is but I am certain it has something to do with these investment schemes. I just do not want anybody folioing around with my port, thank you very much, sir. If I got my facts right, and I looked it up in the dictionary, port has something to do with wine. Why would I want to put a bottle of port into my folio and pretend it is some kind of an investment? I really have to give it to these investment schemers. They really know how to pull the wool over our eyes. I want to go on record as saying that they are not pulling any wool over my eyes. Just leave my wool alone. If I want my wool pulled, it certainly will not be over my eyes, I will tell you that right here. This wool pulling sounds more like sheep ” eecing to me, and I want nothing to do with it. For me I have discovered a way of safeguarding my wealth. My basic “ nancial philosophy is simply spend less than I make. I know that is a revolutionary concept in todays world, but it has stood me in good stead for many a year. We live in a culture that does not know the relationship between saving money and spending money. For example. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage came home the other day and in a very exuberant tone told me how much she saved at the grocery store. I saved $119.23 today at the grocery store. Isnt that terri“ c?Ž Being the humble, demure sort of guy that I am, I did not ask her a question that was buzzing around my head at the time. The question was, how much did it cost me to save you that much money? Having a happy home is more important to me than exploring truth at its core. Especially in this area. My financial strategy down through the years has been a very regular and wise investment plan. I am not quite sure how I came up with this marvelous plan, but one day it just hit me. Ever since that time, I have been using my “ nancial investment plan. My investment plan only cost me $19.79 back in the Year of Our Lord 1986. Since that time, it has faithfully served me and I have no complaints. I have through the years thought about upgrading my investment plan, but then what would the purpose be? Back in 1986, I saw in the mens department of the JCPenney store in our community a very nicely tailored navy blue and gold striped gentlemans vest. It immediately caught my attention and as I examined it, I noticed that inside this vest was a variety of pockets. I looked at them and that is when it hit me. Down through the years I have often wondered why somebody else did not come up with this idea. I guess I am just a genius. I bought the vest and brought it home and hung it in my closet after I “ rst labeled each of the inside pockets. There was a pocket for dollar bills, one for “ ve-dollar bills, one for tendollar bills and one that I do not use as often for $20 bills. Every time I have a little bit of change left over I go to my closet turned to my best and invest that money where nobody can “ nd it. My investment plan is more or less an in and out exchange program. When I have a need, I sometimes divest some money. Through the years, it has been a great blessing in my investment plan and is something that I am rather proud of. Solomon put it in great perspective concerning wealth when he said, Remove far from me vanity and lies: give me neither poverty nor riches; feed me with food convenient for me: lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the LORD? or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vainŽ ( Proverbs 30:8-9 KJV). My investment plan is well buttoned up for future security.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. He can be reached at (352) 687-4240 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. Keeping close tabs on my investments

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunityCross of Military Service awards presented SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy MICHELLE KIRBYSpecial to the NewsThis year is off to an amazing start for the R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Not only did they welcome eight new members into their Chapter, they bestowed a Cross of Military Service to John Hobert Owens for his noble service to our nation during the Vietnam Con” ict. Also presented was a posthumous World War II Cross of Military Service to Mary Ann Brooks Owens in behalf of her father Francis Earl Brooks. The bestowal of military crosses is part of the patriotic and memorial objectives of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. We honor past and current military service men and women who, along with their Confederate ancestor, honorably served. Bestowal of cross and medals originated with the Southern Cross of Honor upon Confederate Veterans in 1898 by Alexander S. (Mary Ann Lamar Cobb) Erwin of Athens, Ga. The original cross was fashioned after the design of a Maltese cross with a wreath of laurel surrounding the words Deo Vindice (God our Vindicator) 1861-1865. Cobbs husband was the “ rst recipient. Since then, more than 12,500 Confederate Veterans were awarded the Cross of Honor with some still being identi“ ed and recognized posthumously by the UDC. The United Daughters of the Confederacy maintains a register of all crosses bestowed during that original issue, as well as all those since. Occasionally we do “ nd more veterans in need of this recognition and facilitate requests by those who seek this information. Crosses of Military Service and Medals bestowals grew into all major military campaigns with the recent announcement of the new Global War on Terror Cross. They are the most prized awards conferred by the UDC. Anyone who is interested in honoring their military loved ones who descends from a Confederate veteran may inquire by contacting the Chapters Military Service Awards Recorder at rdonmcleodudc@gmail. com. Those interested can also visit R. Don McLeods website at http://rdonmcleod. wordpress.com to read more about the awards and other details.Aaron Wiggins earns all three Eagle PalmsSpecial to the NewsBoy Scout Aaron Wiggins, of Crew 4 and Troop 126, earned all three Eagle Palms, bronze, silver and gold, last May. He is the “ rst member of his troop to accomplish this task, as well as the “ rst one in Wakulla County. A scout must earn these palms after earning eagle rank, which Wiggins did in 2010, and before their 18th birthday. Wiggins is a mentor and teaches classes about reptiles during the Summer at Boy Scout camp. We are so proud of him still teaching and being a great mentor to others,Ž said Dena Wiggins, his mother. Aaron Wiggins attends Wakulla High School. Aaron WigginsHappy “ rst birthday, KayeleeKayelee Sky McCallum celebrated her “ rst birthday on March 8. She is the daughter of Lee and Shannon McCallum of Crawfordville. She has three brothers, Seth, 14, Chase, 12, and Tripp, 4. Her paternal grandparents are Leroy and Lisa McCallum of Woodville. Her maternal grandparents are Hank Platt of Crawfordville and Terri Stephens of Tallahassee. Kayelee S. McCallumSimmons announce birth of sonJason and Latricia Simmons of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Justice Annual Simmons, on Dec. 14 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 6, pounds, 13 ounces and was 21 inches long. His maternal grandparents are Annual and Julia Lloyd of Exuma, Bahamas. His paternal grandparents are Frank and Cynthia Simmons of Crawfordville. His maternal greatgrandparents are Annie Lloyd of Exuma, Bahamas, and the late Raymond Lloyd, and the late George and Mae Bula Gary of Sharpes, Fla. His paternal greatgrandparents are Dorothy Brown of Tallahassee and the late Charlie Brown and the late Herman and Willie Mae Simmons of Sopchoppy. Myrt Mayne, District I director, and Louise Thomas, chapter president, present the service awards to Mary Ann Owens, John Hobert Owens. Upcoming classes at the extension o ceThere are several upcoming classes at workshops that will be offered at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce. € On Thursday, March 8 from 7 to 9 p.m. there will a workshop entitled, Small Poultry Flocks For Home Use.Ž Learn the latest techniques for raising poultry for meat and eggs. Topics covered in class will include care and feeding, housing, breed selection, protection from predators and much more. € On March 13 at 6:30 p.m. there will be a workshop entitled Going Green: Sustainable Cleaning Solutions,Ž to include caring for the kitchen, bath, laundry, woods and the air. Cost of the class is $10. Fee charged to provide take home samples. €On Saturday, March 17 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., they will hold a class called, Grow More Fruits and Vegetables … Fertilizer, lime, compost, green manures, and application methods.Ž Learn how to produce fruits and vegetables right in the back yard and get the most fruit and vegetable yields from the least inputs. For more information, call 926-3931 or visit wakulla.ifas.u” .edu/. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Performers include -Crawfordville UMC quartet Raising the Standard InternationalMInistries Gate Opens: 11 A.M Music Begins: Noon Ends: 8 P.M. 252 Park Ave., Sopchoppy City Park FUN: Bring a chair and a cooler and spend the dayno alcohol please MUSIC FOR EVERYONEPraise and worship, R&B, Blue Grass, Contemporary FOODHot dog and hamburger plates available or you may bring a picnic lunch. Childrens programs from noon 4P.M. Saturday,March10,2012FREECHRISTIANMUSIC SopchoppyCityPark AMULTIDENOMINATIONALWORSHIPEXPERIENCE 4 th annual 4 th annual 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolSpecial to The NewsOn Feb. 16, the Riversprings Jazz Band performed in the tough FBA Jazz Band Assessment at Leon High School. The performance was wonderful and the students really rockedŽ the house, said Band Director Carmen Williams. This was a very proud moment because they may have been the “ rst middle school Jazz Band to have performed in this particular event from Wakulla County,Ž Williams said. Riversink Elementary School will hold its fourth Annual Spring Festival on March 9 from 5 to 9 p.m. There will be games, bingo, a silent auction, food and raf” e. For more information, call 926-2664.RMS, WMS and WHS earn AVID national certi“ cationBy BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentThere was standing room only at the Feb. 21, School Board meeting as Riversprings Middle School, Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School were honored for earning National Certi“ cation through the AVID certi“ cation system for 2010-2011. AVID stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination. This certi“ cation means the three schools met all of the 56 criteria to implement this program that helps hard-working students, many of whom will be “ rst generation college goers, to be prepared for success in college. Wakulla implemented AVID in 2009-10 with 75 students in grades 8 and 9. It grew to 125 students in grades 8, 9 and 10 in 20102011 and added 11th grade to total 175 students grades 8 through 11 in 2011-12. Next year will be the “ rst group of graduating AVID students. Three teachers have been implementing AVID from the beginning: RMS AVID teacher and Site Coordinator Donna Sullivan; WMS AVID teacher and Site Coordinator Katherine Spivey; and WHS teacher Nancy Floyd Richardson. Assistant Principal Sunny Chancy is the WHS Site Coordinator. Melinda House has come on board at WHS to teach ninth grade this year. Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell is the AVID District Director. Administrators and teachers from all three schools make up the Site Teams for their schools. They attend rigorous week-long training in the summer, and attend other trainings during the year. Superintendent David Miller advocated for Wakulla County school system to be one of Floridas “ rst rural districts chosen for The Florida Partnership with the College Board grant. The grant has been renewed for three years due to Wakullas effective use of grant dollars. The AVID program has played a big role in preparing students for success in Advanced Placement and college dual enrollment classes. Superintendent Miller said, AVID has proved to be one of the most successful programs I have seen in my career. It gives students the con“ dence to succeed not only in academics, but also to believe that they can take on leadership roles in their schools, and ultimately in our society.Ž AVID is an internationally successful college preparation program that began in the 1980s with one teacher in one classroom who saw college potential in students who were capable but not well prepared for college, or who were not encouraged to take college prep classes such as Honors, Advanced Placement, and Dual Enrollment. The AVID system is now in place in more than 4,500 middle and high schools serving more than 400,000 AVID students throughout the United States and Department of Defense schools worldwide. AVID students are enrolled in rigorous academic classes, but given the support to succeed in them through strategies and tutorials in Writing, Inquiry, Collaborative, and Reading skills (WICR) learned in their AVID elective class. Students are taught to seek out the answers themselves through critical thinking skills, to ask questions in class, and to review their work every evening as a study skill. They are encouraged to get organized by using binders and planners, as well as by taking notes in Cornell Note format to use later as study guides. Last year in 2010-2011, 100 percent of Wakullas 8th grade AVID students took Algebra I or Algebra I Honors for high school credit while in middle school. This is critical for them to be on track to take higher level math courses in high school. All students made a CŽ or better. Nationally, only 22 percent of 8th grade students take Algebra I. In 2011-12, 100 percent of the 8th grade AVID students are taking Algebra I or Algebra I Honors and/or Integrated Science I or Integrated Science I Honors for up to two high school credits. Also in 2011-2012, 100 percent of the 11th grade AVID students are taking and passing one, two, or three Advanced Placement courses for possible college credit. AP classes have a rigorous curriculum with a standardized international test at the end. Students who take AP classes are more likely to complete college because they are more prepared when they get there. Wakulla High School currently offers 14 Advanced Placement classes, an unheard of number for a small district. Of the AVID students in Florida, 90 percent graduate from high school having completed four-year college entrance requirements. The national average is 36 percent. This program has been transformational for our students and our schools,Ž said Miller. Most of our teachers were already using many of the AVID strategies, but this gives a focus to not just preparing students to get into college, but on being successful once they are there.Ž AVID Site Teams from Riversprings Middle School, at left, Wakulla High School, at right, and Wakulla Middle School, below, rece ive honors for earning national certi“ cation for the 2010-11 school year. AVID is Advancement Via Individual Determination. RMS jazz band performs at assessmentSpring festival will be March 9 at Riversink The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary..........36 classrooms/newspapers.........$576/yr Medart Elementary...................33 classrooms/newspapers.........$528/yr Riversink Elementary................20 classrooms/newspapers.........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary..............40 classrooms/newspapers.........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School........10 classrooms/newspapers.........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name_________________________________ Address_______________________________ City_______________________State____Zip_________ Phone______________Email_______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327Fun and ExcitingBirthday Parties!We Can Customize One Just For You! Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: OPEN HOURS 3 9 PM FRI:3 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The News The Tallahassee Jewels is a semi-pro womens tackle football team. Becky Arbogast, 41, of Crawfordville, said the team is a part of the Womens Football Alliance and plays by the NFL rules. There are more than 60 teams nationwide. This is the “ rst season for the Jewels. The Jewels head coach is Lynnette NoodleŽ Alvarado, who has played tackle football for the past 10 years and is a great teacher. She is the perfect combination of no-nonsense and compassion,Ž says Arbogast. She is assisted by Coach Walter Brown, Coach Elvin Presley Jr. and Coach Andrew Brown. The Jewels home “ eld is Godby High School. They have been wonderful in their support of us,Ž Arbogast says of Godby. They allow us to practice on their field under the lights during the week and on their practice “ eld on the weekends.Ž Other sponsors have provided a monetary investment but the team is still looking for more. Game nights are very expensive from the tickets and ticket takers to the EMS support. Also, we will have at least four away games which will require transportation and lodging. Each player is required to pay monthly dues to help pay for their equipment (helmet, pads, and uniform). Sponsors can contact Coach Noodle directly or “ ll out the sponsor information on the website. Arbogast and Christie Mathison both travel from Wakulla County three days a week to play for the Jewels. I work in Tallahassee,Ž says Arbogast, so on Tuesdays and Thursdays, I rush home, feed my dogs and rush back to Godby for practice. Being late is not something that Coach Noodle tolerates well. She is understanding when things come up but we all need to attend practice so we can come together as a team.Ž Arbogast grew up in West Virginia but moved to Tallahassee about 10 years ago and then to Crawfordville in 2007. The drive to work each day is tough but the evenings in the country make up for it,Ž she says. Before moving to Florida, I spent 12 years in the U.S. Army Reserves as a Military Police Of“ cer. My degree in Criminal Justice led to several years as a correctional of“ cer and then as a police of“ cer. When I moved to Florida, I was looking for some peace and quiet. I found it at a publishing company in Tallahassee. I became their of“ ce manager and worked with them until they decided to retire. When a publishing company from Michigan decided to re-locate to Tallahassee, I was very pleased to continue my service with them. They have since expanded into three different publishing companies as well as distribution for other publishers. They have been very supportive of my desire to play football and are also one of the sponsors of the Jewels.Ž We have enough players to move forward but honestly we could use about 10 more players, Arbogast says. I wont lie and say playing football for Coach Noodle is easy because it is not. She expects everyone to give 110 percent but she also gives that as well. It is a lot of work but the reward is amazing. At 41 years old, I never dreamed I would be able to play tackle football. We have players under 30 years of age and over 50. We are a wide range of women but when we come together on the football “ eld we are a team.Ž Currently practices run Tuesdays from 7 to 9 p.m., Thursdays from 7 to 10 p.m. and Saturdays from noon to 3 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays are on their main “ eld at the track and Saturdays on the practice “ eld across Ocala. The teams website is www.tallahasseejewels.com and the Womens Football Alliance is www.wfafootball.com. Becky Arbogast plays womens football for the Tallahassee JewelsTALLAHASSEE JEWELS: Players and coaches for the womens football team, above. Becky Abrogast, left, dressed out for practice.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS€ April 14, HOME Acadiana Zydeco vs. Tallahassee Jewels € April 21, Tallahassee Jewels vs. Palm Beach Punishers € April 28, HOME Carolina Phoenix vs. Tallahassee Jewels € May 5, Tallahassee Jewels vs. Gulf Coast Riptide € May 12, HOME Miami Fury vs. Tallahassee Jewels € May 19, HOME Gulf Coast Riptide vs. Tallahassee Jewels € May 26 Bye € June 2 Bye € June 9, Tallahassee Jewels vs. Gulf Coast Riptide € June 16, Tallahassee Jewels vs. Acadiana ZydecoJewels schedule 5 Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2 Goto http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 C apital C ircle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsThe weather this week is looking pretty darn good. We have a full moon coming up, good tides, warm temperatures and the winds arent supposed to be too bad. The water temperature when I was out on Friday was up to 65 degrees but I dont know what the rain and low 40s did to it. I will know this afternoon. For the past two weeks it has been so windy and foggy it just wasnt worth going out there and not too many folks did. I talked with JR and he said he hasnt been in over two weeks due to the lousy weather but was planning on going tomorrow. He did say he talked to a gentleman “ shing in a canoe at the Econ“ na and he caught two small trout and two small reds casting a Rapala at the boat landing. He hoped to catch a largemouth bass. He also talked to some folks that were catching trout in the Aucilla as far up as the ramp trolling a Rattlin Red“ n. Now you tell me why those “ sh are up that far in the river. Capt. Randy Peart said he didnt “ sh the ” ats because of the lousy weather but he and his son “ shed the Wakulla and caught “ ve nice bass using a plastic lizard. This week he is down in the Keys “ shing so everybody should feel sorry for him. According to the “ shing report in the Democrat, several small Spanish were caught last week over near Dog Island. The water has gotten so warm so fast I am not surprised. Randy Peart said he caught some lady“ sh and usually when the lady“ sh are here the Spanish are here. I imagine cobia will start showing up fairly soon in Destin if they arent already there. Despite the high winds on Saturday, Phil Sharp took some friends out of Shell Point and they caught three keeper trout using the four-inch pearl white Gulp. He said he released the biggest trout he has ever caught and it was probably over 5 pounds. Ray Rich said he also “ shed in the St. Marks River on Saturday and caught two nice reds “ shing with live shrimp on the bottom. Capt. David Fife said the reds are biting pretty good in the Oyster Bay area and hes been using live shrimp and mudminnows for bait. On Wednesday of last week I took Chuck Kleiforth out to see if I could locate some “ sh for a charter I had coming up the next day that depended on if I could “ nd any “ sh. We “ shed around the oyster bars for about an hour and never got a strike. I talked with Larry Hess and he said he had caught several “ sh on the ” ats but they were small. I decided that if there were two out there maybe there were more. We went out and started drifting using a three-inch pearl white Gulp under a Cajun Thunder. Chuck caught six trout, four of which were keepers before I had a bite. He was using a 1/16-ounce gold head and I was using red. I switched over to gold and caught one on the “ rst cast. We ended the afternoon catching and releasing 21 trout, two over 20 inches and we would have had our limit of keepers. The next day I took Michael Chase from Tallahassee and this time took live shrimp. We ended the day with two reds of about 26 inches and three trout about 18 inches. We released about 45 small reds and probably 15 small trout. Everything was caught on a shrimp and couldnt buy a bite on a Gulp. Its tournament time again. The Kevins Red Trout Shootout is April 14 and will be hosted out of C Quarters Marina in Carrabelle. There will be 10 cash prizes from $3,000 down to $200 for the team coming in with the heaviest trout and red combined. Registration fee is $125 for a team of two anglers. On April 28 and 29 the fourth annual Rock the Dock Tournament will be held at Rock Landing in Panacea. There will be a Captains meeting on April 27. The offshore division will be for grouper, amberjack, cobia and kings. The inshore division is for trout, reds, ” ounder and Spanish and the entry fee is $50 per person. For more information on these tournaments go to kevinsredtroutshootout.com and panacearockthedock“ shingtournament.com. Remember to leave that float plan with someone and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing!Weather is looking good for shing From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Special to The NewsTALLAHASSEE The Department of Environmental Protections Florida Park Service announced the results of a survey last week that found outdoor recreation is important to 98 percent of tourists and 96 percent of residents. The results came from the 2011 Florida Outdoor Recreation Participation Survey, which measured the satisfaction of Floridas residents and visitors with current recreation opportunities. This study is a great tool for Floridas outdoor recreation providers, and will help us ensure that we are in tune with the recreational needs of the states citizens and visitors,Ž said DEPs Florida Park Service Director Donald V. Forgione. The survey took into account nearly 4,000 Florida residents and nearly 3,000 tourists between April and October 2011 by telephone. Of the tourists surveyed, 97 percent said they were satis“ ed with the outdoor recreation opportunities in Florida, including 77 percent who are very satis“ ed. The majority of Florida residents (80 percent) are satis“ ed with the outdoor recreation opportunities in their county. Nearly all participants (99 percent of residents and 96 percent of tourists) said spending time with family and friends is an important factor for participating in outdoor recreation. Saltwater beach activities were the most popular among all participants, with 63 percent of residents and 49 percent of visitors enjoying this activity in the past 12 months. The next most popular activity among Florida residents was wildlife viewing, which 49 percent enjoyed in the last year. Forty-six percent went “ shing, 44 percent enjoyed bicycling and 40 percent enjoyed a picnic outdoors in the last year. Forty-seven percent of tourists enjoyed wildlife viewing last year, followed by 37 percent who enjoyed picnicking, 29 percent of visitors who went swimming in public outdoor pools and 26 percent of tourists who visited historical or archaeological sites. LISA SCHWENNING/DEPVisitors enjoy the beach at Dr. Julian G. Bruce St. George Island State Park.Survey shows outdoor recreation is important to residents and visitorsFrom FWC NewsMarch 10-11 is Youth Spring Turkey Hunt Weekend in Florida. This Saturday through Sunday hunt, which occurs the weekend prior to the opening of spring turkey season in each hunting zone, was established in 2011 on private property. It was such a huge success that this year the two-day hunt also is included on 78 of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions wildlife management areas. Only youths under 16 years old are allowed to harvest a turkey while supervised by an adult, 18 years or older. On private land, no license or permit is required of the youth or supervising adult, unless the adult plans to help callinŽ the bird or otherwise participate in the hunt. In that case, the supervisor will need a hunting license and turkey permit. To prevent overcrowding, most of the 78 participating WMAs require a youth spring turkey quota permit, and if the adult supervisor is going to attempt to call in a bird on any of these WMAs, he or she also will need a management area permit in addition to the hunting license and turkey permit. There are still youth spring turkey quota permits available for some areas, and they can be obtained by those hunters under 16 years of age on a “ rst-come, “ rst-served basis at MyFWC. com/License or at a license agent, beginning at 10 a.m. on March 8. There are also 23 WMAs that do not require a quota permit. Those are Apalachicola, Aucilla, Big Bend … Spring Creek Unit, Big Bend … Tide Swamp Unit, Blackwater, Choctawhatchee River (only the south portion of the area), Herky Huffman/Bull Creek, J.W. Corbett, Joe Budd, Jumper Creek, Log Landing, Lower Econ“ na River, and Middle Aucilla. For all of these hunts, it is important to note that adults are not allowed to do the shooting; only the kids may harvest a bird. And on WMAs, the only “ rearms that are allowed to be used during spring turkey seasons are shotguns and muzzleloading shotguns, using shot no larger than No. 2.Take a kid turkey hunting March 10-11 Still serving the Best Tasting Food, Biggest Portions and Best Values in Town!!! To Go!at theirNOWNEW LOCATIONCome by and grab a menu featuring all your favorites: a variety of Sandwiches, Wraps and Burgers. Pork, Beef, Chicken and Fish Dinners!New Hours: 850-421-1150ASK FOR THE BOATERS SPECIALS! Buy ANY Sandwich andget a Second of equal or lesser value1/2 OFF DELIVERY SERVICE COMMING SOON!! 713-001499 Rock Landing Road OPEN: THURSDAY ............. 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .............................. 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday .................. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. SUNDAY ...........................11 A.M. 9 P.M. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonJohn Denmark receives Gilbert Champion Award.Saturday, several members of Flotilla 12 met at the Crawfordville Fire Station for our monthly meeting. In attendance were Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos, Vice Commander Bill Wannal, Ed Burroughs, Raye Crews, David Guttman, Mike Harrison, Chuck Hickman, Norma Hill, Phil Hill, Terry Hoxworth, Steve Hults, Mark Rosen, Duane Treadon and Ray Willis. Also present were Auxiliarists Ann and Ed Gesteland, members of Flotilla 45 08, out of Wisconsin and our newest member Joey Tillman. We were very lucky to also welcome Lt. Tim Smith, a Coast Guard reservist from Jacksonville. Throughout the meeting several items were discussed that are up and coming for us. Next week, we will be participating in the Camp Gordon Johnston parade in Carrabelle. This year we will have two boats in the parade. Larry Kolk will have his hand-built wooden boat, the Georgiana, that invokes the style of the classic life boats used by the Coast Guard in its early years. Chuck Hickman will also have his boat in the parade demonstrating the facilities we typically use today. As we prepare for the upcoming boating season, we are exploring ways to get our communications facility back up and in working order. Some of you may remember that we have a communications station in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, and we are hoping to resurrect it for the coming season. Thankfully, when we are out on the water, Station Panama City is able to provide us with radio watch. Often, the station is staffed with auxiliarists in the radio room standing watch so that the active duty folks can attend to other things. Presentation of the Gilbert Champion Award is traditionally done in the December meeting. I have been reluctant to share with all of you the recipient for the Gilbert Champion Award for 2011. John Denmark has been a member as long as I have and has never stepped down from a challenge. Last year, he worked tirelessly to re-establish relationships with the Wildlife Refuge so that we could get to know the newer staff and work together. Throughout this, John also had several more personal challenges arise. They never let him be deterred from his goals for the Auxiliary. John had not been able to attend a meeting to receive his award until now. Gilbert Champion Award is an annual award established in 2005 by Flotilla 12 in remembrance of two founding members, Don Gilbert and John Champion. Both men were dedicated auxiliarists and exempli“ ed what it means to be a member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. This annual award is presented to one member who meets the following criteria: The member must be in good standing and have been active in flotilla activities throughout the year. The auxiliarists must also exemplify the four cornerstones of Member Service, Recreational Boating Safety, Operations and Marine Safety and Fellowship. These activities may include, but are not limited to, public education, public affairs, operations, personnel services, fellowship, division/district activities, vessel examinations, recreational boating safety, marine science and recruiting. Additionally, such a member promotes Auxiliary to the general public through recruitment, assisting when called upon by active duty and other community organizations and seeking opportunities to promote the missions of the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Finally, this member also continuously pursues advancement in not only their personal skills and training, but also those of their fellow auxiliarists. John received his award this month. He sets the bar high for future recipients! Also awarded a special honor was Steve Hults. Steve received the Meritorious Team Commendation for his service in response to the Tuscaloosa Tornado in 2011. In addition to his work as an auxiliarist, Steve is also active in FEMA disaster response. Bravo Zulu Steve! Lt. Smith brie” y addressed the meeting and thanked the auxiliary for their hard work and dedication to the bating public. He explained that as a reservist, he knows that it is much more than one weekend a month and two weeks a year. For an auxiliarist, he stated that it is all voluntary and he, along with his fellow guardsmen, greatly appreciate our hard work. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Steve Hults gets Meritorious Team Commendation. As an animal with eyes, we are challenged to imagine a world without light. For most of us, even poor eyesight permits a sense of security in the contrast of light and shadow. To imagine what a cave-dwelling creature must manage every day in the absence of light is nearly impossible. For the past several years I have been working on a special research team in search of new (to science) species of crustaceans, found in the back reaches of underwater caves. And for the most part, they dont even have eyes anymore. Creatures that live in underwater caves in the absence of light are usually related to creatures that evolved with light, so their ancestors once had eyes. But, over time, these creatures adapted to the dark, and those that survived over many generations, lost their eyes. Some “ sh that can be found in dark caves have eye sockets, with no eyes. Craw“ sh in dark caves have eyes stalks, but no eyes. And the list goes on. So how do they do it? How can they seeŽ in the dark? There are many explanations. Other sensory capabilities are enhanced, such as touch, taste (smell) and sound. But in the denser medium of water, 800 times denser that air, subtle changes are very useful. Those of you who have visited our cave craw“ sh at the Center may have noticed minnows in the tank. Over time their numbers diminish as they are captured by the blind craw“ sh. I have watched when the hungry craw“ sh is “ shing: It climbs up on a rock and raises its claws above itself. Eventually, a minnow swims between the jaws and the claws close rapidly. The disturbing motion of the water is felt by cilia (little hairs on the claw) that inform the predator food is available. Several weeks ago I found one of my favorite caves full of blind craw“ sh of all sizes. They are usually found scattered over the walls and ceiling rocks, but this day were concentrated on the mud ” oor. And there I found several who had foundŽ each other and were mating. Either the “ nding was a random act resulting from the denser concentration on the ” oor, or more likely, they gave off a smell or pheromone that permitted males to “ nd females on the ” oor of the cave. The beam from my bright cave light would not cause them any attention, but when I put my hand close by one, it would scurry off just like its relative, the colorful Florida Lobster found on the reefs in the Florida Keys. Yes, thats right, these cave animals have no reason to be colorful since sight is not in their world, so they are white or transparent. Now there is the rub. An animal that is white on a black background is like a shining beacon when light is introduced. Open water “ sh (with eyes) have learned that divers carry the sun with them and will follow us in for the feast of their lifetime. We in turn, have learned to turn our lights off at the back of a cavern, to encourage these intelligent “ sh to return to the light. In January we found a starving open water “ sh lost in the back of a cave. As soon as it saw our light, we were its best buddy, following us out tucked in as closely as possible. I often turn my light off when in a cave, trying to imagine what these creatures must feel. I feel the water ” ow past my face, touch contact with the walls, and hear sounds from others in the vicinity. I imagine my surroundings in my minds eye, then to verify it with my light. As part of training, I often get lost, requiring my students to “ nd me. I am getting good at this game, but never as good as the residents because I know I can always ” ick a light switch and return to my world. Find me if you can! Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 3.6 ft. 1:45 AM 3.6 ft. 2:30 AM 3.5 ft. 3:15 AM 3.3 ft. 4:01 AM 2.9 ft. 4:52 AM 2.5 ft. 5:50 AM High -0.3 ft. 8:00 AM -0.0 ft. 8:31 AM 0.3 ft. 9:01 AM 0.6 ft. 9:31 AM 0.9 ft. 10:02 AM 1.2 ft. 10:35 AM -0.3 ft. 12:32 AM Low 3.6 ft. 2:12 PM 3.7 ft. 2:37 PM 3.8 ft. 3:04 PM 3.8 ft. 3:32 PM 3.7 ft. 4:04 PM 3.6 ft. 4:39 PM 2.2 ft. 7:07 AM High -0.4 ft. 8:22 PM -0.6 ft. 9:03 PM -0.8 ft. 9:46 PM -0.7 ft. 10:33 PM -0.6 ft. 11:27 PM 1.5 ft. 11:16 AM Low 3.3 ft. 5:24 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 3.7 ft. 1:42 AM 3.7 ft. 2:27 AM 3.6 ft. 3:12 AM 3.3 ft. 3:58 AM 3.0 ft. 4:49 AM 2.6 ft. 5:47 AM High -0.3 ft. 7:57 AM -0.0 ft. 8:28 AM 0.3 ft. 8:58 AM 0.6 ft. 9:28 AM 1.0 ft. 9:59 AM 1.3 ft. 10:32 AM -0.3 ft. 12:29 AM Low 3.6 ft. 2:09 PM 3.8 ft. 2:34 PM 3.9 ft. 3:01 PM 3.9 ft. 3:29 PM 3.8 ft. 4:01 PM 3.6 ft. 4:36 PM 2.2 ft. 7:04 AM High -0.4 ft. 8:19 PM -0.7 ft. 9:00 PM -0.8 ft. 9:43 PM -0.8 ft. 10:30 PM -0.6 ft. 11:24 PM 1.7 ft. 11:13 AM Low 3.3 ft. 5:21 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 2:21 AM 3.4 ft. 3:06 AM 3.3 ft. 3:51 AM 3.0 ft. 4:37 AM 2.7 ft. 5:28 AM High -0.2 ft. 9:04 AM -0.0 ft. 9:35 AM 0.2 ft. 10:05 AM 0.5 ft. 10:35 AM 0.8 ft. 11:06 AM -0.5 ft. 12:31 AM -0.3 ft. 1:36 AM Low 3.3 ft. 2:48 PM 3.4 ft. 3:13 PM 3.5 ft. 3:40 PM 3.5 ft. 4:08 PM 3.5 ft. 4:40 PM 2.3 ft. 6:26 AM 2.0 ft. 7:43 AM High -0.3 ft. 9:26 PM -0.6 ft. 10:07 PM -0.7 ft. 10:50 PM -0.7 ft. 11:37 PM 1.1 ft. 11:39 AM 1.4 ft. 12:20 PM Low 3.3 ft. 5:15 PM 3.0 ft. 6:00 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 1:37 AM 2.7 ft. 2:22 AM 2.6 ft. 3:07 AM 2.4 ft. 3:53 AM 2.2 ft. 4:44 AM 1.9 ft. 5:42 AM High -0.2 ft. 8:11 AM -0.0 ft. 8:42 AM 0.2 ft. 9:12 AM 0.4 ft. 9:42 AM 0.7 ft. 10:13 AM 0.9 ft. 10:46 AM -0.2 ft. 12:43 AM Low 2.7 ft. 2:04 PM 2.8 ft. 2:29 PM 2.8 ft. 2:56 PM 2.9 ft. 3:24 PM 2.8 ft. 3:56 PM 2.7 ft. 4:31 PM 1.6 ft. 6:59 AM High -0.3 ft. 8:33 PM -0.5 ft. 9:14 PM -0.6 ft. 9:57 PM -0.5 ft. 10:44 PM -0.4 ft. 11:38 PM 1.1 ft. 11:27 AM Low 2.4 ft. 5:16 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 1:29 AM 2.8 ft. 2:14 AM 2.7 ft. 2:59 AM 2.5 ft. 3:45 AM 2.3 ft. 4:36 AM 2.0 ft. 5:34 AM High -0.3 ft. 7:39 AM -0.0 ft. 8:10 AM 0.3 ft. 8:40 AM 0.6 ft. 9:10 AM 0.9 ft. 9:41 AM 1.2 ft. 10:14 AM -0.3 ft. 12:11 AM Low 2.8 ft. 1:56 PM 2.9 ft. 2:21 PM 3.0 ft. 2:48 PM 3.0 ft. 3:16 PM 2.9 ft. 3:48 PM 2.8 ft. 4:23 PM 1.7 ft. 6:51 AM High -0.4 ft. 8:01 PM -0.6 ft. 8:42 PM -0.8 ft. 9:25 PM -0.7 ft. 10:12 PM -0.6 ft. 11:06 PM 1.5 ft. 10:55 AM Low 2.5 ft. 5:08 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:32 AM 2.5 ft. 2:30 AM 2.4 ft. 3:29 AM 2.2 ft. 4:33 AM 2.0 ft. 5:45 AM 1.9 ft. 7:12 AM High 0.2 ft. 7:29 AM 0.4 ft. 7:59 AM 0.7 ft. 8:27 AM 1.0 ft. 8:55 AM 1.2 ft. 9:21 AM 1.3 ft. 9:48 AM -0.2 ft. 12:26 AM Low 2.2 ft. 2:05 PM 2.3 ft. 2:23 PM 2.5 ft. 2:45 PM 2.6 ft. 3:12 PM 2.7 ft. 3:45 PM 2.7 ft. 4:25 PM 2.6 ft. 5:14 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:33 PM 0.0 ft. 8:17 PM -0.2 ft. 9:04 PM -0.3 ft. 9:59 PM -0.2 ft. 11:05 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 8 March 14First March 30 Full April 6 Last March 14 New March 22Major Times 12:32 AM 2:32 AM 12:58 PM 2:58 PM Minor Times 6:42 AM 7:42 AM 7:19 PM 8:19 PM Major Times 1:24 AM 3:24 AM 1:51 PM 3:51 PM Minor Times 7:22 AM 8:22 AM 8:25 PM 9:25 PM Major Times 2:18 AM 4:18 AM 2:46 PM 4:46 PM Minor Times 8:02 AM 9:02 AM 9:34 PM 10:34 PM Major Times 4:14 AM 6:14 AM 4:42 PM 6:42 PM Minor Times 9:47 AM 10:47 AM 11:42 PM 12:42 AM Major Times 5:12 AM 7:12 AM 5:41 PM 7:41 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:35 AM 11:35 AM Major Times 6:11 AM 8:11 AM 6:40 PM 8:40 PM Minor Times 12:48 AM 1:48 AM 11:29 AM 12:29 PM Major Times 7:10 AM 9:10 AM 7:39 PM 9:39 PM Minor Times 1:51 AM 2:51 AM 12:26 PM 1:26 PM SEASONS BEST Better Good Average Average Average Average6:54 am 6:41 pm 7:19 pm 6:43 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:53 am 6:41 pm 8:27 pm 7:22 am 6:52 am 6:42 pm 9:35 pm 8:03 am 6:51 am 6:43 pm 10:43 pm 8:48 am 6:50 am 6:43 pm 11:49 pm 9:37 am 6:48 am 6:44 pm --:-10:30 am 6:47 am 6:45 pm 12:52 am 11:27 am99% 93% 86% 78% 70% 63% 56% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AHe said he was looking for sellability. In creating larger lots, the natural state would be lowered and not meet the state requirement of 45 percent. Also, Boynton was looking for more ” exibility so that a portion of the natural state could be used for the Heritage Village. The state did not have any comments regarding the proposed amendment and at the March 5 county commission meeting, the commissioners voted to adopt the application for the text amendment. This is an unbelievable gift,Ž County Commissioner Jerry Moore said. Boynton said at the request of the commission, an agreement has been executed between himself and the historical society, which sets forth the obligations of each party in developing the village. Everybody agreed and signed off on it,Ž Boynton said. The entire historical society is excited about the possibility of the heritage village becoming a reality, said chairman of the Heritage Village, Murray McLaughlin. McLaughlin said he was also happy for historian Betty Green. Its been a dream of hers for years,Ž McLaughlin said. The project was made possible by Boynton and the county commission, he said. We worked really hard to get this accomplished,Ž McLaughlin said. The next step will be designing a site plan for the property. The society hopes to be able to get help from engineers and designers to lay out their concept. We have a lot of work to do,Ž McLaughlin said. The hope is to have signs and kiosks, amphitheater and walking trails, along with the homes and buildings. They would also like to include educational interactive exhibits of things such as cane grinding and turpentine, which represent the lifestyle of this time period, the 19th and early 20th centuries. The village would also help boost tourism, McLaughlin said. Harden said the village would eventually become a calling card for the county and bring people from all over.Heritage Village deal acceptedmember from arts or health community; one member from the faith community; one member selected by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office; one youth representative chosen by the principal of Wakulla High School; one member from the sports and recreation community; one member from Sopchoppy; and one member from St. Marks. They have to be people with the experience of getting things done,Ž said Bobby Pearce, a member of the temporary group. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the temporary group has the right vision to make the venture successful. The group agreed to help “ nd the permanent members and offer suggestions. The Wakulla County Commission voted unanimously to schedule a public hearing to consider adopting the ordinance to create the advisory group. As it stands right now, the memorandum of understanding between the YMCA and county has not been viewed by the temporary group. According to County Administrator David Edwards, they are still waiting on the agreement from the YMCA. The YMCA was the only organization to respond to the countys request for proposals for managing the community center. Since that time, the county and the YMCA have been trying to determine what renovations would be needed for the YMCA to operate, as well as what they would offer. The YMCA has said in the past they can offer whatever programs and services the county would like, as long as they can break even. Edwards said the original agreement that was sent was very generic and the county is looking for more speci“ cs. In the current design plans for the community center, renovations would only be done to one of the buildings at the community center. For now, the one building with the of“ ces would stay as is. There is only enough funding, $390,000 through legislative appropriation, to renovate the one building and add a gymnasium. The building would have a free weight room and cardio room, “ tness class room, kid zone and restrooms and showers. These facilities are what was requested by the YMCA. However, Campbell pointed out that in the community surveys taken from students, the second choice was a weight room. There is also a gymnasium, which is a high school and college regulation size basketball court. Alan Wise, project manager with Preble-Rish, said the gymnasium would be multi-use and has an open ” oor plan. The gym will be very bare, with a concrete ” oor and simple lighting. To maximize the bene“ t of the $390,000, were going to have to go bare bones on the gymnasium,Ž Wise said. Edwards said the space can be upgraded in the future. Artz was concerned that the space was not very multi-use. Edwards said that could be solved with scheduling and having certain time slots for each activity. Director of the extension of“ ce and member of the temporary group, Les Harrison, said the bare bones gymnasium provides space needs, as well as ” exibility. It gets you where you want to go right now,Ž Harrison said. Also discussed by the board was a grant that was written by Campbell and Disc Village to help with funding for the community center. The Ounce of Prevention Grant would provide funding for staffing and utilities. The grant will be awarded in April. It would be a golden gift,Ž Campbell said. Once the MOU is drafted, it will be presented, along with the conceptual plans for renovation of the community center, to the county commission for approval. Once it is approved, there will be the “ nal designs and permits will be pulled. Wise is estimating that three months later, they will bid the project and construction will begin. The money from the legislative appropriation must be spent by Dec. 31. Continued from Page 1APlans for community center take shapeBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA woman facing felony drug charges after cocaine was found near where she had ” ipped a car while driving drunk, entered a plea to the charges on the eve of her trial in exchange for a sentence of two years probation. Louann McKinney had been set for a jury trial on Friday, March 2, but she pleaded charges of DUI causing serious bodily injury and possession of a controlled substance, both third degree felonies, as well as a misdemeanor charge of driving with a suspended license. If she had been found guilty of the charges, McKinney could have faced a minimum of 39.6 months in prison up to the maximum of “ ve years. Defense attorney Steven Glazer commented that he was prepared to go to trial … contending there was no way to tell who was actually in possession of the cocaine. McKinney was the driver of a borrowed truck that she turned over. Deputies on the scene found a baggie of cocaine nearby and charged her with possessing it, contending it fell out of the vehicle as it overturned. In addition to the two years of probation, McKinney was also given credit for the 233 days shes spent in the Wakulla County Jail since her arrest. For the DUI, McKinney had six months driver license suspension, must serve 50 hours community service, attend DUI school, 10 days vehicle immobilization, and six months ignition interlock. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford, who accepted the plea, also required McKinney to undergo a Victim Impact Panel to hear about what effect impaired driving has on others … those killed by drunk drivers as well as their survivors. Since the truck was totaled, McKinney also agreed to make restitution to the owner. She also must pay $1,730 in court costs and “ nes. The case was prosecuted by Assistant State Attorney Lorena Vollrath-Bueno. € Edward Walker was again found guilty of lewd and lascivious assault in a trial on Wednesday, Feb. 29, and was sentenced to 25 years in prison. It was the second trial for Walker. The First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee reversed and remanded an earlier conviction “ nding their was an error. Circuit Judge Kathleen Dekker presided over the trial and, after the jury returned a verdict of guilty, sentenced Walker to a mandatory term of 25 years in prison. € Judge Fulford, an avid bicyclist, was injured two weeks ago during the Geico Road Safety Bicycle Tour. The tour is a 400-mile bike ride from Orlando to Tallahassee to raise awareness for safe driving. The bicyclists left Orlando on Feb. 20, and stopped in Tampa, Ocala, Gainesville, Live Oak before arriving at the Capitol on Feb. 23. On Feb. 21, Fulfords bike slipped while crossing railroad tracks and she hit her head causing a gash to her face that required stitches as well as other injuries. When in court to accept a plea on Thursday, Fulford had a bandage under her right eye. Court shorts Workers push down a wall on the Linzy home in 2008. FILE PHOTOSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce detectives arrested two Wakulla County men in connection with February aggravated child abuse cases, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. The male suspects, ages 29 and 27 from Crawfordville, were arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail at the conclusion of their separate investigations. The two men have since posted $10,000 bonds and been released from jail. The “ rst case involved a six-year-old male child. The victims mother noticed marks and bruising on his legs from his buttocks to his knees as she was picking him up from the suspect. She contacted the Florida Department of Children and Families Child Protection Team. During the medical examination, the doctor discovered multiple bruises, impact marks, small puncture wounds and lacerations to the childs legs. The marks on the child were consistent with three items being used to inflict the abuse including a belt and an electrical cord. DCF removed the child from the suspects home and he was arrested for aggravated child abuse,Ž according to Undersheriff Maurice Langston. The second case involved a “ ve year old female child. The Florida Department of Children and Families was contacted after a school administrator discovered bruising on the childs head. A medical examination was performed and the doctor determined that the child had been struck in the head area and abrasions that were observed were consistent with partial strangulation. As the investigation unfolded, medical personnel determined that the childs father struck her in the face with a shoe, which caused her to fall, and put one of his hands on her neck and the other on her mouth and nose so the child could not breathe. There are methods in which to discipline your child,Ž said Sheriff Crum. But this is not how to do it.Ž Detective Erika Buckley, Detective Josh Langston, Lt. Mike Kemp and Deputy Lorne Whaley investigated the cases. Two men arrested in separate child abuse cases San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOyst ers Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 USED TOOL SALE! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 13A reportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Feb. 26, a female victim called 911 to report a disturbance. Deputies arrived on the scene and secured a female suspect in a wooded area near the site where the call originated. The homeowner told Sgt. Jeremy Johnston that she observed a 37-year-old woman smoking marijuana inside her home near her childs room. When the victim told the woman to stop, she became irate and struck the homeowner and pulled her hair. The suspect also grabbed the juvenile around the throat in an attempt to keep her from calling 911. The woman took the phone from the juvenile and threw it into the woods. The suspect was arrested for battery, grand theft, possession of drug paraphernalia and cruelty toward a child. The victims phone was recovered along with some of her hair on the ” oor and 7.1 grams of marijuana on the steps of the residence. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Feb. 24, Eva Nelson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered her property and stole an exotic bird and bird cage, valued at $1,230. €On Feb. 23, Brenda Williams of Crawfordville reported “ nding a wallet while walking her dogs on Arran Road near Bostic Pelt Road. The sheriffs of“ ce has been unable to locate the owner of the wallet and it was turned over to the property division for storage. € On Feb. 26, Thomas Watts of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le his tax return and was told somebody had already used his Social Security number. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € On Feb. 24, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after a woman was allegedly seen taking two queen size bed comforters and attempted to leave the store without paying for them. Della Michelle Daughtry, 42, of Tallahassee was arrested for larceny. The comforters were valued at $107. €On Feb. 26, Elizabeth Armstrong of Crawfordville reported a structure fire. The victim reported that her stove caught “ re while she was cooking. She was able to put the “ re out by using baking soda and a towel. The stove top was burned along with the exhaust fan and the cabinets sustained heavy smoke damage. € On Feb. 25, Richard Powell, 32, of Crawfordville was arrested for resisting an of“ cer without violence, disorderly intoxication and possession of cocaine following a disturbance in a parking lot of a Crawfordville bar. Powell allegedly resisted Lt. Jimmy Sessor, who was helped by the bars bouncer, and Powell was eventually secured in handcuffs. During a search of the suspect, a small baggy of a white powder was discovered that reportedly tested positive as cocaine. € On Feb. 25, Elizabeth Brown of Tallahassee reported a Crawfordville residential burglary. The victim discovered her Wakulla County home was entered and items were moved around the home. An air conditioning unit, valued at $1,500, was reportedly removed from the scene. € On Feb. 25, Consuelo Rowland of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tag and criminal mischief to her vehicle. The victims vehicle was keyed. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $500 and the stolen tag was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Feb. 24, Raymonde R. Bergholz of Crawfordville reported the theft of cash from her wallet. The money and a pack of cigarettes were taken from the victims home and a 12-yearold boy was questioned and admitted taking the property. He was issued a notice to appear in juvenile court for petit theft. € On Feb. 27, James Harvey of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church. A catalytic converter was taken off a vehicle owned by the church. The vehicle part is valued at $700. € On Feb. 27, Deputy Clint Beam responded to an illegal burning complaint. Deputy Beam met with State Forestry of“ cials about an individual who was burning tires. Fifteen to 20 tires were observed burning with another 25 to 30 tires sitting next to the “ re pit on Mount Pleasant Lane in Crawfordville. Florida Forestry of“ cials issued a citation to a suspect in the case. € On Feb. 27, Dina Raffield of Crawfordville reported the theft of a pregnant female pit bulldog, valued at $300. The dog was taken from the victims home and a suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Feb. 28, Mary Harts“ eld of Crawfordville reported an attempted vehicle burglary. Someone attempted to steal her vehicle radio system but left the scene rapidly after being observed. € On Feb. 28, Mary Newsome of Crawfordville reported a hit and run accident. The victims mailbox was shattered into pieces and scattered on her front lawn. In addition, a Tallahassee Democrat paper box was damaged on the lawn. The property appeared to be damaged by a vehicle driving at a high rate of speed. Damage was estimated at $200. € On Feb. 29, Randall Bateson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a cellular telephone. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Feb. 28, Rebecca Daugherty of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim helped a friend “ nancially and the friend paid her back with a counterfeit money order that was rejected by her financial institution. The victims “ nancial loss is $987. € On Feb. 28, John Gilbert of Crawfordville recovered a bicycle in a ditch on E.J. Stringer Road. The bike is valued at $100 and it was turned over to the WCSO Evidence Division in an attempt to locate the owner. € On Feb. 28, Susan Council of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The windows of a rental home were shot with BB guns. Damage to the windows and interior of the residence was estimated at $400. Two juvenile suspects, ages 9 and 12, were identi“ ed and agreed to pay for the damage and surrender the BB gun. The victim agreed to drop criminal charges in favor of the restitution. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On Feb. 29, Brittney Dawkins of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim was moving from one home to another and went back to the “ rst home to collect some belongings. A computer and fencing was reportedly missing. The stolen property is valued at $320. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Feb. 29, Melanie Rice of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A television and jewelry, valued at $1,460, was reported stolen. In addition, Sgt. Danny Harrell discovered a neighboring home damaged following a forced entry. It was determined that the home is owned by Virginia Garzanita of Tallahassee. A forced entry was reported but nothing was reported missing. € On Feb. 29, a 51-yearold man was stopped by a concerned citizen at the home of Guinn Haskins in Crawfordville. The man stole three power tools owned by Haskins that were valued at $360. The suspect is being charged with burglary of a structure and grand theft. € On Feb. 24, Isaac Mathis of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone “ led an income tax return using his Social Security number. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On Feb. 25, Alice Mollicone of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le her tax return but it was rejected because someone had already used her Social Security number. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 790 calls for service during the past week including: 13 residential and business alarms; 77 citizen contacts; 32 E-911 calls; 45 investigations; 44 medical emergencies; 237 residential and business security checks; 24 special details; 17 suspicious people; 12 suspicious vehicles; 39 traf“ c stops; 10 disabled vehicles; and 12 wanted people.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsOn Feb. 26, Joyce Stout, 54, of Tallahassee was injured in a traf“ c crash while working with the C.W. Roberts road paving crew on U.S. Highway 319 south of Whitlock at 9:28 p.m. Stout was operating an escort vehicle to lead drivers around the construction and was traveling northbound on the highway. A paving machine pulled from the shoulder into the northbound lane and the 2008 Ford Ranger struck the left side of the paver. The Ford was damaged, but the paver was not. Stout was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital with multiple leg fractures. Wakulla EMS and Fire Rescue personnel responded and assisted Stout. The highway traf“ c was delayed 30 minutes while assistance was rendered. WILLIAM SNOWDENCrash into storefrontStaff ReportA 74-year-old woman crashed into a building in Crawfordville on Sunday, March 4, at about 3 p.m. Nellie Daniels Baggett, the driver of the 1997 Ford, was reportedly leaving the Subway restaurant when she suffered a medical emergency and wrecked into the G-Signs building, according to the Florida Highway Patrol report. She sustained minor injuries, but was not taken to the hospital. The buildings damage was estimated at $20,000. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Escort driver injuredSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403 Saturday, March 17 at Hudson ParkFESTIVAL & PARADE Sponsored by Crawfordville Lions ClubBreakfast at 8 a.m. Parade at 10 a.m.For vendor information call 926-1269 or 566-1828 For parade information call 926-4440Many Arts and Crafts Booths, Exhibits and Food Booths PANACEA HATSAFACTHATSEARLE KIRKWOOD850-524-9103UNDERTHEOAK ON US 98 PANACEASTOLENAFRICAN GREYGRAY W/RED TAIL runny nose on right nostril, currently on treatment. Help us “nd it! If seen, please call: EVA NELSON 766-9012 DET. SCOTT POWELL 926-7171REWARD OFFERED!! HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThis year’s Special Olympics The long jump. Drawing a mural at the Olympic Village. More photos online at thewakullanews.com The Medart Mustang plays with a child. The parade before the start of the Special Olympics. At right, above, one of the running events; below, throwing the softball for distance.Special Olympics were held at Wakulla High School on Friday, March 2.Photos by William Snowden

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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 The Legislature: On budget, and on time? Weekly Roundup, Page 9B Many people believe that hazardous or toxic chemicals are found only in industries that manufacture plastics, pesticides, pharmaceuticals or automobiles. However, a wide range of products that we use in our homes contains chemicals that “ t the de“ nition of hazardous or toxic. Hazardous products line our kitchen, bath, utility and garage shelves. Although the concentration of the chemical products found in the homes are much lower than the concentration of those found in the workshop, exposure to chemicals from household products does exist. Marie Hammer, a former UF/IFAS housing specialist, writing in a publication entitled Hazardous Household Substances: Alternatives That Are Relatively Free of Toxic Effects,Ž FCS 3149, reminds us of some of the safety considerations when using household cleaning products. It includes never mixing chlorine bleach with any other cleaning agent, such as ammonia or vinegar; storing all cleaning solutions out of reach of children; never transferring a product to a container that once held food or drink to avoid accidental poisoning; and never smoking or eating when handling hazardous materials. Have you ever considered making your own household cleaning products? To encourage use of more natural chemicals to insure a clean environment, the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office staff and the members of Sustainable Big Bend would like you to have the opportunity to learn about alternative cleaning products through someone who has been using natural products personally and in her commercial cleaning business for several years. Jennifer Glaubius, owner of The Master Servant Cleaning Service, will share information on the products she has researched and tested. She prefers to call her methods natural,Ž not green,Ž because she feels that the term greenŽ is presently over-used and often misunderstood. Her products utilize more natural ingredients that are safer for the person using them and for the environment. Although she will not be making all of the products she utilizes, recipes will be available and she will facilitate the making of an all-purpose cleaner for each participant to take home. In addition to Glaubiuss presentation, Jenny Druda from Straighten Up will share some of her organizing skills. Through the process of de-cluttering and rearranging, a person can update their environment to greater serve a familys current lifestyle or create space for the life each member wants. An organized environment saves you time and money, and makes ef“ cient use of your space. This part of the evenings program will touch on basic organizing concepts, paper management issues and the challenge of how to part with things.Ž Come and get inspired. The workshop will be held on March 13 at the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office, beginning at 6:30 p.m. There is limited space. Register by calling the extension of“ ce at 926-3931. There is a $10 registration fee. All ingredients for a few cleaning products will be furnished. Green solutions for spring cleaningTime to get Wild About Wakulla By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Special to The NewsFlorida Organic Growers and North Florida Community Colleges Green Industries Institute will present a free workshop about the process of becoming USDA Certi“ ed Organic on Monday, April 23 at Green Industries Institute in Monticello. The workshop begins at 8:30 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m., and is designed for current and prospective farmers, as well as service providers who are interested in learning and sharing about the organic certification process. Becoming USDA Certi“ ed Organic can seem intimidating with the paperwork and inspections,Ž said Claire Mitchell, Sustainable Agriculture Programs Manager at Green Industries. However, the presenters from FOG will walk participants through the process of becoming certified to make it all more manageable, and then well take a look outside at the Green Industries growing space to see what organic farming really looks like.Ž FOG Executive Director Marty Mesh and FOG Project Coordinator Jose Perez will lead an in-depth presentation that will touch on the basics and critical parts of the organic regulations, the organic certi“ cation process, how to prepare applications and how prepare for an organic inspection. That will be followed by a farmer panel featuring currently certified organic farmers, and “ nally an interactive tour of the Green Industries Institute by Claire Mitchell. During the free, working lunch, the workshop will also include some time to discuss miscellaneous topics relevant to growers in the region. Registration forms can be printed out from the Green Industries website at nfcc.edu/green-industries. Mail completed registration forms to P.O. Box 12311, Gainesville FL 32604, or fax to (352) 377-8363. For more information about FOG and the workshop, call (352) 377-6355 or e-mail jose@foginfo.org. For questions concerning Green Industries, call (850) 973-1702 or email mitchellc@nfcc.edu.Special to The News From art shows and wild land tours, to special presentations and worm gruntin, Wakulla Countys Wild About Wakulla Week will boast several area festivals that will educate, entertain and satisfy even the most seasoned traveler. Wakulla County communities of St. Marks, Panacea, Sopchoppy and Crawfordville will each host unique cultural festivals during the week of April 14-22. During the week, Certi“ ed Green Guides will lead tours of the natural wonders of Wakulla County, where more than 70 percent of the county is pristine public land and more than 85 percent of the coastline is unadulterated and will be protected forever. Complete tour details can be found on the festival website, wildaboutwakulla.com. The of“ cial festivities will begin with the much-anticipated Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival. Held annually since 2000, this all-day outdoor event has become a Big Bend treasure that is fun for the whole family. Wondering what Worm Gruntin is? The answer is at the festival! The website wormgruntinfestival.com has more information. Wakulla Wildlife Festival will be held April 20 and 21 at Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park. This began as a modest songbird gathering and has grown into a two-day celebration full of tours, “ ne art, living history demonstrations and dynamic presentations. This festivals growth is no wonder since its tours focus on the diverse, rare and magni“ cent beauty of Wakulla Springs. A $6 per vehicle donation will be welcomed at the entrance station and pre-registration is encouraged as tours “ ll quickly to capacity in advance of festival dates. Interested participants may visit wakullawildlifefestival.org for more information. The Wild About Wakulla celebrations will “ nish out riverside in St. Marks with interpretive coastal boat and historical walking tours from Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee.Ž This special program provides a taste of the forthcoming Viva Florida 500 festivities to be held into the next year. In 2013, Florida will reach a signi“ cant milestone, the 500th anniversary of Juan Ponce de Leons arrival on Floridas east coast. Tour times are listed on the of“ cial festival website. Lodging is available during the festivities at a historic lodge, a country club, an authentic “ sh camp, popular hotels and charming bed and breakfasts. The website visitwakulla.com details these and other accommodations. The support of Comcast and The Wakulla News as Wild About Wakulla Weeks major advertising sponsors is a very much appreciated service to the communities and events involved. The festivals website, wildaboutwakulla.com, was designed by Wakulla High Schools Web Design class as part of Wakulla High Schools Career and Technical Education Program.Organic certi“ cation workshop is set FILE PHOTOSopchoppys Worm Gruntin Festival kicks off the events of Wild About Wakulla. Last year, these young men tried their hand at gruntin worms.The free workshop is sponsored by Florida Organic Growers and will be held in Monticello on April 23. Beach body bingo! – Get FitSustain your Energy … Yoga Health, Page 4B What caused the solar company Solyndra to fail? EarthTalk, Page 3B ThE Battle of Natural Bridge Photos, Page 10B IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED FISH LIMIT IS NOW www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, March 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, March 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, March 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, March 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  WAKULLA CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Tuesday, March 13  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will meet at noon at the TCC Wakulla Center in Crawfordville. Lunch is provided. Call (850) 926-9005 for more information. Thursday, March 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY will hold a public forum ay 7 p.m. at the library with guest speaker County Administrator David Edwards. He will discuss the challenges facing county government. Everybody is welcome to attend.Special EventsThursday, March 8  “A WOMAN’S WORK IN WAKULLA: Exploring the Role of Women Through the Ages and Stages of Wakulla County” will be presented by Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society at 7 p.m. at the library. This will be a panel discussion. The event moderator will be Rachel Sutz Pienta. The panelists include Tammie Bar eld, Madeleine Carr, Andrea Carter, Anginita Rosier, Colleen Skipper, Susan Solburg and Betsy Smith.  SMALL POULTRY FLOCKS FOR HOME USE class will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Learn the latest techniques for raising poultry for meat and eggs. Topics covered in class will include care and feeding, housing, breed selection, protection from predators, and much more. Friday, March 9  WAKULLASTORY: “A Hankerin’ for Headhuntin’ will be presented at 7 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy Highschool. It is presented by The Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society, written by Herb Donaldson, artistic director, based on the writings of Elizabeth Fisher Smith, creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly Magazine.  FOURTH ANNUAL SPRING FESTIVAL will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. at Riversink Elementary School. There will be games, bingo, silent auction, food and a raf e.  WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL SPRING TALENT SHOW will be held at the WHS Auditorium. The doors open at 6 p.m. with the show starting at 7 p.m. There will be two bands this year. “Arrive Alive” will be the opening act, beginning at 6:30 p.m. and “Hammaknockers” will be playing in the second part of the show. There will be dancers and belly dance routine. There is a slam poet, rap group, guitar playing vocalists and piano playing vocalists and solo vocalists. The cost for students is $4 and adults is $6. Proceeds will help pay the rising cost for this year’s State Thespian Trip. Saturday, March 10  SECOND ANNUAL LOW COUNTRY BOIL will be held at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville from 6 to 10 p.m. The event will feature a Low Country Boil dinner, and live music by JB’s Zydeco Zoo.  PUBLIC TALK ON “From Google Earth to Google Embryo: Exploring the Spheres We Grow From” will be held at 7:30 p.m. at Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory, 222 Clark Drive, Panacea. Dick and Natalie Gordon are new scientist volunteers who are establishing an Embryogenesis Center. Admission is free, membership encouraged. Contact Richard Gordon at 984-5297 or by email DickGordonCan@gmail. com.  FOURTH ANNUAL JESUS RIVER FESTIVAL will be held at Sopchoppy City Park from noon until dark. Additional information can be found at jesusriverfest.com.  WAKULLASTORY: “A Hankerin’ for Headhuntin’ will be presented at 3 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy Highschool. It is presented by The Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society, written by Herb Donaldson, artistic director, based on the writings of Elizabeth Fisher Smith, creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly Magazine.  HABITAT FOR HUMANITY RE-STORE will have a clothing give-away from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The store is located at 940 Shadeville Highway. Call 926-4544 for more information. Sunday, March 11  FLAG, Freedom and Liberty Advocacy Group, will meet at 4 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. They will be discussing the 2012 national election and ways to promote a government which retains individual liberty while respecting the Constitution. All are welcome to participate. Tuesday, March 13  GOING GREEN: Spring Cleaning Solutions by Shelley Swenson will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. There is limited space, register by calling 926-3931. There is a $10 registration fee. Ingredients for a few cleaning products will be furnished. Thursday, March 15  FREE LECTURE on “Adventures in Northwest Florida Archaeology “ by Dr. Nancy White, Professor of Archaeology at the University of South Florida, will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. The free lecture is hosted by the Florida Public Archaeology Network, University of West Florida and the Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center. This lecture series is free and open to everyone.  RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL THEATRE TROUPE will present “Next Victim, Please” at 7 p.m. This is a tongue-in-cheek murder mystery. Admission is free, but donations are graciously accepted. The concession will be open prior to the show and at intermission. Saturday, March 17  ST. PATRICK’S DAY FESTIVAL AND PARADE will be held at Hudson Park by the Crawfordville Lions Club. Breakfast in the park will be held at 8 a.m. The parade will start at 10 a.m. There will be several performances throughout the day, including Taekwondo, Coast Charter School, Aleene Benson Irish and Scottish Fiddle Players, Rick Tittle, John Smith and Ken “Muf n Man,” and the Wakulla Wigglers.  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road, from 10 a.m. to noon. All spectrum children and their siblings are invited to this play date. Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times. Children need to bring their favorite train and a snack and drink.  GROW MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES class will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Learn about fertilizer, lime, compost, green manures and application methods. Learn how to produce fruits and vegetables in the back yard.  ST. PADDY’S DAY FAMILY BASH will be held at Beef O’ Brady’s at 6 p.m. Acoustic duo Hot Tamale will play from 6 to 9 p.m.  WATERS JOURNEY: Following the Water to Wakulla Springs tour will be held from 8 a.m. to noon led by Jim Stevenson, an expert biologist. This a tour of the Wakulla Spring Basin which examines the sources and traces the water journey to the world famous Wakulla Springs. Cost of the tour is $18. Tour departs from the TCC campus parking lot at 8 a.m. and ends at the tower overlooking the spring at noon. For more information, call 926-3376. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com ‘A Women’s Work in Wakulla,’ a panel discussion, at the library at 7 p.m. WHS Spring Talent Show at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. Low County Boil at 3Y Ranch from 6 to 10 p.m. WakullaStory at 3 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy High School.ThursdayFridaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, March 8  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway.  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for a budget workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, March 12  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim DirectorFriday Night Movie On Friday, March 9, we are proud to show the latest “ lm by Martin Scorsese which just won “ ve Academy Awards. This “ lm based upon the bestselling novel, The Invention of Hugo CabretŽ by Brian Selznick stars Asa Butter“ eld, Ben Kingsley and Chloe Grace Moretz, and tells the tale of Hugo Cabret who is an orphan boy living in the walls of a train station in the 1930s in Paris. He fixes clocks and other gadgets as he learned to from his father and uncle. The only thing that he has left that connects him to his father is an automaton that doesnt work; Hugo has to “ nd its heart-shaped key. On his adventures, he meets with a cranky old man who works in the train station and his adventure-seeking god-daughter. Hugo “ nds that they have a surprising connection to his father and the automaton, and as he discovers it, the old man starts remembering his past and his signi“ cance to the world of “ lm-making. This wondrous PG (for thematic material, action, and smoking) rated “ lm shows that Scorsese can make a family “ lm just as well done as his classics Raging Bull,Ž GoodfellasŽ and The Departed.Ž Capital City Bank will once again be supplying popcorn and water for donations to the library. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Womens Panel Discussion at WCPL To honor Womens History Month and in conjunction with the Palaver Tree Theatre Company, the Wakulla County Historical Society will be presenting A Womens Work in Wakulla: Exploring the Role of Women Through the Ages and Stages of Wakulla County. This program begins at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 8 at the Library. This discussion will be moderated by Rachel Sutz Pienta with panelists including Tammie Barfield, Madeleine Carr, Andrea Carter, among others. Please come out for whats sure to be an illuminating program which will lead directly into the WakullaStory events this weekend! Computer Classes for the week Were offering two computer classes over the next week, both on Wednesday, March 14. At 9:30 a.m., we have Computer Basics: Getting Started followed by Microsoft PowerPoint: Getting Started at 1:30 p.m. As always seating is limited so please register early. The schedule of computer classes for March and April is available at the front desk, and on our website, www.wakullalibrary. org. Please take advantage of these free classes were proud to offer to the community. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 3BDear EarthTalk: What caused Solyndra, a leading American solar panel maker, to fail last fall and what are the implications for U.S. alternative energy industries? Walt Bottone Englewood, N.J. Solyndra was a California-based maker of thin“ lm solar cells af“ xed to cylindrical panels that could deliver more energy than conventional ” at photovoltaic panels. The companys novel system mounted these ” exible cells, made of copper, indium, gallium and diselenide (so-called CIGS), onto cylindrical tubes where they could absorb energy from any direction, including from indirect and re” ected light. Solyndras technology was so promising that the U.S. government provided $535 million in loan guarantees „ whereby taxpayers foot the payback bill to lenders if a borrower fails. And fail Solyndra did. In September 2011, the company ceased operations, laid off all employees, and “ led for bankruptcy. What caused this shooting star of alternative energy to burn out so spectacularly after just six years in business and such a large investment? Part of what made Solyndras technology so promising was its low cost compared to traditional photovoltaic panels that relied on once costlier silicon. When Solyndra launched, processed silicon was selling at historic highs, which made CIGS a cheaper option,Ž reports Rachel Swaby in Wired Magazine. But silicon producers overreacted to the price run-up and flooded the market.Ž The result was that silicon prices dropped 90 percent, eliminating CIGS initial price advantage. Another problem for Solyndra was the falling price of natural gas „ the cleanest of the readily available fossil fuels „ as extractors implemented new technologies including horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to get at formerly inaccessible domestic reserves in shale rock. In 2001 shale gas accounted for two percent of U.S. natural gas output, while today that number is closer to 30 percent. The result of this increased supply is that the price of natural gas has fallen by some 77 percent since 2008, meaning utilities can produce electricity from it much cheaper as well. Renewables simply cant compete,Ž adds Swaby. The “ nal blow to Solyndra was Chinas creation of a $30 billion credit line for its nascent solar industry. The result: Chinese “ rms went from making just six percent of the worlds solar cells in 2005 to manufacturing more than half of them today,Ž says Swaby. U.S. market share is now just seven percent. Low natural gas prices have also hurt other renewables, especially given the slow economy and its sti” ing effect on innovation. To wit, the rate of new wind-turbine installations in the U.S. has declined by more than half since 2008. The fossil fuel industry and its allies in Congress clearly see the solar and wind industries as a threat and will try to kill [them],Ž says Representative Edward Markey, a top Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Regardless of the challenges in furthering renewables, the White House remains committed to the greener path. In his recent State of the Union, President Obama renewed the call for a federal Renewable Energy Standard that would force utilities to derive signi“ cant percentages of their power from cleaner, greener sources. This would provide much-needed regulatory uniformity and a more robust and consistent market for renewable power, wherever solar panels, wind turbines or other equipment happen to be manufactured. Dear EarthTalk: I was in Los Angeles recently and the smog was not nearly as bad as when I visited 15 years ago. Is it really better now, and if so, how did it get that way? Or did I just happen to visit on a good day? Marjorie Hicke Atlanta Los Angeles is almost as famous for its choking smog „ a haze of groundlevel ozone and particulate pollution that can aggravate asthma and other respiratory problems „ as for its Hollywood stars. The reason so much smog forms there is because the city is in a low basin surrounded by mountains, with millions of cars and industrial sites spewing emissions into the air. But thanks to tougher state and federal air quality standards, L.A. residents can breathe easier than theyve been able to for decades. According to the nonprofit Environment California, air pollution from cars and trucks across the state has decreased since the 1970s by more than 85 percent, with peak smog levels in the city of Los Angeles itself dropping some 70 percent. Meanwhile, Californias South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) has been tracking smog levels in the area since 1976, and reports the number of ozone advisories „ where residents are advised to stay indoors due to unhealthy local accumulations of smog „ fell from a high of 184 days in 1977 to between zero and a few days a year now. Californias efforts to reduce air pollution from cars and trucks have made the states air cleaner than it has been in decades and Californians are healthier as a result,Ž says Bernadette Del Chiaro, Environment Californias clean energy advocate. This is especially notable because the number of miles driven in California doubled since the 1970s even though emissions signi“ cantly dropped „ meaning that vehicles have gotten considerably more fuel ef“ cient over the years. The technologies found on new car lots today were practically unimaginable even 20 years ago, much less 40 years ago,Ž adds Del Chiaro. Yet thanks to strong policies, California has pushed the auto industry to innovate and engineer a greener, cleaner car.Ž According to Environment Californias research, a typical new car today is more than 99 percent cleaner burning than its 1960s counterpart. An older car produces about a ton of smog-forming pollution every 100,000 miles; a new car generates only 10 pounds over the same distance. This improvement saves consumers money at the pump as well as health care expenses and lives due to reduced pollution loads. And a new generation of hybrid and electric cars is driving automotive ef“ ciency to even newer heights. Updated federal air quality standards implemented in 2008 have also helped reduce ozone alert days in California and elsewhere. But despite this progress, environmental and public health advocates are urging federal lawmakers to raise air quality standards even higher. The goal is to get ground level ozone, a chief contributor to smog, no more prevalent than the range of 60-70 parts per billion averaged over eight hours, as unanimously recommended by an independent board of air experts and scientists created under the Clean Air Act to provide periodic review and recommendations on air quality standards. The Obama administra-tion reportedly considered updating the 2008 standard last summer but decided to table the decision until 2013 given economic priorities. Lets hope that the economy turns around enough in the meantime so that industry wont push back too hard against raising the federal standards.GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport CT 06881 or e-mail earthtalk@emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www. emagazine.com/earthtalk/ archives.php. What caused the solar company Solyndra to fail? Low natural gas prices, competition from China and other factors helped sink innovative American solar panel maker, Solyndra, despite its having received $535 million in government loan guarantees. But the Obama administration is not deterred and has renewed efforts to force utilities to derive signi“ cant percentages of their power from cleaner, greener sources.ZACHARY GRAHAM/FlickrA drop in prices of silicon and natural gas, plus competition from China, ultimately led Solyndra to declare bankruptcy 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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5 Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2 Goto http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTHOne of the biggest misconceptions about our source of Energy is that its out there somewhere. The truth is that Energy is within us, ready and waiting for us to access its super colossal potential. Our life Energy is an innate intelligence that masterminds everything from healing wounds to maintaining our breath while we sleep. This Energy within us is part of the ocean of universal Energy that governs all life. We can tap into it through our individual currents. The ways that we breathe, think, eat, work and move all contribute to the quality of Energy that manifests in our lives. Breath is an essential link to our vitality. By consciously directing it, we can calm anxiety, awaken our innate vibrancy and induce states of heightened awareness. Breath control is as powerful and potent as arti“ cial substances. Within each of our bodies is a fully stocked apothecary. But we dont need to take drugs to feel the enthusiasm and invigorating enjoyment of Energy. Simply by getting excited about life or entertaining positive, compelling visions, our bodies automatically produce that boost our vitality and have a positive effect on the immune system. The “ eld of knowledge known as psychoneuroimmunology studies how negative thought and anxious worry drain Energy and how positive, life-enhancing thoughts boost our resistance to disease. When we are de“ cient in Energy, it can mean that we lack some form of nutrition. The very act of eating is a spiritual experience. Many people pray over their food in gratitude and as a way to imbue it with healing Energy. In order to sustain our creative energy, we need to take responsibility for the inner atmosphere we create through eating. Sometimes, not eating for short periods can be enlivening. Overtaxing the body without giving it a break, like never changing the oil in your car, creates a buildup of dirt and residue. When we purify the diet or brie” y fast, we give our system a rest, a chance to heal from abusive habits. During those times when we choose to be empty, we can be “ lled with spirit. Filling up every moment of your day and working yourself to the point of exhaustion drains your Energy. Tired or sick animals instinctively rest, whereas humans tend to run themselves ragged trying to do just one more thing. Learn as much as you can about your own Energy cycles by listening and responding to your bodys messages. Play with yoga postures at the edge … not so far that you strain yourself nor so effortlessly that you are unchallenged. This healthy edge is different for everyone. Yoga permits us to recycle this power so that it is freed up for productive and useful purposes. We maximize our potential, transforming daily life into opportunities for experiencing more aliveness. Do more yoga!Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 3800140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Sustain the Energy that sustains you Its March, our warm weather and beach season is right around the corner. We have talked about health and wellness, road safety and our heart. But now its almost time for fun in the sun. We are getting ready to don our bikinis and surf shorts and hit the beach. Now is the time to try on those bikinis in front of that department store mirror and realize something isnt right. For goodness sake, we dont need the saggy booties, bubba belly and bingo arms to get in our way of looking great in our favorite beach attire. This article is simply for those three areas that concern us before we start our sun rituals. They are simple ways to work all these out without even leaving your house. We will start with our gluteus maximus (The Butt!) DONKEY KICKS On your hands and knees with your back straight, slowly lift one leg bring into body and kick out, bring back in and repeat! Then switch to other leg. Try to start slowly and have your goal 100 on each leg. Great for butts. SINGLE LEG ROMANIAN DEADLIFTS Stand with feet hip-width apart, right foot raised off the floor and right arm extended in front of you. Bending forward from your hips and keeping your back flat, raise your right leg straight behind you until your body forms a TŽ and your right arm hangs down from your shoulder. Return to start. Thats one rep. Complete all reps, then repeat on the other side. If your balance is an issue, place a chair next to the side of the stationary leg to hold on for support. This is also excellent for the core as balance is gained! CHAIR SQUATS Next take a chair and stand about a foot in front of it with your legs and feet in the same starting position. Holding hands away from you or in the up position bend your knees and squat down until your butt touches the chair, then push back. You will be surprised how much this one will work your glutes and hamstrings! Dont hold on! You will notice improvements by doing these exercises daily. Trying to keep your reps high around 15 to 20 and working your way up to three sets. Now the arms. Most women and men do not like sagging skin on the back of their arms, there are simple home exercises for these also. CHAIR DIPS Sit on chair with your feet touching the floor. Place your hands at the sides of your body, grasping the front edge of the seat and slide your butt off the chair and in front of it. Avoid touching the chair. Slowly lower your body toward the ” oor until your arms at a 90-degree angle. Slowly raise your body back and repeat. WALL PUSH UPS Facing the wall an arms length away, place hands on wall at shoulder level. Slowly lean your body towards the wall while bending elbows outward. Once your nose is almost touching wall slowly bring body back by straightening the elbows at starting positions. Repeat. These two exercises will de“ nitely help your triceps and tone your arms. In addition, the push-ups will help your chest and biceps. Push-ups are an easy exercise to do … once you feel strong enough move your push-ups to the ” oor. You will notice improvements in not only your arms, but your chest and your abdominals getting tighter. There are numerous ways to complete a push-up, “ nd the one that “ ts you best and do it! Our bikini would not be worn with-out tight abs, you dont have to have a six-pack just a nice toned belly. The abdominals are broken into three different targeted areas of the abs … the lower abs, the obliques and the upper abs. This is a breakdown of one exercise for each targeted area: REVERSE CRUNCHES Reverse Crunches target the lower abdominal muscles. While lying on your back with knees bent, bring your lower body towards your upper body as far as you can while contracting your abdomen. Slowly lower your knees back to starting position. Repeat. Try to exhale as you bring your lower body towards your upper body and hold for one second to increase the intensity of the exercise. BICYCLE CRUNCH EXERCISE Bicycle crunches are targeting the oblique abdominal muscles. Lie ” at on the ” oor on your back with your fingertips at the base of your head. Tighten your abdominal muscles, bring your knees up to a 45-degree angle, and lift your shoulder blades off the ground. Turn your upper body to the left, bringing the right elbow toward the left knee and extending your right leg and switch sides, bringing the left elbow toward the right knee. Continue this pedaling motion, slowly, try to avoid pulling on the neck. Repeat! ABDOMINAL CRUNCHES This is the most popular abdominal exercise, next to the sit-ups. Crunches work the abdominal muscles by contracting your body until your core muscles get tight. Lie on your back with your knees bent and your hands holding the side of your head or at the nape of your neck. (Remember not to pull your neck) Lift your shoulder blades and torso until your back is a few inches above the ” oor and hold for one second. Then return by lowering your body to the ” oor. Repeat!Okay, now you have some of the tools you need to get that body into shape before one toe digs into that beautiful warm sand. So get moving. Remember to see your doctor before starting any exercise routine to ensure that you are healthy and ready. Good luck and good shopping for that summer bikini! If you would like more information please go to either womens“ tness.com or mens“ tness.com for more exercises, health articles, and nutrition ideas. Live Long and Healthy.Pamela Chichester, CFT, SPN is manager of Body-Tek 24-Hour Gym in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348.Beach body bingo! Time to get in shape – beach season is right around the corner GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTER Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain PARTNE R… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 5B This page sponsored in part by:

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177Anthony E. Dyer Enterprises INTERIOR and EXTERIOR CLEANINGroofs, gutters, yard care and much more... Call today for an estimate!850-980-2018TONY DYER Licensed Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsCoastal StorageLow Rates / Short Term Contracts!850-509-1740 5X10s and 10X20s spaces for lease. Additional discount on already low rates w/contracts! BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Your Spanish Communicator• Document Translations (Spanish /English) • Conference Calls • Telephone Excellence Skills Training (English/Spanish) • Telephone outgoing voice recordingcall LKR COMMUNICATION & TRANSLATIONS, LLC for rates! 850-509-7129 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you”LICENSED AND INSURED Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net ESTATE SALE(“rst of several)Fri/Sat, March 9 & 10, 9AM-1PM 658 Pine Street, Alligator Point HABITAT for HUMANITYRe-StoreCLOTHING GIVE-AWAY! JOB ANNOUNCEMENTCONTRACTOR:I have new TGI Beams. All 3.5 wide by 14 inches tall. Theres three at 16 feet long and 11 at 10 feet long. Yours for $200. Call 850-962-9092 or 732828-2632. Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Trades/ Skills ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICC&L Automotive, Sopchoppy, Call Corey Crum at 850-528-5113 or Shawn Lawhan at 850-519-3443 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLESat. 8a-noon treadmill, punching bag, dishes, shoes, purses, household & tool Misc. 7 Birch Ct St Marks Sat9am-4pm My Last Yard Sale!! Everything Must Go! 135 Burnt Pine Loop Sporting Goods 6 FT. POOL TABLE Full rack of Balls & Two sticks $250. obo 850-212-3252 Mobile Homes For Rent Crawfordville2bed/2bath single wide MH on private lot North of Crawfordville $550. mo. 1st, Last & Deposit required 850-960-4230 SOPCHOPPY3/1, Covered screen. Porch, large wooded lot,$52/mo( incls garbage) + a deposit (850) 566-4124 Real Estate For Rent HOME ON ACREAGEHome on 3 acres. 2BR/2BA. porch, storage building, large oak trees, conveniently located near post office and Walgreens $625/mo 850-251-1253 Brenda Hicks Realty Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 3BR/2BA, Medart,big-fenced yard, very clean, front/back porches, shed. No pets or smoking. $850/month+deposit. 850-545-0126 Must see!! CrawfordvilleGeorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $875, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 443-3300 WATER. BIRDS FISHING2/1, w/covered deck over looking private dock, newly refurbished, completely furnished or neg unfurnished $900 rent + utility fee (850) 524-1026 Commercial Real Estate WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Lots For Sale 2-Acre Lots For Sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Services Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5139-0308 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, March 12, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE : Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 March 8, 2012 5144-0308 PUBLIC NOTICE Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority (NWFTCA) Meeting Notice. The NWFTCA recently commsissioned HDR Engineering, Inc. to prepare a major update to their regional Master Plan, originally adopted in 2007. As part of the initial phase of the update, HDR is working with key stakeholders (Florida DOT, FHWA, city and county reps.,etc.) and the Authority to help analyze future transportation projects by assessing their respective economic benefits, developing an investment plan and proposing viable funding strategies. A series of workshops will be held during this process. The first workshop will be held at two alternate locations: March 13, 2012 from 10:00am to 1:00pm Central Time at the Florida State University Holley Academic Center, Panama City campus located at 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City, Florida and March 14, 2012 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm Central Time at the Days Inn & Suites, Navarre Conference Center, Room D located at 8700 Navarre Parkway, Navarre, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or by email Alicia.Stephen@hdrinc.com Please RSVP by March 6 if you plan to attend. March 8, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5146-0315 (3/24/12 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 24,2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: MARANDA COX JENNIFER WHITING HILL SARAH E. SKIPPER Before the sale date of Saturday, March 24, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. March 8 & 15, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5141-0308 (3/17 Sale-ABC Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 17, at 3:00 PM, at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini Warehouse containing personal property of: DESMOND JONES NELSON WOODS NORMAN BUTCH McCALLISTER Payments must be made before Thursday, March 15, by 12:00 noon.The owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or by paying in person at the warehouse location.March 1 & 8, 2012 4Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $425mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerGARAGE SALE!!SATURDAY MARCH 10, 9AM-4PM at 87 Duncan Drive, CrawfordvilleInfant & girls Spring & Summer clothes galore!!! 0-2t. Over 400 excellent items to choose from. Crib & mattress, couch & loveseat... more! Spring Scentsy OPEN HOUSE TOO! Call Janet 519-0720.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 7B We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month.2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Island 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2BR/2BA with separate 1BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres – $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg.14 Windy Court 3BR/2BA Available 4/1/12 $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 47 Jasmine 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre $1,200 Mo. Available April 1. No Smoking/Small Pets w/approval 20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 917 Jessica 3BR/2BA $800 Mo. Pets ok w/approvalAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate Susan Jones, GRIRealtor566-758491 Culbreath Lane $99,900 Remodeled DWMH nestled on 5 beautiful acres. Spacious oorplan. Large family/living room w/wood burning replace & built in shelving. New ooring, paint & wood blinds throughout. New appliances!! Large deck great for grilling & entertaining. Storage shed & oversized double carport. Enjoy Scenic Views, Flowing Acreage, Majestic Oaks & all nature has to offer in this private location. Take advantage of Wakulla County’s A-rated schools and be only 10 minutes from Capital Circle. Seller will pay 3% of buyer’s closing cost & Home Warranty. HELD ON FEBRUARY 23, 2012MARCH 1, 2012 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL A Business -Community (ABC) School Program, Wakulla County RFP# 12/13 -01 The School Board of Wakulla County requests interested parties to submit formal sealed bids/proposals for the above referenced bid. SCOPE OF WORK: The School Board of Wakulla is seeking proposals from qualified businesses with operations in Wakulla County, Floridainterested in partnering with the District in A Business-Community (ABC)School Program. The proposal is for the Business to provide the facility, including the associated operating and upkeep expenses, in which the Wakulla County School District (WCSD) will provide an educational program for the children of the business employees for 6.5 hours per day or as consistent with the Wakulla County School Board (WCSB) approved elementary school hours and calendar. A Business-Community (ABC) School is defined as a public school offering instruction to students from kindergarten through third grade in a facility owned or leased and operated by a business. The Department of Education 2012-2013 average class size requirement is eighteen students. Eighteen is also the minimum average class size to achieve the effective, efficient use of the taxpayers educational and fiscal resources. Proposals that commit to meeting the maximum and minimum class size criteria or that proved for reimbursement to the Wakulla County School District for any loss in FTE educational funding revenues resulting from the failure of the business to achieve the minimum enrollment will receive the highest consideration. Students in need of or enrolled in special programs or that require special services can best be served at the Wakulla County Schools that offer those programs and services identified in the students individual educational plan. Parents shall be responsible for providing all transportation to and from school or to the other WCSD facilities during, before and after school for the students enrolled in a Business-Community (ABC). Florida Business Community (ABC) Schools shall comply with the constitutional class size requirements. Facilities to a house a FloridaBusiness-Community (ABC) School must comply with the State Uniform Building Code for Educational Building Construction adopted pursuant to section 1013.37, Florida Statutes, and must meet state and local health, environmental, and safety laws and codes. ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS: This package can be requested by mail at Wakulla County School Board, Post Office box 100, Crawfordville, Fl orida 32326 or by calling 850-926-0065 DOCUMENT COST: $1.50 BID BOND: None PRE/BID PROPOSAL CONFERENCE:: Pre-Proposal Conference Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 10 A.M. Wakulla County School Board Administrative Offices Conference Room 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DUE DATE/TIME: April 10, 2012@ 2:00P.M. Eastern The School Board of Wakulla County, Florida must receive bids no later than said date and time. Bids received after such time will be returned unopened. CONTACT: WILLIAM R. BRISTOL 850-926-0065 published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News March 8, 15, 2012 5148-0315 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5138-0308 Vs. Shell Point Residences, LLC, Case No.:2011-31-CA. Amended Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-314-CA IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, Plaintiff, vs. SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 12, 2011, entered in Case No. 2011-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, is the Plaintiff, and SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, and all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against any defendant named herein, are the Defendants. The Wakulla County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in Wakulla County, Florida, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, April 26, 2012, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBITS AŽ AND BŽ IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THIS SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. WITNESS, my hand and the seal of this Court on February 21, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND,As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A LOTS 7, 10, AND 11, BLOCK A, AND LOTS 1 THROUGH 5, LOTS 7 THROUGH 10 AND BEACH CLUB LOT, ALL IN BLOCK B, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices ALL OF BLOCK C, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND PHASE 2 MARINA BASIN RESERVATION AREA BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19, SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA, COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 85.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 133.17 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 103.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 08 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.19 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 06 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 13 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 61.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 42.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 20.61 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 23.63 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.66 FEET, TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 902.73 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 114.91 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 51 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 114.83 FEET) TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 73.91 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 34 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 34.93 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 34.61 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 129.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 38.38 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 32.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 63.07 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 110.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 6.13 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 165.37 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.70 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 58.84 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 2.47 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 67.44 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 94.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.08 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.20 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 33.94 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 43.86 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.79 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 70.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 79.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 64 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 159.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 86.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 41.89 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 16.70 FEET, THENCE CONTINUE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID LINE. A DISTANCE OF 50.64 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 22 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 65.42 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 107.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 10.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 168.31 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 156.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 21.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 01 SECOND EAST A DISTANCE OF 47.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 19.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 40.71 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 23.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 17.23 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 101.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.26 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 86 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 74.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.59 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 54.46 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 211.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 3.12 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CANALS BEGIN AT AN IRON PIN (LB #732) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 219.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 68.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 15.75 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS FOLLOWS: THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 9.88 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 45.34 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 62.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 135.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 189.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 60.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 60.11 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 60.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 60.21 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 11 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 130.83 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 75.56 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 92.14 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 60.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 52 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 60.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 60.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 06 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECOND WEST 60.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.01 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 117.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 30.16 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 104.63 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 115.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 130.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 44 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 60.01 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 51 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 60.12 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.56 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 23.22 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 04 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 100.03 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 99.61 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREE 12 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 100.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 7.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 543.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 260.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 474.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 121.54 FEET, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 21 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 99.10 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 364.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 275.66 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AND RUN THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 125.05 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1327.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-1Ž BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1198.08 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 43.11 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1167.13 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 875.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-2Ž COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1300.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 510.98 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF UNIT NO. 1 SHELL POINT BEACH AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 24 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 524.15 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH BOUNDARY AND RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 86.02 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 540.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 22 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 209.18 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 207.88 FEET), THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 370.90 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 606.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 227.66 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 226.32 FEET) THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.08 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com A RADIUS OF 1113.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 54 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 126.59 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 08 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 126.52 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 79 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 233.41 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 3154.71 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 225.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 1234.99 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP #4261, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 252.34 FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF UNIT 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED. THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 701.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1501.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 34.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 1244.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 43.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL GŽ BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 117 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 491.62 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 RIGHT OF WAY) SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 922.37 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 52 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 07 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 838.76 FEET. (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 23 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 810.15 FEET), THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.13 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1179.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 03 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 29 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 69.46 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 69.45 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 561.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL BŽ BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 6 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO.6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 11.38 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 59 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 77.70 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 71.66 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 78.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 68.91 FEET, THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 30.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 8.44 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 13.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 THENCE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 357.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CŽ COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 92.24 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 64.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 27.54 FEET TO A IRON PIN LB#732, THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 37.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 27.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 53.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 31.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 29.69 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 25.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 23.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 63.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 11.19 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 18.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 17.75 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 32 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 112.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 42 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 45.46 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 46.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 68.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 34 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 53.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 40.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 72.69 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 25.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL DŽ COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 20.04 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 35.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 125.12 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 17 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 40.23 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 43.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 24.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 29 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 40.19 FEET, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 40.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL EŽ COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 8 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 201.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 19.43 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 82.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 74.72 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 98.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 27.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 55.73 FEET, THENCE NORTH 22 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 93.65 FEET, THENCE NORTH 33 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 66.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 38 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 71.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 54.73 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 27.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 31.36 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 69.32 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 36.26 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 44 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 33.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 60.58 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 32 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 74.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 56.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 54.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 36 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 54.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 55.86 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 37.68 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 71.03 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 64.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 58.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 80 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 3.81 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 106.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 70.26 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 39 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 61.74 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 79.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 11.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 53.06 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 47.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 28 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 66.67 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 55.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 41.17 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 68.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 18.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 60.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 48.54 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 190.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL FŽ BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER (ALSO THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER) OF LOT 24 UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED, AND RUN THENCE ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 324.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 56 SECONDS EAST 220.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 8.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 8.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 95.91 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY AND RUN ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 07 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 18.42 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 26.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 29.89 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 65 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 31.85 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 37.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST 54.72 FEET, THENCE NORTH 77 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 54.99 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 47.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 56 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 31.43 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 35.33 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 22.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 75.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 65.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 65.38 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 36 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 53.31 FEET, THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 30.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 50.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 51.23 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 72.12 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 166.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXHIBIT B PERSONAL PROPERTY Shell Point Residences, LLC, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; Shell Point Investments, LLC; and Shell Point Reserve, LLC; and Shell Point 12, LLCs right, title and interest in the following described property pursuant to the Mortgage, and as such terms are defined therein: (i) all buildings, structures and improvements of every nature whatsoever now and hereafter on said Premises, (ii) all insurance policies, leases, subleases and other agreements affecting the use, enjoyment or occupancy of the Premises heretofore or hereafter entered into and all accounts, rents, revenues, issues, profits and all proceeds from the sale or other disposition of such agreements accruing and to accrue from said Premises, (iii) all gas, steam, electric, water and other heating, cooking, refrigerating, lighting, plumbing, ventilating, irrigating and power systems, machines, building materials, appliances, furniture, equipment, goods, inventory, supplies, fixtures and appurtenances and personal property of every nature whatsoever, which now or may hereafter pertain to or be used with, in or on said Premises, even though they may be detached or detachable, (iv) all easements, rights-of-way, licenses, privileges, gores of land, streets, ways, alleys, passages, sewer rights, waters, water rights, permits, development rights and powers and all estates, rights, titles and interests in any way belonging, relating or appertaining to the Premises, (v) all Accounts, Goods, Chattel Paper, Deposit Accounts, Farm Products, Instruments, Documents, General Intangibles, Inventory, Consumer Goods, Equipment, Fixtures and Investment Property, as the foregoing terms are defined in the Uniform Commercial Code, and all contract rights, franchises, books, records, plans, specifications, approvals and actions which now or hereafter relate to, are derived from or are used in connection with the Premises, or the use, operation, maintenance, occupancy or enjoyment thereof or the conduct of any business or activities thereon, (vi) all the tenements, hereditaments, appurtenances, reversions and remainders belonging or pertaining to the Premises, (vii) any and all judgments, awards, settlements, claims, demands, payments, proceeds or other income arising in connection with the Premises, (viii) any items described in those certain UCC-1 Financing Statements of even date herewith between Mortgagor and Mortgagee and (ix) any extensions, additions, increases, substitutions, replacements, parts, accessions, improvements, betterments, proceeds, products and renewals to any of the aforesaid property, whether now existing or hereafter arising, all of the foregoing being included in the term PremisesŽ, it being the intention of Mortgagor and Mortgagee that this Mortgage (which is to be filed for record in the real estate records of the county mentioned above) shall also constitute a security agreement and financing statement as to the Premises herein mortgaged under the Florida Uniform Commercial Code, and that Mortgagee have all rights and remedies of a secured party thereunder. March 1 & 8, 2012 5138-0308 5143-0308 Vs. McVey, Vonda M. Case# 2011-CA-35 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., Case Number: 2011-CA-35 Plaintiff, vs. VONDA M. MCVEY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VONDA M. MCVEY; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, UENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of foreclosure dated February 8, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA-35 of the Circuit Court of the Second 5145-0308 Vs. Atkinson, Johnny Mason 12-4-CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-4-CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE ESTATE OF JOHNNY MASON ATKINSON, SR.., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of JOHNNY MASON A TKINSON, SR., DECEASED,File Number 12 4 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate, Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville, Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the estate must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. The date of the first publication of this Notice is March 8, 2012. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Dated this 1st day of March, 2012. Personal Repr esentative: Teresa Ann Broxton 30 Windy Ct. Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attor ney for Personal Repr esentative: SHAWN P. GOLETZ, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No. 0338450 Smith, Thompson, Shaw, Minacci & Colon, P.A. 320 Thomasville Road, Fourth Floor Tallahassee, FL 32309 Tel: (850)893-4105 Fax: (850)893-7229 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News, March 8 and 15, 2012 5147-0315 Vs.Dicus, Charles, 37 2011 CA 002620 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.37 2011 CA 002620 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES C. DICUS III; MARCIA K. DICUS; CITY OF TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, ET AL Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SER VICE TO: CHARLES C. DICUS III; MARCIA K. DICUS, whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIF IED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property; COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF OAK RIDGE ROAD(STATE ROAD NO. 260-LEON COUNTY NO.2204) AND RUN THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 160.06 FET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 493.80 FEET TO A POINT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 164.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 149.70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 164.50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 149.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE WEST 12 FEET THEREOF SUBJECT TO AN INGRESS, EGRESS EASEMENT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 670, PAGE 179, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH: A 30 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8 TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF OAK RIDGE ROAD AND RUN THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 30.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT -OF-WAY AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 356.38 FEET THENCE NORTH 466.54 FEET THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 466.18 FEET TO A CRIMPED IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 356.93 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME KNOWN AS A 1997 VIN# GAFLV35A12887HH21 AND GAFLV35B12887HH21 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 3010 North Military Trail, Suite 300, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 on or before April 8, 2012 (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed therein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 22nd day of February, 2012 (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE COURT /S/ BY: Elizabeth L. Alford DEPUTY CLERK March 8 & 15, 2012 Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, Brent X. Thurmond as the Clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at public sale at the courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Wakulla County in Crawfordville, Florida with the sale commencing at 11:00AM on the 15th day of March 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: Legal Description: Lots 11, 12, and 13, Block 33, PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 5, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. To include a: 2007 CMHM Vin WHC016110GAA #0099539611 2007 CMHM Vin WHC016110GAB #0099539268 Address: Joe Mack Smith Road, Panacea, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of February, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk March 1st and 8th, 2012 5143-0308 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5136-0308 vs. Gibson, Tracy R. Case 2008-FC-130 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2008-FC-130 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L..P. FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. Plaintiff, vs. TRACY R. GIBSON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OFHOUSING ANDD URBAN DEVELOPMENT; STATE EMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 29th day of March, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 8 of a replat of Pelican Bay, subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 3, page 77 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 14th day of February, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later tha seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis Deputy Clerk March 1st & 8th 2012 5136-0308 5140-0308 Vs. Harris, John 65-2009-CA-000181 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000181 DIVISION JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JOHN HARRIS AKA JOHN H. HARRIS. JR., et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 21, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000181 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., is the Plaintiff and JOHN HARRIS AKA JOHN H. HARRIS, JR.; EVELYN BROWN; JANICE W. HARRIS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the29th day of March, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: AT THE NORTHWEST COMMENCE CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 72 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 963.89 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 71 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY 124.00 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DE5142-0308 Vs.Jefferson, Dennis, Case No.12-54-CA, Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.12-54-CA ROBERT LYTLE Plaintiff, vs. DENNIS JEFFERSON, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HIS UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HIM; HEIRS OF PEGGYE B. JEFFERSON, KNOWN AND UNKNOWN; HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: HEIRS OF PEGGYE B. JEFFERSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Parcel AŽ 0.33 of an acre; Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 15, of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 17 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 23.67 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 926.10 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 585 Page 163 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING and said Northerly right of way line run along said Westerly boundary line South 17 degrees 33 minutes 48 seconds East 181.90 feet to a concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Westerly boundary line run along the Northerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 South 72 degrees 26 minutes 44 seconds West 79.93 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Northerly boundary line run North 17 degrees 37 minutes 26 seconds West 181.57 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line North 72 degrees 12 minutes 35 seconds East 80.12 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.33 of an acre, more or less. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Parcel BŽ 0.33 of an acre; Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 15, of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 17 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 23.67 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 926.10 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 585 Page 163 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said Northerly right of way line run along said Westerly boundary line as follows: South 17 degrees 33 minutes 48 seconds East 181.90 feet; thence South 17 degrees 32 minutes 15 seconds East 181.42 feet to a re-bar marking the Southeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING continue along said Westerly boundary line South 17 degrees 43 minutes 58 seconds East 181.55 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Westerly boundary line run South 72 degrees 25 minutes 20 seconds West 80.18 feet; thence North 17 degrees 35 minutes 48 seconds West 181.48 feet to a re-bar marking the Southwest corner of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438; thence run along the Southerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 North 72 degrees 22 minutes 13 seconds East 79.74 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.33 of an acre, more or less. (hereinafter described as Parcel AŽ and Parcel BŽ the Subject PropertyŽ). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: February 23, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (seal) By: Desiree D Willis As Deputy Clerk March 1 & 8, 2012 GREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDSEAST 122.68 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. B-368, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONVEYS TO THE SOUTHERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1687.02 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 04 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 133.04 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 86 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 133.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, 71.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 330 LOWER BRIDGE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 22, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. March 1 & 8, 2012 5140-0308 F09048347 The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 – Page 9BBy DAVID ROYSE and MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 4 … Budget negotiators sent their thorniest issues to the respective budget chairmen this weekend, as both the Senate and House lined up priorities for the expected “ nal week of the session. On a few issues, there was some closure this week. Lawmakers signed off on a $1.35 million compensation package for William Dillon, who was imprisoned for 27 years for a murder he didnt commit. The Senate passed that bill early in the week and sent it to Gov. Rick Scott … who signed it a couple of hours later. The Legislature also this past week sent the governor a bill allowing students to give inspirational messagesŽ on an apparently limitless universe of subjects from God and the Founding Fathers to the Flying Spaghetti Monster and Kim Kardashian. While the bill was pushed by advocates for more Christian school prayer, hoping that more of that will happen at graduations, football games and other assemblies, they acknowledge that in an effort to render it constitutional, the plan will have to allow students to say anything they want with no interference from school of“ cials. Still, the fear remained among those in the religious and political minorities, that it will mean just what backers hope … lots of Christian prayers that will make public school a little more uncomfortable for Jews, Hindus, Muslims and others who thought the state schools were a haven from being subjected to the majoritys religion. But even with those two closely watched bills being sent from the fourth ” oor of the Capitol to the “ rst, where Scotts of“ ce is, there remained major issues for the “ nal week. Chief among them was the “ nishing touches of the budget, which remained unresolved on Sunday heading toward the deadline. Because of the waiting period between printing a proposed budget and passing it, budget leaders must reach agreement early in the week if theyre going to “ nish the session by Friday as they intend. Other major issues remain to be passed (or failed) in the “ nal week, including Scotts top priority … an overhaul of the personal injury protection auto insurance system. The two chambers have different bills on PIP … the House limiting lawyer fees, for example, while the Senate doesnt. The House plan (HB 119) also caps physician visits and excludes a number of professions from accepting patients. The Senate has taken a more limited approach in its plan (SB 1869), but has yet to take up its version on the ” oor. The governor has pushed hard for lawmakers to pass a PIP bill, and while it looked this week as if the Legislature was moving toward doing that, the “ nal measure still has to pass. The focus the last week, and through the weekend, however, was the budget. Budget writers did agree over the weekend on a couple high pro“ le items … keeping open Jefferson Correctional Institution near Tallahassee, while closing Hillsborough C.I. near Tampa. While the prisons budget is a tiny part of the overall spending plan, the plans by the executive branch to close various prisons this year has been a high pro“ le “ ght, mixed in with a “ ght over prison privatization, and its made the Capitol a second home for hundreds of men and women who spend their working hours walking through the states lockups dealing with its prisoners. Another budget breakthrough over the weekend was for another of Scotts priorities: freeing up more than $61 million to lure businesses to the state. The economic development money had been in doubt, but Senate Budget Chairman JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, said freeing up the cash for Scott was a good idea. The governor, Alexander said, has made good arguments that in his efforts to sell our state and bring quality employers in there, he needed to be able to make commitments faster.Ž Scott would also be able to ask the Legislative Budget Commission for permission to spend another $25 million in incentives, under the budget deal. But some of the big picture items were still being worked on Sunday, including how to divvy up nearly $300 million in cuts to higher education and major portions of the states health-care spending plan. Its not dire, if history is a guide. Lawmakers often enter the “ nal week of the session still working on a budget, and overtime sessions are rare. It usually gets worked out. INSURANCE ISSUES STUMBLE FORWARD While the House passed its reform package targeting the states no-fault automobile insurance system, a couple of other insurance issues remain. On the property insurance front, a proposal (SB 1346) to shift the way the state-backed insurer pays claims is only now on its way to the Senate ” oor after being changed to lower the states overall risk following a major storm. The House has already passed its version (HB 1127) of the change. Both bills shift the responsibility for repaying hurricane claims and reduce immediate assessments for coastal homeowners and the insurance companies who cover them. YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR? A college education in Florida is undeniably cheaper than in most other places. The House agreed this week that, generally, you get what you pay for, and thats whats holding the state back from being on the cutting edge in research. The quality of at least a couple of universities … right now, the University of Florida and Florida State University … could be improved if they could charge market rate tuition, the House decided this week in approving a bill to let them do that. The measure passed the House 85-28 on Friday. Those who opposed it say the idea prices poor students out of high quality higher education. STATE WORKERS ALREADY TESTY, NOW MIGHT BE TESTED The House this week passed a bill to allow state agencies to test employees for drugs if the agency leadership decides to. The bill (HB 1205) follows a similar requirement for random drug testing and pre-employment screening put in place a year ago by the executive order of Gov. Scott. That order is on hold pending the outcome of a court challenge, with Scott telling most agencies in June to hold off on the plan until the courts rule. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-Inverness, would limit the number of employees tested to no more than 10 percent of each agencys workforce every three months. The measure passed 79-37 over the objection of Democrats who said it violates the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution anyway and will likely be overturned. The Senate hasnt taken up the bill on the ” oor. Speaking of executive orders by Scott, the House also voted to give the governor more power this week, though backers of the measure said thats not what their bill did. But currently, by order of a court, the governor is limited in what he can tell his own agencies to do when it comes to rulemaking. The bill (HB 7055) would remove limits on the governors power in rulemaking unless the Legislature expressly says otherwise. That bill also awaits Senate approval in the “ nal week. A number of other bills passed this week by the House but waiting for the Senate include a measure requiring that local judges approve when a public hospital is to be sold or leased to a private entity (HB 711), a bill requiring a 24-hour waiting period before a woman can have an abortion (HB 277), a bill speeding up the process for foreclosures (HB 213) and a bill repealing a statewide septic tank inspection program (HB 999). And early in the week, the House passed HB 3, a ban on Internet-based gambling at the Internet cafesŽ that have sprung up around the state. The Senate, however, has indicated the measure wont pass there. REDISTRICTING The state Supreme Court heard oral arguments from the Legisla-ture on why political maps passed by lawmakers for the coming decade are constitutional, and from opponents on why theyre not. The court must let lawmakers know by March 9 what it thinks. Even if the court says before then what its assessment is, any changes that lawmakers make are widely expected to wait until a special session, probably later this month. TEXT … AND ALSO DRIVE FAST Earlier this week the House passed the agency bill for the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles and the bodys most vocal advocate for highway safety, Rep. Irv Slosberg, D-Boca Raton, lamented that the bill didnt include much in the way of actual highway safety requirements. One bill hed like to see passed … which looks highly unlikely … is one that would ban texting while driving. That wasnt part of the bill, he noted, so how could it really be called a highway safety bill? It could be argued that the inability to ban texting and driving goes beyond the immediate debate about the safety of that particular bad habit, and extends to a larger debate about the role of government in peoples lives. But, it might be that this Legislature just likes a little bit of danger, a little bit of speed. On Friday, the Senate gave the checkered ” ag, at least on that side of the Capitol, to SB 266, which makes auto racing Floridas of“ cial state sport. A PASSING OF NOTE Former state legislator and secretary of state George Firestone died this past week at 80. Firestone, a Democrat, was elected to the House in 1966, elected to the Senate in 1972, and then was elected secretary of state in 1978, serving until 1987. STORY OF THE WEEK: The House and Senate began budget negotiations trying to work out the “ nal spending plan ahead of the end of the session, scheduled for Friday. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Members, Ill be brief.Ž At least four members of the House or Senate beginning farewell speeches that then went on more than a half hour as the clock ticked away on the session this week and bills got closer to death for lack of time.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)On budget, and on time?Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 38 43 45 52 62 66 69 2 39 63 3 40 57 4 35 58 21 29 46 53 5 15 18 30 47 6 31 44 54 64 67 70 7 32 48 59 8 24 36 60 22 33 41 61 9 16 19 42 55 10 34 37 56 65 68 71 11 25 49 12 26 50 13 27 51ACROSS1.Daddy-o 5.Geishas'sashes 9.__-HawleyTariff Actof1930 14."Ismell__!" 15.Prefixwithcabor cure 16.Barbera'spartner inanimation 17.Sorvinoof "SummerofSam" 18.Friedman'ssubj. 19.Rejoinderto "Ain't!" 20.Diceydoingsat Canaveral? 23.Healingplants 24.Resultofa QB's mistake 25.Ambulanceorg. 28. OneofaHill100: Abbr. 29.Hollidaypartner 33.Brightlycolored seashell 35.PartsofTV broadcasts 37.Sendpacking 38.Alternative toa beerbelly? 43. Gobananas 44.Rudolph'smaster, forsh ort 45. Getevenfor 48.Cigarbutt? 49.Equi-kin 52."Alice"dinerowner 53.Victimofdeflation? 55.Kosher,so to speak 57.Commentatthe meatpacking plant? 62.YankeegreatLefty 64."__Nagila" 65.Lieinthesun 66.Roomydress 67.Ambleror Bogosian 68.Pastrychef,at times 69.Paveover 70.Cubiclefixture 71.PoeticdusksDOWN1.Wheregauchos roam 2.Birdonabaseball cap 3."CoatofMany Colors"singer Dolly 4.Likeuncirculated air 5.Cartelsince1960 6.GuitarwizardJeff 7.Pedestaltopper 8.Ten Command ments mount 9.Religionwithno formaldogma 10.Neitherfem.nor neut. 11.Likeafugitive 12.Lennon'slady 13.Confucianpath 21.Finishoff 22.Dad'sbro 26.Junkdrawerabbr. 27.Clockmaker Thomas 30.Toothpastetube abbr. 31.Fixes,asafight 32.__Vecchio(Arno crosser) 34."TheCaineMutiny" author 35.Sundayclosing 36.FedExedorfaxed 38.Pullanall-nighter 39.Beafflictedwith 40.LittleLeague membership restriction 41. Indyservicearea 42.Amtrak'sbullet train 46.Oldcoot 47.HumptyDumpty, e.g. 49.Pianist/politician P aderewski 50.Disgust 51.Catchallcategory 54.Marveledaloud 56.JazzpianistBlake 58.__cava 59.Produce-scale deduction 60."Wetryharder" company 61.Copewith,slangily 62.Needle-nosedfish 63.Bajacheer American Prole Hometown Content 2/12/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 2 32456 789 28 14 7398 9872 856 49623 79 200 9 HtCtt 614 8327 5 9 329475186 578691234 283 167945 745329618 196548372 931 284567 457916823 862753491 P A M P A S C R A M G A R O R I O L E H A V E O L E P A R T O N A G E L I M I T S T A L E A M E N V E N A U S E U P G E E Z E R O P E C A D A E G G B E C K R I G S O O H E D I D O L P O N T E T A R E S I N A I S E N T A V I S U N C P I T H A C K S H I N T O A C E L A M A S C W O U K E U B I E O N T H E R U N I G N A C E O N O M I S C S I C K E N T A O S E T H O T H E R S Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Yankees were once again repulsed at Natural Bridge. As with the original battle, which took place on March 6, 1865, when about 500 Union soldiers were beaten by an equal number of Confederate Home Guards and cadets from the West Florida Seminary, 147 years later the Yankees were again turned back at Natural Bridge. During the Civil War, Union forces landed at the St. Marks Lighthouse as part of an attempt to seize St. Marks. Confederates burned the bridge at Newport, forcing the Yankee soldiers to march upriver to attempt a crossing at Natural Bridge … where the St. Marks River ” ows and then goes underground and rises again in a series of natural features called swallets. This years re-enactment, a skirmish was held on Saturday, March 3, and a full-scale battle on Sunday, March 4, was the “ rst on the Rakestraw Property, which the state recently bought and was the site of the actual battle. Hundreds of spectators attended the battle and to tour the encampments. Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBattle of Natural Bridge Re-enactment Confederate skirmishers “ re on advancing Federal troops, above. Prior to the re-enactment, a Confederate of“ cer at an artillery battery, below left, shows where to expect the Yankees to come from. A cannon “ res, below right, as spectators watch the battle unfold. NP-0000653372 AreYouHard OfHearing? Amajornamebrandhearingaidprovider wishestoeldtestaremarkablenewdigital hearinginstrumentinthearea.Thisoffer isfreeofchargeandyouareunderno obligation. Theserevolutionary100%Digitalinstruments usethelatesttechnologytocomfortablyand almostinvisiblyhelpyouhearmoreclearly. ThistechnologysolvesthestoppedupearsŽ, andheadinabarrelŽsensationsomepeople experience. Ifyouwishtoparticipate,youwillbe requiredtohaveyourhearingtestedinour ofce FREEOFCHARGE todetermine candidacyandreviewyourresultswiththe hearinginstrumentswithourhearingcare specialist. Attheendofthisevaluation,youmay keepyourinstrument,ifyousodesire,at atremendoussavingforparticipatinginthiseldtest.Specialtestingwillbe donetodeterminetheincreasedtsofthistechnology. tsofhearingaidsvarybytypeanddegreeofhearingloss,noise environment,accuracyofhearingtest,andpropert. Thisisawonderful opportunitytodetermineifhearinghelpisavailableforyourhearingloss andgethearinghelpataveryordableprice.CALLNOWIFYOUWISHTOBE INCLUDEDINTHISFIELDTESTNOWThroughMarch 29, 2012 Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. The Log Cabin Barry Building www.snapper.com LT125 285Z *Additional 1 year of limited warranty coverage is available on select models in stock. Current limited warranty duration is 2 y ears. This promotion extends the product warranty coverage to a total of 3 year s from the date of purchase. Engines are warranted separate ly and are not included in the promotional warranty period described abov e. Qualifying products include: select walk-behind mower s, rear-engine riders, RE200, NXT lawn tractors, LT 300 lawn tractor s, YT400 yard tractors, 150Z, 200Z, 285Z, 300Z and 355Z. Produ cts not eligible for this rebate include: All SE series walk-behind mowers, LT125 lawn tractors, SP X lawn tractors, 400Z, 500Z, pre ssure washers, generators, tillers, chipper shredder, brush c utters, leaf blowers, leaf vac uums, mini cultivators, attachments and ac cessories. Limited warranty applies to residential consumer use only. Qualifying product must be purchased between 3/1/12 and 5/31/12. Completion of product registration by the selling dealer is necessa ry to validate the date of purchase for proof of warranty. N o other warranty or implied warranty by the manufacturer exists except where required by law. This warranty gives you speci“c rights th at vary from state to state. Offer valid only in U.S. and Canada. Refer to the products operators manual for warranty details. 1 YEAR OF ADDITIONAL PRODUCT WARRANTY COVERAGE AT NO ADDITIONAL COST!*TAKEADVANTAGEOF THISOFFER FORATOTALOF 3 YEARSOF WARRANTYCOVERAGESee dealer for details 120055 I $1,999$2,899 2219 Crawfordville Hwy. www.3youtdoorequipment.com



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Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Green Scene ....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6BINDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 10th Issue Thursday, March 8, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read DailyThe WakullanewsOBITUARY Tinsley W. Floyd Crawfordvilles Becky Arbogast plays for Tallahassee Jewels, a womens tackle football teamSPORTS, 9ABy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA community meeting that was held in February by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth was intended to uncover the assets, needs and the shortfalls of the county regarding social services and nd ways to bridge the gap. At the meeting, it was determined that one of the major problems in Wakulla County is food insecurity and addressing that need seems to have fallen to churches. Currently, there are eight churches in the county that operate food pantries. It became clear at the meeting how much help the churches need and how it is everyones responsibility to help them, said WCCY Executive Director Gail Campbell. Campbell said the pantries are trying to provide food to even more people with even less resources. According to Feeding America, the nations leading domestic hunger-relief charity, there are 4,370 people in Wakulla County who live with food insecurity. This equates to 14.4 percent of Wakulla County residents. They dont know where their next meal is coming from, Campbell said. To provide enough food for these families, it would cost around $1.7 million a year, according to Feeding America. Campbell added that pantries were also looking for leadership to help form best practices and gather resources. Since the meeting, the coalition has applied for a Hunger Grant on behalf of the food pantries. If awarded, the money would be used to buy food only and would not pay for any administrative costs. The money would only go to existing food pantries, which would form an alliance to better serve Wakulla County. Campbell said hopefully it can bring all the churches together and open those lines of communication and get all food pantries in a better place. The coalition will assist with the management of the grant. The awarding of the grant will not be announced until October. There was also discussion about a community database for food pantries to keep track of customers to ensure there isnt any overlap between pantries. A software program is being sent to the coalition by Brunie Emmanuel, the project manager for the Fund for Gulf Communities, which is an initiative under Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida that is working in seven other counties affected by the BP oil spill. Emmanuel attended the community meeting to assist Wakulla County in meeting basic human needs and offer solutions. Wakulla County was left out of the Fund for Gulf Communities and Emmanuel said he was unaware the county had been affected. He agreed to help Wakulla County and see if there is any way for it to receive funding in the future. At the community meeting, it was also determined that there was a need for a shelter for women and children, as well as rental assistance and adequate housing for low income families. There was also a decision to coordinate expansion as need dictates to include volunteer re departments and possibly use the community center as a distribution site for food. Campbell said the coalition is continuing to look for pathways and resources to ll the gaps. Campbell recently met with Emmanuel again to see if any opportunities for grant funding exist for Wakulla County. The grant will be discussed at the next coalition meeting, as well as other things that are being done. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFuture plans for the Wakulla County Community Center are moving forward and the creation of an advisory group that would help with those plans is in the works. Currently, the county is discussing renovations plans for the center, as well as entering into an agreement with Capital Area YMCA to manage the facility and establishing a permanent advisory group for the community center. A small, temporary advisory group was established to review the renovation plans, help with the memorandum of understanding with the YMCA and offer suggestions for developing the permanent advisory group. The temporary group discussed the need for the permanent group to be diverse and have business experience, as well as grant writing and fundraising experience. These people, as well as the county commission, will answer to the community, said Gail Campbell, a member of the temporary advisory group. She said the people who serve on this community center advisory group will determine if the center succeeds or fails. It has such potential, Campbell said of the center. The permanent group would plan activities, programs and services; seek grant funding; obtain community input and involvement; and assist in developing long term plans for the center. The temporary group recommended the group consist of one member selected by the Wakulla County School Board; one member selected by the Chamber of Commerce that has a business or marketing background; one member who has experience in fundraising and resource development; one member from the Senior Citizens Center; By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCircuit Judge Jackie Fulford released her long-awaited order on the legality of a measure passed by the 2011 state legislature requiring all state employees to contribute 3 percent to their retirement. In an 11-page ruling issued on Tuesday, March 6, Judge Fulford ruled against the state, nding the measure unconstitutional and ordered the state to immediately stop the withholding and reimburse with interest the amount that had been taken out. The ruling only applies to public employees who were members of the Florida Public Retirement System as of June 30, 2011. Obviously sensitive to charges of judicial activism by Republican lawmakers even before the ruling was released, Fulford stated in her order: At the outset let me state clearly, the role of the judiciary is to interpret the law before it; not make new law. But, she added, This court cannot set aside its constitutional obligations because a budget crisis exists in the State of Florida. To do so would be in direct contravention of this courts oath to follow the law. Fulford noted that the state pension plan was created by the Legislature in 1974 that required no contribution from employees and which provided for a cost of living adjustment. The Legislature declared the rights to the members of the pension plan were contractural. Fulford points to a 1981 Florida Supreme Court case that said the Legislature was not precluded from altering bene ts which accrue for future state service, but the judge noted that the ruling did not give the Legislature the power to completely gut and create a new form of pension plan. Fulford found that the 2011 Legislature, faced with a budget shortfall, turned to state employees and ignored the contractual rights given to them by the 1974 Legislature. Fulford ruled that the imposition of a mandatory state employee contribution was unconstitutional for members of FRS prior to July 1, 2011. The ruling is almost certain to be appealed.Heritage Village deal acceptedJudge rules against state in pension lawsuit The county allows Ben Boynton larger lots in his Bloxham Plantation development, and he donates 40 acres for a Heritage Village ParkYouth coalition applies for a Hung er Grant for Wakulla Plans for community center take shape According to Feeding America there are 4,370 people in Wakulla County or 14.4 percent of residents who live with food insecurity, meaning they dont know where their next meal is coming from. PREBLE-RISHPlans for community center show an open gym behind the two existing buildings. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn December, the Wakulla County Commission agreed to send revisions to a land use plan to the state for review to help the Wakulla County Historical Society create a place for the old, historic homes and buildings it has acquired. This place will be called the Heritage Village Park and will consist of 40 acres off Zion Church Hill Road. The Heritage Village would be a community of about 10 historic homes that have been donated by Wakulla County families, as well as the old Smith Creek school house and the old lunch room from Crawfordville. The homes were built in the late 1800s and the society wants to move and repair them before they are destroyed or too far gone to be saved. Its a way to preserve our heritage, said Richard Harden, vice president of the historical society. One of the homes, the Ross and Amy Linzy home, was on the property where Wal-mart is located. They acquired that home and had to move it so it wouldnt be destroyed. Another home, the John Archie McLaughlin home, had to be moved because a developer told the society that they had two weeks to move it or it would be destroyed. The society has been looking for property to move the homes to, and until last year, had been unsuccessful. After hearing a presentation by members of the historical society at a county commission meeting, developer Ben Boynton approached them about possibly donating a portion of his property that will be the future home of Bloxham Plantation. Boynton was looking to create larger lots in the subdivision and wanted approval to go from one unit per acre, to one unit per 2 acres. This would reduce the number of units from 133 to 75. Continued on Page 12AFILE PHOTOThe Ross-Linzy House was dismantled in 2008 and is to be reassembled at the Heritage Village Park, which would include historic houses from Wakulla County.Plans include constructing a multi-use gym behind the current buildings. e gym floor would be a concrete slabContinued on Page 12ATHIS YEARS SPECIAL OLYMPICSSee Page 14A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netCelebration of the Arts was held on March 1 and featured performances from students of all ages. Several hundred people attended the event which was started by the Wakulla Arts Coalition 11 years ago. The person behind the coalition is Diane Perez, the arts coordinator. Perez, who is retiring this year, was honored at the event. Susan Solburg, the treasurer of the coalition, said the coalition was created to provide scholarships in the arts to Wakulla County students. She thanked Perez for having the vision to start the coalition and bringing all those involved in the arts together to form the coalition. Masters of Ceremonies, Ronnie Allen and Danielle Brown-Nelson introduced the acts and kept the crowd entertained during breaks. Those in attendance heard performances by the Wakulla County Elementary Honor Choir, Coast Charter School Stingray Music Ensemble, Wakulla Middle School Drama Group, Wakulla Middle School Jazz Band, Riversprings Middle School Jazz Band, Riversprings Middle School Drama, Wakulla High School Advanced Drama Class, Wakulla High School Concert Band and Wakulla High School Wind Ensemble. Prior to the show, a silent auction was held with artwork by Wakulla County art students.Wakullas Celebration of the Arts The Wakulla Middle School jazz band. Wakulla Middle School drama students perform. Riversprings Middle School jazz band performing with a trombone solo. Student artworks being auctioned off before the show. Wakulla County Elementary Honor Choir sings.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN More photos online at thewakullanews.comAt right, students from COAST Charter School Stingray Music Ensemble perform for the audience. Drama teacher Susan Solburg, at the microphone, speaks of art teacher Diane Perez, holding the owers, who founded the Celebration of the Arts 11 years ago. Perez is retiring at the end of the school year. 2012 Swine Show SponsorsGrand Champion Sponsor ...Vause Mechanical Reserve Champion Sponsor ....................Atkins Showmanship Sponsor............. Centennial Bank Class Winners Sponsor............................ Publix Spirit Award Sponsor ...............Talquin ElectricThe Wakulla County Youth Fair Association would like to thank all of our sponsors of the 2012 Swine Show. Without your support our show would not be possible.F R M Feeds Hicks Heating and Air LLC North Florida Spray Foam, Inc. Allens Excavation, Inc. Charlie Creel for Sheriff Langston for Sheriff Preble-Rish, Inc. Pitmans Custom Construction Capital City Bank Ace Home Center Wharf Express Pepsi Gold Show SponsorsJimmy Johns Buddys Garage, Inc. Welch Land Development ESG Public Works Gulf Coast Lumber Stone Creek Pizza Silver Show SponsorsSusan Jones, Blue Water Realty Group C 4 Soccer Wakulla Dance Academy Mar-Lu Properties, Inc. Mike Stewart County Commissioner Sunshine State Builders LLC Menagerie Sopchoppy Grocery Ashley Feed Premier Motorcars The Barber Shoppe Studio 88 Dance Productions County Commissioner Randy Merritt White Elephant and Friends Alan Brock, Wakulla County Commissioner Macks Meats Bradleys Country Store Drycleaners Express Lube Expert Bronze Show Sponsors the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringDr. Mark McCoyFebruary 2012 Winner His name was drawn fromYou dont nd this type of thing in larger cities. is is a great advertising! More people need to advetise like this.Dr. Mark McCoy OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter agreeing to move forward with developing the language for placing a half-cent tax referendum on the November ballot for the proposed Wakulla 2020 initiative, the Wakulla County Commissions next step was establishing and appointing members to serve on the Wakulla 2020 Advisory Committee. After much discussion at its March 5 meeting, the commission decided to table the item and bring it back at its next meeting. The proposed committee consisted of Pat Jones, Wakulla County School Board; Jared Miller, sheriffs of ce; a member selected by the Chamber; Kevin Vaughn, Wakulla County Economic Development Council; Jackie Lawhon selected by the City of Sopchoppy; Zoe Mans eld selected by the City of St. Marks; Tim Jordan, Wakulla Tourist Development Council; a member selected by the county commission; and a member who resides in the Crawfordville Town Plan, selected by the commission. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he would like to see a member who owns a business or lives in the Crawfordville Town Plan on the committee. Commissioner Mike Stewart felt the proposed committee was not big enough or diverse enough. He suggested the committee include representative from the outlying areas. If were going to ask the people to vote for it, it needs to be right, Stewart said. The commission agreed that it should include Wakulla Station, Medart, Panacea, Spring Creek and Shell Point. Panacea resident and owner of Panacea Discount Liquors, Paige Killeen, said she would also like to see Panacea added. Panacea seems to be the red-headed stepchild, Killeen said. The commission agreed that they would ask Panacea Waterfronts Florida Committee for a recommendation for the Panacea representative. The other representatives would be sought out and the commission would take applications. They also decided to add a representative from the Senior Center. This brought the committee up to 13 members. The commission agreed to move as quickly as possible in getting names for the committee and then approve it. If approved, the committee would review and prioritize proposed projects for the Wakulla 2020 initiative and the Our Town plan and make recommendations to the commission. During the meeting, several commissioners expressed concern that the scope of the initiative was not broad enough. Commissioner Lynn Artz said there should be a broader vision that looks to the future and includes projects dealing with mass transit and bike lanes. Stewart agreed that the focus does not need to solely be on improving Highway 319. Kevin Vaughn, chair of the EDC, said the scope has been expanded to include a number of transportation projects all over the county, including improving Woodville Highway. We do understand that we need public buy-in, Vaughn said. Moore said, Youve got to involve all the people. Vaughn said the first project they would focus on is improving the ve main intersections on Highway 319. The idea of Wakulla 2020 came from Blueprint 2000, an initiative in Tallahassee. A citizen group got together to nd a way to implement the Crawfordville Town Plan, or Our Town Plan, which focused mainly on Highway 319. It was then determined to expand it to the entire county. To fund the initiative, the voters of Wakulla County would need to approve a half-cent sales tax. John Shuff, past president of the Chamber, said they have estimated that the half-cent sales tax would bring in $1.7 million over the next 15 years and with a bonding stream and debt service estimate, their total estimate is $14 million. The committee would also be charged with seeking grant funding as well.COUNTY COMMISSIONMakeup of Wakulla 2020 committee is discussedCommissioners debate who should be on the committee and name 13 to serve, and ultimately table the matter until the next meeting Panacea seems to be the red-headed stepchild, says one of the communitys residents, complaining that it was left without representation on the 2020 committeeBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 3 Legislation that would give parents more ability to determine how to make over a failing school was rammed through a Senate committee on Saturday, a likely preview of a contentious oor ght over charter schools, unions and parental support. By a 13-7 vote, the Senate Budget Committee on Saturday approved SB 1718, the so called parent trigger bill. The most controversial element would allow parents of a failing school to dictate recovery strategies, including the use of forpro t charters, if a majority of them sign petitions to do so. Backers say the measure is a response to a recalcitrant school system that is slow to change and deaf to the needs of communities. The bill is being championed by former Gov. Jeb Bush and Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island. What is to be afraid of having parents involved in their childrens education?, asked Senate sponsor Sen. Lizbeth Benacquisto, R-Fort Myers. Why? Why do we ght so hard against parents standing up to say I would like you to consider this? Critics say the measure represents yet another nail driven at public education and the teacher unions by backers of for-pro t charter school companies that lack the same accountability standards of traditional public schools. I have four children who graduated from public schools. They all have masters degrees, said Sen. Gwen Margolis, D-Miami. I dont know what problem you have. The proposal ramps up accountability standards on a number of fronts, but the most controversial measure, by far, deals with failing schools. The provision says once a school earns an F, if improvement doesnt happen within a year, parents could dictate what will happen, if 51 percent of them agree. They still would be limited to certain options laid out in federal law, and the plan would be subject to Department of Education approval. Among their options, parents could force the school district to transfer students to other schools; close the school and reopen it as a charter school with a new governing board running it; or contract with an outside management group to run it essentially privatize it. Evident Saturday was that the measure is a top priority of Haridopolos and other Senate leaders. Not normally a member of the committee, Senate Majority Leader and incoming Senate President Andy Gardiner, ROrlando, took a high pro le role Saturday, as did prospective future presidents Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, and Sen. John Thrasher, RSt. Augustine. Forced to vote on the bill before the meeting adjourned at 10 a.m., some committee members said the haste by which such a controversial measure was being considered was inappropriate and unnecessary. We are playing around with the lives of children in our schools, said Sen. Evelyn Lynn, R-Ormond Beach. And its time to stop. The idea for the parent trigger comes from California, where two years ago that states legislature passed a similar bill giving parents in failing schools a majority vote on whether to turn it into a charter school. When you have parents involved in their childs education, it inures to the success of the child, said Mike Trujillo, a representative of Parent Revolution, which spearheaded California efforts. What this is, is a vehicle by which parents can be involved in their local school community. Union representatives say its too early to tell if the California effort has made any long-term gain. What is apparent is that it has been controversial and litigious, pitting families against each other. There has been so much animosity that it does more damage in the long run than the improvement they thought they were trying to create, said Jeff Wright, public advocacy director for the Florida Education Association. Improvement in a failing school requires the cooperation of parents, the local business community and local government to put forth a matrix of surrounding services from after-school programs to nutritional support and mentoring. Wright said. The bill, as it stands, does none of that. The bill now travels to the Senate oor. The House bill, HB 1191, passed earlier on an 80-34 vote.STATE LEGISLATURE Schoolyard ght: What can parents do about failing schools? NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGSThe Wakulla County Commissioners will Hold a Public Hearing Before the Planning Commission on April 9, 2012 at 7:00p.m. and the Board of County Commissioners on April 16, 2012 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any nonEnglish speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.MARCH 8, 2012 The School Board of Wakulla County, FloridaNotice of Advertisement of a Public Hearing on proposed School Board Member voting districts DATE: March 12, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m PLACE: Wakulla County School Board Room 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 32327MARCH 8, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on March 14, 2012, at 5:30pm MARCH 8, 2012

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The Chamber held a ribbon cutting for new member Critter Control on Friday, Feb. 24. Critter Control is ranked No. 1 in wildlife control and No. 18 in pest control in the nation. The Certified Wildlife Specialists and IPM trained technicians focus on ecologically sound pest control and humane animal control solutions for homeowners, property managers, businesses and government. Critter Control also offers a wide range of other services such as home friendly Wash Safe roof, siding and deck cleaning, as well as full attic restoration featuring T.A.P. pest proof insulation. We also offer WDO inspections for real estate agents. The owners of the local franchise are Brandon and Dustin Lynch. Brandon is a Certi ed Operator in General Household Pest and Termite Control with the state of Florida. Dustin is a Certi ed Wildlife Specialist. They both live in Wakulla County. Call 1-800CRITTER (800-274-8837) or locally at (850) 745-4111.Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out The Opinion PageThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Judge will allow net lawsuit to move forward Underwater Wakulla for March 1 Michael Mike David Carter obituary Gerald Lee Clevenger obituary Board may revise septic tank policy WakullaStory: A Hankerin for a Headhuntin Margaret R. Sheotes obituary Sheriffs Report for Feb. 23 thewakullanews. com Follow us onVictim of Domestic or Sexual Violence? Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111Editor, The News: Springtime for Wakulla. On a random guess, readers must imagine immediately that this letter is about the blooms, the birds, the return of bugs and pollen. But you would be wrong. This is a letter about all of the hundreds of volunteers who bring good times to our community. In the spring it is the parades. In the spring we look forward to outdoor activities. We celebrate those during Wild About Wakulla week at the beginning of April. In the spring we also look back. We take a walk into history on the occasion of the founding of Wakulla County in March 1843. We celebrate that with the Founders Day play at the auditorium in Sopchoppy this week. All of this volunteering is for nought if it were not for the incredible free contributions a kind of volunteering, dont you agree of The Wakulla News. Generous sponsored advertising, special sections and community involvement make our local newspaper worthy of special recognition. Spring is as good a time as any to say thank you. Madeleine Carr Crawfordville Editor, The News: Let me win, but if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt, the Special Olympic Athlete Oath, was personi ed in the County Games held on Friday, March 2, at Wakulla High School. A huge thanks to all of the athletes, as well as their teachers and parents for the effort, sportsmanship and support that enabled this event to focus on the abilities of this special group of students. This years games were staged under the leadership of Sharon Scherbarth and Patricia Bodiford with the support of the Special Olympic Management Team of Ashley Anderson, Sheila Stephens, Joanna Hernandez, Denise Ray, Louis Hernandez and Farrah Donaldson. The management group has worked tirelessly throughout the year to achieve coaches certifications, generate funding, solicit support and most of all encourage the athletes. Many thanks for their efforts. In addition, appreciation is extended to Principal Mike Crouch and the Wakulla High School family for the peer coaches, drum band, cheerleaders, and student /faculty participation as spectators. Finally, it is with deep gratitude that I recognize the following sponsors for their contributions of time, money, food, shoes for athletes, ribbons, tents and other support: Lindys, Winn Dixie, J.D. Johnson, Colleen Skipper, Lynn Artz, Randy Merritt, Lube Express, Bevis/Harvey Young Funeral Home, Wakulla United Methodist Church and Women, Jennifer Young, Terri Hillier, Pepsi, Susan Payne Turner, Kenny Ts, Crawfordville United Methodist Circuit Riders Sunday School Class, Wakulla Mens Club, Pat Jones and Angel Lewis, Tracy Dempsey, Alpha Delta Kappa (Epsilon Chapter), United Way, Crawfordville Rotary Club, teachers and staff at Wakulla Pre-K, Ladies Auxiliary of the Shriners, George and Gloria Dock, Kast Net Restaurant, Dr. Ed Gardner and Judy Hampton, David and Deana Scherbarth, Edgar Metcalf, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, Boy Scouts of America and Sonic. You all make a difference in the lives of our Special Olympic Athletes and encourage them to be winners in their endeavors each day. Sincerely, Tanya EnglishExceptional Student Education and Student ServicesWakulla County School BoardREADERS WRITE:Springtime is a good time to say thanks Support of Special Olympics is appreciatedEditor, The News: Ive never understood Commissioner Atrzs position on most things shes involved with. It seems shes usually opposed to things that are good for, or desired by, her constituents. When the resolution to the FWC regarding the local Grouper seasons was proposed she was the only commissioner who opposed it. When asked why she said, I dont think this can happen and we are misleading people and pandering to the local shermen when we know its not going to work. Pandering to the local shermen (constituents) is what you were elected to do. Pander: One who ministers to the passions or base desires of others. Then she made the statement that explains everything about her: Im not going to propose something that makes us look stupid and makes us look like we dont have a clue whats going on. In other words shes not going to let anything or anyone taint her self-perceived image that shes smarter than everyone else. Now I get it! Well, Ms. Artz, I wont even address the word stupid in your statement but I can assure you, you dont have a clue whats going on. F.J.Young CrawfordvilleReader says Artz doesnt have a clueBy JO ANN PALMER March will begin a new chapter with Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. Its been my hope that we can expand the understanding of what we mean to Keep Wakulla County Beautiful by getting people involved who have the desire to see us grow as a green community. To help us educate both our children and adults, and get involved with worthwhile projects such as the courthouse block landscape project, clean sweep litter control events and several other upcoming worthwhile projects. Last Monday, we held our first Green Drinks social at the Wildwood Golf Course, where Wendy and her staff prepared a great spread of food, and served what will become our signature drink, the KWCB Green Punch. We had a group of 22 in attendance including commissioners Alan Brock and Jerry Moore, Chamber President Amy Geiger and her husband Sam, Tonya Hobby, the director of the county health departments Tobacco Prevention Program, Margie Callaghan, Riversink fourth grade teacher, and other citizens who came to hear what we are all about. We are looking for citizens interested in getting involved to work on our committees. We are not asking for money, just some of your time. The board members who have served for years, talked about the history of the organization and how the economy has changed peoples behavior. They discussed how many more citizens used to be involved but because of natural attrition, we now need new talents. Last month we adopted updates to our bylaws which included the development of committees. This is where we hope to get people interested again, by giving you an opportunity to decide what your talents are and get involved in that area. We have lots of great ideas and a tremendous need. This is an open invitation for anyone interested in our organization to once again come out and see what we are about. We invite you to our March 8 monthly meeting at the 19th Hole at Wildwood Country Club. Committees meet at 6 p.m., and the board meets at 7 p.m. Our committees are Education, Sponsorship/ Friendship, Community Action and Marketing/Communications. If you see something that interests you, please come out this Thursday, or call me for more information at 745-7111 or email me helpkwcb@gmail.com. Jo Ann Palmer is executive director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful.Editor, The News: On Monday night, March 5, the Wakulla County Commission did a remarkable thing: They unanimously passed a PUD and Comp Plan change for local developer, Ben Boynton. But more importantly, this approval provided for a gift conveyance of approximately 40 acres of land to the Wakulla County Historical Society for development of the Heritage Village Park. This park will allow the Society to move, restore and exhibit a number of old houses that have been donated by Wakulla County families. In addition, the park will enable the historical society to develop a site plan that provides educational programs, interactive exhibits, interpretive paths and a place for re ection on the history of an earlier time in Wakulla County. This is a great example of a private-public partnership that demonstrates government and the private sector can reach compromise that bene ts all. It places a great deal of land in a natural state suitable for passive activities we envision, and also allows a planned development to go forward. Both can help the economy, protect natural resources and preserve our countys heritage. The Wakulla County Historical Society wants to thank Ben Boynton, the county commissioners and all who were involved. We look forward to development of the park. Murray McLaughlin ChairmanHeritage Village CommitteeWakulla County Historical SocietySociety is grateful for Heritage Village site Editor, The News: March is National Social Work Month which makes it an appropriate time for us to salute the valuable and important job that social workers provide all year long. When lifes challenges become overwhelming, many people turn to a social worker for help. Here at Big Bend Hospice, we have 15 social workers who serve as family support counselors, grief counselors and Caring Tree counselors. They work tirelessly with our patients and families to help them cope with the many emotional and practical issues that accompany a life limiting illness. These dedicated professionals assist with everything from coordinating community resources to helping families solve personal and nancial problems, to working through the emotional pain of dealing with an impending death. They recognize the family dynamics that are part of any life threatening disease and help patients reach out to conclude the important business of giving and receiving love and asking for and granting forgiveness. Often it is the social worker who will pause to recognize a special occasion in a patients life and make sure that a birthday is celebrated or a caregiver gets a night out. Our wonderful social workers are an important part of our patient care team and our Big Bend Hospice family. The theme for the 2012 National Social Work Month is Social Work Matters. Time and again I have witnessed the powerful results of social workers, both in our organization, in hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities, in recognizing and meeting the needs of the people they serve. On behalf of Big Bend Hospice, we applaud social workers for their caring hearts and their important contributions to our community. Cathy Adkison, RN, BSN, CHPN President and CEO Big Bend Hospice Recognize social workers during March Critter ControlSPECIAL TO THE NEWSAn incorrect headline ran on the ribbon cutting article for a businees, Critter Control, in last weeks Taking Care of Business section. Here is the article as it should have appeared:CorrectionKeep Wakulla County Beautiful is looking for volunteers Interested in helping KWCB? e groups next meeting is ursday, March 8, at the 19th Hole at Wildwood Country Club at 6 p.m. Editor, The News: I live with type 1 diabetes. I would really love it if you will donate to my team and join me in the Junior Diabetes Research Foundations Walk to Cure Diabetes on April 14 at 10 a.m. at Tallahassee Community College. I was diagnosed at 19 months of age. Ive had my nger pricked over 15,000 times since my diagnosis. I wear an insulin pump 24 hrs a day except when I have a bath or swim. All the food and drinks I consume are calculated and the carb total is entered into my pump. I encourage YOU to sign up, donate and come to the JDRF Walk. I know that the Walk will be a great experience and I also know that YOU can make a difference. See you at the Walk! Sydney Andrews Crawfordville Pledge for Diabetes Walk on April 14

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Beginning t 8 a.m. on Monday, March 12, the speed limit on State Road 363 (Port Leon Drive) in St. Marks between Pine Street and Riverside Drive has been reduced. The posted speed limit will be 25 mph. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the new speed limit when traveling through the corridor. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow it on twitter @myfdot_nwfl. Motorists traveling State Road 369/U.S. 319 between Wakulla-Arran Road and just north of S.R. 267 (Pinewood Street) in Wakulla County can expect intermittent nighttime lane closures Sunday, March 4, through Friday, March 9, from 6:30 p.m. until 6 a.m. Crews will also work along the shoulders between Wakulla-Arran Road and the Leon County line during daytime hours, causing no lane closures. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow it on twitter @ myfdot_nwfl. From state DOT www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 5A Repeal of septic tank inspections passes the HouseOn Wednesday, Feb. 29, the Florida House passed a bill to repeal septic tank inspections. The bill was co-sponsored by Rep. Marti Coley, R-Marianna, and Rep. Chris Dorworth, R-Lake Mary. The bill repeals language passed during the 2010 legislative session that requires individuals and businesses to pay for costly inspections in order to comply with a statewide septic tank evaluation program. In these tough economic times, we should not add financial hardships on Floridians, Rep. Coley said. This bill allows our local counties and municipalities to decide what is best for their citizens regarding septic tank inspections, and if what is best is a no inspection policy, then there will be none. Im committed to making sure that some commonsense is put back into our environmental regulations, Coley added. The legislation must now be approved by the Florida Senate before becoming available for Gov. Rick Scott to sign into law. WHS Talent Show is Friday, March 9Its that time of year when talented students perform at the annual Spring Talent Show at Wakulla High School auditorium on Friday, March 9. This years lineup promises to be one of the best yet, says director Susan Solburg. We have two fabulous bands this year Arrive Alive will be our opening act, actually beginning at 6:30 p.m., and Hammaknockers will be playing in the second part of the show. Also featured are Out-of-this-World Dancers and also an amazing belly dance routine, a slam poet and a real cool rap group, guitar-playing vocalists, and pianoplaying vocalists, and of course beautiful solo vocalists. Admission is $4 for students, $6 for adults. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m. A variety of refreshments will be sold during intermission by our WHS Dramatis Personae members. Proceeds will help pay the rising cost for this years State Thespian Trip. CCOW will hear from David Edwards on local governmentConcerned Citizens of Wakulla will host a forum on the challenges facing local government with Wakulla County Administrator David Edwards on Thursday, March 15, at the public library beginning at 7 p.m. Wakulla County is facing many challenges in these dif cult economic times. County revenues are down, but demands on government services are ever present. Balancing priorities set forth by our Board of County Commissioners within present budget limitations is a daunting challenge. Administrator Edwards will discuss with where the county is and where it is going to meet the many challenges facing our county government. A pre-forum social will be held beginning at 6:30 p.m. St. Patricks Festival set for Saturday, March 17The Lions Clubs annual St. Patricks Festival will be held next Saturday, March 17 in Hudson Park with a parade at 10 a.m. The days begins with Breakfast in the Park at 8 a.m., opening introductions at 9 a.m., opening prayer at 9:15 a.m. by John Braley, youth minister at Lake Ellen Baptist Church, the raising of the colors at 9:20, and the National Anthem, sung by John Braley, followed by the Pledge of Allegiance. After the parade, the scheduled entertainment includes Taekwondo at 11 a.m., a performance by COAST Charter School at 11: 30 a.m., Aleene Benson, Irish and Scottish ddle players at noon, then Rick Tittle, John Smith and Ken Muf n Man at 12:40 and 1:40 p.m., and the Senior Wigglers line dancers at 1:15 p.m. A prize drawing will be held every 30 minutes starting at noon. The drawing for the $250 grand prize will be held at 2:30 p.m. Make A Difference Day is March 24VolunteerWAKULLA is holding its fth annual Make A Difference Day on Saturday, March 24, at Hudson Park. This years event will be different for previous years: a community picnic for the citizens of Wakulla County will be held, and many of the organizations in the County will be setting up booths to make people aware of services available, as well as opportunities to volunteer in the county. At this time, there are more than 25 organizations signed up. There will be a free lunch for all, entertainment and door prizes. Staff Reports WILLIAM SNOWDENAnn Scott reads to Ginnie Browns kindergarten class at Riversink Elementary.Briefs Ann Scott pays a visit to schoolsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netFirst lady Ann Scott visited Riversink and Crawfordville elementary schools last week and read to classes as part of her effort to encourage literacy. Scott visited the schools on Thursday, March 1. In her visit to teacher Ginnie Browns kindergarten class at Riversink, Scott read the book Gloria about a policeman and his dog. Scott talked to the students and answered questions before reading the book. The girls in the class complimented Scotts out t and shoes. After she read them the book, the class presented Scott with a bouquet of construction-paper owers they had made.Street newsSpeed limit changed on 363 in St. Marks Work continues on Crawfordville Road Big Bend High School Bowl starts Friday in TallahasseeSpecial to The NewsThe 2012 Tallahassee Democrat Big Bend High School Bowl, now celebrating its 35th year, opens with 190 students from around the Big Bend Region starting competition, Friday, March 9 at Tallahassee Community College. Wakulla High School will take a team along with 19 other schools, including Aucilla Christian Academy, Bainbridge High School, Brookwood School, Cottondale High School, Florida State University High School, Franklin County High School, Amos P. Godby High School, Graceville High School, Holmes County High School, John Paul II Catholic High School, Lawton Chiles High School, Leon High School, Lincoln High School, Maclay High School, North Florida Christian Academy High School, James S. Rickards High School, Robert F. Munroe High School, Sacred Heart Home School and Thomasville High School. Teams compete for two days, advancing for doubleelimination competition on Saturday, March 10. During the competition, teams answer questions as quickly as possible about current events, science, math, language arts, social studies and popular culture. On the rst day of the tournament, 34 teams from North Florida and South Georgia meet in roundrobin competition. Top winning teams advance to the doubleelimination semi-finals on March 10. The top two teams after the second day then advance to the nals at Aquilina Howell Instructional Services Center on Monday, March 12. Thirty-seven members of the community have volunteered their time to act as moderators of the academic challenges. Leon High School is this years high school host, providing student volunteers and refreshments to help out with the competition. The Democrat, the law rm Brooks LeBoeuf Bennett Foster and Gwartney and Envision Credit Union donate more than $5,000 in cash scholarships and gift certi cates as prizes. The rst-place team wins a $2,500 scholarship and the runner-up, $1,250. The high school bowl encourages academic excellence and promotes teamwork among students. dress store50%-60% OFF850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE) The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree All Ladies ApparelThe best Alterations, Furniture Upholstry & Renishing MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012 Modern Communications850-274-80003342 Crawfordville Hwy. PREPAID MONTHLY PLANS Modern Communicationsnationwide pre-paid cellular pagep l us U NLIMITED TALK & TEXT$4000 PERMO.DATACHARGESMAYAPPLY FRONT PORCH CREATIONS FLORIST 850926-7192850926-7192 House SPECIAL Eve ry FRIDAY MUG BO UQUE T www.FrontPorchCreationsFlowers.com $12 99 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta ANTIQUES CARRIESCOVEC ARRIESC OVENEW ARRIVALS926-50133338 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. New Jewelry & Bed LinensMore Antiques on the Way

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By ETHEL SKIPPER Growth is a natural and expected part of life. From a physical perspective, growth requires little effort. However, from a spiritual perspective, growth toward maturity requires great effort. Bible study, prayer, meditation, introspection and re ection are several tools by which we position ourselves for growth. The key to growth is to make intentional effort to prepare our hearts to receive the truth, and then to walk out that truth through obedience in our life. The Mills-Allen-Rosier-Simmons 2012 Family Reunion: It is about that time again when we come back home where we first started, where the original roots are. The spot will be in Tallahassee, Buckhorn Community in Florida. If you have not registered yet, its time to visit our website, marsreunion2012.com. Our community observed Black History Month in February, to commemorate the signi cant events and achievements of the African-American population in the United States. The tradition has been celebrated since 1976. It was Dr. Carter Woodson who started the Negro History Week which grew into Black History Month in order to focus peoples attention on the role and contribution of African-American history. Skipper Temple Church of Christ had their Black History Celebration on Saturday, Feb. 25, to fellowship and give thanks to the Lord. We have history all around us some we can see as they make history, and feel their joy and hurt too, as they tell their story. U.S. Navy Willie F. Skipper Sr., an original Black History poem written by William Green, U.S. Army Meriddie Rosier Sr., elected of cial Anginita Rosier, Black History message Elder Rodney Smith. On Sunday, Feb. 26, a Black History presentation by Colleen Q. Skipper, mayor of Sopchoppy, and Black History from the youth on how it all began, with Felicia Green, Jamal Green, Lenard White, Gary Clary, Kellen Johnson and Mother Eva Johnson. St. Nora P.B. Church observed their Black History Celebration that Sunday as well. New Destiny Church of Christ had a celebration honoring their pastor, Dr. Elmira P. Davis, on Feb. 25 at Tallahassee Community Colleges Workforce Development Center. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituaryMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWere Here to Share the Journey... Buckhorn NewsSpiritual growth is a part of lifeTinsley W. Floyd, 70, passed away Saturday, Feb. 18, at Centre Pointe Health Care in Tallahassee. He graduated from E.C. Glass High School, Lynchburg, Va., in 1959. He went to college at East Tennessee State, was a member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity and graduated in 1964. He taught economics at Florida A&M University for nine years and Tallahassee Community College for 26 years. A loyal sports enthusiast, he was inducted into the Tallahassee Community College Athletic Hall of Fame in 2007. Memorial Services were held on Saturday, Feb. 25, at Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home, Timberlane Chapel in Tallahassee. There was a reception to follow immediately in the MeadowWood Room. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be made in Tinsley Floyds memory to the TCC Athletic Book Scholarship Fund, TCC Foundation, 444 Appleyard Dr., Tallahassee FL 32304. Survivors include his wife, Kay; ve sisters, Louise Sawyer, Mae Guthrie (A.T.), Katie Faulcone, Sammie Fowler (Larry) and Edna Fogle. Tinsley was a wonderful husband and outstanding teacher but most of all he was known as a great friend.Tinsley W. FloydWakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station has several upcoming events: Saturday, March 17, at noon will be the United Methodist Womens St. Pattys Day Luncheon and Fellowship. On March 28 at 6 p.m. the church will hold its Wednesday night dinner, sponsored by the United Methodist Women in the Alford Building at the church. Wakulla United Methodist Church is located at 1584 Old Woodville Road, For more information, call (850) 421-5741. Church briefsUpcoming events at Wakulla UMCBy the REV. JAMES L. SNYDER I nd it quite amusing that some of the brightest and richest people in our country do not seem to have a clue as to what they are doing. Most do not have the common sense that God gave to a caterpillar. As Abraham Lincoln used to say, common sense is not as common as it used to be. Amen, to that one. The nancial experts are telling us that we need to buy gold or silver to safeguard our investments. I am way ahead of the game. Several years ago, I got a gold tooth. Fortunately, for me, I got it before the nancial crisis in our country. I cannot tell you what a remarkable feeling it is to walk around with your fortune in your mouth. I hear about all of the investment schemes that are supposed to make me rich. I have a sneaking suspicion that the only people getting rich are those with the investment schemes. They want us to buy stocks and bonds and futures. I never heard of anything so silly in all my life. What would I do with stocks, bonds and futures, whatever in the world they are, in my portfolio. I have no idea what a portfolio is but I am certain it has something to do with these investment schemes. I just do not want anybody folioing around with my port, thank you very much, sir. If I got my facts right, and I looked it up in the dictionary, port has something to do with wine. Why would I want to put a bottle of port into my folio and pretend it is some kind of an investment? I really have to give it to these investment schemers. They really know how to pull the wool over our eyes. I want to go on record as saying that they are not pulling any wool over my eyes. Just leave my wool alone. If I want my wool pulled, it certainly will not be over my eyes, I will tell you that right here. This wool pulling sounds more like sheep eecing to me, and I want nothing to do with it. For me I have discovered a way of safeguarding my wealth. My basic nancial philosophy is simply spend less than I make. I know that is a revolutionary concept in todays world, but it has stood me in good stead for many a year. We live in a culture that does not know the relationship between saving money and spending money. For example. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage came home the other day and in a very exuberant tone told me how much she saved at the grocery store. I saved $119.23 today at the grocery store. Isnt that terri c? Being the humble, demure sort of guy that I am, I did not ask her a question that was buzzing around my head at the time. The question was, how much did it cost me to save you that much money? Having a happy home is more important to me than exploring truth at its core. Especially in this area. My financial strategy down through the years has been a very regular and wise investment plan. I am not quite sure how I came up with this marvelous plan, but one day it just hit me. Ever since that time, I have been using my nancial investment plan. My investment plan only cost me $19.79 back in the Year of Our Lord 1986. Since that time, it has faithfully served me and I have no complaints. I have through the years thought about upgrading my investment plan, but then what would the purpose be? Back in 1986, I saw in the mens department of the JCPenney store in our community a very nicely tailored navy blue and gold striped gentlemans vest. It immediately caught my attention and as I examined it, I noticed that inside this vest was a variety of pockets. I looked at them and that is when it hit me. Down through the years I have often wondered why somebody else did not come up with this idea. I guess I am just a genius. I bought the vest and brought it home and hung it in my closet after I rst labeled each of the inside pockets. There was a pocket for dollar bills, one for ve-dollar bills, one for tendollar bills and one that I do not use as often for $20 bills. Every time I have a little bit of change left over I go to my closet turned to my best and invest that money where nobody can nd it. My investment plan is more or less an in and out exchange program. When I have a need, I sometimes divest some money. Through the years, it has been a great blessing in my investment plan and is something that I am rather proud of. Solomon put it in great perspective concerning wealth when he said, Remove far from me vanity and lies: give me neither poverty nor riches; feed me with food convenient for me: lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the LORD? or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vain ( Proverbs 30:8-9 KJV). My investment plan is well buttoned up for future security.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. He can be reached at (352) 687-4240 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. Keeping close tabs on my investments

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 7AhappeningsCommunityCross of Military Service awards presented SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy MICHELLE KIRBYSpecial to the NewsThis year is off to an amazing start for the R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Not only did they welcome eight new members into their Chapter, they bestowed a Cross of Military Service to John Hobert Owens for his noble service to our nation during the Vietnam Con ict. Also presented was a posthumous World War II Cross of Military Service to Mary Ann Brooks Owens in behalf of her father Francis Earl Brooks. The bestowal of military crosses is part of the patriotic and memorial objectives of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. We honor past and current military service men and women who, along with their Confederate ancestor, honorably served. Bestowal of cross and medals originated with the Southern Cross of Honor upon Confederate Veterans in 1898 by Alexander S. (Mary Ann Lamar Cobb) Erwin of Athens, Ga. The original cross was fashioned after the design of a Maltese cross with a wreath of laurel surrounding the words Deo Vindice (God our Vindicator) 1861-1865. Cobbs husband was the rst recipient. Since then, more than 12,500 Confederate Veterans were awarded the Cross of Honor with some still being identi ed and recognized posthumously by the UDC. The United Daughters of the Confederacy maintains a register of all crosses bestowed during that original issue, as well as all those since. Occasionally we do nd more veterans in need of this recognition and facilitate requests by those who seek this information. Crosses of Military Service and Medals bestowals grew into all major military campaigns with the recent announcement of the new Global War on Terror Cross. They are the most prized awards conferred by the UDC. Anyone who is interested in honoring their military loved ones who descends from a Confederate veteran may inquire by contacting the Chapters Military Service Awards Recorder at rdonmcleodudc@gmail. com. Those interested can also visit R. Don McLeods website at http://rdonmcleod. wordpress.com to read more about the awards and other details.Aaron Wiggins earns all three Eagle PalmsSpecial to the NewsBoy Scout Aaron Wiggins, of Crew 4 and Troop 126, earned all three Eagle Palms, bronze, silver and gold, last May. He is the rst member of his troop to accomplish this task, as well as the rst one in Wakulla County. A scout must earn these palms after earning eagle rank, which Wiggins did in 2010, and before their 18th birthday. Wiggins is a mentor and teaches classes about reptiles during the Summer at Boy Scout camp. We are so proud of him still teaching and being a great mentor to others, said Dena Wiggins, his mother. Aaron Wiggins attends Wakulla High School. Aaron WigginsHappy rst birthday, KayeleeKayelee Sky McCallum celebrated her rst birthday on March 8. She is the daughter of Lee and Shannon McCallum of Crawfordville. She has three brothers, Seth, 14, Chase, 12, and Tripp, 4. Her paternal grandparents are Leroy and Lisa McCallum of Woodville. Her maternal grandparents are Hank Platt of Crawfordville and Terri Stephens of Tallahassee. Kayelee S. McCallumSimmons announce birth of sonJason and Latricia Simmons of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Justice Annual Simmons, on Dec. 14 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He weighed 6, pounds, 13 ounces and was 21 inches long. His maternal grandparents are Annual and Julia Lloyd of Exuma, Bahamas. His paternal grandparents are Frank and Cynthia Simmons of Crawfordville. His maternal greatgrandparents are Annie Lloyd of Exuma, Bahamas, and the late Raymond Lloyd, and the late George and Mae Bula Gary of Sharpes, Fla. His paternal greatgrandparents are Dorothy Brown of Tallahassee and the late Charlie Brown and the late Herman and Willie Mae Simmons of Sopchoppy. Myrt Mayne, District I director, and Louise Thomas, chapter president, present the service awards to Mary Ann Owens, John Hobert Owens. Upcoming classes at the extension o ceThere are several upcoming classes at workshops that will be offered at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. On Thursday, March 8 from 7 to 9 p.m. there will a workshop entitled, Small Poultry Flocks For Home Use. Learn the latest techniques for raising poultry for meat and eggs. Topics covered in class will include care and feeding, housing, breed selection, protection from predators and much more. On March 13 at 6:30 p.m. there will be a workshop entitled Going Green: Sustainable Cleaning Solutions, to include caring for the kitchen, bath, laundry, woods and the air. Cost of the class is $10. Fee charged to provide take home samples. On Saturday, March 17 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., they will hold a class called, Grow More Fruits and Vegetables Fertilizer, lime, compost, green manures, and application methods. Learn how to produce fruits and vegetables right in the back yard and get the most fruit and vegetable yields from the least inputs. For more information, call 926-3931 or visit wakulla.ifas.u .edu/. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Performers include -Crawfordville UMC quartet Raising the Standard InternationalMInistries Gate Opens: 11 A.M Music Begins: Noon Ends: 8 P.M. 252 Park Ave., Sopchoppy City Park FUN: Bring a chair and a cooler and spend the dayno alcohol please MUSIC FOR EVERYONEPraise and worship, R&B, Blue Grass, Contemporary FOODHot dog and hamburger plates available or you may bring a picnic lunch. Childrens programs from noon 4P.M. Saturday,March10,2012FREECHRISTIANMUSIC SopchoppyCityPark AMULTIDENOMINATIONALWORSHIPEXPERIENCE 4 th annual4 th annual850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolSpecial to The NewsOn Feb. 16, the Riversprings Jazz Band performed in the tough FBA Jazz Band Assessment at Leon High School. The performance was wonderful and the students really rocked the house, said Band Director Carmen Williams. This was a very proud moment because they may have been the rst middle school Jazz Band to have performed in this particular event from Wakulla County, Williams said. Riversink Elementary School will hold its fourth Annual Spring Festival on March 9 from 5 to 9 p.m. There will be games, bingo, a silent auction, food and raf e. For more information, call 926-2664.RMS, WMS and WHS earn AVID national certi cationBy BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentThere was standing room only at the Feb. 21, School Board meeting as Riversprings Middle School, Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School were honored for earning National Certi cation through the AVID certi cation system for 2010-2011. AVID stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination. This certi cation means the three schools met all of the 56 criteria to implement this program that helps hard-working students, many of whom will be rst generation college goers, to be prepared for success in college. Wakulla implemented AVID in 2009-10 with 75 students in grades 8 and 9. It grew to 125 students in grades 8, 9 and 10 in 20102011 and added 11th grade to total 175 students grades 8 through 11 in 2011-12. Next year will be the rst group of graduating AVID students. Three teachers have been implementing AVID from the beginning: RMS AVID teacher and Site Coordinator Donna Sullivan; WMS AVID teacher and Site Coordinator Katherine Spivey; and WHS teacher Nancy Floyd Richardson. Assistant Principal Sunny Chancy is the WHS Site Coordinator. Melinda House has come on board at WHS to teach ninth grade this year. Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell is the AVID District Director. Administrators and teachers from all three schools make up the Site Teams for their schools. They attend rigorous week-long training in the summer, and attend other trainings during the year. Superintendent David Miller advocated for Wakulla County school system to be one of Floridas rst rural districts chosen for The Florida Partnership with the College Board grant. The grant has been renewed for three years due to Wakullas effective use of grant dollars. The AVID program has played a big role in preparing students for success in Advanced Placement and college dual enrollment classes. Superintendent Miller said, AVID has proved to be one of the most successful programs I have seen in my career. It gives students the con dence to succeed not only in academics, but also to believe that they can take on leadership roles in their schools, and ultimately in our society. AVID is an internationally successful college preparation program that began in the 1980s with one teacher in one classroom who saw college potential in students who were capable but not well prepared for college, or who were not encouraged to take college prep classes such as Honors, Advanced Placement, and Dual Enrollment. The AVID system is now in place in more than 4,500 middle and high schools serving more than 400,000 AVID students throughout the United States and Department of Defense schools worldwide. AVID students are enrolled in rigorous academic classes, but given the support to succeed in them through strategies and tutorials in Writing, Inquiry, Collaborative, and Reading skills (WICR) learned in their AVID elective class. Students are taught to seek out the answers themselves through critical thinking skills, to ask questions in class, and to review their work every evening as a study skill. They are encouraged to get organized by using binders and planners, as well as by taking notes in Cornell Note format to use later as study guides. Last year in 2010-2011, 100 percent of Wakullas 8th grade AVID students took Algebra I or Algebra I Honors for high school credit while in middle school. This is critical for them to be on track to take higher level math courses in high school. All students made a C or better. Nationally, only 22 percent of 8th grade students take Algebra I. In 2011-12, 100 percent of the 8th grade AVID students are taking Algebra I or Algebra I Honors and/or Integrated Science I or Integrated Science I Honors for up to two high school credits. Also in 2011-2012, 100 percent of the 11th grade AVID students are taking and passing one, two, or three Advanced Placement courses for possible college credit. AP classes have a rigorous curriculum with a standardized international test at the end. Students who take AP classes are more likely to complete college because they are more prepared when they get there. Wakulla High School currently offers 14 Advanced Placement classes, an unheard of number for a small district. Of the AVID students in Florida, 90 percent graduate from high school having completed four-year college entrance requirements. The national average is 36 percent. This program has been transformational for our students and our schools, said Miller. Most of our teachers were already using many of the AVID strategies, but this gives a focus to not just preparing students to get into college, but on being successful once they are there. AVID Site Teams from Riversprings Middle School, at left, Wakulla High School, at right, and Wakulla Middle School, below, receive honors for earning national certi cation for the 2010-11 school year. AVID is Advancement Via Individual Determination. RMS jazz band performs at assessmentSpring festival will be March 9 at Riversink The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary..........36 classrooms/newspapers.........$576/yr Medart Elementary...................33 classrooms/newspapers.........$528/yr Riversink Elementary................20 classrooms/newspapers.........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary..............40 classrooms/newspapers.........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School........10 classrooms/newspapers.........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name_________________________________ Address_______________________________ City_______________________State____Zip_________ Phone______________Email_______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327Fun and ExcitingBirthday Parties!We Can Customize One Just For You! Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: OPEN HOURS 3 9 PM FRI:3 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The News The Tallahassee Jewels is a semi-pro womens tackle football team. Becky Arbogast, 41, of Crawfordville, said the team is a part of the Womens Football Alliance and plays by the NFL rules. There are more than 60 teams nationwide. This is the rst season for the Jewels. The Jewels head coach is Lynnette Noodle Alvarado, who has played tackle football for the past 10 years and is a great teacher. She is the perfect combination of no-nonsense and compassion, says Arbogast. She is assisted by Coach Walter Brown, Coach Elvin Presley Jr. and Coach Andrew Brown. The Jewels home eld is Godby High School. They have been wonderful in their support of us, Arbogast says of Godby. They allow us to practice on their field under the lights during the week and on their practice eld on the weekends. Other sponsors have provided a monetary investment but the team is still looking for more. Game nights are very expensive from the tickets and ticket takers to the EMS support. Also, we will have at least four away games which will require transportation and lodging. Each player is required to pay monthly dues to help pay for their equipment (helmet, pads, and uniform). Sponsors can contact Coach Noodle directly or ll out the sponsor information on the website. Arbogast and Christie Mathison both travel from Wakulla County three days a week to play for the Jewels. I work in Tallahassee, says Arbogast, so on Tuesdays and Thursdays, I rush home, feed my dogs and rush back to Godby for practice. Being late is not something that Coach Noodle tolerates well. She is understanding when things come up but we all need to attend practice so we can come together as a team. Arbogast grew up in West Virginia but moved to Tallahassee about 10 years ago and then to Crawfordville in 2007. The drive to work each day is tough but the evenings in the country make up for it, she says. Before moving to Florida, I spent 12 years in the U.S. Army Reserves as a Military Police Of cer. My degree in Criminal Justice led to several years as a correctional of cer and then as a police of cer. When I moved to Florida, I was looking for some peace and quiet. I found it at a publishing company in Tallahassee. I became their of ce manager and worked with them until they decided to retire. When a publishing company from Michigan decided to re-locate to Tallahassee, I was very pleased to continue my service with them. They have since expanded into three different publishing companies as well as distribution for other publishers. They have been very supportive of my desire to play football and are also one of the sponsors of the Jewels. We have enough players to move forward but honestly we could use about 10 more players, Arbogast says. I wont lie and say playing football for Coach Noodle is easy because it is not. She expects everyone to give 110 percent but she also gives that as well. It is a lot of work but the reward is amazing. At 41 years old, I never dreamed I would be able to play tackle football. We have players under 30 years of age and over 50. We are a wide range of women but when we come together on the football eld we are a team. Currently practices run Tuesdays from 7 to 9 p.m., Thursdays from 7 to 10 p.m. and Saturdays from noon to 3 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays are on their main eld at the track and Saturdays on the practice eld across Ocala. The teams website is www.tallahasseejewels.com and the Womens Football Alliance is www.wfafootball.com. Becky Arbogast plays womens football for the Tallahassee JewelsTALLAHASSEE JEWELS: Players and coaches for the womens football team, above. Becky Abrogast, left, dressed out for practice.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS April 14, HOME Acadiana Zydeco vs. Tallahassee Jewels April 21, Tallahassee Jewels vs. Palm Beach Punishers April 28, HOME Carolina Phoenix vs. Tallahassee Jewels May 5, Tallahassee Jewels vs. Gulf Coast Riptide May 12, HOME Miami Fury vs. Tallahassee Jewels May 19, HOME Gulf Coast Riptide vs. Tallahassee Jewels May 26 Bye June 2 Bye June 9, Tallahassee Jewels vs. Gulf Coast Riptide June 16, Tallahassee Jewels vs. Acadiana ZydecoJewels schedule5Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2Goto http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click Continue. Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 Capital Circle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsThe weather this week is looking pretty darn good. We have a full moon coming up, good tides, warm temperatures and the winds arent supposed to be too bad. The water temperature when I was out on Friday was up to 65 degrees but I dont know what the rain and low 40s did to it. I will know this afternoon. For the past two weeks it has been so windy and foggy it just wasnt worth going out there and not too many folks did. I talked with JR and he said he hasnt been in over two weeks due to the lousy weather but was planning on going tomorrow. He did say he talked to a gentleman shing in a canoe at the Econ na and he caught two small trout and two small reds casting a Rapala at the boat landing. He hoped to catch a largemouth bass. He also talked to some folks that were catching trout in the Aucilla as far up as the ramp trolling a Rattlin Red n. Now you tell me why those sh are up that far in the river. Capt. Randy Peart said he didnt sh the ats because of the lousy weather but he and his son shed the Wakulla and caught ve nice bass using a plastic lizard. This week he is down in the Keys shing so everybody should feel sorry for him. According to the shing report in the Democrat, several small Spanish were caught last week over near Dog Island. The water has gotten so warm so fast I am not surprised. Randy Peart said he caught some lady sh and usually when the lady- sh are here the Spanish are here. I imagine cobia will start showing up fairly soon in Destin if they arent already there. Despite the high winds on Saturday, Phil Sharp took some friends out of Shell Point and they caught three keeper trout using the four-inch pearl white Gulp. He said he released the biggest trout he has ever caught and it was probably over 5 pounds. Ray Rich said he also shed in the St. Marks River on Saturday and caught two nice reds shing with live shrimp on the bottom. Capt. David Fife said the reds are biting pretty good in the Oyster Bay area and hes been using live shrimp and mudminnows for bait. On Wednesday of last week I took Chuck Kleiforth out to see if I could locate some sh for a charter I had coming up the next day that depended on if I could nd any sh. We shed around the oyster bars for about an hour and never got a strike. I talked with Larry Hess and he said he had caught several sh on the ats but they were small. I decided that if there were two out there maybe there were more. We went out and started drifting using a three-inch pearl white Gulp under a Cajun Thunder. Chuck caught six trout, four of which were keepers before I had a bite. He was using a 1/16-ounce gold head and I was using red. I switched over to gold and caught one on the rst cast. We ended the afternoon catching and releasing 21 trout, two over 20 inches and we would have had our limit of keepers. The next day I took Michael Chase from Tallahassee and this time took live shrimp. We ended the day with two reds of about 26 inches and three trout about 18 inches. We released about 45 small reds and probably 15 small trout. Everything was caught on a shrimp and couldnt buy a bite on a Gulp. Its tournament time again. The Kevins Red Trout Shootout is April 14 and will be hosted out of C Quarters Marina in Carrabelle. There will be 10 cash prizes from $3,000 down to $200 for the team coming in with the heaviest trout and red combined. Registration fee is $125 for a team of two anglers. On April 28 and 29 the fourth annual Rock the Dock Tournament will be held at Rock Landing in Panacea. There will be a Captains meeting on April 27. The offshore division will be for grouper, amberjack, cobia and kings. The inshore division is for trout, reds, ounder and Spanish and the entry fee is $50 per person. For more information on these tournaments go to kevinsredtroutshootout.com and panacearockthedock shingtournament.com. Remember to leave that float plan with someone and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing!Weather is looking good for shing From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Special to The NewsTALLAHASSEE The Department of Environmental Protections Florida Park Service announced the results of a survey last week that found outdoor recreation is important to 98 percent of tourists and 96 percent of residents. The results came from the 2011 Florida Outdoor Recreation Participation Survey, which measured the satisfaction of Floridas residents and visitors with current recreation opportunities. This study is a great tool for Floridas outdoor recreation providers, and will help us ensure that we are in tune with the recreational needs of the states citizens and visitors, said DEPs Florida Park Service Director Donald V. Forgione. The survey took into account nearly 4,000 Florida residents and nearly 3,000 tourists between April and October 2011 by telephone. Of the tourists surveyed, 97 percent said they were satis ed with the outdoor recreation opportunities in Florida, including 77 percent who are very satis ed. The majority of Florida residents (80 percent) are satis ed with the outdoor recreation opportunities in their county. Nearly all participants (99 percent of residents and 96 percent of tourists) said spending time with family and friends is an important factor for participating in outdoor recreation. Saltwater beach activities were the most popular among all participants, with 63 percent of residents and 49 percent of visitors enjoying this activity in the past 12 months. The next most popular activity among Florida residents was wildlife viewing, which 49 percent enjoyed in the last year. Forty-six percent went shing, 44 percent enjoyed bicycling and 40 percent enjoyed a picnic outdoors in the last year. Forty-seven percent of tourists enjoyed wildlife viewing last year, followed by 37 percent who enjoyed picnicking, 29 percent of visitors who went swimming in public outdoor pools and 26 percent of tourists who visited historical or archaeological sites. LISA SCHWENNING/DEPVisitors enjoy the beach at Dr. Julian G. Bruce St. George Island State Park.Survey shows outdoor recreation is important to residents and visitorsFrom FWC NewsMarch 10-11 is Youth Spring Turkey Hunt Weekend in Florida. This Saturday through Sunday hunt, which occurs the weekend prior to the opening of spring turkey season in each hunting zone, was established in 2011 on private property. It was such a huge success that this year the two-day hunt also is included on 78 of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions wildlife management areas. Only youths under 16 years old are allowed to harvest a turkey while supervised by an adult, 18 years or older. On private land, no license or permit is required of the youth or supervising adult, unless the adult plans to help callin the bird or otherwise participate in the hunt. In that case, the supervisor will need a hunting license and turkey permit. To prevent overcrowding, most of the 78 participating WMAs require a youth spring turkey quota permit, and if the adult supervisor is going to attempt to call in a bird on any of these WMAs, he or she also will need a management area permit in addition to the hunting license and turkey permit. There are still youth spring turkey quota permits available for some areas, and they can be obtained by those hunters under 16 years of age on a rst-come, rst-served basis at MyFWC. com/License or at a license agent, beginning at 10 a.m. on March 8. There are also 23 WMAs that do not require a quota permit. Those are Apalachicola, Aucilla, Big Bend Spring Creek Unit, Big Bend Tide Swamp Unit, Blackwater, Choctawhatchee River (only the south portion of the area), Herky Huffman/Bull Creek, J.W. Corbett, Joe Budd, Jumper Creek, Log Landing, Lower Econ na River, and Middle Aucilla. For all of these hunts, it is important to note that adults are not allowed to do the shooting; only the kids may harvest a bird. And on WMAs, the only rearms that are allowed to be used during spring turkey seasons are shotguns and muzzleloading shotguns, using shot no larger than No. 2.Take a kid turkey hunting March 10-11 Still serving the Best Tasting Food, Biggest Portions and Best Values in Town!!! To Go!at theirNOWNEW LOCATIONCome by and grab a menu featuring all your favorites: a variety of Sandwiches, Wraps and Burgers. Pork, Beef, Chicken and Fish Dinners!New Hours: 850-421-1150ASK FOR THE BOATERS SPECIALS! Buy ANY Sandwich andget a Second of equal or lesser value1/2 OFF DELIVERY SERVICE COMMING SOON!! 713-001499 Rock Landing Road OPEN: THURSDAY ............. 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .............................. 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday .................. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. SUNDAY ...........................11 A.M. 9 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EAR www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 A Free Press Your Key To Freedom

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonJohn Denmark receives Gilbert Champion Award.Saturday, several members of Flotilla 12 met at the Crawfordville Fire Station for our monthly meeting. In attendance were Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos, Vice Commander Bill Wannal, Ed Burroughs, Raye Crews, David Guttman, Mike Harrison, Chuck Hickman, Norma Hill, Phil Hill, Terry Hoxworth, Steve Hults, Mark Rosen, Duane Treadon and Ray Willis. Also present were Auxiliarists Ann and Ed Gesteland, members of Flotilla 45 08, out of Wisconsin and our newest member Joey Tillman. We were very lucky to also welcome Lt. Tim Smith, a Coast Guard reservist from Jacksonville. Throughout the meeting several items were discussed that are up and coming for us. Next week, we will be participating in the Camp Gordon Johnston parade in Carrabelle. This year we will have two boats in the parade. Larry Kolk will have his hand-built wooden boat, the Georgiana, that invokes the style of the classic life boats used by the Coast Guard in its early years. Chuck Hickman will also have his boat in the parade demonstrating the facilities we typically use today. As we prepare for the upcoming boating season, we are exploring ways to get our communications facility back up and in working order. Some of you may remember that we have a communications station in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, and we are hoping to resurrect it for the coming season. Thankfully, when we are out on the water, Station Panama City is able to provide us with radio watch. Often, the station is staffed with auxiliarists in the radio room standing watch so that the active duty folks can attend to other things. Presentation of the Gilbert Champion Award is traditionally done in the December meeting. I have been reluctant to share with all of you the recipient for the Gilbert Champion Award for 2011. John Denmark has been a member as long as I have and has never stepped down from a challenge. Last year, he worked tirelessly to re-establish relationships with the Wildlife Refuge so that we could get to know the newer staff and work together. Throughout this, John also had several more personal challenges arise. They never let him be deterred from his goals for the Auxiliary. John had not been able to attend a meeting to receive his award until now. Gilbert Champion Award is an annual award established in 2005 by Flotilla 12 in remembrance of two founding members, Don Gilbert and John Champion. Both men were dedicated auxiliarists and exempli ed what it means to be a member of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. This annual award is presented to one member who meets the following criteria: The member must be in good standing and have been active in flotilla activities throughout the year. The auxiliarists must also exemplify the four cornerstones of Member Service, Recreational Boating Safety, Operations and Marine Safety and Fellowship. These activities may include, but are not limited to, public education, public affairs, operations, personnel services, fellowship, division/district activities, vessel examinations, recreational boating safety, marine science and recruiting. Additionally, such a member promotes Auxiliary to the general public through recruitment, assisting when called upon by active duty and other community organizations and seeking opportunities to promote the missions of the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Finally, this member also continuously pursues advancement in not only their personal skills and training, but also those of their fellow auxiliarists. John received his award this month. He sets the bar high for future recipients! Also awarded a special honor was Steve Hults. Steve received the Meritorious Team Commendation for his service in response to the Tuscaloosa Tornado in 2011. In addition to his work as an auxiliarist, Steve is also active in FEMA disaster response. Bravo Zulu Steve! Lt. Smith brie y addressed the meeting and thanked the auxiliary for their hard work and dedication to the bating public. He explained that as a reservist, he knows that it is much more than one weekend a month and two weeks a year. For an auxiliarist, he stated that it is all voluntary and he, along with his fellow guardsmen, greatly appreciate our hard work. As Sherrie always says, safe boating is no accident. Be prepared and be aware! Steve Hults gets Meritorious Team Commendation. As an animal with eyes, we are challenged to imagine a world without light. For most of us, even poor eyesight permits a sense of security in the contrast of light and shadow. To imagine what a cave-dwelling creature must manage every day in the absence of light is nearly impossible. For the past several years I have been working on a special research team in search of new (to science) species of crustaceans, found in the back reaches of underwater caves. And for the most part, they dont even have eyes anymore. Creatures that live in underwater caves in the absence of light are usually related to creatures that evolved with light, so their ancestors once had eyes. But, over time, these creatures adapted to the dark, and those that survived over many generations, lost their eyes. Some sh that can be found in dark caves have eye sockets, with no eyes. Craw sh in dark caves have eyes stalks, but no eyes. And the list goes on. So how do they do it? How can they see in the dark? There are many explanations. Other sensory capabilities are enhanced, such as touch, taste (smell) and sound. But in the denser medium of water, 800 times denser that air, subtle changes are very useful. Those of you who have visited our cave craw sh at the Center may have noticed minnows in the tank. Over time their numbers diminish as they are captured by the blind craw sh. I have watched when the hungry craw sh is shing: It climbs up on a rock and raises its claws above itself. Eventually, a minnow swims between the jaws and the claws close rapidly. The disturbing motion of the water is felt by cilia (little hairs on the claw) that inform the predator food is available. Several weeks ago I found one of my favorite caves full of blind craw sh of all sizes. They are usually found scattered over the walls and ceiling rocks, but this day were concentrated on the mud oor. And there I found several who had found each other and were mating. Either the nding was a random act resulting from the denser concentration on the oor, or more likely, they gave off a smell or pheromone that permitted males to nd females on the oor of the cave. The beam from my bright cave light would not cause them any attention, but when I put my hand close by one, it would scurry off just like its relative, the colorful Florida Lobster found on the reefs in the Florida Keys. Yes, thats right, these cave animals have no reason to be colorful since sight is not in their world, so they are white or transparent. Now there is the rub. An animal that is white on a black background is like a shining beacon when light is introduced. Open water sh (with eyes) have learned that divers carry the sun with them and will follow us in for the feast of their lifetime. We in turn, have learned to turn our lights off at the back of a cavern, to encourage these intelligent sh to return to the light. In January we found a starving open water sh lost in the back of a cave. As soon as it saw our light, we were its best buddy, following us out tucked in as closely as possible. I often turn my light off when in a cave, trying to imagine what these creatures must feel. I feel the water ow past my face, touch contact with the walls, and hear sounds from others in the vicinity. I imagine my surroundings in my minds eye, then to verify it with my light. As part of training, I often get lost, requiring my students to nd me. I am getting good at this game, but never as good as the residents because I know I can always ick a light switch and return to my world. Find me if you can! Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 3.6 ft. 1:45 AM 3.6 ft. 2:30 AM 3.5 ft. 3:15 AM 3.3 ft. 4:01 AM 2.9 ft. 4:52 AM 2.5 ft. 5:50 AM High -0.3 ft. 8:00 AM -0.0 ft. 8:31 AM 0.3 ft. 9:01 AM 0.6 ft. 9:31 AM 0.9 ft. 10:02 AM 1.2 ft. 10:35 AM -0.3 ft. 12:32 AM Low 3.6 ft. 2:12 PM 3.7 ft. 2:37 PM 3.8 ft. 3:04 PM 3.8 ft. 3:32 PM 3.7 ft. 4:04 PM 3.6 ft. 4:39 PM 2.2 ft. 7:07 AM High -0.4 ft. 8:22 PM -0.6 ft. 9:03 PM -0.8 ft. 9:46 PM -0.7 ft. 10:33 PM -0.6 ft. 11:27 PM 1.5 ft. 11:16 AM Low 3.3 ft. 5:24 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 3.7 ft. 1:42 AM 3.7 ft. 2:27 AM 3.6 ft. 3:12 AM 3.3 ft. 3:58 AM 3.0 ft. 4:49 AM 2.6 ft. 5:47 AM High -0.3 ft. 7:57 AM -0.0 ft. 8:28 AM 0.3 ft. 8:58 AM 0.6 ft. 9:28 AM 1.0 ft. 9:59 AM 1.3 ft. 10:32 AM -0.3 ft. 12:29 AM Low 3.6 ft. 2:09 PM 3.8 ft. 2:34 PM 3.9 ft. 3:01 PM 3.9 ft. 3:29 PM 3.8 ft. 4:01 PM 3.6 ft. 4:36 PM 2.2 ft. 7:04 AM High -0.4 ft. 8:19 PM -0.7 ft. 9:00 PM -0.8 ft. 9:43 PM -0.8 ft. 10:30 PM -0.6 ft. 11:24 PM 1.7 ft. 11:13 AM Low 3.3 ft. 5:21 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 2:21 AM 3.4 ft. 3:06 AM 3.3 ft. 3:51 AM 3.0 ft. 4:37 AM 2.7 ft. 5:28 AM High -0.2 ft. 9:04 AM -0.0 ft. 9:35 AM 0.2 ft. 10:05 AM 0.5 ft. 10:35 AM 0.8 ft. 11:06 AM -0.5 ft. 12:31 AM -0.3 ft. 1:36 AM Low 3.3 ft. 2:48 PM 3.4 ft. 3:13 PM 3.5 ft. 3:40 PM 3.5 ft. 4:08 PM 3.5 ft. 4:40 PM 2.3 ft. 6:26 AM 2.0 ft. 7:43 AM High -0.3 ft. 9:26 PM -0.6 ft. 10:07 PM -0.7 ft. 10:50 PM -0.7 ft. 11:37 PM 1.1 ft. 11:39 AM 1.4 ft. 12:20 PM Low 3.3 ft. 5:15 PM 3.0 ft. 6:00 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 1:37 AM 2.7 ft. 2:22 AM 2.6 ft. 3:07 AM 2.4 ft. 3:53 AM 2.2 ft. 4:44 AM 1.9 ft. 5:42 AM High -0.2 ft. 8:11 AM -0.0 ft. 8:42 AM 0.2 ft. 9:12 AM 0.4 ft. 9:42 AM 0.7 ft. 10:13 AM 0.9 ft. 10:46 AM -0.2 ft. 12:43 AM Low 2.7 ft. 2:04 PM 2.8 ft. 2:29 PM 2.8 ft. 2:56 PM 2.9 ft. 3:24 PM 2.8 ft. 3:56 PM 2.7 ft. 4:31 PM 1.6 ft. 6:59 AM High -0.3 ft. 8:33 PM -0.5 ft. 9:14 PM -0.6 ft. 9:57 PM -0.5 ft. 10:44 PM -0.4 ft. 11:38 PM 1.1 ft. 11:27 AM Low 2.4 ft. 5:16 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 2.8 ft. 1:29 AM 2.8 ft. 2:14 AM 2.7 ft. 2:59 AM 2.5 ft. 3:45 AM 2.3 ft. 4:36 AM 2.0 ft. 5:34 AM High -0.3 ft. 7:39 AM -0.0 ft. 8:10 AM 0.3 ft. 8:40 AM 0.6 ft. 9:10 AM 0.9 ft. 9:41 AM 1.2 ft. 10:14 AM -0.3 ft. 12:11 AM Low 2.8 ft. 1:56 PM 2.9 ft. 2:21 PM 3.0 ft. 2:48 PM 3.0 ft. 3:16 PM 2.9 ft. 3:48 PM 2.8 ft. 4:23 PM 1.7 ft. 6:51 AM High -0.4 ft. 8:01 PM -0.6 ft. 8:42 PM -0.8 ft. 9:25 PM -0.7 ft. 10:12 PM -0.6 ft. 11:06 PM 1.5 ft. 10:55 AM Low 2.5 ft. 5:08 PM High Thu Mar 8, 12 Fri Mar 9, 12 Sat Mar 10, 12 Sun Mar 11, 12 Mon Mar 12, 12 Tue Mar 13, 12 Wed Mar 14, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 1:32 AM 2.5 ft. 2:30 AM 2.4 ft. 3:29 AM 2.2 ft. 4:33 AM 2.0 ft. 5:45 AM 1.9 ft. 7:12 AM High 0.2 ft. 7:29 AM 0.4 ft. 7:59 AM 0.7 ft. 8:27 AM 1.0 ft. 8:55 AM 1.2 ft. 9:21 AM 1.3 ft. 9:48 AM -0.2 ft. 12:26 AM Low 2.2 ft. 2:05 PM 2.3 ft. 2:23 PM 2.5 ft. 2:45 PM 2.6 ft. 3:12 PM 2.7 ft. 3:45 PM 2.7 ft. 4:25 PM 2.6 ft. 5:14 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:33 PM 0.0 ft. 8:17 PM -0.2 ft. 9:04 PM -0.3 ft. 9:59 PM -0.2 ft. 11:05 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 8 March 14First March 30 Full April 6 Last March 14 New March 22Major Times 12:32 AM 2:32 AM 12:58 PM 2:58 PM Minor Times 6:42 AM 7:42 AM 7:19 PM 8:19 PM Major Times 1:24 AM 3:24 AM 1:51 PM 3:51 PM Minor Times 7:22 AM 8:22 AM 8:25 PM 9:25 PM Major Times 2:18 AM 4:18 AM 2:46 PM 4:46 PM Minor Times 8:02 AM 9:02 AM 9:34 PM 10:34 PM Major Times 4:14 AM 6:14 AM 4:42 PM 6:42 PM Minor Times 9:47 AM 10:47 AM 11:42 PM 12:42 AM Major Times 5:12 AM 7:12 AM 5:41 PM 7:41 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:35 AM 11:35 AM Major Times 6:11 AM 8:11 AM 6:40 PM 8:40 PM Minor Times 12:48 AM 1:48 AM 11:29 AM 12:29 PM Major Times 7:10 AM 9:10 AM 7:39 PM 9:39 PM Minor Times 1:51 AM 2:51 AM 12:26 PM 1:26 PM SEASONS BEST Better Good Average Average Average Average6:54 am 6:41 pm 7:19 pm 6:43 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:53 am 6:41 pm 8:27 pm 7:22 am 6:52 am 6:42 pm 9:35 pm 8:03 am 6:51 am 6:43 pm 10:43 pm 8:48 am 6:50 am 6:43 pm 11:49 pm 9:37 am 6:48 am 6:44 pm --:-10:30 am 6:47 am 6:45 pm 12:52 am 11:27 am99% 93% 86% 78% 70% 63% 56% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1AHe said he was looking for sellability. In creating larger lots, the natural state would be lowered and not meet the state requirement of 45 percent. Also, Boynton was looking for more exibility so that a portion of the natural state could be used for the Heritage Village. The state did not have any comments regarding the proposed amendment and at the March 5 county commission meeting, the commissioners voted to adopt the application for the text amendment. This is an unbelievable gift, County Commissioner Jerry Moore said. Boynton said at the request of the commission, an agreement has been executed between himself and the historical society, which sets forth the obligations of each party in developing the village. Everybody agreed and signed off on it, Boynton said. The entire historical society is excited about the possibility of the heritage village becoming a reality, said chairman of the Heritage Village, Murray McLaughlin. McLaughlin said he was also happy for historian Betty Green. Its been a dream of hers for years, McLaughlin said. The project was made possible by Boynton and the county commission, he said. We worked really hard to get this accomplished, McLaughlin said. The next step will be designing a site plan for the property. The society hopes to be able to get help from engineers and designers to lay out their concept. We have a lot of work to do, McLaughlin said. The hope is to have signs and kiosks, amphitheater and walking trails, along with the homes and buildings. They would also like to include educational interactive exhibits of things such as cane grinding and turpentine, which represent the lifestyle of this time period, the 19th and early 20th centuries. The village would also help boost tourism, McLaughlin said. Harden said the village would eventually become a calling card for the county and bring people from all over.Heritage Village deal acceptedmember from arts or health community; one member from the faith community; one member selected by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office; one youth representative chosen by the principal of Wakulla High School; one member from the sports and recreation community; one member from Sopchoppy; and one member from St. Marks. They have to be people with the experience of getting things done, said Bobby Pearce, a member of the temporary group. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the temporary group has the right vision to make the venture successful. The group agreed to help nd the permanent members and offer suggestions. The Wakulla County Commission voted unanimously to schedule a public hearing to consider adopting the ordinance to create the advisory group. As it stands right now, the memorandum of understanding between the YMCA and county has not been viewed by the temporary group. According to County Administrator David Edwards, they are still waiting on the agreement from the YMCA. The YMCA was the only organization to respond to the countys request for proposals for managing the community center. Since that time, the county and the YMCA have been trying to determine what renovations would be needed for the YMCA to operate, as well as what they would offer. The YMCA has said in the past they can offer whatever programs and services the county would like, as long as they can break even. Edwards said the original agreement that was sent was very generic and the county is looking for more speci cs. In the current design plans for the community center, renovations would only be done to one of the buildings at the community center. For now, the one building with the of- ces would stay as is. There is only enough funding, $390,000 through legislative appropriation, to renovate the one building and add a gymnasium. The building would have a free weight room and cardio room, tness class room, kid zone and restrooms and showers. These facilities are what was requested by the YMCA. However, Campbell pointed out that in the community surveys taken from students, the second choice was a weight room. There is also a gymnasium, which is a high school and college regulation size basketball court. Alan Wise, project manager with Preble-Rish, said the gymnasium would be multi-use and has an open oor plan. The gym will be very bare, with a concrete oor and simple lighting. To maximize the bene t of the $390,000, were going to have to go bare bones on the gymnasium, Wise said. Edwards said the space can be upgraded in the future. Artz was concerned that the space was not very multi-use. Edwards said that could be solved with scheduling and having certain time slots for each activity. Director of the extension of ce and member of the temporary group, Les Harrison, said the bare bones gymnasium provides space needs, as well as exibility. It gets you where you want to go right now, Harrison said. Also discussed by the board was a grant that was written by Campbell and Disc Village to help with funding for the community center. The Ounce of Prevention Grant would provide funding for staffing and utilities. The grant will be awarded in April. It would be a golden gift, Campbell said. Once the MOU is drafted, it will be presented, along with the conceptual plans for renovation of the community center, to the county commission for approval. Once it is approved, there will be the nal designs and permits will be pulled. Wise is estimating that three months later, they will bid the project and construction will begin. The money from the legislative appropriation must be spent by Dec. 31. Continued from Page 1APlans for community center take shapeBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA woman facing felony drug charges after cocaine was found near where she had ipped a car while driving drunk, entered a plea to the charges on the eve of her trial in exchange for a sentence of two years probation. Louann McKinney had been set for a jury trial on Friday, March 2, but she pleaded charges of DUI causing serious bodily injury and possession of a controlled substance, both third degree felonies, as well as a misdemeanor charge of driving with a suspended license. If she had been found guilty of the charges, McKinney could have faced a minimum of 39.6 months in prison up to the maximum of ve years. Defense attorney Steven Glazer commented that he was prepared to go to trial contending there was no way to tell who was actually in possession of the cocaine. McKinney was the driver of a borrowed truck that she turned over. Deputies on the scene found a baggie of cocaine nearby and charged her with possessing it, contending it fell out of the vehicle as it overturned. In addition to the two years of probation, McKinney was also given credit for the 233 days shes spent in the Wakulla County Jail since her arrest. For the DUI, McKinney had six months driver license suspension, must serve 50 hours community service, attend DUI school, 10 days vehicle immobilization, and six months ignition interlock. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford, who accepted the plea, also required McKinney to undergo a Victim Impact Panel to hear about what effect impaired driving has on others those killed by drunk drivers as well as their survivors. Since the truck was totaled, McKinney also agreed to make restitution to the owner. She also must pay $1,730 in court costs and nes. The case was prosecuted by Assistant State Attorney Lorena Vollrath-Bueno. Edward Walker was again found guilty of lewd and lascivious assault in a trial on Wednesday, Feb. 29, and was sentenced to 25 years in prison. It was the second trial for Walker. The First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee reversed and remanded an earlier conviction nding their was an error. Circuit Judge Kathleen Dekker presided over the trial and, after the jury returned a verdict of guilty, sentenced Walker to a mandatory term of 25 years in prison. Judge Fulford, an avid bicyclist, was injured two weeks ago during the Geico Road Safety Bicycle Tour. The tour is a 400-mile bike ride from Orlando to Tallahassee to raise awareness for safe driving. The bicyclists left Orlando on Feb. 20, and stopped in Tampa, Ocala, Gainesville, Live Oak before arriving at the Capitol on Feb. 23. On Feb. 21, Fulfords bike slipped while crossing railroad tracks and she hit her head causing a gash to her face that required stitches as well as other injuries. When in court to accept a plea on Thursday, Fulford had a bandage under her right eye. Court shorts Workers push down a wall on the Linzy home in 2008. FILE PHOTOSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce detectives arrested two Wakulla County men in connection with February aggravated child abuse cases, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. The male suspects, ages 29 and 27 from Crawfordville, were arrested and transported to the Wakulla County Jail at the conclusion of their separate investigations. The two men have since posted $10,000 bonds and been released from jail. The rst case involved a six-year-old male child. The victims mother noticed marks and bruising on his legs from his buttocks to his knees as she was picking him up from the suspect. She contacted the Florida Department of Children and Families Child Protection Team. During the medical examination, the doctor discovered multiple bruises, impact marks, small puncture wounds and lacerations to the childs legs. The marks on the child were consistent with three items being used to inflict the abuse including a belt and an electrical cord. DCF removed the child from the suspects home and he was arrested for aggravated child abuse, according to Undersheriff Maurice Langston. The second case involved a ve year old female child. The Florida Department of Children and Families was contacted after a school administrator discovered bruising on the childs head. A medical examination was performed and the doctor determined that the child had been struck in the head area and abrasions that were observed were consistent with partial strangulation. As the investigation unfolded, medical personnel determined that the childs father struck her in the face with a shoe, which caused her to fall, and put one of his hands on her neck and the other on her mouth and nose so the child could not breathe. There are methods in which to discipline your child, said Sheriff Crum. But this is not how to do it. Detective Erika Buckley, Detective Josh Langston, Lt. Mike Kemp and Deputy Lorne Whaley investigated the cases. Two men arrested in separate child abuse cases San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOyst ers Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 USED TOOL SALE!Friday, 3/9 & Saturday, 3/10 from 9AM to 2PM (Next to 3Y Equipment) in CRAWFORDVILLE363-1538 (if you need directions)lots of tools for sale (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 13A reportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Feb. 26, a female victim called 911 to report a disturbance. Deputies arrived on the scene and secured a female suspect in a wooded area near the site where the call originated. The homeowner told Sgt. Jeremy Johnston that she observed a 37-year-old woman smoking marijuana inside her home near her childs room. When the victim told the woman to stop, she became irate and struck the homeowner and pulled her hair. The suspect also grabbed the juvenile around the throat in an attempt to keep her from calling 911. The woman took the phone from the juvenile and threw it into the woods. The suspect was arrested for battery, grand theft, possession of drug paraphernalia and cruelty toward a child. The victims phone was recovered along with some of her hair on the oor and 7.1 grams of marijuana on the steps of the residence. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Feb. 24, Eva Nelson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered her property and stole an exotic bird and bird cage, valued at $1,230. On Feb. 23, Brenda Williams of Crawfordville reported nding a wallet while walking her dogs on Arran Road near Bostic Pelt Road. The sheriffs of ce has been unable to locate the owner of the wallet and it was turned over to the property division for storage. On Feb. 26, Thomas Watts of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to le his tax return and was told somebody had already used his Social Security number. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. On Feb. 24, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after a woman was allegedly seen taking two queen size bed comforters and attempted to leave the store without paying for them. Della Michelle Daughtry, 42, of Tallahassee was arrested for larceny. The comforters were valued at $107. On Feb. 26, Elizabeth Armstrong of Crawfordville reported a structure fire. The victim reported that her stove caught re while she was cooking. She was able to put the re out by using baking soda and a towel. The stove top was burned along with the exhaust fan and the cabinets sustained heavy smoke damage. On Feb. 25, Richard Powell, 32, of Crawfordville was arrested for resisting an of cer without violence, disorderly intoxication and possession of cocaine following a disturbance in a parking lot of a Crawfordville bar. Powell allegedly resisted Lt. Jimmy Sessor, who was helped by the bars bouncer, and Powell was eventually secured in handcuffs. During a search of the suspect, a small baggy of a white powder was discovered that reportedly tested positive as cocaine. On Feb. 25, Elizabeth Brown of Tallahassee reported a Crawfordville residential burglary. The victim discovered her Wakulla County home was entered and items were moved around the home. An air conditioning unit, valued at $1,500, was reportedly removed from the scene. On Feb. 25, Consuelo Rowland of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tag and criminal mischief to her vehicle. The victims vehicle was keyed. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $500 and the stolen tag was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. A suspect has been identi- ed. On Feb. 24, Raymonde R. Bergholz of Crawfordville reported the theft of cash from her wallet. The money and a pack of cigarettes were taken from the victims home and a 12-yearold boy was questioned and admitted taking the property. He was issued a notice to appear in juvenile court for petit theft. On Feb. 27, James Harvey of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church. A catalytic converter was taken off a vehicle owned by the church. The vehicle part is valued at $700. On Feb. 27, Deputy Clint Beam responded to an illegal burning complaint. Deputy Beam met with State Forestry of cials about an individual who was burning tires. Fifteen to 20 tires were observed burning with another 25 to 30 tires sitting next to the re pit on Mount Pleasant Lane in Crawfordville. Florida Forestry of cials issued a citation to a suspect in the case. On Feb. 27, Dina Raffield of Crawfordville reported the theft of a pregnant female pit bulldog, valued at $300. The dog was taken from the victims home and a suspect has been identi ed. On Feb. 28, Mary Harts eld of Crawfordville reported an attempted vehicle burglary. Someone attempted to steal her vehicle radio system but left the scene rapidly after being observed. On Feb. 28, Mary Newsome of Crawfordville reported a hit and run accident. The victims mailbox was shattered into pieces and scattered on her front lawn. In addition, a Tallahassee Democrat paper box was damaged on the lawn. The property appeared to be damaged by a vehicle driving at a high rate of speed. Damage was estimated at $200. On Feb. 29, Randall Bateson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a cellular telephone. A suspect has been identi ed. On Feb. 28, Rebecca Daugherty of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim helped a friend nancially and the friend paid her back with a counterfeit money order that was rejected by her financial institution. The victims nancial loss is $987. On Feb. 28, John Gilbert of Crawfordville recovered a bicycle in a ditch on E.J. Stringer Road. The bike is valued at $100 and it was turned over to the WCSO Evidence Division in an attempt to locate the owner. On Feb. 28, Susan Council of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The windows of a rental home were shot with BB guns. Damage to the windows and interior of the residence was estimated at $400. Two juvenile suspects, ages 9 and 12, were identi- ed and agreed to pay for the damage and surrender the BB gun. The victim agreed to drop criminal charges in favor of the restitution. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On Feb. 29, Brittney Dawkins of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim was moving from one home to another and went back to the rst home to collect some belongings. A computer and fencing was r eportedly missing. The stolen property is valued at $320. A suspect has been identi ed. On Feb. 29, Melanie Rice of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A television and jewelry, valued at $1,460, was reported stolen. In addition, Sgt. Danny Harrell discovered a neighboring home damaged following a forced entry. It was determined that the home is owned by Virginia Garzanita of Tallahassee. A forced entry was reported but nothing was reported missing. On Feb. 29, a 51-yearold man was stopped by a concerned citizen at the home of Guinn Haskins in Crawfordville. The man stole three power tools owned by Haskins that were valued at $360. The suspect is being charged with burglary of a structure and grand theft. On Feb. 24, Isaac Mathis of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone led an income tax return using his Social Security number. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On Feb. 25, Alice Mollicone of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to le her tax return but it was rejected because someone had already used her Social Security number. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 790 calls for service during the past week including: 13 residential and business alarms; 77 citizen contacts; 32 E-911 calls; 45 investigations; 44 medical emergencies; 237 residential and business security checks; 24 special details; 17 suspicious people; 12 suspicious vehicles; 39 traf c stops; 10 disabled vehicles; and 12 wanted people.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsOn Feb. 26, Joyce Stout, 54, of Tallahassee was injured in a traf c crash while working with the C.W. Roberts road paving crew on U.S. Highway 319 south of Whitlock at 9:28 p.m. Stout was operating an escort vehicle to lead drivers around the construction and was traveling northbound on the highway. A paving machine pulled from the shoulder into the northbound lane and the 2008 Ford Ranger struck the left side of the paver. The Ford was damaged, but the paver was not. Stout was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital with multiple leg fractures. Wakulla EMS and Fire Rescue personnel responded and assisted Stout. The highway traf c was delayed 30 minutes while assistance was rendered. WILLIAM SNOWDENCrash into storefrontStaff ReportA 74-year-old woman crashed into a building in Crawfordville on Sunday, March 4, at about 3 p.m. Nellie Daniels Baggett, the driver of the 1997 Ford, was reportedly leaving the Subway restaurant when she suffered a medical emergency and wrecked into the G-Signs building, according to the Florida Highway Patrol report. She sustained minor injuries, but was not taken to the hospital. The buildings damage was estimated at $20,000. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Escort driver injuredSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403 Saturday, March 17 at Hudson ParkFESTIVAL & PARADE Sponsored by Crawfordville Lions ClubBreakfast at 8 a.m. Parade at 10 a.m.For vendor information call 926-1269 or 566-1828 For parade information call 926-4440Many Arts and Crafts Booths, Exhibits and Food Booths PANACEA HATSAFACTHATSEARLE KIRKWOOD850-524-9103UNDERTHEOAK ON US 98 PANACEASTOLENAFRICAN GREYGRAY W/RED TAIL runny nose on right nostril, currently on treatment. Help us nd it! If seen, please call: EVA NELSON 766-9012 DET. SCOTT POWELL 926-7171REWARD OFFERED!! HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThis years Special Olympics The long jump. Drawing a mural at the Olympic Village.More photos online at thewakullanews.comThe Medart Mustang plays with a child. The parade before the start of the Special Olympics. At right, above, one of the running events; below, throwing the softball for distance.Special Olympics were held at Wakulla High School on Friday, March 2.Photos by William Snowden

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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 The Legislature: On budget, and on time?Weekly Roundup, Page 9B Many people believe that hazardous or toxic chemicals are found only in industries that manufacture plastics, pesticides, pharmaceuticals or automobiles. However, a wide range of products that we use in our homes contains chemicals that t the de nition of hazardous or toxic. Hazardous products line our kitchen, bath, utility and garage shelves. Although the concentration of the chemical products found in the homes are much lower than the concentration of those found in the workshop, exposure to chemicals from household products does exist. Marie Hammer, a former UF/IFAS housing specialist, writing in a publication entitled Hazardous Household Substances: Alternatives That Are Relatively Free of Toxic Effects, FCS 3149, reminds us of some of the safety considerations when using household cleaning products. It includes never mixing chlorine bleach with any other cleaning agent, such as ammonia or vinegar; storing all cleaning solutions out of reach of children; never transferring a product to a container that once held food or drink to avoid accidental poisoning; and never smoking or eating when handling hazardous materials. Have you ever considered making your own household cleaning products? To encourage use of more natural chemicals to insure a clean environment, the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office staff and the members of Sustainable Big Bend would like you to have the opportunity to learn about alternative cleaning products through someone who has been using natural products personally and in her commercial cleaning business for several years. Jennifer Glaubius, owner of The Master Servant Cleaning Service, will share information on the products she has researched and tested. She prefers to call her methods natural, not green, because she feels that the term green is presently over-used and often misunderstood. Her products utilize more natural ingredients that are safer for the person using them and for the environment. Although she will not be making all of the products she utilizes, recipes will be available and she will facilitate the making of an all-purpose cleaner for each participant to take home. In addition to Glaubiuss presentation, Jenny Druda from Straighten Up will share some of her organizing skills. Through the process of de-cluttering and rearranging, a person can update their environment to greater serve a familys current lifestyle or create space for the life each member wants. An organized environment saves you time and money, and makes ef cient use of your space. This part of the evenings program will touch on basic organizing concepts, paper management issues and the challenge of how to part with things. Come and get inspired. The workshop will be held on March 13 at the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office, beginning at 6:30 p.m. There is limited space. Register by calling the extension of ce at 926-3931. There is a $10 registration fee. All ingredients for a few cleaning products will be furnished. Green solutions for spring cleaningTime to get Wild About Wakulla By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Special to The NewsFlorida Organic Growers and North Florida Community Colleges Green Industries Institute will present a free workshop about the process of becoming USDA Certi ed Organic on Monday, April 23 at Green Industries Institute in Monticello. The workshop begins at 8:30 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m., and is designed for current and prospective farmers, as well as service providers who are interested in learning and sharing about the organic certification process. Becoming USDA Certi ed Organic can seem intimidating with the paperwork and inspections, said Claire Mitchell, Sustainable Agriculture Programs Manager at Green Industries. However, the presenters from FOG will walk participants through the process of becoming certified to make it all more manageable, and then well take a look outside at the Green Industries growing space to see what organic farming really looks like. FOG Executive Director Marty Mesh and FOG Project Coordinator Jose Perez will lead an in-depth presentation that will touch on the basics and critical parts of the organic regulations, the organic certi cation process, how to prepare applications and how prepare for an organic inspection. That will be followed by a farmer panel featuring currently certified organic farmers, and nally an interactive tour of the Green Industries Institute by Claire Mitchell. During the free, working lunch, the workshop will also include some time to discuss miscellaneous topics relevant to growers in the region. Registration forms can be printed out from the Green Industries website at nfcc.edu/green-industries. Mail completed registration forms to P.O. Box 12311, Gainesville FL 32604, or fax to (352) 377-8363. For more information about FOG and the workshop, call (352) 377-6355 or e-mail jose@foginfo.org. For questions concerning Green Industries, call (850) 973-1702 or email mitchellc@nfcc.edu.Special to The News From art shows and wild land tours, to special presentations and worm gruntin, Wakulla Countys Wild About Wakulla Week will boast several area festivals that will educate, entertain and satisfy even the most seasoned traveler. Wakulla County communities of St. Marks, Panacea, Sopchoppy and Crawfordville will each host unique cultural festivals during the week of April 14-22. During the week, Certi ed Green Guides will lead tours of the natural wonders of Wakulla County, where more than 70 percent of the county is pristine public land and more than 85 percent of the coastline is unadulterated and will be protected forever. Complete tour details can be found on the festival website, wildaboutwakulla.com. The of cial festivities will begin with the much-anticipated Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival. Held annually since 2000, this all-day outdoor event has become a Big Bend treasure that is fun for the whole family. Wondering what Worm Gruntin is? The answer is at the festival! The website wormgruntinfestival.com has more information. Wakulla Wildlife Festival will be held April 20 and 21 at Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park. This began as a modest songbird gathering and has grown into a two-day celebration full of tours, ne art, living history demonstrations and dynamic presentations. This festivals growth is no wonder since its tours focus on the diverse, rare and magni cent beauty of Wakulla Springs. A $6 per vehicle donation will be welcomed at the entrance station and pre-registration is encouraged as tours ll quickly to capacity in advance of festival dates. Interested participants may visit wakullawildlifefestival.org for more information. The Wild About Wakulla celebrations will nish out riverside in St. Marks with interpretive coastal boat and historical walking tours from Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee. This special program provides a taste of the forthcoming Viva Florida 500 festivities to be held into the next year. In 2013, Florida will reach a signi cant milestone, the 500th anniversary of Juan Ponce de Leons arrival on Floridas east coast. Tour times are listed on the of cial festival website. Lodging is available during the festivities at a historic lodge, a country club, an authentic sh camp, popular hotels and charming bed and breakfasts. The website visitwakulla.com details these and other accommodations. The support of Comcast and The Wakulla News as Wild About Wakulla Weeks major advertising sponsors is a very much appreciated service to the communities and events involved. The festivals website, wildaboutwakulla.com, was designed by Wakulla High Schools Web Design class as part of Wakulla High Schools Career and Technical Education Program.Organic certi cation workshop is set FILE PHOTOSopchoppys Worm Gruntin Festival kicks off the events of Wild About Wakulla. Last year, these young men tried their hand at gruntin worms.The free workshop is sponsored by Florida Organic Growers and will be held in Monticello on April 23. Beach body bingo! Get FitSustain your Energy Yoga Health, Page 4BWhat caused the solar company Solyndra to fail?EarthTalk, Page 3B ThE Battle of Natural BridgePhotos, Page 10B IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED FISH LIMIT IS NOW www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, March 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, March 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, March 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, March 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. WAKULLA CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Tuesday, March 13 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will meet at noon at the TCC Wakulla Center in Crawfordville. Lunch is provided. Call (850) 926-9005 for more information. Thursday, March 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY will hold a public forum ay 7 p.m. at the library with guest speaker County Administrator David Edwards. He will discuss the challenges facing county government. Everybody is welcome to attend.Special EventsThursday, March 8 A WOMANS WORK IN WAKULLA: Exploring the Role of Women Through the Ages and Stages of Wakulla County will be presented by Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society at 7 p.m. at the library. This will be a panel discussion. The event moderator will be Rachel Sutz Pienta. The panelists include Tammie Bar eld, Madeleine Carr, Andrea Carter, Anginita Rosier, Colleen Skipper, Susan Solburg and Betsy Smith. SMALL POULTRY FLOCKS FOR HOME USE class will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Learn the latest techniques for raising poultry for meat and eggs. Topics covered in class will include care and feeding, housing, breed selection, protection from predators, and much more. Friday, March 9 WAKULLASTORY: A Hankerin for Headhuntin will be presented at 7 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy Highschool. It is presented by The Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society, written by Herb Donaldson, artistic director, based on the writings of Elizabeth Fisher Smith, creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly Magazine. FOURTH ANNUAL SPRING FESTIVAL will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. at Riversink Elementary School. There will be games, bingo, silent auction, food and a raf e. WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL SPRING TALENT SHOW will be held at the WHS Auditorium. The doors open at 6 p.m. with the show starting at 7 p.m. There will be two bands this year. Arrive Alive will be the opening act, beginning at 6:30 p.m. and Hammaknockers will be playing in the second part of the show. There will be dancers and belly dance routine. There is a slam poet, rap group, guitar playing vocalists and piano playing vocalists and solo vocalists. The cost for students is $4 and adults is $6. Proceeds will help pay the rising cost for this years State Thespian Trip. Saturday, March 10 SECOND ANNUAL LOW COUNTRY BOIL will be held at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville from 6 to 10 p.m. The event will feature a Low Country Boil dinner, and live music by JBs Zydeco Zoo. PUBLIC TALK ON From Google Earth to Google Embryo: Exploring the Spheres We Grow From will be held at 7:30 p.m. at Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory, 222 Clark Drive, Panacea. Dick and Natalie Gordon are new scientist volunteers who are establishing an Embryogenesis Center. Admission is free, membership encouraged. Contact Richard Gordon at 984-5297 or by email DickGordonCan@gmail. com. FOURTH ANNUAL JESUS RIVER FESTIVAL will be held at Sopchoppy City Park from noon until dark. Additional information can be found at jesusriverfest.com. WAKULLASTORY: A Hankerin for Headhuntin will be presented at 3 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy Highschool. It is presented by The Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society, written by Herb Donaldson, artistic director, based on the writings of Elizabeth Fisher Smith, creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly Magazine. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY RE-STORE will have a clothing give-away from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The store is located at 940 Shadeville Highway. Call 926-4544 for more information. Sunday, March 11 FLAG, Freedom and Liberty Advocacy Group, will meet at 4 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. They will be discussing the 2012 national election and ways to promote a government which retains individual liberty while respecting the Constitution. All are welcome to participate. Tuesday, March 13 GOING GREEN: Spring Cleaning Solutions by Shelley Swenson will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. There is limited space, register by calling 926-3931. There is a $10 registration fee. Ingredients for a few cleaning products will be furnished. Thursday, March 15 FREE LECTURE on Adventures in Northwest Florida Archaeology by Dr. Nancy White, Professor of Archaeology at the University of South Florida, will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. The free lecture is hosted by the Florida Public Archaeology Network, University of West Florida and the Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center. This lecture series is free and open to everyone. RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL THEATRE TROUPE will present Next Victim, Please at 7 p.m. This is a tongue-in-cheek murder mystery. Admission is free, but donations are graciously accepted. The concession will be open prior to the show and at intermission. Saturday, March 17 ST. PATRICKS DAY FESTIVAL AND PARADE will be held at Hudson Park by the Crawfordville Lions Club. Breakfast in the park will be held at 8 a.m. The parade will start at 10 a.m. There will be several performances throughout the day, including Taekwondo, Coast Charter School, Aleene Benson Irish and Scottish Fiddle Players, Rick Tittle, John Smith and Ken Muf n Man, and the Wakulla Wigglers. TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at Harvest Fellowship, 824 Shadeville Road, from 10 a.m. to noon. All spectrum children and their siblings are invited to this play date. Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times. Children need to bring their favorite train and a snack and drink. GROW MORE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES class will be held from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. Learn about fertilizer, lime, compost, green manures and application methods. Learn how to produce fruits and vegetables in the back yard. ST. PADDYS DAY FAMILY BASH will be held at Beef O Bradys at 6 p.m. Acoustic duo Hot Tamale will play from 6 to 9 p.m. WATERS JOURNEY: Following the Water to Wakulla Springs tour will be held from 8 a.m. to noon led by Jim Stevenson, an expert biologist. This a tour of the Wakulla Spring Basin which examines the sources and traces the water journey to the world famous Wakulla Springs. Cost of the tour is $18. Tour departs from the TCC campus parking lot at 8 a.m. and ends at the tower overlooking the spring at noon. For more information, call 926-3376. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com A Womens Work in Wakulla, a panel discussion, at the library at 7 p.m. WHS Spring Talent Show at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. Low County Boil at 3Y Ranch from 6 to 10 p.m. WakullaStory at 3 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy High School.ThursdayFridaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, March 8 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for a budget workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, March 12 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim DirectorFriday Night Movie On Friday, March 9, we are proud to show the latest lm by Martin Scorsese which just won ve Academy Awards. This lm based upon the bestselling novel, The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick stars Asa Butter eld, Ben Kingsley and Chloe Grace Moretz, and tells the tale of Hugo Cabret who is an orphan boy living in the walls of a train station in the 1930s in Paris. He fixes clocks and other gadgets as he learned to from his father and uncle. The only thing that he has left that connects him to his father is an automaton that doesnt work; Hugo has to nd its heart-shaped key. On his adventures, he meets with a cranky old man who works in the train station and his adventure-seeking god-daughter. Hugo nds that they have a surprising connection to his father and the automaton, and as he discovers it, the old man starts remembering his past and his signi cance to the world of lm-making. This wondrous PG (for thematic material, action, and smoking) rated lm shows that Scorsese can make a family lm just as well done as his classics Raging Bull, Goodfellas and The Departed. Capital City Bank will once again be supplying popcorn and water for donations to the library. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Womens Panel Discussion at WCPL To honor Womens History Month and in conjunction with the Palaver Tree Theatre Company, the Wakulla County Historical Society will be presenting A Womens Work in Wakulla: Exploring the Role of Women Through the Ages and Stages of Wakulla County. This program begins at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 8 at the Library. This discussion will be moderated by Rachel Sutz Pienta with panelists including Tammie Barfield, Madeleine Carr, Andrea Carter, among others. Please come out for whats sure to be an illuminating program which will lead directly into the WakullaStory events this weekend! Computer Classes for the week Were offering two computer classes over the next week, both on Wednesday, March 14. At 9:30 a.m., we have Computer Basics: Getting Started followed by Microsoft PowerPoint: Getting Started at 1:30 p.m. As always seating is limited so please register early. The schedule of computer classes for March and April is available at the front desk, and on our website, www.wakullalibrary. org. Please take advantage of these free classes were proud to offer to the community. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 3BDear EarthTalk: What caused Solyndra, a leading American solar panel maker, to fail last fall and what are the implications for U.S. alternative energy industries? Walt Bottone Englewood, N.J. Solyndra was a California-based maker of thin- lm solar cells af xed to cylindrical panels that could deliver more energy than conventional at photovoltaic panels. The companys novel system mounted these exible cells, made of copper, indium, gallium and diselenide (so-called CIGS), onto cylindrical tubes where they could absorb energy from any direction, including from indirect and re ected light. Solyndras technology was so promising that the U.S. government provided $535 million in loan guarantees whereby taxpayers foot the payback bill to lenders if a borrower fails. And fail Solyndra did. In September 2011, the company ceased operations, laid off all employees, and led for bankruptcy. What caused this shooting star of alternative energy to burn out so spectacularly after just six years in business and such a large investment? Part of what made Solyndras technology so promising was its low cost compared to traditional photovoltaic panels that relied on once costlier silicon. When Solyndra launched, processed silicon was selling at historic highs, which made CIGS a cheaper option, reports Rachel Swaby in Wired Magazine. But silicon producers overreacted to the price run-up and flooded the market. The result was that silicon prices dropped 90 percent, eliminating CIGS initial price advantage. Another problem for Solyndra was the falling price of natural gas the cleanest of the readily available fossil fuels as extractors implemented new technologies including horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing to get at formerly inaccessible domestic reserves in shale rock. In 2001 shale gas accounted for two percent of U.S. natural gas output, while today that number is closer to 30 percent. The result of this increased supply is that the price of natural gas has fallen by some 77 percent since 2008, meaning utilities can produce electricity from it much cheaper as well. Renewables simply cant compete, adds Swaby. The nal blow to Solyndra was Chinas creation of a $30 billion credit line for its nascent solar industry. The result: Chinese rms went from making just six percent of the worlds solar cells in 2005 to manufacturing more than half of them today, says Swaby. U.S. market share is now just seven percent. Low natural gas prices have also hurt other renewables, especially given the slow economy and its sti- ing effect on innovation. To wit, the rate of new wind-turbine installations in the U.S. has declined by more than half since 2008. The fossil fuel industry and its allies in Congress clearly see the solar and wind industries as a threat and will try to kill [them], says Representative Edward Markey, a top Democrat on the House Energy and Commerce Committee. Regardless of the challenges in furthering renewables, the White House remains committed to the greener path. In his recent State of the Union, President Obama renewed the call for a federal Renewable Energy Standard that would force utilities to derive signi cant percentages of their power from cleaner, greener sources. This would provide much-needed regulatory uniformity and a more robust and consistent market for renewable power, wherever solar panels, wind turbines or other equipment happen to be manufactured. Dear EarthTalk: I was in Los Angeles recently and the smog was not nearly as bad as when I visited 15 years ago. Is it really better now, and if so, how did it get that way? Or did I just happen to visit on a good day? Marjorie Hicke Atlanta Los Angeles is almost as famous for its choking smog a haze of groundlevel ozone and particulate pollution that can aggravate asthma and other respiratory problems as for its Hollywood stars. The reason so much smog forms there is because the city is in a low basin surrounded by mountains, with millions of cars and industrial sites spewing emissions into the air. But thanks to tougher state and federal air quality standards, L.A. residents can breathe easier than theyve been able to for decades. According to the nonprofit Environment California, air pollution from cars and trucks across the state has decreased since the 1970s by more than 85 percent, with peak smog levels in the city of Los Angeles itself dropping some 70 percent. Meanwhile, Californias South Coast Air Quality Management District (AQMD) has been tracking smog levels in the area since 1976, and reports the number of ozone advisories where residents are advised to stay indoors due to unhealthy local accumulations of smog fell from a high of 184 days in 1977 to between zero and a few days a year now. Californias efforts to reduce air pollution from cars and trucks have made the states air cleaner than it has been in decades and Californians are healthier as a result, says Bernadette Del Chiaro, Environment Californias clean energy advocate. This is especially notable because the number of miles driven in California doubled since the 1970s even though emissions signi cantly dropped meaning that vehicles have gotten considerably more fuel ef cient over the years. The technologies found on new car lots today were practically unimaginable even 20 years ago, much less 40 years ago, adds Del Chiaro. Yet thanks to strong policies, California has pushed the auto industry to innovate and engineer a greener, cleaner car. According to Environment Californias research, a typical new car today is more than 99 percent cleaner burning than its 1960s counterpart. An older car produces about a ton of smog-forming pollution every 100,000 miles; a new car generates only 10 pounds over the same distance. This improvement saves consumers money at the pump as well as health care expenses and lives due to reduced pollution loads. And a new generation of hybrid and electric cars is driving automotive ef ciency to even newer heights. Updated federal air quality standards implemented in 2008 have also helped reduce ozone alert days in California and elsewhere. But despite this progress, environmental and public health advocates are urging federal lawmakers to raise air quality standards even higher. The goal is to get ground level ozone, a chief contributor to smog, no more prevalent than the range of 60-70 parts per billion averaged over eight hours, as unanimously recommended by an independent board of air experts and scientists created under the Clean Air Act to provide periodic review and recommendations on air quality standards. The Obama administration reportedly considered updating t he 2008 standard last summer but decided to table the decision until 2013 given economic priorities. Lets hope that the economy turns around enough in the meantime so that industry wont push back too hard against raising the federal standards.GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport CT 06881 or e-mail earthtalk@emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www. emagazine.com/earthtalk/ archives.php. What caused the solar company Solyndra to fail? Low natural gas prices, competition from China and other factors helped sink innovative American solar panel maker, Solyndra, despite its having received $535 million in government loan guarantees. But the Obama administration is not deterred and has renewed efforts to force utilities to derive signi cant percentages of their power from cleaner, greener sources.ZACHARY GRAHAM/FlickrA drop in prices of silicon and natural gas, plus competition from China, ultimately led Solyndra to declare bankruptcy 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR The Waku l la News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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5Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2Goto http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click Continue. Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTHOne of the biggest misconceptions about our source of Energy is that its out there somewhere. The truth is that Energy is within us, ready and waiting for us to access its super colossal potential. Our life Energy is an innate intelligence that masterminds everything from healing wounds to maintaining our breath while we sleep. This Energy within us is part of the ocean of universal Energy that governs all life. We can tap into it through our individual currents. The ways that we breathe, think, eat, work and move all contribute to the quality of Energy that manifests in our lives. Breath is an essential link to our vitality. By consciously directing it, we can calm anxiety, awaken our innate vibrancy and induce states of heightened awareness. Breath control is as powerful and potent as arti cial substances. Within each of our bodies is a fully stocked apothecary. But we dont need to take drugs to feel the enthusiasm and invigorating enjoyment of Energy. Simply by getting excited about life or entertaining positive, compelling visions, our bodies automatically produce that boost our vitality and have a positive effect on the immune system. The eld of knowledge known as psychoneuroimmunology studies how negative thought and anxious worry drain Energy and how positive, life-enhancing thoughts boost our resistance to disease. When we are de cient in Energy, it can mean that we lack some form of nutrition. The very act of eating is a spiritual experience. Many people pray over their food in gratitude and as a way to imbue it with healing Energy. In order to sustain our creative energy, we need to take responsibility for the inner atmosphere we create through eating. Sometimes, not eating for short periods can be enlivening. Overtaxing the body without giving it a break, like never changing the oil in your car, creates a buildup of dirt and residue. When we purify the diet or brie y fast, we give our system a rest, a chance to heal from abusive habits. During those times when we choose to be empty, we can be lled with spirit. Filling up every moment of your day and working yourself to the point of exhaustion drains your Energy. Tired or sick animals instinctively rest, whereas humans tend to run themselves ragged trying to do just one more thing. Learn as much as you can about your own Energy cycles by listening and responding to your bodys messages. Play with yoga postures at the edge not so far that you strain yourself nor so effortlessly that you are unchallenged. This healthy edge is different for everyone. Yoga permits us to recycle this power so that it is freed up for productive and useful purposes. We maximize our potential, transforming daily life into opportunities for experiencing more aliveness. Do more yoga!Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 3800140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Sustain the Energy that sustains you Its March, our warm weather and beach season is right around the corner. We have talked about health and wellness, road safety and our heart. But now its almost time for fun in the sun. We are getting ready to don our bikinis and surf shorts and hit the beach. Now is the time to try on those bikinis in front of that department store mirror and realize something isnt right. For goodness sake, we dont need the saggy booties, bubba belly and bingo arms to get in our way of looking great in our favorite beach attire. This article is simply for those three areas that concern us before we start our sun rituals. They are simple ways to work all these out without even leaving your house. We will start with our gluteus maximus (The Butt!) DONKEY KICKS On your hands and knees with your back straight, slowly lift one leg bring into body and kick out, bring back in and repeat! Then switch to other leg. Try to start slowly and have your goal 100 on each leg. Great for butts. SINGLE LEG ROMANIAN DEADLIFTS Stand with feet hip-width apart, right foot raised off the floor and right arm extended in front of you. Bending forward from your hips and keeping your back flat, raise your right leg straight behind you until your body forms a T and your right arm hangs down from your shoulder. Return to start. Thats one rep. Complete all reps, then repeat on the other side. If your balance is an issue, place a chair next to the side of the stationary leg to hold on for support. This is also excellent for the core as balance is gained! CHAIR SQUATS Next take a chair and stand about a foot in front of it with your legs and feet in the same starting position. Holding hands away from you or in the up position bend your knees and squat down until your butt touches the chair, then push back. You will be surprised how much this one will work your glutes and hamstrings! Dont hold on! You will notice improvements by doing these exercises daily. Trying to keep your reps high around 15 to 20 and working your way up to three sets. Now the arms. Most women and men do not like sagging skin on the back of their arms, there are simple home exercises for these also. CHAIR DIPS Sit on chair with your feet touching the floor. Place your hands at the sides of your body, grasping the front edge of the seat and slide your butt off the chair and in front of it. Avoid touching the chair. Slowly lower your body toward the oor until your arms at a 90-degree angle. Slowly raise your body back and repeat. WALL PUSH UPS Facing the wall an arms length away, place hands on wall at shoulder level. Slowly lean your body towards the wall while bending elbows outward. Once your nose is almost touching wall slowly bring body back by straightening the elbows at starting positions. Repeat. These two exercises will de nitely help your triceps and tone your arms. In addition, the push-ups will help your chest and biceps. Push-ups are an easy exercise to do once you feel strong enough move your push-ups to the oor. You will notice improvements in not only your arms, but your chest and your abdominals getting tighter. There are numerous ways to complete a push-up, nd the one that ts you best and do it! Our bikini would not be worn with-out tight abs, you dont have to have a six-pack just a nice toned belly. The abdominals are broken into three different targeted areas of the abs the lower abs, the obliques and the upper abs. This is a breakdown of one exercise for each targeted area: REVERSE CRUNCHES Reverse Crunches target the lower abdominal muscles. While lying on your back with knees bent, bring your lower body towards your upper body as far as you can while contracting your abdomen. Slowly lower your knees back to starting position. Repeat. Try to exhale as you bring your lower body towards your upper body and hold for one second to increase the intensity of the exercise. BICYCLE CRUNCH EXERCISE Bicycle crunches are targeting the oblique abdominal muscles. Lie at on the oor on your back with your fingertips at the base of your head. Tighten your abdominal muscles, bring your knees up to a 45-degree angle, and lift your shoulder blades off the ground. Turn your upper body to the left, bringing the right elbow toward the left knee and extending your right leg and switch sides, bringing the left elbow toward the right knee. Continue this pedaling motion, slowly, try to avoid pulling on the neck. Repeat! ABDOMINAL CRUNCHES This is the most popular abdominal exercise, next to the sit-ups. Crunches work the abdominal muscles by contracting your body until your core muscles get tight. Lie on your back with your knees bent and your hands holding the side of your head or at the nape of your neck. (Remember not to pull your neck) Lift your shoulder blades and torso until your back is a few inches above the oor and hold for one second. Then return by lowering your body to the oor. Repeat! Okay, now you have some of t he tools you need to get that body into shape before one toe digs into that beautiful warm sand. So get moving. Remember to see your doctor before starting any exercise routine to ensure that you are healthy and ready. Good luck and good shopping for that summer bikini! If you would like more information please go to either womens tness.com or mens tness.com for more exercises, health articles, and nutrition ideas. Live Long and Healthy.Pamela Chichester, CFT, SPN is manager of Body-Tek 24-Hour Gym in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348.Beach body bingo! Time to get in shape beach season is right around the corner GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTER Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain PARTNE R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 5B This page sponsored in part by:

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177Anthony E. Dyer Enterprises INTERIOR and EXTERIOR CLEANINGroofs, gutters, yard care and much more... Call today for an estimate!850-980-2018TONY DYER Licensed Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsCoastal StorageLow Rates / Short Term Contracts!850-509-1740 5X10s and 10X20s spaces for lease. Additional discount on already low rates w/contracts! BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Your Spanish Communicator Document Translations (Spanish /English) Conference Calls Telephone Excellence Skills Training (English/Spanish) Telephone outgoing voice recordingcall LKR COMMUNICATION & TRANSLATIONS, LLC for rates! 850-509-7129 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netESTATE SALE(rst of several)Fri/Sat, March 9 & 10, 9AM-1PM 658 Pine Street, Alligator Point HABITAT for HUMANITYRe-StoreCLOTHING GIVE-AWAY! JOB ANNOUNCEMENTCONTRACTOR:I have new TGI Beams. All 3.5 wide by 14 inches tall. Theres three at 16 feet long and 11 at 10 feet long. Yours for $200. Call 850-962-9092 or 732828-2632. Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Trades/ Skills ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICC&L Automotive, Sopchoppy, Call Corey Crum at 850-528-5113 or Shawn Lawhan at 850-519-3443 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLESat. 8a-noon treadmill, punching bag, dishes, shoes, purses, household & tool Misc. 7 Birch Ct St Marks Sat9am-4pm My Last Yard Sale!! Everything Must Go! 135 Burnt Pine Loop Sporting Goods 6 FT. POOL TABLE Full rack of Balls & Two sticks $250. obo 850-212-3252 Mobile Homes For Rent Crawfordville2bed/2bath single wide MH on private lot North of Crawfordville $550. mo. 1st, Last & Deposit required 850-960-4230 SOPCHOPPY3/1, Covered screen. Porch, large wooded lot,$52/mo( incls garbage) + a deposit (850) 566-4124 Real Estate For Rent HOME ON ACREAGEHome on 3 acres. 2BR/2BA. porch, storage building, large oak trees, conveniently located near post office and Walgreens $625/mo 850-251-1253 Brenda Hicks Realty Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 3BR/2BA, Medart,big-fenced yard, very clean, front/back porches, shed. No pets or smoking. $850/month+deposit. 850-545-0126 Must see!! CrawfordvilleGeorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $875, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 443-3300 WATER. BIRDS FISHING2/1, w/covered deck over looking private dock, newly refurbished, completely furnished or neg unfurnished $900 rent + utility fee (850) 524-1026 Commercial Real Estate WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Lots For Sale 2-Acre Lots For Sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Services Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5139-0308 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, March 12, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 March 8, 2012 5144-0308 PUBLIC NOTICE Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority (NWFTCA) Meeting Notice. The NWFTCA recently commsissioned HDR Engineering, Inc. to prepare a major update to their regional Master Plan, originally adopted in 2007. As part of the initial phase of the update, HDR is working with key stakeholders (Florida DOT, FHWA, city and county reps.,etc.) and the Authority to help analyze future transportation projects by assessing their respective economic benefits, developing an investment plan and proposing viable funding strategies. A series of workshops will be held during this process. The first workshop will be held at two alternate locations: March 13, 2012 from 10:00am to 1:00pm Central Time at the Florida State University Holley Academic Center, Panama City campus located at 4750 Collegiate Drive, Panama City, Florida and March 14, 2012 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm Central Time at the Days Inn & Suites, Navarre Conference Center, Room D located at 8700 Navarre Parkway, Navarre, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or by email Alicia.Stephen@hdrinc.com Please RSVP by March 6 if you plan to attend. March 8, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5146-0315 (3/24/12 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART 1V Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 24,2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: MARANDA COX JENNIFER WHITING HILL SARAH E. SKIPPER Before the sale date of Saturday, March 24, 2012, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. March 8 & 15, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5141-0308 (3/17 Sale-ABC Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 17, at 3:00 PM, at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini Warehouse containing personal property of: DESMOND JONES NELSON WOODS NORMAN BUTCH McCALLISTER Payments must be made before Thursday, March 15, by 12:00 noon.The owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or by paying in person at the warehouse location.March 1 & 8, 2012 4Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $425mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerGARAGE SALE!!SATURDAY MARCH 10, 9AM-4PM at 87 Duncan Drive, CrawfordvilleInfant & girls Spring & Summer clothes galore!!! 0-2t. Over 400 excellent items to choose from. Crib & mattress, couch & loveseat... more! Spring Scentsy OPEN HOUSE TOO! Call Janet 519-0720.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 7B We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month.2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Island 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2BR/2BA with separate 1BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking or Pets 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. Available April 1st. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg.14 Windy Court 3BR/2BA Available 4/1/12 $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 47 Jasmine 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre $1,200 Mo. Available April 1. No Smoking/Small Pets w/approval 20 Liberty 3BR/2BA $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets Available April 1. 917 Jessica 3BR/2BA $800 Mo. Pets ok w/approvalAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate Susan Jones, GRIRealtor566-758491 Culbreath Lane $99,900 Remodeled DWMH nestled on 5 beautiful acres. Spacious oorplan. Large family/living room w/wood burning replace & built in shelving. New ooring, paint & wood blinds throughout. New appliances!! Large deck great for grilling & entertaining. Storage shed & oversized double carport. Enjoy Scenic Views, Flowing Acreage, Majestic Oaks & all nature has to offer in this private location. Take advantage of Wakulla Countys A-rated schools and be only 10 minutes from Capital Circle. Seller will pay 3% of buyers closing cost & Home Warranty. HELD ON FEBRUARY 23, 2012MARCH 1, 2012 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL A Business -Community (ABC) School Program, Wakulla County RFP# 12/13 -01 The School Board of Wakulla County requests interested parties to submit formal sealed bids/proposals for the above referenced bid. SCOPE OF WORK: The School Board of Wakulla is seeking proposals from qualified businesses with operations in Wakulla County, Floridainterested in partnering with the District in A Business-Community (ABC)School Program. The proposal is for the Business to provide the facility, including the associated operating and upkeep expenses, in which the Wakulla County School District (WCSD) will provide an educational program for the children of the business employees for 6.5 hours per day or as consistent with the Wakulla County School Board (WCSB) approved elementary school hours and calendar. A Business-Community (ABC) School is defined as a public school offering instruction to students from kindergarten through third grade in a facility owned or leased and operated by a business. The Department of Education 2012-2013 average class size requirement is eighteen students. Eighteen is also the minimum average class size to achieve the effective, efficient use of the taxpayers educational and fiscal resources. Proposals that commit to meeting the maximum and minimum class size criteria or that proved for reimbursement to the Wakulla County School District for any loss in FTE educational funding revenues resulting from the failure of the business to achieve the minimum enrollment will receive the highest consideration. Students in need of or enrolled in special programs or that require special services can best be served at the Wakulla County Schools that offer those programs and services identified in the students individual educational plan. Parents shall be responsible for providing all transportation to and from school or to the other WCSD facilities during, before and after school for the students enrolled in a Business-Community (ABC). Florida Business Community (ABC) Schools shall comply with the constitutional class size requirements. Facilities to a house a FloridaBusiness-Community (ABC) School must comply with the State Uniform Building Code for Educational Building Construction adopted pursuant to section 1013.37, Florida Statutes, and must meet state and local health, environmental, and safety laws and codes. ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS: This package can be requested by mail at Wakulla County School Board, Post Office box 100, Crawfordville, Fl orida 32326 or by calling 850-926-0065 DOCUMENT COST: $1.50 BID BOND: None PRE/BID PROPOSAL CONFERENCE:: Pre-Proposal Conference Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 10 A.M. Wakulla County School Board Administrative Offices Conference Room 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DUE DATE/TIME: April 10, 2012@ 2:00P.M. Eastern The School Board of Wakulla County, Florida must receive bids no later than said date and time. Bids received after such time will be returned unopened. CONTACT: WILLIAM R. BRISTOL 850-926-0065 published two (2) times in the The Wakulla News March 8, 15, 2012 5148-0315 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5138-0308 Vs. Shell Point Residences, LLC, Case No.:2011-31-CA. Amended Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-314-CA IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, Plaintiff, vs. SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 12, 2011, entered in Case No. 2011-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, is the Plaintiff, and SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, and all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against any defendant named herein, are the Defendants. The Wakulla County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in Wakulla County, Florida, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, April 26, 2012, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBITS A AND B IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THIS SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. WITNESS, my hand and the seal of this Court on February 21, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND,As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A LOTS 7, 10, AND 11, BLOCK A, AND LOTS 1 THROUGH 5, LOTS 7 THROUGH 10 AND BEACH CLUB LOT, ALL IN BLOCK B, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices ALL OF BLOCK C, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND PHASE 2 MARINA BASIN RESERVATION AREA BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19, SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA, COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 85.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 133.17 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 103.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 08 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.19 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 06 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 13 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 61.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 42.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 20.61 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 23.63 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.66 FEET, TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 902.73 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 114.91 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 51 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 114.83 FEET) TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 73.91 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 34 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 34.93 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 34.61 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 129.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 38.38 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 32.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 63.07 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 110.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 6.13 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 165.37 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.70 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 58.84 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 2.47 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 67.44 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 94.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.08 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.20 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 33.94 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 43.86 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.79 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 70.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 79.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 64 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 159.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 86.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 41.89 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 16.70 FEET, THENCE CONTINUE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID LINE. A DISTANCE OF 50.64 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 22 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 65.42 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 107.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 10.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 168.31 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 156.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 21.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 01 SECOND EAST A DISTANCE OF 47.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 19.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 40.71 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 23.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 17.23 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 101.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.26 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 86 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 74.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.59 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 54.46 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 211.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 3.12 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CANALS BEGIN AT AN IRON PIN (LB #732) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 219.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 68.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 15.75 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS FOLLOWS: THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 9.88 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 45.34 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 62.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 135.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 189.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 60.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 60.11 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 60.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 60.21 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 11 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 130.83 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 75.56 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 92.14 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 60.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 52 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 60.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 60.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 06 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECOND WEST 60.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.01 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 117.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 30.16 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 104.63 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 115.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 130.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 44 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 60.01 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 51 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 60.12 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.56 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 23.22 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 04 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 100.03 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 99.61 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREE 12 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 100.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 7.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 543.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 260.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 474.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 121.54 FEET, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 21 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 99.10 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 364.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 275.66 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AND RUN THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 125.05 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1327.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-1 BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1198.08 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 43.11 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1167.13 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 875.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-2 COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1300.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 510.98 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF UNIT NO. 1 SHELL POINT BEACH AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 24 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 524.15 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH BOUNDARY AND RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 86.02 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 540.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 22 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 209.18 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 207.88 FEET), THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 370.90 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 606.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 227.66 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 226.32 FEET) THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.08 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comA RADIUS OF 1113.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 54 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 126.59 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 08 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 126.52 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 79 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 233.41 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 3154.71 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 225.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 1234.99 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP #4261, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 252.34 FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF UNIT 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED. THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 701.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1501.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 34.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 1244.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 43.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL G BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 117 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 491.62 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 RIGHT OF WAY) SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 922.37 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 52 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 07 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 838.76 FEET. (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 23 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 810.15 FEET), THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.13 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1179.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 03 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 29 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 69.46 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 69.45 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 561.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL B BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 6 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO.6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 11.38 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 59 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 77.70 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 71.66 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 78.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 68.91 FEET, THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 30.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 8.44 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 13.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 THENCE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 357.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL C COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 92.24 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 64.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 27.54 FEET TO A IRON PIN LB#732, THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 37.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 27.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 53.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 31.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 29.69 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 25.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 23.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 63.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 11.19 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 18.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 17.75 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 32 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 112.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 42 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 45.46 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 46.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 68.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 34 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 53.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 40.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 72.69 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 25.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL D COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 20.04 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 35.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 125.12 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 17 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 40.23 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 43.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 24.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 29 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 40.19 FEET, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 40.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL E COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 8 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 201.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 19.43 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 82.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 74.72 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 98.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 27.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 55.73 FEET, THENCE NORTH 22 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 93.65 FEET, THENCE NORTH 33 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 66.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 38 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 71.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 54.73 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 27.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 31.36 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 69.32 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 36.26 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 44 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 33.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 60.58 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 32 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 74.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 56.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 54.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 36 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 54.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 55.86 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 37.68 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 71.03 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 64.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 58.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 80 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 3.81 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 106.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 70.26 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 39 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 61.74 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 79.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 11.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 53.06 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 47.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 28 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 66.67 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 55.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 41.17 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 68.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 18.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 60.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 48.54 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 190.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL F BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER (ALSO THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER) OF LOT 24 UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED, AND RUN THENCE ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 324.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 56 SECONDS EAST 220.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 8.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 8.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 95.91 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY AND RUN ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 07 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 18.42 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 26.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 29.89 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 65 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 31.85 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 37.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST 54.72 FEET, THENCE NORTH 77 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 54.99 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 47.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 56 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 31.43 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 35.33 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 22.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 75.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 65.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 65.38 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 36 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 53.31 FEET, THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 30.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 50.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 51.23 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 72.12 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 166.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXHIBIT B PERSONAL PROPERTY Shell Point Residences, LLC, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; Shell Point Investments, LLC; and Shell Point Reserve, LLC; and Shell Point 12, LLCs right, title and interest in the following described property pursuant to the Mortgage, and as such terms are defined therein: (i) all buildings, structures and improvements of every nature whatsoever now and hereafter on said Premises, (ii) all insurance policies, leases, subleases and other agreements affecting the use, enjoyment or occupancy of the Premises heretofore or hereafter entered into and all accounts, rents, revenues, issues, profits and all proceeds from the sale or other disposition of such agreements accruing and to accrue from said Premises, (iii) all gas, steam, electric, water and other heating, cooking, refrigerating, lighting, plumbing, ventilating, irrigating and power systems, machines, building materials, appliances, furniture, equipment, goods, inventory, supplies, fixtures and appurtenances and personal property of every nature whatsoever, which now or may hereafter pertain to or be used with, in or on said Premises, even though they may be detached or detachable, (iv) all easements, rights-of-way, licenses, privileges, gores of land, streets, ways, alleys, passages, sewer rights, waters, water rights, permits, development rights and powers and all estates, rights, titles and interests in any way belonging, relating or appertaining to the Premises, (v) all Accounts, Goods, Chattel Paper, Deposit Accounts, Farm Products, Instruments, Documents, General Intangibles, Inventory, Consumer Goods, Equipment, Fixtures and Investment Property, as the foregoing terms are defined in the Uniform Commercial Code, and all contract rights, franchises, books, records, plans, specifications, approvals and actions which now or hereafter relate to, are derived from or are used in connection with the Premises, or the use, operation, maintenance, occupancy or enjoyment thereof or the conduct of any business or activities thereon, (vi) all the tenements, hereditaments, appurtenances, reversions and remainders belonging or pertaining to the Premises, (vii) any and all judgments, awards, settlements, claims, demands, payments, proceeds or other income arising in connection with the Premises, (viii) any items described in those certain UCC-1 Financing Statements of even date herewith between Mortgagor and Mortgagee and (ix) any extensions, additions, increases, substitutions, replacements, parts, accessions, improvements, betterments, proceeds, products and renewals to any of the aforesaid property, whether now existing or hereafter arising, all of the foregoing being included in the term Premises, it being the intention of Mortgagor and Mortgagee that this Mortgage (which is to be filed for record in the real estate records of the county mentioned above) shall also constitute a security agreement and financing statement as to the Premises herein mortgaged under the Florida Uniform Commercial Code, and that Mortgagee have all rights and remedies of a secured party thereunder. March 1 & 8, 2012 5138-0308 5143-0308 Vs. McVey, Vonda M. Case# 2011-CA-35 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., Case Number: 2011-CA-35 Plaintiff, vs. VONDA M. MCVEY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VONDA M. MCVEY; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, UENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of foreclosure dated February 8, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA-35 of the Circuit Court of the Second 5145-0308 Vs. Atkinson, Johnny Mason 12-4-CP PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-4-CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE ESTATE OF JOHNNY MASON ATKINSON, SR.., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: The administration of the estate of JOHNNY MASON A TKINSON, SR., DECEASED,File Number 12 4 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate, Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville, Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the estate must file their claims with the Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. The date of the first publication of this Notice is March 8, 2012. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Dated this 1st day of March, 2012. Personal Repr esentative: Teresa Ann Broxton 30 Windy Ct. Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attor ney for Personal Repr esentative: SHAWN P. GOLETZ, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No. 0338450 Smith, Thompson, Shaw, Minacci & Colon, P.A. 320 Thomasville Road, Fourth Floor Tallahassee, FL 32309 Tel: (850)893-4105 Fax: (850)893-7229 Published two (2) times in the Wakulla News, March 8 and 15, 2012 5147-0315 Vs.Dicus, Charles, 37 2011 CA 002620 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.37 2011 CA 002620 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES C. DICUS III; MARCIA K. DICUS; CITY OF TALLAHASSEE, FLORIDA; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2, ET AL Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION CONSTRUCTIVE SER VICE TO: CHARLES C. DICUS III; MARCIA K. DICUS, whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIF IED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property; COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF OAK RIDGE ROAD(STATE ROAD NO. 260-LEON COUNTY NO.2204) AND RUN THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 160.06 FET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 493.80 FEET TO A POINT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST 164.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 149.70 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 164.50 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 149.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE WEST 12 FEET THEREOF SUBJECT TO AN INGRESS, EGRESS EASEMENT RECORDED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 670, PAGE 179, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH: A 30 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST LINE OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8 TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA WITH THE NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF OAK RIDGE ROAD AND RUN THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 30.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH RIGHT -OF-WAY AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 356.38 FEET THENCE NORTH 466.54 FEET THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 466.18 FEET TO A CRIMPED IRON PIPE; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 356.93 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME KNOWN AS A 1997 VIN# GAFLV35A12887HH21 AND GAFLV35B12887HH21 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 3010 North Military Trail, Suite 300, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 on or before April 8, 2012 (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed therein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at County, Florida, this 22nd day of February, 2012 (COURT SEAL) CLERK OF THE COURT /S/ BY: Elizabeth L. Alford DEPUTY CLERK March 8 & 15, 2012 Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, Brent X. Thurmond as the Clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at public sale at the courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Wakulla County in Crawfordville, Florida with the sale commencing at 11:00AM on the 15th day of March 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: Legal Description: Lots 11, 12, and 13, Block 33, PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 5, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. To include a: 2007 CMHM Vin WHC016110GAA #0099539611 2007 CMHM Vin WHC016110GAB #0099539268 Address: Joe Mack Smith Road, Panacea, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of February, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk March 1st and 8th, 2012 5143-0308 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5136-0308 vs. Gibson, Tracy R. Case 2008-FC-130 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2008-FC-130 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L..P. FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. Plaintiff, vs. TRACY R. GIBSON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OFHOUSING ANDD URBAN DEVELOPMENT; STATE EMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 29th day of March, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 8 of a replat of Pelican Bay, subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 3, page 77 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 14th day of February, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later tha seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis Deputy Clerk March 1st & 8th 2012 5136-0308 5140-0308 Vs. Harris, John 65-2009-CA-000181 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000181 DIVISION JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JOHN HARRIS AKA JOHN H. HARRIS. JR., et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 21, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000181 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., is the Plaintiff and JOHN HARRIS AKA JOHN H. HARRIS, JR.; EVELYN BROWN; JANICE W. HARRIS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the29th day of March, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: AT THE NORTHWEST COMMENCE CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 72 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 963.89 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 71 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY 124.00 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DE5142-0308 Vs.Jefferson, Dennis, Case No.12-54-CA, Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.12-54-CA ROBERT LYTLE Plaintiff, vs. DENNIS JEFFERSON, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HIS UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HIM; HEIRS OF PEGGYE B. JEFFERSON, KNOWN AND UNKNOWN; HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: HEIRS OF PEGGYE B. JEFFERSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Parcel A 0.33 of an acre; Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 15, of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 17 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 23.67 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 926.10 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 585 Page 163 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING and said Northerly right of way line run along said Westerly boundary line South 17 degrees 33 minutes 48 seconds East 181.90 feet to a concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Westerly boundary line run along the Northerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 South 72 degrees 26 minutes 44 seconds West 79.93 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Northerly boundary line run North 17 degrees 37 minutes 26 seconds West 181.57 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line North 72 degrees 12 minutes 35 seconds East 80.12 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.33 of an acre, more or less. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Parcel B 0.33 of an acre; Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 15, of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 17 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 23.67 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 926.10 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 585 Page 163 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said Northerly right of way line run along said Westerly boundary line as follows: South 17 degrees 33 minutes 48 seconds East 181.90 feet; thence South 17 degrees 32 minutes 15 seconds East 181.42 feet to a re-bar marking the Southeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING continue along said Westerly boundary line South 17 degrees 43 minutes 58 seconds East 181.55 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Westerly boundary line run South 72 degrees 25 minutes 20 seconds West 80.18 feet; thence North 17 degrees 35 minutes 48 seconds West 181.48 feet to a re-bar marking the Southwest corner of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438; thence run along the Southerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 North 72 degrees 22 minutes 13 seconds East 79.74 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.33 of an acre, more or less. (hereinafter described as Parcel A and Parcel B the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: February 23, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (seal) By: Desiree D Willis As Deputy Clerk March 1 & 8, 2012 GREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDSEAST 122.68 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. B-368, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONVEYS TO THE SOUTHERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1687.02 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 04 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 133.04 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 86 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 133.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, 71.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 330 LOWER BRIDGE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 22, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. March 1 & 8, 2012 5140-0308 F09048347 The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 Page 9BBy DAVID ROYSE and MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 4 Budget negotiators sent their thorniest issues to the respective budget chairmen this weekend, as both the Senate and House lined up priorities for the expected nal week of the session. On a few issues, there was some closure this week. Lawmakers signed off on a $1.35 million compensation package for William Dillon, who was imprisoned for 27 years for a murder he didnt commit. The Senate passed that bill early in the week and sent it to Gov. Rick Scott who signed it a couple of hours later. The Legislature also this past week sent the governor a bill allowing students to give inspirational messages on an apparently limitless universe of subjects from God and the Founding Fathers to the Flying Spaghetti Monster and Kim Kardashian. While the bill was pushed by advocates for more Christian school prayer, hoping that more of that will happen at graduations, football games and other assemblies, they acknowledge that in an effort to render it constitutional, the plan will have to allow students to say anything they want with no interference from school of cials. Still, the fear remained among those in the religious and political minorities, that it will mean just what backers hope lots of Christian prayers that will make public school a little more uncomfortable for Jews, Hindus, Muslims and others who thought the state schools were a haven from being subjected to the majoritys religion. But even with those two closely watched bills being sent from the fourth oor of the Capitol to the rst, where Scotts of ce is, there remained major issues for the nal week. Chief among them was the nishing touches of the budget, which remained unresolved on Sunday heading toward the deadline. Because of the waiting period between printing a proposed budget and passing it, budget leaders must reach agreement early in the week if theyre going to nish the session by Friday as they intend. Other major issues remain to be passed (or failed) in the nal week, including Scotts top priority an overhaul of the personal injury protection auto insurance system. The two chambers have different bills on PIP the House limiting lawyer fees, for example, while the Senate doesnt. The House plan (HB 119) also caps physician visits and excludes a number of professions from accepting patients. The Senate has taken a more limited approach in its plan (SB 1869), but has yet to take up its version on the oor. The governor has pushed hard for lawmakers to pass a PIP bill, and while it looked this week as if the Legislature was moving toward doing that, the nal measure still has to pass. The focus the last week, and through the weekend, however, was the budget. Budget writers did agree over the weekend on a couple high pro le items keeping open Jefferson Correctional Institution near Tallahassee, while closing Hillsborough C.I. near Tampa. While the prisons budget is a tiny part of the overall spending plan, the plans by the executive branch to close various prisons this year has been a high pro le ght, mixed in with a ght over prison privatization, and its made the Capitol a second home for hundreds of men and women who spend their working hours walking through the states lockups dealing with its prisoners. Another budget breakthrough over the weekend was for another of Scotts priorities: freeing up more than $61 million to lure businesses to the state. The economic development money had been in doubt, but Senate Budget Chairman JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, said freeing up the cash for Scott was a good idea. The governor, Alexander said, has made good arguments that in his efforts to sell our state and bring quality employers in there, he needed to be able to make commitments faster. Scott would also be able to ask the Legislative Budget Commission for permission to spend another $25 million in incentives, under the budget deal. But some of the big picture items were still being worked on Sunday, including how to divvy up nearly $300 million in cuts to higher education and major portions of the states health-care spending plan. Its not dire, if history is a guide. Lawmakers often enter the nal week of the session still working on a budget, and overtime sessions are rare. It usually gets worked out. INSURANCE ISSUES STUMBLE FORWARD While the House passed its reform package targeting the states no-fault automobile insurance system, a couple of other insurance issues remain. On the property insurance front, a proposal (SB 1346) to shift the way the state-backed insurer pays claims is only now on its way to the Senate oor after being changed to lower the states overall risk following a major storm. The House has already passed its version (HB 1127) of the change. Both bills shift the responsibility for repaying hurricane claims and reduce immediate assessments for coastal homeowners and the insurance companies who cover them. YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR? A college education in Florida is undeniably cheaper than in most other places. The House agreed this week that, generally, you get what you pay for, and thats whats holding the state back from being on the cutting edge in research. The quality of at least a couple of universities right now, the University of Florida and Florida State University could be improved if they could charge market rate tuition, the House decided this week in approving a bill to let them do that. The measure passed the House 85-28 on Friday. Those who opposed it say the idea prices poor students out of high quality higher education. STATE WORKERS ALREADY TESTY, NOW MIGHT BE TESTED The House this week passed a bill to allow state agencies to test employees for drugs if the agency leadership decides to. The bill (HB 1205) follows a similar requirement for random drug testing and pre-employment screening put in place a year ago by the executive order of Gov. Scott. That order is on hold pending the outcome of a court challenge, with Scott telling most agencies in June to hold off on the plan until the courts rule. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-Inverness, would limit the number of employees tested to no more than 10 percent of each agencys workforce every three months. The measure passed 79-37 over the objection of Democrats who said it violates the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution anyway and will likely be overturned. The Senate hasnt taken up the bill on the oor. Speaking of executive orders by Scott, the House also voted to give the governor more power this week, though backers of the measure said thats not what their bill did. But currently, by order of a court, the governor is limited in what he can tell his own agencies to do when it comes to rulemaking. The bill (HB 7055) would remove limits on the governors power in rulemaking unless the Legislature expressly says otherwise. That bill also awaits Senate approval in the nal week. A number of other bills passed this week by the House but waiting for the Senate include a measure requiring that local judges approve when a public hospital is to be sold or leased to a private entity (HB 711), a bill requiring a 24-hour waiting period before a woman can have an abortion (HB 277), a bill speeding up the process for foreclosures (HB 213) and a bill repealing a statewide septic tank inspection program (HB 999). And early in the week, the House passed HB 3, a ban on Internet-based gambling at the Internet cafes that have sprung up around the state. The Senate, however, has indicated the measure wont pass there. REDISTRICTING The state Supreme Court heard oral arguments from the Legislature on why political maps passed by lawmak ers for the coming decade are constitutional, and from opponents on why theyre not. The court must let lawmakers know by March 9 what it thinks. Even if the court says before then what its assessment is, any changes that lawmakers make are widely expected to wait until a special session, probably later this month. TEXT AND ALSO DRIVE FAST Earlier this week the House passed the agency bill for the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles and the bodys most vocal advocate for highway safety, Rep. Irv Slosberg, D-Boca Raton, lamented that the bill didnt include much in the way of actual highway safety requirements. One bill hed like to see passed which looks highly unlikely is one that would ban texting while driving. That wasnt part of the bill, he noted, so how could it really be called a highway safety bill? It could be argued that the inability to ban texting and driving goes beyond the immediate debate about the safety of that particular bad habit, and extends to a larger debate about the role of government in peoples lives. But, it might be that this Legislature just likes a little bit of danger, a little bit of speed. On Friday, the Senate gave the checkered ag, at least on that side of the Capitol, to SB 266, which makes auto racing Floridas of cial state sport. A PASSING OF NOTE Former state legislator and secretary of state George Firestone died this past week at 80. Firestone, a Democrat, was elected to the House in 1966, elected to the Senate in 1972, and then was elected secretary of state in 1978, serving until 1987. STORY OF THE WEEK: The House and Senate began budget negotiations trying to work out the nal spending plan ahead of the end of the session, scheduled for Friday. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Members, Ill be brief. At least four members of the House or Senate beginning farewell speeches that then went on more than a half hour as the clock ticked away on the session this week and bills got closer to death for lack of time.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)On budget, and on time?Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 38 43 45 52 62 66 69 2 39 63 3 40 57 4 35 58 21 29 46 53 5 15 18 30 47 6 31 44 54 64 67 70 7 32 48 59 8 24 36 60 22 33 41 61 9 16 19 42 55 10 34 37 56 65 68 71 11 25 49 12 26 50 13 27 51ACROSS1.Daddy-o 5.Geishas'sashes 9.__-HawleyTariff Actof1930 14."Ismell__!" 15.Prefixwithcabor cure 16.Barbera'spartner inanimation 17.Sorvinoof "SummerofSam" 18.Friedman'ssubj. 19.Rejoinderto "Ain't!" 20.Diceydoingsat Canaveral? 23.Healingplants 24.Resultofa QB's mistake 25.Ambulanceorg. 28. OneofaHill100: Abbr. 29.Hollidaypartner 33.Brightlycolored seashell 35.PartsofTV broadcasts 37.Sendpacking 38.Alternative toa beerbelly? 43. Gobananas 44.Rudolph'smaster, forsh ort 45. Getevenfor 48.Cigarbutt? 49.Equi-kin 52."Alice"dinerowner 53.Victimofdeflation? 55.Kosher,so to speak 57.Commentatthe meatpacking plant? 62.YankeegreatLefty 64."__Nagila" 65.Lieinthesun 66.Roomydress 67.Ambleror Bogosian 68.Pastrychef,at times 69.Paveover 70.Cubiclefixture 71.PoeticdusksDOWN1.Wheregauchos roam 2.Birdonabaseball cap 3."CoatofMany Colors"singer Dolly 4.Likeuncirculated air 5.Cartelsince1960 6.GuitarwizardJeff 7.Pedestaltopper 8.Ten Command ments mount 9.Religionwithno formaldogma 10.Neitherfem.nor neut. 11.Likeafugitive 12.Lennon'slady 13.Confucianpath 21.Finishoff 22.Dad'sbro 26.Junkdrawerabbr. 27.Clockmaker Thomas 30.Toothpastetube abbr. 31.Fixes,asafight 32.__Vecchio(Arno crosser) 34."TheCaineMutiny" author 35.Sundayclosing 36.FedExedorfaxed 38.Pullanall-nighter 39.Beafflictedwith 40.LittleLeague membership restriction 41. Indyservicearea 42.Amtrak'sbullet train 46.Oldcoot 47.HumptyDumpty, e.g. 49.Pianist/politician P aderewski 50.Disgust 51.Catchallcategory 54.Marveledaloud 56.JazzpianistBlake 58.__cava 59.Produce-scale deduction 60."Wetryharder" company 61.Copewith,slangily 62.Needle-nosedfish 63.BajacheerAmerican Prole Hometown Content 2/12/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 2 32456 789 28 14 7398 9872 856 49623 79 00 9 HtCtt 614 8327 5 9 329475186 578691234 283 167945 745329618 196548372 931 284567 457916823 862753491 P A M P A S C R A M G A R O R I O L E H A V E O L E P A R T O N A G E L I M I T S T A L E A M E N V E N A U S E U P G E E Z E R O P E C A D A E G G B E C K R I G S O O H E D I D O L P O N T E T A R E S I N A I S E N T A V I S U N C P I T H A C K S H I N T O A C E L A M A S C W O U K E U B I E O N T H E R U N I G N A C E O N O M I S C S I C K E N T A O S E T H O T H E R S Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Yankees were once again repulsed at Natural Bridge. As with the original battle, which took place on March 6, 1865, when about 500 Union soldiers were beaten by an equal number of Confederate Home Guards and cadets from the West Florida Seminary, 147 years later the Yankees were again turned back at Natural Bridge. During the Civil War, Union forces landed at the St. Marks Lighthouse as part of an attempt to seize St. Marks. Confederates burned the bridge at Newport, forcing the Yankee soldiers to march upriver to attempt a crossing at Natural Bridge where the St. Marks River ows and then goes underground and rises again in a series of natural features called swallets. This years re-enactment, a skirmish was held on Saturday, March 3, and a full-scale battle on Sunday, March 4, was the rst on the Rakestraw Property, which the state recently bought and was the site of the actual battle. Hundreds of spectators attended the battle and to tour the encampments. Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 8, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBattle of Natural Bridge Re-enactment Confederate skirmishers re on advancing Federal troops, above. Prior to the re-enactment, a Confederate of cer at an artillery battery, below left, shows where to expect the Yankees to come from. A cannon res, below right, as spectators watch the battle unfold. NP-0000653372 AreYouHard OfHearing? Amajornamebrandhearingaidprovider wishestoeldtestaremarkablenewdigital hearinginstrumentinthearea.Thisoffer isfreeofchargeandyouareunderno obligation. Theserevolutionary100%Digitalinstruments usethelatesttechnologytocomfortablyand almostinvisiblyhelpyouhearmoreclearly. Thistechnologysolvesthestoppedupears, andheadinabarrelsensationsomepeople experience. Ifyouwishtoparticipate,youwillbe requiredtohaveyourhearingtestedinour ofce FREEOFCHARGE todetermine candidacyandreviewyourresultswiththe hearinginstrumentswithourhearingcare specialist. Attheendofthisevaluation,youmay keepyourinstrument,ifyousodesire,at atremendoussavingforparticipatinginthiseldtest.Specialtestingwillbe donetodeterminetheincreasedtsofthistechnology. tsofhearingaidsvarybytypeanddegreeofhearingloss,noise environment,accuracyofhearingtest,andpropert. Thisisawonderful opportunitytodetermineifhearinghelpisavailableforyourhearingloss andgethearinghelpataveryordableprice.CALLNOWIFYOUWISHTOBE INCLUDEDINTHISFIELDTESTNOWThroughMarch 29, 2012 Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. The Log Cabin Barry Building www.snapper.com LT125 285Z*Additional 1 year of limited warranty coverage is available on select models in stock. Current limited warranty duration is 2 y ears. This promotion extends the product warranty coverage to a total of 3 year s from the date of purchase. Engines are warranted separate ly and are not included in the promotional warranty period described above. Qualifying products include: select walk-behind mower s, rear-engine riders, RE200, NXT lawn tractors, LT 300 lawn tractor s, YT400 yard tractors, 150Z, 200Z, 285Z, 300Z and 355Z. Products not eligible for this rebate include: All SE series walk-behind mowers, LT125 lawn tractors, SPX lawn tractors, 400Z, 500Z, pre ssure washers, generators, tillers, chipper shredder, brush cutters, leaf blowers, leaf vac uums, mini cultivators, attachments and ac cessories. Limited warranty applies to residential consumer use only. Qualifying product must be purchased between 3/1/12 and 5/31/12. Completion of product registration by the selling dealer is necessa ry to validate the date of purchase for proof of warranty. N o other warranty or implied warranty by the manufacturer exists except where required by law. This warranty gives you specic rights th at vary from state to state. Offer valid only in U.S. and Canada. Refer to the products operators manual for warranty details.1 YEAR OF ADDITIONAL PRODUCT WARRANTY COVERAGE AT NO ADDITIONAL COST!*TAKEADVANTAGEOF THISOFFER FORATOTALOF 3 YEARSOF WARRANTYCOVERAGESee dealer for details120055 I$1,999$2,899 2219 Crawfordville Hwy. www.3youtdoorequipment.com