<%BANNER%>
Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00398
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 03-01-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00398
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn speaking with John Shuff, who is seeking a seat on the Wakulla County Commission in district 5, it becomes quite clear his main focus is bringing jobs to the county. Theres nothing more important than getting people to work,Ž Shuff said. Shuff said he would like to look at building, planning and landscaping regulations that are currently in place and see if they need updating. Nothing when passed by a committee will be perfect,Ž Shuff said. After some time has passed, the regulations need to be re-evaluated, Shuff said. Shuff said he will curtail regulations that inhibit sustainable economic opportunities, jobs and commerce. He wants to grow commerce and spur economic development. That strengthens families, which in turn, strengthens the community,Ž Shuff said. He said he was against impact fees and didnt feel they were fair. Shuff is a strong proponent of the Our Town plan or what is now being referred to as Wakulla 2020, which was created out of the Crawfordville Town Plan and is an initiative that has been led by the Chamber and a volunteer citizens group, along with the county commission. Shuff has been involved in the Chamber for 12 years and is the past president. The idea is to improve Highway 319, as well as other roadways in the county. To pay for these projects, a half-cent tax referendum has been suggested. Shuff said the main project of the plan is to fourlane 319, which the state has been promising for years. When projections were released recently, the county was told it would be another 20 years. Like most of us, I remember in the 80s when we were told well get it in 15 years,Ž Shuff said. Wakulla County does not have the transportation infrastructure, such as a fourlane highway or railroad, to bring in large companies like a distribution center, Shuff said. Shuff said if the corridor is improved, it will make it more attractive and hopefully entice businesses to open in Wakulla County. Wakulla County is a bedroom community, with 60 percent of residents going to Tallahassee for work, Shuff said, and people also go to Tallahassee to shop. We use Wakulla County services, but we leave our tax dollars in Leon County,Ž Shuff said. If Highway 319 can be fixed and improved and shopping choices can be created, then tax dollars will be spent where the services are being utilized, Shuff said. Shuff also feels eco-tourism and tourism development are big issues for the county. Thats going to be our future,Ž Shuff said of ecotourism. Shuff said Wakulla County has some of the best “ shing, the largest spring in the world, three outstanding Florida waterways, a national forest, national wildlife refuge and state forest. A way to facilitate the sustainable use of all these resources to ensue economic opportunities and job growth needs to be “ gured out, he said. The key word is sustainable,Ž Shuff said. He added that if infrastructure is improved, which ties into Wakulla 2020, it will help visitors as well. Shuff said he feels the county needs a little more access to the water, as well. He is also interested in the debate about allowing recreational cave diving at Wakulla Springs and said he thinks if it is well regulated, it could be bene“ cial to the county. Another issue Shuff feels is important is having a balanced county budget. Thats what got us in trouble,Ž Shuff said. Shuff said there needs to be ef“ ciency in the government and an annual strengthening of the rainy day fund.Continued on Page 12A WakullaStory: A Hankerin’ for a Headhuntin’Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A Comment & Opinion .......................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B INDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 9th Issue Thursday, March 1, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read DailyThe Wakullanews OBITUARIES Michael David Carter Martha Hackworth Louis Edward Herouart By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsIn celebration of both founders and Women’s History month, the Wakulla County Historical Society along with the Palaver Tree Theater Company present the next installment of “WakullaStory: A Hankerin’ for Headhuntin’” – the stylized reading presentation is based on the writings of the late Elizabeth Fisher Smith (1920-1977), creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly, a magazine of news, features and history about Wakulla County. Smith, a Pennsylvania native, arrived in Wakulla in 1953. She was a schoolteacher. She married local pharmacist, Harold Smith, and they had four children: three girls and one boy. Their eldest daughter, Betsy Smith, remembers many days in her father’s store: “My dad was a one-man show,” Betsy Smith recalls, “He lled prescriptions, took care of customers, scooped ice cream – all of it. When there was no business, he’d sit next door drinking coffee, but watching his door for customers coming in. All of us kids at some point in our lives waited on customers. That was our job after school, during the summer.” How exactly did Mr. and Mrs. Smith meet? “Well, as my mother tells it,” remembers Betsy, “she’d heard there was this handsome pharmacist – her age – in town. So she goes into his store and asks him for something she didn’t think he’d have – like paregoric – and, lo and behold, he had it. I think she did it on a dare with some other single gal in town who was interested in him also. My mother wasn’t shy.” Continued on Page 12ABoard may revise septic tank policyBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Commission is looking at revising its current septic tank requirements so that the rules are not the same across the board. In 2006, the commission amended the infrastructure element of its comprehensive plan to include policies that required the county-wide use of performance-based septic tanks for all new developments and for replacement and repairs of existing systems. The original intent was to protect Wakulla Springs and other open water bodies from pollution. Commissioner Randy Merritt brought the idea forward to modify the policies and requirements. In the past, he has said that not all areas within the county are the same and do not require the same restrictions. I think weve set this too high and its not going to cause any benefit,Ž Merritt said. Studies have been completed on the impacts of nitrogen reducing systems to Wakulla Countys springs and water bodies since the policies were amended in 2006 and Merritt wanted to incorporate the new study into the revisions. Merritt worked alongside county staff, County Health Department Director Pad Juarez and County Attorney Heather Encinosa to draft a text amendment to the infrastructure policies. In the draft, the septic tank requirements would be removed from the Comprehensive Plan and would be addressed in the Land Development Code. These include the specific areas where the performancebased septic tanks would be required, the standards for treatment and the criteria for the replacement and modification of existing systems.Continued on Page 12A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA proposed contract to save energy that costs nearly $700,000 over four years was unanimously approved by the Wakulla County School Board. In fact, the presentation was so convincing that a citizen who began the meeting speaking out against the contract as a waste, changed her mind and announced she was for it. The school board approved the contract with Energy Education at a special meeting on Thursday, Feb. 23. The company guarantees energy cost savings, or it makes up the difference between its contract price and the utility costs. Continued on Page 8AJohn Shu announces his candidacy for county commission $700K contract to save energy costs approved by school board is years installment in the community play tells of happenings from 1963-65 as told by Elizabeth Fisher Smith, author of the Magnolia Monthly.COURTESY OF JENN Y DRUD AWAKULLA PUBLIC LIBRAR Y = ARCHIVESCommissioners weigh requiring performance-based septic systems only in sensitive areas of the county; the high cost of systems is cited as a concern JENNIFER JENSENJohn Shuff, a candidate in District 5Marshane Godbolt named All Big Bend Defensive Player of the Year  Head Coach Scott Klees named Big Bend Coach of the YearSPORTS, 9A SWINE SHOW Page 14A

PAGE 2

Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comTCC signs lease with Centennial BankSpecial to The NewsTallahassee Community College will soon expand its services in Wakulla County due in large part to a lease agreement with Centennial Bank. TCC assumes approximately 10,000 square feet of the existing bank structure that currently houses Centennial Banks Crawfordville branch. TCCs first Wakulla County-based service center opened in January 2006. Through programs such as the Ecotourism Institute and the Green Guide Certi“ cation Program, the facility has served hundreds of residents in Wakulla County and the neighboring coastal region. With growth and a need for expansion of services, however, came the need for additional space … the current facility is 3,835 square feet. We are excited about the opportunities that lie ahead for the residents of Wakulla County,Ž said TCC President Jim Murdaugh. The decision made by the Board and Centennial Bank gives the college many avenues to explore as we seek to expand our education offerings in Wakulla County and the surrounding areas.Ž The new TCC Wakulla Center will expand the colleges workforce offerings to help train more citizen for in-demand jobs. It will also offer a limited number of basic for creditŽ classes in order to help Wakulla County residents begin their education path with TCC. The TCC Wakulla Center will provide access to a full array of student services, including admissions, advising, financial aid and testing, as well as services to the Colleges Learning Commons, which may be facilitated online or by appointment. TCC also anticipates expanding its environmental institute classes at the Center. We are excited about our partnership with Tallahassee Community College,Ž said Tracy French, Centennial Bank Regional President. Centennial Bank is a strong supporter of education, and we value the opportunities that education offers. We are thrilled to be a part of this win-win joint venture for our community and are looking forward to the “ rst classes being offered,Ž French said. The “ ve-year agreement ends January 31, 2017, at which time both sides can choose to renew the lease. The new TCC Wakulla Center, located at 2932 Crawfordville Highway, is scheduled for a late 2012 opening, possibly in time for the fall semester. Until the new facility is open, TCC will continue to offer a number of workforce programs in ecotourism, allied health and manufacturing at the existing Wakulla Center.Staff ReportGulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea recently unveiled its latest project, a touch tank trailer. On Feb. 15, it made its “ rst of“ cial school visit to Crawfordville Elementary and the following weekend it made its “ rst festival appearance. Following these two events, it became clear that the trailer still had some kinks that needed to be worked out. Co-founder of Gulf Specimen, Jack Rudloe, said they are seeking donations to try and improve the trailer so the can continue with their idea of bringing the marine life to the public, instead of them having to visit the lab. Rudloe said they need to upgrade the aquarium and life support system. At this time, Rudloe is unsure how much the improvements might cost, but is seeking assistance from engineers to help determine what is needed. For those who wish to contribute to the project call Gulf Specimen at 9845297 or email Rudloe at jrudloe@earthlink.net. WAKULLA NEWSTCC Wakulla will occupy the newer part of the Centennial Bank building.Gulf Specimen seeks donations to “ x touch tank trailerSPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe touch tank trailer was recently unveiled by Gulf Specimen as a way to take the labs exhibits to students. FOLLOW-UP TO LAST WEEK’S STORY:TCC Wakulla will take over the back part of the bank building, some 10,000 square feet, and anticipates having the facility open in late 2012. Also announced: TCC Wakulla will o er a limited number of for credit classes at the new facility Lock in 2 yearsofsavings. CALL NOW!Lock in oneyear of savingsand get our best offers oneverypackage.twoyears *BILL CREDIT/PROGRAMMINGOFFER: IF BY THE END OF PROMOTIONAL PRICE PERIOD(S)CUSTOMERDOES NOT CONTACT DIRECTV TO CHANGESERVICETHE NALLSERVICESWILL AUTOMATICALLY CONTINUE AT THE THEN-PREVAILING RATES. Free SHOWTIME for three months, a value of $38.97. Free HBO, STARZ,SHOWTIMEandCinemax for three months, a value of $135.LIMITON E PROGRAMMINGOFFER PER ACCOUNT. Featured package namesandprices: ENTERTAINMENT $54.99/mo.;CHOICE $63.99/mo.;CHOICE XTRA $68.99/mo. Pricesinclude the following bill credits for 12 monthsafter rebate: $20 for ENTERTAINMENT, $24 for CHOICEandCHOICEXTRA;plusana dditional$5withonline rebate andconsenttoemailalerts.Inmonths 13-24, bill creditwillbe $10/mo. Eligibility basedonZIP code. Upo nDIRECTV Systemactivation,customerwill receive rebate redemptioninstructions (includedincustomers “rstDIRECTV bill, a separate mailing, or, in thestate of New York, from retailer) and must comply with the terms of the instructions. In order to receive $25 monthly credits fortheENTERTAI NMENT Package ($29 forCHOICEandCHOICEXTRA)inthe “rst 12months,customermust submit rebate online (validemailaddress required) an dconsent to emailalerts priorto rebate redemption. Rebatebeginsuptoeight weeks after receiptof rebate submission onlineor by phone. Duration of promotional price variesbased on r edemption date.$10CREDIT OFFER: Customers activating and maintainingtheENTERTAINMENTPackage or above alongwith an HD Receiveror HD DVR and enrollment in Auto B ill Pay will receive an additional $10 bill creditfor 24 months. Account must be in good standingŽ as determined by DIRECTV in its sole discretion to remain eligible for all offers. **24-MO. LEASE AGREEMENT: EARLY CANCELLATIONWILLRESULT IN A FEE OF $20/MONTH FOR EACH REMAININGMONTH. Must maintain 24 consecutive monthsof your DIRECTV programmingpackage. Advanced Receiver-DVR fee($8/mo.) required for DVRlease. Advanced Receiver-HD fee($10/mo.) required forHD Receiverlease. Advanced Receiver fee($20/mo.) required for HD DVRandTiVo HD D VR from DIRECTV lease.TiVo service fee($5/mo.) required for TiVo HD DVR from DIRECTV lease. If you have two boxes or one box andan enabled TV, anadditional $6/mo. fee applies. For each additional box and/or enabled TV on youra ccount you are chargedanadditional feeof$6/mo.per box and/orenabled TV. NON-ACTIVATIONCHARGEOF $150PERRECEIVER MAY APPLY. ALL EQUIPMENT IS LEASEDANDMUST BERETURNED TO DIRECTV UPON CANCELLATION,ORUNRE TURNEDEQUIPMENT FEESAPPLY. VISITdirectv.com ORCALL 1-800-DIRECTV FORDETAILS. Advanced receiver instant rebate requires activation of the ENTERTAINMENT Package orabove; OPTIMO MSorabove (for DVR Receiver, MS LATINO);Jadeworld;oranyquali fyinginternationalservicebundle,whichshallincludethePREFERREDCHOICE programmingpackage (valuedat$41.99/mo.).Second,third and fo urthHD Receiver offer requires activationofthe ENTERTAINMENT Package or above or MS ULTRA Package orabove andHD DVR asthe “rst free receiver upgrade.Home Media Center HD DVR andadditionaladvanced receiver upgradesavailable for a charge. INSTALLATION: Standard professionalinstallationin up to fourrooms only. Custominstallationextra. DIRECTV CINEMA/ON DEMAND: Accessto available DIRECTV OnDemand programmingisbased on package selection. Actualnumberof TV shows and movieswill vary. Addit ional feesapply fornew releases.SomeDIRECTV CINEMAandOnDemandcontent requiresanHD DVR(HR20orlater)or DVR(R22orlater),DIRECTV CI NEMAConnectionKitand broadbandInternetservicewith speeds of750kbpsorhigherand a network routerwithan available Ethernetport are required. Visitdirectv.com/cinema fordetails. To access DIRECTV HD programming, HD equipment required. Number of HD channels based on package selection.Customersatisfaction ratingsbasedon2011AmericanCustomerSatisfactionIndex.Localchannelseligibilitybasedon serviceaddress. Notallnetworks availableina llmarkets. Programming,pricing,termsandconditionssubjecttochange atanytime.Pricing residential. Taxes notincluded. ReceiptofDIR ECTV programmingsubjecttoDIRECTV Customer Agreement; copy provided at directv. com/legal and inordercon“rmation. 2012 DIRECTV.DIRECTV and the Cyclone Design logo,DIRECTV CINEMA, CHOICE and CHOICE XTRA are trademarks of DIRECTV, LLC. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective owners. AllDIRECTVoffers require 24-month agreement.** The CHOICE XTRA’ PackageFOR12 MONTHS AfterRebate99/MO*39$MORE CHANNELS,MOVIES AND SPORTS. OVER205Digital Channels 4FREEUPGRADES HDDVR and up to 3 HDReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select models only. DIRECTVONDEMAND 7,000Showsand Movies HD Included PLUS, FREE FOR 3 MONTHS SAVESAVE $39/mo.in 1st year! AND $20/mo.in 2nd year! Includes $10/mo. with HDequipment and Auto Bill Pay. The CHOICE’ PackageFOR 12 MONTHS After Rebate99/MO*34$THE TV PACKAGE THAT BEATS CABLE. OVER150Digital Channels 4FREEUPGRADES HD DVR and upto3 HD ReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select modelsonly. DIRECTVONDEMAND 6,000 Shows and Movies HD Included PLUS, FREE FOR 3 MONTHS SAVESAVE $39/mo.in 1st year! AND $20/mo.in 2nd year! Includes $10/mo. with HDequipment and Auto Bill Pay. The ENTERTAINMENT P ackageFOR 12 MONTHS AfterRebate99/MO*29$OUR BESTVALUE PACKAGE. OVER140Digital Channels 4 FREEUPGRADES HD DVRand up to 3 HD ReceiversAdditional& AdvancedReceiver fees apply. Select models only. HD Included DIRECTV ON DEMAND 4,000 Shows andMovies PLUS, FREE FOR 3 MONTHS SAVESAVE $35/mo. in 1st year! AND $20/mo. in 2nd year! Includes $10/mo.with HDequipment and Auto Bill Pay. FREEProfessionalInstallation. #1inCustomerSatisfactionOverAll CableandSatelliteTV Providers. Among the largest national cable & satellite TV providers. NOEquipment toBuy.NOStart-Up Costs. 99%Worry-FreeSignalReliability. Based on a Nationwide Study of representative cities. LocalChannelsIncluded inover 97%of theU.S.With every package you get: PLUS Offers end 3/14/12. Credit card required (except in MA & PA). New approved customers only (lease required). $19.95 Handling & D elivery fee may apply. Applicable use tax adjustment may apply on the retail value of the installation. Programming/pricing may vary in certain markets. Authorized DIRECTV Dealer 850-926-DISHTHE SIGHTS AND SOUND CO. ANTIQUES CARRIE’SCOVEC ARRIE’SC OVE …NEW ARRIVALS…926-50133338 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. Waterford Crystal and Bath & Bed Linens (850)926-6526 charliegrim@msn.comLubeXpert.usFull Service OILCHANGE Vacuuming Included $ 6.00OFF$ 10.00OFF Exp. 3/31/2012 2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Across from Beefs TO 55678F OR INSTANT SAVINGSTEXTLUBEEXTRANSMISSIONFLUID CHANGE

PAGE 3

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe decision to move forward with a plan to pay for four-laning Highway 319 could end up in the hands of the voters. The Wakulla County Commission approved an item at its Feb. 21 meeting to have County Attorney Heather Encinosa bring back language for placing an item on the November ballot. If approved, the county would place a half-cent tax referendum on the ballot and allow the voters to decide if they support the Our Town Plan, or what is now being referred to as Wakulla 2020. The Chamber of Commerce, along with other organizations and community leaders, has been working to “ nd ways to implement the Crawfordville Town Plan, which included four-laning Highway 319 and expanding intersections within Crawfordville to improve traf“ c ” ow. The cost of the project is estimated at $7 million, according to project engineer with Preble-Rish, Alan Wise. John Shuff, past president of the Chamber, said they have estimated that the half-cent sales tax would bring in $1.7 million over the next 15 years and with a bonding stream and debt service estimate, their total estimate is $14 million. Shuff said there is also the hope that the group would seek out grants to get additional funding. If approved, the money generated could only be used on road and bridge improvements. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the Department of Transportation has always asked what the local government could put towards road projects and the county has never had the ability to offer any money. Stewart said Wakulla 2020 would allow the county to approach DOT with projects and a portion of the cost associated with those projects, which would move them along much faster. Along with approving to draft ballot language for this referendum, the commission also voted to create a Wakulla 2020 committee which would prioritize projects. That list would then be taken to the voters. The model for the committee was designed from BluePrint 2000, which was the initiative done in Tallahassee and Leon County. Shuff said their committee had 30 to 35 people, but since they are a much smaller county, they wanted to keep the committee on the smaller side. The commission approved the creation of the advisory committee. There was some concern expressed about the closeness of this referendum and the one-cent sales tax extension vote. The one-cent sales tax ends in 2017 and the county was prepared to have the extension be presented to voters in 2014. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the half-cent tax might affect the approval of the one-cent sales tax which goes to roads, parks and recreation, public safety and public facilities. Commissioner Alan Brock said, I have con“ dence in the voters.Ž The commission also agreed to create an interlocal authority which would have the authority to spend the money.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netRepresentatives from Hinkle and Foran were at the Feb. 21 Wakulla County Commission meeting to give an update on the countys oil spill claim. John Dailey, president of JDA Strategies, a public policy research and development consulting “ rm, said they are currently gathering data from Wakulla County to determine the projected revenue. Dailey said the preliminary estimates are $300,000, which he said were conservative. This case is being referred to as the largest civil case in history, he said. They are still waiting on data from the state parks. They also intend to see if there was an impact on ad valorem. The trial for establishing blame was to begin on Feb. 27, but it was postponed. The judge in the case gave more time for settlement talks and the trial was set to begin on March 5. According to Dailey, the second trial for damages and why it took so long for the well to be capped, will take place in July. It was determined that it was better to wait until at least after the “ rst trial to enter into negotiations, Dailey said. We feel well be in a better position,Ž Dailey said. The attorneys fees are 20 percent and the thousands of clients who are being represented will share the costs of the other expenses, including economists, Dailey said. Attorney Lisa Foran ensured the county commission that their responsibility would not exceed their gross recovery amount. As of Feb. 17, 932 claims have been awarded totaling $17.4 million in Wakulla County. In other news: € The commission chose to change the income level for those who would qualify for hardship assistance for the solid waste and “ re assessments. Previously, the level was set at very low income. A family of four needed to make less than $29,900 to be exempt. According to the county, 411 households quali“ ed for solid waste assistance for a total of $80,556. The commission decided to set the level at extremely low. This would mean a family of four that makes less than $17,950 would be exempt. We all want to be compassionate to those least fortunate among us,Ž said Commissioner Randy Merritt. He said his main concern is the senior citizens. Commissioner Mike Stewart pointed out that people had a short amount of time to apply for assistance this time around and said he felt the number would increase next time. All commissioners also expressed making sure the word gets out about the assistance program. The commission voted unanimously to lower the income level. € The county commission approved allowing Fire Chief Michael Morgan to apply for a federal Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response Grant which would be used for the retaining and recruiting volunteer “ re“ ghters. Morgan said there is no match and it would provide four years of funding. They would look at using the funds for incentives, attraction of new volunteers and improvement of training facilities. The grant award will be announced no later than Sept. 30. € Commissioner Randy Merritt brought forth an item to revise the land development code related to temporary uses. This item dealt speci“ cally with food trailers. Currently, temporary uses are allowed, but the length of time is restricted to 30 days. Merritt wanted to revise regulations to allow food trailers the ability to stay for up to a year and renew the temporary use permit annually. I want to get these guys out of limbo,Ž Merritt said. He added that he didnt want to open Pandoras box and said it should probably be limited to food type trailers only. The commission voted unanimously to advertise for a public hearing to consider adopting the revisions. The next county commission meeting is set for March 5 at 5 p.m. There will be an attorney client session at 4 p.m. in the matter of Voyles vs. Wakulla County.COUNTY COMMISSIONCounty’s damages from BP oil spill could be $300,000Wakulla 2020 plan is moving forward Whats proposed is a half-cent sales tax to fund improvements to U.S. Highway 319. e matter is planned to go before voters in November The countys oil spill claim is being researched prior to the lawsuit getting underway to determine whos responsible for the disaster As of Feb. 17, 932 claims for oil spill damages have been awarded totaling $17.4 million in Wakulla County. 000AFUI PUBLIC HEARINGThe City of St. Marks will hold a Public Hearing Community Redeveloping Area BoardThe City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of“ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.MARCH 1, 2012 Date:March 8, 2012 Time:6:50 pm Place:788 Port Leon DriveNOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING MARCH 1, 2012 JOB ANNOUNCEMENTSTOLENAFRICAN GREYGRAY W/RED TAIL runny nose on right nostril, currently on treatment. Help us “nd it! If seen, please call: EVA NELSON 766-9012 DET. SCOTT POWELL 926-7171REWARD OFFERED!!

PAGE 4

Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Wayne Martin, Country Gold to perform at Sopchoppy Opry • Meet the creature: Gulf Specimen takes its touch tanks on the road • Week in Wakulla: Feb. 16-23 •Tornado watch in effect Friday afternoon until 8 p.m. • Believing in our self, column by Rita Haney € Coast Guard Auxiliary for Feb. 23 • From the Dock for Feb. 23thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE: anks for helping save the dogsEditor, The News: Recently four AKC German Shepherd dogs were brought to me as rescues. I already had “ ve dogs and could not keep the others. A hard choice had to be made to thin down the pack. My neighbor had already reported me to county Animal Control. Fortunately, the Leon County Humane Society took gentle Bella into their foster program. She will go to their Pet Smart Adoption Booth to get a new home. Unfortunately, the other three were not good candidates for adoption, old, abused and hyper. Not knowing what else to do, it was decided to ET them, a terrible choice. When I went to Animal Control, Ivanhoe Carroll was so kind and very understanding. And what a miracle, Bonnie Brinson was also there and she said she could place the dogs so they would not have to be killed. Bonnie got the old one into a GS rescue. The hyper one went to a new single person, no other pet in the home, and is so happy to have all of the attention. Then Bonnie contacted Ann English of the Tallahassee Animal Service Center, who will be coming down every day for one week to work with the aggressive abused dog to hopefully be able to place him. Thank you all so much for helping save the dogs. Kathryn Wilson CrawfordvilleFriends Furr Life pet food drive is going onEditor, The News: As a volunteer for the Leon County Humane Society, I wanted the people of Wakulla County to know that there is an annual Senior Citizen Pet Food Drive, Friends Furr Life, for their companion animals. Every year for the past five years, pet food and pet supplies have been collected and then distributed to seniors in our county. This year, donations may be dropped off at Crawfordville Animal Hospital, on U.S. Highway 319 across from the Lion at Azalea Park, or at Ashley Feed Store on Highway 61. Any dog or cat food or supplies would be greatly appreciated. Some seniors have only their dog or cat for company and on a “ xed income, pet food costs are dif“ cult. Please show how generous Wakulla County can be. Thank you. Michele Roddy CrawfordvilleRepublican debate comments clari“ edEditor, The News: I watched the “ nal Republican Presidential debate and was amazed at the many distortions and outright falsehoods that these potential presidential Republican hopefuls made. Individuals who do not research these issues, to learn the actual facts, consistently believe these falsehoods time and time again until they eventually believe them, as inaccurately as they are. To start off, in general, instead of focusing on the issues that matters most to the American people … jobs … the Republican candidates tripped over themselves trying to prove that each is further to the right than the rest. Take time and look at their record. Both Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney criticized the auto rescue credited with saving more than 1.4 million auto industry jobs, creating more than 200,000 new jobs and helping the American auto industry gain market share for the first time in decades. By the way, Chrysler and Fiat have paid back most of the bailout money. Romney said he would have encouraged bankruptcy! What does bankruptcy mean? The bottom line is no jobs, no health care, and no factory. In addition, despite being proven wrong repeatedly by auto industry leaders and economists, Romney continued to falsely claim that President Obama followed his lead on the auto rescue. Go to several sources and look it up. On immigration, Romney also confirmed that he would have the most extreme position on immigration of any nominee in modern history. He called the Arizona immigration law, which allows random document checks and detainment, a modelŽ for the nation. He also has embraced the inhumane policy of self-deportation,Ž promised to veto the Dream Act and derided it as a handout,Ž and said he would separate families that have contributed to their communities for a generation. Review the Dream Act to see how it would give an opportunity to undocumented immigrant students who have been living in the U.S. since they were young, a chance to contribute back to the country that has given so much to them and a chance to utilize their hard earned education and talents. Take a thorough look at just what Romney and others would do. Once again, Romney misrepresented his record as governor of Massachusetts. Not only did Romney falsely claim that the Presidents policy forces the Catholic ChurchŽ to provide contraception coverage … it does not by the way … but he also overlooked the fact that he oversaw and protected a virtually identical policy in Massachusetts. Look at his record and verify what he speaks of. He railed against earmarks, forgetting that as governor he had an of“ ce dedicated to lobbying for federal money, and that he directed an unprecedented taxpayer bailout for the Olympics. Examine his remarks and learn the actual facts. Lets pride ourselves on knowing the difference between untruths and factual information. Dont be misled. Joan E. Hendrix, SecretaryWakulla Democratic Executive CommitteeEditor, The News: As much as I appreciate the Letters to the Editor of my having been responsible for the saving the gag grouper season for all the “ shermen of the Big Bend and the southeast who come to Wakulla and other counties to “ sh, I cannot accept the praise without mentioning the dozens of concerned citizens who were present at the meeting in Quincy with the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission. I would especially like to mention Ronald Fred Crum of Crums Mini-Mall in Panacea, Paige Killeen of Panacea Waterfronts, Major Alan LaMarche of Plantation Security of Shell Point, Mayor Chuck Shields of St. Marks, Keith Ward of Lighthouse Seafood and Richard Lynn of Lynn Brothers Seafood, both of St. Marks. Without the group effort there would not be a gag season in the Gulf or it would have been in the summertime when all the grouper are in deep water, not in the shallow Apalachee Bay area. The opposition were out in force but this was a win for the home team. Thanks so much for all those who participated. Jerry Moore County commissioner Editor, The News: Thank you, Colleen Skipper, for your wonderful presentation to those in attendance at the Wakulla County Senior Center on Feb. 23. Your successes in life have demonstrated how we all can enjoy our community. The seniors dearly loved your positive re” ection on your life in Wakulla County as a young black female. Your humor, sincerity and positive attitude are inspirations to all who desire a happy and successful life. You brought the brightest light to our month of celebration of Black History. The presence and support of your family really added to this event. The music you brought along with your sisters, Glenda and Chinesta, in addition to Tray Crump and Theresa Jones added so much to this celebration. Again, thanks to every one of you for making this a wonderful celebration. R.H. Carter Director of Senior Center Editor, The News: The Lowell Douglas Raker family would like to thank all the friends and family that came to visit, brought food, cards and ” owers, it was so thoughtful and very much appreciated. We would like to recognize an aunt who was not mentioned in error in the obituary, Linda Harvey Raker, Maurice Rakers wife. Raker familyAnother airport scandal in the making?Editor, The News: Has it become a trend in the Panhandle of Florida for private individuals to gain airport improvements at the expense of the public? Didnt we learn enough from the recent Destin/Okaloosa airport hangarŽ scandal? Now, a similar scenario is coming to light in Wakulla County. Private parties deeded a hobbyist airstrip to the county years ago and are now using the county as a conduit to seek public funds to purchase their lands. A single incident in 2009 of standing water on the airstrip caused alarm. Former Commissioner Kessler used that to become an active proponent for improvements to the airport (see agenda requests of Dec. 8, 2009 and April 5, 2010). Such small airports generate revenue from rental of tie-down space, rental of hangar space, fuel sales and the sale of sundries. Funds are available from the Florida Department of Transportation as a grant to Wakulla County, for improvements to generate those revenues. However, the land deeded to the county was conveniently de“ ned to be the narrow airstrip itself. The lands upon which to expand the airport are owned by parties with interests in the airport. That is, 13 privately owned acres have been partially developed with hangars. According to the Airport Layout Plan of 2008 and a map that has been obtained from DOT, the 13 acre property would be purchased as a site for the revenue generating activities, including a fuel farm. Another tract (16 acres) would be purchased from an interested party for reorientation and extending the runway … a runway that becomes proximate to Surf Road. Also on that DOT map, due to the shift and extension of the runway, five waterfront homes on Surf Road will now fall within the runway protection zone (RPZ). Those are in addition to the seven residential properties that are at the base of the existing runway on Bay Drive. All of those homes will become unsuitable for residential occupancy and litigation is certain to follow. A review of the capital improvement budget shows that there is a significant shortfall in the funds allocated from the DOT grant for land acquisition. Does Wakulla County really want to incur the costs of eminent domain actions (direct or inverse) and remove expensive properties from the tax roll? The internet is inundated with links that clearly show airports and residential land uses to be incompatible. There are numerous links as to the avoidance of floodplains in airport development. Chapter 12 of FAAs Airport Desk Reference deals with ” oodplains and states To meet Executive Order 11988 ... all airport development actions must avoid the ” oodplain, if a practicable alternative exists.Ž There are plenty of alternative tracts elsewhere in Wakulla County that are outside of the ” oodplain … at cheaper costs than the homes on Surf Road. It is also an FAA requirement to conduct an environmental audit that takes a hard look at expected environmental effects of a proposed action.Ž It is pure negligence to ignore the warnings. Furthermore, parts of the tract for the reoriented runway contain wetlands. If water on a runway is undesirable, then what are we doing pouring good money into a property that is within the ” oodplain? The costs to “ ll the site to elevate the runway out of the floodplain would be enormous. That site was a bad choice for an airstrip site from the outset. The FDOT aviation manager also stated that the costs for an airport attendant (fuel farm and otherwise) would have to borne by the county. During a recent consent agenda of the county commission, payment was approved for the countys airport liability insurance in an amount of around $2,500 … one must wonder what that premium will become with a fuel farm. DOT documents show between two and six aircraft as being based at Wakulla Airport. That facility should be contained with its pre-existing ” ight path and deeded back to the Tarpines development for its use. In what appears to be a surreptitious manner for the airport improvement project to gain traction, the airport has been included in an extension of the Panacea Enterprise zone. The airport began as an idea of a private party that … if the proposed plans are implemented … will become an albatross to the county. The Panacea Enterprise zone should not be extended to include the airport … certainly not at this juncture. As a footnote to whomever may wonder, our home site on Surf Road is in a subdivision (Tarpon Shores) that was developed by my wifes grandfather (Jack Simmons) well before the airstrip was conceived. My wife spent her childhood summers at Simmons Lodge. We intend to enjoy and live-out our closing years in quiet enjoyment here on Surf Road … watching an occasional small plane or experimental aircraft ” y along the river. L. James Parham Ochlockonee Bay MAP PROVIDED BY L. JAMES PARHAMProperties that would have to be bought by the county for the proposed expansion of the Wakulla Airport runway. Cant take credit for grouper rule change ank you, Colleen Skipper Raker family thanks those who visited

PAGE 5

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netDozens of people turned out for the Minority Health Day of Dialogue held Saturday, Feb. 25, at Riversprings Middle School. The goal of the event was to empower churches, families and youth for healthy behavior changes, and to make residents aware of resources. Lots of health exhibitors were on hand in the gym, providing information on healthy choices and services available in the community. In the cafeteria, speakers spoke on a variety of topics ranging from Wakulla Health Department administrator Pad Juarez on Health Disparities in Wakulla CountyŽ to mental health to shopping for healthy foods. A youth summit was held in the school with students able to discuss issues such as bullying with Tallahassee counselor Jane Marks, to HIV prevention and spirituality. Speakers share health and nutritional information in the schools cafeteria.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 5A  Celebration of the Arts is ThursdayCelebration of the Arts, a night of singing, musical acts and theatrical performances, begins at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 1, at Wakulla High School, with a Silent Art Auction. As last year, each school has produced a painted canvas for the public to bid on. At 6:30 p.m., the performances begin with singing from the elementary students, followed by musical performances and skits from Wakulla and Riversprings middle schools and Wakulla High School. Tickets can be purchased at the door and prices are $2 for students and $5 for adults. Hang onto that ticket because door prizes will be given away. All proceeds bene t Wakulla High seniors for scholarships in the arts. Special Olympics is FridaySpecial Olympics Florida Wakulla County Athletes will be competing in sporting events (track & eld and Bocce) at the Wakulla High School track from 9:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. on March 2.  ‘Be a Hero’ sh fry is Saturday"Be A Hero To Our Heroes," a community-wide sh fry to honor U.S. military service members, will be held Saturday, March 3, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. Veterans Services of Wakulla is co-sponsoring this event to help support and honor Wakulla County U.S. military service members who are currently away from home protecting the nation's security and freedom. They are committed to supporting them through prayers, letters, care packages and providing encouragement to their families who are left behind. For more information regarding the event, please contact Glenda Washington at 850.599.5999. Battle of Natural Bridge is this weekend Saturday, March 3 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors will mingle with Civil War re-enactors and observe a Confederate-Union skirmish in the afternoon, cavalry demonstrations, artillery shows and a medical demonstration in the afternoon. Following the skirmish, sutlers and food vendors will be present. Sunday, March 4 The of cial Opening Ceremonies and Dedication will he held, followed by a fullscale re-enactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge at 2:30 p.m. Donations of $3 per person for adults and $1 for children younger than six. Relay for Life fundraiser set at Beef O’Brady’s On Monday, March 5, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Crawfordville's Beef O'Brady's will be donating 10 percent of all receipts to Relay for Life of Wakulla. Relay for Life is the largest fundraiser for The American Cancer Society. The Wakulla Relay for Life event will be held on April 20 at Wakulla High School. We are looking for new teams and sponsors to join the ght against cancer at the Relay. A team consists of 10 to 15 members who each commit to raise at least $100. Team members will take turns walking throughout the night during the Relay to support and honor those who are ghting the battle with cancer and to remember those whose time ran out. Visit www.relayforlife. org/ WakullaFL for more information about the event.  Full moon lighthouse climb at St. George IslandThe March Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Thursday, March 8, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association, and includes light hors d'oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at (850) 927-7744 or toll free at 888927-7744. Make A Difference Day is March 24VolunteerWAKULLA is holding its fth annual Make A Difference Day on Saturday, March 24, at Hudson Park. This year's event will be different for previous years: a community picnic for the citizens of Wakulla County will be held, and many of the organizations in the County will be setting up booths to make people aware of services available, as well as opportunities to volunteer in the county. At this time we have more than 25 organizations signed up. There will be a free lunch for all, entertainment and door prizes. Briefs PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENExhibitors in the Riversprings Middle School gym for Day of Dialogue on Saturday. Minority health fair is held Wakulla Rotary participates in ramp building Members of the Wakulla Rotary Club joined with members of the Tallahassee Southside Rotary to build a wheelchair ramp at a home in Woodville. Rotary Clubs throughout the district participated in a community-wide effort. At left, Rotarian Richard Russell at work. Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals

PAGE 6

Pastor Gerald Fielder and the folks at Good News Assembly of God are pleased to welcome Tommy, Heather, Ashlyn and Olivia Green. Tommy is joining the team at Good News as the assistant pastor. Heather will be joining the praise and worship team as their leader. Tommy grew up in Wakulla County and graduated from Wakulla High School. He became licensed by the Assemblies of God after Bible Study through Berean School of Bible. Since leaving Wakulla County, he has served congregations in the Midwest as youth pastor, assistant pastor and lead pastor. Tommy is pleased to be back in Wakulla County and we at Good News Assembly welcome him here. Heather grew up in the home of Kullman and Rita Lackey, long term Assemblies of God evangelists. Heather sang for congregations in childhood as the family traveled through the eastern half of the country. Tommy and Heather join Pastor Fielder in inviting anyone who doesnt have a church home to join them at Good News Assembly of God, 2028 Bloxham Cutoff Road, in Crawfordville.Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213Michael David Carter Martha Hackworth Louis Edward HerouartChurch Briefs Regular Sunday Services and Times8:30 am Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship Service 6 pm Evening Service 7 pm Discipleship Training(On Hwy. 319 one block south of the Courthouse)850-926-7896 office www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Michael MikeŽ David Carter, 64, of Tallahassee passed away at home. He was born in Fort Pierce. Graveside services will be Thursday, March 1, at 2 p.m. at Oakland Cemetery in Tallahassee. Survivors include a brother, Fred Carter of Woodville; a sister, Judy Sarvis of Crawfordville; six nephews and one niece; and several great nieces and nephews. He is predeceased by his parents, Harold and Jacquelyn Carter; a brother, Loren Carter; and two sisters, Marguerite Bley and Harriet Carter. Martha Hackworth, 92, of Crawfordville, passed away on Friday, Feb. 17. She was born in Little Rock, Ark., and had lived in this area since 2005. She was a housewife, mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother. She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Aberdeen, N.C., where she and her husband owned Aberdeen 5 & 10. She was president of the Aberdeen Businesswomens Club, a member of the Sandhills Community Book Club and the Aberdeen Garden Club. She enjoyed boating, bowling, golf, ceramics and needlepoint. A memorial service celebrating her life was held at the Respite Center of Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville on Monday, Feb. 27. She will be buried in the Bethesda Cemetery in Aberdeen, N.C. Survivors include her devoted daughter, Patricia; granddaughters, Stefani Pantelis of Bayside, N.Y., Constantina Pantelis of Crawfordville, and Debra Kay Burke of Kent, Wash.; six great-grandchildren, Andre and Aleni Martinez of Bayside, N.Y., Leylah Pantelis of Crawfordville, and Carol Ann, Rebecca and Roger Burke of Kent, Wash. She was preceded in death by her parents, Luther and Irene Coleman of North Little Rock, Ark.; her husband of 68 years, Cecil Hackworth, in 2007; and her son, Cecil Hackworth Jr., in 2009. She has left behind many more special people that she loved especially at the Lake Ellen Church Respite Group of which she attended and the Covenant Hospice Staff and her friend and companion Mary Kelly. Louis Edward Herouart was born in Union Township, Hunterdon, N.J., on Aug. 20, 1933. His precious Saviour, whom he loved dearly and was so devoted, welcomedŽ him home on Feb. 23. He is survived by his devoted and loving wife, Lois. He was chairman of the Deacon Board, New Hope Baptist Church, choir soloist, member of newly formed Mens Breakfast Club and Planning Committee. He enjoyed capturing and recording all events, serving as the church photographer. He was active in Crane Lakes Pool Club, Block Captain and Security Guard. He served in the Korean War aboard the USS Dyess. He is retired from the Haworth, N.J., Police Department and Pinellas Park. Besides his wife, survivors include two daughters, Renee Aro (Albert) and Suzanne Kane (John); two step-sons, Stewart Wolthers (Cathy) and Kent Ware; eight grandchildren and “ ve greatgrandchildren. A celebration of his life will be held Saturday, March 3, at 1 p.m. in the Crane Lakes Ball Room, Port Orange. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to New Hope Baptist Church, 1675 Taylor Rd, Port Orange FL 32127. Michael D. Carter Louis Edward Herouart Martha HackworthGreen is new assistant pastor Tommy, Heather, Ashlyn and Olivia Green. The Bradham and the Webster family would like to thank everyone for the cards, food, ” owers, encouraging words and all of the many acts of kindness shown during the loss of our loved one Quinton Bradham. We thank you and may God bless each of you. The Bradham and Webster Family Rocky Mount Church of Christ will be celebrating their church anniversary on Sunday, March 4, at 11 a.m. Elder Benjamin Washington along with East Spring Church of Tallahassee will render service. Dinner will be served after service. Everyone is invited to attend. Pilgrim Rest P.B. Church will host its annual Family and Friends Day on Sunday, March 4 at 3 p.m. Elder Eddie L. Franklin Sr. and St. Nora P.B. Church will render services. For more information, please call (850) 926-8906. Panacea Congregational Holiness Church will hold revival services Sunday, March 4, through Wednesday, March 7. Services will begin on Sunday at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. The Monday through Wednesday services begin at 7:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be Sister Grace Day. Church is located at 1127 Coastal Highway in Panacea. For more information please call 850-984-5579. New Testament Bible Church is now meeting at the Wakulla Public Library. We are still trying to get a new Bible-believing church up and running. The library is graciously allowing us to meet in their large conference room every Sunday from 11 a.m. until noon. We will be having songs, prayer, and Bible teaching and preaching. Please see our website at www.biblegems.com.Rocky Mount anniversary is March 4 Family & Friends Day at Pilgrim Rest Revival set at Panacea Holiness New Testament Church now meets at public library Family says thank you for kindness

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunityDaughters of the Confederacy visit Eden Springs following Christmas celebrationSpecial to The NewsThe R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy held its annual Christmas celebration at the Wildwood Country Club. Members dressed in period attire presented A Journey Back in TimeŽ where each lady represented a Confederate woman from different Confederacy States and told how she spent Christmas Day 1862. The fellowship and festivities concluded with a visit by Chapter members to Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center to deliver 35 gift baskets to its residents. Previous to the gifts being accumulated, Louise Sloan, activities coordinator of Eden Springs, visited a Chapter meeting and provided speci“ c gift requests including FSU baskets, pudding baskets, etc. While at Eden Springs, Chapter members visited many of the residents either in their rooms or in the public areas spreading Dixie cheer. One of the “ ve objectives of the UDC is benevolent. The UDC is glad to support the needs of the community as possible. Expect to hear more great things about the R. Don McLeod ladies who were awarded Most Outstanding UDC Chapter in Florida District I which spans the entire Florida Panhandle. If anyone is interested in learning more about the United Daughters of the Confederacy and membership in our organization, visit their web site at: http:// rdonmcleod.wordpress.com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSR. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 members are Peggy Mock, June Seymour, Laveda Raker, Elizabeth Smith, Melinda Sarvis; standing, Mildred Willis, Ann Casseaux, Arlene Vause, Mary Ann Owens, Lisa Morgan, Evelyn Stills, Syble Owens, Amanda Daughtry; back row, Sherry Willis, Michelle Kirby, Amy Carraway, Jean McMillan, Louise Thomas and Tanya Lynn.Harris and Bradford announce wedding Melissa Ann Harris and Joshua Brandon Bradford announce their marriage on Feb. 26. The couple had a private ceremony in Graceville. The bride is the daughter of the late Robert Lawson Aaron and Linda Dyan Salisbury of Grand Ridge, Fla. The groom is the son of Fred Bradford Sr. of Baltimore, Md., and Cindy Kay Bradford of Panacea. Joshua B. Bradford and Melissa A. HarrisHappy “ rst birthday to Ellie Grace Campbell Ellie Grace Campbell celebrated her “ rst birthday on Feb. 19. She is the daughter of Jonathan and Kristin Campbell of Crawfordville. Her maternal grandparents are Jeff Mathers and Sherry Dudley both of Crawfordville. Her maternal great-grandparents are Doc and Faye Mathers of Crawfordville and Charles Perrin of Prattville, Ala., and the late Karen Perrin and Betty Jones of Thomasville, Ga. Her maternal great greatgrandparents are Margaret Pelt of St. Marks and the late Robert Pelt. Her paternal grandparents are Keith Campbell of Crawfordville and John and Ramona Coleman of Crawfordville. Her paternal great-grandparents are the late Donald and Joan Campbell of New York and the late Gloria DeRosa Cash of Rhode Island and Raymond Cash of Pensacola. Ellie G. CampbellOptimist essay contest winners announced The Optimist Essay Contest winners are Casey Camp, “ rst place; Alexander Lewis, second place; and Brittany Evans, third place. Congratulations to these students and their teachers. The students and teachers are invited to join the Coastal Optimist Club members for lunch at Poseys in Panacea on March 8. The winners will receive their awards at the luncheon: “ rst place, $100; second place, $75 and third place, $50. Casey Camp will read his winning essay and the students will be told about Optimist Club activities. Camps essay has been sent on to the District competition. The theme was How my Positive Outlook Bene“ ts my Community.Ž Thanks to Sally Gandy and Jo Ann Brierton who helped with the judging on Saturday. Performers include -Crawfordville UMC quartet Raising the Standard InternationalMInistries Gate Opens: 11 A.M Music Begins: Noon Ends: 8 P.M. 252 Park Ave., Sopchoppy City Park FUN: Bring a chair and a cooler and spend the dayno alcohol please MUSIC FOR EVERYONEPraise and worship, R&B, Blue Grass, Contemporary FOODHot dog and hamburger plates available or you may bring a picnic lunch. Childrens programs from noon 4P.M. Saturday,March10,2012FREECHRISTIANMUSIC SopchoppyCityPark AMULTIDENOMINATIONALWORSHIPEXPERIENCE 4 th annual 4 th annual www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK NAMI WAKULLA’S 2ND ANNUAL TRIPPLE CROWN DERBY FOR MENTAL ILLNESSSAVE THE DAT E!

PAGE 8

Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolContinued from Page 1A Superintendent of Schools David Miller said district staff had been investigating the program for years. In his own conversations with other superintendents around the state who are clients of the company, Miller said the typical response was that they wished they had done it earlier. While the contract calls for paying Energy Education some $696,000 over four years, the company anticipates it can save the district $1.5 million over the term of the contract, and more than $4.4 million over 10 years. Miller put that in terms of teachers jobs saved … two or three in the “ rst year alone with projected net savings of $122,350. The company requires the district to hire an Energy Education Specialist who will do frequent energy checks at the different facilities around the county. That position will likely be “ lled by a teacher, because it requires teaching other district staff about behavioral changes in saving money on energy costs. After personnel costs, electricity is typically the second highest expense for a school district. The company also guaranteed results, promising to write a check back if there were no savings. A software program that the district would buy as part of the contract would allow the school board to document the energy savings. School Board member Greg Thomas indicated he was initially skeptical: My first thought was we can do this ourselves.Ž But, he said, the guarantee and the results the company has demonstrated with other school districts in the state convinced him. That was echoed later by citizen Donna Sanford, who spoke out against the contract as potentially a waste of money. Sanford contended it was a program that could be done in-house. After hearing the presentation, Sanford was convinced. She told the school board: I support the program because of the guarantee.Ž$700K contract approved by school boardTeachers and employee of the month for February announcedSpecial to The NewsFebruary Teachers of the Month are Medart Elementary Schools Jessica Johnson and Wakulla Middle Schools Karen Amison Sherrod and the Employee of the Month, is Food Services Colleen Altenburg. Jessica Johnson has been teaching at Medart Elementary School since August 2003. Johnson graduated from Flagler College in 2003 with a Bachelors degree and went on to earn her Masters degree from Florida State University. Johnson grew up in Wakulla and returned, accepting a second grade teaching position at Medart Elementary. She holds state certi“ cation in the areas of Elementary Education, ESOL and Ed Leadership. Johnson said, I believe that each and every child should be encouraged on a daily basis. The more students trust and respect their teacher, the more likely they are to succeed. It is crucial to give every child the same opportunities to learn. The moment you see a child get it makes this job worth every second.Ž Johnson stays very active in programs outside the classroom as Camp TEAM after school program chairperson and teacher and serves as an active member with Relay for Life, Technology/Computer Lab, Yearbook and Delta Kappa Gamma sorority. Medart Principal Sharon Kemp said, Jessica Johnson is an exceptional teacher. Her dedication to the education of her students is evident in her careful planning, the materials that she creates, and the clear manner in which she delivers instruction. She has distinguished herself as a leader at Medart Elementary School. Jessica is a very warm and caring person. Her students and colleagues love and admire her. Jessica Johnson is truly a great asset to our school and we are very blessed to have her.Ž Karen Amison Sherrod, Wakulla Middle Schools 6th grade teacher, has dedicated 21 years of service to the district. Growing up and graduating from high school in Apalachicola, she pursued and completed her formal education at the University of South Florida and Florida State University. After graduation, she began her career teaching at Shadeville Elementary then transferred to Wakulla Middle School in 2002. In 1999, Sherrod furthered her education earning her Masters degree and is currently certi“ ed in Primary Ed, Elementary Ed and Middle Grades Integrated. Sherrod said, I recently received an email from a former student, a grown man, which began with Hello to the best teacher in the whole world and ended with my second mom, its for these moments and my children … I teach.Ž Principal Mike Barwick said, Mrs. Sherrods greatest attribute is her genuine care for her students. Its why she comes to work every day and her students know this. They understand that she cares that they learn to their maximum potential. You can see this every day in her lessons and her daily interactions with their students. Her students know that she will accept nothing less than their best effort every day.Ž Colleen Altenburg, Wakulla Educational Centers Food Service Manager moved to Wakulla after the devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina. She began as a food service sub in 2005, and quickly worked her way up through the ranks as a school food service manager in 2011. Altenburg attended school in Wisconsin. She owned and operated her own day care facility for 14 years. Upon her selection as a Wakulla food service employee, she became an active member of School Food Service Association and is currently the president-elect of the association. She said, One of the most amusing moments came when a student came into the kitchen with their teacher to ask me a question which was, Mrs. C, is that hamburger gravy deer meat? It was good! They think they are real big and dont want your help. Little peopleƒbig hearts.Ž Food Service Director Gail Mathers said, Mrs. Colleen Altenburg worked as the baker and cashier at Medart Elementary School prior to moving into her current position as Cafeteria Manager at WEC. Her up-beat personality and can-do attitude are positive assets that have enabled her to be successful in each position. She is dedicated, organized and a problem solver. Most impressive is Mrs. Altenburgs interaction with the children. The children look forward to seeing Ms. Colleen every day. She treats each child as if they were her own, sprinkling humor and compassion throughout the lunch line while throwing in a touch of “ rmness when needed. Recognizing that good habits start young, she goes above and beyond with her beautiful decorations and made from scratch dishes to encourage and excite the pre-school children to eat a variety of items. Mrs. Altenburg has an outstanding work ethic; she genuinely cares about the children and takes pride in knowing that she has had a positive impact in their young lives. The Food Service Department is very fortunate to have an individual of Mrs. Altenburgs caliber as a part of the team.Ž Karen Amison Sherrod Jessica Johnson Colleen AltenburgWMS band students earn superior and excellence ratings at festival Special to The NewsWakulla Middle School was well represented by the band on Saturday, Feb. 18, when 13 students performed solos and the Florida Bandmasters District Solo and Ensemble Festival. The students were very well prepared and played their solos with con“ dence,Ž said band director, Laura Hudson. I am very proud of them and I know their families listening to them perform are proud of them too.Ž Students received valuable comments from the judges to help them grow as musicians and excel in future performances. Students receiving the highest rating awarded of Superior were Chazya Bissionnette and Tia Unsell on ” ute; Madison Edwards and Kayla Taff on clarinet; Amanda Darnell on alto saxophone; David Decoeur and Alisa Moody on trumpet; Bobbi Sanders on French horn; Andi Hutto on tuba; and Rafel Fortier on snare drum. Students receiving the second highest of Excellent were Juliana Prestia on ” ute; Hannah McKnight on clarinet, and Austin Yontz on tuba. Wakulla Middle School band membersSPECIAL TO THE NEWSRegistration open for summer campRegistration is now open for the Wakulla Christian School Academic and Personal Enrichment Summer Camp. Camp will be offered this summer from June 4 to Aug. 10 to all children between the ages of 3-14. Camp days will be balanced between indoor and outdoor programs, each designed for speci“ c age groups. Field trips to local businesses and venues are scheduled. Wakulla Springs, Marianna Caverns, area museums, bowling, movies, aquariums and FSU are just a few events planned. Space is limited, so register today. For more information call WCS at 926-5583, or visit their website at www.wakullachristian.com. JUMP START THIS SCHOOL YEAR TODAY! ELEMENTARY & MIDDLE SCHOOLIntroduction to concepts & skills for each grade level Algebra 1 End-of-Course Exam Prep(Passing score required to earn credit for the class)Algebra 2 One-on-One & Small Group TutoringACT & SAT PrepSAT Test Date … Prep Class Register by February 27 March 3 March 10 ACT Test Date … Prep Class Register by April 1 April 7 April 14Locally owned/operated by Melisa Taylor3119-B Crawfordville Hwy.850-926-2179 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012 dress store50%-60% OFF850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE) The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree All Ladies ApparelThe best Alterations, Furniture Upholstry & Re nishing

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach The Wakulla High School track teams traveled to Rickards High School in Tallahassee on Thursday, Feb. 23, for their second meet of the young season, the Rickards Relays. Rather than follow the standard track meet format, this meet consisted of a few individual events plus a wide variety of relay races. It created a fun atmosphere and also allowed athletes to run a variety of distances as part of a relay team. By the time the dust had settled, the WHS girls had won their second consecutive meet of the season and the boys had “ nished in “ fth place out of the eight teams participating. The WHS girls used their dominance in the middle distance relays to capture the title, taking “ rst place in the 4x400 meter relay ( Alina McCulllers, Emily McCullers, Savanna Harris, Madi Harris ), the 4x800 relay ( Emily McCullers, Savanna Harris, Marty Wiedeman, Madi Harris ), the 4x1600 relay ( Kasey James, Lilli Broadway, Lydia Wiedeman, Tyler Kinard ) and the Distance Medley Relay ( Cora Atkinson, Norma Woodcock, Raychel Gray, Kaylyn Thigpen ). The meet regulations also allowed a school to enter a second relay team in each event and the WHSs second teams also showed their prowess by placing 7th in the 4x400 relay, 3rd in the 4x800 relay, 2nd in the 4x1600 relay and 2nd in the Distance Medley Relay. Other scoring points for the local team included the 4x100 meter relay team, Emily McCullers (3rd, long jump), Taylor Vaughn (2nd, 100 meter hurdles), 4x200 meter relay team (5th), 4x100 meter relay team (8th), Lisa House (4th, shot put/ 4th, discus) and Shelby Alsup (8th, shot put/ 3rd, discus). BOYS TEAM WAS CONSISTENT The WHS boys team used consistent performances in the variety of relays to place solid in the “ eld, with the 4x1600 meter relay of Stanley Linton, Cody James, Travis Parks and MItchell Atkinson accounting for the lone “ rst place relay “ nish for the local team. The other relay teams ran solidy, with the following results: 4x100 relay team (3rd), 4x200 meter relay (5th), 4x200 meter relay No. 2 (8th), 4x400 meter relay (5th), 4x800 meter relay (3rd), Sprint Medley (3rd) and the Distance Medley team (2nd). Individually, freshman Kaedretis Keaton led the way with a “ rst place “ nish in the triple jump (38 10.00Ž). Also scoing individually for the team were Logan Hay (7th, shot put/5th discus) and Jamal Gavin (7th, discus). The teams performed well at this meet and had a lot of fun in the process,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. The variety of relay events made it a unique meet and allowed a lot of runners to run distances they normally wouldnt. Weve done pretty well so far,Ž coach said, but also realize that it gets much tougher from here on out. It was a fun time and we had over 50 different athletes that performed at this meet, so it was a good experience,Ž Hoover said.TRACKGirls make it two in a rowSpecial to The NewsOn Feb. 18, Gulf Winds Track Club held its 24th annual Flash Dash 12K/6K in St. Marks. This annual race was moved to the San Marcos de Apalachee State Park two years ago after being held in Chaires and later in Woodville. The race started and finished at the fort. After winding through the streets of St. Marks, onto the bike path, and back, several local runners “ nished in the top 10. Of the 214 runners in the 12K, Wakulla High senior Stanley Linton placed second for the men while senior Cora Atkinson placed ninth for the women. In the 6K, 89 runners competed. Duane Evans placed first for the men while Jamie Nichols placed third and Karen Bennett placed seventh for the women. Anyone interested in local races can “ nd information on the Gulf Winds web site at www.gulfwinds. org.RUNNINGFlash 12K/6K held in St. MarksOn Saturday, March 3, athletes from Tallahassee, Crawfordville and the Wakulla area will be competing in XAC: First Rite. www.XacFighting.com. This event will showcase Boxing, Kick Boxing and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). First Rite will take place at Tallahassee Community College. Doors open at 6 p.m. and “ ghts start at 7 p.m. Tickets are $50 for ringside, $30 for ” oor and $20 general admission.MIXED MARTIAL ARTSWakulla athletes will compete in First Rite tournament SPECIAL TO THE NEWSALL-STATE: Head Coach Scott Klees with War Eagle players named to the All-State Team: Marshane Godbolt, Will Thomas, Chris Grif“ n, Ryan Henderson and Kevin James.FOOTBALLWar Eagles named to All-State, All Big Bend team SPECIAL TO THE NEWSALL BIG BEND: Punter Conner Smith, Defensive Player of the Year defensive back Marshane Godbolt, safety Deonte Hutchinson, offensive lineman Chris Grif“ n, running back Will Thomas, linebacker Ryan Henderson, and Head Coach of the Year Scott Klees. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles season that culminated in a trip to the state championship game continued to reap honors, with a handful of players named to the All-State team, plus players named to All Big Bend. The honors included Marshane Godbolt being named All Big Bend Defensive Player of the Year. Head Coach Scott Klees was named Coach of the Year for the Big Bend. Its a really humbling experience,Ž Klees said of the honor. All-State players are Godbolt, running back Will Thomas, lineman Chris Griffin, linebacker Ryan Henderson and linebacker Kevin James. First team All Big Bend players included Godbolt, Thomas, Grif“ n and Henderson … plus punter Conner Smith, and safety Deonte Hutchinson. Players named to the All Big Bend second team include center Caleb Brown, defensive tackle C.J. Roberts, linebacker Kevin James and safety Mikal Cromartie. Honorable mention included Tamarick Holmes, Fred Cumming and Luke Taylor. Since Ive been here, weve never had anybody represented like that,Ž Klees said of the number of players being recognized. While a lot of the players named are seniors, a handful will return next year … including Kevin James and Chris Grif“ n, Klees noted.Marshane Godbolt is named All Big Bend Defensive Player of the Year. Head Coach Scott Klees is named Big Bend Coach of the Year. CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEƒEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Flor i da Cert i “ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR 1 1 8 6 6 7 4 2 1 3 7 3w w w f l o r i d a c l a s s i f i e d s c o m T h e k e y t o a d v e r t i s i n g s u c c e s s Classified • Display • Metro Daily • Online “Re-Store”Shadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat.  9 a.m. 5 p.m. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

PAGE 10

By SUSAN BLAKENational Forest in FloridaIts a pleasure to get up in the morning and go to work,Ž says Toniette ToniŽ Addison. Addison is a Civil Engineer for the National Forests in Florida. I spend the majority of my time designing recreation sites on some of the most beautiful and remote areas of our forests,Ž she says. Now in her “ fth year with the U.S. Forest Service, she has had assignments as far away as Washington state. Today, she lives with her twin sister Antoinette in Tallahassee, Fla. But things were not all rosy for Addison. One of six children, Addison recalls a dif“ cult life growing up as a young African American girl in the projects of Fort Myers. Her mother, a single parent, frequently left her and her siblings home alone to fend for themselves, sometimes for as long as two weeks. She attributes her survival to her twin, Antoinette. At an early age, the twins, being oldest, had a great deal of responsibility caring for three sisters and one brother. At the time, Addisons only lifeline was her grandmother who frequently stopped by to look in on them and took care of their youngest sister while the rest were in school. I dont feel like I really had a childhood most of the time,Ž she recalls. But at the end of the day, I think it made me a really disciplined person.Ž The competition in school between Addison and Antoinette was “ erce. While they grew up under dif“ cult circumstances they maintained good grades, chastising one another over who would do best. As they progressed into middle school though, life in the projects started to wear on Addison and her sister. They were headed down a rocky road and turmoil consumed their lives. We were just bad!Ž says Addison. My sister was in the principals of“ ce every single day.Ž I cant explain the mindset, only to say that if youre in such a negative environment, you kind of think, What do I have to do to get out of this; what do I have to live for.Ž During this critical time, another of Addisons sisters fell gravely ill. As a result, she and her sister Antoinette started going to a nearby church and developed a friendship with the pastor and his family. By the time she reached high school Addison and her twin were on the straight and narrow. Reflecting on her past, Addison recalls, Its all about what you make it. You, as an individual, have to surround yourself with positive in” uences. Thats what I would tell anybody today whos living in the projects.Ž Upon graduating from high school, Addison was accepted to the University of Florida, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) and Florida State University with full scholarship. But twins must stick together and the two went to FAMU at their grandmothers insistence. Once at FAMU, Addisons math instructor pushed her into engineering. She had a head for numbers and he thought this would be the best use of her talents. Addison believes happiness is much more important than money. As long as I continue to be happy I dont want to go anywhere else. I like the Forest Service a whole lot. I think its because were such a close-knit family, but at the same time, our personalities and people are so diverse.Ž Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors I was in a jet liner perhaps two miles up, and as the clouds broke momentarily to allow me to view our Earth below us, there … off the north coast of the Yucatan … was a coral reef of indescribable beauty. The aqua blue-green of its waters jolted my senses. Then it was gone, replaced by an unending layer of clouds that followed us clear to Atlanta, and then on to New Jersey. The whole eastern U.S., clear into most of the Gulf of Mexico, was overcast. And in New Jersey of course it was cold. Id ” own up to be with my Patti on Jan. 26, and there had been blessed with an opportunity to be driven to a few places to see some unusual birds that had been sighted in that state. Pattis friends Chris and Paula drove us “ rst to a big rock dam where I had my “ rst good look at a Snowy Owl. It was preening, and was constantly blinking its big yellow eyes in the process. As big as a Great Horned Owl, but pure white … neat! The following day we drove to the coast, and there were my “ rst Purple Sandpipers and a Razorbill (auklet). Recording them was great, but even better was seeing about 200 Long-tailed Ducks or Old Squaw, and especially about 200 Harlequin Duck. The drakes of this species are spectacular. If youre not familiar with this species I beg you to check it out in a guide. We were on a jetty and had many Harlequin within 20 feet of us! Then on the morning of Feb. 1, Patti and I boarded a jet at Newark, and by that afternoon were being ” own in a small three-seater over the jungles of Belize. We stayed a few days at the well known Chan Chich Lodge. There I saw a wild Morelets Crocodile Crocodylus moreletti which gets up to about 11 feet. Around the lodge were some large ” ocks of Ocellated turkeys … a species absolutely shimmering with iridescent colors. They had become habituated to humans as there is no hunting at this preserve, and would therefore pass us on a sidewalk! Many of the other birds I saw there -all new to me -had names I found hard to pronounce like the Yellow-throated Euphonia (a type of tanager) pronounced U-phone-I-ah, Crested Guan, (Goo-an), and Great Curassow (Cur-a-sow), plus a Northern Jacana, a wading over lilypads bird with spurs on its wings, that carry its young between its legs when ” ying from danger. There was a night-calling bird (like the Whip-poorwill) called the Pauraque (Par-rock-ee) and another weird bird with strange habits called the Grove-billed Ani (An-ee), plus a toucan (with the big bills) called Collard Aracari (Air-a-car-e), and then a king“ sher like bird named the Rufoustailed Jacamar (Jack-a-mar). We also saw a couple of times a Masked Tityra (Ttie-ra), and a Rose-throated Becard (Be-card), and a ” ycatcher named the Yellowbellied Elania (E-lane-I-a). Patti pointed out a Leaf cutter ant colony to me and then we saw around the dining area a Red-throated ant tanager, and she pointed out there are many birds with ant attached somewhere in their names for they follow the swarms of marching Army Ants feeding on the insects ” eeing these aggressive creatures that will take down any critter that remains in their path. Latter on, we saw a swarm of perhaps a million Army Ants. But thats another story which I promise Ill write about next time.Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHEye-opening trips to New Jersey, BelizeSpecial to The NewsPlantation Security Of“ cer Grady Phelps and his Korean War buddy Jake Chapman get together each winter to spend a day on the Gulf catching a box full of Key West Grunts. Jake comes down from Iowa and brings his grandson Brent to serve as First Mate. The two 80-year-old veteran warriors rehash old war tales and come up with solutions for “ xing our world problems. Major Alan Lamarche takes them out from Shell Point in his boat and he says he enjoys listening to the wisdom of the ages.Ž This year, they caught 75 grunts that Jake and Brent plan to take back home to Iowa so they can have something to eat besides beef and corn. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKorean War buddies have a “ shing reunionForest Service engineer Toni Addison triumphs over hardships FOREST SERVICEToni Addison at the Leon Sinks Geological Area on the Apalachicola National Forest, one of several renovation projects undertaken last year with stimulus money. Brent Chapman, Grady Phelps and Jake Chapman. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 26 o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED FISH LIMIT IS NOW GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ƒONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EARƒ Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 PANACEA HATSAFACTHATSEARLE KIRKWOOD850-524-9103UNDERTHEOAK ON US 98 PANACEA • Interior Remodeling • Doors • Floors • Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling • Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonThe column this week is compliments of Phil Hill. There is just over a week left until it is time to spring forward and set our clocks once again, and just over two weeks until the of“ cial start of spring! It is now time to get back out on the water. Our waters allow for year round boating, but remember cold water can cause hypothermia. When you fall into cold water, there are many physical reactions that occur. The “ rst is that you cant breathe. Your heart rate and blood pressure increase. You may have uncontrolled gasping for air. Your movements may also be uncontrolled. This phase is called cold water response. It can last from 30 seconds to several minutes. Of people who die in cold water, 20 percent die within the “ rst two minutes of falling into the water. This phase will pass and you will need to stay calm and get your breathing under control. The second is called cold incapacitation. As the warmth of your body is lowered by the water surrounding you, your body will work to keep your core temperature high. Blood ” ow to your arms and legs will be lowered. You will lose the ability to swim. Without some sort of ” otation device, 50 percent of those who die in cold water die of drowning due to cold incapacitation. The “ nal phase is hypothermia. You can survive in cold water much longer than many believe, as long as you are wearing a life jacket. It could take an hour or much longer to lose consciousness. So what can you do to lessen the dangers of cold water boating? First, always wear your life jacket. If you fall into the water, your life jacket will keep your head above the water while you catch your breath and get your breathing under control. It will keep you ” oating when your arms and legs are too cold to work. It will keep you ” oating even if you are unconscious. You should attach a whistle, a re” ective mirror, and an emergency strobe light to your life jacket. If you have an Emergency Position-indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB), make sure it is in working order and with you. EPIRBs can be purchased and some companies rent them. These items will make you easier to “ nd in the water. File a float plan with somebody. If the unforeseen happens, this may trigger a search that saves your life. Wear cold water gear. When the water temperature drops to 60 degrees or less, USCG regulations require the Auxiliary to wear mustang suits. These may be hot on deck, but offer us good protection if we end up in the water. We practice being in the water wearing these suits so that we know what it feels like to before we are in a dangerous situation. Keep a change of dry clothes on board. If you do get wet, you can change and keep from getting chilled. If you “ nd yourself in the water, try to get out as quickly as possible. Follow the 1-10-1Ž rule. Take one minute to calm yourself and get your breathing under control. Use the next 10 minutes to get yourself out of the water while your arms and legs are fully functioning. Conserve your body heat as best you can. Limit your movement and assume the heat-emitting lessening position (HELP). Cross your arms and place your hands under your armpits. Cross your legs and try to pull up into a ball. This will help to protect your core temperature. Finally, your battle with the cold is not over even if help arrives. There is the possibility of post-rescue collapse or after drop. Hypothermia weakens the body and can bring it to the edge of collapse. The rescue itself is stressful to the victim. Get the person out of the wet clothes. This is not a time for modesty. Wet clothes are hard to remove, so do not waste too much time with their removal. Cover the victim with a blanket. Keep them horizontal on their back or side. If you have hot water bottles or hot packs, apply them to the head, neck, chest, and groin. You can also lie next to or on top of the victim to warm them with your own body heat. Do not apply heat directly to the arms or legs. You can kill a person by causing cold blood to ” ow to the heart and brain. Let the extremities warm on their own. If the victim is conscious, you can give them warm liquids sweetened with sugar for energy. Do not give alcohol and avoid caffeine if possible. Keep the person horizontal even if the victim begins to feel better. Their body is in a fragile state. The heart can quit pumping correctly. Let the local ER determine if the person is ready to stand. If you are in a situation where you or someone else falls into the cold water and hypothermia is setting in, use your VHS radio to call for help on channel 16 and head for shore. EMS can meet you dockside if they know you are coming. Hopefully you have found this information helpful. Since taking over for Sherrie, I have asked for help from other Auxiliarists to give you different points of view and diverse information. Flotilla 12 will be holding our monthly meeting Saturday March 3, beginning at 10 a.m. at the Crawfordville Fire Station. Come out and join us! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarists in Mustang suits. While going to school in Hawaii, I naturally spent a lot of time underwater, looking at reef animals. Under ledges and in marine caverns, I would see these “ sh swimming around upside down! Of course I emulated them to better understand their tendency to swim in this manner. My regulator would “ ll up with water and soon send me back out into the open water sputtering. The “ sh ” ed with me and hovered about me now upside right! Something under the ledge must be doing this to the “ sh (and not me). In my senior year in college I chose to experiment with these same “ sh as part of an animal behavior class project. I tried moving surfaces around, currents, day vs. night all in an aquarium and to no avail. My “ sh stayed upright. Then one day the light in my room re” ected off a glass surface and beamed into the transparent aquarium from the ” oor. The “ sh, a long nose butter” y “ sh, promptly turned upside down. It seems they have what is called a dorsal light response, turning their top surface towards light. Since they are neutral in their buoyancy, and only “ nd these conditions in overhangs on the reef, they rise up to the ceiling of a ledge and swim upside down. I was able to replicate this condition, even without the ceiling substrate, by inserting a tight mesh box into the aquarium that had all dark sides except one where the light could penetrate. I could turn the mesh box randomly causing the “ sh to swim on its side, upside down or otherwise at my command. Needless to say, I earned a good grade in that class. Fast forward a decade or so and “ nd me diving under 10 feet of ice in the Antarctic. There, snow on the ice darkens the surface ceiling, except where our entrance hole beams light on to a crystalline reef. I would often “ nd myself unexpectedly upside down, even on my knees pressed against the hard ice ceiling, looking up … no, down … at the sponge reef below. I had strange sensations in my head since gravity continued to affect the balancing organs of my inner ear that con” icted with what my eyes were seeing. Ultimately the inner ear won, permitting me to drop to the sea ” oor and get on with data collecting. Since I was hose diving, breathing in a helmet with gasses from the surface was better; at least my gas supply was not interrupted, but rising bubbles still confused sight! Fast forward another few decades and “ nd me diving under tons of rock in a very large cavern near Williston, training/evaluating yet another new rebreather. Here we carry our own lights, so dorsal light response is not so much an issue. After two days of testing, where everyone swam around on the ” oor, pretty much like normal “ sh … ah, people … do, I found myself drawn to the walls and then the ceiling. But unlike others up there with me, I was comfortably upside down. For much of the last dive I spent watching the other test divers swimming upside down on the ceiling substrate. I mean they seemed strange looking at me strangely. What was notable was for the “ rst time, I discovered a rebreather that truly breathes equally in all attitudes, head up, down, somersaults and on my back. And no exhaled bubbles were released to confuse sight. Of course I was reprimanded by the dive supervisors of the evaluation for my antics, but exalted by the designing engineer who agreed with me that it no longer mattered as to which way was up. I am a “ sh! Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:14 AM 3.4 ft. 1:00 AM High 0.4 ft. 2:11 AM 0.3 ft. 3:47 AM 0.1 ft. 4:54 AM -0.2 ft. 5:42 AM -0.4 ft. 6:21 AM -0.4 ft. 6:56 AM -0.4 ft. 7:29 AM Low 2.0 ft. 9:27 AM 2.2 ft. 10:56 AM 2.5 ft. 11:45 AM 2.8 ft. 12:20 PM 3.0 ft. 12:51 PM 3.2 ft. 1:19 PM 3.4 ft. 1:46 PM High 1.7 ft. 12:55 PM 1.8 ft. 2:53 PM 1.6 ft. 4:32 PM 1.3 ft. 5:34 PM 0.9 ft. 6:21 PM 0.5 ft. 7:02 PM 0.0 ft. 7:42 PM Low 2.6 ft. 6:31 PM 2.5 ft. 8:26 PM 2.6 ft. 10:16 PM 2.9 ft. 11:22 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 12:11 AM 3.5 ft. 12:57 AM High 0.5 ft. 2:08 AM 0.3 ft. 3:44 AM 0.1 ft. 4:51 AM -0.2 ft. 5:39 AM -0.4 ft. 6:18 AM -0.5 ft. 6:53 AM -0.4 ft. 7:26 AM Low 2.0 ft. 9:24 AM 2.3 ft. 10:53 AM 2.6 ft. 11:42 AM 2.9 ft. 12:17 PM 3.1 ft. 12:48 PM 3.3 ft. 1:16 PM 3.5 ft. 1:43 PM High 1.9 ft. 12:52 PM 2.0 ft. 2:50 PM 1.8 ft. 4:29 PM 1.4 ft. 5:31 PM 1.0 ft. 6:18 PM 0.5 ft. 6:59 PM 0.0 ft. 7:39 PM Low 2.6 ft. 6:28 PM 2.5 ft. 8:23 PM 2.7 ft. 10:13 PM 3.0 ft. 11:19 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 12:50 AM 3.2 ft. 1:36 AM High 0.4 ft. 3:15 AM 0.3 ft. 4:51 AM 0.1 ft. 5:58 AM -0.2 ft. 6:46 AM -0.3 ft. 7:25 AM -0.4 ft. 8:00 AM -0.4 ft. 8:33 AM Low 1.8 ft. 10:03 AM 2.1 ft. 11:32 AM 2.3 ft. 12:21 PM 2.6 ft. 12:56 PM 2.8 ft. 1:27 PM 3.0 ft. 1:55 PM 3.2 ft. 2:22 PM High 1.6 ft. 1:59 PM 1.7 ft. 3:57 PM 1.5 ft. 5:36 PM 1.2 ft. 6:38 PM 0.8 ft. 7:25 PM 0.4 ft. 8:06 PM 0.0 ft. 8:46 PM Low 2.4 ft. 7:07 PM 2.3 ft. 9:02 PM 2.5 ft. 10:52 PM 2.7 ft. 11:58 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:06 AM 2.6 ft. 12:52 AM High 0.3 ft. 2:22 AM 0.2 ft. 3:58 AM 0.0 ft. 5:05 AM -0.1 ft. 5:53 AM -0.3 ft. 6:32 AM -0.3 ft. 7:07 AM -0.3 ft. 7:40 AM Low 1.5 ft. 9:19 AM 1.7 ft. 10:48 AM 1.9 ft. 11:37 AM 2.1 ft. 12:12 PM 2.3 ft. 12:43 PM 2.4 ft. 1:11 PM 2.6 ft. 1:38 PM High 1.3 ft. 1:06 PM 1.3 ft. 3:04 PM 1.2 ft. 4:43 PM 0.9 ft. 5:45 PM 0.7 ft. 6:32 PM 0.3 ft. 7:13 PM 0.0 ft. 7:53 PM Low 1.9 ft. 6:23 PM 1.9 ft. 8:18 PM 2.0 ft. 10:08 PM 2.2 ft. 11:14 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:44 AM High 0.4 ft. 1:50 AM 0.3 ft. 3:26 AM 0.1 ft. 4:33 AM -0.2 ft. 5:21 AM -0.4 ft. 6:00 AM -0.4 ft. 6:35 AM -0.4 ft. 7:08 AM Low 1.5 ft. 9:11 AM 1.7 ft. 10:40 AM 2.0 ft. 11:29 AM 2.2 ft. 12:04 PM 2.4 ft. 12:35 PM 2.5 ft. 1:03 PM 2.7 ft. 1:30 PM High 1.7 ft. 12:34 PM 1.8 ft. 2:32 PM 1.6 ft. 4:11 PM 1.3 ft. 5:13 PM 0.9 ft. 6:00 PM 0.4 ft. 6:41 PM 0.0 ft. 7:21 PM Low 2.0 ft. 6:15 PM 1.9 ft. 8:10 PM 2.1 ft. 10:00 PM 2.3 ft. 11:06 PM 2.5 ft. 11:58 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:33 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:59 AM -0.1 ft. 3:14 AM -0.2 ft. 4:15 AM -0.3 ft. 5:04 AM -0.3 ft. 5:46 AM -0.2 ft. 6:24 AM -0.1 ft. 6:58 AM Low 2.3 ft. 6:36 PM 1.8 ft. 11:50 AM 1.9 ft. 12:25 PM 2.0 ft. 12:52 PM 2.0 ft. 1:14 PM 2.1 ft. 1:32 PM 2.1 ft. 1:48 PM High 1.4 ft. 1:58 PM 1.4 ft. 3:37 PM 1.2 ft. 4:41 PM 1.0 ft. 5:30 PM 0.8 ft. 6:12 PM 0.5 ft. 6:52 PM Low 2.2 ft. 7:46 PM 2.2 ft. 9:06 PM 2.3 ft. 10:23 PM 2.4 ft. 11:31 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 1 March 7First March 30 Full March 7 Last March 14 New March 22Major Times 6:59 AM 8:59 AM 7:24 PM 9:24 PM Minor Times 1:42 AM 2:42 AM 12:14 PM 1:14 PM Major Times 7:49 AM 9:49 AM 8:15 PM 10:15 PM Minor Times 2:31 AM 3:31 AM 1:07 PM 2:07 PM Major Times 8:41 AM 10:41 AM 9:06 PM 11:06 PM Minor Times 3:19 AM 4:19 AM 2:03 PM 3:03 PM Major Times 9:32 AM 11:32 AM 9:58 PM 11:58 PM Minor Times 4:03 AM 5:03 AM 3:03 PM 4:03 PM Major Times 10:24 AM 12:24 PM 10:49 PM 12:49 AM Minor Times 4:45 AM 5:45 AM 4:04 PM 5:04 PM Major Times 11:15 AM 1:15 PM 11:40 PM 1:40 AM Minor Times 5:26 AM 6:26 AM 5:08 PM 6:08 PM Major Times --:---:-12:06 PM 2:06 PM Minor Times 6:04 AM 7:04 AM 6:12 PM 7:12 PM Average+ Average+ Average Average Good Better Best7:02 am 6:36 pm 12:15 pm 1:42 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:01 am 6:37 pm 1:08 pm 2:32 am 7:00 am 6:37 pm 2:04 pm 3:19 am 6:59 am 6:38 pm 3:04 pm 4:04 am 6:58 am 6:39 pm 4:05 pm 4:46 am 6:57 am 6:40 pm 5:09 pm 5:26 am 6:55 am 6:40 pm 6:13 pm 6:05 am51% 58% 64% 71% 77% 84% 92% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 12

Continued from Page 1AAnother issue Shuff feels strongly about is the need for citizen input. Decisions need to be geared toward all the citizens in the county, Shuff said. Shuff said he decided to run for county commission after he semi-retired in January. He has owned a contracting business in Wakulla County since 1976. I have a lot of energy,Ž Shuff said. And its very satisfying to do something good and to feel like you helped do that.Ž Shuff said he has been involved in the Chamber for years and was instrumental in the renovations of the old courthouse. In being heavily involved in the Chamber, he also became active with the local government and served on the Construction Licensing and Appeals Board, landscaping ordinance writing committee, infrastructure committee. He said his life experiences would make him uniquely quali“ ed to serve as a county commissioner. I have the time, experience and desire to treat this opportunity as a regular job so that the decisions I make will be reasoned, informed and in the best interests of Wakulla County,Ž Shuff said. Shuff grew up in a Navy family and settled in Jacksonville in 1961. He was an Eagle Scout and camp counselor during his high school and college years. He graduated from Florida State University in 1970 with a degree in international affairs and geography. He went on to graduate school, but eventually left to become a contractor. He got his contractors license and moved to Wakulla County in 1973. In 1976, he opened his own business. He is married to Petra Shuff. Continued from Page 1A Though Elizabeths husband would go down in local history as the “ rst pharmacist in Wakulla, Elizabeth became something of an uncommon legend. But not for all the right reasons. My mom had a pretty extensive life before she got married,Ž says Betsy. Her family had a long history in Pennsylvania in a community that spoke German. Those aspects of her culture were still intact. She was given her dads car when he passed, and she drove across country. She worked in Washington state, traveled to Mexico and Italy. She enjoyed her opinions and liked a good debate. She was very much the outsider politically and temperamentally.Ž In 1963, the Beatles made their “ rst U.S. television appearance while Frank Sinatra Jr. was being kidnapped. That year Dr. King made a famous speech during the March on Washington, followed weeks later by the death of four black girls in a Birmingham church … victims of a Ku Klux Klan bombing. It was also the year Americas 35th President, John F. Kennedy, made an ill-fated trip to Texas. It was this backdrop that would set the stage for Smiths “ rst edition of the Magnolia Monthly in October 1963. She speaks strongly in the publication about womens issues; the practices of slavery and peonage in the county along with the cost to be paid for keeping others in a state of severe servitude; education; politics; and the forward thinking of preparing for a technological age. The Magnolia Monthly is packed with stories of her travels to Czechoslovakia, Sweden, Germany and more, in search of clues as to how the human species managed to survive in an ever-changing world, in which most of the changes seemed not to be in their best interest. Those were the times,Ž says Betsy, and its the times that make certain things relevant. She was opinionated and politically in a different realm than some people. She encouraged her children to be independent. She did what she wanted and brushed off the controversy. As her daughter, I often thought she was clueless about certain things, but as I grow older, I think her methods were intentionally downplayed.Ž Smith documented the countys history and that of its people through extensive research and interviews with many older residents. Her collection of family histories, local politics, Wakullas educational system, courtroom dramas, the misdeeds of county commissioners … and a great deal more … became countywide discussion during the 1960s and 70s. Not only was it a publication that set the communitys teeth on edge, it remains today as one of the largest collections of county history available. Elizabeth F. Smith would continue to write the awardwinning Magnolia Monthly until her death in 1977. The State Archives of Florida collection of her work contain personal papers from 1935 to 1977, including diaries, scrapbooks and other correspondence. Her diaries re” ect her early interest in writing; her personal views on social and political issues; and information on her early family life and the people close to her. Scrapbooks re” ect her academic life, participation in the war effort in Florida, the birth of her children, family history and tidbits on life in North Florida. WakullaStory: A Hankerin for HeadhuntinŽ will cover the early years of Smiths publication (19631965), and plans future theatrical works based on her extensive research. A Woman’s Work in Wakulla is a panel discussion that explores the role women have played throughout the ages – and stages – of the county. The event will launch this year’s WakullaStory. The moderator will Dr. Rachel SutzPienta, College of Education professor at Valdosta State University and Women Studies at FSU. Panelists include Dr. Madeleine Carr, historian of American History; Tammie Bar eld, general manager of The Wakulla News; Andrea Carter, former educator and principal within the county’s school system; Anginita Rosier, Sopchoppy city commission; Colleen Skipper, Mayor of Sopchoppy; Susan Solburg, longtime performing arts educator for the county school system; and Betsy Smith, daughter of Elizabeth and Harold Smith. “My mother was a voice of the times,” says Betsy Smith “and her voice went far beyond Wakulla. She wanted to see social progress and advancement. Back then people needed for someone to stand up and tell it like it was. And maybe it’s that time now. With all that’s going on in the country, it feels like the 60’s all over again.”– HERB DONALDSON Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWakullaStory: A Hankerin for a HeadhuntinWHEN: Friday, March 9 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, March 10 at 3 p.m. WHERE: Sopchoppy School Auditorium. TICKETS: $10 for general public (general seating); $7 for members of Wakulla Historical Society; $5 for students; free for children 11 and younger.CAST: Pat Chamburs, Constance Clineman, Kenneth Clineman, Layne Davis, Betty Green, Judith Harriss, Karen Henry, Shirley Howard, Karen Johnson, Doug Jones, Desmond Maxwell, Helen McLaughlin, Murray McLaughlin, Brianna Nelson, Michael Patrick Nicholson, Taryn P“ ster, Susan Schatzman and Tawanna Williams. LIGHT/SOUND: Mike Sherlock/MSR Services. Online: www.wakullahistory.com Phone: (850) 926-1110 WakullaStory performancesPANEL DISCUSSION: “A Woman’s Work in Wakulla” WHEN: Thursday, March 8 WHERE: Wakulla County Public Library TIME: 7 p.m. MODERATOR: Rachel Sutz Pienta PANELISTS: Andrea Carter, Susan Solburg, Anginita Rosier, Madeleine Carr, Colleen Skipper, Tammie Bar eld and Betsy Smith.A Womans Work in WakullaContinued from Page 1A In the draft, those areas which would be required to install nitrogen reducing systems are Bloxham Cutoff at the county line east to Crawfordville Highway; Crawfordville Highway south to East Ivan Road; East Ivan Road south to Wakulla Arran; Wakulla Arran west to Cajer Posey Road; Cajer Posey Road south to Shadeville Highway; Shadeville Highway east to Woodville Highway; and Woodville Highway north to the county line. The requirement would also extend to those properties near rivers and streams, wet sinks or swallets where the onsite sewage system is to be installed within 150 feet of the high water level. Properties where the total acreage is less than 229 contiguous acres of deeded property will also be required to have nitrogen reducing systems. The properties outside those zones will be required to hook up to municipal sewage, if available, otherwise they may install a standard septic system. Merritt said if the area is smaller, the county can keep a closer eye on them and ensure people are maintaining the systems. We can concentrate our efforts and get a lot better return,Ž Merritt said. Commissioner Lynn Artz said there is a misconception that these requirements were done to only protect Wakulla Springs. They were also done to protect the coastal areas. Both of the recent studies show the recharge area being Wakulla Springs and Spring Creek, Artz said. Commissioner Alan Brock said he would also like to see the county look at including Wakulla Springs and Spring Creek. Also included in the study are those areas which are vulnerable to pollution, Artz said. Those were Medart, Crawfordville, North Crawfordville, Wakulla Springs and Panacea, and most of these areas are not included in the proposed area, she added. We already have in this county a pollution problem,Ž Artz said. However, she said the comments she is hearing from those who want to change the policies is not that there isnt a pollution problem, but that the septic systems are expensive. The whole thrust of this is backwards,Ž Artz said. She suggested addressing the “ nancial concerns, instead of backing off on addressing the pollution problem. One option was allowing people to make payments on the new system, which costs around $6,000. Commissioner Mike Stewart said people would still be paying for the septic tank, they would just be doing it over time. Commissioner Jerry Moore said people cant afford the high cost of these systems. He added that there is proof the performancebased systems dont work and people turn them off. Juarez said in the “ rst year, when inspections were performed, it was determined about 40 percent of the systems were being turned off. Now, only about 5 to 10 percent are being turned off. However, Merritt wondered if people knew when inspections were going to be performed and simply turned the systems on when the inspector arrived and turned them right back off when they left. Artz said the reference that the systems dont work is untrue. They cut the pollution in half,Ž Artz said. Juarez said most of the systems in the county do not reduce the nitrogen levels by 90 percent, which is what is required in the policy. There were a few that did obtain 90 percent, he said, but most were reaching the national average of 50 percent. Included in the proposed revisions is changing the 90 percent to 50 percent to be in line with federal standards, Juarez said. Also included in the revisions is the allowance of repairs within a certain dollar amount for people who live in the proposed enforcement area. A standard repair or modi“ cation may be done if it does not exceed $1,500. Once over that amount, a new performance based systems must be installed, Merritt said. The commission voted four to one, with Artz opposing, to move forward with the Comprehensive Plan text amendment. The amendment will go before the planning commission, then a public hearing will be held, the county commission will vote on the item, and if approved, it will then go to the state for review and then it comes back to the county commission for approval. In the meantime, the county staff will be working on the changes to the land development code which would include the speci“ c septic tank requirements.Board may revise septic tank policyJohn Shu announces candidacy 713-001499 Rock Landing Road OPEN: THURSDAY ............. 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .............................. 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday .................. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. SUNDAY ...........................11 A.M. 9 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA MARCH INTOTWO BIGYARD SALESMAR. 2 & 3MAR. 16 & 17 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Feb. 17, Susan Wilson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle crash on East Ivan Road in Crawfordville. The victim heard a loud noise near the end of her driveway and discovered a vehicle had run into her fence and left the scene. The vehicle struck a telephone box and telephone pole and slid through the victims fence. Evidence was collected at the scene and damage to the fence, phone pole and phone box was estimated at $1,500. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Feb. 16, Bonita Holub of Panacea reported a vehicle burglary as someone entered her car and removed a laptop computer and an iPad computer. The stolen property was valued at $3,100. € On Feb. 16, Dustin Heath Raker, 27, of Crawfordville was charged with knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license suspended, resisting an of“ cer without violence, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams and possession of narcotics equipment following a traf“ c stop in Crawfordville. Raker reportedly admitted he did not possess a valid driver license and allegedly resisted Deputy Sean Wheeler as he attempted to place Rakers hands in handcuffs. The deputy allegedly observed cannabis and a smoking pipe in plain view inside the vehicle. The cannabis reportedly weighed seven grams. A computer tablet was seized to protect it from damage during the vehicle towing phase and was turned over to Detective Erika Buckley. A 15-year-old juvenile inside the vehicle was not charged. € On Feb. 16, Dorothy Mitchell of Crawfordville and the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department reported a second theft of a “ re extinguisher from the recreation park in the same week. The equipment is valued at $50. € On Feb. 17, June Lee of Lees Liquor Mart in Crawfordville reported a retail theft. Fifteen Lottery tickets, valued at $163, were reported missing. Some of the tickets were recovered in the trash. Winning tickets were discovered, but were not validated and of no cash value. € On Feb. 20, a female victim reported a violation of a court-ordered injunction. A suspect, who was identi“ ed from the Wakulla County Jail, called the victim on the telephone on two occasions. The injunction included a no-contact clause and the inmate admitted to calling the victim twice. The 38-year-old inmate was charged with contempt of court for willful violation of the injunction. € On Feb. 20, David Morgan of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to file his tax return when he discovered that someone had already used his Social Security number. € On Feb. 20, Cecil Bowen of Crawfordville reported a theft of marine items. A battery was taken from one of his vessels and a fuel line and tank was stolen from another boat. The property is valued at $155. € On Feb. 20, William Harris of Crawfordville reported a theft at the Ship Yard Hunting Club. Someone cut the cable gate to the property and stole four rustic water pumps, valued at $300 each. € On Feb. 20, Jared Causseaux of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Someone stole four baseball gloves from the victims carport. The property is valued at $400. € On Feb. 20, Dorothy Milton of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim entered into an agreement to have cabinets built at her home. The victim paid a subject $3,000 to get started and the check was cashed. The work on the cabinets did not take place. € On Feb. 19, James Coleman of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone damaged a door at a neighboring unoccupied mobile home. Damage was estimated at less than $200. € On Feb. 19, Joshua Adam Eures, 31, of Crawfordville was arrested for retail theft for stealing a bottle of alcohol from Dux Liquors in Crawfordville. Employees allegedly observed the suspect shove a bottle into his pants and run from the establishment. Eures was apprehended by Lt. Jimmy Sessor in a wooded area near the establishment and the bottle was recovered. It was valued at $39. € On Feb. 19, Mary Robinson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left her purse inside her vehicle. The wallet and contents taken were valued at $55. The victim left her vehicle unlocked. € On Feb. 18, Roy Lafayette Avery IV, 18, of Sopchoppy was issued a notice to appear in court for hosting an open house party in Sopchoppy. Lt. Jimmy Sessor and Sgt. Ray Johnson were working Party Patrol in Sopchoppy when they observed a large crowd at Averys home. Several subjects under the age of 21 were observed at the scene along with a large quantity of alcohol. The alcohol was turned over to people at the party who were of legal drinking age and they were asked to leave the residence. € On Feb. 18, Shawn Michael Ridley, 25, of Crawfordville was arrested for disorderly intoxication following an altercation on Wakulla Arran Road. Lt. Mike Kemp was attempting to speak to Ridley when he charged the deputy. A relative tried to stop Ridley, but he charged Kemp a second time and was subdued with the deployment of a Taser. € On Feb. 17, Brandi Escorpizo of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A television, valued at $2,000, was taken from a shed on the property. € On Feb. 18, concerned citizens from Crawfordville reported a suspicious vehicle on Pebble Court in Crawfordville. Witnesses observed the vehicle go from one home to another and remove five marine batteries. The batteries were from boats owned by Terry Mitchell Johnson of Jacksonville and John Roger Johnston of Newberry and are valued at $500. Suspects have been identi“ ed. € On Feb. 18, Kenneth Thomas of Panacea reported a grand theft of marine batteries from Ochlockonee Bay. The batteries are valued at $300 and are owned by Richard Dean Rogers of Tallahassee and Raymond Michael Chase of Tallahassee. Later, on Feb, 21, Detective Derek Lawhon was investigating that case and discovered another boat that was missing a battery. It is owned by James Pokorski. A witness in the case was able to identity Ryan Travis Perez, 18, who was arrested on three counts of burglary and three counts of theft. Since Perez used his vehicle in the commission of a felony, his vehicle was seized and placed in the WCSO Impound Yard. € On Feb. 21, Kevin Riggles of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at the recreation park in Crawfordville. Both restrooms were vandalized as toilets were broken and toilet paper was thrown around. A hydraulic door mechanism was also stolen. Damage was estimated at $250 and the restrooms were ” ooded. € On Feb. 21, Michael Cozzy of Crawfordville reported a structure “ re. A “ re started in the kitchen and was concentrated in the stove area. Damage was reported to a microwave oven. There was no structural damage to the home. Firefighters determined the stove had an electrical failure and damage was estimated at $1,500. € On Feb. 21, Adrian Daniel Pittman, 30, of Crawfordville was arrested for knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license was suspended or revoked. Deputy Cole Wells conducted a traf“ c stop after observing the driver cross the center line twice. The drivers license was revoked in 2010. € On Feb. 22, John Thomas of Sopchoppy reported a burglary of a chain saw and pole saw, valued at $330. The saw were removed from a storage container at his home. € On Feb. 22, Neil Watts of Sopchoppy and ESG reported the grand theft of a utility trailer. The trailer, valued at $1,000, was taken from the county property at Trice Lane. The trailer was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. € On Feb. 22, Kelly Hand of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received a letter from a Texas bank stating that her account was overdrawn. The victim never opened a bank account in Texas. Somebody used her Social Security number to open it. € During the week, there continued to be numer-ous reports of fraudulent income tax returns being “ led. Citizens would go to “ le their return and “ nd it reported that their Social Security number or other personal information had been used to “ le returns. € On Feb. 22, Jimmie Gavin of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a water tank and water pump from property owned by an Illinois relative. Metal was also taken from a vacant mobile home and garage. The total value of the scrap metal is $2,000. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 843 calls for service during the past week including 18 residential and business alarms; 59 citizen contacts; 19 disturbances; 10 ” ag downs; 61 investigations; 44 medical emergencies; 10 thefts; 34 traf“ c stops; 10 disabled vehicles; 13 reckless vehicles; 12 wanted people; and 12 watch orders.Sheri s Report www.snapper.com LT125 285Z *Additional 1 year of limited warranty coverage is available on select models in stock. Current limited warranty duration is 2 y ears. This promotion extends the product warranty coverage to a total of 3 year s from the date of purchase. Engines are warranted separate ly and are not included in the promotional warranty period described abov e. Qualifying products include: select walk-behind mower s, rear-engine riders, RE200, NXT lawn tractors, LT 300 lawn tractors, YT400 yard tractors, 150Z, 200Z, 285Z, 300Z and 355Z. Produ cts not eligible for this rebate include: All SE series walk-behind mo wers, LT125 lawn tractors, SPX lawn tractors, 400Z, 500Z, pre ssure washers, generators, tillers, chipper shredder, brush c utters, leaf blowers, leaf va cuums, mini cultivators, attachments and ac cessories. Limited warranty applies to residential consumer use only. Qualifying product must be purchased between 3/1/12 and 5/31/12. Completion of product registration by the selling dealer is necessa ry to validate the date of purchase for proof of warranty. N o other warranty or implied warranty by the manufacturer exists except where required by law. This warranty gives you speci“c rights th at vary from state to state. Offer valid only in U.S. and Canada. Refer to the products operators manual for warranty details. 1 YEAR OF ADDITIONAL PRODUCT WARRANTY COVERAGE AT NO ADDITIONAL COST!*TAKEADVANTAGEOF THISOFFER FORATOTALOF 3 YEARSOF WARRANTYCOVERAGESee dealer for details 120055 I $1,999$2,899 2219 Crawfordville Hwy. www.3youtdoorequipment.com

PAGE 14

Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com SWINE SHOW The 46th annual Wakulla Area Swine Show was held on Feb. 25 at the livestock pavilion in Crawfordville and show judge, Ed Sapp, awarded grand champion to Natalie Hurst and reserve champion to Oliver Green. The show started with the showmanship competition, which was broken into five different age groups. Johnny Piland took first place for those exhibitors who were 15 years old and older; Colton McCulley was awarded “ rst for 13 to 14 year olds; Lincoln Porter was “ rst place for 10 to 11 year olds; and Oliver Green was awarded “ rst place for 8 to 9 year olds. The youngest exhibitors were 6 and 7 years old and Brayden Lawhon took “ rst place in that age group. Following the youth exhibitors, several former exhibitors participated in the alumni showmanship. Richard Gowdy won in that category. The class winners were Johnny Piland, class 1; Cole Gowdy, class 2; Gabriel Gowdy, class 3; Oliver Green, class 4; Natalie Hurst, class 5; and Branden Piland, class 6. The Herdsman Award went to Lincoln Porter. The Spirit Award was awarded to Brayden Lawhon and the Presidents Excellence Award was given to Oliver Green. The “ rst place team for junior judging went to Anna Green, Lockland Vause and Natalie Hurst. The “ rst place individual was awarded to Dawson Vause. The “ rst place team for senior judging went to Mikayla Flornoy, Kara Fowler and Torri Harrell of Liberty County. The “ rst place individual was awarded to Torri Harell of Liberty County. After those in attendance and the participants “ nished up their barbecue lunch, the pig scramble was held. Swine Show Winners LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA group shot of all the participants in the Swine Show on Saturday. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENGrand champion Natalie Hurst, above, brushes off her pig during the showing. Connor Scott, at right, guides his pig away from the fence as spectators watch. JENNIFER JENSENGet out of the way! Its the pig scramble. The “ fth annual Ochlockonee River Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival was held this past weekend and included atlatl demonstrations, bow making, knapping, deer hide brain tanning, basket weaving and pottery. Several competitions were held over the weekend, including the knapping contest. Steve Holloway won the event. Primitive bow and arrow shoot contest was also More photos online at thewakullanews.com Stone Age Festivalheld and Donnie Collins won. There was also an atlatl contest which was won by Mark Bracken. Those in attendance could bid on donated artwork in the auction, as well as visit the many different vendors who offered arrow heads, dream catchers, necklaces, baskets and other items.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook Call 866.484.7057Espaol 866.960.7085 Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV Now you have a better TV choice.[ The CenturyLink Prism Project. ]GET ON THE COUCH AND SEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Packages starting at $39.99a month for 6 months*CenturyLinkTM PrismTM.Interactive TV you control … any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. Prism Project … Demonstrations are with non-Prism’ TV customers using basic CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV service with standard featur es in High Definition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/11 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional acto rs, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. *Offer ends 5/31/2012. Offer and stated rates are available to new, first-time CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV residential customers onl y. The stated monthly rate of $39.99 applies to Prism’ TV programming package, and applies only for the first six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional i nstallation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. An $8.99 monthly DVR serv ice fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with the Prism’ TV programming package. Promotional offer cannot be combined with any other Prism of fers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees and surcharges will apply. Custome r must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the 3-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to spec ific locations. General … Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them b y service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restric tions apply. Terms and Conditions … All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at http://about.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees and Surcharges … Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply, including a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time High -Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charg es for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicab le taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate for All Service Bundles … The monthly rate for all bundled services will apply while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more s ervices are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV … All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box, one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct vid eo streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided set-top boxes are required to view TV. If a term commitment is required for liste d Prism offer and customer terminates those services before the end of the applicable term commitment, CenturyLink will assess an early termination fee of $120, reduced by $10 for each month that customer has paid in full for those services during that term commitment. Local channel availability varies by market. Caller ID service must be purchased separately to enable the on-screen Caller ID feature; Caller ID feature is not available in all areas. High Definition (HD) available on all TV plans for an addit ional $11.99/month, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of set-top boxes (STBs ) in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard definition. Subscription to service precludes customers f rom purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for Prism’ Premiu m plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscripti on services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Customer may dial 67 (touchtone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to opera te correctly, customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Equipment … Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) ST Bs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) rem ote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service dis connection in an undamaged condition, or customer will be cha rged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism’ TV Plan … Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the pro perty of their respective owners.

PAGE 15

Special to The NewsOur monthly networking luncheon, well attended by 42 members, was held at Wakulla Springs Lodge on Wednesday, Feb. 22. The lodge graciously waved the entrance fee to the park. Again this time, we saw a lot of members, or new associates that we have not yet had the opportunity to meet … thank you for joining us. For the several brand new members in attendance, it was an opportunity to introduce themselves, and give the audience a quick glimpse of what they do and what their business is about. Lisa Russell, shop owner of the recently opened store, Lisas Timeless Treasures in Sopchoppy, invited everyone to visit and drop in anytime to look around. Jo Ann Palmer, director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, was excited about rejoining the Chamber, and reminded everyone of the hazardous waste day coming up March 24, giving you an opportunity to drop off old batteries and other items that should not go into a land“ ll. More information is posted on the Chamber website. She also invited everyone to come on out to the 19th Hole at Wildwood Golf Course on Feb. 27 for the “ rst social, kicking off the Great American Cleanup. Continued on Page 3B Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 The battle for leadership in the state Senate: The future is now Weekly Roundup, Page 9B Business Spotlight: Stow Away CenterNominations sought for Business Awards ChamberNews, Page 3B Presidents MessageBy AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentSupport of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce is important to businesses, professionals, and all citizens because it pays real dividends in the form of creating more businesses and better living conditions to make Wakulla County a more desirable community in which to live. If you havent renewed your membership, contact Petra at the Chamber office today to make the necessary arrangements. We need you now more than ever. To our new members, we appreciate the investment you have made to protect the future of Wakulla businesses. CHAMBER ACTIVITIES This year has already started with a bang so I will briefly mention a few of the initiatives we have been involved in that many of you will be hearing more about in our next newsletter. On Feb. 9, the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners hosted a public workshop on Economic Development in Wakulla County. The goal of the workshop was to bring together different organizations working to promote economic development in our community and have each organization give a presentation on what their organization does to promote economic growth in Wakulla. I would like to thank Kevin Vaughn, our EDC chair, and John Shuff, past president, for assisting with our presentation. We all came away with a better understanding of the resources available and look forward to working with our local of“ cials in the future. Our Economic Development Council, a subsidiary of the Chamber, has been working with our Commerce and Government Committee on Wakulla 2020. Continued on Page 3B Chamber membership is importantNetworking lunch at Wakulla Springs SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChamber members Petra Myrick, Susan Schatzman, Sandy Lott and David Rosetti share a table. Courtney Peacock, Amy Geiger, Zoe Mans“ eld and June Vause at the Chamber networking luncheon. Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011…2012.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, March 9 Friday, March 23 Friday, April 13 Friday, April 27 Friday, May 11 Friday, May 25 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA NP-0000653372 AreYouHard OfHearing? Amajornamebrandhearingaidprovider wishestoeldtestaremarkablenewdigital hearinginstrumentinthearea.Thisoffer isfreeofchargeandyouareunderno obligation. Theserevolutionary100%Digitalinstruments usethelatesttechnologytocomfortablyand almostinvisiblyhelpyouhearmoreclearly. ThistechnologysolvesthestoppedupearsŽ, andheadinabarrelŽsensationsomepeople experience. Ifyouwishtoparticipate,youwillbe requiredtohaveyourhearingtestedinour ofce FREEOFCHARGE todetermine candidacyandreviewyourresultswiththe hearinginstrumentswithourhearingcare specialist. Attheendofthisevaluation,youmay keepyourinstrument,ifyousodesire,at atremendoussavingforparticipatinginthiseldtest.Specialtestingwillbe donetodeterminetheincreasedtsofthistechnology. tsofhearingaidsvarybytypeanddegreeofhearingloss,noise environment,accuracyofhearingtest,andpropert. Thisisawonderful opportunitytodetermineifhearinghelpisavailableforyourhearingloss andgethearinghelpataveryordableprice.CALLNOWIFYOUWISHTOBE INCLUDEDINTHISFIELDTESTNOWThroughMarch 29, 2012 Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. The Log Cabin Barry Building

PAGE 16

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, March 1  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 2  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, March 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at the Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For current information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol.com, Linda Wood at 899-0025 in Port St. Joe, or email Sheri at skpsky2000@comcast.net. Sunday, March 4  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, March 5  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, March 6  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY COALITION FOR YOUTH will meet from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the library. Thirty professionals/ disciplines are represented at each meeting. The group uses a holistic approach towards the betterment of children’s lives in Wakulla County. The public is welcome to attend. Thursday, March 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Special EventsThursday, March 1  ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS will be held at 5:30 p.m. at Wakulla High School. The night begins with a silent art auction. As last year, each school has produced a painted canvas for the public to bid upon. At 6:30, the performances begin with singing from the elementary students, followed by musical performances and skits from Wakulla Middle, Riversprings Middle and Wakulla High Schools. Tickets may be purchased at the door and prices are $2 for students and $5 for adults.  FREE LECTURE on the Natural Bridge Campaign, then and now, will be presented by Dr. William Lees, executive director of the Florida Archaeology Network, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center. The free lecture is hosted by the Florida Public Archaeology Network, University of West Florida and the Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center. This lecture series is free and open to everyone. Friday, March 2  35TH ANNUAL BATTLE OF NATURAL BRIDGE REENACTMENT will be held today, Saturday and Sunday at Natural Bridge Battle eld Historic State Park, 7502 Natural Bridge Road, Tallahassee. School day will take place for middle school and high school students, starting at 10:30 a.m. There will be multiple stations set up around the state park with living historians giving 19th century demonstrations. Students are welcome to pack a lunch with them. Please feel free to contact the Natural Bridge State Park for more information at (850) 922-6007 ,The CSO will accept donations of $3.00 per person for adults and $1.00 for children under the age of six.  SPECIAL OLYMPICS FLORIDA WAKULLA COUNTY SUMMER GAMES will take place at Wakulla High School from 9:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wakulla County athletes will be competing in sporting events, such as track and eld and Bocce. Everyone is invited to come out and support these athletes. For more information contact Susan Scherbarth at 322-7427. Saturday, March 3  35TH ANNUAL BATTLE OF NATURAL BRIDGE REENACTMENT will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the state park. Guests will mingle with civil war re-enactors and observe a Confederate-Union skirmish in the afternoon, cavalry demonstrations, artillery shows and a 19th century medical demonstration in the afternoon direct following the skirmish. 19th century sutlers and food vendors will be present. Please feel free to contact the Natural Bridge State Park for more information at (850) 922-6007 ,The CSO will accept donations of $3.00 per person for adults and $1.00 for children under the age of six.  BE A HERO TO OUR HEROES community-wide sh fry will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. Veterans Services of Wakulla is co-sponsoring this event to help support and honor Wakulla County U.S. military service members who are currently away from home. For more information regarding the event, contact Glenda Washington at 599-5999.  CONCERT BY BELMONT & JONES, Carrie Hamby and Charlie Engstrom, will be held at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Original music and blues from “the well” of deep country. Hamby lives in Tallahassee and Engstrom in New Orleans, La. Both are seasoned musicians and songwriters in many styles of music, this show will take us back in time to when the blues were pure and simple, and soulfully true. For reservations contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Sunday, March 4  OPENING CEREMONIES AND DEDICATION of the 35th annual re-enactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge will be held, followed by a full-scale reenactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge at 2:30 p.m. 19th century sutlers and food vendors will be present. Please feel free to contact the Natural Bridge State Park for more information at (850) 922-6007 ,The CSO will accept donations of $3.00 per person for adults and $1.00 for children under the age of six.  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE will present “The Fungus Amongus: Mushroom Basics” by Bill Petty, master gardener, naturalist, author and past president of the Sarracenia chapter of the Native Plant Society at 2 p.m. He will discuss mushroom shapes, ecology, nutrients, and relationships between fungi and other organisms. A brief mushroom hunt will follow. The presentation will be held in the “Nature’s Classroom” of the Environmental Education Center at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Call 850.925-6121 for additional information or visit www.fws.gov/saintmarks/.Upcoming Events Friday, March 9  WAKULLASTORY: “A Hankerin’ for Headhuntin’ will be presented at 7 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy Highschool. It is presented by The Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society, written by Herb Donaldson, artistic director, based on the writings of Elizabeth Fisher Smith, creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly Magazine. Saturday, March 10  SECOND ANNUAL LOW COUNTRY BOIL will be held at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville from 6 to 10 p.m. The event will feature a Low Country Boil dinner, and live music by JB’s Zydeco Zoo. For tickets contact the Chamber of ce (850) 926-1848.  PUBLIC TALK ON “From Google Earth to Google Embryo: Exploring the Spheres We Grow From” will be held at 7:30 p.m. at Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory, 222 Clark Drive, Panacea. Dick and Natalie Gordon are new scientist volunteers who are establishing the Embryogenesis Center. Admission is free, membership encouraged. Contact Richard Gordon at 984-5297 or by email DickGordonCan@gmail. com.  FOURTH ANNUAL JESUS RIVER FESTIVAL will be held at Sopchoppy City Park from noon until dark. Additional information can be found at jesusriverfest.com.  WAKULLASTORY: “A Hankerin’ for Headhuntin’ will be presented at 3 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy Highschool. It is presented by The Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society, written by Herb Donaldson, artistic director, based on the writings of Elizabeth Fisher Smith, creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly Magazine. Thursday, March 15  FREE LECTURE on “Adventures in Northwest Florida Archaeology “ by Dr. Nancy White, Professor of Archaeology at the University of South Florida, will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. The free lecture is hosted by the Florida Public Archaeology Network, University of West Florida and the Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center. This lecture series is free and open to everyone.  RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL THEATRE TROUPE will present “Next Victim, Please” at 7 p.m. This is a tongue-in-cheek murder mystery. Admission is free, but donations are graciously accepted. The concession will be open prior to the show and at intermission. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Annual Celebration of the Arts at Wakulla High School at 5:30 p.m. Special Olympics Summer Games at Wakulla High School 9:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Fish Fry for military 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Battle of Natural Bridge Re-enactment at 2:30 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsMonday, March 5  PUBLIC RECORDS COMMITTEE will meet at 2 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room, 3093 Crawfordville Highway.  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, March 8  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for a budget workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Belmont and Jones will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy on March 3 at 8 p.m.

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 3B T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Continued from Page 1B Catherine Cameron, recently retired, opened her own business in the county, LKR Communications and Translations. Besides translating from or to Spanish, she also holds telephone excellence seminars. Michael Weltman, recently re-joined under a new business, First Bank, and has more than 10 years of experience in FHA reverse mortgages, and leads the Senior Products Division. Elva Peppers with Florida Environmental Land Services shared that her company works on environmental studies, and permitting for seawalls and docks in Wakulla. Upcoming events shared: TCC Workforce Development is offering a Spanish class, taught by Kathy Hallowell, a former Spanish teacher. This is a three-hour class once a week for six weeks. For more information, call 9226290. David Rosetti called for sponsors for a bene“ t horse show held by Cauzican Care and Allens Equestrian Services dedicated to the rescue of animals in need. The bene“ t will take place May 26 at 3Y Ranch. For advertising, sponsorship or information call Allens Equestrian Services … Gay Allen at (850) 567-3228. Elena Myhre recently joined Southern Flooring in Crawfordville, and invited everyone to come visit their new showroom for all your ” ooring needs. Elena is excited to have the opportunity to be more active in the Chamber, and is a wonderful addition to our youngŽ crowd of members. Jo Ann Palmer introduced her guest, Planning and Community Development Director Luis Serna. John Shuff announced his candidacy for County Commission, District 5, and invited anyone to contact him to share their issues, and ask his views on them. Susan Payne Turner was the proud winner of our $42 cash drawing. We want to thank our attending members for their donated prizes to our raf” e, which included homemade jams and pepper jelly, $50 travel cards, ” ashlights, annual planners, gift baskets, scratch-off lotto tickets, T-shirts, complimentary pest control service and free termite inspection and more. Plan to join us next month, Wednesday, March 28. The Wakulla Extension graciously offered to host our luncheon at their facility, 84 Cedar Avenue in Crawfordville. Jim Lowe with Hamaknockers will be catering. Watch for the invitation and if you are not a Chamber member, membership has many advantages, and we invite you to join us. Contact Petra Shuff at (850) 926-1848 for information.Networking lunch is held at Wakulla SpringsContinued from Page 1BLook for more details next month. On March 28, Bike Florida will be visiting Wakulla County, and will be staying overnight at The Wildwood Resort. Please come out and join us in welcoming the bicyclists to our community. UPCOMING EVENTS Listed below are just a few of the events hosted by the Chamber. We invite you to join us at these and other events! € Second Annual Low Country Boil The Wakulla Chamber of Commerce Special Events Fundraising Committee is gearing up for our second Annual Low Country Boil. We are pleased to announce our premier sponsors for the event are Capital City Bank, The Wakulla News and Waste Pro. This evening of fun and great food will take place at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville on Saturday, March 10, from 6 to 10 p.m. The event will feature a Low Country Boil dinner and live music by JBs Zydeco Zoo, whose fun, danceable music appeals to all ages and all tastes. Continuing with our pledge to support education, part of the proceeds from the event is again earmarked to support Wakulla County students through scholarships. In addition, a portion of the proceeds will enable us to continue restoration and furnishing the historic Wakulla County Courthouse; the only wooden courthouse still in use. Last years event sold out with an overwhelming response and we anticipate this years event to exceed your expectations. For tickets contact the Chamber office at (850) 926-1848. € Business Excellence Awards Nominations are now being accepted for the 2012 Wakulla County Chamber Business Excellence Awards. This program is designed to recognize a Chamber Business of the Year, a Chamber Start-up Business of the Year, a Chamber Non-Pro“ t Organization of the Year, a Chamber Environmental Stewardship Business of the Year and new this year, a Chamber Member of the Year. A banquet honoring the winners will be held on Thursday, May 17, at the Senior Center. Please take this opportunity to submit your nominations and recognize a fellow Chamber member today! Nominations must be received by Friday, March 16. If you have any questions, please call either Petra Shuff (850) 926-1848 or Jo Ann Palmer (850) 9264095. € Networking Luncheons The Chambers monthly networking luncheons for business professionals give individuals the opportunity to discuss and share ideas while learning about other local businesses. It is a relationship-building experience held each month at one of our local eateries that bene“ ts you and your company through added contacts and resources. If you havent joined us yet, you are missing out on a great event that is being attended by more than 40 other professionals. Be sure to RSVP for our March luncheon. Hamaknockers will be catering at the Wakulla Extension, 84 Cedar Ave. In closing, thank you for your continued support of the Chamber and the many professionals who give their time to our business community. I look forward to seeing you all at the Low Country Boil on March 10. Yours in Service, Amy GeigerGeiger: Chamber membership is importantTell us about your business : The Stow Away Center is located at the corner of Coastal Highway 98 and Spring Creek Highway. Formerly known as Galveston and Lindas Mini Warehouses, we purchased the property in 2007. Since that time we have added a covered boat shelter and additional fencing. Stow Away Marine & More features gently used and consignment boats, new and used parts and accessories to include Amsoil Oil, Interstate Batteries, propeller service and a repair and maintenance shop. We have plans to add more covered boat storage and additional self-storage buildings in the near future. We currently offer self-storage units ranging in size from 5x10 to 20x20 for commercial or residential use. We have a gated open or covered Boat/RV/Vehicle Storage area that has controlled access with personal codes for entry, and a rent-by-phone service for any time an after-hours rental is needed. We also have a full line of in-stock moving, packing and storage supplies (locks, boxes, tarps and more). We offer notary, copy and fax services. Half of our business-retail center is leased to Dr. Griggs of Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital, with one space leased to Stow Away Marine & More, and another space (approximately 600 square feet) available as of March 1. Our property is monitored with 24 hour remote video surveillance to help protect you and your valuables! What services, products do you offer? Self-Storage, Boat/RV/Auto Storage, 10 day emergency storage (during tropical storms, etc.), retail space, moving and storage supplies, of“ ce services, and boat sales and maintenance. What sets your business apart from the competition? You get the personal service and attention of an on-site, owner operated business. And you can stop in for, or I just might bring you out, a cold bottle of water if you look like you need one! What should the community/ customer expect when they visit your business? A well maintained, secure facility to stow your treasure; great customer service and a fair and competitive value. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 2007, when we purchased the center. Why did you join the Chamber? To get involved with the community, support the local Chamber of Commerce and to meet our fellow business owners! Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? I believe that life in general takes a village,Ž whether you are talking about raising your children or your business. Whenever I have a project going on, I always call local people and hope that they would do the same … keeping the business and pro“ ts in our own community! If anyone is interested in your products/ services, how do they contact you? The office phone number is (850) 926-5725. Sherris cell phone: (850) 3227106. Gerards cell phone: (850) 5564652. Visit our website at www.stowawaycenter.com. Or email us at stowaway@centurylink.net Additional comments: We support many local charities and have donated many months of storage to organizations such as the Promise Land Ministries, Heavens Garden Ministries, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Progressive Pediatric Therapy and The Wakulla County Library just to mention a few. If you have a fundraiser coming up and need a place to secure your donations, you can call me too! Stow Away Center is located at 2669 Spring Creek Highway. The phone number is (850) 926-5725. Business: Stow Away Center Owners: Gerard and Sherri Merkle Merkle Enterprises LLCSpecial to The NewsChamber members were emailed a packet last week for the annual Business Excellence Awards, kicking off the 2012 Business Excellence Awards nomination process. We will again be presenting awards for the Business of the Year, Environmental Stewardship, Start-Up Business, NonPro“ t Business and new this year, the Chamber Member of the Year. All nominations for these categories must be submitted by a Chamber member, which includes employees of chamber members. We are also continuing to recognize the Wakulla Area Business of the Year, which is open to the public for nominations of any business in the Wakulla County area, member or non-member. Because the Chamber is a membership-based organization, we rely solely on membership dues along with fundraisers to accomplish everything we do. When membership is down, so are revenues. When sponsorships dry up, so do potential services. When people are closing their businesses, they dont remain members. This is why we feel so strongly about the Business Excellence Awards. There are businesses that have pushed through the challenges of the past couple of years and have survived on shoestring budgets, made adjustments, and have kept their doors open. Owners have done without for their employees and we want to recognize them. Every business in our area is critical to the survival of our community. We encourage you to help us recognize a deserving business by nominating your favorite business and bringing them to our attention. Added this year is the 2012 Chamber Member of the Year. This award is the idea of the Chamber Event Committee and is intended to recognize leadership and service. In thinking about how dif“ cult it has been for many businesses to be creative and keep customers coming back, we looked at what it takes, besides the brick and mortar, to be an excellent business, and recognized that it takes excellent employees. Employees and owners are the face of every business. This award will be given to an owner or an employee of a member business whose service and dedication have made a signi“ cant contribution to the Chamber and to the community. We want to recognize that one special person who exempli“ es the characteristics of what it means to go above and beyond the call of duty. If you have integrity, initiative, vision, innovation, leadership and commitment, we want to hear about you. Self-nominations are welcome. Everyone has a favorite bank teller, favorite vet tech, server at a local restaurant, cashier, business owner or county employee. Anyone who is employed, or owns a business that is a member of the Chamber is eligible to nominate and be nominated as the Chamber Member of the Year. Outstanding achievements are accomplished every day … we want to know about them. The awards banquet is scheduled for May 17. Invitations will be emailed prior to the event. All nominees and their guests will be invited to attend. This year, we are especially excited once again to have the opportunity to recognize these businesses that stand out in our community, based on their service and commitment to our area. Nomination forms for all business excellence awards are available on the chamber website at wakullacountychamber. com, attached to this article on thewakullanews. com or you can contact the Chamber at 926-1848. We encourage everyone to submit a nomination. New members:  Keep Wakulla County Beautiful – Specializing in environmental education, community beauti cation projects and litter control.  Capital City Maintenance – Specializing in lawn maintenance, landscaping and steam pressure washing.  Lisa’s Timeless Treasures A sweet shop in downtown Sopchoppy featuring antiques, vintage items and collectibles. Come and enjoy the past today! Upcoming luncheon:  Hamaknockers will be catering at Wakulla Extension Facility 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville on March 28, from noon until 1:15 p.m. Upcoming ribbon cuttings:  11:30 a.m. at Chamber Ofce, 23 High Drive on Wednesday, March 7 for LKR Communications and Translations LLC.Chamber ChatterNominations open for Business Awards

PAGE 18

Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary..........36 classrooms/newspapers.........$576/yr Medart Elementary...................33 classrooms/newspapers.........$528/yr Riversink Elementary................20 classrooms/newspapers.........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary..............40 classrooms/newspapers.........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School........10 classrooms/newspapers.........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers..........$320/yr Attention Teachers – if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name_________________________________ Address_______________________________ City_______________________State____Zip_________ Phone______________Email_______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) SHS Management held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Feb. 21, joining the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce to celebrate the induction of Bridlewood Apartments, the latest addition to SHS Management LLC. Bridlewood Apartments offers 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartment homes with amenities that include pool, “ tness center, clubhouse and civil servant discounts. The fabulous community amenities, various ” oor plan designs, as well as excellent customer service makes this SHS property the perfect choice. SHS Management manages a diverse portfolio which includes student housing, residential, multi-family and commercial real estate. We are excited to be serving Crawfordville and Wakulla County. Bridlewood Apartments is located at 7 Home Stretch Lane (off Highway 61) in Crawfordville. The of“ ce number is (850) 926-1134, and the fax is (850) 926-1534. Bridlewood Apartments Critter Getter International GymThe Chamber held a ribbon cutting for new member Critter Control on Friday, Feb. 24. Critter Control is ranked No. 1 in wildlife control and No. 18 in pest control in the nation. The Certi“ ed Wildlife Specialists and IPM trained technicians focus on ecologically sound pest control and humane animal control solutions for homeowners, property managers, businesses and government. Critter Control also offers a wide range of other services such as home friendly Wash Safe roof, siding and deck cleaning, as well as full attic restoration featuring T.A.P. pest proof insulation. We also offer WDO inspections for Ribbon cuttings:International Gold Gymnastics ribbon cutting ceremony was on Feb. 13. Owners Olga and Alexander Babakhin, former Russian Olympic coaches, are happy to be a part of the Wakulla County community. The original gym was in the old Crawfordville Elementary School gymnasium; it took seven years to create this state of the art facility now located at 54 Feli Way between Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Boulevard and Shadeville Highway. There will be an open house on March 3 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. All coaches are safety certi“ ed and trained and under expert supervision, children will build strength, ” exibility, coordination, con“ dence, discipline and self-esteem. IGG also offers parent-tot classes, girls and boys gymnastics, tumbling, cheerleading, before and after school care programs, weekend birthday parties, as well as summer and spring break camps. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSreal estate agents. The owners of the local franchise are Brandon and Dustin Lynch. Brandon is a Certi“ ed Operator in General Household Pest and Termite Control with the state of Florida. Dustin is a Certi“ ed Wildlife Specialist. They both live in Wakulla County. Call 1-800-CRITTER (800-274-8837) or locally at (850) 745-4111.Special to The NewsLogic holds that businesses that cant keep up will be left behind. Just to keep pace, businesses must develop organizational agility, and its absolutely critical if they want to do more than just survive,Ž says Mike Richardson, author of Wheel$pin: The Agile Executives Manifesto: Accelerate Your Growth, Leverage Your Value, Beat Your Competition (www. mydrivingseat.com). Organizational agility is being able to move quickly and decisively, and one of the biggest obstacles is unproductive, time-wasting meetings he says. They start late, run long, and dont achieve much,Ž he says. But meetings are the backbone of an agile business.Ž He offers these tips for developing agile meetings with traction: € Map your meeting: Create a standing agenda and a master spreadsheet with tabs relevant to each agenda item with the expected inputs, throughputs and outputs. That way, the meetings are easy for the chairman to run because everything is crystal clear. € Set the mood: Set the tone for the energy level by playing a video or music. You can tell a story, read a quotation, or be unpredictable and create a surprise factor. € Spark creativity: Frame the purpose of the meeting as a question: How do we best ƒ? Questions get the human brain thinking more quickly. € Document the action live: Instead of taking notes, editing them and distributing them afterward, save time by capturing everything electronically in real time € Time-box everything: Meetings should last 45 minutes, from 5 after the hour to 10 minutes to the hour. Allot time for each agenda item and especially for presentations. Get people used to the fact that you will guillotine anything which runs over. When you challenge people to “ gure out how to get things done in the time allotted, you will be amazed at how they can. € Leverage the wallspace: Wall space is one of the most underutilized assets in your business. Have the standing agenda on the wall, creative problem-solving frameworks, your core values, key elements of your strategic plan, etc., all in a format large enough for you to refer to during the meeting. € Generate input: Have everyone take a minute to write down an idea relevant to the agenda item. Go around the table and allow each person to share his or her idea, or break into pairs or triads to discuss the ideas and report back. € Get fast consensus: Once the options are on the table, facilitate the group toward fast decisions with statements and questions like: Im leaning toward thisŽ or Does anyone have a violent objection to that?Ž Then move them into fast action: How would we best do that?Ž Agility is the ability to be constantly looking for opportunities to move forward toward goals while planning for problems,Ž Richardson says. Creating agile meetings is one big step toward creating an agile organization.Stop wasting time in meetingsIn the Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla county area, one of the occupations with the most vacancies is for workers who hold Commercial Drivers Licenses: heavy and tractor-trailer truck driver. Truck drivers can earn upwards of $25 per hour, with bonuses for those drivers who save their companies money. Opportunities are not just available in long-haul driving either. Tractor-trailer drivers, delivery service drivers and driver-sales workers are needed everywhere, so Workforce Plus hopes jobseekers take this chance to step into a new career If you or anyone you know would bene t from the Jobs = Paychecks Now initiative, contact Workforce Plus by calling (866) WFP–JOB1 today or emailing wfp@wfplus.org to apply. Commercial driver training is available SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 5B This page sponsored in part by: Jokes and Riddles Q: How can you tell when Rapunzel likes a parade?A: She lets down her hair. A: Stop picking on me!Q: What did the beanstalk say to Jack on the parade float? COLORING PICTURE List 10 words that rhyme with “float.” 1. ____________ 2. _____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ____________ 6. ____________ 7. __________ 8. ____________ 9. ___________ 10. ___________Some answers: boat, coat, dote, goat, gloat, moat, note, oat, tote, wroteWhat Rhymes with Float? 1) R __ N __ L D M C __ O N A __ __2) D O __ A3) M I __ __ E Y M __ U __ E4) __ __ R E K5) A __ __ Y C A D A __ __ Y6) S N __ __ P Y7) S P I __ E __ __ A N Name That Balloon Turn on the TV on Thanksgiving morning and you might catch a glimpse of the balloons in the Macy’s parade in New York City. Fill in the blanks to name some of the characters floating high above the streets as balloons. Answers: 1) Ronald McDonald, 2) Dora, 3) Mickey Mouse, 4) Shrek, 5) Abby Cadabby, 6) Snoopy, 7) Spider-Man Fact or Fiction?Marching Band Challenge Answers: 1) Fiction, banner carriers walk in front of marching bands, 2) Fiction, drum majors usually lead marching bands, 3) Fiction, the big drum is called a bass drum, 4) Fiction, tubas are one of the biggest, 5) Fiction, flutes are one of the smallest, 6) Fact, 7) Fact, 8) Fiction, violins are usually found in an orchestra not a marching band, 9) Fact, 10) Fiction, cymbals, not saxophones, are clashed together Most parades have at least one marching band, if not more. Here are some questions about marching bands. How many can you answer correctly?1) Banner carriers usually walk near the end of marching bands. Fact or Fiction? 2) Drum captains often lead marching bands. Fact or Fiction? 3) Most marching bands have a large, low-sounding drum called the trombone. Fact or Fiction? 4) One of the smallest instruments in a marching band is the tuba. Fact or Fiction? 5) One of the biggest instruments in a marching band is the flute. Fact or Fiction? 6) Some people in a marching band might play the cornet, which looks like a trumpet. Fact or Fiction? 7) In order to be heard, some French horn players might switch to a mellophone when marching. Fact or Fiction? 8) Violins are often found in marching bands. Fact or Fiction? 9) Some marching bands are accompanied by a guard. Fact or Fiction? 10) A marching band song might end with the clash of the saxophones. Fact or Fiction? North America holds some of the biggest St. Patrick’s Day celebrations in the world. The highlight of these celebrations is the parade. The first parade for St. Patrick’s Day, in fact, took place in North America in New York City on March 17, 1762, when Irish soldiers from the English army marched down the city streets. As more and more Irish moved to America, groups like the Friendly Sons of Saint Patrick came together and held their own St. Patrick’s Day parade each year. In 1848, several of these groups combined their parades into one big one-the New York City St. Patrick’s Day parade. Today the New York City St. Patrick’s Day parade is the largest in the United States. Over 150,000 people take part in the five-hour long event, and over three million people come out to see it. Irish Eyes Are Smiling Irish Eyes Are Smiling

PAGE 20

Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsCoastal StorageLow Rates / Short Term Contracts!850-509-1740 5X10’s and 10X20’s spaces for lease. Additional discount on already low rates w/contracts! BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you”LICENSED AND INSURED SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.CCC 053 88 7408-8563Residential Commercial Re-Roo“ng Repairs Since 1980 Free Estimates Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net weather weather Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Found Found Dog female-2/22, near Wakulla Gardens, black mini, has a collar, call to identify. Please call to claim. 850-545-4698 Announcements Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida. Call Advertising Networks of Florida for statewide and regional advertising. (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida classifieds. com Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Trades/ Skills Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay 2Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Trades/ Skills ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICC&L Automotive, Sopchoppy, Call Corey Crum at 850-528-5113 or Shawn Lawhan at 850-519-3443 DRIVERHometime Choices: Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF, 14/ON-7/OFF. Daily Pay. New trucks! Van and Refrigerated, CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. Top Benefits! (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers: Run 5 States Regional! Get home weekends, earn up to 39cent mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp. required. SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC 800-572-5489 X 227 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers! Earn 50-52 cpm loaded. Up to 55 cpm for O.D. loads. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. (843)266-3731 bulldoghiway.com EOE Career Opportunities Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877) 994-9904 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction ALLIED HEALTHCareer training -Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.Centura Online.com Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline .com Sporting Goods 6 FT. POOL TABLE Full rack of Balls & Two sticks $250. obo 850-212-3252 Pets Stop Scratching & Gnawing.Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch no More, Apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet.Ashley Feed & Hardware (850) 421-7703www. happyjackinc.com Mobile Homes For Sale Mobile Home for Sale2 BR 2 BASW. 938 sq. ft. Fully furnished. 100X176 lot. Panacea. $50,000. 850-984-0182. Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 3BR/2BA, Medart,big-fenced yard, very clean, front/back porches, shed. No pets or smoking. $850/month+deposit. 850-545-0126 Must see!! CrawfordvilleGeorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $875, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 443-3300 Rentals to Share CrawfordvilleRoomate to Share 3 Bed 2 Bath Home near Wakulla Libarary $350 mo. + 1/2 utilities Call Norma (850)926-5486 Vacation Rentals ALLIGATOR POINT2/Bedroom, 2/Bath 1,200 sf, Gulf Front, Vacation Rental 3 blks to white sandy beach, 75ft. to Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful Sunsets $1,000. Wk. (904)687-3397 Real Estate For Sale House for Sale2 BR, 1 BA Up 1 BR, 1 BA Down. 100X200 fenced lot. Panacea. $90,000. 850-984-0182. Commercial Real Estate Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-926-2480 WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953 www. sunsetranch es.com GENTLEMANS FARM FOR SALE stable w/bath and equipment barn on 2+/ Acres in Chatham, VA. $148,900. Agnes Dowdy & Associates Real Estate (434)851-8522 photos at www. AgnesDowdyRE.com Waterfront Grand Opening Sale! One Day Only -Sat March 10th New Log Cabin on 2+ Acres w/200+ FT DOCKABLE WF Only $74,500. Save tens of thousands on new log cabin w/dockable lake frontage on one of Alabamas premier recreational lakes. Excellent financing. Call now (866)952-5302, x151 Lots For Sale 2-Acre Lots For Sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 Self Storage Notices 5141-0308 (3/17 Sale-ABC Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 17, at 3:00 PM, at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini Warehouse containing personal property of: DESMOND JONES NELSON WOODS NORMAN BUTCH McCALLISTER Payments must be made before Thursday, March 15, by 12:00 noon.The owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or by paying in person at the warehouse location.March 1 & 8, 2012 filler space filler space 4Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $425mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker TWO YARD SALES! NO EARL Y BIRDSNO EARL Y BIRDS8AM-2PM Selling? Classified Ads For $10 A Week 877-676-1403 The Wakulla News JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Rent to on D oile ome. 0 0mont, plus deposit. 5 0250 Mobile Home for Rent Indoor Yard SalebehindComing in March!Space limited! Reserve space at Menagerie NOW! $25/for the weekend or $15/one day. Set up Friday and Saturday 8AM-4PM(we can set up for you for additional $10/per booth)Rent for a day, weekend or month, as often as you want. 3079 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY., CRAWFORDVILLE745-8381 Anthony E. Dyer Enterprises INTERIOR and EXTERIOR CLEANINGroofs, gutters, yard care and much more... Call today for an estimate!850-980-2018TONY DYER Licensed

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 7B Please Recycle 5138-0308 Vs. Shell Point Residences, LLC, Case No.:2011-31-CA. Amended Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-314-CA IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, Plaintiff, vs. SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 12, 2011, entered in Case No. 2011-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, is the Plaintiff, and SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, and all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against any defendant named herein, are the Defendants. The Wakulla County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in Wakulla County, Florida, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, April 26, 2012, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBITS AŽ AND BŽ IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THIS SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. WITNESS, my hand and the seal of this Court on February 21, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND,As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A LOTS 7, 10, AND 11, BLOCK A, AND LOTS 1 THROUGH 5, LOTS 7 THROUGH 10 AND BEACH CLUB LOT, ALL IN BLOCK B, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND ALL OF BLOCK C, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND PHASE 2 MARINA BASIN RESERVATION AREA BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19, SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA, COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 85.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 133.17 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 103.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 08 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.19 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 06 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 13 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 61.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 42.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 20.61 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 23.63 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.66 FEET, TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 902.73 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 114.91 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 51 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 114.83 FEET) TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 73.91 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 34 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 34.93 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 34.61 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 129.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 38.38 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 32.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 63.07 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 110.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 6.13 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 165.37 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.70 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 58.84 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 2.47 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 67.44 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 94.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.08 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.20 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 33.94 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 43.86 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.79 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 70.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 79.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 64 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 159.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 86.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 41.89 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 16.70 FEET, THENCE CONTINUE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID LINE. A DISTANCE OF 50.64 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 22 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 65.42 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 107.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 10.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 168.31 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 156.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 21.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 01 SECOND EAST A DISTANCE OF 47.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 19.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 40.71 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 23.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 17.23 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 52 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 101.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.26 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 86 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 74.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.59 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 54.46 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 211.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 3.12 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CANALS BEGIN AT AN IRON PIN (LB #732) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 219.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 68.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 15.75 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS FOLLOWS: THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 9.88 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 45.34 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 62.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 135.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 189.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 60.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 60.11 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 60.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 60.21 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 11 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 130.83 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 75.56 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 92.14 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 60.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 52 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 60.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 60.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 06 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECOND WEST 60.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.01 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 117.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 30.16 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 104.63 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 115.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 130.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 44 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 60.01 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 51 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 60.12 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.56 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 23.22 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 04 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 100.03 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 99.61 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREE 12 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 100.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 7.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 543.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 260.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 474.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 121.54 FEET, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 21 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 99.10 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 364.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 275.66 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AND RUN THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 125.05 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1327.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-1Ž BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1198.08 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 43.11 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1167.13 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 875.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-2Ž COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1300.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 510.98 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF UNIT NO. 1 SHELL POINT BEACH AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 24 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 524.15 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH BOUNDARY AND RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 86.02 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 540.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 22 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 209.18 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 207.88 FEET), THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 370.90 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 606.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 227.66 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 226.32 FEET) THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.08 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1113.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 54 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 126.59 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 08 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 126.52 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 79 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 233.41 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 3154.71 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 225.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 1234.99 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP #4261, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 252.34 FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF UNIT 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED. THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 701.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1501.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 34.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 1244.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 43.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL GŽ BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 117 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 491.62 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 RIGHT OF WAY) SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 922.37 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 52 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 07 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 838.76 FEET. (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 23 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 810.15 FEET), THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.13 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1179.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 03 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 29 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 69.46 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 69.45 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 561.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL BŽ BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 6 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO.6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 11.38 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 59 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 77.70 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 71.66 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 78.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 68.91 FEET, THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 30.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 8.44 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 13.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 THENCE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 357.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL CŽ COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 92.24 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 64.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 27.54 FEET TO A IRON PIN LB#732, THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 37.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 27.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 53.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 31.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 29.69 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 25.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 23.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 63.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 11.19 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 18.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 17.75 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 32 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 112.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 42 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 45.46 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 46.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 68.81 FEET, RowellAuctions.com ONLINE ONLY Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc.800-323-838810% Buyers Premium AU 479, AB 296 2% Broker Participation2 Res. Lots, Camelot Subdivision, Crawfordville, FL Res. Lot, Burnt Pine Loop, St. Marks, FLBidding Ends March 6th at 3 pm EST/2 pm CST 63 Bank Foreclosed Properties in North FLMany Selling Absolute! We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month.2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Alwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres – Available March 1 $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 203 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd 3BR/2BA MH $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets14 Windy Court 3BR/2BA Available 4/1/12 $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets26 Magnolia Ridge 3 BR/2BA with replace, above ground pool. $1125 Mo, No Smoking or PetsAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstateAdvertisement Detail WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Wakulla County Tourist Development Council PRINTING SERVICES Invitation to Bid No. 2012-06 Advertisement Begin Date: March 1, 2012 Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed responses for Printing Services addressed to the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, P. O. Box 1263, Crawfordville, FL 32327 will be received until 2:00 p.m. on March 16, 2012, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Any responses received after the time and date speci“ed will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Debbie Dubose, Purchasing Coordinator Wakulla County P. O. Box 1263 Crawfordville, FL 32326 FAX: 850.926.0940 e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at the location listed above after 8:00 a.m. on Thursday, March 1, 2012. Any person with a quali“ed disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this of“ce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Debbie Dubose, Purchasing Coordinator MARCH 1, 2012

PAGE 22

Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com THENCE NORTH 34 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 53.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 40.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 72.69 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 25.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL DŽ COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 20.04 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 35.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 125.12 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 17 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 40.23 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 43.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 24.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 29 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 40.19 FEET, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 40.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL EŽ COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 8 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 201.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 19.43 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 82.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 74.72 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 98.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 27.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 55.73 FEET, THENCE NORTH 22 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 93.65 FEET, THENCE NORTH 33 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 66.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 38 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 71.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 54.73 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 27.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 31.36 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 69.32 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 36.26 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 44 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 33.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 60.58 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 32 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 74.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 56.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 54.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 54.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 55.86 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 37.68 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 71.03 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 64.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 58.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 80 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 3.81 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 106.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 70.26 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 39 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 61.74 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 79.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 11.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 53.06 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 47.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 28 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 66.67 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 55.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 41.17 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 68.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 18.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 60.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 48.54 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 190.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL FŽ BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER (ALSO THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER) OF LOT 24 UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED, AND RUN THENCE ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 324.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 56 SECONDS EAST 220.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 8.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 8.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 95.91 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY AND RUN ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 07 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 18.42 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 26.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 29.89 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 65 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 31.85 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 37.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST 54.72 FEET, THENCE NORTH 77 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 54.99 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 47.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 56 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 31.43 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 35.33 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 22.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 75.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 65.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 65.38 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 36 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 53.31 FEET, THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 30.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 50.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 51.23 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 72.12 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 166.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXHIBIT B PERSONAL PROPERTY Shell Point Residences, LLC, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; Shell Point Investments, LLC; and Shell Point Reserve, LLC; and Shell Point 12, LLCs right, title and interest in the following described property pursuant to the Mortgage, and as such terms are defined therein: (i) all buildings, structures and improvements of every nature whatsoever now and hereafter on said Premises, (ii) all insurance policies, leases, subleases and other agreements affecting the use, enjoyment or occupancy of the Premises heretofore or hereafter entered into and all accounts, rents, revenues, issues, profits and all proceeds from the sale or other disposition of such agreements accruing and to accrue from said Premises, (iii) all gas, steam, electric, water and other heating, cooking, refrigerating, lighting, plumbing, ventilating, irrigating and power systems, machines, building materials, appliances, furniture, equipment, goods, inventory, supplies, fixtures and appurtenances and personal property of every nature whatsoever, which now or may hereafter pertain to or be used with, in or on said Premises, even though they may be detached or detachable, (iv) all easements, rights-of-way, licenses, privileges, gores of land, streets, ways, alleys, passages, sewer rights, waters, water rights, permits, development rights and powers and all estates, rights, titles and interests in any way belonging, relating or appertaining to the Premises, (v) all Accounts, Goods, Chattel Paper, Deposit Accounts, Farm Products, Instruments, Documents, General Intangibles, Inventory, Consumer Goods, Equipment, Fixtures and Investment Property, as the foregoing terms are defined in the Uniform Commercial Code, and all contract rights, franchises, books, records, plans, specifications, approvals and actions which now or hereafter relate to, are derived from or are used in connection with the Premises, or the use, operation, maintenance, occupancy or enjoyment thereof or the conduct of any business or activities thereon, (vi) all the tenements, hereditaments, appurtenances, reversions and remainders belonging or pertaining to the Premises, (vii) any and all judgments, awards, settlements, claims, demands, payments, proceeds or other income arising in connection with the Premises, (viii) any items described in those certain UCC-1 Financing Statements of even date herewith between Mortgagor and Mortgagee and (ix) any extensions, additions, increases, substitutions, replacements, parts, accessions, improvements, betterments, proceeds, products and renewals to any of the aforesaid property, whether now existing or hereafter arising, all of the foregoing being included in the term PremisesŽ, it being the intention of Mortgagor and Mortgagee that this Mortgage (which is to be filed for record in the real estate records of the county mentioned above) shall also constitute a security agreement and financing statement as to the Premises herein mortgaged under the Florida Uniform Commercial Code, and that Mortgagee have all rights and remedies of a secured party thereunder. March 1 & 8, 2012 5138-0308 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5142-0308 Vs.Jefferson, Dennis, Case No.12-54-CA, Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.12-54-CA ROBERT LYTLE Plaintiff, vs. DENNIS JEFFERSON, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HIS UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HIM; HEIRS OF PEGGYE B. JEFFERSON, KNOWN AND UNKNOWN; HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: HEIRS OF PEGGYE B. JEFFERSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Brain Teaser 1 14 17 25 36 41 44 47 63 67 70 2 20 26 56 3 27 57 4 23 37 58 5 28 42 52 21 38 48 6 15 18 29 45 53 64 68 71 7 30 49 59 8 24 39 60 22 31 43 54 9 16 19 40 50 65 69 72 10 32 46 55 11 33 51 61 12 34 62 13 35 66ACROSS1.Whimpers 6. "Survivor"network 9."Welldone!" 14."...andthereby hangs__" 15."Bali__" 16.Staffanew 17.Sodashopfreebie 18.Socialconnections 19.Cordialflavor 20.PIN 23.Have__at (try) 24.Tieupthephone 25.Tippler'sroad offense,briefly 28.Lustfulgod 31.Indicateaturn 36.CubecreatorRubik 38.Caverncomeback 40.Slug'strail 41.PIN 44."Onceupon__..." 45.Culinarydirective 46.Confined,with"up" 47.Takeumbrageat 49.Baseballgreat Slaughter 51.Cambodian's neighbor 52.Sym bolofmight 54."Bill__,The ScienceGuy" 56.PIN 63.Salof "Exodus" 64."Dubya,"asa collegian 65.PartofHUD 67.Scorpionattack 68.Keepout 69.SocialiteMesta 70. Oil magnateJ. Paul 71.Whereslopis served 72. Gottosecond base,inaway?DOWN1.BarkerandKettle 2.SingerJamesor Jones 3.BitofHalloween makeup 4.WoollyAndean 5.Whentreated,it becomessludge 6."Blondie"creator Young 7.Ruination 8.Pantywaist 9.Havingasalty taste 10.Janetof theClinton cabinet 11. Inthethickof 12.Budholder 13.1300hours 21.Kitchenutensil 22.KLM rival 25.__flask(inspiration fortheThermos) 26.Putonpaper 27.RoyorNigerof CORE 29.Newspaperman Adolph 30."OntheBeach" novelistNevil 32.Hardlyfour-star fare 33.BruceofSherlock Holmesfilms 34.Appliancebrand 35.Slowly,onascore 37."All__"(popular '30s tune) 39.ActorKenorLena 42.Winemaker's science 43.Sweden's monetaryunit 48.__kwondo 50. IHOPcondiments 53.TVbeatnik Maynard G.__ 55.Plumedwader 56.Takethebait 57."Putalid__!" 58.Tooka turn 59.Mattresssupport 60.Knee-h ightoa grasshopper 61.RiverofAragon 62.LikemostNBAers 63.Chowmein additive 66.Societypageword American Prole Hometown Content 2/5/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 12 2341 54678 1 84 7893 356 94 715 8563 28 200 9 HtCtt 647 1823 5 9 829537416 531946728 316 894572 758621943 492375861 964 713285 285469137 173258694 M A S D E W A R M S G E T T A W R I T E B I T E W A R T I N N I S O N I T L L A M A O F M E W E N T S E W A G E O E N O L O G Y C O R E R T A E C H I C O C H S K R E B S B A N E S H U T E S L A T S I S S Y O L I N T I N Y S A S K R O N A B R A C K I S H S Y R U P S R E N O G L O P E G R E T A M I D N I G E L E B R O V A S E A M A N A T A L L O N E L E N T O N E E Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.comThe meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Colleen Altenburg was recognized as Employee of the Month. Jessica Johnson and Karen Sherrod were recognized as Teachers of the Month. All were congratulated and presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. A presentation was given to Wakulla High, Wakulla Middle and Riversprings Middle by Assistant Superintendent ODonnell for obtaining the AVID National Certi“cation. All parties involved in this certi“cation process were congratulated. All board members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the agenda as amended. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the following consent items: 1. Approve the Minutes of the Meeting held on January 17, 2012. 2. Approved the following Employment of Personnel: New Hires: 12 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Cook, DrewDO/MISTech/AT02/06/12-06/30/12 Grant, RoscoeDO/ MaintenanceTrades Specialist01/24/12-06/30/12 Mays (Jones), TenayaDO/MISTech/AT02/13/12-06/30/12 9 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Jackson, Jr., NathanielWHSCustodian01/17/12-06/04/12 Brown, SherrySESCustodian02/08/12-06/04/12 Transfers: 12 Month Employee* Time Limited *Part-time NamePosition FromProgram FromPosition To Program ToTerm of Service Chipps, EmilyCustodian T.L. WMSCustodian P.T.WMS 01/18/12-06/30/12 Clemons, KatieBus Attendant Transportation SecretaryDO/Special01/24/12-06/30/12 Programs 9 Month Employee NamePosition From Program From Position ToProgram ToTerm of Service Boheler, DeniseCustodian/WHS/SESParaprofessionalSEC 12/12/11-06/04/12Food Service Miller, LaurenT.L. Remedial CESCDA … T.L.Pre-K/WEC 01/18/12-06/04/12Teacher Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Adams, MarleneRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Adkison, AlisaCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Austin, AdrienneRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Baker, LaurenRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Bartnick, KimberlyCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Bowen, MirandaCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Bryan, AmyWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Burley, AlenaRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Burnham, CassandraRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12| Burse, CindyCESA/S Remediation Teacher11/09/11-02/22/12 Butler, AmandaRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Byars, SandylWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Callaghan, MargaretRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Crawford, AlenaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Crombie, MeganRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Crouch, LoganWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) cont. NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Davis, DeanaRESParaprofessional … Time Limited12/19/11-02/13/12 Davis, LindaSESA/S Remediation Teacher02/09/12-04/12/12 Driggers, DianeRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Dykes, KellyRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Edwards, SuzanneWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Evans, BethanyWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Evans, LindsayWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Gentry, AngelaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Glisson, Ruth AnneWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Graham, LucileWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Grif“n, RhondaRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Harvey, FrankieCESA/S Remediation Teacher11/09/11-02/22/12 Hat“eld, HeatherCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Henderson, ErinCESRemedial Teacher Time Limited01/30/12-04/13/12 Hernandez, LouisRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Hume, LauraRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Hutchins, SusanWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Jump, JeriCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Langston, KristenDO/FinanceSecretary 02/22/12-06/30/12 Lassiter, SusanRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Lee, BridgettWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Madden, JohnRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Mapes, JessicaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Martin, MelissaRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 McBrayer, DavidRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Miller, DerekWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Morgan, DeborahCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Musgrove, KarrieRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Myhre, RichardWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Piland, PatriciaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Roberts, MarySESA/S Remediation Teacher02/09/12-04/12/12 Roddenberry, KatrinaRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Rozanski, JosephWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Rueth, TonyaWMSCustodian … Time Limited01/18/12-06/30/12 Sanders, KarenWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Sandgren, JoshuaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Sarvis, ChristinaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Sherrod, KarenWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Shotwell, NormaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Spivey, KatherineWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Strickland, PatriciaCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Sweatt, LaurenWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Thomas, RebeccaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Tomaini, Denny Transportation Bus Attendant … Time Limited02/01/12-05/31/12 Teuton, ChristinaCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Walker, DeidreWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Walker, VanessaRMSCustodian … Time Limited01/17/12-06/30/12 Ward, StanleyRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Weaver, NicholasRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) cont. NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Weber, JanetRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Wells, JessicaRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Wells, RobertWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 White, KrystalRES A/S Remediation Paraprofessial02/28/12-04/12/12 Young, DonnaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Supplemental Positions: NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Ewell, MoniqueWHS Head Varsity Girls Basketball Coach 2011-2012 Gorman, JamesWMS Assistant Boys Soccer Coach 2011-2012 Lawhon, Richard WHS Head JV Wrestling Coach2011-2012 Washington, MichaelWHS Assistant Girls Track Coach 2011-2012 3.Approved the following Letters of Retirement: Dora Dugger/effective February 29, 2012 Terry Price/effective May 1, 2012 and enter DROP Donald Jefferson/effective February 29, 2012 and exit DROP Charles Lawhon/effective February 1, 2012 and enter DROP. 4.Approved the following Letters of Resignation: Scott Nagy/effective January 31, 2012 Pat Vice/effective January 20, 2012 Mary Williams/effective January 17, 2012 Elena Myhre/effective January 26, 2012 5,Approved the following requests for Leave of Absence Sharon Allen/from February 15, 2012 for approx. six weeks Jennifer Monroe/effective March 26 … May 7, 2012 Phyllis Linck/effective January 9 … June 4, 2012 6.Approved Illness in the Line of Duty/FMLA. (See Supplemental File #21 7.Approved Budget Amendments #11/12 … 4 & 5. 8.Approved the Disposal of Equipment. (See Supplemental File #21) 9.Approved the January Financial Statement. 10.Approved the Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve for advertising a Request for Proposal, A Business-Community (ABC) School Program, Wakulla County Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2012-2013 Wakulla Middle School Cheerleading Constitution. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the 2012-2013 Wakulla High School Cheerleader Constitution. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve student expulsion #11/12-04. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans approve the Superintendents recommendation for student expulsion #11/12-03 to be held in abeyance until such time that the student returns to the school system if that occurs. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to award bid #11/12-06 Food and Non-Food Items. (See Supplemental File #21) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve St. Marks Powder to use a bus and driver. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the Internship and Mentor Teacher handbook revisions. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Mid-Year Report on Strategic Plan Priorities. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Class Size Reduction Compliance Plan. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Inter-Institutional Articulation Agreement between Tallahassee Community College and the Wakulla County School Board. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve School Board Policy 6.545* as advertised. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve The School Parent Connection … A Parents Guide to Wakulla County Schools for 2011-2012. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON FEBRUARY 21, 2012MARCH 1, 2012

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 – Page 9B Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Parcel AŽ 0.33 of an acre; Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 15, of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 17 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 23.67 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 926.10 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 585 Page 163 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING and said Northerly right of way line run along said Westerly boundary line South 17 degrees 33 minutes 48 seconds East 181.90 feet to a concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Westerly boundary line run along the Northerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 South 72 degrees 26 minutes 44 seconds West 79.93 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Northerly boundary line run North 17 degrees 37 minutes 26 seconds West 181.57 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line North 72 degrees 12 minutes 35 seconds East 80.12 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.33 of an acre, more or less. Parcel BŽ 0.33 of an acre; Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 15, of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 17 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 23.67 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 926.10 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 585 Page 163 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said Northerly right of way line run along said Westerly boundary line as follows: South 17 degrees 33 minutes 48 seconds East 181.90 feet; thence South 17 degrees 32 minutes 15 seconds East 181.42 feet to a re-bar marking the Southeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING continue along said Westerly boundary line South 17 degrees 43 minutes 58 seconds East 181.55 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Westerly boundary line run South 72 degrees 25 minutes 20 seconds West 80.18 feet; thence North 17 degrees 35 minutes 48 seconds West 181.48 feet to a re-bar marking the Southwest corner of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438; thence run along the Southerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 North 72 degrees 22 minutes 13 seconds East 79.74 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.33 of an acre, more or less. (hereinafter described as Parcel AŽ and Parcel BŽ the Subject PropertyŽ). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: February 23, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (seal) By: Desiree D Willis As Deputy Clerk March 1 & 8, 2012 5132-0223 Vs. Merkison, Jimmy R. 65-2011-CA-000331 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000331 DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JIMMY R. MERKISON, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION TO: KASEY MERKISON Last Known Address: 311 Trice Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIEDthat an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 73 A DISTANCE OF 33.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 66 FOOT COUNTY ROAD, RUN THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 308.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 217.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET, RUN THENCE SOUTH 72DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 311 TRICE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the 5136-0308 vs. Gibson, Tracy R. Case 2008-FC-130 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2008-FC-130 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L..P. FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. Plaintiff, vs. TRACY R. GIBSON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OFHOUSING ANDD URBAN DEVELOPMENT; STATE EMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 29th day of March, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 8 of a replat of Pelican Bay, subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 3, page 77 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 14th day of February, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later tha seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis Deputy Clerk March 1st & 8th 2012 5136-0308 5140-0308 Vs. Harris, John 65-2009-CA-000181 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000181 DIVISION JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JOHN HARRIS AKA JOHN H. HARRIS. JR., et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 21, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000181 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., is the Plaintiff and JOHN HARRIS AKA JOHN H. HARRIS, JR.; EVELYN BROWN; JANICE W. HARRIS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the29th day of March, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: AT THE NORTHWEST COMMENCE CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 72 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 963.89 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 71 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY 124.00 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDSEAST 122.68 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. B-368, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONVEYS TO THE SOUTHERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1687.02 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 04 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 133.04 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 86 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 133.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, 71.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 330 LOWER BRIDGE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 22, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. March 1 & 8, 2012 5140-0308 F09048347 5143-0308 Vs. McVey, Vonda M. Case# 2011-CA-35 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., Case Number: 2011-CA-35 Plaintiff, vs. VONDA M. MCVEY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VONDA M. MCVEY; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, UENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of foreclosure dated February 8, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA-35 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, Brent X. Thurmond as the Clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at public sale at the courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Wakulla County in Crawfordville, Florida with the sale commencing at 11:00AM on the 15th day of March 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: Legal Description: Lots 11, 12, and 13, Block 33, PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 5, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. To include a: 2007 CMHM Vin WHC016110GAA #0099539611 2007 CMHM Vin WHC016110GAB #0099539268 Address: Joe Mack Smith Road, Panacea, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of February, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk March 1st and 8th, 2012 5143-0308 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5134-0301 Linton, John S.,12-12-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO:12-12-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN S. LINTON, DECEASED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOHN S. LINTON, deceased, whose date of death was February 4, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division under probate file #12-12-CP, the address of which is Courthouse Square, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is requires to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is February 23, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Nancy G. Linton 6081 Pisgah Church Road Tallahassee, Florida 32309 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ by T. Buckingham Bird, Esq. P.O. Box 247, Monticello, Florida 32345 (850)997-3503 February 23 & March 1, 2012 5134-0301 W akulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 14 day of February, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the ADA Coordinator, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone (850)926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770(Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850)926-0905; Fax: (850)926-0901. February 23 and March 1, 2012 GC-11-84561 5132-0223 filler space WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 24 … The Senate this week passed a budget for the coming year … but some of its members were focused on another year in the future as those who want to be Senate president down the road intensi“ ed their maneuvering in the face of an increasingly apparent challenge to the chambers conservative ruling class. The Senate has long been a place where the incharge Republican Party has been fractured, with splits between social moderates and conservatives, “ scally conservative members and those less antagonistic to government services, and populists versus the big business wing. That schism has been in the open as much as ever … if not more in the now almost two years that Senate President Mike Haridopolos has led the Senate. Its a murky split … with those opposed to the faction led by Haridopolos a shifting and motley group. Some are more populist, some are more moderate, and some are simply independentminded and seem to be most interested in preserving a Senate that doesnt blindly follow a leader. Put all those together in a coalition, and throw in a few surprises in the November election, and the possibility has emerged that a real challenge could be mounted to the status quo when it comes to the generally presumed line of succession to the Senate throne. The Senate presidency over the next several years has generally been thought to be preordained by the leaders of the chamber. When Haridopolos leaves of“ ce in November, the gavel will be handed to Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville. That much is nearly certain. After that, the general expectation has been that Haridopolos-Gaetz ally Sen. Andy Gardiner, currently a member of the leadership team as majority leader, will take over. Then would come other members of the leadership team, maybe Sen. John Thrasher and Sen. Joe Negron, both conservative, business-backed Republicans loyal to the current leadership. But something has been bubbling up in the last couple years that may threaten that. A soft coalition of Republican senators who have disagreements with the Haridopolos group has increasingly been thwarting the leaderships agenda. During the last day of session last year, there was a near mutiny over what was in several budget bills. This year, there was the prison privatization “ asco, in which leadership lost in a ” oor vote on one of its top priorities, privatizing a large number of prisons. Then there was the University of South Florida “ ght … in which some Republican senators fought with Budget Chairman and Haridopolos ally JD Alexander over the USF budget and the future of a USF branch campus that is going to break off. There have been other little “ ghts … an ethics bill pushed by Thrasher went down, for example. A leadership move to consolidate expressway authorities was softened. Deeply involved in many of the challenges to the authority of Haridopolos et al has been the veteran newcomer Sen. Jack Latvala. The moderate Republican from St. Petersburg was in the Senate for a long time, and then left before returning again. Latvala was a leader of the fight against prison privatization, and this week emerged as a serious challenger to Gardiner for the presidency of the Senate in 2014. This week there were lots of rumors floating around the Senate that the Haridopolos-Thrasher conservative wing of the party was looking to replace Gardiner in the line of succession because of the fear that Gardiner wouldnt be able to hold off a challenge from Latvala. By Thursday night Gardiner was claiming victory in the race for the 2014 presidency, though Thrasher was openly questioning whether that would be so. Thrasher, who like Latvala has been around the Capitol seemingly forever as a member who left the Legislature and later returned, sure sounded like a Gardiner opponent. I dont think anybody has pledges until the day they get designated,Ž Thrasher said. MEANWHILE, THERES A BUDGET TO WRITE For some in the Senate, the wrangling over its future leadership was a sideshow to a more pressing issue: the session only has a couple weeks left and theres a budget to write for the more immediate future. The session is early this year because of redistricting, so theres plenty of time before the start of the “ scal year. But it is an election year, and lawmakers who have to run in new districts would like to get to it, not be here in May putting the “ nishing touches on a budget. So the Senate passed its budget this week, which was probably the other big news. A couple of issues dominated the debate … the aforementioned “ ght over the University of South Floridas budget got by far the most attention. With Alexander putting a hold on some money for the university earlier, and then backing off, it was an interesting drama that overshadowed an otherwise pretty good story: the Senate managed to cobble together a balanced budget when theres a tax-revenue shortfall, didnt raise taxes, increased education spending by more than $1 billion and didnt have massive protests a t the Capitol over the cuts that have been suggested. Still, even with the budget passing this week in the Senate, it doesnt match up with the House yet, and the hard work is just beginning. STEINBERG QUITS Rep. Richard Steinberg stepped down on Friday after admitting hed sent repeated text messages anonymously to a married Miami prosecutor who didnt want them. The prosecutor Marlene FernandezKaravetsos, asked whoever kept sending her the inappropriate messages to identify himself and to stop sending them … Steinberg didnt. While she couldnt “ gure out who they were coming from, the U.S. Secret Service had no problem and by midweek Steinberg was facing a looming story in the Miami Herald about the investigation. He confessed to the paper that hed sent the messages and said he was sorry. On Friday, Steinberg, who wasnt in Tallahassee for the second half of the week, apologized again and then resigned. The Democrat from Miami Beach likely will be replaced in a special election. BONDI JOINS LAWSUIT OVER CONTRACEPTIVES Just as the row over the federal rule requiring coverage of contraceptives seemed to subside a bit late this week, Florida got into the issue. Attorney General Pam Bondi on Thursday announced she was joining six other state attorneys general in a lawsuit against the federal decision to require religious employers to offer health insurance that covers contraceptives and other services that violate the tenets of the employers af“ liated religion. Government has no business forcing religious institutions and individuals to violate their sincerely held beliefs,Ž Bondi said in a statement. This lawsuit is about protecting religious liberty and the rights of conscience, our most basic freedoms as Americans.Ž Bondi joined attorneys general from Nebraska, Michigan, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Texas in the lawsuit. Other plaintiffs include a Catholic high school, social services agencies and a nun, among others. URINE TROUBLE NOW State agencies may be able to soon drug test workers after all. The governor ordered drug testing of state employees last year in an executive order, but it was blocked by the courts for most workers. But Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-Inverness, has taken up the cause, pushing a bill (HB 1205) that would allow agencies, though not require them, to set up random drug testing plans for employees. The bill looks like it is on its way to passage, headed to the House ” oor after a vote this week in the State Affairs Committee. Civil liberties groups say it, too, will be found unconstitutional, and that theres no evidence state workers are more likely to use drugs than anyone else. Backers say its just like in the private sector: if they know they might be tested they wont use drugs. STORY OF THE WEEK: Weve seen the future and it is here: the 2012-13 budget was passed by the Senate setting up a conference with the House, while the 2014 Senate presidency contest got murky. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Im not going anywhere,Ž Sen. Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, about his plans to be the Senate president in 2014. Or possibly referring to the prospects for his campaign?Senate leadership battle: e future is now

PAGE 24

Special to The News The growth of two-income families and increasing levels of job stress are two of the most significant work trends affecting American businesses and families in recent years. Having just one stressedout spouse can harm couples work and home lives „ but what about when its both? A new study conducted by Wayne Hochwarter, the Jim Moran Professor of Business Administration in the Florida State University College of Business, examines the role of support in households where daily stress is common to both spouses. Given that a lack of support from ones spouse represents a major cause of both divorce and career derailment, this research is needed to address issues that affect both home and work,Ž Hochwarter said. More than 400 working couples, in both blueand white-collar occupations, participated in Hochwarters research. Those who reported high levels of stress but strong spousal support „ as compared to stressed-out employees without such support „ experienced the following positive bene“ ts: € 50 percent higher rates of satisfaction with their marriage; € 33 percent greater likelihood of having positive relationships with co-workers; € 30 percent lower likelihood of experiencing guilt associated with home/family neglect; € 30 percent lower likelihood of being critical of others (spouse, children) at home; € 25 percent higher rates of concentration levels at work; € 25 percent lower likelihood of experiencing fatigue at home after work; € 25 percent higher rates of satisfaction with the amount of time spent with their children; € 20 percent higher views that their careers were heading in the right direction; and € 20 percent higher level of job satisfaction. The number of employees who returned to the workplace even more agitated because they were unable to generate coping support at home is particularly distressing to Hochwarter. Further, Hochwarter identi“ ed key factors distinguishing favorable from unfavorable support. Some attempts to support your stressed-out spouse can back“ re, actually making the situation much worse,Ž he said. Support that had a deep and far-reaching impact had several common characteristics, which included: € Awareness of ones spouses daily work demands (i.e., time pressures, lack of resources, deadlines, and supervisors). € Not forcing support.Ž € Understanding that communication lines are open regardless of the circumstances. € Recognizing that distancing oneself from the family or lashing out is not a practical way to foster help. In fact, it tends to bring out the worst in others „ and even causes the supporting spouse to become distant and act out as well. € Being able to bring ones spouse back to the middle „ to bring up when down in the dumps, and to calm down when overly agitated. € Not bombarding the family with complaints about minor workplace irritants. € Not trying to one-upŽ ones spouse in terms of who has had the worse day. € Not being complacent „ continuing to work at it. € Remaining rational and not automatically casting the spouse as the bad guy.Ž € Not keeping a running tab on who is giving and who is getting. Most important, though, was the ability for a spouse to offer support on days when he or she needs it just as much,Ž Hochwarter said. According to one 47year-old sales manager interviewed for the study, I had a horrible day, and all I wanted was a homecooked meal and some time to myself. Instead, I took my wife out to dinner and heard everything about her bad boss and how her co-workers werent pulling their weight. By the end of the evening, we both felt at least a little bit better.Ž Hochwarter also noted that the men and women differed by gender in terms of what support behaviors worked best for them. In general, wives appreciated getting cut some slackŽ in terms of household activities; feeling wanted; and receiving expressions of warmth and affection. The husbands, meanwhile, were more likely to respond positively to offers of assistance with errands and feeling appreciated and needed. Both husbands and wives, however, were especially grateful for their spouses help in getting time away from work and home hassles to simply rest and recharge their batteries. Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comIn sickness and in health: FSU study shows importance of supportive spouses for coping with work-related stress METRO GRAPHICS



PAGE 1

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIn speaking with John Shuff, who is seeking a seat on the Wakulla County Commission in district 5, it becomes quite clear his main focus is bringing jobs to the county. Theres nothing more important than getting people to work, Shuff said. Shuff said he would like to look at building, planning and landscaping regulations that are currently in place and see if they need updating. Nothing when passed by a committee will be perfect, Shuff said. After some time has passed, the regulations need to be re-evaluated, Shuff said. Shuff said he will curtail regulations that inhibit sustainable economic opportunities, jobs and commerce. He wants to grow commerce and spur economic development. That strengthens families, which in turn, strengthens the community, Shuff said. He said he was against impact fees and didnt feel they were fair. Shuff is a strong proponent of the Our Town plan or what is now being referred to as Wakulla 2020, which was created out of the Crawfordville Town Plan and is an initiative that has been led by the Chamber and a volunteer citizens group, along with the county commission. Shuff has been involved in the Chamber for 12 years and is the past president. The idea is to improve Highway 319, as well as other roadways in the county. To pay for these projects, a half-cent tax referendum has been suggested. Shuff said the main project of the plan is to fourlane 319, which the state has been promising for years. When projections were released recently, the county was told it would be another 20 years. Like most of us, I remember in the s when we were told well get it in 15 years, Shuff said. Wakulla County does not have the transportation infrastructure, such as a fourlane highway or railroad, to bring in large companies like a distribution center, Shuff said. Shuff said if the corridor is improved, it will make it more attractive and hopefully entice businesses to open in Wakulla County. Wakulla County is a bedroom community, with 60 percent of residents going to Tallahassee for work, Shuff said, and people also go to Tallahassee to shop. We use Wakulla County services, but we leave our tax dollars in Leon County, Shuff said. If Highway 319 can be fixed and improved and shopping choices can be created, then tax dollars will be spent where the services are being utilized, Shuff said. Shuff also feels eco-tourism and tourism development are big issues for the county. Thats going to be our future, Shuff said of ecotourism. Shuff said Wakulla County has some of the best shing, the largest spring in the world, three outstanding Florida waterways, a national forest, national wildlife refuge and state forest. A way to facilitate the sustainable use of all these resources to ensue economic opportunities and job growth needs to be gured out, he said. The key word is sustainable, Shuff said. He added that if infrastructure is improved, which ties into Wakulla 2020, it will help visitors as well. Shuff said he feels the county needs a little more access to the water, as well. He is also interested in the debate about allowing recreational cave diving at Wakulla Springs and said he thinks if it is well regulated, it could be bene cial to the county. Another issue Shuff feels is important is having a balanced county budget. Thats what got us in trouble, Shuff said. Shuff said there needs to be ef ciency in the government and an annual strengthening of the rainy day fund.Continued on Page 12A WakullaStory: A Hankerin for a HeadhuntinPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A Comment & Opinion .......................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6BINDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 9th Issue Thursday, March 1, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read DailyThe WakullanewsOBITUARIES Michael David Carter Martha Hackworth Louis Edward Herouart By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsIn celebration of both founders and Womens History month, the Wakulla County Historical Society along with the Palaver Tree Theater Company present the next installment of WakullaStory: A Hankerin for Headhuntin the stylized reading presentation is based on the writings of the late Elizabeth Fisher Smith (1920-1977), creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly, a magazine of news, features and history about Wakulla County. Smith, a Pennsylvania native, arrived in Wakulla in 1953. She was a schoolteacher. She married local pharmacist, Harold Smith, and they had four children: three girls and one boy. Their eldest daughter, Betsy Smith, remembers many days in her fathers store: My dad was a one-man show, Betsy Smith recalls, He lled prescriptions, took care of customers, scooped ice cream all of it. When there was no business, hed sit next door drinking coffee, but watching his door for customers coming in. All of us kids at some point in our lives waited on customers. That was our job after school, during the summer. How exactly did Mr. and Mrs. Smith meet? Well, as my mother tells it, remembers Betsy, shed heard there was this handsome pharmacist her age in town. So she goes into his store and asks him for something she didnt think hed have like paregoric and, lo and behold, he had it. I think she did it on a dare with some other single gal in town who was interested in him also. My mother wasnt shy. Continued on Page 12ABoard may revise septic tank policyBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Commission is looking at revising its current septic tank requirements so that the rules are not the same across the board. In 2006, the commission amended the infrastructure element of its comprehensive plan to include policies that required the county-wide use of performance-based septic tanks for all new developments and for replacement and repairs of existing systems. The original intent was to protect Wakulla Springs and other open water bodies from pollution. Commissioner Randy Merritt brought the idea forward to modify the policies and requirements. In the past, he has said that not all areas within the county are the same and do not require the same restrictions. I think weve set this too high and its not going to cause any benefit, Merritt said. Studies have been completed on the impacts of nitrogen reducing systems to Wakulla Countys springs and water bodies since the policies were amended in 2006 and Merritt wanted to incorporate the new study into the revisions. Merritt worked alongside county staff, County Health Department Director Pad Juarez and County Attorney Heather Encinosa to draft a text amendment to the infrastructure policies. In the draft, the septic tank requirements would be removed from the Comprehensive Plan and would be addressed in the Land Development Code. These include the specific areas where the performancebased septic tanks would be required, the standards for treatment and the criteria for the replacement and modification of existing systems.Continued on Page 12A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA proposed contract to save energy that costs nearly $700,000 over four years was unanimously approved by the Wakulla County School Board. In fact, the presentation was so convincing that a citizen who began the meeting speaking out against the contract as a waste, changed her mind and announced she was for it. The school board approved the contract with Energy Education at a special meeting on Thursday, Feb. 23. The company guarantees energy cost savings, or it makes up the difference between its contract price and the utility costs. Continued on Page 8AJohn Shu announces his candidacy for county commission $700K contract to save energy costs approved by school board is years installment in the community play tells of happenings from 1963-65 as told by Elizabeth Fisher Smith, author of the Magnolia Monthly.COURTESY OF JENN Y DRUDAWAKULLA PUBLIC LIBRAR Y = ARCHIVESCommissioners weigh requiring performance-based septic systems only in sensitive areas of the county; the high cost of systems is cited as a concern JENNIFER JENSENJohn Shuff, a candidate in District 5Marshane Godbolt named All Big Bend Defensive Player of the Year Head Coach Scott Klees named Big Bend Coach of the YearSPORTS, 9A SWINE SHOWPage 14A

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comTCC signs lease with Centennial BankSpecial to The NewsTallahassee Community College will soon expand its services in Wakulla County due in large part to a lease agreement with Centennial Bank. TCC assumes approximately 10,000 square feet of the existing bank structure that currently houses Centennial Banks Crawfordville branch. TCCs first Wakulla County-based service center opened in January 2006. Through programs such as the Ecotourism Institute and the Green Guide Certi- cation Program, the facility has served hundreds of residents in Wakulla County and the neighboring coastal region. With growth and a need for expansion of services, however, came the need for additional space the current facility is 3,835 square feet. We are excited about the opportunities that lie ahead for the residents of Wakulla County, said TCC President Jim Murdaugh. The decision made by the Board and Centennial Bank gives the college many avenues to explore as we seek to expand our education offerings in Wakulla County and the surrounding areas. The new TCC Wakulla Center will expand the colleges workforce offerings to help train more citizen for in-demand jobs. It will also offer a limited number of basic for credit classes in order to help Wakulla County residents begin their education path with TCC. The TCC Wakulla Center will provide access to a full array of student services, including admissions, advising, financial aid and testing, as well as services to the Colleges Learning Commons, which may be facilitated online or by appointment. TCC also anticipates expanding its environmental institute classes at the Center. We are excited about our partnership with Tallahassee Community College, said Tracy French, Centennial Bank Regional President. Centennial Bank is a strong supporter of education, and we value the opportunities that education offers. We are thrilled to be a part of this win-win joint venture for our community and are looking forward to the rst classes being offered, French said. The ve-year agreement ends January 31, 2017, at which time both sides can choose to renew the lease. The new TCC Wakulla Center, located at 2932 Crawfordville Highway, is scheduled for a late 2012 opening, possibly in time for the fall semester. Until the new facility is open, TCC will continue to offer a number of workforce programs in ecotourism, allied health and manufacturing at the existing Wakulla Center.Staff ReportGulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea recently unveiled its latest project, a touch tank trailer. On Feb. 15, it made its rst of cial school visit to Crawfordville Elementary and the following weekend it made its rst festival appearance. Following these two events, it became clear that the trailer still had some kinks that needed to be worked out. Co-founder of Gulf Specimen, Jack Rudloe, said they are seeking donations to try and improve the trailer so the can continue with their idea of bringing the marine life to the public, instead of them having to visit the lab. Rudloe said they need to upgrade the aquarium and life support system. At this time, Rudloe is unsure how much the improvements might cost, but is seeking assistance from engineers to help determine what is needed. For those who wish to contribute to the project call Gulf Specimen at 9845297 or email Rudloe at jrudloe@earthlink.net. WAKULLA NEWSTCC Wakulla will occupy the newer part of the Centennial Bank building.Gulf Specimen seeks donations to x touch tank trailerSPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe touch tank trailer was recently unveiled by Gulf Specimen as a way to take the labs exhibits to students. FOLLOW-UP TO LAST WEEKS STORY:TCC Wakulla will take over the back part of the bank building, some 10,000 square feet, and anticipates having the facility open in late 2012. Also announced: TCC Wakulla will o er a limited number of for credit classes at the new facility Lock in 2 yearsofsavings. CALL NOW!Lock in oneyear of savingsand get our best offers oneverypackage.twoyears *BILL CREDIT/PROGRAMMINGOFFER: IF BY THE END OF PROMOTIONAL PRICE PERIOD(S)CUSTOMERDOES NOT CONTACT DIRECTV TO CHANGESERVICETHE NALLSERVICESWILL AUTOMATICALLY CONTINUE AT THE THEN-PREVAILING RATES. Free SHOWTIME for three months, a value of $38.97. Free HBO, STARZ,SHOWTIMEandCinemax for three months, a value of $135.LIMITONE PROGRAMMINGOFFER PER ACCOUNT. Featured package namesandprices: ENTERTAINMENT $54.99/mo.;CHOICE $63.99/mo.;CHOICE XTRA $68.99/mo. Pricesinclude the following bill credits for 12 monthsafter rebate: $20 for ENTERTAINMENT, $24 for CHOICEandCHOICEXTRA;plusana dditional$5withonline rebate andconsenttoemailalerts.Inmonths 13-24, bill creditwillbe $10/mo. Eligibility basedonZIP code. Upo nDIRECTV Systemactivation,customerwill receive rebate redemptioninstructions (includedincustomers rstDIRECTV bill, a separate mailing, or, in thestate of New York, from retailer) and must comply with the terms of the instructions. In order to receive $25 monthly credits fortheENTERTAI NMENT Package ($29 forCHOICEandCHOICEXTRA)inthe rst 12months,customermust submit rebate online (validemailaddress required) an dconsent to emailalerts priorto rebate redemption. Rebatebeginsuptoeight weeks after receiptof rebate submission onlineor by phone. Duration of promotional price variesbased on r edemption date.$10CREDIT OFFER: Customers activating and maintainingtheENTERTAINMENTPackage or above alongwith an HD Receiveror HD DVR and enrollment in Auto B ill Pay will receive an additional $10 bill creditfor 24 months. Account must be in good standing as determined by DIRECTV in its sole discretion to remain eligible for all offers. **24-MO. LEASE AGREEMENT: EARLY CANCELLATIONWILLRESULT IN A FEE OF $20/MONTH FOR EACH REMAININGMONTH. Must maintain 24 consecutive monthsof your DIRECTV programmingpackage. Advanced Receiver-DVR fee($8/mo.) required for DVRlease. Advanced Receiver-HD fee($10/mo.) required forHD Receiverlease. Advanced Receiver fee($20/mo.) required for HD DVRandTiVo HD D VR from DIRECTV lease.TiVo service fee($5/mo.) required for TiVo HD DVR from DIRECTV lease. If you have two boxes or one box andan enabled TV, anadditional $6/mo. fee applies. For each additional box and/or enabled TV on youra ccount you are chargedanadditional feeof$6/mo.per box and/orenabled TV. NON-ACTIVATIONCHARGEOF $150PERRECEIVER MAY APPLY. ALL EQUIPMENT IS LEASEDANDMUST BERETURNED TO DIRECTV UPON CANCELLATION,ORUNRE TURNEDEQUIPMENT FEESAPPLY. VISITdirectv.com ORCALL 1-800-DIRECTV FORDETAILS. Advanced receiver instant rebate requires activation of the ENTERTAINMENT Package orabove; OPTIMO MSorabove (for DVR Receiver, MS LATINO);Jadeworld;oranyquali fyinginternationalservicebundle,whichshallincludethePREFERREDCHOICE programmingpackage (valuedat$41.99/mo.).Second,third and fourthHD Receiver offer requires activationofthe ENTERTAINMENT Package or above or MS ULTRA Package orabove andHD DVR asthe rst free receiver upgrade.Home Media Center HD DVR andadditionaladvanced receiver upgradesavailable for a charge. INSTALLATION: Standard professionalinstallationin up to fourrooms only. Custominstallationextra. DIRECTV CINEMA/ON DEMAND: Accessto available DIRECTV OnDemand programmingisbased on package selection. Actualnumberof TV shows and movieswill vary. Addit ional feesapply fornew releases.SomeDIRECTV CINEMAandOnDemandcontent requiresanHD DVR(HR20orlater)or DVR(R22orlater),DIRECTV CI NEMAConnectionKitand broadbandInternetservicewith speeds of750kbpsorhigherand a network routerwithan available Ethernetport are required. Visitdirectv.com/cinema fordetails. To access DIRECTV HD programming, HD equipment required. Number of HD channels based on package selection.Customersatisfaction ratingsbasedon2011AmericanCustomerSatisfactionIndex.Localchannelseligibilitybasedon serviceaddress. Notallnetworks availableina llmarkets. Programming,pricing,termsandconditionssubjecttochange atanytime.Pricing residential. Taxes notincluded. ReceiptofDIR ECTV programmingsubjecttoDIRECTV Customer Agreement; copy provided at directv. com/legal and inorderconrmation. DIRECTV.DIRECTV and the Cyclone Design logo,DIRECTV CINEMA, CHOICE and CHOICE XTRA are trademarks of DIRECTV, LLC. All other trademarks and service marks are the property of their respective owners.AllDIRECTVoffers require 24-month agreement.** The CHOICE XTRA PackageFOR12 MONTHS AfterRebate99/MO*39$MORE CHANNELS,MOVIES AND SPORTS. OVER205Digital Channels 4FREEUPGRADES HDDVR and up to 3 HDReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select models only. DIRECTVONDEMAND 7,000Showsand Movies HD Included PLUS, FREE FOR 3 MONTHS SAVESAVE $39/mo.in 1st year! AND $20/mo.in 2nd year! Includes $10/mo. with HDequipment and Auto Bill Pay. The CHOICE PackageFOR 12 MONTHS After Rebate99/MO*34$THE TV PACKAGE THAT BEATS CABLE. OVER150Digital Channels 4FREEUPGRADES HD DVR and upto3 HD ReceiversAdditional & Advanced Receiver fees apply. Select modelsonly. DIRECTVONDEMAND 6,000 Shows and Movies HD Included PLUS, FREE FOR 3 MONTHS SAVESAVE $39/mo.in 1st year! AND $20/mo.in 2nd year! Includes $10/mo. with HDequipment and Auto Bill Pay. The ENTERTAINMENT P ackageFOR 12 MONTHS AfterRebate99/MO*29$OUR BESTVALUE PACKAGE. OVER140Digital Channels 4 FREEUPGRADES HD DVRand up to 3 HD ReceiversAdditional& AdvancedReceiver fees apply. Select models only. HD Included DIRECTV ON DEMAND 4,000 Shows andMovies PLUS, FREE FOR 3 MONTHS SAVESAVE $35/mo. in 1st year! AND $20/mo. in 2nd year! Includes $10/mo.with HDequipment and Auto Bill Pay. FREEProfessionalInstallation. #1inCustomerSatisfactionOverAll CableandSatelliteTV Providers. Among the largest national cable & satellite TV providers. NOEquipment toBuy.NOStart-Up Costs. 99%Worry-FreeSignalReliability. Based on a Nationwide Study of representative cities. LocalChannelsIncluded inover 97%of theU.S.With every package you get: PLUS Offers end 3/14/12. Credit card required (except in MA & PA). New approved customers only (lease required). $19.95 Handling & Delivery fee may apply. Applicable use tax adjustment may apply on the retail value of the installation. Programming/pricing may vary in certain markets. Authorized DIRECTV Dealer850-926-DISHTHE SIGHTS AND SOUND CO. ANTIQUES CARRIESCOVEC ARRIESC OVENEW ARRIVALS926-50133338 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. Waterford Crystal and Bath & Bed Linens (850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.comLubeXpert.usFull Service OILCHANGEVacuuming Included$ 6.00OFF$ 10.00OFFExp. 3/31/2012 2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Across from Beefs TO 55678F OR INSTANT SAVINGSTEXTLUBEEXTRANSMISSIONFLUID CHANGE

PAGE 3

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe decision to move forward with a plan to pay for four-laning Highway 319 could end up in the hands of the voters. The Wakulla County Commission approved an item at its Feb. 21 meeting to have County Attorney Heather Encinosa bring back language for placing an item on the November ballot. If approved, the county would place a half-cent tax referendum on the ballot and allow the voters to decide if they support the Our Town Plan, or what is now being referred to as Wakulla 2020. The Chamber of Commerce, along with other organizations and community leaders, has been working to nd ways to implement the Crawfordville Town Plan, which included four-laning Highway 319 and expanding intersections within Crawfordville to improve traf c ow. The cost of the project is estimated at $7 million, according to project engineer with Preble-Rish, Alan Wise. John Shuff, past president of the Chamber, said they have estimated that the half-cent sales tax would bring in $1.7 million over the next 15 years and with a bonding stream and debt service estimate, their total estimate is $14 million. Shuff said there is also the hope that the group would seek out grants to get additional funding. If approved, the money generated could only be used on road and bridge improvements. Commissioner Mike Stewart said the Department of Transportation has always asked what the local government could put towards road projects and the county has never had the ability to offer any money. Stewart said Wakulla 2020 would allow the county to approach DOT with projects and a portion of the cost associated with those projects, which would move them along much faster. Along with approving to draft ballot language for this referendum, the commission also voted to create a Wakulla 2020 committee which would prioritize projects. That list would then be taken to the voters. The model for the committee was designed from BluePrint 2000, which was the initiative done in Tallahassee and Leon County. Shuff said their committee had 30 to 35 people, but since they are a much smaller county, they wanted to keep the committee on the smaller side. The commission approved the creation of the advisory committee. There was some concern expressed about the closeness of this referendum and the one-cent sales tax extension vote. The one-cent sales tax ends in 2017 and the county was prepared to have the extension be presented to voters in 2014. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the half-cent tax might affect the approval of the one-cent sales tax which goes to roads, parks and recreation, public safety and public facilities. Commissioner Alan Brock said, I have con dence in the voters. The commission also agreed to create an interlocal authority which would have the authority to spend the money.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netRepresentatives from Hinkle and Foran were at the Feb. 21 Wakulla County Commission meeting to give an update on the countys oil spill claim. John Dailey, president of JDA Strategies, a public policy research and development consulting rm, said they are currently gathering data from Wakulla County to determine the projected revenue. Dailey said the preliminary estimates are $300,000, which he said were conservative. This case is being referred to as the largest civil case in history, he said. They are still waiting on data from the state parks. They also intend to see if there was an impact on ad valorem. The trial for establishing blame was to begin on Feb. 27, but it was postponed. The judge in the case gave more time for settlement talks and the trial was set to begin on March 5. According to Dailey, the second trial for damages and why it took so long for the well to be capped, will take place in July. It was determined that it was better to wait until at least after the rst trial to enter into negotiations, Dailey said. We feel well be in a better position, Dailey said. The attorneys fees are 20 percent and the thousands of clients who are being represented will share the costs of the other expenses, including economists, Dailey said. Attorney Lisa Foran ensured the county commission that their responsibility would not exceed their gross recovery amount. As of Feb. 17, 932 claims have been awarded totaling $17.4 million in Wakulla County. In other news: The commission chose to change the income level for those who would qualify for hardship assistance for the solid waste and re assessments. Previously, the level was set at very low income. A family of four needed to make less than $29,900 to be exempt. According to the county, 411 households quali ed for solid waste assistance for a total of $80,556. The commission decided to set the level at extremely low. This would mean a family of four that makes less than $17,950 would be exempt. We all want to be compassionate to those least fortunate among us, said Commissioner Randy Merritt. He said his main concern is the senior citizens. Commissioner Mike Stewart pointed out that people had a short amount of time to apply for assistance this time around and said he felt the number would increase next time. All commissioners also expressed making sure the word gets out about the assistance program. The commission voted unanimously to lower the income level. The county commission approved allowing Fire Chief Michael Morgan to apply for a federal Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response Grant which would be used for the retaining and recruiting volunteer re ghters. Morgan said there is no match and it would provide four years of funding. They would look at using the funds for incentives, attraction of new volunteers and improvement of training facilities. The grant award will be announced no later than Sept. 30. Commissioner Randy Merritt brought forth an item to revise the land development code related to temporary uses. This item dealt speci cally with food trailers. Currently, temporary uses are allowed, but the length of time is restricted to 30 days. Merritt wanted to revise regulations to allow food trailers the ability to stay for up to a year and renew the temporary use permit annually. I want to get these guys out of limbo, Merritt said. He added that he didnt want to open Pandoras box and said it should probably be limited to food type trailers only. The commission voted unanimously to advertise for a public hearing to consider adopting the revisions. The next county commission meeting is set for March 5 at 5 p.m. There will be an attorney client session at 4 p.m. in the matter of Voyles vs. Wakulla County.COUNTY COMMISSIONCountys damages from BP oil spill could be $300,000Wakulla 2020 plan is moving forward Whats proposed is a half-cent sales tax to fund improvements to U.S. Highway 319. e matter is planned to go before voters in November The countys oil spill claim is being researched prior to the lawsuit getting underway to determine whos responsible for the disaster As of Feb. 17, 932 claims for oil spill damages have been awarded totaling $17.4 million in Wakulla County. 000AFUI PUBLIC HEARINGThe City of St. Marks will hold a Public Hearing Community Redeveloping Area BoardThe City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Ofce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.MARCH 1, 2012 Date:March 8, 2012 Time:6:50 pm Place:788 Port Leon DriveNOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING MARCH 1, 2012 JOB ANNOUNCEMENTSTOLENAFRICAN GREYGRAY W/RED TAIL runny nose on right nostril, currently on treatment. Help us nd it! If seen, please call: EVA NELSON 766-9012 DET. SCOTT POWELL 926-7171REWARD OFFERED!!

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Wayne Martin, Country Gold to perform at Sopchoppy Opry Meet the creature: Gulf Specimen takes its touch tanks on the road Week in Wakulla: Feb. 16-23 Tornado watch in effect Friday afternoon until 8 p.m. Believing in our self, column by Rita Haney Coast Guard Auxiliary for Feb. 23 From the Dock for Feb. 23thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE: anks for helping save the dogsEditor, The News: Recently four AKC German Shepherd dogs were brought to me as rescues. I already had ve dogs and could not keep the others. A hard choice had to be made to thin down the pack. My neighbor had already reported me to county Animal Control. Fortunately, the Leon County Humane Society took gentle Bella into their foster program. She will go to their Pet Smart Adoption Booth to get a new home. Unfortunately, the other three were not good candidates for adoption, old, abused and hyper. Not knowing what else to do, it was decided to ET them, a terrible choice. When I went to Animal Control, Ivanhoe Carroll was so kind and very understanding. And what a miracle, Bonnie Brinson was also there and she said she could place the dogs so they would not have to be killed. Bonnie got the old one into a GS rescue. The hyper one went to a new single person, no other pet in the home, and is so happy to have all of the attention. Then Bonnie contacted Ann English of the Tallahassee Animal Service Center, who will be coming down every day for one week to work with the aggressive abused dog to hopefully be able to place him. Thank you all so much for helping save the dogs. Kathryn Wilson CrawfordvilleFriends Furr Life pet food drive is going onEditor, The News: As a volunteer for the Leon County Humane Society, I wanted the people of Wakulla County to know that there is an annual Senior Citizen Pet Food Drive, Friends Furr Life, for their companion animals. Every year for the past five years, pet food and pet supplies have been collected and then distributed to seniors in our county. This year, donations may be dropped off at Crawfordville Animal Hospital, on U.S. Highway 319 across from the Lion at Azalea Park, or at Ashley Feed Store on Highway 61. Any dog or cat food or supplies would be greatly appreciated. Some seniors have only their dog or cat for company and on a xed income, pet food costs are dif cult. Please show how generous Wakulla County can be. Thank you. Michele Roddy CrawfordvilleRepublican debate comments clari edEditor, The News: I watched the nal Republican Presidential debate and was amazed at the many distortions and outright falsehoods that these potential presidential Republican hopefuls made. Individuals who do not research these issues, to learn the actual facts, consistently believe these falsehoods time and time again until they eventually believe them, as inaccurately as they are. To start off, in general, instead of focusing on the issues that matters most to the American people jobs the Republican candidates tripped over themselves trying to prove that each is further to the right than the rest. Take time and look at their record. Both Rick Santorum and Mitt Romney criticized the auto rescue credited with saving more than 1.4 million auto industry jobs, creating more than 200,000 new jobs and helping the American auto industry gain market share for the first time in decades. By the way, Chrysler and Fiat have paid back most of the bailout money. Romney said he would have encouraged bankruptcy! What does bankruptcy mean? The bottom line is no jobs, no health care, and no factory. In addition, despite being proven wrong repeatedly by auto industry leaders and economists, Romney continued to falsely claim that President Obama followed his lead on the auto rescue. Go to several sources and look it up. On immigration, Romney also confirmed that he would have the most extreme position on immigration of any nominee in modern history. He called the Arizona immigration law, which allows random document checks and detainment, a model for the nation. He also has embraced the inhumane policy of self-deportation, promised to veto the Dream Act and derided it as a handout, and said he would separate families that have contributed to their communities for a generation. Review the Dream Act to see how it would give an opportunity to undocumented immigrant students who have been living in the U.S. since they were young, a chance to contribute back to the country that has given so much to them and a chance to utilize their hard earned education and talents. Take a thorough look at just what Romney and others would do. Once again, Romney misrepresented his record as governor of Massachusetts. Not only did Romney falsely claim that the Presidents policy forces the Catholic Church to provide contraception coverage it does not by the way but he also overlooked the fact that he oversaw and protected a virtually identical policy in Massachusetts. Look at his record and verify what he speaks of. He railed against earmarks, forgetting that as governor he had an of ce dedicated to lobbying for federal money, and that he directed an unprecedented taxpayer bailout for the Olympics. Examine his remarks and learn the actual facts. Lets pride ourselves on knowing the difference between untruths and factual information. Dont be misled. Joan E. Hendrix, SecretaryWakulla Democratic Executive CommitteeEditor, The News: As much as I appreciate the Letters to the Editor of my having been responsible for the saving the gag grouper season for all the shermen of the Big Bend and the southeast who come to Wakulla and other counties to sh, I cannot accept the praise without mentioning the dozens of concerned citizens who were present at the meeting in Quincy with the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission. I would especially like to mention Ronald Fred Crum of Crums Mini-Mall in Panacea, Paige Killeen of Panacea Waterfronts, Major Alan LaMarche of Plantation Security of Shell Point, Mayor Chuck Shields of St. Marks, Keith Ward of Lighthouse Seafood and Richard Lynn of Lynn Brothers Seafood, both of St. Marks. Without the group effort there would not be a gag season in the Gulf or it would have been in the summertime when all the grouper are in deep water, not in the shallow Apalachee Bay area. The opposition were out in force but this was a win for the home team. Thanks so much for all those who participated. Jerry Moore County commissioner Editor, The News: Thank you, Colleen Skipper, for your wonderful presentation to those in attendance at the Wakulla County Senior Center on Feb. 23. Your successes in life have demonstrated how we all can enjoy our community. The seniors dearly loved your positive re ection on your life in Wakulla County as a young black female. Your humor, sincerity and positive attitude are inspirations to all who desire a happy and successful life. You brought the brightest light to our month of celebration of Black History. The presence and support of your family really added to this event. The music you brought along with your sisters, Glenda and Chinesta, in addition to Tray Crump and Theresa Jones added so much to this celebration. Again, thanks to every one of you for making this a wonderful celebration. R.H. Carter Director of Senior Center Editor, The News: The Lowell Douglas Raker family would like to thank all the friends and family that came to visit, brought food, cards and owers, it was so thoughtful and very much appreciated. We would like to recognize an aunt who was not mentioned in error in the obituary, Linda Harvey Raker, Maurice Rakers wife. Raker familyAnother airport scandal in the making?Editor, The News: Has it become a trend in the Panhandle of Florida for private individuals to gain airport improvements at the expense of the public? Didnt we learn enough from the recent Destin/Okaloosa airport hangar scandal? Now, a similar scenario is coming to light in Wakulla County. Private parties deeded a hobbyist airstrip to the county years ago and are now using the county as a conduit to seek public funds to purchase their lands. A single incident in 2009 of standing water on the airstrip caused alarm. Former Commissioner Kessler used that to become an active proponent for improvements to the airport (see agenda requests of Dec. 8, 2009 and April 5, 2010). Such small airports generate revenue from rental of tie-down space, rental of hangar space, fuel sales and the sale of sundries. Funds are available from the Florida Department of Transportation as a grant to Wakulla County, for improvements to generate those revenues. However, the land deeded to the county was conveniently de ned to be the narrow airstrip itself. The lands upon which to expand the airport are owned by parties with interests in the airport. That is, 13 privately owned acres have been partially developed with hangars. According to the Airport Layout Plan of 2008 and a map that has been obtained from DOT, the 13 acre property would be purchased as a site for the revenue generating activities, including a fuel farm. Another tract (16 acres) would be purchased from an interested party for reorientation and extending the runway a runway that becomes proximate to Surf Road. Also on that DOT map, due to the shift and extension of the runway, five waterfront homes on Surf Road will now fall within the runway protection zone (RPZ). Those are in addition to the seven residential properties that are at the base of the existing runway on Bay Drive. All of those homes will become unsuitable for residential occupancy and litigation is certain to follow. A review of the capital improvement budget shows that there is a significant shortfall in the funds allocated from the DOT grant for land acquisition. Does Wakulla County really want to incur the costs of eminent domain actions (direct or inverse) and remove expensive properties from the tax roll? The internet is inundated with links that clearly show airports and residential land uses to be incompatible. There are numerous links as to the avoidance of floodplains in airport development. Chapter 12 of FAAs Airport Desk Reference deals with oodplains and states To meet Executive Order 11988 ... all airport development actions must avoid the oodplain, if a practicable alternative exists. There are plenty of alternative tracts elsewhere in Wakulla County that are outside of the oodplain at cheaper costs than the homes on Surf Road. It is also an FAA requirement to conduct an environmental audit that takes a hard look at expected environmental effects of a proposed action. It is pure negligence to ignore the warnings. Furthermore, parts of the tract for the reoriented runway contain wetlands. If water on a runway is undesirable, then what are we doing pouring good money into a property that is within the oodplain? The costs to ll the site to elevate the runway out of the floodplain would be enormous. That site was a bad choice for an airstrip site from the outset. The FDOT aviation manager also stated that the costs for an airport attendant (fuel farm and otherwise) would have to borne by the county. During a recent consent agenda of the county commission, payment was approved for the countys airport liability insurance in an amount of around $2,500 one must wonder what that premium will become with a fuel farm. DOT documents show between two and six aircraft as being based at Wakulla Airport. That facility should be contained with its pre-existing ight path and deeded back to the Tarpines development for its use. In what appears to be a surreptitious manner for the airport improvement project to gain traction, the airport has been included in an extension of the Panacea Enterprise zone. The airport began as an idea of a private party that if the proposed plans are implemented will become an albatross to the county. The Panacea Enterprise zone should not be extended to include the airport certainly not at this juncture. As a footnote to whomever may wonder, our home site on Surf Road is in a subdivision (Tarpon Shores) that was developed by my wifes grandfather (Jack Simmons) well before the airstrip was conceived. My wife spent her childhood summers at Simmons Lodge. We intend to enjoy and live-out our closing years in quiet enjoyment here on Surf Road watching an occasional small plane or experimental aircraft y along the river. L. James Parham Ochlockonee Bay MAP PROVIDED BY L. JAMES PARHAMProperties that would have to be bought by the county for the proposed expansion of the Wakulla Airport runway. Cant take credit for grouper rule change ank you, Colleen Skipper Raker family thanks those who visited

PAGE 5

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netDozens of people turned out for the Minority Health Day of Dialogue held Saturday, Feb. 25, at Riversprings Middle School. The goal of the event was to empower churches, families and youth for healthy behavior changes, and to make residents aware of resources. Lots of health exhibitors were on hand in the gym, providing information on healthy choices and services available in the community. In the cafeteria, speakers spoke on a variety of topics ranging from Wakulla Health Department administrator Pad Juarez on Health Disparities in Wakulla County to mental health to shopping for healthy foods. A youth summit was held in the school with students able to discuss issues such as bullying with Tallahassee counselor Jane Marks, to HIV prevention and spirituality. Speakers share health and nutritional information in the schools cafeteria.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 5A Celebration of the Arts is ThursdayCelebration of the Arts, a night of singing, musical acts and theatrical performances, begins at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 1, at Wakulla High School, with a Silent Art Auction. As last year, each school has produced a painted canvas for the public to bid on. At 6:30 p.m., the performances begin with singing from the elementary students, followed by musical performances and skits from Wakulla and Riversprings middle schools and Wakulla High School. Tickets can be purchased at the door and prices are $2 for students and $5 for adults. Hang onto that ticket because door prizes will be given away. All proceeds bene t Wakulla High seniors for scholarships in the arts. Special Olympics is FridaySpecial Olympics Florida Wakulla County Athletes will be competing in sporting events (track & eld and Bocce) at the Wakulla High School track from 9:15 a.m. to 1 p.m. on March 2. Be a Hero sh fry is SaturdayBe A Hero To Our Heroes, a community-wide sh fry to honor U.S. military service members, will be held Saturday, March 3, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. Veterans Services of Wakulla is co-sponsoring this event to help support and honor Wakulla County U.S. military service members who are currently away from home protecting the nations security and freedom. They are committed to supporting them through prayers, letters, care packages and providing encouragement to their families who are left behind. For more information regarding the event, please contact Glenda Washington at 850.599.5999. Battle of Natural Bridge is this weekend Saturday, March 3 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors will mingle with Civil War re-enactors and observe a Confederate-Union skirmish in the afternoon, cavalry demonstrations, artillery shows and a medical demonstration in the afternoon. Following the skirmish, sutlers and food vendors will be present. Sunday, March 4 The of cial Opening Ceremonies and Dedication will he held, followed by a fullscale re-enactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge at 2:30 p.m. Donations of $3 per person for adults and $1 for children younger than six. Relay for Life fundraiser set at Beef OBradys On Monday, March 5, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., Crawfordvilles Beef OBradys will be donating 10 percent of all receipts to Relay for Life of Wakulla. Relay for Life is the largest fundraiser for The American Cancer Society. The Wakulla Relay for Life event will be held on April 20 at Wakulla High School. We are looking for new teams and sponsors to join the ght against cancer at the Relay. A team consists of 10 to 15 members who each commit to raise at least $100. Team members will take turns walking throughout the night during the Relay to support and honor those who are ghting the battle with cancer and to remember those whose time ran out. Visit www.relayforlife. org/ WakullaFL for more information about the event. Full moon lighthouse climb at St. George IslandThe March Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Thursday, March 8, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association, and includes light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at (850) 927-7744 or toll free at 888927-7744. Make A Difference Day is March 24VolunteerWAKULLA is holding its fth annual Make A Difference Day on Saturday, March 24, at Hudson Park. This years event will be different for previous years: a community picnic for the citizens of Wakulla County will be held, and many of the organizations in the County will be setting up booths to make people aware of services available, as well as opportunities to volunteer in the county. At this time we have more than 25 organizations signed up. There will be a free lunch for all, entertainment and door prizes. Briefs PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENExhibitors in the Riversprings Middle School gym for Day of Dialogue on Saturday. Minority health fair is held Wakulla Rotary participates in ramp building Members of the Wakulla Rotary Club joined with members of the Tallahassee Southside Rotary to build a wheelchair ramp at a home in Woodville. Rotary Clubs throughout the district participated in a community-wide effort. At left, Rotarian Richard Russell at work. Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals

PAGE 6

Pastor Gerald Fielder and the folks at Good News Assembly of God are pleased to welcome Tommy, Heather, Ashlyn and Olivia Green. Tommy is joining the team at Good News as the assistant pastor. Heather will be joining the praise and worship team as their leader. Tommy grew up in Wakulla County and graduated from Wakulla High School. He became licensed by the Assemblies of God after Bible Study through Berean School of Bible. Since leaving Wakulla County, he has served congregations in the Midwest as youth pastor, assistant pastor and lead pastor. Tommy is pleased to be back in Wakulla County and we at Good News Assembly welcome him here. Heather grew up in the home of Kullman and Rita Lackey, long term Assemblies of God evangelists. Heather sang for congregations in childhood as the family traveled through the eastern half of the country. Tommy and Heather join Pastor Fielder in inviting anyone who doesnt have a church home to join them at Good News Assembly of God, 2028 Bloxham Cutoff Road, in Crawfordville.Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Michael David Carter Martha Hackworth Louis Edward HerouartChurch Briefs Regular Sunday Services and Times8:30 am Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship Service 6 pm Evening Service 7 pm Discipleship Training(On Hwy. 319 one block south of the Courthouse)850-926-7896 office www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Tallahassee Michael Mike David Carter, 64, of Tallahassee passed away at home. He was born in Fort Pierce. Graveside services will be Thursday, March 1, at 2 p.m. at Oakland Cemetery in Tallahassee. Survivors include a brother, Fred Carter of Woodville; a sister, Judy Sarvis of Crawfordville; six nephews and one niece; and several great nieces and nephews. He is predeceased by his parents, Harold and Jacquelyn Carter; a brother, Loren Carter; and two sisters, Marguerite Bley and Harriet Carter. Martha Hackworth, 92, of Crawfordville, passed away on Friday, Feb. 17. She was born in Little Rock, Ark., and had lived in this area since 2005. She was a housewife, mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother. She was a member of the First Baptist Church in Aberdeen, N.C., where she and her husband owned Aberdeen 5 & 10. She was president of the Aberdeen Businesswomens Club, a member of the Sandhills Community Book Club and the Aberdeen Garden Club. She enjoyed boating, bowling, golf, ceramics and needlepoint. A memorial service celebrating her life was held at the Respite Center of Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville on Monday, Feb. 27. She will be buried in the Bethesda Cemetery in Aberdeen, N.C. Survivors include her devoted daughter, Patricia; granddaughters, Stefani Pantelis of Bayside, N.Y., Constantina Pantelis of Crawfordville, and Debra Kay Burke of Kent, Wash.; six great-grandchildren, Andre and Aleni Martinez of Bayside, N.Y., Leylah Pantelis of Crawfordville, and Carol Ann, Rebecca and Roger Burke of Kent, Wash. She was preceded in death by her parents, Luther and Irene Coleman of North Little Rock, Ark.; her husband of 68 years, Cecil Hackworth, in 2007; and her son, Cecil Hackworth Jr., in 2009. She has left behind many more special people that she loved especially at the Lake Ellen Church Respite Group of which she attended and the Covenant Hospice Staff and her friend and companion Mary Kelly. Louis Edward Herouart was born in Union Township, Hunterdon, N.J., on Aug. 20, 1933. His precious Saviour, whom he loved dearly and was so devoted, welcomed him home on Feb. 23. He is survived by his devoted and loving wife, Lois. He was chairman of the Deacon Board, New Hope Baptist Church, choir soloist, member of newly formed Mens Breakfast Club and Planning Committee. He enjoyed capturing and recording all events, serving as the church photographer. He was active in Crane Lakes Pool Club, Block Captain and Security Guard. He served in the Korean War aboard the USS Dyess. He is retired from the Haworth, N.J., Police Department and Pinellas Park. Besides his wife, survivors include two daughters, Renee Aro (Albert) and Suzanne Kane (John); two step-sons, Stewart Wolthers (Cathy) and Kent Ware; eight grandchildren and ve greatgrandchildren. A celebration of his life will be held Saturday, March 3, at 1 p.m. in the Crane Lakes Ball Room, Port Orange. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to New Hope Baptist Church, 1675 Taylor Rd, Port Orange FL 32127. Michael D. Carter Louis Edward Herouart Martha HackworthGreen is new assistant pastor Tommy, Heather, Ashlyn and Olivia Green. The Bradham and the Webster family would like to thank everyone for the cards, food, owers, encouraging words and all of the many acts of kindness shown during the loss of our loved one Quinton Bradham. We thank you and may God bless each of you. The Bradham and Webster Family Rocky Mount Church of Christ will be celebrating their church anniversary on Sunday, March 4, at 11 a.m. Elder Benjamin Washington along with East Spring Church of Tallahassee will render service. Dinner will be served after service. Everyone is invited to attend. Pilgrim Rest P.B. Church will host its annual Family and Friends Day on Sunday, March 4 at 3 p.m. Elder Eddie L. Franklin Sr. and St. Nora P.B. Church will render services. For more information, please call (850) 926-8906. Panacea Congregational Holiness Church will hold revival services Sunday, March 4, through Wednesday, March 7. Services will begin on Sunday at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. The Monday through Wednesday services begin at 7:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be Sister Grace Day. Church is located at 1127 Coastal Highway in Panacea. For more information please call 850-984-5579. New Testament Bible Church is now meeting at the Wakulla Public Library. We are still trying to get a new Bible-believing church up and running. The library is graciously allowing us to meet in their large conference room every Sunday from 11 a.m. until noon. We will be having songs, prayer, and Bible teaching and preaching. Please see our website at www.biblegems.com.Rocky Mount anniversary is March 4 Family & Friends Day at Pilgrim Rest Revival set at Panacea Holiness New Testament Church now meets at public library Family says thank you for kindness

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 7AhappeningsCommunityDaughters of the Confederacy visit Eden Springs following Christmas celebrationSpecial to The NewsThe R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy held its annual Christmas celebration at the Wildwood Country Club. Members dressed in period attire presented A Journey Back in Time where each lady represented a Confederate woman from different Confederacy States and told how she spent Christmas Day 1862. The fellowship and festivities concluded with a visit by Chapter members to Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center to deliver 35 gift baskets to its residents. Previous to the gifts being accumulated, Louise Sloan, activities coordinator of Eden Springs, visited a Chapter meeting and provided speci c gift requests including FSU baskets, pudding baskets, etc. While at Eden Springs, Chapter members visited many of the residents either in their rooms or in the public areas spreading Dixie cheer. One of the ve objectives of the UDC is benevolent. The UDC is glad to support the needs of the community as possible. Expect to hear more great things about the R. Don McLeod ladies who were awarded Most Outstanding UDC Chapter in Florida District I which spans the entire Florida Panhandle. If anyone is interested in learning more about the United Daughters of the Confederacy and membership in our organization, visit their web site at: http:// rdonmcleod.wordpress.com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSR. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 members are Peggy Mock, June Seymour, Laveda Raker, Elizabeth Smith, Melinda Sarvis; standing, Mildred Willis, Ann Casseaux, Arlene Vause, Mary Ann Owens, Lisa Morgan, Evelyn Stills, Syble Owens, Amanda Daughtry; back row, Sherry Willis, Michelle Kirby, Amy Carraway, Jean McMillan, Louise Thomas and Tanya Lynn.Harris and Bradford announce wedding Melissa Ann Harris and Joshua Brandon Bradford announce their marriage on Feb. 26. The couple had a private ceremony in Graceville. The bride is the daughter of the late Robert Lawson Aaron and Linda Dyan Salisbury of Grand Ridge, Fla. The groom is the son of Fred Bradford Sr. of Baltimore, Md., and Cindy Kay Bradford of Panacea. Joshua B. Bradford and Melissa A. HarrisHappy rst birthday to Ellie Grace Campbell Ellie Grace Campbell celebrated her rst birthday on Feb. 19. She is the daughter of Jonathan and Kristin Campbell of Crawfordville. Her maternal grandparents are Jeff Mathers and Sherry Dudley both of Crawfordville. Her maternal great-grandparents are Doc and Faye Mathers of Crawfordville and Charles Perrin of Prattville, Ala., and the late Karen Perrin and Betty Jones of Thomasville, Ga. Her maternal great greatgrandparents are Margaret Pelt of St. Marks and the late Robert Pelt. Her paternal grandparents are Keith Campbell of Crawfordville and John and Ramona Coleman of Crawfordville. Her paternal great-grandparents are the late Donald and Joan Campbell of New York and the late Gloria DeRosa Cash of Rhode Island and Raymond Cash of Pensacola. Ellie G. CampbellOptimist essay contest winners announced The Optimist Essay Contest winners are Casey Camp, rst place; Alexander Lewis, second place; and Brittany Evans, third place. Congratulations to these students and their teachers. The students and teachers are invited to join the Coastal Optimist Club members for lunch at Poseys in Panacea on March 8. The winners will receive their awards at the luncheon: rst place, $100; second place, $75 and third place, $50. Casey Camp will read his winning essay and the students will be told about Optimist Club activities. Camps essay has been sent on to the District competition. The theme was How my Positive Outlook Bene ts my Community. Thanks to Sally Gandy and Jo Ann Brierton who helped with the judging on Saturday. Performers include -Crawfordville UMC quartet Raising the Standard InternationalMInistries Gate Opens: 11 A.M Music Begins: Noon Ends: 8 P.M. 252 Park Ave., Sopchoppy City Park FUN: Bring a chair and a cooler and spend the dayno alcohol please MUSIC FOR EVERYONEPraise and worship, R&B, Blue Grass, Contemporary FOODHot dog and hamburger plates available or you may bring a picnic lunch. Childrens programs from noon 4P.M. Saturday,March10,2012FREECHRISTIANMUSIC SopchoppyCityPark AMULTIDENOMINATIONALWORSHIPEXPERIENCE 4 th annual4 th annual www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK NAMI WAKULLAS 2ND ANNUAL TRIPPLE CROWN DERBY FOR MENTAL ILLNESSSAVE THE DAT E!

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolContinued from Page 1A Superintendent of Schools David Miller said district staff had been investigating the program for years. In his own conversations with other superintendents around the state who are clients of the company, Miller said the typical response was that they wished they had done it earlier. While the contract calls for paying Energy Education some $696,000 over four years, the company anticipates it can save the district $1.5 million over the term of the contract, and more than $4.4 million over 10 years. Miller put that in terms of teachers jobs saved two or three in the rst year alone with projected net savings of $122,350. The company requires the district to hire an Energy Education Specialist who will do frequent energy checks at the different facilities around the county. That position will likely be lled by a teacher, because it requires teaching other district staff about behavioral changes in saving money on energy costs. After personnel costs, electricity is typically the second highest expense for a school district. The company also guaranteed results, promising to write a check back if there were no savings. A software program that the district would buy as part of the contract would allow the school board to document the energy savings. School Board member Greg Thomas indicated he was initially skeptical: My first thought was we can do this ourselves. But, he said, the guarantee and the results the company has demonstrated with other school districts in the state convinced him. That was echoed later by citizen Donna Sanford, who spoke out against the contract as potentially a waste of money. Sanford contended it was a program that could be done in-house. After hearing the presentation, Sanford was convinced. She told the school board: I support the program because of the guarantee.$700K contract approved by school boardTeachers and employee of the month for February announcedSpecial to The NewsFebruary Teachers of the Month are Medart Elementary Schools Jessica Johnson and Wakulla Middle Schools Karen Amison Sherrod and the Employee of the Month, is Food Services Colleen Altenburg. Jessica Johnson has been teaching at Medart Elementary School since August 2003. Johnson graduated from Flagler College in 2003 with a Bachelors degree and went on to earn her Masters degree from Florida State University. Johnson grew up in Wakulla and returned, accepting a second grade teaching position at Medart Elementary. She holds state certi cation in the areas of Elementary Education, ESOL and Ed Leadership. Johnson said, I believe that each and every child should be encouraged on a daily basis. The more students trust and respect their teacher, the more likely they are to succeed. It is crucial to give every child the same opportunities to learn. The moment you see a child get it makes this job worth every second. Johnson stays very active in programs outside the classroom as Camp TEAM after school program chairperson and teacher and serves as an active member with Relay for Life, Technology/Computer Lab, Yearbook and Delta Kappa Gamma sorority. Medart Principal Sharon Kemp said, Jessica Johnson is an exceptional teacher. Her dedication to the education of her students is evident in her careful planning, the materials that she creates, and the clear manner in which she delivers instruction. She has distinguished herself as a leader at Medart Elementary School. Jessica is a very warm and caring person. Her students and colleagues love and admire her. Jessica Johnson is truly a great asset to our school and we are very blessed to have her. Karen Amison Sherrod, Wakulla Middle Schools 6th grade teacher, has dedicated 21 years of service to the district. Growing up and graduating from high school in Apalachicola, she pursued and completed her formal education at the University of South Florida and Florida State University. After graduation, she began her career teaching at Shadeville Elementary then transferred to Wakulla Middle School in 2002. In 1999, Sherrod furthered her education earning her Masters degree and is currently certi ed in Primary Ed, Elementary Ed and Middle Grades Integrated. Sherrod said, I recently received an email from a former student, a grown man, which began with Hello to the best teacher in the whole world and ended with my second mom, its for these moments and my children I teach. Principal Mike Barwick said, Mrs. Sherrods greatest attribute is her genuine care for her students. Its why she comes to work every day and her students know this. They understand that she cares that they learn to their maximum potential. You can see this every day in her lessons and her daily interactions with their students. Her students know that she will accept nothing less than their best effort every day. Colleen Altenburg, Wakulla Educational Centers Food Service Manager moved to Wakulla after the devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina. She began as a food service sub in 2005, and quickly worked her way up through the ranks as a school food service manager in 2011. Altenburg attended school in Wisconsin. She owned and operated her own day care facility for 14 years. Upon her selection as a Wakulla food service employee, she became an active member of School Food Service Association and is currently the president-elect of the association. She said, One of the most amusing moments came when a student came into the kitchen with their teacher to ask me a question which was, Mrs. C, is that hamburger gravy deer meat? It was good! They think they are real big and dont want your help. Little peoplebig hearts. Food Service Director Gail Mathers said, Mrs. Colleen Altenburg worked as the baker and cashier at Medart Elementary School prior to moving into her current position as Cafeteria Manager at WEC. Her up-beat personality and can-do attitude are positive assets that have enabled her to be successful in each position. She is dedicated, organized and a problem solver. Most impressive is Mrs. Altenburgs interaction with the children. The children look forward to seeing Ms. Colleen every day. She treats each child as if they were her own, sprinkling humor and compassion throughout the lunch line while throwing in a touch of rmness when needed. Recognizing that good habits start young, she goes above and beyond with her beautiful decorations and made from scratch dishes to encourage and excite the pre-school children to eat a variety of items. Mrs. Altenburg has an outstanding work ethic; she genuinely cares about the children and takes pride in knowing that she has had a positive impact in their young lives. The Food Service Department is very fortunate to have an individual of Mrs. Altenburgs caliber as a part of the team. Karen Amison Sherrod Jessica Johnson Colleen AltenburgWMS band students earn superior and excellence ratings at festival Special to The NewsWakulla Middle School was well represented by the band on Saturday, Feb. 18, when 13 students performed solos and the Florida Bandmasters District Solo and Ensemble Festival. The students were very well prepared and played their solos with con dence, said band director, Laura Hudson. I am very proud of them and I know their families listening to them perform are proud of them too. Students received valuable comments from the judges to help them grow as musicians and excel in future performances. Students receiving the highest rating awarded of Superior were Chazya Bissionnette and Tia Unsell on ute; Madison Edwards and Kayla Taff on clarinet; Amanda Darnell on alto saxophone; David Decoeur and Alisa Moody on trumpet; Bobbi Sanders on French horn; Andi Hutto on tuba; and Rafel Fortier on snare drum. Students receiving the second highest of Excellent were Juliana Prestia on ute; Hannah McKnight on clarinet, and Austin Yontz on tuba. Wakulla Middle School band membersSPECIAL TO THE NEWSRegistration open for summer campRegistration is now open for the Wakulla Christian School Academic and Personal Enrichment Summer Camp. Camp will be offered this summer from June 4 to Aug. 10 to all children between the ages of 3-14. Camp days will be balanced between indoor and outdoor programs, each designed for speci c age groups. Field trips to local businesses and venues are scheduled. Wakulla Springs, Marianna Caverns, area museums, bowling, movies, aquariums and FSU are just a few events planned. Space is limited, so register today. For more information call WCS at 926-5583, or visit their website at www.wakullachristian.com. JUMP START THIS SCHOOL YEAR TODAY! ELEMENTARY & MIDDLE SCHOOLIntroduction to concepts & skills for each grade level Algebra 1 End-of-Course Exam Prep(Passing score required to earn credit for the class)Algebra 2 One-on-One & Small Group TutoringACT & SAT PrepSAT Test Date Prep Class Register by February 27 March 3 March 10 ACT Test Date Prep Class Register by April 1 April 7 April 14Locally owned/operated by Melisa Taylor3119-B Crawfordville Hwy.850-926-2179 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012 dress store50%-60% OFF850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE) The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree All Ladies ApparelThe best Alterations, Furniture Upholstry & Renishing

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach The Wakulla High School track teams traveled to Rickards High School in Tallahassee on Thursday, Feb. 23, for their second meet of the young season, the Rickards Relays. Rather than follow the standard track meet format, this meet consisted of a few individual events plus a wide variety of relay races. It created a fun atmosphere and also allowed athletes to run a variety of distances as part of a relay team. By the time the dust had settled, the WHS girls had won their second consecutive meet of the season and the boys had nished in fth place out of the eight teams participating. The WHS girls used their dominance in the middle distance relays to capture the title, taking rst place in the 4x400 meter relay (Alina McCulllers, Emily McCullers, Savanna Harris, Madi Harris ), the 4x800 relay (Emily McCullers, Savanna Harris, Marty Wiedeman, Madi Harris), the 4x1600 relay (Kasey James, Lilli Broadway, Lydia Wiedeman, Tyler Kinard) and the Distance Medley Relay ( Cora Atkinson, Norma Woodcock, Raychel Gray, Kaylyn Thigpen ). The meet regulations also allowed a school to enter a second relay team in each event and the WHSs second teams also showed their prowess by placing 7th in the 4x400 relay, 3rd in the 4x800 relay, 2nd in the 4x1600 relay and 2nd in the Distance Medley Relay. Other scoring points for the local team included the 4x100 meter relay team, Emily McCullers (3rd, long jump), Taylor Vaughn (2nd, 100 meter hurdles), 4x200 meter relay team (5th), 4x100 meter relay team (8th), Lisa House (4th, shot put/ 4th, discus) and Shelby Alsup (8th, shot put/ 3rd, discus). BOYS TEAM WAS CONSISTENT The WHS boys team used consistent performances in the variety of relays to place solid in the eld, with the 4x1600 meter relay of Stanley Linton, Cody James, Travis Parks and MItchell Atkinson accounting for the lone rst place relay nish for the local team. The other relay teams ran solidy, with the following results: 4x100 relay team (3rd), 4x200 meter relay (5th), 4x200 meter relay No. 2 (8th), 4x400 meter relay (5th), 4x800 meter relay (3rd), Sprint Medley (3rd) and the Distance Medley team (2nd). Individually, freshman Kaedretis Keaton led the way with a rst place nish in the triple jump (38 10.00). Also scoing individually for the team were Logan Hay (7th, shot put/5th discus) and Jamal Gavin (7th, discus). The teams performed well at this meet and had a lot of fun in the process, said Coach Paul Hoover. The variety of relay events made it a unique meet and allowed a lot of runners to run distances they normally wouldnt. Weve done pretty well so far, coach said, but also realize that it gets much tougher from here on out. It was a fun time and we had over 50 different athletes that performed at this meet, so it was a good experience, Hoover said.TRACKGirls make it two in a rowSpecial to The NewsOn Feb. 18, Gulf Winds Track Club held its 24th annual Flash Dash 12K/6K in St. Marks. This annual race was moved to the San Marcos de Apalachee State Park two years ago after being held in Chaires and later in Woodville. The race started and finished at the fort. After winding through the streets of St. Marks, onto the bike path, and back, several local runners nished in the top 10. Of the 214 runners in the 12K, Wakulla High senior Stanley Linton placed second for the men while senior Cora Atkinson placed ninth for the women. In the 6K, 89 runners competed. Duane Evans placed first for the men while Jamie Nichols placed third and Karen Bennett placed seventh for the women. Anyone interested in local races can nd information on the Gulf Winds web site at www.gulfwinds. org.RUNNINGFlash 12K/6K held in St. MarksOn Saturday, March 3, athletes from Tallahassee, Crawfordville and the Wakulla area will be competing in XAC: First Rite. www.XacFighting.com. This event will showcase Boxing, Kick Boxing and Mixed Martial Arts (MMA). First Rite will take place at Tallahassee Community College. Doors open at 6 p.m. and ghts start at 7 p.m. Tickets are $50 for ringside, $30 for oor and $20 general admission.MIXED MARTIAL ARTSWakulla athletes will compete in First Rite tournament SPECIAL TO THE NEWSALL-STATE: Head Coach Scott Klees with War Eagle players named to the All-State Team: Marshane Godbolt, Will Thomas, Chris Grif n, Ryan Henderson and Kevin James.FOOTBALLWar Eagles named to All-State, All Big Bend team SPECIAL TO THE NEWSALL BIG BEND: Punter Conner Smith, Defensive Player of the Year defensive back Marshane Godbolt, safety Deonte Hutchinson, offensive lineman Chris Grif n, running back Will Thomas, linebacker Ryan Henderson, and Head Coach of the Year Scott Klees. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles season that culminated in a trip to the state championship game continued to reap honors, with a handful of players named to the All-State team, plus players named to All Big Bend. The honors included Marshane Godbolt being named All Big Bend Defensive Player of the Year. Head Coach Scott Klees was named Coach of the Year for the Big Bend. Its a really humbling experience, Klees said of the honor. All-State players are Godbolt, running back Will Thomas, lineman Chris Griffin, linebacker Ryan Henderson and linebacker Kevin James. First team All Big Bend players included Godbolt, Thomas, Grif n and Henderson plus punter Conner Smith, and safety Deonte Hutchinson. Players named to the All Big Bend second team include center Caleb Brown, defensive tackle C.J. Roberts, linebacker Kevin James and safety Mikal Cromartie. Honorable mention included Tamarick Holmes, Fred Cumming and Luke Taylor. Since Ive been here, weve never had anybody represented like that, Klees said of the number of players being recognized. While a lot of the players named are seniors, a handful will return next year including Kevin James and Chris Grif n, Klees noted.Marshane Godbolt is named All Big Bend Defensive Player of the Year. Head Coach Scott Klees is named Big Bend Coach of the Year. CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR1 1-866-742-1373www.florida-classifieds.com The key to advertising success Classified Display Metro Daily Online Re-StoreShadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

PAGE 10

By SUSAN BLAKENational Forest in FloridaIts a pleasure to get up in the morning and go to work, says Toniette Toni Addison. Addison is a Civil Engineer for the National Forests in Florida. I spend the majority of my time designing recreation sites on some of the most beautiful and remote areas of our forests, she says. Now in her fth year with the U.S. Forest Service, she has had assignments as far away as Washington state. Today, she lives with her twin sister Antoinette in Tallahassee, Fla. But things were not all rosy for Addison. One of six children, Addison recalls a dif cult life growing up as a young African American girl in the projects of Fort Myers. Her mother, a single parent, frequently left her and her siblings home alone to fend for themselves, sometimes for as long as two weeks. She attributes her survival to her twin, Antoinette. At an early age, the twins, being oldest, had a great deal of responsibility caring for three sisters and one brother. At the time, Addisons only lifeline was her grandmother who frequently stopped by to look in on them and took care of their youngest sister while the rest were in school. I dont feel like I really had a childhood most of the time, she recalls. But at the end of the day, I think it made me a really disciplined person. The competition in school between Addison and Antoinette was erce. While they grew up under dif cult circumstances they maintained good grades, chastising one another over who would do best. As they progressed into middle school though, life in the projects started to wear on Addison and her sister. They were headed down a rocky road and turmoil consumed their lives. We were just bad! says Addison. My sister was in the principals of ce every single day. I cant explain the mindset, only to say that if youre in such a negative environment, you kind of think, What do I have to do to get out of this; what do I have to live for. During this critical time, another of Addisons sisters fell gravely ill. As a result, she and her sister Antoinette started going to a nearby church and developed a friendship with the pastor and his family. By the time she reached high school Addison and her twin were on the straight and narrow. Reflecting on her past, Addison recalls, Its all about what you make it. You, as an individual, have to surround yourself with positive in uences. Thats what I would tell anybody today whos living in the projects. Upon graduating from high school, Addison was accepted to the University of Florida, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU) and Florida State University with full scholarship. But twins must stick together and the two went to FAMU at their grandmothers insistence. Once at FAMU, Addisons math instructor pushed her into engineering. She had a head for numbers and he thought this would be the best use of her talents. Addison believes happiness is much more important than money. As long as I continue to be happy I dont want to go anywhere else. I like the Forest Service a whole lot. I think its because were such a close-knit family, but at the same time, our personalities and people are so diverse. Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors I was in a jet liner perhaps two miles up, and as the clouds broke momentarily to allow me to view our Earth below us, there off the north coast of the Yucatan was a coral reef of indescribable beauty. The aqua blue-green of its waters jolted my senses. Then it was gone, replaced by an unending layer of clouds that followed us clear to Atlanta, and then on to New Jersey. The whole eastern U.S., clear into most of the Gulf of Mexico, was overcast. And in New Jersey of course it was cold. Id own up to be with my Patti on Jan. 26, and there had been blessed with an opportunity to be driven to a few places to see some unusual birds that had been sighted in that state. Pattis friends Chris and Paula drove us rst to a big rock dam where I had my rst good look at a Snowy Owl. It was preening, and was constantly blinking its big yellow eyes in the process. As big as a Great Horned Owl, but pure white neat! The following day we drove to the coast, and there were my rst Purple Sandpipers and a Razorbill (auklet). Recording them was great, but even better was seeing about 200 Long-tailed Ducks or Old Squaw, and especially about 200 Harlequin Duck. The drakes of this species are spectacular. If youre not familiar with this species I beg you to check it out in a guide. We were on a jetty and had many Harlequin within 20 feet of us! Then on the morning of Feb. 1, Patti and I boarded a jet at Newark, and by that afternoon were being own in a small three-seater over the jungles of Belize. We stayed a few days at the well known Chan Chich Lodge. There I saw a wild Morelets Crocodile Crocodylus moreletti which gets up to about 11 feet. Around the lodge were some large ocks of Ocellated turkeys a species absolutely shimmering with iridescent colors. They had become habituated to humans as there is no hunting at this preserve, and would therefore pass us on a sidewalk! Many of the other birds I saw there -all new to me -had names I found hard to pronounce like the Yellow-throated Euphonia (a type of tanager) pronounced U-phone-I-ah, Crested Guan, (Goo-an), and Great Curassow (Cur-a-sow), plus a Northern Jacana, a wading over lilypads bird with spurs on its wings, that carry its young between its legs when ying from danger. There was a night-calling bird (like the Whip-poorwill) called the Pauraque (Par-rock-ee) and another weird bird with strange habits called the Grove-billed Ani (An-ee), plus a toucan (with the big bills) called Collard Aracari (Air-a-car-e), and then a king sher like bird named the Rufoustailed Jacamar (Jack-a-mar). We also saw a couple of times a Masked Tityra (Ttie-ra), and a Rose-throated Becard (Be-card), and a ycatcher named the Yellowbellied Elania (E-lane-I-a). Patti pointed out a Leaf cutter ant colony to me and then we saw around the dining area a Red-throated ant tanager, and she pointed out there are many birds with ant attached somewhere in their names for they follow the swarms of marching Army Ants feeding on the insects eeing these aggressive creatures that will take down any critter that remains in their path. Latter on, we saw a swarm of perhaps a million Army Ants. But thats another story which I promise Ill write about next time.Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHEye-opening trips to New Jersey, BelizeSpecial to The NewsPlantation Security Of cer Grady Phelps and his Korean War buddy Jake Chapman get together each winter to spend a day on the Gulf catching a box full of Key West Grunts. Jake comes down from Iowa and brings his grandson Brent to serve as First Mate. The two 80-year-old veteran warriors rehash old war tales and come up with solutions for xing our world problems. Major Alan Lamarche takes them out from Shell Point in his boat and he says he enjoys listening to the wisdom of the ages. This year, they caught 75 grunts that Jake and Brent plan to take back home to Iowa so they can have something to eat besides beef and corn. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKorean War buddies have a shing reunionForest Service engineer Toni Addison triumphs over hardships FOREST SERVICEToni Addison at the Leon Sinks Geological Area on the Apalachicola National Forest, one of several renovation projects undertaken last year with stimulus money. Brent Chapman, Grady Phelps and Jake Chapman. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED FISH LIMIT IS NOW GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EAR Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 PANACEA HATSAFACTHATSEARLE KIRKWOOD850-524-9103UNDERTHEOAK ON US 98 PANACEA Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonThe column this week is compliments of Phil Hill. There is just over a week left until it is time to spring forward and set our clocks once again, and just over two weeks until the of cial start of spring! It is now time to get back out on the water. Our waters allow for year round boating, but remember cold water can cause hypothermia. When you fall into cold water, there are many physical reactions that occur. The rst is that you cant breathe. Your heart rate and blood pressure increase. You may have uncontrolled gasping for air. Your movements may also be uncontrolled. This phase is called cold water response. It can last from 30 seconds to several minutes. Of people who die in cold water, 20 percent die within the rst two minutes of falling into the water. This phase will pass and you will need to stay calm and get your breathing under control. The second is called cold incapacitation. As the warmth of your body is lowered by the water surrounding you, your body will work to keep your core temperature high. Blood ow to your arms and legs will be lowered. You will lose the ability to swim. Without some sort of otation device, 50 percent of those who die in cold water die of drowning due to cold incapacitation. The nal phase is hypothermia. You can survive in cold water much longer than many believe, as long as you are wearing a life jacket. It could take an hour or much longer to lose consciousness. So what can you do to lessen the dangers of cold water boating? First, always wear your life jacket. If you fall into the water, your life jacket will keep your head above the water while you catch your breath and get your breathing under control. It will keep you oating when your arms and legs are too cold to work. It will keep you oating even if you are unconscious. You should attach a whistle, a re ective mirror, and an emergency strobe light to your life jacket. If you have an Emergency Position-indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB), make sure it is in working order and with you. EPIRBs can be purchased and some companies rent them. These items will make you easier to nd in the water. File a float plan with somebody. If the unforeseen happens, this may trigger a search that saves your life. Wear cold water gear. When the water temperature drops to 60 degrees or less, USCG regulations require the Auxiliary to wear mustang suits. These may be hot on deck, but offer us good protection if we end up in the water. We practice being in the water wearing these suits so that we know what it feels like to before we are in a dangerous situation. Keep a change of dry clothes on board. If you do get wet, you can change and keep from getting chilled. If you nd yourself in the water, try to get out as quickly as possible. Follow the -10-1 rule. Take one minute to calm yourself and get your breathing under control. Use the next 10 minutes to get yourself out of the water while your arms and legs are fully functioning. Conserve your body heat as best you can. Limit your movement and assume the heat-emitting lessening position (HELP). Cross your arms and place your hands under your armpits. Cross your legs and try to pull up into a ball. This will help to protect your core temperature. Finally, your battle with the cold is not over even if help arrives. There is the possibility of post-rescue collapse or after drop. Hypothermia weakens the body and can bring it to the edge of collapse. The rescue itself is stressful to the victim. Get the person out of the wet clothes. This is not a time for modesty. Wet clothes are hard to remove, so do not waste too much time with their removal. Cover the victim with a blanket. Keep them horizontal on their back or side. If you have hot water bottles or hot packs, apply them to the head, neck, chest, and groin. You can also lie next to or on top of the victim to warm them with your own body heat. Do not apply heat directly to the arms or legs. You can kill a person by causing cold blood to ow to the heart and brain. Let the extremities warm on their own. If the victim is conscious, you can give them warm liquids sweetened with sugar for energy. Do not give alcohol and avoid caffeine if possible. Keep the person horizontal even if the victim begins to feel better. Their body is in a fragile state. The heart can quit pumping correctly. Let the local ER determine if the person is ready to stand. If you are in a situation where you or someone else falls into the cold water and hypothermia is setting in, use your VHS radio to call for help on channel 16 and head for shore. EMS can meet you dockside if they know you are coming. Hopefully you have found this information helpful. Since taking over for Sherrie, I have asked for help from other Auxiliarists to give you different points of view and diverse information. Flotilla 12 will be holding our monthly meeting Saturday March 3, beginning at 10 a.m. at the Crawfordville Fire Station. Come out and join us! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarists in Mustang suits. While going to school in Hawaii, I naturally spent a lot of time underwater, looking at reef animals. Under ledges and in marine caverns, I would see these sh swimming around upside down! Of course I emulated them to better understand their tendency to swim in this manner. My regulator would ll up with water and soon send me back out into the open water sputtering. The sh ed with me and hovered about me now upside right! Something under the ledge must be doing this to the sh (and not me). In my senior year in college I chose to experiment with these same sh as part of an animal behavior class project. I tried moving surfaces around, currents, day vs. night all in an aquarium and to no avail. My sh stayed upright. Then one day the light in my room re ected off a glass surface and beamed into the transparent aquarium from the oor. The sh, a long nose butter y sh, promptly turned upside down. It seems they have what is called a dorsal light response, turning their top surface towards light. Since they are neutral in their buoyancy, and only nd these conditions in overhangs on the reef, they rise up to the ceiling of a ledge and swim upside down. I was able to replicate this condition, even without the ceiling substrate, by inserting a tight mesh box into the aquarium that had all dark sides except one where the light could penetrate. I could turn the mesh box randomly causing the sh to swim on its side, upside down or otherwise at my command. Needless to say, I earned a good grade in that class. Fast forward a decade or so and nd me diving under 10 feet of ice in the Antarctic. There, snow on the ice darkens the surface ceiling, except where our entrance hole beams light on to a crystalline reef. I would often nd myself unexpectedly upside down, even on my knees pressed against the hard ice ceiling, looking up no, down at the sponge reef below. I had strange sensations in my head since gravity continued to affect the balancing organs of my inner ear that con icted with what my eyes were seeing. Ultimately the inner ear won, permitting me to drop to the sea oor and get on with data collecting. Since I was hose diving, breathing in a helmet with gasses from the surface was better; at least my gas supply was not interrupted, but rising bubbles still confused sight! Fast forward another few decades and nd me diving under tons of rock in a very large cavern near Williston, training/evaluating yet another new rebreather. Here we carry our own lights, so dorsal light response is not so much an issue. After two days of testing, where everyone swam around on the oor, pretty much like normal sh ah, people do, I found myself drawn to the walls and then the ceiling. But unlike others up there with me, I was comfortably upside down. For much of the last dive I spent watching the other test divers swimming upside down on the ceiling substrate. I mean they seemed strange looking at me strangely. What was notable was for the rst time, I discovered a rebreather that truly breathes equally in all attitudes, head up, down, somersaults and on my back. And no exhaled bubbles were released to confuse sight. Of course I was reprimanded by the dive supervisors of the evaluation for my antics, but exalted by the designing engineer who agreed with me that it no longer mattered as to which way was up. I am a sh! Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:14 AM 3.4 ft. 1:00 AM High 0.4 ft. 2:11 AM 0.3 ft. 3:47 AM 0.1 ft. 4:54 AM -0.2 ft. 5:42 AM -0.4 ft. 6:21 AM -0.4 ft. 6:56 AM -0.4 ft. 7:29 AM Low 2.0 ft. 9:27 AM 2.2 ft. 10:56 AM 2.5 ft. 11:45 AM 2.8 ft. 12:20 PM 3.0 ft. 12:51 PM 3.2 ft. 1:19 PM 3.4 ft. 1:46 PM High 1.7 ft. 12:55 PM 1.8 ft. 2:53 PM 1.6 ft. 4:32 PM 1.3 ft. 5:34 PM 0.9 ft. 6:21 PM 0.5 ft. 7:02 PM 0.0 ft. 7:42 PM Low 2.6 ft. 6:31 PM 2.5 ft. 8:26 PM 2.6 ft. 10:16 PM 2.9 ft. 11:22 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 12:11 AM 3.5 ft. 12:57 AM High 0.5 ft. 2:08 AM 0.3 ft. 3:44 AM 0.1 ft. 4:51 AM -0.2 ft. 5:39 AM -0.4 ft. 6:18 AM -0.5 ft. 6:53 AM -0.4 ft. 7:26 AM Low 2.0 ft. 9:24 AM 2.3 ft. 10:53 AM 2.6 ft. 11:42 AM 2.9 ft. 12:17 PM 3.1 ft. 12:48 PM 3.3 ft. 1:16 PM 3.5 ft. 1:43 PM High 1.9 ft. 12:52 PM 2.0 ft. 2:50 PM 1.8 ft. 4:29 PM 1.4 ft. 5:31 PM 1.0 ft. 6:18 PM 0.5 ft. 6:59 PM 0.0 ft. 7:39 PM Low 2.6 ft. 6:28 PM 2.5 ft. 8:23 PM 2.7 ft. 10:13 PM 3.0 ft. 11:19 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 12:50 AM 3.2 ft. 1:36 AM High 0.4 ft. 3:15 AM 0.3 ft. 4:51 AM 0.1 ft. 5:58 AM -0.2 ft. 6:46 AM -0.3 ft. 7:25 AM -0.4 ft. 8:00 AM -0.4 ft. 8:33 AM Low 1.8 ft. 10:03 AM 2.1 ft. 11:32 AM 2.3 ft. 12:21 PM 2.6 ft. 12:56 PM 2.8 ft. 1:27 PM 3.0 ft. 1:55 PM 3.2 ft. 2:22 PM High 1.6 ft. 1:59 PM 1.7 ft. 3:57 PM 1.5 ft. 5:36 PM 1.2 ft. 6:38 PM 0.8 ft. 7:25 PM 0.4 ft. 8:06 PM 0.0 ft. 8:46 PM Low 2.4 ft. 7:07 PM 2.3 ft. 9:02 PM 2.5 ft. 10:52 PM 2.7 ft. 11:58 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:06 AM 2.6 ft. 12:52 AM High 0.3 ft. 2:22 AM 0.2 ft. 3:58 AM 0.0 ft. 5:05 AM -0.1 ft. 5:53 AM -0.3 ft. 6:32 AM -0.3 ft. 7:07 AM -0.3 ft. 7:40 AM Low 1.5 ft. 9:19 AM 1.7 ft. 10:48 AM 1.9 ft. 11:37 AM 2.1 ft. 12:12 PM 2.3 ft. 12:43 PM 2.4 ft. 1:11 PM 2.6 ft. 1:38 PM High 1.3 ft. 1:06 PM 1.3 ft. 3:04 PM 1.2 ft. 4:43 PM 0.9 ft. 5:45 PM 0.7 ft. 6:32 PM 0.3 ft. 7:13 PM 0.0 ft. 7:53 PM Low 1.9 ft. 6:23 PM 1.9 ft. 8:18 PM 2.0 ft. 10:08 PM 2.2 ft. 11:14 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:44 AM High 0.4 ft. 1:50 AM 0.3 ft. 3:26 AM 0.1 ft. 4:33 AM -0.2 ft. 5:21 AM -0.4 ft. 6:00 AM -0.4 ft. 6:35 AM -0.4 ft. 7:08 AM Low 1.5 ft. 9:11 AM 1.7 ft. 10:40 AM 2.0 ft. 11:29 AM 2.2 ft. 12:04 PM 2.4 ft. 12:35 PM 2.5 ft. 1:03 PM 2.7 ft. 1:30 PM High 1.7 ft. 12:34 PM 1.8 ft. 2:32 PM 1.6 ft. 4:11 PM 1.3 ft. 5:13 PM 0.9 ft. 6:00 PM 0.4 ft. 6:41 PM 0.0 ft. 7:21 PM Low 2.0 ft. 6:15 PM 1.9 ft. 8:10 PM 2.1 ft. 10:00 PM 2.3 ft. 11:06 PM 2.5 ft. 11:58 PM High Thu Mar 1, 12 Fri Mar 2, 12 Sat Mar 3, 12 Sun Mar 4, 12 Mon Mar 5, 12 Tue Mar 6, 12 Wed Mar 7, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 12:33 AM High -0.0 ft. 1:59 AM -0.1 ft. 3:14 AM -0.2 ft. 4:15 AM -0.3 ft. 5:04 AM -0.3 ft. 5:46 AM -0.2 ft. 6:24 AM -0.1 ft. 6:58 AM Low 2.3 ft. 6:36 PM 1.8 ft. 11:50 AM 1.9 ft. 12:25 PM 2.0 ft. 12:52 PM 2.0 ft. 1:14 PM 2.1 ft. 1:32 PM 2.1 ft. 1:48 PM High 1.4 ft. 1:58 PM 1.4 ft. 3:37 PM 1.2 ft. 4:41 PM 1.0 ft. 5:30 PM 0.8 ft. 6:12 PM 0.5 ft. 6:52 PM Low 2.2 ft. 7:46 PM 2.2 ft. 9:06 PM 2.3 ft. 10:23 PM 2.4 ft. 11:31 PM HighGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 1 March 7First March 30 Full March 7 Last March 14 New March 22Major Times 6:59 AM 8:59 AM 7:24 PM 9:24 PM Minor Times 1:42 AM 2:42 AM 12:14 PM 1:14 PM Major Times 7:49 AM 9:49 AM 8:15 PM 10:15 PM Minor Times 2:31 AM 3:31 AM 1:07 PM 2:07 PM Major Times 8:41 AM 10:41 AM 9:06 PM 11:06 PM Minor Times 3:19 AM 4:19 AM 2:03 PM 3:03 PM Major Times 9:32 AM 11:32 AM 9:58 PM 11:58 PM Minor Times 4:03 AM 5:03 AM 3:03 PM 4:03 PM Major Times 10:24 AM 12:24 PM 10:49 PM 12:49 AM Minor Times 4:45 AM 5:45 AM 4:04 PM 5:04 PM Major Times 11:15 AM 1:15 PM 11:40 PM 1:40 AM Minor Times 5:26 AM 6:26 AM 5:08 PM 6:08 PM Major Times --:---:-12:06 PM 2:06 PM Minor Times 6:04 AM 7:04 AM 6:12 PM 7:12 PM Average+ Average+ Average Average Good Better Best7:02 am 6:36 pm 12:15 pm 1:42 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:01 am 6:37 pm 1:08 pm 2:32 am 7:00 am 6:37 pm 2:04 pm 3:19 am 6:59 am 6:38 pm 3:04 pm 4:04 am 6:58 am 6:39 pm 4:05 pm 4:46 am 6:57 am 6:40 pm 5:09 pm 5:26 am 6:55 am 6:40 pm 6:13 pm 6:05 am51% 58% 64% 71% 77% 84% 92% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 12

Continued from Page 1AAnother issue Shuff feels strongly about is the need for citizen input. Decisions need to be geared toward all the citizens in the county, Shuff said. Shuff said he decided to run for county commission after he semi-retired in January. He has owned a contracting business in Wakulla County since 1976. I have a lot of energy, Shuff said. And its very satisfying to do something good and to feel like you helped do that. Shuff said he has been involved in the Chamber for years and was instrumental in the renovations of the old courthouse. In being heavily involved in the Chamber, he also became active with the local government and served on the Construction Licensing and Appeals Board, landscaping ordinance writing committee, infrastructure committee. He said his life experiences would make him uniquely quali ed to serve as a county commissioner. I have the time, experience and desire to treat this opportunity as a regular job so that the decisions I make will be reasoned, informed and in the best interests of Wakulla County, Shuff said. Shuff grew up in a Navy family and settled in Jacksonville in 1961. He was an Eagle Scout and camp counselor during his high school and college years. He graduated from Florida State University in 1970 with a degree in international affairs and geography. He went on to graduate school, but eventually left to become a contractor. He got his contractors license and moved to Wakulla County in 1973. In 1976, he opened his own business. He is married to Petra Shuff. Continued from Page 1A Though Elizabeths husband would go down in local history as the rst pharmacist in Wakulla, Elizabeth became something of an uncommon legend. But not for all the right reasons. My mom had a pretty extensive life before she got married, says Betsy. Her family had a long history in Pennsylvania in a community that spoke German. Those aspects of her culture were still intact. She was given her dads car when he passed, and she drove across country. She worked in Washington state, traveled to Mexico and Italy. She enjoyed her opinions and liked a good debate. She was very much the outsider politically and temperamentally. In 1963, the Beatles made their rst U.S. television appearance while Frank Sinatra Jr. was being kidnapped. That year Dr. King made a famous speech during the March on Washington, followed weeks later by the death of four black girls in a Birmingham church victims of a Ku Klux Klan bombing. It was also the year Americas 35th President, John F. Kennedy, made an ill-fated trip to Texas. It was this backdrop that would set the stage for Smiths rst edition of the Magnolia Monthly in October 1963. She speaks strongly in the publication about womens issues; the practices of slavery and peonage in the county along with the cost to be paid for keeping others in a state of severe servitude; education; politics; and the forward thinking of preparing for a technological age. The Magnolia Monthly is packed with stories of her travels to Czechoslovakia, Sweden, Germany and more, in search of clues as to how the human species managed to survive in an ever-changing world, in which most of the changes seemed not to be in their best interest. Those were the times, says Betsy, and its the times that make certain things relevant. She was opinionated and politically in a different realm than some people. She encouraged her children to be independent. She did what she wanted and brushed off the controversy. As her daughter, I often thought she was clueless about certain things, but as I grow older, I think her methods were intentionally downplayed. Smith documented the countys history and that of its people through extensive research and interviews with many older residents. Her collection of family histories, local politics, Wakullas educational system, courtroom dramas, the misdeeds of county commissioners and a great deal more became countywide discussion during the 1960s and s. Not only was it a publication that set the communitys teeth on edge, it remains today as one of the largest collections of county history available. Elizabeth F. Smith would continue to write the awardwinning Magnolia Monthly until her death in 1977. The State Archives of Florida collection of her work contain personal papers from 1935 to 1977, including diaries, scrapbooks and other correspondence. Her diaries re ect her early interest in writing; her personal views on social and political issues; and information on her early family life and the people close to her. Scrapbooks re ect her academic life, participation in the war effort in Florida, the birth of her children, family history and tidbits on life in North Florida. WakullaStory: A Hankerin for Headhuntin will cover the early years of Smiths publication (19631965), and plans future theatrical works based on her extensive research. A Womans Work in Wakulla is a panel discussion that explores the role women have played throughout the ages and stages of the county. The event will launch this years WakullaStory. The moderator will Dr. Rachel SutzPienta, College of Education professor at Valdosta State University and Women Studies at FSU. Panelists include Dr. Madeleine Carr, historian of American History; Tammie Bar eld, general manager of The Wakulla News; Andrea Carter, former educator and principal within the countys school system; Anginita Rosier, Sopchoppy city commission; Colleen Skipper, Mayor of Sopchoppy; Susan Solburg, longtime performing arts educator for the county school system; and Betsy Smith, daughter of Elizabeth and Harold Smith. My mother was a voice of the times, says Betsy Smith and her voice went far beyond Wakulla. She wanted to see social progress and advancement. Back then people needed for someone to stand up and tell it like it was. And maybe its that time now. With all thats going on in the country, it feels like the 60s all over again. HERB DONALDSON Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWakullaStory: A Hankerin for a HeadhuntinWHEN: Friday, March 9 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, March 10 at 3 p.m. WHERE: Sopchoppy School Auditorium. TICKETS: $10 for general public (general seating); $7 for members of Wakulla Historical Society; $5 for students; free for children 11 and younger.CAST: Pat Chamburs, Constance Clineman, Kenneth Clineman, Layne Davis, Betty Green, Judith Harriss, Karen Henry, Shirley Howard, Karen Johnson, Doug Jones, Desmond Maxwell, Helen McLaughlin, Murray McLaughlin, Brianna Nelson, Michael Patrick Nicholson, Taryn P ster, Susan Schatzman and Tawanna Williams. LIGHT/SOUND: Mike Sherlock/MSR Services. Online: www.wakullahistory.com Phone: (850) 926-1110 WakullaStory performancesPANEL DISCUSSION: A Womans Work in Wakulla WHEN: Thursday, March 8 WHERE: Wakulla County Public Library TIME: 7 p.m. MODERATOR: Rachel Sutz Pienta PANELISTS: Andrea Carter, Susan Solburg, Anginita Rosier, Madeleine Carr, Colleen Skipper, Tammie Bar eld and Betsy Smith.A Womans Work in WakullaContinued from Page 1A In the draft, those areas which would be required to install nitrogen reducing systems are Bloxham Cutoff at the county line east to Crawfordville Highway; Crawfordville Highway south to East Ivan Road; East Ivan Road south to Wakulla Arran; Wakulla Arran west to Cajer Posey Road; Cajer Posey Road south to Shadeville Highway; Shadeville Highway east to Woodville Highway; and Woodville Highway north to the county line. The requirement would also extend to those properties near rivers and streams, wet sinks or swallets where the onsite sewage system is to be installed within 150 feet of the high water level. Properties where the total acreage is less than 229 contiguous acres of deeded property will also be required to have nitrogen reducing systems. The properties outside those zones will be required to hook up to municipal sewage, if available, otherwise they may install a standard septic system. Merritt said if the area is smaller, the county can keep a closer eye on them and ensure people are maintaining the systems. We can concentrate our efforts and get a lot better return, Merritt said. Commissioner Lynn Artz said there is a misconception that these requirements were done to only protect Wakulla Springs. They were also done to protect the coastal areas. Both of the recent studies show the recharge area being Wakulla Springs and Spring Creek, Artz said. Commissioner Alan Brock said he would also like to see the county look at including Wakulla Springs and Spring Creek. Also included in the study are those areas which are vulnerable to pollution, Artz said. Those were Medart, Crawfordville, North Crawfordville, Wakulla Springs and Panacea, and most of these areas are not included in the proposed area, she added. We already have in this county a pollution problem, Artz said. However, she said the comments she is hearing from those who want to change the policies is not that there isnt a pollution problem, but that the septic systems are expensive. The whole thrust of this is backwards, Artz said. She suggested addressing the nancial concerns, instead of backing off on addressing the pollution problem. One option was allowing people to make payments on the new system, which costs around $6,000. Commissioner Mike Stewart said people would still be paying for the septic tank, they would just be doing it over time. Commissioner Jerry Moore said people cant afford the high cost of these systems. He added that there is proof the performancebased systems dont work and people turn them off. Juarez said in the rst year, when inspections were performed, it was determined about 40 percent of the systems were being turned off. Now, only about 5 to 10 percent are being turned off. However, Merritt wondered if people knew when inspections were going to be performed and simply turned the systems on when the inspector arrived and turned them right back off when they left. Artz said the reference that the systems dont work is untrue. They cut the pollution in half, Artz said. Juarez said most of the systems in the county do not reduce the nitrogen levels by 90 percent, which is what is required in the policy. There were a few that did obtain 90 percent, he said, but most were reaching the national average of 50 percent. Included in the proposed revisions is changing the 90 percent to 50 percent to be in line with federal standards, Juarez said. Also included in the revisions is the allowance of repairs within a certain dollar amount for people who live in the proposed enforcement area. A standard repair or modi cation may be done if it does not exceed $1,500. Once over that amount, a new performance based systems must be installed, Merritt said. The commission voted four to one, with Artz opposing, to move forward with the Comprehensive Plan text amendment. The amendment will go before the planning commission, then a public hearing will be held, the county commission will vote on the item, and if approved, it will then go to the state for review and then it comes back to the county commission for approval. In the meantime, the county staff will be working on the changes to the land development code which would include the speci c septic tank requirements.Board may revise septic tank policyJohn Shu announces candidacy 713-001499 Rock Landing Road OPEN: THURSDAY ............. 4 P.M. 9 P.M. Friday .............................. 4 P.M. 10 P.M. Saturday .................. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. SUNDAY ...........................11 A.M. 9 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAAMARCH INTOTWO BIGYARD SALESMAR. 2 & 3MAR. 16 & 17 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Feb. 17, Susan Wilson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle crash on East Ivan Road in Crawfordville. The victim heard a loud noise near the end of her driveway and discovered a vehicle had run into her fence and left the scene. The vehicle struck a telephone box and telephone pole and slid through the victims fence. Evidence was collected at the scene and damage to the fence, phone pole and phone box was estimated at $1,500. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Feb. 16, Bonita Holub of Panacea reported a vehicle burglary as someone entered her car and removed a laptop computer and an iPad computer. The stolen property was valued at $3,100. On Feb. 16, Dustin Heath Raker, 27, of Crawfordville was charged with knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license suspended, resisting an of- cer without violence, possession of marijuana less than 20 grams and possession of narcotics equipment following a traf c stop in Crawfordville. Raker reportedly admitted he did not possess a valid driver license and allegedly resisted Deputy Sean Wheeler as he attempted to place Rakers hands in handcuffs. The deputy allegedly observed cannabis and a smoking pipe in plain view inside the vehicle. The cannabis reportedly weighed seven grams. A computer tablet was seized to protect it from damage during the vehicle towing phase and was turned over to Detective Erika Buckley. A 15-year-old juvenile inside the vehicle was not charged. On Feb. 16, Dorothy Mitchell of Crawfordville and the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department reported a second theft of a re extinguisher from the recreation park in the same week. The equipment is valued at $50. On Feb. 17, June Lee of Lees Liquor Mart in Crawfordville reported a retail theft. Fifteen Lottery tickets, valued at $163, were reported missing. Some of the tickets were recovered in the trash. Winning tickets were discovered, but were not validated and of no cash value. On Feb. 20, a female victim reported a violation of a court-ordered injunction. A suspect, who was identi ed from the Wakulla County Jail, called the victim on the telephone on two occasions. The injunction included a no-contact clause and the inmate admitted to calling the victim twice. The 38-year-old inmate was charged with contempt of court for willful violation of the injunction. On Feb. 20, David Morgan of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to file his tax return when he discovered that someone had already used his Social Security number. On Feb. 20, Cecil Bowen of Crawfordville reported a theft of marine items. A battery was taken from one of his vessels and a fuel line and tank was stolen from another boat. The property is valued at $155. On Feb. 20, William Harris of Crawfordville reported a theft at the Ship Yard Hunting Club. Someone cut the cable gate to the property and stole four rustic water pumps, valued at $300 each. On Feb. 20, Jared Causseaux of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Someone stole four baseball gloves from the victims carport. The property is valued at $400. On Feb. 20, Dorothy Milton of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim entered into an agreement to have cabinets built at her home. The victim paid a subject $3,000 to get started and the check was cashed. The work on the cabinets did not take place. On Feb. 19, James Coleman of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone damaged a door at a neighboring unoccupied mobile home. Damage was estimated at less than $200. On Feb. 19, Joshua Adam Eures, 31, of Crawfordville was arrested for retail theft for stealing a bottle of alcohol from Dux Liquors in Crawfordville. Employees allegedly observed the suspect shove a bottle into his pants and run from the establishment. Eures was apprehended by Lt. Jimmy Sessor in a wooded area near the establishment and the bottle was recovered. It was valued at $39. On Feb. 19, Mary Robinson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left her purse inside her vehicle. The wallet and contents taken were valued at $55. The victim left her vehicle unlocked. On Feb. 18, Roy Lafayette Avery IV, 18, of Sopchoppy was issued a notice to appear in court for hosting an open house party in Sopchoppy. Lt. Jimmy Sessor and Sgt. Ray Johnson were working Party Patrol in Sopchoppy when they observed a large crowd at Averys home. Several subjects under the age of 21 were observed at the scene along with a large quantity of alcohol. The alcohol was turned over to people at the party who were of legal drinking age and they were asked to leave the residence. On Feb. 18, Shawn Michael Ridley, 25, of Crawfordville was arrested for disorderly intoxication following an altercation on Wakulla Arran Road. Lt. Mike Kemp was attempting to speak to Ridley when he charged the deputy. A relative tried to stop Ridley, but he charged Kemp a second time and was subdued with the deployment of a Taser. On Feb. 17, Brandi Escorpizo of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A television, valued at $2,000, was taken from a shed on the property. On Feb. 18, concerned citizens from Crawfordville reported a suspicious vehicle on Pebble Court in Crawfordville. Witnesses observed the vehicle go from one home to another and remove five marine batteries. The batteries were from boats owned by Terry Mitchell Johnson of Jacksonville and John Roger Johnston of Newberry and are valued at $500. Suspects have been identi ed. On Feb. 18, Kenneth Thomas of Panacea reported a grand theft of marine batteries from Ochlockonee Bay. The batteries are valued at $300 and are owned by Richard Dean Rogers of Tallahassee and Raymond Michael Chase of Tallahassee. Later, on Feb, 21, Detective Derek Lawhon was investigating that case and discovered another boat that was missing a battery. It is owned by James Pokorski. A witness in the case was able to identity Ryan Travis Perez, 18, who was arrested on three counts of burglary and three counts of theft. Since Perez used his vehicle in the commission of a felony, his vehicle was seized and placed in the WCSO Impound Yard. On Feb. 21, Kevin Riggles of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at the recreation park in Crawfordville. Both restrooms were vandalized as toilets were broken and toilet paper was thrown around. A hydraulic door mechanism was also stolen. Damage was estimated at $250 and the restrooms were ooded. On Feb. 21, Michael Cozzy of Crawfordville reported a structure re. A re started in the kitchen and was concentrated in the stove area. Damage was reported to a microwave oven. There was no structural damage to the home. Firefighters determined the stove had an electrical failure and damage was estimated at $1,500. On Feb. 21, Adrian Daniel Pittman, 30, of Crawfordville was arrested for knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license was suspended or revoked. Deputy Cole Wells conducted a traf c stop after observing the driver cross the center line twice. The drivers license was revoked in 2010. On Feb. 22, John Thomas of Sopchoppy reported a burglary of a chain saw and pole saw, valued at $330. The saw were removed from a storage container at his home. On Feb. 22, Neil Watts of Sopchoppy and ESG reported the grand theft of a utility trailer. The trailer, valued at $1,000, was taken from the county property at Trice Lane. The trailer was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. On Feb. 22, Kelly Hand of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received a letter from a Texas bank stating that her account was overdrawn. The victim never opened a bank account in Texas. Somebody used her Social Security number to open it. During the week, there continued to be numerous reports of fraudulent income t ax returns being led. Citizens would go to le their return and nd it reported that their Social Security number or other personal information had been used to le returns. On Feb. 22, Jimmie Gavin of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a water tank and water pump from property owned by an Illinois relative. Metal was also taken from a vacant mobile home and garage. The total value of the scrap metal is $2,000. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 843 calls for service during the past week including 18 residential and business alarms; 59 citizen contacts; 19 disturbances; 10 ag downs; 61 investigations; 44 medical emergencies; 10 thefts; 34 traf c stops; 10 disabled vehicles; 13 reckless vehicles; 12 wanted people; and 12 watch orders.Sheri s Report www.snapper.com LT125 285Z*Additional 1 year of limited warranty coverage is available on select models in stock. Current limited warranty duration is 2 y ears. This promotion extends the product warranty coverage to a total of 3 year s from the date of purchase. Engines are warranted separate ly and are not included in the promotional warranty period described above. Qualifying products include: select walk-behind mower s, rear-engine riders, RE200, NXT lawn tractors, LT 300 lawn tractors, YT400 yard tractors, 150Z, 200Z, 285Z, 300Z and 355Z. Produ cts not eligible for this rebate include: All SE series walk-behind mo wers, LT125 lawn tractors, SPX lawn tractors, 400Z, 500Z, pre ssure washers, generators, tillers, chipper shredder, brush cutters, leaf blowers, leaf va cuums, mini cultivators, attachments and ac cessories. Limited warranty applies to residential consumer use only. Qualifying product must be purchased between 3/1/12 and 5/31/12. Completion of product registration by the selling dealer is necessa ry to validate the date of purchase for proof of warranty. N o other warranty or implied warranty by the manufacturer exists except where required by law. This warranty gives you specic rights th at vary from state to state. Offer valid only in U.S. and Canada. Refer to the products operators manual for warranty details.1 YEAR OF ADDITIONAL PRODUCT WARRANTY COVERAGE AT NO ADDITIONAL COST!*TAKEADVANTAGEOF THISOFFER FORATOTALOF 3 YEARSOF WARRANTYCOVERAGESee dealer for details120055 I$1,999$2,899 2219 Crawfordville Hwy. www.3youtdoorequipment.com

PAGE 14

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comSWINE SHOWThe 46th annual Wakulla Area Swine Show was held on Feb. 25 at the livestock pavilion in Crawfordville and show judge, Ed Sapp, awarded grand champion to Natalie Hurst and reserve champion to Oliver Green. The show started with the showmanship competition, which was broken into five different age groups. Johnny Piland took first place for those exhibitors who were 15 years old and older; Colton McCulley was awarded rst for 13 to 14 year olds; Lincoln Porter was rst place for 10 to 11 year olds; and Oliver Green was awarded rst place for 8 to 9 year olds. The youngest exhibitors were 6 and 7 years old and Brayden Lawhon took rst place in that age group. Following the youth exhibitors, several former exhibitors participated in the alumni showmanship. Richard Gowdy won in that category. The class winners were Johnny Piland, class 1; Cole Gowdy, class 2; Gabriel Gowdy, class 3; Oliver Green, class 4; Natalie Hurst, class 5; and Branden Piland, class 6. The Herdsman Award went to Lincoln Porter. The Spirit Award was awarded to Brayden Lawhon and the Presidents Excellence Award was given to Oliver Green. The rst place team for junior judging went to Anna Green, Lockland Vause and Natalie Hurst. The rst place individual was awarded to Dawson Vause. The rst place team for senior judging went to Mikayla Flornoy, Kara Fowler and Torri Harrell of Liberty County. The rst place individual was awarded to Torri Harell of Liberty County. After those in attendance and the participants nished up their barbecue lunch, the pig scramble was held. Swine Show Winners LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA group shot of all the participants in the Swine Show on Saturday. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENGrand champion Natalie Hurst, above, brushes off her pig during the showing. Connor Scott, at right, guides his pig away from the fence as spectators watch. JENNIFER JENSENGet out of the way! Its the pig scramble. The fth annual Ochlockonee River Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival was held this past weekend and included atlatl demonstrations, bow making, knapping, deer hide brain tanning, basket weaving and pottery. Several competitions were held over the weekend, including the knapping contest. Steve Holloway won the event. Primitive bow and arrow shoot contest was also More photos online at thewakullanews.com Stone Age Festivalheld and Donnie Collins won. There was also an atlatl contest which was won by Mark Bracken. Those in attendance could bid on donated artwork in the auction, as well as visit the many different vendors who offered arrow heads, dream catchers, necklaces, baskets and other items.PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011follow us on facebook Call 866.484.7057Espaol 866.960.7085Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV Now you have a better TV choice.[ The CenturyLink Prism Project. ]GET ON THE COUCH AND SEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Packages starting at $39.99a month for 6 months*CenturyLinkTM PrismTM.Interactive TV you control any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. Prism Project Demonstrations are with non-Prism TV customers using basic CenturyLink Prism TV service with standard featur es in High Definition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/11 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional actors, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. *Offer ends 5/31/2012. Offer and stated rates are available to new, first-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers onl y. The stated monthly rate of $39.99 applies to Prism TV programming package, and applies only for the first six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional i nstallation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. An $8.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with the Prism TV programming package. Promotional offer cannot be combined with any other Prism of fers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees and surcharges will apply. Custome r must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the 3-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to spec ific locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restric tions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at http://about.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees and Surcharges Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply, including a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time High -Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charg es for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicab le taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate for All Service Bundles The monthly rate for all bundled services will apply while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more s ervices are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. CenturyLink Prism TV All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box, one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct vid eo streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided set-top boxes are required to view TV. If a term commitment is required for liste d Prism offer and customer terminates those services before the end of the applicable term commitment, CenturyLink will assess an early termination fee of $120, reduced by $10 for each month that customer has paid in full for those services during that term commitment. Local channel availability varies by market. Caller ID service must be purchased separately to enable the on-screen Caller ID feature; Caller ID feature is not available in all areas. High Definition (HD) available on all TV plans for an addit ional $11.99/month, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of set-top boxes (STBs) in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard definition. Subscription to service precludes customers from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for Prism Premiu m plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscripti on services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Customer may dial 67 (touchtone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to opera te correctly, customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) ST Bs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) rem ote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service dis connection in an undamaged condition, or customer will be cha rged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism TV Plan Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners.

PAGE 15

Special to The NewsOur monthly networking luncheon, well attended by 42 members, was held at Wakulla Springs Lodge on Wednesday, Feb. 22. The lodge graciously waved the entrance fee to the park. Again this time, we saw a lot of members, or new associates that we have not yet had the opportunity to meet thank you for joining us. For the several brand new members in attendance, it was an opportunity to introduce themselves, and give the audience a quick glimpse of what they do and what their business is about. Lisa Russell, shop owner of the recently opened store, Lisas Timeless Treasures in Sopchoppy, invited everyone to visit and drop in anytime to look around. Jo Ann Palmer, director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, was excited about rejoining the Chamber, and reminded everyone of the hazardous waste day coming up March 24, giving you an opportunity to drop off old batteries and other items that should not go into a land ll. More information is posted on the Chamber website. She also invited everyone to come on out to the 19th Hole at Wildwood Golf Course on Feb. 27 for the rst social, kicking off the Great American Cleanup. Continued on Page 3B Taking Care of Business Business News from Business News from Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 The battle for leadership in the state Senate: The future is nowWeekly Roundup, Page 9BBusiness Spotlight: Stow Away CenterNominations sought for Business AwardsChamberNews, Page 3B Presidents MessageBy AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentSupport of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce is important to businesses, professionals, and all citizens because it pays real dividends in the form of creating more businesses and better living conditions to make Wakulla County a more desirable community in which to live. If you havent renewed your membership, contact Petra at the Chamber office today to make the necessary arrangements. We need you now more than ever. To our new members, we appreciate the investment you have made to protect the future of Wakulla businesses. CHAMBER ACTIVITIES This year has already started with a bang so I will briefly mention a few of the initiatives we have been involved in that many of you will be hearing more about in our next newsletter. On Feb. 9, the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners hosted a public workshop on Economic Development in Wakulla County. The goal of the workshop was to bring together different organizations working to promote economic development in our community and have each organization give a presentation on what their organization does to promote economic growth in Wakulla. I would like to thank Kevin Vaughn, our EDC chair, and John Shuff, past president, for assisting with our presentation. We all came away with a better understanding of the resources available and look forward to working with our local of cials in the future. Our Economic Development Council, a subsidiary of the Chamber, has been working with our Commerce and Government Committee on Wakulla 2020. Continued on Page 3B Chamber membership is importantNetworking lunch at Wakulla Springs SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChamber members Petra Myrick, Susan Schatzman, Sandy Lott and David Rosetti share a table. Courtney Peacock, Amy Geiger, Zoe Mans eld and June Vause at the Chamber networking luncheon. Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, March 9 F riday, March 23 Friday, April 13 Friday, April 27 Friday, May 11 Friday, May 25 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA NP-0000653372 AreYouHard OfHearing? Amajornamebrandhearingaidprovider wishestoeldtestaremarkablenewdigital hearinginstrumentinthearea.Thisoffer isfreeofchargeandyouareunderno obligation. Theserevolutionary100%Digitalinstruments usethelatesttechnologytocomfortablyand almostinvisiblyhelpyouhearmoreclearly. Thistechnologysolvesthestoppedupears, andheadinabarrelsensationsomepeople experience. Ifyouwishtoparticipate,youwillbe requiredtohaveyourhearingtestedinour ofce FREEOFCHARGE todetermine candidacyandreviewyourresultswiththe hearinginstrumentswithourhearingcare specialist. Attheendofthisevaluation,youmay keepyourinstrument,ifyousodesire,at atremendoussavingforparticipatinginthiseldtest.Specialtestingwillbe donetodeterminetheincreasedtsofthistechnology. tsofhearingaidsvarybytypeanddegreeofhearingloss,noise environment,accuracyofhearingtest,andpropert. Thisisawonderful opportunitytodetermineifhearinghelpisavailableforyourhearingloss andgethearinghelpataveryordableprice.CALLNOWIFYOUWISHTOBE INCLUDEDINTHISFIELDTESTNOWThroughMarch 29, 2012 Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. The Log Cabin Barry Building

PAGE 16

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, March 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, March 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at the Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For current information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol.com, Linda Wood at 899-0025 in Port St. Joe, or email Sheri at skpsky2000@comcast.net. Sunday, March 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, March 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, March 6 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Cr awfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. WAKULLA COUNTY COALITION FOR YOUTH will meet from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. at the library. Thirty professionals/ disciplines are represented at each meeting. The group uses a holistic approach towards the betterment of childrens lives in Wakulla County. The public is welcome to attend. Thursday, March 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, March 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Special EventsThursday, March 1 ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS will be held at 5:30 p.m. at Wakulla High School. The night begins with a silent art auction. As last year, each school has produced a painted canvas for the public to bid upon. At 6:30, the performances begin with singing from the elementary students, followed by musical performances and skits from Wakulla Middle, Riversprings Middle and Wakulla High Schools. Tickets may be purchased at the door and prices are $2 for students and $5 for adults. FREE LECTURE on the Natural Bridge Campaign, then and now, will be presented by Dr. William Lees, executive director of the Florida Archaeology Network, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center. The free lecture is hosted by the Florida Public Archaeology Network, University of West Florida and the Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center. This lecture series is free and open to everyone. Friday, March 2 35TH ANNUAL BATTLE OF NATURAL BRIDGE REENACTMENT will be held today, Saturday and Sunday at Natural Bridge Battle eld Historic State Park, 7502 Natural Bridge Road, Tallahassee. School day will take place for middle school and high school students, starting at 10:30 a.m. There will be multiple stations set up around the state park with living historians giving 19th century demonstrations. Students are welcome to pack a lunch with them. Please feel free to contact the Natural Bridge State Park for more information at (850) 922-6007 ,The CSO will accept donations of $3.00 per person for adults and $1.00 for children under the age of six. SPECIAL OLYMPICS FLORIDA WAKULLA COUNTY SUMMER GAMES will take place at Wakulla High School from 9:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wakulla County athletes will be competing in sporting events, such as track and eld and Bocce. Everyone is invited to come out and support these athletes. For more information contact Susan Scherbarth at 322-7427. Saturday, March 3 35TH ANNUAL BATTLE OF NATURAL BRIDGE REENACTMENT will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the state park. Guests will mingle with civil war re-enactors and observe a Confederate-Union skirmish in the afternoon, cavalry demonstrations, artillery shows and a 19th century medical demonstration in the afternoon direct following the skirmish. 19th century sutlers and food vendors will be present. Please feel free to contact the Natural Bridge State Park for more information at (850) 922-6007 ,The CSO will accept donations of $3.00 per person for adults and $1.00 for children under the age of six. BE A HERO TO OUR HEROES community-wide sh fry will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. Veterans Services of Wakulla is co-sponsoring this event to help support and honor Wakulla County U.S. military service members who are currently away from home. For more information regarding the event, contact Glenda Washington at 599-5999. CONCERT BY BELMONT & JONES, Carrie Hamby and Charlie Engstrom, will be held at Posh Java at 8 p.m. Original music and blues from the well of deep country. Hamby lives in Tallahassee and Engstrom in New Orleans, La. Both are seasoned musicians and songwriters in many styles of music, this show will take us back in time to when the blues were pure and simple, and soulfully true. For reservations contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Sunday, March 4 OPENING CEREMONIES AND DEDICATION of the 35th annual re-enactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge will be held, followed by a full-scale reenactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge at 2:30 p.m. 19th century sutlers and food vendors will be present. Please feel free to contact the Natural Bridge State Park for more information at (850) 922-6007 ,The CSO will accept donations of $3.00 per person for adults and $1.00 for children under the age of six. FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE will present The Fungus Amongus: Mushroom Basics by Bill Petty, master gardener, naturalist, author and past president of the Sarracenia chapter of the Native Plant Society at 2 p.m. He will discuss mushroom shapes, ecology, nutrients, and relationships between fungi and other organisms. A brief mushroom hunt will follow. The presentation will be held in the Natures Classroom of the Environmental Education Center at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Call 850.925-6121 for additional information or visit www.fws.gov/saintmarks/.Upcoming Events Friday, March 9 WAKULLASTORY: A Hankerin for Headhuntin will be presented at 7 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy Highschool. It is presented by The Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society, written by Herb Donaldson, artistic director, based on the writings of Elizabeth Fisher Smith, creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly Magazine. Saturday, March 10 SECOND ANNUAL LOW COUNTRY BOIL will be held at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville from 6 to 10 p.m. The event will feature a Low Country Boil dinner, and live music by JBs Zydeco Zoo. For tickets contact the Chamber of ce (850) 926-1848. PUBLIC TALK ON From Google Earth to Google Embryo: Exploring the Spheres We Grow From will be held at 7:30 p.m. at Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory, 222 Clark Drive, Panacea. Dick and Natalie Gordon are new scientist volunteers who are establishing the Embryogenesis Center. Admission is free, membership encouraged. Contact Richard Gordon at 984-5297 or by email DickGordonCan@gmail. com. FOURTH ANNUAL JESUS RIVER FESTIVAL will be held at Sopchoppy City Park from noon until dark. Additional information can be found at jesusriverfest.com. WAKULLASTORY: A Hankerin for Headhuntin will be presented at 3 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy Highschool. It is presented by The Palaver Tree Theater Co. and the Wakulla County Historical Society, written by Herb Donaldson, artistic director, based on the writings of Elizabeth Fisher Smith, creator and editor of the Magnolia Monthly Magazine. Thursday, March 15 FREE LECTURE on Adventures in Northwest Florida Archaeology by Dr. Nancy White, Professor of Archaeology at the University of South Florida, will be held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center. The free lecture is hosted by the Florida Public Archaeology Network, University of West Florida and the Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center. This lecture series is free and open to everyone. RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL THEATRE TROUPE will present Next Victim, Please at 7 p.m. This is a tongue-in-cheek murder mystery. Admission is free, but donations are graciously accepted. The concession will be open prior to the show and at intermission. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Annual Celebration of the Arts at Wakulla High School at 5:30 p.m. Special Olympics Summer Games at Wakulla High School 9:15 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Fish Fry for military 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Battle of Natural Bridge Re-enactment at 2:30 p.m. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsMonday, March 5 PUBLIC RECORDS COMMITTEE will meet at 2 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room, 3093 Crawfordville Highway. COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, March 8 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for a budget workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Belmont and Jones will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy on March 3 at 8 p.m.

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 3B Taking Care of Business Taking Care of Business Business News from Business News from Continued from Page 1B Catherine Cameron, recently retired, opened her own business in the county, LKR Communications and Translations. Besides translating from or to Spanish, she also holds telephone excellence seminars. Michael Weltman, recently re-joined under a new business, First Bank, and has more than 10 years of experience in FHA reverse mortgages, and leads the Senior Products Division. Elva Peppers with Florida Environmental Land Services shared that her company works on environmental studies, and permitting for seawalls and docks in Wakulla. Upcoming events shared: TCC Workforce Development is offering a Spanish class, taught by Kathy Hallowell, a former Spanish teacher. This is a three-hour class once a week for six weeks. For more information, call 9226290. David Rosetti called for sponsors for a bene t horse show held by Cauzican Care and Allens Equestrian Services dedicated to the rescue of animals in need. The bene t will take place May 26 at 3Y Ranch. For advertising, sponsorship or information call Allens Equestrian Services Gay Allen at (850) 567-3228. Elena Myhre recently joined Southern Flooring in Crawfordville, and invited everyone to come visit their new showroom for all your ooring needs. Elena is excited to have the opportunity to be more active in the Chamber, and is a wonderful addition to our young crowd of members. Jo Ann Palmer introduced her guest, Planning and Community Development Director Luis Serna. John Shuff announced his candidacy for County Commission, District 5, and invited anyone to contact him to share their issues, and ask his views on them. Susan Payne Turner was the proud winner of our $42 cash drawing. We want to thank our attending members for their donated prizes to our raf e, which included homemade jams and pepper jelly, $50 travel cards, ashlights, annual planners, gift baskets, scratch-off lotto tickets, T-shirts, complimentary pest control service and free termite inspection and more. Plan to join us next month, Wednesday, March 28. The Wakulla Extension graciously offered to host our luncheon at their facility, 84 Cedar Avenue in Crawfordville. Jim Lowe with Hamaknockers will be catering. Watch for the invitation and if you are not a Chamber member, membership has many advantages, and we invite you to join us. Contact Petra Shuff at (850) 926-1848 for information.Networking lunch is held at Wakulla SpringsContinued from Page 1BLook for more details next month. On March 28, Bike Florida will be visiting Wakulla County, and will be staying overnight at The Wildwood Resort. Please come out and join us in welcoming the bicyclists to our community. UPCOMING EVENTS Listed below are just a few of the events hosted by the Chamber. We invite you to join us at these and other events! Second Annual Low Country Boil The Wakulla Chamber of Commerce Special Events Fundraising Committee is gearing up for our second Annual Low Country Boil. We are pleased to announce our premier sponsors for the event are Capital City Bank, The Wakulla News and Waste Pro. This evening of fun and great food will take place at 3Y Ranch in Crawfordville on Saturday, March 10, from 6 to 10 p.m. The event will feature a Low Country Boil dinner and live music by JBs Zydeco Zoo, whose fun, danceable music appeals to all ages and all tastes. Continuing with our pledge to support education, part of the proceeds from the event is again earmarked to support Wakulla County students through scholarships. In addition, a portion of the proceeds will enable us to continue restoration and furnishing the historic Wakulla County Courthouse; the only wooden courthouse still in use. Last years event sold out with an overwhelming response and we anticipate this years event to exceed your expectations. For tickets contact the Chamber office at (850) 926-1848. Business Excellence Awards Nominations are now being accepted for the 2012 Wakulla County Chamber Business Excellence Awards. This program is designed to recognize a Chamber Business of the Year, a Chamber Start-up Business of the Year, a Chamber Non-Pro t Organization of the Year, a Chamber Environmental Stewardship Business of the Year and new this year, a Chamber Member of the Year. A banquet honoring the winners will be held on Thursday, May 17, at the Senior Center. Please take this opportunity to submit your nominations and recognize a fellow Chamber member today! Nominations must be received by Friday, March 16. If you have any questions, please call either Petra Shuff (850) 926-1848 or Jo Ann Palmer (850) 9264095. Networking Luncheons The Chambers monthly networking luncheons for business professionals give individuals the opportunity to discuss and share ideas while learning about other local businesses. It is a relationship-building experience held each month at one of our local eateries that bene ts you and your company through added contacts and resources. If you havent joined us yet, you are missing out on a great event that is being attended by more than 40 other professionals. Be sure to RSVP for our March luncheon. Hamaknockers will be catering at the Wakulla Extension, 84 Cedar Ave. In closing, thank you for your continued support of the Chamber and the many professionals who give their time to our business community. I look forward to seeing you all at the Low Country Boil on March 10. Yours in Service, Amy GeigerGeiger: Chamber membership is importantTell us about your business: The Stow Away Center is located at the corner of Coastal Highway 98 and Spring Creek Highway. Formerly known as Galveston and Lindas Mini Warehouses, we purchased the property in 2007. Since that time we have added a covered boat shelter and additional fencing. Stow Away Marine & More features gently used and consignment boats, new and used parts and accessories to include Amsoil Oil, Interstate Batteries, propeller service and a repair and maintenance shop. We have plans to add more covered boat storage and additional self-storage buildings in the near future. We currently offer self-storage units ranging in size from 5x10 to 20x20 for commercial or residential use. We have a gated open or covered Boat/RV/Vehicle Storage area that has controlled access with personal codes for entry, and a rent-by-phone service for any time an after-hours rental is needed. We also have a full line of in-stock moving, packing and storage supplies (locks, boxes, tarps and more). We offer notary, copy and fax services. Half of our business-retail center is leased to Dr. Griggs of Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital, with one space leased to Stow Away Marine & More, and another space (approximately 600 square feet) available as of March 1. Our property is monitored with 24 hour remote video surveillance to help protect you and your valuables! What services, products do you offer? Self-Storage, Boat/RV/Auto Storage, 10 day emergency storage (during tropical storms, etc.), retail space, moving and storage supplies, of ce services, and boat sales and maintenance. What sets your business apart from the competition? You get the personal service and attention of an on-site, owner operated business. And you can stop in for, or I just might bring you out, a cold bottle of water if you look like you need one! What should the community/ customer expect when they visit your business? A well maintained, secure facility to stow your treasure; great customer service and a fair and competitive value. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 2007, when we purchased the center. Why did you join the Chamber? To get involved with the community, support the local Chamber of Commerce and to meet our fellow business owners! Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? I believe that life in general takes a village, whether you are talking about raising your children or your business. Whenever I have a project going on, I always call local people and hope that they would do the same keeping the business and pro ts in our own community! If anyone is interested in your products/ services, how do they contact you? The office phone number is (850) 926-5725. Sherris cell phone: (850) 3227106. Gerards cell phone: (850) 5564652. Visit our website at www.stowawaycenter.com. Or email us at stowaway@centurylink.net Additional comments: We support many local charities and have donated many months of storage to organizations such as the Promise Land Ministries, Heavens Garden Ministries, Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Progressive Pediatric Therapy and The Wakulla County Library just to mention a few. If you have a fundraiser coming up and need a place to secure your donations, you can call me too! Stow Away Center is located at 2669 Spring Creek Highway. The phone number is (850) 926-5725. Business: Stow Away Center Owners: Gerard and Sherri Merkle Merkle Enterprises LLCSpecial to The NewsChamber members were emailed a packet last week for the annual Business Excellence Awards, kicking off the 2012 Business Excellence Awards nomination process. We will again be presenting awards for the Business of the Year, Environmental Stewardship, Start-Up Business, NonPro t Business and new this year, the Chamber Member of the Year. All nominations for these categories must be submitted by a Chamber member, which includes employees of chamber members. We are also continuing to recognize the Wakulla Area Business of the Year, which is open to the public for nominations of any business in the Wakulla County area, member or non-member. Because the Chamber is a membership-based organization, we rely solely on membership dues along with fundraisers to accomplish everything we do. When membership is down, so are revenues. When sponsorships dry up, so do potential services. When people are closing their businesses, they dont remain members. This is why we feel so strongly about the Business Excellence Awards. There are businesses that have pushed through the challenges of the past couple of years and have survived on shoestring budgets, made adjustments, and have kept their doors open. Owners have done without for their employees and we want to recognize them. Every business in our area is critical to the survival of our community. We encourage you to help us recognize a deserving business by nominating your favorite business and bringing them to our attention. Added this year is the 2012 Chamber Member of the Year. This award is the idea of the Chamber Event Committee and is intended to recognize leadership and service. In thinking about how dif cult it has been for many businesses to be creative and keep customers coming back, we looked at what it takes, besides the brick and mortar, to be an excellent business, and recognized that it takes excellent employees. Employees and owners are the face of every business. This award will be given to an owner or an employee of a member business whose service and dedication have made a signi cant contribution to the Chamber and to the community. We want to recognize that one special person who exempli es the characteristics of what it means to go above and beyond the call of duty. If you have integrity, initiative, vision, innovation, leadership and commitment, we want to hear about you. Self-nominations are welcome. Everyone has a favorite bank teller, favorite vet tech, server at a local restaurant, cashier, business owner or county employee. Anyone who is employed, or owns a business that is a member of the Chamber is eligible to nominate and be nominated as the Chamber Member of the Year. Outstanding achievements are accomplished every day we want to know about them. The awards banquet is scheduled for May 17. Invitations will be emailed prior to the event. All nominees and their guests will be invited to attend. This year, we are especially excited once again to have the opportunity to recognize these businesses that stand out in our community, based on their service and commitment to our area. Nomination forms for all business excellence awards are available on the chamber website at wakullacountychamber. com, attached to this article on thewakullanews. com or you can contact the Chamber at 926-1848. We encourage everyone to submit a nomination. New members: Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Specializing in environmental education, community beauti cation projects and litter control. Capital City Maintenance Specializing in lawn maintenance, landscaping and steam pressure washing. Lisas Timeless Treasures A sweet shop in downtown Sopchoppy featuring antiques, vintage items and collectibles. Come and enjoy the past today! Upcoming luncheon: Hamaknockers will be catering at Wakulla Extension Facility 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville on March 28, from noon until 1:15 p.m. Upcoming ribbon cuttings: 11:30 a.m. at Chamber Ofce, 23 High Drive on Wednesday, March 7 for LKR Communications and Translations LLC.Chamber ChatterNominations open for Business Awards

PAGE 18

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary..........36 classrooms/newspapers.........$576/yr Medart Elementary...................33 classrooms/newspapers.........$528/yr Riversink Elementary................20 classrooms/newspapers.........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary..............40 classrooms/newspapers.........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School........10 classrooms/newspapers.........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name_________________________________ Address_______________________________ City_______________________State____Zip_________ Phone______________Email_______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) SHS Management held a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Feb. 21, joining the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce to celebrate the induction of Bridlewood Apartments, the latest addition to SHS Management LLC. Bridlewood Apartments offers 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartment homes with amenities that include pool, tness center, clubhouse and civil servant discounts. The fabulous community amenities, various oor plan designs, as well as excellent customer service makes this SHS property the perfect choice. SHS Management manages a diverse portfolio which includes student housing, residential, multi-family and commercial real estate. We are excited to be serving Crawfordville and Wakulla County. Bridlewood Apartments is located at 7 Home Stretch Lane (off Highway 61) in Crawfordville. The of ce number is (850) 926-1134, and the fax is (850) 926-1534. Bridlewood Apartments Critter Getter International GymThe Chamber held a ribbon cutting for new member Critter Control on Friday, Feb. 24. Critter Control is ranked No. 1 in wildlife control and No. 18 in pest control in the nation. The Certi ed Wildlife Specialists and IPM trained technicians focus on ecologically sound pest control and humane animal control solutions for homeowners, property managers, businesses and government. Critter Control also offers a wide range of other services such as home friendly Wash Safe roof, siding and deck cleaning, as well as full attic restoration featuring T.A.P. pest proof insulation. We also offer WDO inspections for Ribbon cuttings:International Gold Gymnastics ribbon cutting ceremony was on Feb. 13. Owners Olga and Alexander Babakhin, former Russian Olympic coaches, are happy to be a part of the Wakulla County community. The original gym was in the old Crawfordville Elementary School gymnasium; it took seven years to create this state of the art facility now located at 54 Feli Way between Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Boulevard and Shadeville Highway. There will be an open house on March 3 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. All coaches are safety certi ed and trained and under expert supervision, children will build strength, exibility, coordination, con dence, discipline and self-esteem. IGG also offers parent-tot classes, girls and boys gymnastics, tumbling, cheerleading, before and after school care programs, weekend birthday parties, as well as summer and spring break camps. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSreal estate agents. The owners of the local franchise are Brandon and Dustin Lynch. Brandon is a Certi ed Operator in General Household Pest and Termite Control with the state of Florida. Dustin is a Certi ed Wildlife Specialist. They both live in Wakulla County. Call 1-800-CRITTER (800-274-8837) or locally at (850) 745-4111.Special to The NewsLogic holds that businesses that cant keep up will be left behind. Just to keep pace, businesses must develop organizational agility, and its absolutely critical if they want to do more than just survive, says Mike Richardson, author of Wheel$pin: The Agile Executives Manifesto: Accelerate Your Growth, Leverage Your Value, Beat Your Competition (www. mydrivingseat.com). Organizational agility is being able to move quickly and decisively, and one of the biggest obstacles is unproductive, time-wasting meetings he says. They start late, run long, and dont achieve much, he says. But meetings are the backbone of an agile business. He offers these tips for developing agile meetings with traction: Map your meeting: Create a standing agenda and a master spreadsheet with tabs relevant to each agenda item with the expected inputs, throughputs and outputs. That way, the meetings are easy for the chairman to run because everything is crystal clear. Set the mood: Set the tone for the energy level by playing a video or music. You can tell a story, read a quotation, or be unpredictable and create a surprise factor. Spark creativity: Frame the purpose of the meeting as a question: How do we best ? Questions get the human brain thinking more quickly. Document the action live: Instead of taking notes, editing them and distributing them afterward, save time by capturing everything electronically in real time Time-box everything: Meetings should last 45 minutes, from 5 after the hour to 10 minutes to the hour. Allot time for each agenda item and especially for presentations. Get people used to the fact that you will guillotine anything which runs over. When you challenge people to gure out how to get things done in the time allotted, you will be amazed at how they can. Leverage the wallspace: Wall space is one of the most underutilized assets in your business. Have the standing agenda on the wall, creative problem-solving frameworks, your core values, key elements of your strategic plan, etc., all in a format large enough for you to refer to during the meeting. Generate input: Have everyone take a minute to write down an idea relevant to the agenda item. Go around the table and allow each person to share his or her idea, or break into pairs or triads to discuss the ideas and report back. Get fast consensus: Once the options are on the table, facilitate the group toward fast decisions with statements and questions like: Im leaning toward this or Does anyone have a violent objection to that? Then move them into fast action: How would we best do that? Agility is the ability to be constantly looking for opportunities to move forward toward goals while planning for problems, Richardson says. Creating agile meetings is one big step toward creating an agile organization.Stop wasting time in meetingsIn the Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla county area, one of the occupations with the most vacancies is for workers who hold Commercial Drivers Licenses: heavy and tractor-trailer truck driver. Truck drivers can earn upwards of $25 per hour, with bonuses for those drivers who save their companies money. Opportunities are not just available in long-haul driving either. Tractor-trailer drivers, delivery service drivers and driver-sales workers are needed everywhere, so Workforce Plus hopes jobseekers take this chance to step into a new career If you or anyone you know would bene t from the Jobs = Paychecks Now initiative, contact Workforce Plus by calling (866) WFPJOB1 today or emailing wfp@wfplus.org to apply. Commercial driver training is available SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 5B This page sponsored in part by: Jokes and RiddlesQ: How can you tell when Rapunzel likes a parade?A: She lets down her hair. A: Stop picking on me!Q: What did the beanstalk say to Jack on the parade float? COLORING PICTURE List 10 words that rhyme with float. 1. ____________ 2. _____________ 3. ____________ 4. ____________ 5. ____________ 6. ____________ 7. __________ 8. ____________ 9. ___________ 10. ___________Some answers: boat, coat, dote, goat, gloat, moat, note, oat, tote, wroteWhat Rhymes with Float? 1) R __ N __ L D M C __ O N A __ __2) D O __ A3) M I __ __ E Y M __ U __ E4) __ __ R E K5) A __ __ Y C A D A __ __ Y6) S N __ __ P Y7) S P I __ E __ __ A NName That BalloonTurn on the TV on Thanksgiving morning and you might catch a glimpse of the balloons in the Macys parade in New York City. Fill in the blanks to name some of the characters floating high above the streets as balloons. Answers: 1) Ronald McDonald, 2) Dora, 3) Mickey Mouse, 4) Shrek, 5) Abby Cadabby, 6) Snoopy, 7) Spider-Man Fact or Fiction?Marching Band ChallengeAnswers: 1) Fiction, banner carriers walk in front of marching bands, 2) Fiction, drum majors usually lead marching bands, 3) Fiction, the big drum is called a bass drum, 4) Fiction, tubas are one of the biggest, 5) Fiction, flutes are one of the smallest, 6) Fact, 7) Fact, 8) Fiction, violins are usually found in an orchestra not a marching band, 9) Fact, 10) Fiction, cymbals, not saxophones, are clashed together Most parades have at least one marching band, if not more. Here are some questions about marching bands. How many can you answer correctly?1) Banner carriers usually walk near the end of marching bands. Fact or Fiction? 2) Drum captains often lead marching bands. Fact or Fiction? 3) Most marching bands have a large, low-sounding drum called the trombone. Fact or Fiction? 4) One of the smallest instruments in a marching band is the tuba. Fact or Fiction? 5) One of the biggest instruments in a marching band is the flute. Fact or Fiction? 6) Some people in a marching band might play the cornet, which looks like a trumpet. Fact or Fiction? 7) In order to be heard, some French horn players might switch to a mellophone when marching. Fact or Fiction? 8) Violins are often found in marching bands. Fact or Fiction? 9) Some marching bands are accompanied by a guard. Fact or Fiction? 10) A marching band song might end with the clash of the saxophones. Fact or Fiction? North America holds some of the biggest St. Patricks Day celebrations in the world. The highlight of these celebrations is the parade. The first parade for St. Patricks Day, in fact, took place in North America in New York City on March 17, 1762, when Irish soldiers from the English army marched down the city streets. As more and more Irish moved to America, groups like the Friendly Sons of Saint Patrick came together and held their own St. Patricks Day parade each year. In 1848, several of these groups combined their parades into one big one-the New York City St. Patricks Day parade. Today the New York City St. Patricks Day parade is the largest in the United States. Over 150,000 people take part in the five-hour long event, and over three million people come out to see it. Irish Eyes Are Smiling Irish Eyes Are Smiling

PAGE 20

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsCoastal StorageLow Rates / Short Term Contracts!850-509-1740 5X10s and 10X20s spaces for lease. Additional discount on already low rates w/contracts! BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.comfollow us on facebook TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.CCC 053 88 7408-8563Residential Commercial Re-Roong Repairs Since 1980 Free Estimates Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net weather weather Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Found Found Dog female-2/22, near Wakulla Gardens, black mini, has a collar, call to identify. Please call to claim. 850-545-4698 Announcements Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida. Call Advertising Networks of Florida for statewide and regional advertising. (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida classifieds. com Medical MEDICAL BILLING TRAINEES NEEDED Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No Experience needed! Job Training & Local Placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 Trades/ Skills Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay 2Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Trades/ Skills ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICC&L Automotive, Sopchoppy, Call Corey Crum at 850-528-5113 or Shawn Lawhan at 850-519-3443 DRIVERHometime Choices: Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF, 14/ON-7/OFF. Daily Pay. New trucks! Van and Refrigerated, CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. Top Benefits! (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers: Run 5 States Regional! Get home weekends, earn up to 39cent mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp. required. SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC 800-572-5489 X 227 Experienced OTR Flatbed Drivers! Earn 50-52 cpm loaded. Up to 55 cpm for O.D. loads. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. (843)266-3731 bulldoghiway.com EOE Career Opportunities Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877) 994-9904 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. CALL Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction ALLIED HEALTHCareer training -Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.Centura Online.com Schools/ Instruction Attend College Online from Home *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-203-3179 www.CenturaOnline .com Sporting Goods 6 FT. POOL TABLE Full rack of Balls & Two sticks $250. obo 850-212-3252 Pets Stop Scratching & Gnawing.Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch no More, Apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet.Ashley Feed & Hardware (850) 421-7703www. happyjackinc.com Mobile Homes For Sale Mobile Home for Sale2 BR 2 BASW. 938 sq. ft. Fully furnished. 100X176 lot. Panacea. $50,000. 850-984-0182. Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished 3BR/2BA, Medart,big-fenced yard, very clean, front/back porches, shed. No pets or smoking. $850/month+deposit. 850-545-0126 Must see!! CrawfordvilleGeorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $875, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 443-3300 Rentals to Share CrawfordvilleRoomate to Share 3 Bed 2 Bath Home near Wakulla Libarary $350 mo. + 1/2 utilities Call Norma (850)926-5486 Vacation Rentals ALLIGATOR POINT2/Bedroom, 2/Bath 1,200 sf, Gulf Front, Vacation Rental 3 blks to white sandy beach, 75ft. to Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful Sunsets $1,000. Wk. (904)687-3397 Real Estate For Sale House for Sale2 BR, 1 BA Up 1 BR, 1 BA Down. 100X200 fenced lot. Panacea. $90,000. 850-984-0182. Commercial Real Estate Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-926-2480 WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Out of Town Real Estate 20 Acres-Live on Land NOW!! Only $99/mo $0 Down, Owner Finance.NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas, Beautiful Mountain Views! Free Color Brochure. 800-755-8953 www. sunsetranch es.com GENTLEMANS FARM FOR SALE stable w/bath and equipment barn on 2+/ Acres in Chatham, VA. $148,900. Agnes Dowdy & Associates Real Estate (434)851-8522 photos at www. AgnesDowdyRE.com Waterfront Grand Opening Sale! One Day Only -Sat March 10th New Log Cabin on 2+ Acres w/200+ FT DOCKABLE WF Only $74,500. Save tens of thousands on new log cabin w/dockable lake frontage on one of Alabamas premier recreational lakes. Excellent financing. Call now (866)952-5302, x151 Lots For Sale 2-Acre Lots For Sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 Self Storage Notices 5141-0308 (3/17 Sale-ABC Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV, that ABC Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 17, at 3:00 PM, at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327, of the contents of Mini Warehouse containing personal property of: DESMOND JONES NELSON WOODS NORMAN BUTCH McCALLISTER Payments must be made before Thursday, March 15, by 12:00 noon.The owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by contacting ABC Storage at 508-5177. Or by paying in person at the warehouse location.March 1 & 8, 2012 filler space filler space 4Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $425mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker TWO YARD SALES! NO EARL Y BIRDSNO EARL Y BIRDS8AM-2PM Selling? Classified Ads For $10 A Week 877-676-1403 The Wakulla News JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Rent to on D oile ome. 00mont, plus deposit. 5 0250 Mobile Home for Rent Indoor Yard SalebehindComing in March!Space limited! Reserve space at Menagerie NOW! $25/for the weekend or $15/one day. Set up Friday and Saturday 8AM-4PM(we can set up for you for additional $10/per booth)Rent for a day, weekend or month, as often as you want. 3079 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY., CRAWFORDVILLE745-8381 Anthony E. Dyer Enterprises INTERIOR and EXTERIOR CLEANINGroofs, gutters, yard care and much more... Call today for an estimate!850-980-2018TONY DYER Licensed

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 7B Please Recycle 5138-0308 Vs. Shell Point Residences, LLC, Case No.:2011-31-CA. Amended Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-314-CA IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, Plaintiff, vs. SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 12, 2011, entered in Case No. 2011-31-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein IBERIABANK, Assignee to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Receiver for Orion Bank, as Assignor, is the Plaintiff, and SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; SHELL POINT INVESTMENTS, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT RESERVE, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT 12, LLC, a Florida limited liability company; SHELL POINT PARTNERS, INC., a Florida corporation; GPI SOUTHEAST, INC., a Florida corporation; GEORGE W. HEATON, individually; and THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida not for profit corporation, and all parties claiming interest by, through, under or against any defendant named herein, are the Defendants. The Wakulla County Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at the at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in Wakulla County, Florida, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes, at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, April 26, 2012, the following described property, as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBITS A AND B IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THIS SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. WITNESS, my hand and the seal of this Court on February 21, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND,As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A LOTS 7, 10, AND 11, BLOCK A, AND LOTS 1 THROUGH 5, LOTS 7 THROUGH 10 AND BEACH CLUB LOT, ALL IN BLOCK B, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND ALL OF BLOCK C, THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79, 80, 81 AND 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND PHASE 2 MARINA BASIN RESERVATION AREA BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19, SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA, COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 85.85 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 133.17 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 103.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 50.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.60 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 08 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.19 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 06 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.07 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 07 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 13 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 60.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 61.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 42.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 33 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 20.61 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 23.63 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.09 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.66 FEET, TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 902.73 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 35 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 114.91 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 51 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 114.83 FEET) TO THE POINT OF CURVE OF A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG SAID CURVE HAVING A RADIUS OF 73.91 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 27 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 34 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 34.93 FEET (CHORD OF SAID ARC BEARS NORTH 00 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 34.61 FEET), THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 129.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 38.38 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 32.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 63.07 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 110.87 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 6.13 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 165.37 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 74 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 30.70 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 58.84 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 2.47 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 67.44 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.04 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 36 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 94.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 7.08 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.20 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 33.94 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 34 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 43.86 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 0.79 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 35 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 70.48 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 79.32 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 64 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 159.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 80 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 86.14 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 41.89 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 45 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 16.70 FEET, THENCE CONTINUE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID LINE. A DISTANCE OF 50.64 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 22 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 65.42 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 107.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 1.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 10.68 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 168.31 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 156.92 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.22 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 21.27 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 52 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 01 SECOND EAST A DISTANCE OF 47.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 19.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 40.71 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 23.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 17.23 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 52 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 101.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 15.26 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 86 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 74.01 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 48.59 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 54.46 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 211.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 3.12 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CANALS BEGIN AT AN IRON PIN (LB #732) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 19 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 219.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 68.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 48 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 15.75 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 5 AS FOLLOWS: THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 9.88 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 45.34 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 62.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 135.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 189.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 60.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 60.11 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 60.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 60.21 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 60.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 11 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 130.83 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 75.56 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 92.14 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 60.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST 60.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 52 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 60.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 60.78 FEET, THENCE NORTH 06 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 01 SECOND WEST 60.45 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 60.01 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 117.07 FEET, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 30.16 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 104.63 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 83 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 115.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST 130.55 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 44 MINUTES 31 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 60.01 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 51 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 60.02 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 60.12 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 07 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 60.56 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 23.22 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 04 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 100.03 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 99.61 FEET TO THE BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT 4 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREE 12 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 100.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 7.00 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 543.08 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 260.48 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 474.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 79 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 121.54 FEET, TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 47 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 21 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 99.10 FEET, THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 364.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 86 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 275.66 FEET THENCE LEAVING SAID BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 2 AND RUN THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 125.05 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 3, PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1327.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-1 BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1198.08 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 43.11 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1167.13 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6, THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 875.42 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL A-2 COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 41.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 177.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 20.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST 20.27 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 686.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 1300.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 510.98 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF UNIT NO. 1 SHELL POINT BEACH AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 24 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE NORTH 84 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 524.15 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY), THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH BOUNDARY AND RUN NORTH 05 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 86.02 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHWEST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 540.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 22 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 209.18 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 207.88 FEET), THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 370.90 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 606.69 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 21 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 227.66 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 226.32 FEET) THENCE NORTH 05 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.08 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1113.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 06 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 54 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 126.59 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 08 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 126.52 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 79 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 233.41 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 3154.71 FEET, THENCE NORTH 78 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 225.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 04 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST 1234.99 FEET TO A NAIL AND CAP #4261, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 252.34 FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF UNIT 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED. THENCE RUN SOUTH 28 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 701.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 1501.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 79 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 34.82 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 1244.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 43.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL G BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 117 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 491.62 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 367 (66.0 RIGHT OF WAY) SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON A POINT OF CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHEAST, THENCE NORTHWEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 922.37 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 52 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 07 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 838.76 FEET. (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 23 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 810.15 FEET), THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 193.13 FEET, TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1179.28 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 03 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 29 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 69.46 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 69.45 FEET), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 561.43 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL B BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF LOT 6 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO.6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 38 SECONDS WEST 11.38 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 59 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST 31.33 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 77.70 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 71.66 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 78.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 75 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 68.91 FEET, THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 30.47 FEET, THENCE NORTH 66 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 8.44 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 13.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 THENCE SOUTH 71 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 357.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL C COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 92.24 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 36 SECONDS WEST 64.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 88 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 27.54 FEET TO A IRON PIN LB#732, THENCE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 37.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 27.39 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 25 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 53.27 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST 31.68 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 29.69 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 27 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 25.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 23.06 FEET, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 63.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 11.19 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 45 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 18.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 70 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 17.75 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREE 32 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 112.97 FEET, THENCE NORTH 42 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 45.46 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 46.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 18 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 68.81 FEET, RowellAuctions.com ONLINE ONLY Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc.800-323-838810% Buyers Premium AU 479, AB 296 2% Broker Participation2 Res. Lots, Camelot Subdivision, Crawfordville, FL Res. Lot, Burnt Pine Loop, St. Marks, FLBidding Ends March 6th at 3 pm EST/2 pm CST 63 Bank Foreclosed Properties in North FLMany Selling Absolute! We Offer Long-Term & Vacation Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month.2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Alwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres Available March 1 $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 203 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd 3BR/2BA MH $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets14 Windy Court 3BR/2BA Available 4/1/12 $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets26 Magnolia Ridge 3 BR/2BA with replace, above ground pool. $1125 Mo, No Smoking or PetsAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstateAdvertisement Detail WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Wakulla County Tourist Development Council PRINTING SERVICES Invitation to Bid No. 2012-06 Advertisement Begin Date: March 1, 2012 Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed responses for Printing Services addressed to the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, P. O. Box 1263, Crawfordville, FL 32327 will be received until 2:00 p.m. on March 16, 2012, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Any responses received after the time and date specied will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Debbie Dubose, Purchasing Coordinator Wakulla County P. O. Box 1263 Crawfordville, FL 32326 FAX: 850.926.0940 e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at the location listed above after 8:00 a.m. on Thursday, March 1, 2012. Any person with a qualied disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this ofce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Debbie Dubose, Purchasing Coordinator MARCH 1, 2012

PAGE 22

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com THENCE NORTH 34 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST 53.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 30 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 40.07 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 73 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 72.69 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 25.39 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL D COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254 MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 7 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 20.04 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 35.21 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 125.12 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 17 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 40.23 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 43.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 26 SECONDS EAST 24.41 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 29 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 40.19 FEET, THENCE NORTH 25 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 40.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL E COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 8 OF CEDAR ISLAND A REPLAT OF SHELL POINT BEACH UNIT NO. 6 AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 9 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 201.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 19.43 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 82.29 FEET, THENCE NORTH 04 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 74.72 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 69 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 98.32 FEET, THENCE NORTH 03 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 27.35 FEET, THENCE NORTH 24 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 55.73 FEET, THENCE NORTH 22 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 93.65 FEET, THENCE NORTH 33 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 66.10 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 38 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 71.68 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 08 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 54.73 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 64 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 27.44 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 31.36 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 85 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 69.32 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 36.26 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 44 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 33.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 41 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 60.58 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 32 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 74.93 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 20 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 56.20 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 03 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 54.78 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 36 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST 54.95 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 55.86 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 37.68 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 43 SECONDS EAST 71.03 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 64.36 FEET, THENCE NORTH 23 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 58.98 FEET, THENCE NORTH 80 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 3.81 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 106.79 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 70.26 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 39 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 61.74 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 62 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 79.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 11.81 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 11 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 53.06 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 09 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 47.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 28 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 66.67 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 55.02 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 44 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 41.17 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 64 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST 68.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 18.35 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 33 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 60.75 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 30 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 48.54 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 61 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 190.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL F BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER (ALSO THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER) OF LOT 24 UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH UNRECORDED, AND RUN THENCE ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID UNIT NO. 7 SHELL POINT BEACH AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 324.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 80 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 56 SECONDS EAST 220.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 8.04 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 70 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 8.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT #1254, THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 95.91 FEET TO THE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY AND RUN ALONG SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 07 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 18.42 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 74 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 26.19 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 81 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 29.89 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 65 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 31.85 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 37.05 FEET, THENCE NORTH 85 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST 54.72 FEET, THENCE NORTH 77 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 54.99 FEET, THENCE NORTH 76 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 47.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 56 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 31.43 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 10 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST 35.33 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 45 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 22.60 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 75.99 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 86 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 65.16 FEET, THENCE NORTH 81 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 56.30 FEET, THENCE NORTH 12 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 65.38 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREE 36 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 53.31 FEET, THENCE NORTH 10 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 07 SECONDS WEST 30.21 FEET, THENCE NORTH 32 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 50.62 FEET, THENCE NORTH 55 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 51.23 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 72.12 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MEAN HIGH WATER LINE AND RUN THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 166.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXHIBIT B PERSONAL PROPERTY Shell Point Residences, LLC, f/k/a Shell Point Residences, Inc.; Shell Point Investments, LLC; and Shell Point Reserve, LLC; and Shell Point 12, LLCs right, title and interest in the following described property pursuant to the Mortgage, and as such terms are defined therein: (i) all buildings, structures and improvements of every nature whatsoever now and hereafter on said Premises, (ii) all insurance policies, leases, subleases and other agreements affecting the use, enjoyment or occupancy of the Premises heretofore or hereafter entered into and all accounts, rents, revenues, issues, profits and all proceeds from the sale or other disposition of such agreements accruing and to accrue from said Premises, (iii) all gas, steam, electric, water and other heating, cooking, refrigerating, lighting, plumbing, ventilating, irrigating and power systems, machines, building materials, appliances, furniture, equipment, goods, inventory, supplies, fixtures and appurtenances and personal property of every nature whatsoever, which now or may hereafter pertain to or be used with, in or on said Premises, even though they may be detached or detachable, (iv) all easements, rights-of-way, licenses, privileges, gores of land, streets, ways, alleys, passages, sewer rights, waters, water rights, permits, development rights and powers and all estates, rights, titles and interests in any way belonging, relating or appertaining to the Premises, (v) all Accounts, Goods, Chattel Paper, Deposit Accounts, Farm Products, Instruments, Documents, General Intangibles, Inventory, Consumer Goods, Equipment, Fixtures and Investment Property, as the foregoing terms are defined in the Uniform Commercial Code, and all contract rights, franchises, books, records, plans, specifications, approvals and actions which now or hereafter relate to, are derived from or are used in connection with the Premises, or the use, operation, maintenance, occupancy or enjoyment thereof or the conduct of any business or activities thereon, (vi) all the tenements, hereditaments, appurtenances, reversions and remainders belonging or pertaining to the Premises, (vii) any and all judgments, awards, settlements, claims, demands, payments, proceeds or other income arising in connection with the Premises, (viii) any items described in those certain UCC-1 Financing Statements of even date herewith between Mortgagor and Mortgagee and (ix) any extensions, additions, increases, substitutions, replacements, parts, accessions, improvements, betterments, proceeds, products and renewals to any of the aforesaid property, whether now existing or hereafter arising, all of the foregoing being included in the term Premises, it being the intention of Mortgagor and Mortgagee that this Mortgage (which is to be filed for record in the real estate records of the county mentioned above) shall also constitute a security agreement and financing statement as to the Premises herein mortgaged under the Florida Uniform Commercial Code, and that Mortgagee have all rights and remedies of a secured party thereunder. March 1 & 8, 2012 5138-0308 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5142-0308 Vs.Jefferson, Dennis, Case No.12-54-CA, Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.12-54-CA ROBERT LYTLE Plaintiff, vs. DENNIS JEFFERSON, IF DECEASED OR NOT KNOWN TO BE DECEASED OR ALIVE, HIS UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HIM; HEIRS OF PEGGYE B. JEFFERSON, KNOWN AND UNKNOWN; HER UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIR(S), DEVISEE(S), GRANTEE(S), JUDGMENT CREDITOR(S), AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST HER; OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, OR UNDER THOSE UNKNOWN NATURAL PARTIES; AND ALL CLAIMANT(S), PERSON(S) OR PARTIES, NATURAL OR CORPORATE, OR WHOSE EXACT LEGAL STATUS IS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING UNDER ANY OF THE ABOVE NAMED OR DESCRIBED DEFENDANTS HEREIN Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: HEIRS OF PEGGYE B. JEFFERSON, OTHER ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS AND ALL OTHERS WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Brain Teaser 1 14 17 25 36 41 44 47 63 67 70 2 20 26 56 3 27 57 4 23 37 58 5 28 42 52 21 38 48 6 15 18 29 45 53 64 68 71 7 30 49 59 8 24 39 60 22 31 43 54 9 16 19 40 50 65 69 72 10 32 46 55 11 33 51 61 12 34 62 13 35 66ACROSS1.Whimpers 6. "Survivor"network 9."Welldone!" 14."...andthereby hangs__" 15."Bali__" 16.Staffanew 17.Sodashopfreebie 18.Socialconnections 19.Cordialflavor 20.PIN 23.Have__at (try) 24.Tieupthephone 25.Tippler'sroad offense,briefly 28.Lustfulgod 31.Indicateaturn 36.CubecreatorRubik 38.Caverncomeback 40.Slug'strail 41.PIN 44."Onceupon__..." 45.Culinarydirective 46.Confined,with"up" 47.Takeumbrageat 49.Baseballgreat Slaughter 51.Cambodian's neighbor 52.Sym bolofmight 54."Bill__,The ScienceGuy" 56.PIN 63.Salof "Exodus" 64."Dubya,"asa collegian 65.PartofHUD 67.Scorpionattack 68.Keepout 69.SocialiteMesta 70. Oil magnateJ. Paul 71.Whereslopis served 72. Gottosecond base,inaway?DOWN1.BarkerandKettle 2.SingerJamesor Jones 3.BitofHalloween makeup 4.WoollyAndean 5.Whentreated,it becomessludge 6."Blondie"creator Young 7.Ruination 8.Pantywaist 9.Havingasalty taste 10.Janetof theClinton cabinet 11. Inthethickof 12.Budholder 13.1300hours 21.Kitchenutensil 22.KLM rival 25.__flask(inspiration fortheThermos) 26.Putonpaper 27.RoyorNigerof CORE 29.Newspaperman Adolph 30."OntheBeach" novelistNevil 32.Hardlyfour-star fare 33.BruceofSherlock Holmesfilms 34.Appliancebrand 35.Slowly,onascore 37."All__"(popular '30s tune) 39.ActorKenorLena 42.Winemaker's science 43.Sweden's monetaryunit 48.__kwondo 50. IHOPcondiments 53.TVbeatnik Maynard G.__ 55.Plumedwader 56.Takethebait 57."Putalid__!" 58.Tooka turn 59.Mattresssupport 60.Knee-h ightoa grasshopper 61.RiverofAragon 62.LikemostNBAers 63.Chowmein additive 66.SocietypagewordAmerican Prole Hometown Content 2/5/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 12 2341 54678 1 84 7893 356 94 715 8563 28 00 9 HtCtt 647 1823 5 9 829537416 531946728 316 894572 758621943 492375861 964 713285 285469137 173258694 M A S D E W A R M S G E T T A W R I T E B I T E W A R T I N N I S O N I T L L A M A O F M E W E N T S E W A G E O E N O L O G Y C O R E R T A E C H I C O C H S K R E B S B A N E S H U T E S L A T S I S S Y O L I N T I N Y S A S K R O N A B R A C K I S H S Y R U P S R E N O G L O P E G R E T A M I D N I G E L E B R O V A S E A M A N A T A L L O N E L E N T O N E E Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.comThe meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Colleen Altenburg was recognized as Employee of the Month. Jessica Johnson and Karen Sherrod were recognized as Teachers of the Month. All were congratulated and presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. A presentation was given to Wakulla High, Wakulla Middle and Riversprings Middle by Assistant Superintendent ODonnell for obtaining the AVID National Certication. All parties involved in this certication process were congratulated. All board members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the agenda as amended. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the following consent items: 1. Approve the Minutes of the Meeting held on January 17, 2012. 2. Approved the following Employment of Personnel: New Hires: 12 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Cook, DrewDO/MISTech/AT02/06/12-06/30/12 Grant, RoscoeDO/ MaintenanceTrades Specialist01/24/12-06/30/12 Mays (Jones), TenayaDO/MISTech/AT02/13/12-06/30/12 9 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Jackson, Jr., NathanielWHSCustodian01/17/12-06/04/12 Brown, SherrySESCustodian02/08/12-06/04/12 Transfers: 12 Month Employee* Time Limited *Part-time NamePosition FromProgram FromPosition To Program ToTerm of Service Chipps, EmilyCustodian T.L. WMSCustodian P.T.WMS 01/18/12-06/30/12 Clemons, KatieBus Attendant Transportation SecretaryDO/Special01/24/12-06/30/12 Programs 9 Month Employee NamePosition From Program From Position ToProgram ToTerm of Service Boheler, DeniseCustodian/WHS/SESParaprofessionalSEC 12/12/11-06/04/12Food Service Miller, LaurenT.L. Remedial CESCDA T.L.Pre-K/WEC 01/18/12-06/04/12Teacher Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Adams, MarleneRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Adkison, AlisaCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Austin, AdrienneRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Baker, LaurenRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Bartnick, KimberlyCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Bowen, MirandaCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Bryan, AmyWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Burley, AlenaRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Burnham, CassandraRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12| Burse, CindyCESA/S Remediation Teacher11/09/11-02/22/12 Butler, AmandaRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Byars, SandylWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Callaghan, MargaretRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Crawford, AlenaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Crombie, MeganRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Crouch, LoganWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) cont. NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Davis, DeanaRESParaprofessional Time Limited12/19/11-02/13/12 Davis, LindaSESA/S Remediation Teacher02/09/12-04/12/12 Driggers, DianeRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Dykes, KellyRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Edwards, SuzanneWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Evans, BethanyWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Evans, LindsayWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Gentry, AngelaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Glisson, Ruth AnneWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Graham, LucileWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Grifn, RhondaRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Harvey, FrankieCESA/S Remediation Teacher11/09/11-02/22/12 Hateld, HeatherCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Henderson, ErinCESRemedial Teacher Time Limited01/30/12-04/13/12 Hernandez, LouisRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Hume, LauraRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Hutchins, SusanWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Jump, JeriCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Langston, KristenDO/FinanceSecretary 02/22/12-06/30/12 Lassiter, SusanRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Lee, BridgettWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Madden, JohnRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Mapes, JessicaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Martin, MelissaRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 McBrayer, DavidRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Miller, DerekWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Morgan, DeborahCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Musgrove, KarrieRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Myhre, RichardWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Piland, PatriciaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Roberts, MarySESA/S Remediation Teacher02/09/12-04/12/12 Roddenberry, KatrinaRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Rozanski, JosephWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Rueth, TonyaWMSCustodian Time Limited01/18/12-06/30/12 Sanders, KarenWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Sandgren, JoshuaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Sarvis, ChristinaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Sherrod, KarenWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Shotwell, NormaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Spivey, KatherineWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Strickland, PatriciaCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Sweatt, LaurenWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Thomas, RebeccaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Tomaini, Denny Transportation Bus Attendant Time Limited02/01/12-05/31/12 Teuton, ChristinaCESA/S Remediation Teacher02/07/12-04/12/12 Walker, DeidreWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Walker, VanessaRMSCustodian Time Limited01/17/12-06/30/12 Ward, StanleyRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Weaver, NicholasRESA/S Remediation Teacher02/28/12-04/12/12 Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) cont. NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Weber, JanetRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Wells, JessicaRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/19/12-05/31/12 Wells, RobertWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 White, KrystalRES A/S Remediation Paraprofessial02/28/12-04/12/12 Young, DonnaWMSA/S Remediation Teacher02/02/12-04/13/12 Supplemental Positions: NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Ewell, MoniqueWHS Head Varsity Girls Basketball Coach 2011-2012 Gorman, JamesWMS Assistant Boys Soccer Coach 2011-2012 Lawhon, Richard WHS Head JV Wrestling Coach2011-2012 Washington, MichaelWHS Assistant Girls Track Coach 2011-2012 3.Approved the following Letters of Retirement: Dora Dugger/effective February 29, 2012 Terry Price/effective May 1, 2012 and enter DROP Donald Jefferson/effective February 29, 2012 and exit DROP Charles Lawhon/effective February 1, 2012 and enter DROP. 4.Approved the following Letters of Resignation: Scott Nagy/effective January 31, 2012 Pat Vice/effective January 20, 2012 Mary Williams/effective January 17, 2012 Elena Myhre/effective January 26, 2012 5,Approved the following requests for Leave of Absence Sharon Allen/from February 15, 2012 for approx. six weeks Jennifer Monroe/effective March 26 May 7, 2012 Phyllis Linck/effective January 9 June 4, 2012 6.Approved Illness in the Line of Duty/FMLA. (See Supplemental File #21 7.Approved Budget Amendments #11/12 4 & 5. 8.Approved the Disposal of Equipment. (See Supplemental File #21) 9.Approved the January Financial Statement. 10.Approved the Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve for advertising a Request for Proposal, A Business-Community (ABC) School Program, Wakulla County Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2012-2013 Wakulla Middle School Cheerleading Constitution. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the 2012-2013 Wakulla High School Cheerleader Constitution. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve student expulsion #11/12-04. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans approve the Superintendents recommendation for student expulsion #11/12-03 to be held in abeyance until such time that the student returns to the school system if that occurs. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to award bid #11/12-06 Food and Non-Food Items. (See Supplemental File #21) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve St. Marks Powder to use a bus and driver. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the Internship and Mentor Teacher handbook revisions. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Mid-Year Report on Strategic Plan Priorities. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the Class Size Reduction Compliance Plan. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Inter-Institutional Articulation Agreement between Tallahassee Community College and the Wakulla County School Board. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve School Board Policy 6.545* as advertised. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve The School Parent Connection A Parents Guide to Wakulla County Schools for 2011-2012. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON FEBRUARY 21, 2012MARCH 1, 2012

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 Page 9B Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Parcel A 0.33 of an acre; Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 15, of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 17 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 23.67 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 926.10 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 585 Page 163 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING and said Northerly right of way line run along said Westerly boundary line South 17 degrees 33 minutes 48 seconds East 181.90 feet to a concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Westerly boundary line run along the Northerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 South 72 degrees 26 minutes 44 seconds West 79.93 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Northerly boundary line run North 17 degrees 37 minutes 26 seconds West 181.57 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line North 72 degrees 12 minutes 35 seconds East 80.12 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.33 of an acre, more or less. Parcel B 0.33 of an acre; Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 15, of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 17 degrees 23 minutes 30 seconds East 23.67 feet to a point lying on the Southerly right of way line of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway #98); thence run along said Southerly right of way line South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West 926.10 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 585 Page 163 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said Northerly right of way line run along said Westerly boundary line as follows: South 17 degrees 33 minutes 48 seconds East 181.90 feet; thence South 17 degrees 32 minutes 15 seconds East 181.42 feet to a re-bar marking the Southeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING continue along said Westerly boundary line South 17 degrees 43 minutes 58 seconds East 181.55 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Westerly boundary line run South 72 degrees 25 minutes 20 seconds West 80.18 feet; thence North 17 degrees 35 minutes 48 seconds West 181.48 feet to a re-bar marking the Southwest corner of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438; thence run along the Southerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record Book 235 Page 438 North 72 degrees 22 minutes 13 seconds East 79.74 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.33 of an acre, more or less. (hereinafter described as Parcel A and Parcel B the Subject Property). has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, on or before date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: February 23, 2012. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT AND COUNTY COURTS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (seal) By: Desiree D Willis As Deputy Clerk March 1 & 8, 2012 5132-0223 Vs. Merkison, Jimmy R. 65-2011-CA-000331 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000331 DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JIMMY R. MERKISON, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION TO: KASEY MERKISON Last Known Address: 311 Trice Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIEDthat an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 73 A DISTANCE OF 33.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 66 FOOT COUNTY ROAD, RUN THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 308.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 217.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET, RUN THENCE SOUTH 72DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 311 TRICE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the 5136-0308 vs. Gibson, Tracy R. Case 2008-FC-130 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2008-FC-130 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L..P. FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC. Plaintiff, vs. TRACY R. GIBSON; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY OFHOUSING ANDD URBAN DEVELOPMENT; STATE EMPLOYEES CREDIT UNION, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 29th day of March, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 8 of a replat of Pelican Bay, subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in plat book 3, page 77 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 14th day of February, 2012. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904)926-0905, not later tha seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) BY: /s/ Desiree D Willis Deputy Clerk March 1st & 8th 2012 5136-0308 5140-0308 Vs. Harris, John 65-2009-CA-000181 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000181 DIVISION JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JOHN HARRIS AKA JOHN H. HARRIS. JR., et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated February 21, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000181 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., is the Plaintiff and JOHN HARRIS AKA JOHN H. HARRIS, JR.; EVELYN BROWN; JANICE W. HARRIS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the29th day of March, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: AT THE NORTHWEST COMMENCE CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF LOT 72 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 963.89 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 71 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY 124.00 FEET TO AN OLD AXLE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDSEAST 122.68 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD NO. B-368, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONVEYS TO THE SOUTHERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1687.02 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 04 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 05 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 133.04 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 86 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST, 133.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, 71.37 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 330 LOWER BRIDGE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on February 22, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. March 1 & 8, 2012 5140-0308 F09048347 5143-0308 Vs. McVey, Vonda M. Case# 2011-CA-35 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., Case Number: 2011-CA-35 Plaintiff, vs. VONDA M. MCVEY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF VONDA M. MCVEY; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, UENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of foreclosure dated February 8, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA-35 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, Brent X. Thurmond as the Clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash, at public sale at the courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway in Wakulla County in Crawfordville, Florida with the sale commencing at 11:00AM on the 15th day of March 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to wit: Legal Description: Lots 11, 12, and 13, Block 33, PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 5, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. To include a: 2007 CMHM Vin WHC016110GAA #0099539611 2007 CMHM Vin WHC016110GAB #0099539268 Address: Joe Mack Smith Road, Panacea, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Dated this 21st day of February, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk March 1st and 8th, 2012 5143-0308 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5134-0301 Linton, John S.,12-12-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO:12-12-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN S. LINTON, DECEASED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOHN S. LINTON, deceased, whose date of death was February 4, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division under probate file #12-12-CP, the address of which is Courthouse Square, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is requires to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is February 23, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Nancy G. Linton 6081 Pisgah Church Road Tallahassee, Florida 32309 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ by T. Buckingham Bird, Esq. P.O. Box 247, Monticello, Florida 32345 (850)997-3503 February 23 & March 1, 2012 5134-0301 W akulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 14 day of February, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the ADA Coordinator, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone (850)926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770(Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850)926-0905; Fax: (850)926-0901. February 23 and March 1, 2012 GC-11-84561 5132-0223 filler space WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 24 The Senate this week passed a budget for the coming year but some of its members were focused on another year in the future as those who want to be Senate president down the road intensi ed their maneuvering in the face of an increasingly apparent challenge to the chambers conservative ruling class. The Senate has long been a place where the incharge Republican Party has been fractured, with splits between social moderates and conservatives, scally conservative members and those less antagonistic to government services, and populists versus the big business wing. That schism has been in the open as much as ever if not more in the now almost two years that Senate President Mike Haridopolos has led the Senate. Its a murky split with those opposed to the faction led by Haridopolos a shifting and motley group. Some are more populist, some are more moderate, and some are simply independentminded and seem to be most interested in preserving a Senate that doesnt blindly follow a leader. Put all those together in a coalition, and throw in a few surprises in the November election, and the possibility has emerged that a real challenge could be mounted to the status quo when it comes to the generally presumed line of succession to the Senate throne. The Senate presidency over the next several years has generally been thought to be preordained by the leaders of the chamber. When Haridopolos leaves of ce in November, the gavel will be handed to Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville. That much is nearly certain. After that, the general expectation has been that Haridopolos-Gaetz ally Sen. Andy Gardiner, currently a member of the leadership team as majority leader, will take over. Then would come other members of the leadership team, maybe Sen. John Thrasher and Sen. Joe Negron, both conservative, business-backed Republicans loyal to the current leadership. But something has been bubbling up in the last couple years that may threaten that. A soft coalition of Republican senators who have disagreements with the Haridopolos group has increasingly been thwarting the leaderships agenda. During the last day of session last year, there was a near mutiny over what was in several budget bills. This year, there was the prison privatization asco, in which leadership lost in a oor vote on one of its top priorities, privatizing a large number of prisons. Then there was the University of South Florida ght in which some Republican senators fought with Budget Chairman and Haridopolos ally JD Alexander over the USF budget and the future of a USF branch campus that is going to break off. There have been other little ghts an ethics bill pushed by Thrasher went down, for example. A leadership move to consolidate expressway authorities was softened. Deeply involved in many of the challenges to the authority of Haridopolos et al has been the veteran newcomer Sen. Jack Latvala. The moderate Republican from St. Petersburg was in the Senate for a long time, and then left before returning again. Latvala was a leader of the fight against prison privatization, and this week emerged as a serious challenger to Gardiner for the presidency of the Senate in 2014. This week there were lots of rumors floating around the Senate that the Haridopolos-Thrasher conservative wing of the party was looking to replace Gardiner in the line of succession because of the fear that Gardiner wouldnt be able to hold off a challenge from Latvala. By Thursday night Gardiner was claiming victory in the race for the 2014 presidency, though Thrasher was openly questioning whether that would be so. Thrasher, who like Latvala has been around the Capitol seemingly forever as a member who left the Legislature and later returned, sure sounded like a Gardiner opponent. I dont think anybody has pledges until the day they get designated, Thrasher said. MEANWHILE, THERES A BUDGET TO WRITE For some in the Senate, the wrangling over its future leadership was a sideshow to a more pressing issue: the session only has a couple weeks left and theres a budget to write for the more immediate future. The session is early this year because of redistricting, so theres plenty of time before the start of the scal year. But it is an election year, and lawmakers who have to run in new districts would like to get to it, not be here in May putting the nishing touches on a budget. So the Senate passed its budget this week, which was probably the other big news. A couple of issues dominated the debate the aforementioned ght over the University of South Floridas budget got by far the most attention. With Alexander putting a hold on some money for the university earlier, and then backing off, it was an interesting drama that overshadowed an otherwise pretty good story: the Senate managed to cobble together a balanced budget when theres a tax-revenue shortfall, didnt raise taxes, increased education spending by more than $1 billion and didnt have massive protests a t the Capitol over the cuts that have been suggested. Still, even with the budget passing this week in the Senate, it doesnt match up with the House yet, and the hard work is just beginning. STEINBERG QUITS Rep. Richard Steinberg stepped down on Friday after admitting hed sent repeated text messages anonymously to a married Miami prosecutor who didnt want them. The prosecutor Marlene FernandezKaravetsos, asked whoever kept sending her the inappropriate messages to identify himself and to stop sending them Steinberg didnt. While she couldnt gure out who they were coming from, the U.S. Secret Service had no problem and by midweek Steinberg was facing a looming story in the Miami Herald about the investigation. He confessed to the paper that hed sent the messages and said he was sorry. On Friday, Steinberg, who wasnt in Tallahassee for the second half of the week, apologized again and then resigned. The Democrat from Miami Beach likely will be replaced in a special election. BONDI JOINS LAWSUIT OVER CONTRACEPTIVES Just as the row over the federal rule requiring coverage of contraceptives seemed to subside a bit late this week, Florida got into the issue. Attorney General Pam Bondi on Thursday announced she was joining six other state attorneys general in a lawsuit against the federal decision to require religious employers to offer health insurance that covers contraceptives and other services that violate the tenets of the employers af liated religion. Government has no business forcing religious institutions and individuals to violate their sincerely held beliefs, Bondi said in a statement. This lawsuit is about protecting religious liberty and the rights of conscience, our most basic freedoms as Americans. Bondi joined attorneys general from Nebraska, Michigan, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Texas in the lawsuit. Other plaintiffs include a Catholic high school, social services agencies and a nun, among others. URINE TROUBLE NOW State agencies may be able to soon drug test workers after all. The governor ordered drug testing of state employees last year in an executive order, but it was blocked by the courts for most workers. But Rep. Jimmie Smith, R-Inverness, has taken up the cause, pushing a bill (HB 1205) that would allow agencies, though not require them, to set up random drug testing plans for employees. The bill looks like it is on its way to passage, headed to the House oor after a vote this week in the State Affairs Committee. Civil liberties groups say it, too, will be found unconstitutional, and that theres no evidence state workers are more likely to use drugs than anyone else. Backers say its just like in the private sector: if they know they might be tested they wont use drugs. STORY OF THE WEEK: Weve seen the future and it is here: the 2012-13 budget was passed by the Senate setting up a conference with the House, while the 2014 Senate presidency contest got murky. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Im not going anywhere, Sen. Andy Gardiner, R-Orlando, about his plans to be the Senate president in 2014. Or possibly referring to the prospects for his campaign?Senate leadership battle: e future is now

PAGE 24

Special to The News The growth of two-income families and increasing levels of job stress are two of the most significant work trends affecting American businesses and families in recent years. Having just one stressedout spouse can harm couples work and home lives but what about when its both? A new study conducted by Wayne Hochwarter, the Jim Moran Professor of Business Administration in the Florida State University College of Business, examines the role of support in households where daily stress is common to both spouses. Given that a lack of support from ones spouse represents a major cause of both divorce and career derailment, this research is needed to address issues that affect both home and work, Hochwarter said. More than 400 working couples, in both blueand white-collar occupations, participated in Hochwarters research. Those who reported high levels of stress but strong spousal support as compared to stressed-out employees without such support experienced the following positive bene ts: 50 percent higher rates of satisfaction with their marriage; 33 percent greater likelihood of having positive relationships with co-workers; 30 percent lower likelihood of experiencing guilt associated with home/family neglect; 30 percent lower likelihood of being critical of others (spouse, children) at home; 25 percent higher rates of concentration levels at work; 25 percent lower likelihood of experiencing fatigue at home after work; 25 percent higher rates of satisfaction with the amount of time spent with their children; 20 percent higher views that their careers were heading in the right direction; and 20 percent higher level of job satisfaction. The number of employees who returned to the workplace even more agitated because they were unable to generate coping support at home is particularly distressing to Hochwarter. Further, Hochwarter identi ed key factors distinguishing favorable from unfavorable support. Some attempts to support your stressed-out spouse can back re, actually making the situation much worse, he said. Support that had a deep and far-reaching impact had several common characteristics, which included: Awareness of ones spouses daily work demands (i.e., time pressures, lack of resources, deadlines, and supervisors). Not forcing support. Understanding that communication lines are open regardless of the circumstances. Recognizing that distancing oneself from the family or lashing out is not a practical way to foster help. In fact, it tends to bring out the worst in others and even causes the supporting spouse to become distant and act out as well. Being able to bring ones spouse back to the middle to bring up when down in the dumps, and to calm down when overly agitated. Not bombarding the family with complaints about minor workplace irritants. Not trying to one-up ones spouse in terms of who has had the worse day. Not being complacent continuing to work at it. Remaining rational and not automatically casting the spouse as the bad guy. Not keeping a running tab on who is giving and who is getting. Most important, though, was the ability for a spouse to offer support on days when he or she needs it just as much, Hochwarter said. According to one 47year-old sales manager interviewed for the study, I had a horrible day, and all I wanted was a homecooked meal and some time to myself. Instead, I took my wife out to dinner and heard everything about her bad boss and how her co-workers werent pulling their weight. By the end of the evening, we both felt at least a little bit better. Hochwarter also noted that the men and women differed by gender in terms of what support behaviors worked best for them. In general, wives appreciated getting cut some slack in terms of household activities; feeling wanted; and receiving expressions of warmth and affection. The husbands, meanwhile, were more likely to respond positively to offers of assistance with errands and feeling appreciated and needed. Both husbands and wives, however, were especially grateful for their spouses help in getting time away from work and home hassles to simply rest and recharge their batteries. Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 1, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comIn sickness and in health: FSU study shows importance of supportive spouses for coping with work-related stress METRO GRAPHICS