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Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00397
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 02-23-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00397
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter 10 years of collecting parts and three months of putting them all together, Don Volsch, of Wakulla County, can “ nally cross an item off his bucket list. Volsch built a No. 1 Civil War “ eld carriage with a 6-pound cannon and started the project with only a gun barrel. I have always loved things that put out smoke and ” ames and go boom,Ž Volsch says. Volsch is a history buff and has been collecting artifacts since he was a child. He has been diving for artifacts for the last 30 years. He has numerous shelves full of mastadon teeth he has found over the years. He grew up in Tallahassee, but when he was younger, he loved going to the St. Marks River at low tide to hunt for trinkets. The history was phenomenal,Ž Volsch says. He found arrow heads, Spanish black glass bottles, pipes, Civil War buckles, musket balls and buttons. I would sit for hours and sift the sand with my “ ngers and “ nd trade beads from the Spanish and Civil War period,Ž Volsch said. Chasing artifacts has always been a passion, he says. About 15 years ago, he did some horse tradingŽ with another collector for the gun barrel and says since then he has always wanted to use it to build a cannon. It was one of those things on my bucket list,Ž Volsch says. One day, three months ago, he decided it was time to put that plan into action. I didnt think it would take me three months and 30 to 40 hours a week,Ž he says. The cannon is built 100 percent to speci“ cations. He used a copy of the original blueprint for this type of cannon. Every measurement is as a Civil War 6-pounder would have been,Ž Volsch says. A problem with the blue prints is that they are vague and it took some time to decipher the measurements. Everything has to be so precise,Ž Volsch says. Continued on Page 5A By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Christian Coalition held its sixth annual Arthur L. Andrews Memorial Scholarship Banquet in the main dining room of Wakullas Senior Center on Friday, Feb. 17. The event is held each year as a fundraiser to help with activities of the WCCC. This years presentation was attended by many of the original founders of the WCCC, which began close to 10 years ago. The program was opened with a musical prelude by Fred Lee, whose covers of familiar songs were often lively. His version of Barry Whites Cant Get Enough of Your LoveŽ set many in the room to dancing. And his somber, more poignant songs depicting the struggle and hopes of the African-American were especially moving. An invocation was given by Pastor Alfred Nelson of the Macedonia Church of God Written in Heaven. The highlight of the evening was a keynote address given by Dr. Kimball Thomas, native of Wakulla County, and principal of East Gadsen High School in Quincy. Thomas was introduced by his sister, Shirlyne Everette, who spoke of moments in their childhood as only a sister can do. She was encouraged in her statements by their mother, Evelyn Thomas, who was also in attendance. Thomas was formerly principal of Rickards High School in Tallahassee for four years and the Florida A&M Developmental Research High School for two. He was once an assistant principal and teacher at Wakulla Middle School. As an administrator, he achieved success by raising test scores in reading, mathematics and writing. Due to his efforts, Rickards High School was kept off the critical low list during his four-year tenure. He was also directly involved in the implementation of its International Baccalaureate Program. He is a life-long learner with a Bachelor of Science in Education, Masters in Administration and Supervision and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership. Continued on Page 14A Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A Comment & Opinion .......................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 4B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 5B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 5B INDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 8th Issue Thursday, February 23, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents Teachers: Visit TheWakullaNews.com for links to FREE NIE curriculum Please see Page 4B P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read DailyThe Wakullanews OBITUARIES Gerald Lee Clevenger Margaret R. Sheotes Doris Shadix Jackson SmithFEBRUARY IS BLACK HISTORY MONTHChristian Coalition holds its annual Scholarship Banquet Judge will allow net lawsuit to move forward CIVIL WAR CANNONBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCircuit Judge Jackie Fulford refused to dismiss a lawsuit “ led by Wakulla “ shermen that challenges state net regulations as unconstitutional. The lawsuit was “ led by the Wakulla Commercial Fishermens Association and “ shermen Ronald Fred Crum, Jonas Porter and Keith Ward. The state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission had “ led a motion seeking to have the lawsuit dismissed. Among the arguments made by Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Glogau, who is representing the FWC, is that “ shermen have “ led and lost several lawsuits in the past in which they have challenged state rules on what kind of nets can legally be used. But “ shermen, who are represented by attorney Ron Mowrey, contend that there is new evidence from scienti“ c research that shows the nets the state requires them to use are detrimental to the environmental because the small mesh catches mostly juvenile “ sh, not legal mullet. In a seven-page order released on Tuesday, Feb. 14, Judge Fulford concluded by saying: This court cannot agree that our system of government is so harsh as to bind the hands and gag the mouths of those who believe they have been wronged.Ž Mowrey said the language reminded him of an order in a net case written several years ago by then-Circuit Judge Charles McClure, now retired, who compared the situation of mullet “ shermen to Indians being driven from their land. While Fulford refused to dismiss the case, she did allow some counts to be dismissed … including a count in which “ shermen claim that the FWC is selectively prosecuting Wakulla and Franklin county “ shermen. The judge found that selective prosecution is a defense to criminal prosecution and is not appropriate in a civil lawsuit. Continued on Page 12A East Gadsden Principal and Wakulla native Dr. Kimball Thomas was the keynote speaker at the Arthur L. Andrews Scholarship Banquet held Friday.Kimball Thomas The parade ” oat for Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church #2 in Saturdays Black History Parade. For more photos, see Page 14A. Black History Parade WILLIAM SNOWDENAFRICAN-AMERICAN READ-IN was held at the public library on Sunday as part of Black History Month. See story, Page 14A. JENNIFER JENSENDon Volsch with his Civil War 6-pound cannon. He traded with another collector for the barrel and then collected and built the rest of the parts for the “ eld gun, which took him three months to assemble. Local resident builds a cannon that will be used at the re-enactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge Friday, March 2 – Middle and high school students will visit the state park beginning at 10:30 a.m. There will be multiple stations set up with living historians giving 19th century demonstrations.  Saturday, March 3 – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors will mingle with Civil War re-enactors and observe a Confederate-Union skirmish in the afternoon, cavalry demonstrations, artillery shows and a medical demonstration in the afternoon. Following the skirmish, sutlers and food vendors will be present.  Sunday, March 4 – The of cial Opening Ceremonies and Dedication will he held, followed by a full-scale re-enactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge at 2:30 p.m. The CSO will accept donations of $3 per person for adults and $1 for children younger than six. Contact the Natural Bridge State Park for more information at (850) 922-6007. Battle of Natural Bridge is this weekend SPORTS, Page 9A Coach J.D. Jones to be inducted into Hall of Fame

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFor the last several years, Gulf Specimen Marine Lab has been able to bring its sea life to the public in the form of a touch tank. On Feb. 15, the lab unveiled its latest project, which is leaps and bounds above the touch tank. It is travel trailer full of sea creatures. The trailer is essentially a mobile touch tank that is completely self-sustaining. The trailer visited Crawfordville Elementary School for its “ rst of“ cial school visit and trial run. The schools second graders were given the chance to visit the trailer where they were able to touch and pick up sea life and learn different facts about them. Before the students were allowed to experience the touch trailer, they had to learn about the different creatures they would be meeting. The marine lab has partnered with former teacher and principal Jo Ann Daniels who has designed lesson plans that are up to state and federal standards, and which are presented to each classroom, said Cypress Rudloe of Gulf Specimen. Rudloe said one of the bene“ ts of the travel trailer for the schools is that only a small amount of the students day is taken up. When the students visit the lab, it is an all day adventure. With this concept, the lab can reach an entire school in a day, not just the 60 to 100 students who were able to take a “ eld trip to the lab. The idea is also cost effective. Rudloe said the cost is about $500 per day, depending on travel, which amounts to about $2 to $3 per child. The school does not have to spend money on gas and entry fees to the lab. Times are hard,Ž Rudloe said. We decided to start diversifying.Ž He added that because of the expense, they are unable to get to all the children in the area. They created the marine lab to educate people and create an interest and this is another way to do so. The idea to bring their lab to the public started as a touch tank, which was taken to festivals. Rudloe said he created the tank out of an 8 foot by 4 foot cage. About two to three years ago, he took the tank to the Thomasville Wildlife Festival and people from the Williams Foundation liked the idea and wanted to help Gulf Specimen create their idea of a touch trailer. They received a grant from the Williams Foundation to create the trailer to bring to festivals. Rudloe said they decided to go beyond festivals and wanted to be able to bring the tank to schools as well. Jack Rudloe, founder of Gulf Specimen, said when they “ rst decided on the idea he started doing research to see how it had been done before. The problem, he said, is that it hadnt been done before. There were virtually zero,Ž he said of mobile type touch tanks. We didnt know it would be something new.Ž The cost of the trailer also exceeded the amount of the grant, so they had to “ nd matching funds, said Cypress Rudloe. David Corbin, an architect who helped develop the 3D sketch of the trailer, said the trailer is self contained and is on its own power. Its rare that you get to work on something this neat,Ž Corbin said. The designs were sent to an engineering firm who delivered the project on April 15. Since then, Cypress Rudloe said they have been trying to work out all the kinks and three weeks ago, it was ready for its “ rst visit. Jack Rudloe said it has been very challenging and there are still bugs to work out, but overall he said he is very pleased with the way it turned out. It has the complexity of the space shuttle,Ž Jack Rudloe said of the inside of trailer. Eventually, he said he would like to juice up the trailer and include octopuses and sharks, this way there is always something different for the children to see. We want the kids here to know whats in their back yards,Ž Rudloe said. Superintendent of Schools David Miller said the trailer was a great opportunity for the children and was a way for them to experience their environment. For some of these kids, this is the “ rst time theyve seen it, let alone touch it,Ž Miller said of the marine life. School Board Member Greg Thomas agreed and said, It makes the ocean and science real to these kids.Ž Miller said it is also economically beneficial to Rudloe and the school district to be able to cover several different grade levels in one day. I think hes found a great niche,Ž Miller said of the trailer. For more information, visit www.gulfspecimen. org/ or call 984-5297. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com MEET THE CREATURES:Gulf Specimen takes its touch tanks on the road to visit Wakulla students at their schools JENNIFER JENSENCypress Rudloe of Gulf Specimen teaches second grade students at Crawfordville Elementary about marine life. With the self-sustaining touch tank, the marine lab can reach an entire school in a day, not just the 60 to 100 students who were able to take a “ eld trip to the lab. www.SnapperPro.com T HE BE S T VALUE IN C O MMERCIAL M O WIN G !S50x ’ SALES & SERVICESMALL ENGINE REPAIR

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Commission is developing a bicycle, pedestrian, blueways master plan and was seeking input from the public on its consultants current recommendations and designs. Staff members with Kimley-Horn and Associates led a public workshop on Feb. 16 and was asking the public for ideas on how to improve walking, biking and paddling in Wakulla County. About 30 people broke into groups and told staff members with KimleyHorn where they felt the connectors to walking, cycling and paddling trails should be, as well as sidewalks and multi-use trails. The county also wanted to know the publics opinion on the placement of way“ nding and branding signage. They also sought help with identifying key destinations in the county, refining the engineers preliminary recommendations and recommending additional bicycle and pedestrian facilities. The plan included ideas for placement of countywide paved multi-use trails, sidewalk and crosswalk safety recommendations, safe school routes, policy recommendations, blueway plan for increased paddling, improvement of those facilities and launch areas. Kimley-Horn also provided recommendations for facilities; signage, marketing and wayfinding; policies; design guidelines; bicycle route map; implementation plan and funding strategies. Jon Sewell of KimleyHorn said their vision for the plan is to increase connectivity between neighborhoods, civic locations, school and neighborhoods, provide regional connectors and promote economic opportunities throughout the county. Theres lots of opportunities for regional bike trail connectors,Ž Sewell said. One of these examples is the proposed Capital City to Sea Loop. These loop will go from Tallahassee to St. Marks to Panacea up to Sopchoppy, down to Carabelle and back to Tallahassee. Currently, there is a lack of sidewalks in the county, crosswalks and unified signange, Sewell said. There is also improvement needed at most of the blueway facilities, he said. Sewell and his staff have provided some policy recommendations, which included the creation of a program manager position within the county who would oversee the plan and communicate directly with the Department of Transportation and the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency. Another recommendation was establishing an advisory committee, as well as developing maintenance policies and ones addressing the repair of sidewalks during road repairs. Included in the plan will be a focus on bike trails and lanes. Sewell said according to VisitFlorida, the No. 1 questions that visitors ask is, where they can bike in the area. Following the workshop, the public comments will be analyzed and a list of priorities will be drafted, as well as a phasing plan for the projects. This plan will be presented to the county commission in April. Funding sources for the project will also be identi“ ed, Sewell said.COUNTY COMMISSIONPublic gives input on master plan A workshop was held to get comments on the countys bicycle, pedestrian, blueways master plan that is under designPHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN Citizens were divided into different groups for discussion of the plan. A report will be given in April. Notice of Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment AdoptionCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.FEBRUARY 23, 2012 Public HearingThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled a Public Hearing before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, March 5, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.FEBRUARY 23, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.FEBRUARY 23, 2012 SPECIAL MEETINGCommunity Development Block Grant StreetscapeThe City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of“ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.FEBRUARY 23, 2012 Date:March 1, 2012 Time:6:30 pm Place:City Hall 788 Port Leon Drive

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Miami man pleas to taking more than $27,400 from Medart Assembly of God • Wayne Martin, Country Gold to perform at Sopchoppy Opry • Gregory Alan Putnam Sr. obituary •Sheriff’s Report for Feb. 16 • Traffic crash on Spring Creek Highway sends two to hospital € Frank ‘Butch’ LeRoy Goodman Jr. obituary • Teaching values: Smith family helps others on ‘Service Saturdays’thewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Victim of Domestic or Sexual Violence? Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111Jerry Moore does stand for jobs anks to those who changed the rule Free “ nancial counseling is availableREADERS WRITE:Moore praised for role in grouper ruleEditors Note: We received several letters this week from citizens thanking County Commissioner Jerry Moore for his efforts in pushing for a local exemption from the state FIsh and Wildlife Conservation Commission on the gag grouper rule for the Gulf. Editor, The News: In the course of trying to regulate the “ shing industry, the FWC was considering swinging the pendulum of reasonable “ shing regulations to a position which would have crippled the “ shing industry and caused an even worse economic downturn than we are currently experiencing. If the FWC had decided to follow the path NOAA was proposing, to achieve consistency between the commissions reef rule and the federal regulations in federal waters, then a signi“ cant number of people would have been disenfranchised and the coastal communities and their economies would have become collateral damage. Commissioner Jerry Moore was bound and determined that would not be the fate of Wakulla County and its waterfront communities. Commissioner Moore laid out the facts. He explained the reduction of the gag grouper season to 123 days for recreational “ sherman would leave waterfront communities to become ghost towns and the loss of tourism would mean the “ nal nail in our economic cof“ n. The loss of jobs would have meant a very bleak future for Wakulla County and its citizens. I personally wish to thank him for coming to speak on behalf of all the businesses which depend on the “ shing industry and the tourists who come to “ sh in our waters and make memories with their families and friends. Paige Killeen PanaceaMoore saves Wakullas coastal jobsEditor, The News: Wakulla “ shermen and coastal businesses owe Jerry Moore a big Thank You.Ž Thank you, Commissioner Moore for leading the charge to keep Wakulla County state waters (out to nine miles) open to Spring gag grouper “ shing and for saving dozens of “ shing dependent jobs. Had Commissioner Moore not challenged the FWC and the National Marine Fisheries on this critical economic issue, Wakulla Countys spring tourist crowd would not be coming to our county to spend their money in pursuit of our bountiful supply of spring gag grouper. On Jan. 24, Commissioner Moore introduced a Resolution to the Wakulla County Commission, and it passed 4 to 1 with Commissioner Lynn Artz voting no. The main points of the resolution are: Whereas, gag grouper leave the shallow state waters of the Gulf of Mexico during the hottest and coolest times of the year to migrate to deeper Federal waters, and Whereas, limiting gag grouper fishing in the state waters of the Gulf of Mexico to the months of July through October will severely hamper the “ shing community in Wakulla County, a community that has already sustained economic blows in the aftermath of the BP oil spillƒŽ After successfully passing the resolution, Commissioner Moore attended the FWC meeting on Feb. 8 where he presented the Wakulla resolution and pleaded with the FWC commissioners to Help save jobs and the economy of Wakulla County.Ž Commissioner Moore told the FWC that Fishing and related tourism is the life blood of Wakullas coastal communities, and our businesses are dependent on the influx of spring tourists, who come to “ sh for gags in shallow local waters.Ž He added, They keep boats at our marinas, stay in our motels and cabins, buy gas and bait, hire “ shing guides, eat at our restaurants, shop in our stores, and help keep our citizens employed.Ž Commissioner Moore asked the FWC to make an exemption to the Proposed Rule to allow our “ shermen and tourists to catch our fish while they are here.Ž Adding that, ...The gags have all left Wakulla waters by the time the federal season opens.Ž The FWC listened to Commissioner Moores presentation, asked him questions and later voted unanimously to grant his request. Thank you Commissioner Moore for all of your efforts! Alan Lamarche Shell Point Editor, The News: This letter is being written to thank the many people who either sent an email or took the time to attend the meeting on Feb. 8 in regard to a proposed FWC rule change which would have negatively affected many people both from a recreational as well as a business standpoint. Because of the support and concern for not having the State of Florida gag grouper season coincide with the federal season, four counties along the Big Bend coast have been granted an exception … Wakulla being one of them. We will now be able to continue “ shing for gag grouper in State of Florida waters during April, May and June. I especially want to thank Wakulla County Commissioner Jerry Moore who personally attended this meeting and gave a great three minute presentation. And at the break, he talked to each of the FWC commissioners about the negative effect this proposal would have on the job opportunities and economy of this area. Also, I would like to thank Senator Bill Nelson and Congressman Steve Southerland for having representation at this important meeting. The results of this meeting clearly exempli“ es government in the sunshineŽ and proves that our governing boards do listen when enough people voice their concern. Thank you FWC and to everyone who played a role in this decision. Charles C. Shields Mayor City of St. Marks Last weeks Arts & Entertainment section featured a story on Riversprings Middle Schools play, the murder mystery-comedy Next Victim, Please.Ž The play was originally scheduled to be performed on March 2, but due to 6th grade FCAT Computer Training, the date has been changed to March 14 for the student body (morning) and March 15 evening performance for friends and families (7 p.m.) Editor, The News: In last weeks paper, your staff covered a story concerning the economic challenges facing so many Wakulla County citizens. As an arm of the University of Florida, the Wakulla County Extension Office staff realizes their role through financial education. Instead of a series of educational seminars, our approach is for a person, couple or family to have time with a trained volunteer to discuss any aspect of their “ nances. Four trained volunteers are available and we have provided space for con“ dential counseling at our of“ ce. These same volunteers are willing to do group presentations to encourage a persons involvement in the one-on-one counseling sessions. I am delighted to have the volunteer pool that we have … a retired banker, an educator, a business person and a CPA. All feel this to be their unique way to return to Wakulla County what they have so richly been given. I cant think of anyone who would not be interested in this free counseling. It is my hope that a year from now we will look back and know that we have made a “ nancial difference through this unique educational approach in the lives of Wakulla County citizens. Call the Extension Of“ ce at 926-3931 to set up an appointment. Sincerely, Shelley Swenson UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension By RITA HANEY, LCSW Our sense of self-worth plays a major role in our journey through life. Self-esteem or self-worth is important in all our relationships and dealings in our world. We begin building selfesteem from the beginning of our lives. Babies who cry are comforted, fed and rocked to sleep; this begins the journey of self-discovery. Learning how to be a friend and have friends is another milestone. Our sense of self changes and changes with our development. Self-esteem, as de“ ned by Nathaniel Braden, Ph.D. author of The Six Pillars of Self Esteem,Ž is an experience.Ž It is a good deal more than a mere feeling. Selfworth is our de“ nition of our self. We approach our lives from the perspective of who we are and what we are worth. It is truly a wonderful experience to be popular, receive awards, have honors and achievements, yet this is really what we do, not who we are. Liking and believing in ourselves is more important than who likes us. Our sense of self starts from the beginning of our lives and develops, re-develops and grows over the life-span. From time to time most of us feel sad and blue, if not depressed, with ourselves, our achievements, our very lives. Thankfully for most of us this is a temporary state of mind and using our inner resources we are able to bounce back, sometimes bounce higher than before. Positive self-worth is a necessity in facing lifes challenges, set-backs and disappointments. If drugs are a necessity to maintain our self of well-being we need to ask ourselves questions. We can experience a temporary happiness and elation through the use of drugs, a relationship or praise; yet self-worth is built over time. Self-esteem/self-worth comes from our commitment to our self. What seems clear is our sense of self is priceless. If my worth depends on you it would seem I have no control over my own inner world and I am always looking to someone outside of myself to determine my sense of well-being. Sometimes we confuse self-esteem/self-worth with a superior attitude; feeling superior is a faade which blocks our ability to relate to others in a genuine manner. Knowing we did well on an exam, a project at work, or being a parent does not mean I am better than you, rather it means I feel positive about myself and my abilities. It also means I can feel genuine joy and happiness when a friend, relative or co-worker does well. The guidelines for developing our inner resources presented in The Six PillarsŽ are: € Living Consciously … being present and open in our lives, € Self-acceptance … owning our experience and taking responsibility for our lives, € Self-responsibility … owning our choices and actions, € Self-assertiveness … the willingness to stand up for ourselves in appropriate ways, € Living with purpose … identifying our goals, and € Practice of Personal Integrity … honoring our commitments and values. As Shakespeare stated To thine own self be true.Ž The Wakulla County library is willing to order the above book.Rita Haney is a licensed social worker who works in Wakulla County. She can be reached at 926-2039. Believing in our selfWILLIAM SNOWDENThe Rotary Club of Wakulla County presented $1,000 cash to Amy Tidwell, whose ticket was drawn at the clubs Valentine Celebration on Feb. 11. Tidwell went to the clubs meeting on Thursday, Feb. 16 to collect her prize. Tidwell is suffering from renal failure and said she plans to use the money to buy medications that her insurance doesnt cover and to catch up on some bills. It couldnt have come at a better time,Ž she said. The Rotary Club had two cash prizes for the raf” e, a $1,000 grand prize and $500 second place, which was won by Christia Lee. Members of the Wakulla Rotary Club with $1,000 grand prize winner Amy Tidwell.Rotary winner collects $1,000 prize Clari“ cation

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 – Page 5ABy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA newcomer and an incumbent were sworn into office at a special called meeting of the St. Marks City Commission on Feb. 16. Allen Hobbs will continue as commissioner in seat 3 and Ray Stokes will now hold seat 4, which was formerly held by Keith Ward who did not seek reelection. Stokes and Hobbs were the only residents to submit their names for a seat on the commission, so an election was not held. In other news: € The design for the street improvements in St. Marks along Port Leon Drive has been completed by Hydro Engineering, who delivered the plans to the city on Thursday, Feb. 9. The plans are part of a $600,000 Community Development Block Grant the city received back in June. The money will be spent on economic revitalization, which includes lighting, sidewalks and landscaping. The design includes the addition of a sidewalk on both sides of Port Leon Drive from Pine Street to Riverside Drive. At the end of Riverside Drive, there will be an imprint of a lighthouse in the center of the road. Some business owners in St. Marks expressed concern about the addition of sidewalks in front of their businesses. Many were worried the sidewalks would interfere with customer parking. One concern was whether the gas pumps at Bo Lynns would be considered too close to the sidewalks and if a car was parked to “ ll up their gas tank, they would be considered parked illegally. Mayor Chuck Shields said if a car pulled up to get gas and someone was walking down the sidewalk, that pedestrian would have to go around. He added that the state was involved in the permitting of this project and nothing was mentioned. They know what weve got,Ž Shields said. Also included in the design is a 4-foot median in certain points of the road, which would have ” owers and other plants to help with the beauti“ cation of the road. The only issue the commissioners saw was a need to put two short boardwalks over two areas where there are ditches, instead of covering them with concrete. According to the Northwest Florida Water Management District, those ditches are considered wetlands and cannot be covered. The boardwalks would have guard rails and fencing along the sides, said City Manager Zoe Mans“ eld. Its not going to ” ow,Ž Mans“ eld said. The commissioners felt the design for the boardwalks would not go with the rest of the design. I just think it would look chopped up,Ž said Commissioner Gail Gilman. The commissioners plan to speak with the engineers and see what their options are regarding the boardwalks. We may not get all our wishes,Ž said Commissioner Phil Cantner. The commissioners will hold a workshop to go over the design before it is “ nalized. Its a great benefit,Ž Cantner said of the project. And almost a gift to the city.Ž The next commission meeting is March 8 at 7 p.m. at city hall. Continued from Page 1A He ordered parts online and built some of his own using his knowledge of woodworking and help from Arlo Kelly, a master woodworker. He also received help from his wife, Terri, who is an engineer and machinist, She volunteered to help me with the trickey angles on the axle,Ž Volsch says. Volsch says building the cannon was a challenge and some days he didnt accomplish much. Some days, the only things I could accomplish was using some choice words that I thought at the time were appropriate,Ž he says. However, he says he is extremely happy with the way the cannon turned out and cant wait to see it shoot. He will get that chance because the cannon is being used in the Battle at Natural Bridge re-enactment the weekend of March 3 and 4 at the Natural Bridge Battle“ eld Historic State Park in Tallahassee. Volsch and his father-inlaw, Hoot Harrison, who he refers to as Power MonkeyŽ will also be in the re-enactment. They have joined with the 1st Confederate light artillery. We are looking forward to our “ rst re-enactment,Ž Volsch says. They recently picked up their uniforms and Volsch says being involved in the re-enactment is on his father-in-laws bucket list, and hes happy to be joining him and helping him check it off his list. For more information about the re-enactment, visit www.” oridastateparks. org/naturalbridge/events. cfm or call (850) 245-2157.Civil War Cannon Day of Dialogue on Minority Health is SaturdayChurches play a key role in helping people to be healthy — spiritually, mentally and physically. But churches are not always organized to take the action needed to help families stay healthy. To help churches and other community organizations play a broader role in promoting health, the Day of Dialogue on Minority Health will host a Health Fair Saturday, Feb. 25, at Riversprings Middle School from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.  Construction will continue on 319Drivers on U.S. 319 between Wakulla-Arran Road and just north of Bloxham Cutoff in Wakulla County can expect intermittent nighttime lane closures Sunday, Feb. 19 through Friday, Feb. 24 from 6:30 p.m. until 6 a.m. Crews will also work along the shoulders between Wakulla-Arran Road and the Leon County line during daytime hours, causing no lane closures. NAMI Wakulla will meet on MondayNAMI Wakulla, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is offering a public discussion of recovery services at its monthly meeting on Monday, Feb. 27. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club, in Crawfordville. Members of NAMI Connection, along with mental health professionals, will be at the meeting. NAMI Connection is a recovery support group led by Wakulla County people with mental illness for people in Wakulla County with mental illness. Turnout for NAMI Connection has been so popular that NAMI Wakulla expanded meetings to 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday at the Wakulla County Library and 7 p.m. on Tuesday at the NAMI Wakulla of ce on Crawfordville Highway. The Monday night program will also have NAMI Wakulla volunteers on hand to answer questions from the audience. For more information, please check namiwakulla. org, or call NAMI Wakulla at 926-1033. Rotary will be building wheelchair ramps SaturdayThe Rotary Clubs of Tallahassee and Wakulla Countyare partnering on a local wheelchair-building project for a number of residents in the area with disabilities on Saturday, Feb. 25. The local clubs are working with Ability 1st on the project. The six ramps that will be built will be the single largest ramp build day in Ability 1st’s history. The project is part of a community-wide service day for Rotary District 6940, which extends from the Chie and area to Pensacola, to mark the annual anniversary of the founding of Rotary. The Rotary Club of Wakulla County and the Tallahassee Southside Club are partnering on a local ramp build project with the assistance of members of both Rotary Clubs, members of the Wakulla High School Interact Club, and contractor John Shuff. For more information about the project please contact Doug Jones, President of the Rotary Club of Wakulla County, or Leon Jacobs, President of Tallahassee Southside Rotary Club. Pearlmans to perform on SundayScottish Fiddle, piano and step dancing by Ed and Neil Pearlman on Sunday, Feb. 26, at 7 p.m., at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy. A workshop on Scottish/ Cape Bretton/Irish music for melody instruments will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 29, at 7 p.m., if their is enough interest. Contact Posh Java for more information: (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com Visit www.edpearlman. net for more information on the musicians. Chamber seeks nominations for awardsNominations are now being accepted for the 2012 Wakulla County Chamber Business Excellence Awards. This program is designed to recognize a Chamber Business of the Year, a Chamber Start-up Business of the Year, a Chamber Non-Profit Organization of the Year, a Chamber Environmental Stewardship Business of the Year, and new this year, a Chamber Member of the Year. Nominations for the awards are limited to Chamber members in good standing as of Dec.31, 2011, and may only be submitted by membership. BriefsCITY OF ST. MARKSCity commissioners sworn-in SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCity Manager Zoe Mans“ eld swears in city commissioners Ray Stokes and Allen Hobbs last week. FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATIONSEEKING ITEMS FOR GIANT YARD SALE!Its time to go through those closets....FWMA is preparing for its biannual yard sale that will be held at Nads storage onMarch 15th, 16th, and 17thNads is located at 59 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. All proceeds from this event will be used to care for sick, injured and orphaned wildlife! Donations of yard sale items can be dropped off at Nads storage in number 33 at any time before the sale or can be brought to the sale on Thursday March 15 after 12:00 noon. If you have items but are unable to drop them off or you would like to become a volunteer for our fundraising committee please email Jeff at jeffstudio54@yahoo.com.All donations are tax deductible and greatly appreciated. Thank you so much for helping us help our local wildlife! 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304

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The Christ Church Anglican ” oat Fishers of MenŽ won “ rst prize of $100 in last Saturdays Rotary Valentine Parade. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey... Gerald Lee Clevenger Margaret R. Sheotes Doris Shadix Jackson SmithGerald Lee Clevenger went home to rest with his Heavenly Father on Feb. 11. He was surrounded by family and loved ones in his home in Crawfordville. Jerry was a lifelong master carpenter and well remembered for his soft spoken and kind disposition to all in his life. JerryŽ leaves behind his wife, Sabinna; his mother, Ruth; four children, Lisa, Brian, Jeremy and Benjamin; seven grandchildren; four brothers; one sister and a large extended family. Jerry was preceded in death by his “ rst wife Sharon Lynne Davis. His life was already celebrated with friends and family on Feb. 11. Donations in remembrance of him can be made to Be The Solution, Inc. at (850) 545-2043 in line with his and Sabinnas love and passion for animals. Otherwise, plant a tree. Culleys Meadow Wood Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. (www. culleysmeadowwood.com) The WeaverMy life is but a weaving, Between my Lord and me. I cannot choose the colors He worketh steadily.Oft times He weaveth sorrowAnd I in foolish pride, Forget He sees the upper And I the underside.The dark threads are as needfulIn the weavers skillful handAs the threads of gold & silverIn the pattern He has planned.Not till the loom is silent And the shuttles cease to ” y, Shall God unroll the canvas And explain the reason why.… Author unknown Margaret R. Sheotes, 70, of Crawfordville, passed away Saturday, Feb. 18. Born in Boston, Mass., and formerly of West Palm Beach, Ms. Sheotes made her home in Crawfordville for the past 15 years. She was a professional dog breeder, handler and trainer who enjoyed spending time with family and friends. A memorial service will be held at a later date. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, a donation be made in Ms. Sheotes name to your local animal shelter. Survivors include a daughter, Robin Wake“ eld of Crawfordville; son, Bill Reinhard of Okeechobee; step-daughter, Sherry (Larry) Smalling of Jacksonville; step-son, Gary (Nancy) Sheotes of Lake Worth; beloved grandchildren, April Selph, Alisha Archibald and Bill Reinhard Jr.; a beloved niece, Kendra Waldman; and numerous other family members and friends. She was preceded in death by her husband Richard Sheotes. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850) 559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www. forbesfuneralhome.net. Doris Shadix Jackson Smith, 88, Tallahassee, died on Friday, Feb. 17, in Tallahassee. She was born Aug. 2, 1923, in Douglasville, Ga., to John William Shadix Sr. and Clara Wright Shadix. She was a veteran of the U.S. Navy during World War II and was of the Baptist faith. Survivors include her sons, Auston Michael Jackson of Middleburg and Tony Alford (Cheryl Jackson) of Tallahassee; four grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; a brother, Thomas A. Shadix of Pleasant View, Tenn.; three sisters, Inzer Winslett of Douglasville and Betty Jean Plowman, both of Douglasville, Ga., and LaFeise Edwards of Carrabelle. Memorial services were held on Feb. 21 at Abbey Funeral Home with interment at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. Donations may be made to Most High Ministries, attention: Lori Jackson, P.O. Box 180391, Tallahassee FL 32318 for the orphans in Ukraine. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.Margaret R. Sheotes Doris S.J. Smith Gerald L. ClevengerChrist Church Anglican wins 1st place in the Rotary Valentine Parade PHOTOS BY FRANCINE WALKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS The sign on the back of the Christ Church Anglican ” oat reads, Follow me and I will make you “ shers of men.Ž Some upcoming events at Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla StatIon:  Thursday, Feb. 23, at 10 a.m. – Quilting Group meets. All are welcome.  Sunday, Feb. 26, at 4:30 p.m. – Chancel Choir practice will be held.  Sunday, Feb. 26, at 6 p.m. – Youth meeting, Call (850) 421-5741 or (850) 766-390 for more information.  Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 6 p.m.– Praise Team practice will be held.  Wednesday, Feb. 29, at 6 a.m. – Men’s Bible Study with Breakfast following at 8 a.m. in the Alford Building, Wakulla United Methodist Church is located at 1584 Old Woodville Highway. For more information, call (850) 421-5741.Upcoming events at Wakulla UMCChurch Briefs

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On Sunday March 4 at 2 p.m., The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will present The Fungus Amongus: Mushroom BasicsŽ by Bill Petty. Petty is a master gardener, naturalist, author and past president of the Sarracenia chapter of the Native Plant Society. He will discuss mushroom shapes, ecology, nutrients, and relationships between fungi and other organisms. A brief mushroom hunt will follow. First Sunday presentations are held in the Natures ClassroomŽ of the Environmental Education Center at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Rd. All First Sunday presentations are free and open to the public. Call (850) 925-6121 for additional information or visit the website at www.fws.gov/saintmarks/. Special to The NewsThe Big Bend Hospice Patient and Family Holiday Gift Drive was born over 15 years ago as a way to give patients and families happy memories of a “ nal holiday. For terminally ill patients and their families, the holiday season can seem overwhelming. The importance of maintaining holiday traditions and making lasting memories, especially at the end of life, is very important. For some patients purchasing gifts for their family is impossible as the cost of being chronically ill has financially drained their resources. For some families, the loss of the main bread winner has meant that everyday is a struggle to make ends meet. The annual Holiday Gift Drive has connected individuals, neighborhood groups, book clubs, or an entire of“ ce and organization to a family in need of some holiday cheer. Some of the gift requests are meager, warm socks, basic toiletries, or candy. For other patients, the needs are more compelling. Big Bend Hospice Chaplain Lenny Marshall had a patient whose only request was to have a decorated tree in her home for her last Christmas. Community donors purchased the speci“ c tree decorations that the patient requested, as well as an arti“ cial tree and all the trimmings. Marshall, keenly aware of the patients physical challenges brought a hospice volunteer to the patients home along with a donated tree, ornaments, garlands, lights, and even a CD of holiday music to play while trimming the tree for the patient. This lovely lady was so happy, and “ lled with joy, her smile lit up the room like there was a great light within her,Ž said Chaplain Marshall. What pleasure that gift gave her and what beauty it brought to her home.Ž Another patient dreamed of improving his home before his death so that his wife might live more comfortably and securely after he was gone. The home was in need of heat as well as other necessary repairs. Community donors donated two portable heating systems for the patient and his wife. A contractor who lives in our community learned of the patients need for repairs and donated his own time, skills, labor and materials to improve the patients home. These donations provided the patient with a sense of peace regarding his wifes future which was truly a gift to the patient. The wonderful donors who participate in the Gift Drive are very special individuals. They are kind, caring individuals with giving hearts who have a desire to reach out and touch the lives of hospice patients and their families. We are so grateful for our donors and the wonderful communities in which we live! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunitySparkman to wed EvansLindsay Evans of Sopchoppy and Troy Sparkman of Crawfordville announce their engagement. The bride-elect is the daughter of Jerry Evans of Sopchoppy and the late Pamela Evans. The groom-elect is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Donnie Sparkman of Crawfordville. She is a graduate from FSU with a degree in criminology, employed by the Wakulla County School Board as a seventh grade teacher at Wakulla Middle School. He graduated from FSU with a masters degree in Geographical Information Systems and is employed by General Dynamics. The wedding will be held on May 5 at 5 p.m. at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. Lindsay Evans and Troy SparkmanHappy “ rst birthdayHunter Lareu Durrance celebrated his “ rst birthday on Feb. 19. He is the son of Stacy House of Sopchoppy. He is the grandson of Walter and Sara Durrance of Sopchoppy. He is also the grandson of the late Barbara Durrance. Hunter Durrance, at right. Lylla R. DurranceLylla Renea Durrance celebrated her “ rst birthday on Feb. 11. She is the daughter of Travis Durrance and Jessica Goodman, both of Sopchoppy. Hunter L. DurranceGardening classes o ered at Extension O ceLearn to get more out of the lawn and garden at the Wakulla Extension Of“ ce. Two series of classes will be offered beginning in mid-March. We are offering Wakulla County residents the tools and techniques for growing fruits, vegetables, lawns and landscapes,Ž said Les Harrison, UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension director. Learn to grow more fruits and vegetablesŽ will begin on Saturday, March 17, 2012 at 9 a.m. The series of four classes will focus on what homeowners, vegetable gardeners and small farmers can produce. The classes will include one hour of classroom presentations, then an hour working in the demonstration garden. Students will get the chance to have a unique hands-on gardening experience which can be the basis for developing their fruit and vegetable production expertise. Topics covered will include both organic and conventional production methods, insects and diseases, proper water use, and fertilizer and soil nutrients. To learn more, check out the Wakulla Extension Of“ ce video at youtube/cFVeofh3B4k. The Spring 2012 Master Gardener Class will begin on Wednesday, March 21. The objective of this weekday class is to teach homeowners and landscapers proper landscape techniques. This series of eight classes will include classroom presentations and work in the demonstrations gardens. Students will receive in-depth instruction on fertilizer and soil nutrients, plant selection, efficient water use and much, much more. To sign up or request an information packet, contact the Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 926-3931 or visit the website at wakulla.ifas.u” edu. Lylla DurranceHospice patients and families bene“ t from gift drive First Sunday at the Refuge presents mushroom basics www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink)

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchool19 Students perform in district honor bandsSpecial to The NewsOn Jan. 28, 19 of our most talented students performed in the Florida Bandmasters Association All District 3 Honor Bands. These bands, high school and middle school, are comprised of only those students who successfully passed rather dif“ cult audition requirements. They also had only three rehearsals to learn and perform up to “ ve tough selections of music for their group. All the students handled themselves with dedication and hard work. The FBA All District 3 Honor Band Concert was held in the Lawton Chiles High School Auditorium and in front of a standing room onlyŽ crowd. The music and performance was exceptional. Thanks are given to all the administrators, schools, families and friends who support the band programs in this county. It is moments like this that truly demonstrate the uniqueness of what we have here and the importance of education in our county,Ž said Carmen Williams, the band director at Riversprings Middle School. Congratulations to the following students on a job well done: Wakulla High School: Seth McManus and Toby Jordan; Wakulla Middle School: Tyler Westcott and Rafel Fortier; and Riversprings Middle School: Emma Chason, Mike King, Breana Sykes, Kyle Pearson, Nic Samlal, Robert Hogan, Jenna Franck, Whitle Kerce, Paige Pearson, Sheleen Burton, Kyra Townes, Mattias Gunnarsson, Coy White, Adrian Morris and Scott Curry. Riversprings Middle School band members Members of the Wakulla Middle School band, at left, and members of the Wakulla High School band perform in the FBA All District 3 Honor Bands.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSGunnarsson performs in All State Honor BandSpecial to The NewsMattias Gunnarsson, an eighth grade trombonists at Riversprings Middle School, performed in the MENC All State Honor Band last month. He was the only band representative from the county to participate. The Riversprings Band Program has been proud to have representatives attend this event for the past three years. Mattias has been a very hard working and dedicated student since the sixth grade and we are all very proud of what he has achieved. Hes a really talented individual,Ž said Carmen Williams, band director at Riversprings. He has scored Superior in all band functions, such as the FBA Solo/Ensemble Evaluation and the FBA District MPA for the past two years. Mattias GunnarssonStudent artwork on displayStudent artwork is on display at locations in Wakulla County until May. At Centennial Bank/ Crawfordville : Dawn Evans (C.O.A.S.T.), Ethan Owen, Damonta Morris (Wakulla High), Cori Chaganis (Riversprings Middle), Savannah Petrandis (Medart Elementary), Aiden Stroup (Riversink Elementary) and Aubrey Trice, Nhi Hoang and Dallas Harris (Wakulla Middle). School Board Office: Harley Rigdon, Alyssa Stokley (Wakulla Middle); Chris Revell, Shelby Cain, Kiersten Simmons (Wakulla High); Aidan Annand, Laney Grubbs (Riversink Elementary); Haylee Taff, Brooke Roddenberry (Medart Elementary); and Andrew Marlow and Tad West (Riversprings Middle). Senior Center: Fisher Lawhon, Chevy Stewart (Riversink Elementary); Alissa Anthony (Riversprings Middle); Morgan Clark, Tyler Tucker (Wakulla Middle); and Jacob Oliver (Wakulla High). Public Library: Maclellan Hicks (Riversprings Middle); Elizabeth Chaires, Courtney Pool (Medart Elementary); Aden McClintock, Tanasha Cooksey (Riversink Elementary); Jenah Messer (Wakulla Middle); and David Mathis (Wakulla High). County Courthouse: Jack Miller, Madalyn Stewart, Justus Jones, Trent Hollinsworth, Charlie Murphy, Dylan Sizemore, Alex Blanken, Carter Wessinger, Laural Gray, Lia Roddenberry, Brad Campbell, Christian Grimes, Madison Hooker, Jase Kelly, Mackenzie Crockett, Haley Peavy, Kason Tang, Jordan Smith, Kayla Mckenzie, Cole Posey, Cheyenne Pigott ( Riversink Elementary); Keely Mathers (Wakulla Middle); Lauren Lewis, Natasha Gunnarson, Michael Royce, Emily Kelley, Adrian Peacock, and Kelton Donaldson (All from Riversprings Middle); Dylan Pope, Carson Clemon-Brown, and Jalyn Burnes (Medart); and Garrett Wheeler (Wakulla High). At Centennial Bank/St. Marks: Tristin Brooks and Megan Nylund (Riversink Elementary); and Katia Toth (Medart Elementary). Refresher Spanish for AdultsTuesday nights from 6-9 p.m., February 28 – May 8,Only $99Refresher Spanish is designed for the adult learner who has studied some Spanish, but would like review and practice.The course will cover:Review of pronunciation and basic vocabulary Review of basic grammar concepts Extensive conversational practice in areas determined by student needs, such as work, travel, family, etc. Additional vocabulary instruction and practice for conversation activities Practice listening to native speakers of different accents Offered at the TCC Wakulla Center5 Crescent Way, Crawfordville For registration information, contact TCC Wakulla Center at (850) 922-6290. The c ollege of choi ce! Carolina Bandannas850-524-9103GOTCHARACTER PANACEA HATSAFACT • Interior Remodeling • Doors • Floors • Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling • Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS dress store50%-60% OFF850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE) The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree All Ladies ApparelThe best Alterations, Furniture Upholstry & Re nishing Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 – Page 9ACLASSIFIEDS $10 Per Week!sports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The NewsFormer Wakulla High School Coach J.D. Jones is among the group of 12 selected for induction into the Florida High School Athletic Hall of Fame. The FHSAA released the names of the inductees last week. The group also includes former Taylor and Bolles School baseball standout Larry ChipperŽ Jones, foursport star Daniel Tharpe, trailblazer and longtime contest official Margaret Busbee and prominent peacemaker during the early days of integration, Eddie Shannon. Other Hall of Famers include Central Florida Of“ cials Association member Prince Pollard; Naples girls basketball coach David Walker; Astronaut boys tennis head coach Michael Hoctor; the late football head coach H. Edward Feely; Gainesville girls volleyball head coach Cindy Boulware; Duval County administrator Jon Fox; and the late Vero Beach football head coach William BillyŽ Livings. This is the 22nd group to be inducted. With these 12 inductees, there are 156 individuals in the FHSAA Hall of Fame. The 2012 Florida High School Athletic Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will take place April 29 at 7 p.m. at the Best Western Gateway Grand in Gainesville. John David Jones, 65, had been within the Wakulla High School athletic system for about 33 years. After three years of being an assistant and head JV coach, he eventually became the head coach for boys basketball, football, weightlifting and softball during his tenure at Wakulla. In his 29 years as a football head coach, he had a 219-98 record, made 20 state playoffs and won back-to-back state championships in the 1980-81 seasons. Known for never cutting a student-athlete from a team, Jones was the Wakulla High athletic director from 1982 through 1987 and continued coaching until 2006. He won the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference Coach of the Year for six consecutive years and in 1981 alone, won “ ve Coach of the Year awards. In 2005 the Wakulla High Football Stadium was renamed the J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. Jones is still an active chapter member of the Childers/Everett Scholarship Program and the Houston Taft Scholarship Program. Two separate committees comprised of active and retired administrators, coaches, of“ cials, studentathletes and news media representatives evaluated the nominations of the 12 individuals selected for induction to the FHSAA Hall of Fame this year. A seven-member screening committee first reviewed all nominations received and determined which nominees were viable candidates for induction into the Hall of Fame. The nominations of those candidates then were forwarded to a 16-member selection committee, which rated the nomination of each candidate to determine the candidates who would be inducted.Coach J.D. Jones nominated for FHSAA Hall of FameSpecial to The NewsThe state wrestling championship for class 1A was held Feb. 17 and 19 in Lakeland. After two intense days, four of Wakullas six state quali“ ers earned medals and placed. The team came in 10th out of 77 teams competing in 1A. Zack Malik (junior) led the way by placing third in the 113 pound weight class. Malik pinned Jupiter Christians Elijah Cleary and Troy Reed of Fivay before losing his semi“ nal match to Somerset Academys Chase Singletary (who won the title). But he bounced back to beat Lake Highland Preps Nick Vestal 4-2 and win again over Fivays Troy Reed 5-1. It feels great to place third,Ž he said. I wish I was on the other side of the bracket because I think I was better than the second place kid. But over the summer me, Kevon (White) and Bill (Morgan) are going to train hard and leave no doubts next year. Ive never wanted anything more than to win a state title,Ž Malik said. Cole Woofter (senior) “ nished fourth. He beat Scott Riker of Fort Pierce Westwood 4-3 and Kazimeirz Dymek of Sarasota Booker 3-2 to advance to the semi“ nals in the 220 pound weight class. He lost to Carter Shipley of Lake Highland Prep (who won the title) in the semi“ nal round. Woofter won his next match 3-2 over Clays Justin Fountain but fell to Raines Kenneth Bynum 3-2 in the consolation “ nals to take fourth place. Kevon White (junior) placed “ fth in the 132 pound weight class. His “ rst match was a 7-1 win against Jonathan Smith of Robinson. Kevons 3-1 loss to Cardinal Gibbons Anthony Vasquez sent him to the consolation bracket. But he battled back to win against Bookers Eric Cabral 7-3, Trace Woxberg of Cocoa 4-1 and beat Vasquez 6-3 in a re-match to earn “ fth place. Luke Taylor (senior) came in sixth in the 182 pound weight class. He beat David Prindiville of Mulberry 11-2 in his “ rst match and then lost to St. Pierre Anilus of Key West to fall to the consolation round. Luke pinned Rodney Thomas of Cardinal Gibbons and Robert Kratman of Chaminade before falling to William Norelia of Golden Gate 5-4 and Jerry Willis of Suwannee 3-1 for sixth place. Taylor reached 100 career wins at the Regional tournament. Travis Hinsey (senior) lost to Niko DeAugustino of Pasco 11-5 and came back to pin Andrew Calderwood of Key West and beat Jamarcus Crump of Rickards 11-4 before losing to Bradfords Jarraid Forsyth 13-9, falling one match short of placing in the 138 pound weight class. Bill Morgans (sophomore) “ rst match was a 5-3 loss to Anthony Patrone of Lake Highland Prep (who “ nished as state runner-up) in the 120 pound weight class. Morgan came back to beat Daniel Laguna of Key West 2-0 and then lost to Tony Ruggiero of Wesley Chapel. The biggest thing is we “ nished 10th and we had no guys in the “ nals,Ž said Coach William Pafford. The finals are where you score the big points. Im superexcited about what this group did, and it will only be getting better.Ž The team earned a district championship, was third at Regionals, had six state quali“ ers and four state placers and “ nished in the top 10 in class 1A. Wakulla returns 10 of 13 starters next season.WRESTLINGWar Eagles come in 10th in state; four wrestlers medal FILE PHOTOCoach J.D. Jones in 2007 with the proclamation naming the stadium in his honor. With him are his wife Sarabeth and daughter Sally Jones.Jones won two state football championships and had an overall record of 219-98By PAUL HOOVER WHS Track CoachThe 2012 Wakulla High School track teams opened their competitive season on Tuesday, Feb. 14, at the Kick Off Meet hosted by Rickards High School in Tallahassee. The WHS girls team emerged as the meet winners and the boys team “ nished in second place. Emily McCullers (long jump) and Cora Atkinson (1600 meter run) won individual events and the girls 4x400 meter relay team of Alina McCullers, Emily McCullers, Savanna Harris and Madison Harris also placed “ rst. Other girls and relays earning points were Alexis Collins (3rd,100/4th, 200), Alina McCullers (2nd, 200), Norma Woodcock (4th, 400/3rd 800), Savanna Strickland (6th, 400/5th 800), Kaylyn Thigpen (7th, 400), Holi Capps (7th, 800), Lydia Wiedeman (2nd, 1600), Tyler Kinard (5th, 1600), Kasey James (2nd, 3200), Raychel Gray (3rd, 3200), Alexandra Cotes (4th, 3200), Taylor Vaughn (2nd, 100 meter hurdles), Lateshia Curry (4th, long jump), Lisa House (5th, shotput), Shelby Alsup (6th, shotput/3rd discus) and the 4x800 relay team (2nd, Cora Atkinson, Emily McCullers, Lydia Wiedeman and Marty Wiedeman ). On the boys side, Will Thomas (400) and Stanley Linton (1600/3200) were individual winners and the 4x400 relay team of Brantley Lockwood, Tamarick Holmes, Demetrius Lindsey, Will Thomas also placed “ rst. Other boys and relays scoring for the team included Demetrius Lindsey (3rd, 100), Justin Goates (5th, 100/7th 200), J.P. Piortrowski (3rd, 800), Gabe Hutchins (4th, 800), Travis Parks (7th, 1600), Nathan Green (8th, 1600), Cody James (3rd, 3200), Brantley Lockwood (2nd, 300 hurdles), Alan Pearson (4th, 300 hurdles), Kaedretis Keaton (5th, long jump/2nd, triple jump), Jamal Gavin (5th, Discus), Logan Hay (8th, discus), the 4x100 meter relay team (2nd, Brantley Lockwood, Tamarick Holmes, Demetrius Lindsey, Will Thomas ), and the 4x800 relay team (4th, J.P. Piotroski, Aaron Smith, Mitchell Atkinson, David Sloan ).TRACKFirst meet gets season started Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals Workout, lose weightƒ Each class feelsLIKE A PARTY!Saturdays 9AM-10AM Thursdays 6:30PM-7:30PMat BodyTek 56 Rainbow Dr. (behind El Jaliscos)Kim Crum 251-9195 Pam Chichester 459-5279 visit us on facebook $5 per class CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ƒONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EARƒ Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.-----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 926-3281

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBesides guiding, I work with an association that does a conference in New Orleans every year. Its always in New Orleans the week before Fat Tuesday. I got back on Sunday and am glad this conference is over. It was the largest ever and I spent more time on this than any in the past and now Im ready to get down to some serious “ shing. I just got off the phone with Capt. Randy Peart and he said fishing around the Econ“ na has been hit and miss. The one thing that surprised me was he said the water temperature was still at 60 degrees. I “ gured the cold would have dropped it but evidently that was a warm rain we had the other day. Randy said he “ shed a week and a half ago before the “ rst cold and he caught 22 trout and “ ve reds on the ” ats using the Rapala Twitchin Rap. Two days later it got cold and the “ sh moved up into the river and he had 13 nice trout and most were 19 inches. He “ shed yesterday and said things were tough “ shing-wise and weather-wise. He managed four nice reds and one trout and he also caught two blues and two lady“ sh. I have been “ shing down here since 1976 and I dont believe I have ever seen a lady“ sh caught this early. Capt. David Fife said he fished out of Spring Creek on Saturday and caught some nice reds and a few trout. He was “ shing the oyster bars between Oyster Bay and Panacea. The St. Marks River is still producing quite a few reds and some trout. The area around East River has been good for both trout and reds using live shrimp, Mirrolures and Gulps. I talked with Capt. Kent Taylor at AMS and about a week ago he and a buddy “ shed the St. Marks and caught over 100 trout in the turning basin but most were not legal size. Capt. Luke went out to about 35 feet of Dog Island Reef and said he caught some of the biggest black sea bass he has ever caught. Tom Riddle and Mike Pearson from Tifton were down about a week and a half ago and “ shed the Rotary for sheepshead. Using live shrimp and a -ounce sinker they caught 25 nice sheepshead and three black drum. On Friday he and Dr. Greg Anderson from Tifton went out and didnt catch quite as many sheepshead but he said they were all big. Saturdays weather forecast turned out to be wrong so they went out to K Tower and caught and released some big reds and big gag grouper. On the way in they stopped and caught some big black sea bass. I “ shed the Thursday before Valentines day with some folks from Indiana who are down here for a month. We “ shed the oyster bars with live shrimp and the Gulp and at the end of the day “ shed on the ” ats. We ended up with 12 nice trout and missed quite a few. The “ sh on the ” ats just wanted the live shrimp and didnt bite until the tide started falling good. Kevins Fine Outdoor Gear and Apparel is having their Red Trout Shootout on April 14, 2012. The entry fee is $125 for up to two anglers and over $10,000 in prize money will be awarded. The Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament in Panacea will be April 28 and 29. For more information on this you can go to panacearockthedock.com. The boat show is coming up soon and if youre thinking about buying a boat this is a good time. It will be March 2, 3 and 4 at the fairgrounds in Tallahassee. I just got off the phone with Mike Falk Jr. at Mikes Marine and he said Mike Crum was “ shing the hole at the mouth of the Ochlockonee River and about a seven-foot bull shark came up and tried to eat one of their “ sh. That again goes to show how screwed up the weather is. There should not be any sharks around this time of year. Heck, its still February. You better start checking your boat battery, make sure the boats is gonna run. Change the line on your reels and sharpen those hooks. It looks like its gonna be an early “ shing year. Dont forget to leave that ” oat plan with someone and know your limits. Good luck and good “ shing!Lady sh and sharks in February? This weather has everything messed up From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuges continuing First Sunday series will present The Fungus Amongus: Mushroom BasicsŽ by Bill Petty on Sunday, March 4. Petty, a Master Gardner, naturalist, author, and past president of the Sarracenia chapter of the Native Plant Society, will discuss mushroom shapes, ecology, nutrients, and relationships between fungi and other organisms. A brief mushroom hunt will follow. The program will begin at 2 p.m. in the Natures Classroom of the Environmental Education Center at the refuge. For more information, call (850) 925-6121 or visit the website, www.fws.gov/saintmarks/ The “ fth annual Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival will be held at the Ochlockonee River State Park on Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Admission to the festival is $4 per vehicle. Visitors will gather insight into how early man lived and worked; participate in demonstrations of ” int knapping, projectile point fashioning, deer hide brain tanning, bone, wood, and antler carving, and observe bow and arrow construction, basket weaving and early pottery. Competitions in Atlatl throwing and primitive archery are scheduled. An auction will be held on Saturday to auction off donated artwork. Ochlockonee River State Park is located four miles southwest of Sopchoppy on U.S. Highway 319. For more information, call 962-2771 or visit the website www.knapfest.com.Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival this weekend Refuge will host program on mushrooms on March 4The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety internet-completion course in Gadsden County. The course will be at the Florida Public Safety Institute, Academy Drive, off U.S. 90 W., 7.8 miles north of the Interstate 10 exit. The institute is between Midway and Quincy, across the highway from East Gadsden High School. Instruction is from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 10, in Classroom 120. Students must complete the internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the “ nal report from the online portion of the course. The “ nal report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling the FWCs regional of“ ce in Panama City at 850-265-3676.Free hunter safety course o ered in Gadsden County IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED GROUPER LIMIT IS 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com FWC NewsSome of Floridas commercial fishermen will soon have more fishing opportunities, thanks to changes made by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at its Feb. 8, Commission meeting. Management changes will be made to the oyster harvest in Apalachicola Bay and the king mackerel harvest in southern Florida. The commissioners approved a measure that will allow the harvest of oysters for seven days a week in Apalachicola Bay. Previously, harvest was not allowed on Fridays and Saturdays from June 1 through Aug. 31 and on Saturdays and Sundays from Sept. 1 through Nov. 15. The measure will go into effect June 1. This increased harvesting opportunity comes in response to management changes in 2010 by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services that require oyster harvesters to deliver their oysters by a speci“ ed time of day during the warmer months of the year. The seven-day work week will allow Apalachicola Bay oyster harvesters the ability to make up for time lost in harvesting because of the new earlier delivery times. Commercial king mackerel “ shers harvesting from waters off Monroe County will be able to land and sell their harvest in Collier County from April 1 to July 1. The commission took this action because commercial fisherman cant land their catch in Collier County because the season usually closes before April. When the waters off Collier County are closed, commercial fishermen harvesting from Monroe County waters experience economic hardships because they must travel farther distances to sell their “ sh. The change will allow these “ shermen to travel a shorter distance to sell their catch. To learn more about these management changes, visit MyFWC.com/Commission and click on Commission MeetingsŽ and then Agenda.ŽHarvest of Apalachicola oysters is expanded

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonMany of you may not know the significance of Feb. 15. For members of Flotilla 12 it is a day we celebrate the birth of one of our cherished members. The year I will leave it up to your imagination. Mark Rosen joined the Auxiliary on Jan. 8, 1991, in Tampa. He quickly immersed himself and learned all he could as well as imparted his vast knowledge to all who were willing to listen, and some who were not so willing, but knew they needed to listen. While in Tampa, he earned the former Department of Transportation Secretarys outstanding unit award, received his instructor qualification, several team and unit commendations, multiple sustained service awards (given for every 750 hours of service), several public education service awards, a presidential unit citation, several operations service awards, meritorious team commendations, auxiliary achievement awards, auxiliary humanitarian service award and his certi“ cate for 20 years of service. During those 20-plus years, Mark has earned crew and coxswain status, “ lled several positions in the ” otillas as well as at Division level, completed vessel exams, program visits and is one of our leading instructors. For several years, he used his boat, the 2nd LoveŽ as a facility and the stories so many of us can share about being on that facility are too numerous to write this week. Totaled, Mark has donated over 6,200 hours to the Auxiliary since records for hours began to be tracked electronically in 2000. This is most likely a gross underestimate of the time he has donated since Mark seems to always have the Auxiliary in mind in all that he does. There is not much Mark has not done. In Flotilla 12, as a transfer, he is in the top “ ve for time served. Two of the other “ ve, Steve Hults and Rich Rasmussen share this birthday celebration. February seems to be a good month for Flotilla 12. Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon round out the top “ ve for service to the auxiliary in the ” otilla. Many of us owe what we know to Mark Rosen. He has taken us in, mentored us and challenged us to be the auxiliarists we are today. Without his dedication, I know I can personally say that I may not have learned as much and been able to apply it when out on the water. It is always a pleasure to share with all of you the milestones we cross as we continue to evolve as a ” otilla. As we move forward, we are grateful to have members with great knowledge and experience like Mark, Tim, Steve, Rich and Duane; but we are as excited to have our new members who bring to us a fresh outlook and new energy that reminds us all why we joined the auxiliary. If any of you are interested in joining the Auxiliary or just seeing what we are all about, please contact Norma Hill, our human resource staff of“ cer at FSO-HR@ uscgaux.net As Sherrie says, safe boating is NO accident, educate yourself so that you are part of the solution and not part of the problem. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCoast Guard Auxiliarist Mark RosenI climbed down the slope at a favorite sinkhole and dive site last week only to be met by the stench coming from bags of rotting “ sh heads. Last month it was the remains of a butchered deer. Every month the trash is different: a broken toilet, soiled diapers, or racks of beer bottles, but the message is the same. Clearly the folks trashing our local sinkholes have not made the connection that these sites are also windows into our drinking water. How could anyone in good conscience soil their drinking water? I would have thought the county commission requirement for universal trash pickup would have made clandestine dumping trash less likely. But I continue to hear this common complaint from other land owners with sinkholes on their property. The problem is not new. Wes Skyles video Water JourneyŽ documents a number of sites littered with old batteries, spent antifreeze and tar buckets oozing poisons into the very water that feeds downstream drinking wells. Years ago, a farmer in Central Florida decided to dump old pesticides in a sinkhole on his property. All animal life residing in the downstream passage was killed. Before you say it does not matter because you get your water from Talquin, ask yourself where do they get that water? Thats right, from our local aquifer, exposed to the very sinkholes into which people continue to dump their trash. Archaeologists tell us sinkholes are a wonderful source of historic materials, nicely preserved in the muds of time. They tell us all manner of ancient trash are found there. Sonny Cockrell said of Warm Mineral Springs that 30,000 years of Florida history, including human remains, could be found in the ledges and mud deposits below. Two thousand one hundred feet into the main spring of Jackson County called Jackson Blue is a trash pile, out of which someone found a 1930s stoplight. Someone perched it on top of a stone in the middle of the passage, and to this day its listed on cave maps. Several years ago on an Island in the Bahamas our search for new species of crustaceans was curtailed by an enormous pile of glass bottles pushed into the sinkhole. The heat had actually melted some of them above water. Any chance of penetrating the cave was lost, but Im sure bottle collectors one day will “ nd this a treasure. Locally, cave explorers have had their progress halted because of an apparent sinkhole collapse that may be explained by the actions of a previous landowner. They did not like the location of a sinkhole on their property, so they “ lled it in with dirt dug up from another part of their yard. So how can we change? How can we make our sinkholes attractive, not repulsive? We can start by recognizing our caves have an intrinsic value that attracts people (and their money) from around the state, nation and world. We can encourage the Wakulla County Dive Club that happily provides sinkhole clean-up services in exchange for diving privileges. Whenever the club visits dive sites now, they always carry trash bags and clean up the trash before leaving. Is it possible to keep our sinkholes clean or shall we continue to support some future archaeologists quest for our trash? Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday y Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 2:40 AM 3.1 ft. 3:14 AM 2.9 ft. 3:49 AM 2.7 ft. 4:26 AM 2.4 ft. 5:08 AM 2.2 ft. 6:02 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:48 AM 0.1 ft. 9:12 AM 0.3 ft. 9:35 AM 0.6 ft. 10:00 AM 0.8 ft. 10:27 AM 1.1 ft. 10:59 AM 0.4 ft. 12:40 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:55 PM 3.4 ft. 3:17 PM 3.3 ft. 3:39 PM 3.3 ft. 4:01 PM 3.1 ft. 4:25 PM 3.0 ft. 4:54 PM 1.9 ft. 7:25 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:10 PM -0.1 ft. 9:43 PM -0.1 ft. 10:17 PM 0.0 ft. 10:55 PM 0.2 ft. 11:39 PM 1.4 ft. 11:41 AM Low 2.8 ft. 5:32 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 2:37 AM 3.2 ft. 3:11 AM 3.0 ft. 3:46 AM 2.7 ft. 4:23 AM 2.5 ft. 5:05 AM 2.2 ft. 5:59 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:45 AM 0.1 ft. 9:09 AM 0.3 ft. 9:32 AM 0.6 ft. 9:57 AM 0.9 ft. 10:24 AM 1.2 ft. 10:56 AM 0.4 ft. 12:37 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:52 PM 3.4 ft. 3:14 PM 3.4 ft. 3:36 PM 3.3 ft. 3:58 PM 3.2 ft. 4:22 PM 3.1 ft. 4:51 PM 2.0 ft. 7:22 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:07 PM -0.1 ft. 9:40 PM -0.1 ft. 10:14 PM 0.1 ft. 10:52 PM 0.2 ft. 11:36 PM 1.5 ft. 11:38 AM Low 2.9 ft. 5:29 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 3:16 AM 2.9 ft. 3:50 AM 2.7 ft. 4:25 AM 2.5 ft. 5:02 AM 2.3 ft. 5:44 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:52 AM 0.1 ft. 10:16 AM 0.3 ft. 10:39 AM 0.5 ft. 11:04 AM 0.8 ft. 11:31 AM 0.2 ft. 12:43 AM 0.3 ft. 1:44 AM Low 3.1 ft. 3:31 PM 3.1 ft. 3:53 PM 3.1 ft. 4:15 PM 3.0 ft. 4:37 PM 2.9 ft. 5:01 PM 2.0 ft. 6:38 AM 1.8 ft. 8:01 AM High -0.1 ft. 10:14 PM -0.1 ft. 10:47 PM -0.1 ft. 11:21 PM 0.0 ft. 11:59 PM 1.0 ft. 12:03 PM 1.3 ft. 12:45 PM Low 2.8 ft. 5:30 PM 2.6 ft. 6:08 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 2:32 AM 2.3 ft. 3:06 AM 2.2 ft. 3:41 AM 2.0 ft. 4:18 AM 1.8 ft. 5:00 AM 1.6 ft. 5:54 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:59 AM 0.1 ft. 9:23 AM 0.2 ft. 9:46 AM 0.4 ft. 10:11 AM 0.6 ft. 10:38 AM 0.8 ft. 11:10 AM 0.3 ft. 12:51 AM Low 2.5 ft. 2:47 PM 2.5 ft. 3:09 PM 2.5 ft. 3:31 PM 2.4 ft. 3:53 PM 2.4 ft. 4:17 PM 2.2 ft. 4:46 PM 1.5 ft. 7:17 AM High -0.0 ft. 9:21 PM -0.1 ft. 9:54 PM -0.0 ft. 10:28 PM 0.0 ft. 11:06 PM 0.2 ft. 11:50 PM 1.0 ft. 11:52 AM Low 2.1 ft. 5:24 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 2:24 AM 2.4 ft. 2:58 AM 2.3 ft. 3:33 AM 2.1 ft. 4:10 AM 1.9 ft. 4:52 AM 1.7 ft. 5:46 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:27 AM 0.1 ft. 8:51 AM 0.3 ft. 9:14 AM 0.6 ft. 9:39 AM 0.8 ft. 10:06 AM 1.1 ft. 10:38 AM 0.4 ft. 12:19 AM Low 2.6 ft. 2:39 PM 2.6 ft. 3:01 PM 2.6 ft. 3:23 PM 2.5 ft. 3:45 PM 2.5 ft. 4:09 PM 2.3 ft. 4:38 PM 1.5 ft. 7:09 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:49 PM -0.1 ft. 9:22 PM -0.1 ft. 9:56 PM 0.0 ft. 10:34 PM 0.2 ft. 11:18 PM 1.4 ft. 11:20 AM Low 2.2 ft. 5:16 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 2:27 AM 2.0 ft. 3:13 AM 1.9 ft. 4:01 AM 1.8 ft. 4:53 AM 1.7 ft. 5:54 AM 1.6 ft. 7:09 AM High 0.2 ft. 8:20 AM 0.4 ft. 8:37 AM 0.6 ft. 8:54 AM 0.7 ft. 9:14 AM 0.9 ft. 9:38 AM 1.1 ft. 10:07 AM 0.0 ft. 12:35 AM Low 2.1 ft. 2:57 PM 2.2 ft. 3:11 PM 2.3 ft. 3:30 PM 2.4 ft. 3:54 PM 2.4 ft. 4:23 PM 2.4 ft. 4:58 PM 1.6 ft. 8:47 AM High 0.3 ft. 8:34 PM 0.2 ft. 9:10 PM 0.1 ft. 9:48 PM 0.0 ft. 10:31 PM 0.0 ft. 11:24 PM 1.2 ft. 10:42 AM Low 2.4 ft. 5:42 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacFeb. 23 Feb. 29First Feb. 29 Full March 7 Last March 14 New March 22Major Times 1:41 AM 3:41 AM 2:03 PM 4:03 PM Minor Times 7:48 AM 8:48 AM 8:21 PM 9:21 PM Major Times 2:23 AM 4:23 AM 2:46 PM 4:46 PM Minor Times 8:19 AM 9:19 AM 9:16 PM 10:16 PM Major Times 3:07 AM 5:07 AM 3:29 PM 5:29 PM Minor Times 8:52 AM 9:52 AM 10:09 PM 11:09 PM Major Times 3:51 AM 5:51 AM 4:13 PM 6:13 PM Minor Times 9:26 AM 10:26 AM 11:03 PM 12:03 AM Major Times 4:36 AM 6:36 AM 4:59 PM 6:59 PM Minor Times 10:03 AM 11:03 AM 11:57 PM 12:57 AM Major Times 5:22 AM 7:22 AM 5:46 PM 7:46 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:42 AM 11:42 AM Major Times 6:10 AM 8:10 AM 6:34 PM 8:34 PM Minor Times 12:49 AM 1:49 AM 11:27 AM 12:27 PM Better++ Good Average Average Average Average Average7:10 am 6:31 pm 7:49 am 8:23 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:09 am 6:32 pm 8:20 am 9:17 pm 7:07 am 6:33 pm 8:53 am 10:10 pm 7:06 am 6:33 pm 9:27 am 11:04 pm 7:05 am 6:34 pm 10:03 am 11:57 pm 7:04 am 6:35 pm 10:43 am --:-7:03 am 6:35 pm 11:27 am 12:50 am9% 15% 21% 27% 33% 39% 45% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comCourt shortsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA 70-year-old Miami man was ordered to serve three years probation and pay back more than $27,430 to Medart Assembly of God in money that was intended for a church mission trip. Charles McComas entered a plea in Wakulla Circuit Court on Wednesday, Feb. 15, to a felony charge of grand theft of more than $20,000. McComas owned World Mission Tours, which was arranging the mission trip for the church. The travel business was up for sale and, according to the police report in the court “ le, McComas told investigators he believed he could use the money for some expenses and, using the money from when he sold the business, have the money back in time to buy the churchs tickets. It did not work out that way. The church ended up losing its money and cancelling the mission trip, which had been planned for August 2010. In January of last year, the matter was reported to the sheriffs of“ ce. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford accepted McComas plea deal, which called for adjudication to be withheld, meaning he will not have a criminal conviction on his record, and for him to make restitution payments of $500 a month to the church. In other court matters this week: € Andrew Wilson, the man accused of two murders in Wakulla Station last year, will likely not go to trial before the end of this year and it will probably be 2013 before his case is heard. Judge Fulford held a hearing on Thursday, Feb. 16, to hear from attorneys on the status of the case. Wilson, who shared a child with Gabrielle McKenzie, is charged with sneaking into McKenzies home with a knife on March 30, 2011, and murdering Gabrielles father, John McKenzie, and her boyfriend, Patrick Pittman. Gabrielle was reportedly left for dead with a cut throat. Deputies who arrived on the scene found Wilson and McKenzies 1year-old son in the house covered in blood and crying inconsolably. Wilson was later arrested in Georgia after wrecking his truck. It was reported by law enforcement at the time that Wilson may have lost consciousness and crashed due to blood loss because of severe wounds to his hands. Assistant State Attorney Lorena Vollrath-Bueno, who is prosecuting the case, announced last year that the state will be seeking the death penalty against Wilson if hes found guilty at trial. Andy Thomas, the chief assistant public defender, told the court at the status hearing that there are more than 60 witnesses in the case and that he and Bueno are scheduling depositions. € A former clerks of“ ce employee, April Wilson Metcalf, pleaded no contest to embezzling more than $6,200 from the of“ ce between April 2010 and March 2011. Metcalf, 48, pleaded no contest on Wednesday, Feb. 15, to a charge of grand theft and two counts of criminal use of personal information. As part of a plea agreement, she was adjudicated guilty and ordered to serve “ ve years probation and make restitution. Metcalf had used information, including a Social Security number, for an employee of the county ambulance service to generate payments from the county which she deposited in her account. The ruse came unraveled after the ambulance service employee received two W-2s in the mail and went to the county “ nance of“ ce to try to determine what the second payments were for. € Jared Millender, an inmate at the Wakulla County jail, “ led a lawsuit against the jail seeking a court order to have the facility give him the proper medications for bipolar disorder. Millender was on Wellbutrin, but there was concern that he was hoarding his medications and giving it to other prisoners, so it was changed to an XR formula which is crushable. The jail medical staff had considered allowing him to have his regular medication, according to Millenders handwritten complaint, but refused to do so after he was caught with a shank,Ž or homemade knife. In addition to the felony charge of having a knife in jail, Millender was also charged with threatening the medical staff. Millender “ led the handwritten case on Feb. 1. Continued from Page 1AAt the root of the controversy is the 1994 constitutional amendment that limited net “ shing … the so-called net ban. That amendment, overwhelming approved by voters, outlawed gill and entangling nets and limited “ shermen to using nets no larger than 500 square feet. The problem is that all nets gill, and over the years the FWC, and its precursor agency, the state Marine Fisheries Commission, had been creating rules and developing an evolving de“ nition of what constitutes a gill net. In practical terms for “ shermen, a legal net is 500 square feet or smaller, constructed of nylon (not mono“ lament) and has a mesh size no larger than two inches stretch. Prior to the net ban, mullet nets were thousands of feet long, made of monofilament, and with a mesh size upwards of three inches depending on the size of mullet being caught. It is the mesh size requirement that “ shermen have challenged several times in court, arguing that the smaller mesh size harms the resource by catching juvenile mullet and game “ sh. Fishermen contend that upwards of 90 percent of what they catch they cannot sell … which is known as bycatch. And that, they contend, violates what was the single purpose of the net ban amendment … which was not to outlaw gill nets, but to stop the unnecessary killing, over“ shing and wasteŽ of marine resources. The fishermen have typically won at the trial court level, but are reversed when the case reaches the First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee. The appeal court has cited the FWCs authority to make whatever rules it sees “ t to make under a rational basisŽ test. Mowrey contends he will present to the court substantial evidence to show that the net rules are unconstitutional and that fishermen are entitled to injunctive relief. The evidence we present will be overwhelming,Ž he said, that we are destroying the resource with the use of these nets. I think well prevail,Ž he said. Judge will allow net lawsuit to move forwardBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter having met several times and still not being able to sift through all the different data to get accurate numbers, the Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committee decided to hold off meeting next month until it could be resolved. When trying to determine who is the highest energy consumer under the umbrella of the county commission, the committee ran across issues with inaccurate data. The utility companies had different measurements of square footage for buildings from the property appraiser, building names were confusing, etc. We couldnt make sense of the numbers,Ž Commissioner Lynn Artz said. She added that linking it all up has been dif“ cult. Since the beginning, the committee has been trying to “ gure out the best way to sort through the data. Bobby Pickels, of Progress Energy, said it seemed like the committees main focus was identifying the highest energy consumers in the county and trying to address the problems. Now, it seems a broader net has been cast. It seems weve lost some momentum,Ž Pickels said. Artz said the committee has also been researching maintenance and energy policies and procedures from other areas, because it was determined that this was desperately needed in Wakulla County. The one thing each policy that Artz has studied has in common is the need to track energy use. Ive been trying to do this for three years,Ž Artz said. Committee Chairwoman Elinor Elfner said the idea of collecting data and identifying the highest energy consumers “ ts right in with tracking data. We need to get feedback to the people who are responsible,Ž Elfner said. Originally, the idea was to physically go out to each building and measure the square footage and take down the meter numbers, Elfner said. Now, they are trying to re“ ne a spreadsheet with a listing of all the buildings, their monthly usage and expenditures and kilowatts or gallons consumed. Elfner said she has been working to identify all the buildings the county owns and sort through them. The list will then be grouped by department and will be a good tool to track progress and hold staff accountable for increases or decreases in consumption, Elfner said. One of the problems is “ guring out who will enter the data on a monthly basis, Artz said. Dan Ard, of Talquin Electric, said they can provide the data to the county, or people can simply pull the information from their bill. Several departments do not see their monthly bills, but pay a set fee for utilities, said Building Of“ cial Rod Revell. Elfner said the committee has unearthed another administrative issue, inconsistency among departments regarding utility bills. Pickels said historical data can be pulled off their website to enter into the spreadsheet. Artz said that option might be easier for the buildings on Progress Energy. Talquin does not have that option available, Ard said. Representatives from Progress Energy offered to sit down with county staff and show them how to use their website and get the data needed. Elfner suggested the committee start with the administration buildings, and have a representative from each department get the website training. Artz said she would like to speak with County Administrator David Edwards “ rst and see who should be the person responsible in each department. Until the spreadsheet is complete and the list of the highest offenders is drawn up, Artz suggested the committee not meet. She said the committee needs to know each building, its address and meter numbers and who will be responsible for entering data at each building. Ard said Talquin cant fully help the committee when he had bad data and doesnt have the full scope. Thats an internal problem,Ž Ard said. One of the issues is that many of the accounts predate the 911 addresses, Revell said. When you grow up fast, this is what happens,Ž Elfner said. Pickels said they will make general recommendations of the top few accounts that the committee might want to consider. Artz and Elfner said they plan to meet with Edwards and discuss these items and set priorities for the county.COUNTY GOVERNMENTCommittee tries to analyze data on energy use in county buildingsEnergy committees original focus was on which buildings are highest energy users, but running into inaccurate data stalls them HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. 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PAGE 13

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MANYOTHERS TOCHOOSEFROM SALE $13295 Poulan Pro Push Mower 22Žcut Reg. $19599 SALE $132 95 HI Wheel SALE $12495 Poulan Pro Chain Saw 18Ž Reg. $17999 SALE $124 95 SALE $2,315 Poulan Pro Zero Turn 22HP 54Žcut Reg. $3,19599 SALE $2,315 SALE $1,155 Reg. $1,74999 SALE $1,155 Poulan Trimmer SALE $6495 Reg. $7999 SALE $64 95 SALE $1,040 Poulan Riding Mower 22 HP 46Žcut Reg. $1,44999 SALE $1,040 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 – Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Feb. 14, detectives with the Criminal Investigations Division executed two search warrants on Greenlin Villa Road and Hill Greene Road in Crawfordville. While serving the search warrants, four “ rearms were recovered. Three of the weapons were confirmed stolen and the fourth firearm had an obliterated serial number. Arrested during the investigation was Edward McNeil Harris Jr., 24, of Crawfordville, charged with grand theft of a firearm and dealing in stolen property; Dennis Gustavus Rosier Jr., 25, of Crawfordville, charged with burglary, larceny and criminal mischief; and Justin Andrew Francis, 21, of Crawfordville, charged with burglary, larceny and criminal mischief. The arrests solve a business theft reported in Tallahassee and two vehicle burglaries reported in Sopchoppy and Crawfordville. Detectives have been investigating the case for several weeks. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Feb. 9, Scott Davis of Crawfordville reported an income tax fraud. The victim attempted to “ le his taxes and discovered that his Social Security number had already been used. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. € On Feb. 9, Deputy Ian Dohme investigated a disturbance in Sopchoppy and observed a vehicle tag that had been altered. The deputy seized the tag which contained an altered expiration date. € On Feb. 9, Elva Hoffman of Crawfordville reported the theft of a handgun from her vehicle. The “ rearm is valued at $300 and is owned by a friend. Deputy Mike Crum identi“ ed a possible time for the theft in another jurisdiction. The stolen gun was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. € On Feb. 10, Admiral D. Barwick of Panacea reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle. Someone cut the victims tire. Damage to the tire was estimated at $40. A dog carcass was also found in the driveway. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On Feb. 11 at 8:14 p.m., a 16-year-old female high school student ” ipped her 2000 Toyota Tacoma on its side while traveling on FH 13 two miles west of Crawfordville. Three other passengers, a 17-year-old male, a 16-year-old female and 17-year-old female, were also riding in the vehicle when the accident occurred. Three of the occupants were transported to the hospital as a precaution by their parents while the fourth juvenile was picked up by parents. Deputy Cole Wells investigated the accident. € On Feb. 10, a clerk at the Kangaroo in Wakulla Station reported a retail theft and gasoline driveoff. A suspect driving a green Chevrolet 2500 HD towing a trailer with a red Suzuki Samurai pumped $41 in diesel fuel and failed to pay for the product. The subject used cash to purchase Lotto tickets and soda but failed to pay for the gas. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. € On Feb. 10 John Revell of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft of copper. Wire was observed in a dried up pond. A suspect has been identi“ ed and Progress Energy was contacted about the cut wire. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € On Feb. 10, Frankie Paulk of Santa Rosa Beach reported the theft of a $9,000 root rake that was loaned to a Bainbridge, Ga., man and never returned. The root rake was discovered off Commerce Blvd., but when the owner went to pick up the farm equipment, it was no longer at the same location. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € On Feb. 10, Deputy Nick Gray conducted a traf“ c stop of a vehicle driven by Admiral Doyle Barwick, 25, of Panacea for a brake light being out. Barwick is alleged to have not had a valid driver license and to have some marijuana in his pocket. Deputy Gray cited Barwick for driving on a suspended license with knowledge and issued him a notice to appear in court for being in possession of three grams of marijuana. € On Feb. 11, Brian Rudolph of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief at a Crawfordville home owned by John Collett of Buford, Ga. Many windows were broken at the residence. Rocks and tree limbs were thrown through nine windows and damage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Reed Brown investigated. € On Feb. 11, Latoya Smith of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victim lost the card and it was used to create $301 worth of unauthorized charges in Tallahassee. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € On Feb. 11, Christy Spears of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A mini bike, valued at $400, was reported missing from the victims property. PSO Wes Coleman investigated. € On Feb. 13, Richard Strickland of Crawfordville reported recovering a cellular telephone on his Crawfordville property. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated the case and was unable to determine an owner of the phone due to it being damaged. € On Feb. 13, Kenneth Jones of Crawfordville reported an identity theft. The victim attempted to file his tax return and discovered that someone had already used his Social Security number. Lt. Steve Ganey investigated. € On Feb. 14, Marilyn Henderson of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim was completing her tax return when she discovered that her Social Security number was used on another tax return. Lt. Steve Ganey investigated. € On Feb. 15, Deputy Joe Page was alerted to a 16-year-old Sopchoppy Second Chance School student reportedly possessing marijuana. The student was detained by Principal Tom Askins and 4.1 grams of marijuana was allegedly discovered in the students boot. He was issued a notice to appear in court and the marijuana was turned in as evidence. € On Feb. 14, Denise Deaton of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim attempted to have a mechanic make automotive repairs for her and paid him $800 to do so. The mechanic took apart the victims engine and left the parts in the yard for more than a month. Ultimately it cost the victim another $2,700 to get the engine “ xed. The case investigation continues. Lt. Steve Ganey investigated. € On Feb. 14, Dominique Davis of Tallahassee reported a grand theft of furniture in Crawfordville. Furniture owned by an estate was removed from a Crawfordville residence while the property was in probate. The property is valued at $2,600 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € On Feb. 15, Gary Rinehart of Panacea reported a bank fraud. The victim attempted to open a bank account and discovered that someone used his Social Security number at another bank. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On Feb. 15, Melissa Quincey of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims Social Security number to file and tax return. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. € On Feb. 15, a 20-yearold Crawfordville man reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle and the 15-year-old brother of the victim was listed as the suspect. The victim noted damage on two occasions as dents and scratches were observed. The juvenile was arrested for burglary of a vehicle and two counts of criminal mischief. Damage was estimated at $2,010. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On Feb. 16, Dorothy Mitchell of Crawfordville and the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department reported a theft of a “ re extinguisher from the recreation park. The equipment is valued at $50. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € On Feb 15, Lt. Sherrell Morrison arrested Jason Scott Harrell, 38, of Crawfordville in connection with a grand theft and burglary at the home of Lesley Hemsworth of Sopchoppy. On Feb. 2, the victim reported the theft of a laptop computer and she has since reported the theft of a GPS and jewelry. The stolen items are valued at $1,755. Harrell was allegedly observed inside the victims home. Deputy Will Hudson and Detective Lorne Whaley also investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 716 calls for service during the past week .Sheri s Report Dennis G. Rosier Jr. Edward M. Harris Jr. Justin A. Francis

PAGE 14

Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 L o o k i n g f o r Looking for t h e l a t e s t the latest L o c a l N e w s ? Local News? LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakulla news.comFEBRUARY IS BLACK HISTORY MONTHContinued from Page 1A Thomas opened his speech with a remembrance of being a small child, having just been admitted into the Crawfordville Elementary School, after previously attending the Shadeville School. The textbooks at Shadeville, noted Thomas, were always old and worn. On back of the front cover were the names of students who had used these same books for years on end. However, upon attending Crawfordville Elementary, he received his very “ rst textbook … brand new. His name would be the first ever written in the issued toŽ column of the book. And though students were not allowed to take their books home, he managed to smuggle his out, so that his mother could see it. Dr. Thomas speech brought forth memories for all in the audience … particularly African-Americans … on how far it is weve actually come as a nation, and more speci“ cally, as people of Wakulla County. The Arthur L. Andrews Memorial Scholarship committee is currently taking applications to award two seniors the honor of this years scholarship. For more information on how to apply, call (850) 766-3178. Call 866.484.7057Espaol 866.960.7085 Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV Now you have a better TV choice.[ The CenturyLink Prism Project. ]GET ON THE COUCH AND SEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Packages starting at $39.99a month for 6 months*CenturyLinkTM PrismTM.Interactive TV you control … any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. Prism Project … Demonstrations are with non-Prism’ TV customers using basic CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV service with standard featur es in High Definition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/11 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional acto rs, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. *Offer ends 5/31/2012. Offer and stated rates are available to new, first-time CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV residential customers onl y. The stated monthly rate of $39.99 applies to Prism’ TV programming package, and applies only for the first six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional i nstallation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. 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Staff ReportThe fifth annual African-American Read-In was held at the Wakulla County Public Library on Feb. 19 as part of the Black History Month celebration. The library has hosted the event for several years in partnership with the Wakulla County Christian Coalition. The purpose of the event is to make literacy a signi“ cant part of Black History Month. Works from several African American authors were read, discussed and honored at the read-in. Several local authors read aloud excerpts from their books and residents were also given the chance to share their favorite books written by African Americans and read a passage from them. There was also an opportunity to check out books from the Doris Clack Memorial Collection of African American materials. Clack was a native of Wakulla County and faculty member of FSUs School of Library and Information Studies. The event is part of the national African American Read In Chain, which is in its 23rd year. The event is endorsed by the International Reading Association. More than a million readers of all ethnic groups from the United States, the West Indies and African countries have participated.African-American Read-in is held Christian Coalition JENNIFER JENSENParticipants at the Read-In at the public library. PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN More photos online at thewakullanews.net Black History Parade

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W a k u l l a C o u n t y S e n i o r C i t i z e n s C e l e b r a t e L i f e Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012The column published last month promoted CELEBRATING LIFE in the Senior Center. It did not discuss health education, screening or exercise. This month we are discussing these issues and some lifestyles that will help you age successfully. The health of your body and your brain depends on many factors. Some are in your control and some are not. Its important to understand both. As you better understand the difference, it becomes especially important to act on the things you can change. Research reinforces the value of a healthy lifestyle. We are what we eat, how we exercise, and if we smoke. A healthy body and a healthy mind appear to go hand-in-hand. Listed below are some activities provided at the Senior Center that are designed to improve the health and welfare of our clients. Diabetes Support Classes. The Wakulla County Health Department presents classes on prevention, risk factors, symptoms, complications, lifestyles and home remedies. Blood Pressure. Every week, we have blood pressure checks and maintain records of each check on each client. Epilepsy. Periodically, the Epilepsy Association presents facts, case management, prevention and education regarding this symptom of a disorder of the brain. It can affect anyone, at anytime, at any age. Nutrition. Every month the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce presents classes on the value of foods for a healthy diet. Hospice Services. Both Covenant and Big Bend Hospice present classes on end of life issues including coping with grief and loss. Eyesavers. They avail themselves monthly for eye exams and free repair to glasses. Vision Impairments. The Division of Blind services promotes independent living services to those that have limited vision. They present low-vision devices and training for self-care skills. Parkinson Disease. The Parkinson Center, a satellite clinic of the Nation Parkinson Foundation presents information on the classic signs and other symptoms of this disease. Even though there is no known cure, there are medications to treat the symptoms. ACCESS Florida. This is a software system that enables our staff to assist eligible seniors to obtain food, cash, Medicaid and kidcare provided by the Florida Department of Children and Families Services. Fall Prevention. These presentations encourage evaluation of vision, vestibular system (inner ear), balance and coordination. Emergency Response System. This program explains how pressing a button worn on your body will establish immediate contact with medical emergency help. This allows you to live alone independently. There are many other health and welfare programs such as blood glucose screening, Eden Springs Rehab Center, elder abuse, bone density screenings, lowering Medicare costs, cancer symptoms and management, sexually transmitted diseases, and new programs added regularly. Exercise activities include Yoga, line dancing, chair exercising, brain gym, walking trail and many others. Continued on Page 3B Too few private ayes on prisons in the state Senate Weekly Roundup, Page 7B When older drivers need to stop driving AARP Tax tips for 50+ taxpayers Senior News, Page 3B Successful aging R.H. CarterSeniors celebrate Chinese New Year, arrange owers, paint watercolors, learn about bears, and sing karaokeBy DIANE LANTER and TAMARA BYRNESof the Senior CenterThe January 2012 New Year brought cooler weather, but not quite the winter cold that we have experienced in past years. We started out the year with decorations commemorating the Chinese New Year. Tamaras Tuesday craft class designed Ikebana ” ower arrangements for the tables and her watercolor class tried their hand at oriental painting. These paintings adorned the walls and colorful kimonos hung from the ceiling, along with bright Chinese lanterns. Chef Mary served sweet and sour chicken and egg rolls for lunch and all were challenged to try eating with chop sticks donated by a local Chinese restaurant. It was a new experience for many and a fun day for all. Continued on Page 8B SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTamaras craft class works on ” ower arrangements as part of Januarys focus on the Orient. Im Bob Braman the Head Coach of Mens Track & Field for Florida State University. I have been a runner since 1973, and while health and tness have alway s been pr iorities for me, I owe my life to a cardiac procedure performed at Tallahassee Memorial. Almost exactly a year ago, I began experiencing a pain in my throat during my daily, 5-mile run. Normally the pain would strike after the rst mile, and if I slowed down the pace for about thirty minutes I could nish my usual distance. Still, I decided to see my primary care doctor, Hugh VanLandingham, MD about the pain. It turns out, I had a 95 percent blockage in a branch of my left coronary artery. This blockage was preventing healthy blood ow to my heart and placed me at high risk for heart attack or cardiac arrest. I normally run in the woods by myself „ I could have easily dropped dead. I am so thankful I was diagnosed that day. Dr. VanLandingham referred me to Dr. Frank Gredler, who performed a stress echo, then sent me for a heart catheterization which led to a coronary artery stent being placed. Ive felt great ever since. Through this whole experience, Ive learned that theres no perfect formula for determining whether someone will get coronary heart disease. Im one of those odd cases, but, when the unexpected happened, I saw rsthand that you can count on the cardiac care team right here in town at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. TMH.orgFrankGredler,MD BoardCertified CardiologistBobBraman, HeartPatientAt TMH, Your Heart is in the Right Place...Home.The physician(s) referred to herein are independent practitioners and are not agents or employees of TMH.

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, February 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. at the library. The public is encouraged to attend.  LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Henry “Buddy” Wells, supervisor of elections, will be speaking at the meeting. In addition, the Wakulla League has invited Marilyn Wills, former Florida League President, and long-time Leon County member Gaynell Waldo to help explore the implications of the new voting laws, and the dates of the races and the times for early voting which have changed this year. Friday, February 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, February 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, February 26  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, February 27  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, February 28  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, February 29  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 1  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Special EventsFriday, February 24  WALK TO DEFEAT ALS will be held at 6 p.m. in downtown Tallahassee, 228 S. Adams Street. People will gather to join the ght to nd a cure for a deadly illness. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease. Wheelchair-bound patients along with their families and friends will make a 2-mile trek in The Walk to Defeat ALS. Interested walkers should call 888-257-1717, ext. 115 or register online at www.WalktoDefeatALS.org. Registration also begins at 4:30 p.m. the day of the race.  FIFTH ANNUAL STONE AGE AND PRIMITIVE ARTS FESTIVAL will be held at the Ochlockonee River State Park from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the festival is $4 per vehicle. Guests will gather insight into how early man lived and worked; participate in demonstrations of int knapping, projectile point fashioning, deer hide brain tanning, bone, wood, and antler carving; and observe bow and arrow construction, basket weaving and early pottery. Competitions in Atlatl throwing and primitive archery are scheduled. For more information, please visit www.knapfest.com. The festival will continue on Saturday and Sunday. Saturday, February 25  INTRODUCTION TO BEEKEEPING SHORTCOURSE, hosted by the Apalachee Beekeepers Association, will be held from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Leon County Extension Of ce. Individual registration with lunch is $50; $35 for ABA members, $25, 14 years and younger when accompanied by an adult attendee. Rotating, hands-on group sessions will include: Hive Assembly, Nutrition, Foraging, Bee Health, Open Hives Demonstration, Tools & Safety, Management, Pests and Integrated Pest Management. For more information, contact Lisa Lazarus at 294-3372.  STONE AGE AND PRIMITIVE ARTS FESTIVAL will be held at the Ochlockonee River State Park from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the festival is $4 per vehicle (up to eight occupants). There will be an auction. For more information, please visit www.knapfest.com.  DAY OF DIALOGUE ON MINORITY HEALTH will be held at Riversprings Middle School from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. This free event is held annually to promote community health in Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla and Jefferson counties. This event will provide assistance to residents by education and promoting the importance of a health lifestyle. For more information, contact Kenny Manning at 545-5982 or email kmann5_2008@yahoo.com.  ANNUAL WAKULLA COUNTY YOUTH FAIR ASSOCIATION SWINE SHOW will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wakulla County Livestock Pavilion, Cedar Avenue in Crawfordville. The show will begin at 9 a.m., with a barbecue lunch at noon. The awards ceremony will be at 1 p.m. The annual Greased Pig Scramble will be held before the awards. For more information, contact P. J. Piland at ppiland@comcast.net or 509-3263.  SOPCHOPPY OPRY will feature Wayne Martin and his Country Gold Band at 7 p.m., along with special guest Billy Rader. Sopchoppy Opry is performed at the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. Tickets are $15. Call (850) 962-3711 for tickets and information.  SONGWRITERS RICK OTT AND MIMI HEARN will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. For reservations call (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Sunday, February 26  STONE AGE AND PRIMITIVE ARTS FESTIVAL will be held at the Ochlockonee River State Park from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the festival is $4 per vehicle. For more information, please visit www.knapfest.com. Monday, February 27  NAMI WAKULLA will hold its monthly meeting on recovery services at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club, 64 Ochlockonee Street. Members of NAMI Connection, along with mental health professionals, will be on hand to discuss support group successes, who is eligible for recovery support groups, how meetings are conducted, and ways to encourage people with a diagnosis to take that dif cult step to attend. For more information, visit namiwakulla.org, or call 926-1033. Tuesday, February 28  AARP DRIVER SAFETY CLASS will be held at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. This program is for seniors 50 years and older. It is a classroom setting and no driving is done. The program discusses how age related physical changes can effect the way seniors drive. The cost for AARP members is $12 Non members $14 Seniors can register by calling 926-4605. The classes are also April 24, June 26, Aug. 28 and Oct. 23. Wednesday, February 29  PUBLIC FORUM will be held at 7 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Lodge on Tallahassee Community College and its future in Wakulla County. The guest speaker will be Dr. Jim Murdaugh, president of TCC. Thursday, March 1  ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS will be held at 5:30 p.m. at Wakulla High School starting with a silent auction. At 6:30 p.m., the performances begin with singing from the elementary students, followed by musical performances and skits from Wakulla Middle, Riversprings Middle, and Wakulla High Schools. Tickets may be purchased at the door and prices are $2 for students and $5 for adults. All proceeds bene t lucky Wakulla High seniors for scholarships in the Arts. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival at Ochlockonee River State Park. Day of Dialogue on Minority Health at Riversprings Middle 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Youth Fair Association Swine Show at Livestock Pavilion 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Center Advisory Committee meeting at 1 p.m. in BOCC conference room. All WeekendSaturdaySaturdayMonday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsMonday, February 27  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMUNITY CENTER ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 1 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room.  WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim DirectorJust a reminder from last week that on Tuesday Feb. 28, WCPL will be switching to a new automation system. While the vast majority of our patrons wont be affected by this change, there will be the inevitable growing pains as we work out the kinks in the new system so we ask for your patience. The new system will be internet based and will have some neat features for every library card holder to take advantage of, which we will tell you about in the coming weeks as soon as the staff is completely comfortable with the new system. A couple of immediate changes, which you need to be made aware of now, are the way we handle overdue fines will be a little different. While we will still have the current grace period before “ nes are assessed, starting a week after we go live with the new system, if you turn in material after the grace period ends, you will also owe “ nes for the entire grace period as well. Currently, the “ nes begin accumulating starting from one day after the grace period ends. An easy way to avoid this is to return your materials on time of course. In addition, we will be able to send via email reminders when books are coming due, when holds are available, and overdue notices. If you have been receiving my weekly email newsletter, over the next few weeks, your email address will be added to our new system. Once we begin using all the attributes of this new automation system (which is at a third of the cost of our current one) we think we will be able to provide even better service as we will be connected to our patrons even more. Friday Night Movie now with popcorn from Capital City Bank! Our Friday Night Movie this week is the Clint Eastwood directed multiaward nominee “ lm of the life and career of J. Edgar Hoover. Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Arnie Hammer and Naomi Watts, this “ lm follows the controversial, nearly 50-year career of Hoovers directorship of the FBI. The face of American law enforcement for a half century had secrets of his own which could have destroyed his career. Beginning with this film, Capital City Bank, as part of their community outreach program, will have popcorn and bottles of water available for a small donation to the library. So please join us for a great “ lm and the long awaited popcorn on Feb. 24. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing of this R (for language) drama. AARP Tax Prep at WCPL The AARP has begun their free tax preparation service at WCPL on Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This service continues each Thursday and Saturday at the same times throughout tax season. Its intended for low to middle income “ lers which an emphasis on senior citizens. It is also “ rst come, “ rst served so come early. AARP 55 Alive Driving Class On Tuesday, Feb. 28, there will be a AARP 55 Alive driving class held here at the library. This program is for those 50 and older, and is set in a classroom setting so no driving is involved. The class will discuss how age related physical changes can affect the way seniors drive. Many insurance programs offer discounts to those who take this class. The class will be from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a half hour break for lunch and will have a $12 fee for AARP members and $14 for non-members to cover material costs. Rregistration is required by calling Ernie Conte at 926-4605. Seating is limited but this class will be offered in April, June, August and October for those who miss it this time. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 – Page 3B San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.We will be at Ochlockonee State Park this weekend for Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival! the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering His name was drawn from OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Raymond RichJanuary 2012 Winnerank You So Much! (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926–8116 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Please RecycleContinued from Page 1B Age 65 is often considered a turning point. And so it is as well for Alzheimers disease: with age the greatest risk factor for the brain disorder, the number of people with the disease doubles every five years beyond age 65. However, this milestone can also be looked at positively as a time to really concentrate on successful aging. By incorporating these steps into your daily life, people over 65 ( and under 65) can help protect their bodies and brains as they age: € Develop a healthy attitude. Youre never too old to start taking care of your physical and mental health. Doing so can make the difference between another good decade or a decade of disability. € Exercise regularly. Studies show that a 30-minute walk each day is optimal. € Maintain social contacts. Loneliness is deadly for older people. A network of friends will stimulate the brain and the soul. € Quit smoking. Many older people have the attitude, It doesnt make any difference, the harm is done.Ž People can feel better and avoid smokingrelated health problems by quitting cigarettes at any age. € Stay trim. Obesity in older persons can increase health problems, including driving up blood sugars and boosting the risk for dementia. Chronic obesity in middle age may increase the risk of dementia in late life. € Limit alcohol. Alcohol damages the heart, liver, muscles and nerves, and excess drinking can lead to falls and injuries. Limit consumption to one ounce per day. People with Alzheimers disease should not drink any alcohol. € Understand your medications. Frequently, doctors do not talk to other doctors so your medications may interact or overlap. Youre responsible for understanding your medications and asking questions about side effects. € Watch your diet. Eat a balanced diet and take an all-purpose vitamin. Calcium supplementation is important to maintain bone strength. € Find a doctor you trust. Look for a primary care doctor who understands health problems in older persons, since medication doses, medical management strategies and treatment philosophy is different than for younger individuals. € Keep your soul healthy. Spiritual “ tness is as important as your physical and spiritual health and can reduce the incidence of health problems. € Enjoy your life. Humor and joy will lift your spirit, strengthen your body and feed your soul. € Prepare in advance. You dont have to wait until your 65th birthday to start on the road to successful aging. Implement a hearthealthy and brain-healthy regimen at any age. Discuss strategies with your primary care provider. R.H. Carter: Successful agingSpecial to The NewsThe Home Instead Senior Care of“ ce serving seniors in Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson and Wakulla counties has announced the Salute to Senior Service program to honor senior volunteers for the contributions they make to their local communities. The program includes a search for the most outstanding senior volunteer in each state and culminates with the selection of a national winner during Older Americans Month in May. Nominees must be 65 years of age or older and volunteer at least 15 hours a month. Nominations will be accepted at www.SalutetoSeniorService.com through March 15. Nomination forms also can be requested at ckoehler@homeinsteadinc. com. State Senior Hero winners will receive plaques, and their stories will be posted on the SalutetoSeniorService.com website. In addition, $5,000 will be donated to the national winners nonpro“ t charity of choice. Research shows that 52 percent of seniors volunteer their time through unpaid community service. Nearly 20 percent (one in “ ve) started volunteering when they reached the traditional age of retirement … 65 or older. For more information about the Salute to Senior program or Home Instead, call (850) 297-1897.SENIOR CITIZEN NEWSBy JESSICA EDMONDSON The good news this year is that youve got a couple of extra days. Rather than “ ling your taxes by April 15, the IRS tax “ ling deadline is Tuesday, April 17. But thats not the only change. Before “ ling your taxes, AARP has a few tips that older taxpayers may be able to use to cut taxes and to gain a bigger refund. Tax tips for older taxpayers: € If you turned 65 before Jan. 1, 2012, youre eligible to take a higher than normal standard deduction: Single $7,250; married $13,900; head of household $9,950; qualifying widow/widower $12,750. € If your adjusted gross income, untaxed interest and half your Social Security bene“ t add up to less than $25,000 ($32,000 if married and “ ling jointly or qualifying widow), youll pay no taxes on your Social Security income. € If youre in a tax bracket of 15 percent or lower, youll pay no federal taxes on long-term capital gains you racked up during the year. € If you work while paying a home health aide to take care of your spouse or dependent, you may be able to claim a credit of up to $3,000 in dependent (or spouse) care expenses. € If you pay all or some of your parents medical bills, you can deduct those as health care expenses. € If you contributed after-tax income to your retirement account, a percentage of your annual distribution may be tax-free. € If your stay at an assisted living facility or nursing home is related to medical care, you may be able to deduct the cost. € If you bought hearing aids and batteries, arti“ cial teeth and prescription drugs, you may be able to deduct some of the medical expenses. € If you made certain energy-ef“ cient improvements to your home, you may get a tax credit for expenses such as installing a new roof or new windows or exterior doors. Some of these tips come with restrictions that may apply to you, so consult with a tax adviser or visit www.aarp.org/ money/taxes/ for more information. Also, check out AARP Foundation Tax-Aide, a free program that offers tax services to low income and senior taxpayers, to make sure that you are taking advantage of every deduction and credit available to you. Dear Savvy Senior, Im worried about my fathers driving. At age 84, his driving skills have diminished signi“ cantly, but I know hes bound and determined to keep going as long as hes alive. What tips can you recommend that can help me help my dad stop driving? Nervous Daughter Dear Nervous, For many families, telling an elderly parent its time to give up the car keys is a very sensitive and dif“ cult topic. While theres no one simple way to handle this issue, here are a number of tips and resources you can try to help ease your dad away from driving. Take a Ride. To get a clear picture of your dads driving abilities, the first thing you need to do is take a ride with him watching for problem areas. For example: Does he drive too slow or too fast? Does he tailgate or drift between lanes? Does he have difficulty seeing, backing up or changing lanes? Does he react slowly? Does he get distracted or confused easily? Also, has your dad had any fender benders or tickets lately, or have you noticed any dents or scrapes on his vehicle? These, too, are red ” ags. Start Talking. After your assessment, you need to have a talk with your dad about your concerns, but dont sound alarmed. If you begin with a dramatic outburst like Dad, youre going to kill someone!Ž youre likely to trigger resistance. Start by gently expressing that youre worried about his safety. For tips on how to talk to your dad about this touchy topic, the Hartford Financial Services Group and MIT AgeLab offers some guides titled Family Conversations with Older DriversŽ and Family Conversations about Alzheimers Disease, Dementia & DrivingŽ that can help, along with a online seminar called We Need to TalkŽ that was produced by AARP. To access these free resources, visit safedrivingforalifetime. com. Like many elderly seniors, your dad may not even realize his driving skills have slipped. If this is the case, consider signing him up for an older driver refresher course through AARP (aarp.org/drive, 888227-7669), your local AAA or a driving school. By becoming aware of his driving limitations, your dad may be able to make some simple adjustments … like driving only in daylight or on familiar routes … that can help keep him safe and driving longer. Or, he may decide to hang up the keys on his own. Refuses To Quit. If, however, you believe your dad has reached the point that he can no longer drive safely, but he refuses to quit, you have several options. One possible solution is to suggest a visit to his doctor who can give him a medical evaluation, and if warranted, prescribeŽ that he stops driving. Older people will often listen to their doctor before they will listen to their own family. If that doesnt do it, ask him to get a comprehensive driving evaluation done by a driver rehabilitation specialist … this can cost several hundred dollars. A driving evaluation will test your dads cognition, vision and motor skills, as well as his on-road driving abilities. To locate a specialist in your area, contact the Association of Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (driver-ed.org, 866-672-9466) or the American Occupational Therapy Association (aota.org/olderdriver). If he still refuses to move to the passenger seat, call your local Department of Motor Vehicles to see if they can help. Or call in an attorney to discuss with your dad the potential “ nancial and legal consequences of a crash or injury. If all else fails, you may just have to take away his keys. Arrange Transportation. Once your dad stops driving hes going to need other ways to get around, so help him create a list of names and phone numbers of family, friends and local transportation services that he can call on. To locate community transportation services call the Area Agency on Aging. Call 800-677-1116 for contact information. Send your senior questions to Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior. org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy SeniorŽ book.When elderly drivers need to limit or stop driving By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior AARP NEWSTax tips for 50+ taxpayersSearch is on for outstanding senior volunteers

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: COLORING PICTURE Flag Day 2012 is Friday, February 24. How many questions about the American flag can you answer correctly?1) The flag has 13 red and green stripes. Fact or Fiction? 2) The number of stripes stands for the original 13 colonies. Fact or Fiction? 3) The colors of the stripes stand for purity and innocence and hardiness and valor. Fact or Fiction? 4) The flag has 60 white stars on a blue background. Fact or Fiction? 5) The blue background stands for the Union. Fact or Fiction? 6) The color of the background stands for vigilance, perseverance and justice. Fact or Fiction? 7) The stars stand for the millions of people living in the United States. Fact or Fiction? 8) Each of the stars has four points. Fact or Fiction? 9) The stars can be placed anywhere on the blue background. Fact or Fiction? 10) A new star and stripe are added to the flag each time a new state enters the United States. Fact or Fiction?Fact or Fiction?American Flag Challenge Answers: 1) Fiction, the stripes are red and white, 2) Fact, 3) Fact, 4) Fiction, the flag has 50 stars, 5) Fact, 6) Fact, 7) Fiction, the 50 stars stand for the number of states in America, 8) Fiction, each of the stars has five points, 9) Fiction, the stars must be placed in a certain pattern, 10) Fiction, that practice stopped in 1818 when it became clear that adding stripes was not going to work Jokes and RiddlesQ: What do patriotic monkeys wave?A: Star Spangled bananas!Q: What did the soldier’s letter say to the stamp?A: Stick with me, kid, and we’ll go places. Crossword Puzzle

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 – Page 5BA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you”LICENSED AND INSURED SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.CCC 053 88 7408-8563Residential Commercial Re-Roo“ng Repairs Since 1980 Free Estimates Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 4Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $800mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $750mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2-2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker RowellAuctions.com ONLINE ONLY Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc.800-323-838810% Buyers Premium AU 479, AB 296 2% Broker Participation2 Res. Lots, Camelot Subdivision, Crawfordville, FL Res. Lot, Burnt Pine Loop, St. Marks, FLBidding Ends March 6th at 3 pm EST/2 pm CST 63 Bank Foreclosed Properties in North FLMany Selling Absolute! 5137-0223 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to Fictitious Name Notices engage in business under the fictitious name of, Wakulla Springs Alliance located at 137 Royster Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the FlorFictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices ida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 27th day of February 2012. /s/Ron Piasecki Published one time in The Wakulla News on February 23, 2012 5133-0223 PUBLIC NOTICE MEETING NOTICE A special meeting of the Meeting Notices Apalachee Bay Marine Safety Support Group, Inc., will be held on March 24, 2012, from 12:30-2:00 PM at 1557 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Shell Point Rd. Lunch to follow. Bob Morgan, Secretary 850-926-8074. February 23,2012 5131-0223 March 10, 2012 sale-Callaway Auto & Truck Repair PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that the following Vehicle will be sold for repairs and storage Charges pursuant to section 713.585 Date of Sale: March 10, 2012 Time: 9:30AM Vehicle: 2000 Ford Ranger Vin# : 1FTYR14V9VTA30970 All sales to be held at Callaway Auto & Truck Repair, 1502 Shadeville, Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Telephone 850-926-1039 February 23, 2012 Lien Notices Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Lost LOST CAT,White, longed haired, 6 months old Off MLK and Wakulla Gardens REWARD (850) 926-3633 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEFri Sat Sun 8-3 furniture kids items, antiques, household Mens clothing, fishing, tools 118 Appaloosa RD. Pets Stop Scratching & Gnawing.Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch no More, Apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet.Ashley Feed & Hardware (850) 421-7703www. happyjackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE M/H for rent, 3BR/1BA.$450/mo. includes water, garbage, lawn-care. Quiet neighborhood. No pets. Call after 6pm850-926-3280 Mobile Homes For Sale Mobile Home for Sale2 BR 2 BASW. 938 sq. ft. Fully furnished. 100X176 lot. Panacea. $50,000. 850-984-0182. Real Estate For Rent 2Bedroom/1Bath,Mobile Home for Rent LARGE DECK, SHED ROOMY„QUIET NEIGHBORHOOD NO PETS„FIRM $525./month, $500./security. 850-926-6212. Apartments Furnished SHELL PointLarge loft style apartment, with separate office, full kitchen, washer, dryer, pets ok $650 month, first, last, security (850) 273-2633 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses LIGHT BRIGHT CLEAN 2 br. 1 ba in Oyster Bay Private dock, great view, furnished or unfurnished call 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEConvenient Location 3BR, 2BA, on Large Lot Screened back porch, washer/dryer. Carport, no smoking or pets $775 mo. (850) 508-9928 Mysterious Waters2BR/2BA wood-detail, vaulted ceiling, large-porch, covered parking, short walk to Wakulla River, community park, boat-ramp, dock. $800/mo. 850-926-6289. Real Estate For Sale House for Sale2 BR, 1 BA Up 1 BR, 1 BA Down. 100X200 fenced lot. Panacea. $90,000. 850-984-0182. Commercial Real Estate Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-926-2480 Commercial Real Estate Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300  Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-656-6340 WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Lots For Sale 2-Acre Lots For Sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 Lien Notices Lien Notices 5102-0223 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF VIOLATION/ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINT AND ORDER NWFWMD VS JERRY LAMAR HIERS Notice is hereby given to Mr. Jerry Hiers by the Northwest Florida Water Management District of the following violation of rules and regulations promulgated under Chapter 373, Florida Statues, Chapter 40A-3 and Chapter 62-531. Mr. Hiers is not a licensed water well contractor in the state of Florida, but constructed water wells at 59 Starling Trace, 10 Cardinal Court, and 14 Nuthatch Trail, Crawfordville. Engaging in the business of water well contracting without an active water well contractor license is a violation of Subsection 373.323 and Paragraph 373.33(4)(d) Florida Statues (F.S.) and Rule 40A-3.037(2), Florida Administrative Code. The District orders that within thirty (30) days of this public notification, Mr. Jerry Lamar Hiers will cease and desist from any activities that require a well water contractor license and pay to the District an administrative fine of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000.00). If a written request for hearing (Chapter 120, F.S.) is not made within 30 days after this four-week noticing period is complete, then this order shall be final. February 2,9,16 and 23, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5132-0223 Vs. Merkison, Jimmy R. 65-2011-CA-000331 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000331 DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JIMMY R. MERKISON, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION TO: KASEY MERKISON Last Known Address: 311 Trice Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIEDthat an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 73 A DISTANCE OF 33.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 66 FOOT COUNTY ROAD, RUN THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 308.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 217.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET, RUN THENCE SOUTH 72DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 311 TRICE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the W akulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 14 day of February, 2012. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Coastal StorageLow Rates / Short Term Contracts!850-509-1740 5X10s and 10X20s spaces for lease. Additional discount on already low rates w/contracts!

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA possible 3BR House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,000 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres – Avilable March 1 $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 203 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd 3BR/2BA MH $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets14 Windy Court 3BR/2BA Available 4/1/12 $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets26 Magnolia Ridge 3 BR/2BA with replace, above ground pool. $1125 Mo, No Smoking or PetsAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the ADA Coordinator, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone (850)926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770(Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850)926-0905; Fax: (850)926-0901. February 23 and March 1, 2012 GC-11-84561 5132-0223 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5127-0223 Vs. Mccallister, Norman W., 65-2010-CA-000412 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000412 AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY, INC.. Plaintiff, vs. NORMAN W. MCCALLISTER; SHERRY MCCALLISTER;: UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 25, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOTS NUMBERED ONE, TWO, THREE, SIX, SEVEN AND EIGHT (1,2,3,6,7 AND 8), BLOCK MŽ IN THESUBDIVISION KNOWN AS PANACEA PARK, IN SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PAGE 191 OF DEED BOOK 14, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2002 GENERAL DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME HAVING VIN#GMHGA4190128156A, TITLE #89938793 AND VIN #GMHGA4190128156B, TITLE #89939033. a/k/a 107 CHEHAW STREET, PANACEA, FL 32346 at public sale on March 1, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 1st day of February, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. February 16 & 23, 2012. 5125-0223 Estate of Mary Martha Rodgers, 11-15-PR, Notice to Creditors IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.:11-15-PR PUBLIC NOTICE IN RE: ESTATE OF MARY MARTHA RODGERS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Mary Martha Rodgers for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division; the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice has been served, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THIS FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.0702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is February 16, 2012 Personal Representative /s/ Sharon Theofane 2392 Dr. Martin Luther King Pkwy. Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ Sherry D. Walker Attorney at Law, Florida Bar No. 0608461, 8133 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32309 (850)386-5656 fax (850)386-5136(fax) February 16 & 23, 2012 5125-0223 5128-0223 Estate of Newberry, Jr. William Robert, Case No.12-3-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.12-3-CP IN RE: THE ESTATE OF William Robert Newberry, Jr., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of William Robert newberry, Jr., deceased, File Number 12-3-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court, for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: 5129-0223 Estate of Mardella Reichard Lort, CASE NO:12-5-CP, Notice to Creditors IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY COUNTY, FLORIDA PUBLIC NOTICE CASE NO: 12-5-CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF MARDELLA REICHARD LORT Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The ancillary administration of the Estate of Mardella Reichard Lort, deceased, whose date of death was 16 April 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division; Case Number 12-5-CP, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the ancillary personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: FEBRUARY 16, 2012 Ancillary Personal Representative James R/ Brewster 547 N Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 Attorney for Personal Representative James R. Brewster, Esquire Florida Bar No.; 440787 Suite 203, The Walker Building 547 North Monroe Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301 Telephone :(850)561-1037 February 16 & 23, 2012 5134-0301 Linton, John S.,12-12-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO:12-12-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN S. LINTON, DECEASED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOHN S. LINTON, deceased, whose date of Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5126-0223 03/01 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida StatuesŽ, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday, March 1, 2012 at 11:00 am at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Mickey Somerset Before the sale date of March 1, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 February 16 & 23, 2012. 5126-0223 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices death was February 4, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division under probate file #12-12-CP, the address of which is Courthouse Square, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is requires to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is February 23, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Nancy G. Linton 6081 Pisgah Church Road Tallahassee, Florida 32309 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ by T. Buckingham Bird, Esq. P.O. Box 247, Monticello, Florida 32345 (850)997-3503 February 23 & March 1, 2012 5134-0301 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF THE DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first Publication of this notice is February 16, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Patricia Athanson 9821 Nicklans Drive, New Port Richey, FL 34655 Attorney for the Personal Representative Allen, Kopet & Associates, PLLC. /s/ Jennifer Haley Gleason, Esquire, Florida Bar No.087653, Post Office Box 14269, Tallahassee, FL 32317 Telephone (850)385-5612 February 16 & 23, 2012 5128-0223 We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1150 per month. 2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. 5 Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2 Goto http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. Trying to sell something?Call and enter aClassi ed Ad for Only $10 in 877-676-1403 Subscribe to your local newspaper!Please Go Towww.thewakullanews.comand click on subscribeor Call877-401-6408

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 – Page 7BBy MICHAEL PELTIER and DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 17 … .Legislative efforts to privatize a third of Florida prisons fell by the wayside this week in the Senate only to receive a reprieve by Gov. Rick Scott in an ongoing battle pitting unions, prison guards, spending skeptics and civil rights groups against Senate leadership, less-government advocates and for-pro“ t prisons. Meanwhile, Scott signed into law new congressional district maps, which will be contested in court, just as lawmakers sent briefs to the state Supreme Court to argue that the legislative maps they passed earlier this month are constitutional. And as Senate leaders got down to the serious work of crafting their $70.8 billion budget package, a simmering feud between a powerful Lake Wales Republican lawmaker and University of South Florida of“ cials boiled over, as Senate Budget Committee Chairman JD Alexander continued his quest to create a new public university in his own backyard. All the while, committees scrambled to move bills to the floor in the face of upcoming deadlines. After next week, most action will take place on the chamber ” oors. NOT ENOUGH PRIVATE AYES TO PRIVATIZE In a Legislature so overwhelmingly dominated by one party, in Floridas case Republicans, dramatic close votes are pretty rare, and you take them where you can get them. The Senate has seen a few coalition votes that have brought some drama into the process, on SunRail, for example, but there arent many. So this week when Senate President Mike Haridopolos brought a bill (SB 2038) to the ” oor for a showdown vote on whether to privatize most of the prisons in the Southern third of the state, the Capitol was more tense than X-wing just before a riot. Backers of the bill said it was plain and simple … the state needs every dollar it can “ nd … Sen. Don Gaetz said during debate that Florida is stacking penniesŽ to balance the budget. The $16.5 million annual minimum savings required in the contract to run the prisons would buy a lot of textbooks,Ž said another supporter, Sen. Mike Bennett. But a coalition of Republicans joined Democrats in opposing it. The vote came on Tuesday and the 21-19 count against privatizing ended up being a little less dramatic than predicted only because it wasnt a tie. Opponents had said the day before theyd lined up the 20 votes needed to kill the measure. They got one more than they needed when the lone Democrat they hadnt counted on, Sen. Gary Siplin, joined the rest of his party in opposing the measure. The GOP coalition was made up of some members who have lots of corrections officers in their districts … even those who wouldnt see their prisons privatized hated the idea. That brought Sens. Charlie Dean, Steve Oelrich and Greg Evers into the no camp. Some, including Dean and Oelrich, both former sheriffs, said privatizing core public safety functions just wasnt a good idea … add Sen. Dennis Jones to that group. But the opposition was led by Sens. Mike Fasano, Paula Dockery, and Jack Latvala, all of whom said they didnt really trust that the scheme was a particularly good deal for taxpayers. Fasano and Dockery, in particular, said they just didnt buy the numbers put forth by the Department of Corrections in terms of how much would likely be saved. Meanwhile, a lot of hard-working corrections of“ cers would likely lose their jobs, or be forced to move, they said. Fasano, Dockery and Latvala have from time-to-time been at odds with their own party, but rarely does leadership lose a vote on one of its priorities. Haridopolos had said for a couple of weeks that it would be extremely close, and even acknowledged his side might not win on the vote. He got kudos from some in the Senate for daring to bring it up for a vote anyway. Haridopolos has often talked … and frequently said this week … that its just not his style to control the agenda, that he wasnt twisting any arms. But much of the talk around the Capitol was not about how noble Haridopolos was for allowing senators to vote their beliefs publicly, even in voting against him, but why he couldnt get them to agree with him and pass one of his top priorities. But if you think the question was sent to the hole for a year … think again. Gov. Scott jumped into the matter later in the week, saying Thursday that he was disappointed the Senate didnt pass the bill, and plans to look into what opportunities he has for pushing the issue forward on his own. The Department of Corrections, which answers to Scott, does have contracting authority, and that was always something backers of the privatization idea noted … that the whole legislative exercise might be moot anyway. Its worth remembering that the Legislature tried to privatize prisons in the same 18 counties a year ago and did so, in the budget, but the courts threw out their work. Lawmakers bristled that someone would question their authority to do it. Now, the Legislature says the prisons cant be privatized and the governor may over-ride them anyway. Hows that for separation of powers irony? Besides Haridopolos, one of the other senators who took a hit on the failure of the prison bill was the one guy who has something to hold over the rest of the Senate … line items. The biggest backer of the privatization plan was Sen. JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, who was in a perfect position to know just how much that $16.5 million might buy because hes chairman of the Budget Committee. POLYTECHNIC PYROTECHNICS But Alexander had another issue grating on him this week. In an ongoing battle with USF, a proposal to withhold $25 million from the Tampa-based university ended Wednesday in a dispute over independence for the schools Lakeland campus, resolving for now the latest turn in a months-long feud over the creation of Florida Polytechnic University. Alexander had initially tried to force USF to turn over all its property at its Lakeland campus to the Polytechnic before releasing $25 million to USF. He wasnt coy, didnt try to deny he was doing it … he said he didnt have any faith that USF would go forward with the move, even though the Board of Governors approved it last year. But following several days of high drama, Alexander backed off, expressing con“ dence that his point had been made and the $25 million hold was lifted. REDISTRICTING HEADS TO COURT On Friday, briefs were turned into the Supreme Court saying why the Legislatures new redistricting plans either are or arent constitutional. The brief “ ling deadline came less than a day after Scott signed the Legislatures plan to redraw the states congressional districts. That measure also is being challenged by the Florida Democratic Party in court, and a coalition of voting-rights groups said theyll likely follow suit. The groups intend to challenge the maps under the anti-gerrymandering Fair Districts amendments, approved by voters in the 2010 elections. Those standards require lawmakers to draw the maps without regard for how they might impact incumbents or political parties. Arguments over the once-adecade redrawing of House and Senate maps will be held on a day that only comes around every fourth year. The Florida Supreme Court announced it would hold arguments Feb. 29. TAX EXEMPTIONS: FROM CORPORATE TO BACK TO SCHOOL The House was busy this week, passing a series of tax breaks, freeing thousands of businesses from corporate-income taxes and putting extra money in the pockets of back-to-school shoppers. House members went along with the governors proposal to increase the corporate-income tax exemption from $25,000 to $50,000, passing it as part of a broader economic-development bill. Some Democrats continued to criticize the income-tax proposal, contending that it would primarily help large corporations and do little for small businesses. The House voted 92-22 to approve the economic-development package, which also includes new or expanded tax breaks related to agricultural packing houses, aircraft repairs and industrial machinery and equipment. A House analysis said the package eventually would eliminate about $121 million a year in tax revenues for state and local governments. The House voted unanimously to hold a sales tax holidayŽ from Aug. 3 through Aug. 5 that would allow shoppers to avoid paying sales taxes on items such as clothing, shoes and bags that cost $75 or less and schools supplies valued at less than $15. A LEANER DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH A Senate committee this week approved a wide-ranging plan that would scale back the role of the Florida Department of Health, close the states tuberculosis hospital and block mandatory septic-tank inspections. The 106-page plan, however, stops short of a House bill that calls for transferring public health responsibilities … and thousands of jobs … from the department to counties. Both bills are part of a three-year effort by lawmakers to more narrowly focus the Department of Health. IMMUNITY OR EVASION The House Judiciary Commit-tee approved a measure Thursday giving lawmakers complete immunity from civil cases dealing with their legislative duties. The approval came over complaints that the bill was an attempt to undermine legal challenges to the Legislatures redistricting proposals. Republicans painted the measure (HB 7123) as a response to a series of efforts to subpoena lawmakers in civil cases challenging legislative actions. But Democrats see the bill as an attempt to keep lawmakers from having to testify as redistricting cases begin to wind their way through the court system. STORY OF THE WEEK: Despite an all-out press by Senate leadership, a plan to privatize a third of Floridas prisons went down to defeat. Its last hope? Gov. Rick Scott, who said he might do it anyway. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: USF should not and will not be singled out for cuts in their budget. Good news is that we have a bicameral Legislature.Ž Rep. Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, in a tweet, about the push in the Senate to withhold money from the Tampa university.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Too few private ayes on prisons; Polytechnic pyrotechnicsBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 26 32 39 42 49 56 61 65 68 2 27 50 3 23 51 4 40 45 5 33 57 62 66 69 18 28 46 52 6 15 29 43 53 7 24 47 63 8 21 34 64 9 30 41 54 58 10 31 35 55 67 70 22 25 48 11 16 19 36 44 12 37 59 13 38 60ACROSS1.J.FredMuggswas one 6.HenryVIII'shouse 11.Sine__non 14.BookafterDaniel 15.Inflames 16.Cityarea,informally 17.Barrierwhosename waspopularizedby Churchill 19.Self-image 20.Checkerforpoison, maybe 21.Vexed 23.Musicalconclusion 24.Soughtaseat 25."Ifall__fails..." 26.Truckerwitha handle 28.Dundeedenial 30."High__" (Andersonplay) 32.WheretosendIMs 33.Blairof "The Exorcist" 35.Wateryporridge 39.Settingfora resignation announcem ent, maybe 42.Foodofmany shapes 43.HallofFamegrid coach Greasy 44.Corleone's title 45.PINrequester 47.__-Magnon 48.Bitofprogress 49.Abbr.onan envelope 52.Sitcomplanet 54.Anglingarea 56.TheUSS Constitution, notably 58.Slipby 61.Won__(Chinese dumpling) 62.Asphaltflattener 65. Genesisfigure 66.ColumnistJoseph orStewart 67.Theatercapacity 68.Hi-__graphics 69.CheatsatPinthe Tailon theDonkey 70.Motel meeting, maybeDOWN1.Gambler's marker 2.Barmitzvahdance 3.Having twoequal sides 4.Wisecounselor 5.Actedtheexpectant father,perhaps 6.Smoker'sintake 7.Educators'org. 8.ActressDorsor Rigg 9.Pointintheright direction 10.PatronizeU-Haul, e.g. 11.Putdownforcibly 12.Hankerings 13.Whereyoulive 18.Pertaining to element92 22.__Haute, Indiana 24.JeffFoxworthy's "YouMightBea__ If..." 26.DogpatchcreatorAl 27.Whendoubled,one oftheSociety Islands 29.Ever'spartner 31.Folklorefiend 33.Futureatty.'sexam 34. Inthedistance 36.Dealwithsubt ly 37.MBAsubj. 38.ShroveTuesday follower 40.Bespectacled comedianArnold 41.Justiceofthe peace'sclient 46.Patternonapinto bean 48.Holderofall the cards,temporarily 49.Intro tomath? 50.Treasurecache 51.Dinnerforkquartet 53.EbbetsField shortstop 55. "TheLove__" (HaroldMelvin& theBlueNoteshit) 57. "Pronto!"toaCEO 59.Matchdivisions 60.Formerly,formerly 63.NASAgo-ahead 64.AWOLchasers American Prole Hometown Content 1/29/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 23 34567 843 6 492 59 3178 9 81 17536 374 200 9 HtCtt 961 7238 5 4 324518967 785694231 617 489523 548236179 239157648 493 862715 172945386 856371492 C H I T C A P P A F T E R H O R A B O R A T R O V E I S O S C E L E S T I N E S M E N T O R S T A N G P A C E D L S A T A S A P U R A N I C M O T T L E T A R A N O N R E E S E U F T R E D N E C K A O K D I A N A A F A R M P S O R I E N T E L O P E R R E N T O G R E I L O S T T E R R E D E A L E R Q U E L L U N D E R P L A Y U R G E S E C O N S E T S A B O D E L E N T E R S T Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant – AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco – Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans – Grilled Chicken Pita with side Talk o’ The Town Deli – Choice of Sandwich & DrinkHamaknockers – Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken E A T I N ’ p a t h … EATIN’ path… O F F OFF t h e the Winner Dr Mark McCoydrawn from Hamaknockers in Crawfordville EATIN’ path… Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Win One Meal from Every Restaurant! OFF the Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. € 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m.1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99MixedTues. & urs. Kids EatFree on Wednesday12 & under 926-4329 mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com S S G S Open Mon. Fri. 11 – 7 Sat. 11:00 – 3:00 926-3500 fax order to 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy. Across from El Jalisco R Y P PTM OA New Yor k Sty le Deli 850-926-4737 C OMEENJO Y GENU INE “ OLD FASH ION” SMOKEHOUS E BBQ $2 $375 Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Private Party Rooms Private Party Rooms Tuesday Nights Tuesday Nights $ 4 95 $ 4 95 Spaghetti with Meat Sauce Spaghetti with Meat Sauce Myra Jeans Restaurant has long been known for their epic hand pressed cheeseburgers and the addicting grilled chicken pita. The place has a welcoming feel to it, and its great to enjoy a nice homestyle breakfast there surrounded by your fellow Wakulla Countians. Kids love the menu, the working choochew train and, of course, the ice cream sundaes. We all know to check the daily special board when we “ rst enter (or run the risk of missing out on an amazing meal not found on the menu). What you may not realize is that every Friday Myra Jeans does seafood, and each week they offer something different. One week its fried fresh mullet and cheese grits. Next week it could be a blackened gulf grouper sandwich or a grilled shrimp basket with sweet onion hushpuppies. Friday is also the day when they take a dollar off their fresh cut 12 and 16 ounce ribeye steaks. To seal the deal they serve cold beer, wine and champagne to enhance your meal. The prices are very reasonable for these friday delights. It is recommended that you call ahead and ask what the Friday seafood special will be. You do not want to miss the fried Apalachicola oyster basket. MMM mmm. Myra Jeans Restaurant 926-7530 Gotta try the seafood and ribeyes at Myra Jean’s OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Win ner!One Meal fro m Every Restau rant You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe Wakuulanews Continued from Page 1B Early in the month, local artist Gretchen Hobby taught an advanced collage class. Seniors collected favorite pictures, fabrics and maps to go along with their favorite theme. The Florida Wildlife Commission presented a great educational program called, The Bear Experience.Ž An interesting “ lm was shown with suggestions on how to keep these bears from bothering our garbage cans, pet feeders and bird feeders. A bear hide was on display so that the seniors could see up close exactly what our Florida black bears look like. Our karaoke sing-along with Lisa Godza was a big hit with the seniors. The Iris Garden Club had donated a karaoke machine several months ago and Lisa volunteered to lead the show. If anyone has any CD+G music that is no longer being used, we would appreciate the donation and put them to good use. Local Green Guide Kent Mayer has agreed to donate walking sticks for the seniors to use when utilizing the walking trail behind the center. This trail is maintained by the sheriffs department and we sure appreciate that. The Senior Center Volunteer of the Year has been awarded to Virginia Davis, who has been volunteering at the center for many years and we are so blessed to have her. Come and join us for our many activities held daily, Monday through Friday at the Wakulla County Senior Center. If you would like to join us for lunch, we ask that you call by 9:30 a.m. on the day you plan to be here. Participating in a bone density scan at the senior center. R.H. Carter with Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis. A bear hide at the program on bears.Seniors celebrate Chinese New Year, arrange ” owers, and more



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter 10 years of collecting parts and three months of putting them all together, Don Volsch, of Wakulla County, can nally cross an item off his bucket list. Volsch built a No. 1 Civil War eld carriage with a 6-pound cannon and started the project with only a gun barrel. I have always loved things that put out smoke and ames and go boom, Volsch says. Volsch is a history buff and has been collecting artifacts since he was a child. He has been diving for artifacts for the last 30 years. He has numerous shelves full of mastadon teeth he has found over the years. He grew up in Tallahassee, but when he was younger, he loved going to the St. Marks River at low tide to hunt for trinkets. The history was phenomenal, Volsch says. He found arrow heads, Spanish black glass bottles, pipes, Civil War buckles, musket balls and buttons. I would sit for hours and sift the sand with my ngers and nd trade beads from the Spanish and Civil War period, Volsch said. Chasing artifacts has always been a passion, he says. About 15 years ago, he did some horse trading with another collector for the gun barrel and says since then he has always wanted to use it to build a cannon. It was one of those things on my bucket list, Volsch says. One day, three months ago, he decided it was time to put that plan into action. I didnt think it would take me three months and 30 to 40 hours a week, he says. The cannon is built 100 percent to speci cations. He used a copy of the original blueprint for this type of cannon. Every measurement is as a Civil War 6-pounder would have been, Volsch says. A problem with the blue prints is that they are vague and it took some time to decipher the measurements. Everything has to be so precise, Volsch says. Continued on Page 5A By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Christian Coalition held its sixth annual Arthur L. Andrews Memorial Scholarship Banquet in the main dining room of Wakullas Senior Center on Friday, Feb. 17. The event is held each year as a fundraiser to help with activities of the WCCC. This years presentation was attended by many of the original founders of the WCCC, which began close to 10 years ago. The program was opened with a musical prelude by Fred Lee, whose covers of familiar songs were often lively. His version of Barry Whites Cant Get Enough of Your Love set many in the room to dancing. And his somber, more poignant songs depicting the struggle and hopes of the African-American were especially moving. An invocation was given by Pastor Alfred Nelson of the Macedonia Church of God Written in Heaven. The highlight of the evening was a keynote address given by Dr. Kimball Thomas, native of Wakulla County, and principal of East Gadsen High School in Quincy. Thomas was introduced by his sister, Shirlyne Everette, who spoke of moments in their childhood as only a sister can do. She was encouraged in her statements by their mother, Evelyn Thomas, who was also in attendance. Thomas was formerly principal of Rickards High School in Tallahassee for four years and the Florida A&M Developmental Research High School for two. He was once an assistant principal and teacher at Wakulla Middle School. As an administrator, he achieved success by raising test scores in reading, mathematics and writing. Due to his efforts, Rickards High School was kept off the critical low list during his four-year tenure. He was also directly involved in the implementation of its International Baccalaureate Program. He is a life-long learner with a Bachelor of Science in Education, Masters in Administration and Supervision and a Doctorate in Educational Leadership. Continued on Page 14A Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A Comment & Opinion .......................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 4B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 5B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 5BINDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 8th Issue Thursday, February 23, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Teachers: Visit TheWakullaNews.com for links to FREE NIE curriculumPlease see Page 4B Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read DailyThe WakullanewsOBITUARIES Gerald Lee Clevenger Margaret R. Sheotes Doris Shadix Jackson SmithFEBRUARY IS BLACK HISTORY MONTHChristian Coalition holds its annual Scholarship Banquet Judge will allow net lawsuit to move forward CIVIL WAR CANNONBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netCircuit Judge Jackie Fulford refused to dismiss a lawsuit led by Wakulla shermen that challenges state net regulations as unconstitutional. The lawsuit was led by the Wakulla Commercial Fishermens Association and shermen Ronald Fred Crum, Jonas Porter and Keith Ward. The state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission had led a motion seeking to have the lawsuit dismissed. Among the arguments made by Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Glogau, who is representing the FWC, is that shermen have led and lost several lawsuits in the past in which they have challenged state rules on what kind of nets can legally be used. But shermen, who are represented by attorney Ron Mowrey, contend that there is new evidence from scienti c research that shows the nets the state requires them to use are detrimental to the environmental because the small mesh catches mostly juvenile sh, not legal mullet. In a seven-page order released on Tuesday, Feb. 14, Judge Fulford concluded by saying: This court cannot agree that our system of government is so harsh as to bind the hands and gag the mouths of those who believe they have been wronged. Mowrey said the language reminded him of an order in a net case written several years ago by then-Circuit Judge Charles McClure, now retired, who compared the situation of mullet shermen to Indians being driven from their land. While Fulford refused to dismiss the case, she did allow some counts to be dismissed including a count in which shermen claim that the FWC is selectively prosecuting Wakulla and Franklin county shermen. The judge found that selective prosecution is a defense to criminal prosecution and is not appropriate in a civil lawsuit. Continued on Page 12A East Gadsden Principal and Wakulla native Dr. Kimball Thomas was the keynote speaker at the Arthur L. Andrews Scholarship Banquet held Friday.Kimball Thomas The parade oat for Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church #2 in Saturdays Black History Parade. For more photos, see Page 14A.Black History ParadeWILLIAM SNOWDENAFRICAN-AMERICAN READ-IN was held at the public library on Sunday as part of Black History Month. See story, Page 14A. JENNIFER JENSENDon Volsch with his Civil War 6-pound cannon. He traded with another collector for the barrel and then collected and built the rest of the parts for the eld gun, which took him three months to assemble. Local resident builds a cannon that will be used at the re-enactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge Friday, March 2 Middle and high school students will visit the state park beginning at 10:30 a.m. There will be multiple stations set up with living historians giving 19th century demonstrations. Saturday, March 3 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors will mingle with Civil War re-enactors and observe a Confederate-Union skirmish in the afternoon, cavalry demonstrations, artillery shows and a medical demonstration in the afternoon. Following the skirmish, sutlers and food vendors will be present. Sunday, March 4 The of cial Opening Ceremonies and Dedication will he held, followed by a full-scale re-enactment of the Battle of Natural Bridge at 2:30 p.m. The CSO will accept donations of $3 per person for adults and $1 for children younger than six. Contact the Natural Bridge State Park for more information at (850) 922-6007. Battle of Natural Bridge is this weekend SPORTS, Page 9ACoach J.D. Jones to be inducted into Hall of Fame

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFor the last several years, Gulf Specimen Marine Lab has been able to bring its sea life to the public in the form of a touch tank. On Feb. 15, the lab unveiled its latest project, which is leaps and bounds above the touch tank. It is travel trailer full of sea creatures. The trailer is essentially a mobile touch tank that is completely self-sustaining. The trailer visited Crawfordville Elementary School for its rst of cial school visit and trial run. The schools second graders were given the chance to visit the trailer where they were able to touch and pick up sea life and learn different facts about them. Before the students were allowed to experience the touch trailer, they had to learn about the different creatures they would be meeting. The marine lab has partnered with former teacher and principal Jo Ann Daniels who has designed lesson plans that are up to state and federal standards, and which are presented to each classroom, said Cypress Rudloe of Gulf Specimen. Rudloe said one of the bene ts of the travel trailer for the schools is that only a small amount of the students day is taken up. When the students visit the lab, it is an all day adventure. With this concept, the lab can reach an entire school in a day, not just the 60 to 100 students who were able to take a eld trip to the lab. The idea is also cost effective. Rudloe said the cost is about $500 per day, depending on travel, which amounts to about $2 to $3 per child. The school does not have to spend money on gas and entry fees to the lab. Times are hard, Rudloe said. We decided to start diversifying. He added that because of the expense, they are unable to get to all the children in the area. They created the marine lab to educate people and create an interest and this is another way to do so. The idea to bring their lab to the public started as a touch tank, which was taken to festivals. Rudloe said he created the tank out of an 8 foot by 4 foot cage. About two to three years ago, he took the tank to the Thomasville Wildlife Festival and people from the Williams Foundation liked the idea and wanted to help Gulf Specimen create their idea of a touch trailer. They received a grant from the Williams Foundation to create the trailer to bring to festivals. Rudloe said they decided to go beyond festivals and wanted to be able to bring the tank to schools as well. Jack Rudloe, founder of Gulf Specimen, said when they rst decided on the idea he started doing research to see how it had been done before. The problem, he said, is that it hadnt been done before. There were virtually zero, he said of mobile type touch tanks. We didnt know it would be something new. The cost of the trailer also exceeded the amount of the grant, so they had to nd matching funds, said Cypress Rudloe. David Corbin, an architect who helped develop the 3D sketch of the trailer, said the trailer is self contained and is on its own power. Its rare that you get to work on something this neat, Corbin said. The designs were sent to an engineering firm who delivered the project on April 15. Since then, Cypress Rudloe said they have been trying to work out all the kinks and three weeks ago, it was ready for its rst visit. Jack Rudloe said it has been very challenging and there are still bugs to work out, but overall he said he is very pleased with the way it turned out. It has the complexity of the space shuttle, Jack Rudloe said of the inside of trailer. Eventually, he said he would like to juice up the trailer and include octopuses and sharks, this way there is always something different for the children to see. We want the kids here to know whats in their back yards, Rudloe said. Superintendent of Schools David Miller said the trailer was a great opportunity for the children and was a way for them to experience their environment. For some of these kids, this is the rst time theyve seen it, let alone touch it, Miller said of the marine life. School Board Member Greg Thomas agreed and said, It makes the ocean and science real to these kids. Miller said it is also economically beneficial to Rudloe and the school district to be able to cover several different grade levels in one day. I think hes found a great niche, Miller said of the trailer. For more information, visit www.gulfspecimen. org/ or call 984-5297. Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com MEET THE CREATURES:Gulf Specimen takes its touch tanks on the road to visit Wakulla students at their schools JENNIFER JENSENCypress Rudloe of Gulf Specimen teaches second grade students at Crawfordville Elementary about marine life. With the self-sustaining touch tank, the marine lab can reach an entire school in a day, not just the 60 to 100 students who were able to take a eld trip to the lab. www.SnapperPro.com T HE BE S T VALUE IN C O MMERCIAL M O WIN G !S50x SALES & SERVICESMALL ENGINE REPAIR

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Commission is developing a bicycle, pedestrian, blueways master plan and was seeking input from the public on its consultants current recommendations and designs. Staff members with Kimley-Horn and Associates led a public workshop on Feb. 16 and was asking the public for ideas on how to improve walking, biking and paddling in Wakulla County. About 30 people broke into groups and told staff members with KimleyHorn where they felt the connectors to walking, cycling and paddling trails should be, as well as sidewalks and multi-use trails. The county also wanted to know the publics opinion on the placement of way nding and branding signage. They also sought help with identifying key destinations in the county, refining the engineers preliminary recommendations and recommending additional bicycle and pedestrian facilities. The plan included ideas for placement of countywide paved multi-use trails, sidewalk and crosswalk safety recommendations, safe school routes, policy recommendations, blueway plan for increased paddling, improvement of those facilities and launch areas. Kimley-Horn also provided recommendations for facilities; signage, marketing and wayfinding; policies; design guidelines; bicycle route map; implementation plan and funding strategies. Jon Sewell of KimleyHorn said their vision for the plan is to increase connectivity between neighborhoods, civic locations, school and neighborhoods, provide regional connectors and promote economic opportunities throughout the county. Theres lots of opportunities for regional bike trail connectors, Sewell said. One of these examples is the proposed Capital City to Sea Loop. These loop will go from Tallahassee to St. Marks to Panacea up to Sopchoppy, down to Carabelle and back to Tallahassee. Currently, there is a lack of sidewalks in the county, crosswalks and unified signange, Sewell said. There is also improvement needed at most of the blueway facilities, he said. Sewell and his staff have provided some policy recommendations, which included the creation of a program manager position within the county who would oversee the plan and communicate directly with the Department of Transportation and the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency. Another recommendation was establishing an advisory committee, as well as developing maintenance policies and ones addressing the repair of sidewalks during road repairs. Included in the plan will be a focus on bike trails and lanes. Sewell said according to VisitFlorida, the No. 1 questions that visitors ask is, where they can bike in the area. Following the workshop, the public comments will be analyzed and a list of priorities will be drafted, as well as a phasing plan for the projects. This plan will be presented to the county commission in April. Funding sources for the project will also be identi ed, Sewell said.COUNTY COMMISSIONPublic gives input on master plan A workshop was held to get comments on the countys bicycle, pedestrian, blueways master plan that is under designPHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN Citizens were divided into different groups for discussion of the plan. A report will be given in April. Notice of Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment AdoptionCopies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.FEBRUARY 23, 2012 Public HearingThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled a Public Hearing before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, March 5, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962.FEBRUARY 23, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Ofce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.FEBRUARY 23, 2012 SPECIAL MEETINGCommunity Development Block Grant StreetscapeThe City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Ofce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.FEBRUARY 23, 2012 Date:March 1, 2012 Time:6:30 pm Place:City Hall 788 Port Leon Drive

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Miami man pleas to taking more than $27,400 from Medart Assembly of God Wayne Martin, Country Gold to perform at Sopchoppy Opry Gregory Alan Putnam Sr. obituary Sheriffs Report for Feb. 16 Traffic crash on Spring Creek Highway sends two to hospital Frank Butch LeRoy Goodman Jr. obituary Teaching values: Smith family helps others on Service Saturdaysthewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Victim of Domestic or Sexual Violence? Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111Jerry Moore does stand for jobs anks to those who changed the rule Free nancial counseling is availableREADERS WRITE:Moore praised for role in grouper ruleEditors Note: We received several letters this week from citizens thanking County Commissioner Jerry Moore for his efforts in pushing for a local exemption from the state FIsh and Wildlife Conservation Commission on the gag grouper rule for the Gulf. Editor, The News: In the course of trying to regulate the shing industry, the FWC was considering swinging the pendulum of reasonable shing regulations to a position which would have crippled the shing industry and caused an even worse economic downturn than we are currently experiencing. If the FWC had decided to follow the path NOAA was proposing, to achieve consistency between the commissions reef rule and the federal regulations in federal waters, then a signi cant number of people would have been disenfranchised and the coastal communities and their economies would have become collateral damage. Commissioner Jerry Moore was bound and determined that would not be the fate of Wakulla County and its waterfront communities. Commissioner Moore laid out the facts. He explained the reduction of the gag grouper season to 123 days for recreational sherman would leave waterfront communities to become ghost towns and the loss of tourism would mean the nal nail in our economic cof n. The loss of jobs would have meant a very bleak future for Wakulla County and its citizens. I personally wish to thank him for coming to speak on behalf of all the businesses which depend on the shing industry and the tourists who come to sh in our waters and make memories with their families and friends. Paige Killeen PanaceaMoore saves Wakullas coastal jobsEditor, The News: Wakulla shermen and coastal businesses owe Jerry Moore a big Thank You. Thank you, Commissioner Moore for leading the charge to keep Wakulla County state waters (out to nine miles) open to Spring gag grouper shing and for saving dozens of shing dependent jobs. Had Commissioner Moore not challenged the FWC and the National Marine Fisheries on this critical economic issue, Wakulla Countys spring tourist crowd would not be coming to our county to spend their money in pursuit of our bountiful supply of spring gag grouper. On Jan. 24, Commissioner Moore introduced a Resolution to the Wakulla County Commission, and it passed 4 to 1 with Commissioner Lynn Artz voting no. The main points of the resolution are: Whereas, gag grouper leave the shallow state waters of the Gulf of Mexico during the hottest and coolest times of the year to migrate to deeper Federal waters, and Whereas, limiting gag grouper fishing in the state waters of the Gulf of Mexico to the months of July through October will severely hamper the shing community in Wakulla County, a community that has already sustained economic blows in the aftermath of the BP oil spill After successfully passing the resolution, Commissioner Moore attended the FWC meeting on Feb. 8 where he presented the Wakulla resolution and pleaded with the FWC commissioners to Help save jobs and the economy of Wakulla County. Commissioner Moore told the FWC that Fishing and related tourism is the life blood of Wakullas coastal communities, and our businesses are dependent on the influx of spring tourists, who come to sh for gags in shallow local waters. He added, They keep boats at our marinas, stay in our motels and cabins, buy gas and bait, hire shing guides, eat at our restaurants, shop in our stores, and help keep our citizens employed. Commissioner Moore asked the FWC to make an exemption to the Proposed Rule to allow our shermen and tourists to catch our fish while they are here. Adding that, ...The gags have all left Wakulla waters by the time the federal season opens. The FWC listened to Commissioner Moores presentation, asked him questions and later voted unanimously to grant his request. Thank you Commissioner Moore for all of your efforts! Alan Lamarche Shell Point Editor, The News: This letter is being written to thank the many people who either sent an email or took the time to attend the meeting on Feb. 8 in regard to a proposed FWC rule change which would have negatively affected many people both from a recreational as well as a business standpoint. Because of the support and concern for not having the State of Florida gag grouper season coincide with the federal season, four counties along the Big Bend coast have been granted an exception Wakulla being one of them. We will now be able to continue shing for gag grouper in State of Florida waters during April, May and June. I especially want to thank Wakulla County Commissioner Jerry Moore who personally attended this meeting and gave a great three minute presentation. And at the break, he talked to each of the FWC commissioners about the negative effect this proposal would have on the job opportunities and economy of this area. Also, I would like to thank Senator Bill Nelson and Congressman Steve Southerland for having representation at this important meeting. The results of this meeting clearly exempli es government in the sunshine and proves that our governing boards do listen when enough people voice their concern. Thank you FWC and to everyone who played a role in this decision. Charles C. Shields Mayor City of St. Marks Last weeks Arts & Entertainment section featured a story on Riversprings Middle Schools play, the murder mystery-comedy Next Victim, Please. The play was originally scheduled to be performed on March 2, but due to 6th grade FCAT Computer Training, the date has been changed to March 14 for the student body (morning) and March 15 evening performance for friends and families (7 p.m.) Editor, The News: In last weeks paper, your staff covered a story concerning the economic challenges facing so many Wakulla County citizens. As an arm of the University of Florida, the Wakulla County Extension Office staff realizes their role through financial education. Instead of a series of educational seminars, our approach is for a person, couple or family to have time with a trained volunteer to discuss any aspect of their nances. Four trained volunteers are available and we have provided space for con dential counseling at our of ce. These same volunteers are willing to do group presentations to encourage a persons involvement in the one-on-one counseling sessions. I am delighted to have the volunteer pool that we have a retired banker, an educator, a business person and a CPA. All feel this to be their unique way to return to Wakulla County what they have so richly been given. I cant think of anyone who would not be interested in this free counseling. It is my hope that a year from now we will look back and know that we have made a nancial difference through this unique educational approach in the lives of Wakulla County citizens. Call the Extension Of ce at 926-3931 to set up an appointment. Sincerely, Shelley Swenson UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension By RITA HANEY, LCSW Our sense of self-worth plays a major role in our journey through life. Self-esteem or self-worth is important in all our relationships and dealings in our world. We begin building selfesteem from the beginning of our lives. Babies who cry are comforted, fed and rocked to sleep; this begins the journey of self-discovery. Learning how to be a friend and have friends is another milestone. Our sense of self changes and changes with our development. Self-esteem, as de ned by Nathaniel Braden, Ph.D. author of The Six Pillars of Self Esteem, is an experience. It is a good deal more than a mere feeling. Selfworth is our de nition of our self. We approach our lives from the perspective of who we are and what we are worth. It is truly a wonderful experience to be popular, receive awards, have honors and achievements, yet this is really what we do, not who we are. Liking and believing in ourselves is more important than who likes us. Our sense of self starts from the beginning of our lives and develops, re-develops and grows over the life-span. From time to time most of us feel sad and blue, if not depressed, with ourselves, our achievements, our very lives. Thankfully for most of us this is a temporary state of mind and using our inner resources we are able to bounce back, sometimes bounce higher than before. Positive self-worth is a necessity in facing lifes challenges, set-backs and disappointments. If drugs are a necessity to maintain our self of well-being we need to ask ourselves questions. We can experience a temporary happiness and elation through the use of drugs, a relationship or praise; yet self-worth is built over time. Self-esteem/self-worth comes from our commitment to our self. What seems clear is our sense of self is priceless. If my worth depends on you it would seem I have no control over my own inner world and I am always looking to someone outside of myself to determine my sense of well-being. Sometimes we confuse self-esteem/self-worth with a superior attitude; feeling superior is a faade which blocks our ability to relate to others in a genuine manner. Knowing we did well on an exam, a project at work, or being a parent does not mean I am better than you, rather it means I feel positive about myself and my abilities. It also means I can feel genuine joy and happiness when a friend, relative or co-worker does well. The guidelines for developing our inner resources presented in The Six Pillars are: Living Consciously being present and open in our lives, Self-acceptance owning our experience and taking responsibility for our lives, Self-responsibility owning our choices and actions, Self-assertiveness the willingness to stand up for ourselves in appropriate ways, Living with purpose identifying our goals, and Practice of Personal Integrity honoring our commitments and values. As Shakespeare stated To thine own self be true. The Wakulla County library is willing to order the above book.Rita Haney is a licensed social worker who works in Wakulla County. She can be reached at 926-2039. Believing in our selfWILLIAM SNOWDENThe Rotary Club of Wakulla County presented $1,000 cash to Amy Tidwell, whose ticket was drawn at the clubs Valentine Celebration on Feb. 11. Tidwell went to the clubs meeting on Thursday, Feb. 16 to collect her prize. Tidwell is suffering from renal failure and said she plans to use the money to buy medications that her insurance doesnt cover and to catch up on some bills. It couldnt have come at a better time, she said. The Rotary Club had two cash prizes for the raf e, a $1,000 grand prize and $500 second place, which was won by Christia Lee. Members of the Wakulla Rotary Club with $1,000 grand prize winner Amy Tidwell.Rotary winner collects $1,000 prize Clari cation

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Page 5ABy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA newcomer and an incumbent were sworn into office at a special called meeting of the St. Marks City Commission on Feb. 16. Allen Hobbs will continue as commissioner in seat 3 and Ray Stokes will now hold seat 4, which was formerly held by Keith Ward who did not seek reelection. Stokes and Hobbs were the only residents to submit their names for a seat on the commission, so an election was not held. In other news: The design for the street improvements in St. Marks along Port Leon Drive has been completed by Hydro Engineering, who delivered the plans to the city on Thursday, Feb. 9. The plans are part of a $600,000 Community Development Block Grant the city received back in June. The money will be spent on economic revitalization, which includes lighting, sidewalks and landscaping. The design includes the addition of a sidewalk on both sides of Port Leon Drive from Pine Street to Riverside Drive. At the end of Riverside Drive, there will be an imprint of a lighthouse in the center of the road. Some business owners in St. Marks expressed concern about the addition of sidewalks in front of their businesses. Many were worried the sidewalks would interfere with customer parking. One concern was whether the gas pumps at Bo Lynns would be considered too close to the sidewalks and if a car was parked to ll up their gas tank, they would be considered parked illegally. Mayor Chuck Shields said if a car pulled up to get gas and someone was walking down the sidewalk, that pedestrian would have to go around. He added that the state was involved in the permitting of this project and nothing was mentioned. They know what weve got, Shields said. Also included in the design is a 4-foot median in certain points of the road, which would have owers and other plants to help with the beauti cation of the road. The only issue the commissioners saw was a need to put two short boardwalks over two areas where there are ditches, instead of covering them with concrete. According to the Northwest Florida Water Management District, those ditches are considered wetlands and cannot be covered. The boardwalks would have guard rails and fencing along the sides, said City Manager Zoe Mans eld. Its not going to ow, Mans eld said. The commissioners felt the design for the boardwalks would not go with the rest of the design. I just think it would look chopped up, said Commissioner Gail Gilman. The commissioners plan to speak with the engineers and see what their options are regarding the boardwalks. We may not get all our wishes, said Commissioner Phil Cantner. The commissioners will hold a workshop to go over the design before it is nalized. Its a great benefit, Cantner said of the project. And almost a gift to the city. The next commission meeting is March 8 at 7 p.m. at city hall. Continued from Page 1A He ordered parts online and built some of his own using his knowledge of woodworking and help from Arlo Kelly, a master woodworker. He also received help from his wife, Terri, who is an engineer and machinist, She volunteered to help me with the trickey angles on the axle, Volsch says. Volsch says building the cannon was a challenge and some days he didnt accomplish much. Some days, the only things I could accomplish was using some choice words that I thought at the time were appropriate, he says. However, he says he is extremely happy with the way the cannon turned out and cant wait to see it shoot. He will get that chance because the cannon is being used in the Battle at Natural Bridge re-enactment the weekend of March 3 and 4 at the Natural Bridge Battle- eld Historic State Park in Tallahassee. Volsch and his father-inlaw, Hoot Harrison, who he refers to as Power Monkey will also be in the re-enactment. They have joined with the 1st Confederate light artillery. We are looking forward to our rst re-enactment, Volsch says. They recently picked up their uniforms and Volsch says being involved in the re-enactment is on his father-in-laws bucket list, and hes happy to be joining him and helping him check it off his list. For more information about the re-enactment, visit www. oridastateparks. org/naturalbridge/events. cfm or call (850) 245-2157.Civil War Cannon Day of Dialogue on Minority Health is SaturdayChurches play a key role in helping people to be healthy spiritually, mentally and physically. But churches are not always organized to take the action needed to help families stay healthy. To help churches and other community organizations play a broader role in promoting health, the Day of Dialogue on Minority Health will host a Health Fair Saturday, Feb. 25, at Riversprings Middle School from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Construction will continue on 319Drivers on U.S. 319 between Wakulla-Arran Road and just north of Bloxham Cutoff in Wakulla County can expect intermittent nighttime lane closures Sunday, Feb. 19 through Friday, Feb. 24 from 6:30 p.m. until 6 a.m. Crews will also work along the shoulders between Wakulla-Arran Road and the Leon County line during daytime hours, causing no lane closures. NAMI Wakulla will meet on MondayNAMI Wakulla, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is offering a public discussion of recovery services at its monthly meeting on Monday, Feb. 27. The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club, in Crawfordville. Members of NAMI Connection, along with mental health professionals, will be at the meeting. NAMI Connection is a recovery support group led by Wakulla County people with mental illness for people in Wakulla County with mental illness. Turnout for NAMI Connection has been so popular that NAMI Wakulla expanded meetings to 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday at the Wakulla County Library and 7 p.m. on Tuesday at the NAMI Wakulla of ce on Crawfordville Highway. The Monday night program will also have NAMI Wakulla volunteers on hand to answer questions from the audience. For more information, please check namiwakulla. org, or call NAMI Wakulla at 926-1033. Rotary will be building wheelchair ramps SaturdayThe Rotary Clubs of Tallahassee and Wakulla Countyare partnering on a local wheelchair-building project for a number of residents in the area with disabilities on Saturday, Feb. 25. The local clubs are working with Ability 1st on the project. The six ramps that will be built will be the single largest ramp build day in Ability 1sts history. The project is part of a community-wide service day for Rotary District 6940, which extends from the Chie and area to Pensacola, to mark the annual anniversary of the founding of Rotary. The Rotary Club of Wakulla County and the Tallahassee Southside Club are partnering on a local ramp build project with the assistance of members of both Rotary Clubs, members of the Wakulla High School Interact Club, and contractor John Shuff. For more information about the project please contact Doug Jones, President of the Rotary Club of Wakulla County, or Leon Jacobs, President of Tallahassee Southside Rotary Club. Pearlmans to perform on SundayScottish Fiddle, piano and step dancing by Ed and Neil Pearlman on Sunday, Feb. 26, at 7 p.m., at Posh Java in downtown Sopchoppy. A workshop on Scottish/ Cape Bretton/Irish music for melody instruments will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 29, at 7 p.m., if their is enough interest. Contact Posh Java for more information: (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com Visit www.edpearlman. net for more information on the musicians. Chamber seeks nominations for awardsNominations are now being accepted for the 2012 Wakulla County Chamber Business Excellence Awards. This program is designed to recognize a Chamber Business of the Year, a Chamber Start-up Business of the Year, a Chamber Non-Profit Organization of the Year, a Chamber Environmental Stewardship Business of the Year, and new this year, a Chamber Member of the Year. Nominations for the awards are limited to Chamber members in good standing as of Dec.31, 2011, and may only be submitted by membership. BriefsCITY OF ST. MARKSCity commissioners sworn-in SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCity Manager Zoe Mans eld swears in city commissioners Ray Stokes and Allen Hobbs last week. FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATIONSEEKING ITEMS FOR GIANT YARD SALE!Its time to go through those closets....FWMA is preparing for its biannual yard sale that will be held at Nads storage onMarch 15th, 16th, and 17thNads is located at 59 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. All proceeds from this event will be used to care for sick, injured and orphaned wildlife! Donations of yard sale items can be dropped off at Nads storage in number 33 at any time before the sale or can be brought to the sale on Thursday March 15 after 12:00 noon. If you have items but are unable to drop them off or you would like to become a volunteer for our fundraising committee please email Jeff at jeffstudio54@yahoo.com.All donations are tax deductible and greatly appreciated. Thank you so much for helping us help our local wildlife! 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304

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The Christ Church Anglican oat Fishers of Men won rst prize of $100 in last Saturdays Rotary Valentine Parade. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChurchreligious views and eventsObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a. m Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWere Here to Share the Journey... Gerald Lee Clevenger Margaret R. Sheotes Doris Shadix Jackson SmithGerald Lee Clevenger went home to rest with his Heavenly Father on Feb. 11. He was surrounded by family and loved ones in his home in Crawfordville. Jerry was a lifelong master carpenter and well remembered for his soft spoken and kind disposition to all in his life. Jerry leaves behind his wife, Sabinna; his mother, Ruth; four children, Lisa, Brian, Jeremy and Benjamin; seven grandchildren; four brothers; one sister and a large extended family. Jerry was preceded in death by his rst wife Sharon Lynne Davis. His life was already celebrated with friends and family on Feb. 11. Donations in remembrance of him can be made to Be The Solution, Inc. at (850) 545-2043 in line with his and Sabinnas love and passion for animals. Otherwise, plant a tree. Culleys Meadow Wood Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. (www. culleysmeadowwood.com) The WeaverMy life is but a weaving, Between my Lord and me. I cannot choose the colors He worketh steadily.Oft times He weaveth sorrowAnd I in foolish pride, Forget He sees the upper And I the underside.The dark threads are as needfulIn the weavers skillful handAs the threads of gold & silverIn the pattern He has planned.Not till the loom is silent And the shuttles cease to y, Shall God unroll the canvas And explain the reason why. Author unknown Margaret R. Sheotes, 70, of Crawfordville, passed away Saturday, Feb. 18. Born in Boston, Mass., and formerly of West Palm Beach, Ms. Sheotes made her home in Crawfordville for the past 15 years. She was a professional dog breeder, handler and trainer who enjoyed spending time with family and friends. A memorial service will be held at a later date. The family requests that in lieu of flowers, a donation be made in Ms. Sheotes name to your local animal shelter. Survivors include a daughter, Robin Wake eld of Crawfordville; son, Bill Reinhard of Okeechobee; step-daughter, Sherry (Larry) Smalling of Jacksonville; step-son, Gary (Nancy) Sheotes of Lake Worth; beloved grandchildren, April Selph, Alisha Archibald and Bill Reinhard Jr.; a beloved niece, Kendra Waldman; and numerous other family members and friends. She was preceded in death by her husband Richard Sheotes. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850) 559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www. forbesfuneralhome.net. Doris Shadix Jackson Smith, 88, Tallahassee, died on Friday, Feb. 17, in Tallahassee. She was born Aug. 2, 1923, in Douglasville, Ga., to John William Shadix Sr. and Clara Wright Shadix. She was a veteran of the U.S. Navy during World War II and was of the Baptist faith. Survivors include her sons, Auston Michael Jackson of Middleburg and Tony Alford (Cheryl Jackson) of Tallahassee; four grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; a brother, Thomas A. Shadix of Pleasant View, Tenn.; three sisters, Inzer Winslett of Douglasville and Betty Jean Plowman, both of Douglasville, Ga., and LaFeise Edwards of Carrabelle. Memorial services were held on Feb. 21 at Abbey Funeral Home with interment at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. Donations may be made to Most High Ministries, attention: Lori Jackson, P.O. Box 180391, Tallahassee FL 32318 for the orphans in Ukraine. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.Margaret R. Sheotes Doris S.J. Smith Gerald L. ClevengerChrist Church Anglican wins 1st place in the Rotary Valentine Parade PHOTOS BY FRANCINE WALKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS The sign on the back of the Christ Church Anglican oat reads, Follow me and I will make you shers of men. Some upcoming events at Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla StatIon: Thursday, Feb. 23, at 10 a.m. Quilting Group meets. All are welcome. Sunday, Feb. 26, at 4:30 p.m. Chancel Choir practice will be held. Sunday, Feb. 26, at 6 p.m. Youth meeting, Call (850) 421-5741 or (850) 766-390 for more information. Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 6 p.m. Praise Team practice will be held. Wednesday, Feb. 29, at 6 a.m. Mens Bible Study with Breakfast following at 8 a.m. in the Alford Building, Wakulla United Methodist Church is located at 1584 Old Woodville Highway. For more information, call (850) 421-5741.Upcoming events at Wakulla UMCChurch Briefs

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On Sunday March 4 at 2 p.m., The First Sunday at the Refuge Presentation Series will present The Fungus Amongus: Mushroom Basics by Bill Petty. Petty is a master gardener, naturalist, author and past president of the Sarracenia chapter of the Native Plant Society. He will discuss mushroom shapes, ecology, nutrients, and relationships between fungi and other organisms. A brief mushroom hunt will follow. First Sunday presentations are held in the Natures Classroom of the Environmental Education Center at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Rd. All First Sunday presentations are free and open to the public. Call (850) 925-6121 for additional information or visit the website at www.fws.gov/saintmarks/. Special to The NewsThe Big Bend Hospice Patient and Family Holiday Gift Drive was born over 15 years ago as a way to give patients and families happy memories of a nal holiday. For terminally ill patients and their families, the holiday season can seem overwhelming. The importance of maintaining holiday traditions and making lasting memories, especially at the end of life, is very important. For some patients purchasing gifts for their family is impossible as the cost of being chronically ill has financially drained their resources. For some families, the loss of the main bread winner has meant that everyday is a struggle to make ends meet. The annual Holiday Gift Drive has connected individuals, neighborhood groups, book clubs, or an entire of ce and organization to a family in need of some holiday cheer. Some of the gift requests are meager, warm socks, basic toiletries, or candy. For other patients, the needs are more compelling. Big Bend Hospice Chaplain Lenny Marshall had a patient whose only request was to have a decorated tree in her home for her last Christmas. Community donors purchased the speci c tree decorations that the patient requested, as well as an arti cial tree and all the trimmings. Marshall, keenly aware of the patients physical challenges brought a hospice volunteer to the patients home along with a donated tree, ornaments, garlands, lights, and even a CD of holiday music to play while trimming the tree for the patient. This lovely lady was so happy, and lled with joy, her smile lit up the room like there was a great light within her, said Chaplain Marshall. What pleasure that gift gave her and what beauty it brought to her home. Another patient dreamed of improving his home before his death so that his wife might live more comfortably and securely after he was gone. The home was in need of heat as well as other necessary repairs. Community donors donated two portable heating systems for the patient and his wife. A contractor who lives in our community learned of the patients need for repairs and donated his own time, skills, labor and materials to improve the patients home. These donations provided the patient with a sense of peace regarding his wifes future which was truly a gift to the patient. The wonderful donors who participate in the Gift Drive are very special individuals. They are kind, caring individuals with giving hearts who have a desire to reach out and touch the lives of hospice patients and their families. We are so grateful for our donors and the wonderful communities in which we live! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Page 7AhappeningsCommunitySparkman to wed EvansLindsay Evans of Sopchoppy and Troy Sparkman of Crawfordville announce their engagement. The bride-elect is the daughter of Jerry Evans of Sopchoppy and the late Pamela Evans. The groom-elect is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Donnie Sparkman of Crawfordville. She is a graduate from FSU with a degree in criminology, employed by the Wakulla County School Board as a seventh grade teacher at Wakulla Middle School. He graduated from FSU with a masters degree in Geographical Information Systems and is employed by General Dynamics. The wedding will be held on May 5 at 5 p.m. at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. Lindsay Evans and Troy SparkmanHappy rst birthdayHunter Lareu Durrance celebrated his rst birthday on Feb. 19. He is the son of Stacy House of Sopchoppy. He is the grandson of Walter and Sara Durrance of Sopchoppy. He is also the grandson of the late Barbara Durrance. Hunter Durrance, at right. Lylla R. DurranceLylla Renea Durrance celebrated her rst birthday on Feb. 11. She is the daughter of Travis Durrance and Jessica Goodman, both of Sopchoppy. Hunter L. DurranceGardening classes o ered at Extension O ceLearn to get more out of the lawn and garden at the Wakulla Extension Of ce. Two series of classes will be offered beginning in mid-March. We are offering Wakulla County residents the tools and techniques for growing fruits, vegetables, lawns and landscapes, said Les Harrison, UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension director. Learn to grow more fruits and vegetables will begin on Saturday, March 17, 2012 at 9 a.m. The series of four classes will focus on what homeowners, vegetable gardeners and small farmers can produce. The classes will include one hour of classroom presentations, then an hour working in the demonstration garden. Students will get the chance to have a unique hands-on gardening experience which can be the basis for developing their fruit and vegetable production expertise. Topics covered will include both organic and conventional production methods, insects and diseases, proper water use, and fertilizer and soil nutrients. To learn more, check out the Wakulla Extension Of ce video at youtube/cFVeofh3B4k. The Spring 2012 Master Gardener Class will begin on Wednesday, March 21. The objective of this weekday class is to teach homeowners and landscapers proper landscape techniques. This series of eight classes will include classroom presentations and work in the demonstrations gardens. Students will receive in-depth instruction on fertilizer and soil nutrients, plant selection, efficient water use and much, much more. To sign up or request an information packet, contact the Wakulla Extension Of- ce at 926-3931 or visit the website at wakulla.ifas.u edu. Lylla DurranceHospice patients and families bene t from gift drive First Sunday at the Refuge presents mushroom basics www.wildaboutwakulla.com APRIL 14 22 WEEK Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink)

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchool19 Students perform in district honor bandsSpecial to The NewsOn Jan. 28, 19 of our most talented students performed in the Florida Bandmasters Association All District 3 Honor Bands. These bands, high school and middle school, are comprised of only those students who successfully passed rather dif cult audition requirements. They also had only three rehearsals to learn and perform up to ve tough selections of music for their group. All the students handled themselves with dedication and hard work. The FBA All District 3 Honor Band Concert was held in the Lawton Chiles High School Auditorium and in front of a standing room only crowd. The music and performance was exceptional. Thanks are given to all the administrators, schools, families and friends who support the band programs in this county. It is moments like this that truly demonstrate the uniqueness of what we have here and the importance of education in our county, said Carmen Williams, the band director at Riversprings Middle School. Congratulations to the following students on a job well done: Wakulla High School: Seth McManus and Toby Jordan; Wakulla Middle School: Tyler Westcott and Rafel Fortier; and Riversprings Middle School: Emma Chason, Mike King, Breana Sykes, Kyle Pearson, Nic Samlal, Robert Hogan, Jenna Franck, Whitle Kerce, Paige Pearson, Sheleen Burton, Kyra Townes, Mattias Gunnarsson, Coy White, Adrian Morris and Scott Curry. Riversprings Middle School band members Members of the Wakulla Middle School band, at left, and members of the Wakulla High School band perform in the FBA All District 3 Honor Bands.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSGunnarsson performs in All State Honor BandSpecial to The NewsMattias Gunnarsson, an eighth grade trombonists at Riversprings Middle School, performed in the MENC All State Honor Band last month. He was the only band representative from the county to participate. The Riversprings Band Program has been proud to have representatives attend this event for the past three years. Mattias has been a very hard working and dedicated student since the sixth grade and we are all very proud of what he has achieved. Hes a really talented individual, said Carmen Williams, band director at Riversprings. He has scored Superior in all band functions, such as the FBA Solo/Ensemble Evaluation and the FBA District MPA for the past two years. Mattias GunnarssonStudent artwork on displayStudent artwork is on display at locations in Wakulla County until May. At Centennial Bank/ Crawfordville : Dawn Evans (C.O.A.S.T.), Ethan Owen, Damonta Morris (Wakulla High), Cori Chaganis (Riversprings Middle), Savannah Petrandis (Medart Elementary), Aiden Stroup (Riversink Elementary) and Aubrey Trice, Nhi Hoang and Dallas Harris (Wakulla Middle). School Board Office: Harley Rigdon, Alyssa Stokley (Wakulla Middle); Chris Revell, Shelby Cain, Kiersten Simmons (Wakulla High); Aidan Annand, Laney Grubbs (Riversink Elementary); Haylee Taff, Brooke Roddenberry (Medart Elementary); and Andrew Marlow and Tad West (Riversprings Middle). Senior Center: Fisher Lawhon, Chevy Stewart (Riversink Elementary); Alissa Anthony (Riversprings Middle); Morgan Clark, Tyler Tucker (Wakulla Middle); and Jacob Oliver (Wakulla High). Public Library: Maclellan Hicks (Riversprings Middle); Elizabeth Chaires, Courtney Pool (Medart Elementary); Aden McClintock, Tanasha Cooksey (Riversink Elementary); Jenah Messer (Wakulla Middle); and David Mathis (Wakulla High). County Courthouse: Jack Miller, Madalyn Stewart, Justus Jones, Trent Hollinsworth, Charlie Murphy, Dylan Sizemore, Alex Blanken, Carter Wessinger, Laural Gray, Lia Roddenberry, Brad Campbell, Christian Grimes, Madison Hooker, Jase Kelly, Mackenzie Crockett, Haley Peavy, Kason Tang, Jordan Smith, Kayla Mckenzie, Cole Posey, Cheyenne Pigott ( Riversink Elementary); Keely Mathers (Wakulla Middle); Lauren Lewis, Natasha Gunnarson, Michael Royce, Emily Kelley, Adrian Peacock, and Kelton Donaldson (All from Riversprings Middle); Dylan Pope, Carson Clemon-Brown, and Jalyn Burnes (Medart); and Garrett Wheeler (Wakulla High). At Centennial Bank/St. Marks: Tristin Brooks and Megan Nylund (Riversink Elementary); and Katia Toth (Medart Elementary). Refresher Spanish for AdultsTuesday nights from 6-9 p.m., February 28 May 8,Only $99Refresher Spanish is designed for the adult learner who has studied some Spanish, but would like review and practice.The course will cover:Review of pronunciation and basic vocabulary Review of basic grammar concepts Extensive conversational practice in areas determined by student needs, such as work, travel, family, etc. Additional vocabulary instruction and practice for conversation activities Practice listening to native speakers of different accents Offered at the TCC Wakulla Center5 Crescent Way, Crawfordville For registration information, contact TCC Wakulla Center at (850) 922-6290. The c ollege of choi ce! Carolina Bandannas850-524-9103GOTCHARACTER PANACEA HATSAFACT Interior Remodeling Doors Floors Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 JESUS dress store50%-60% OFF850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE) The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree All Ladies ApparelThe best Alterations, Furniture Upholstry & Re nishing Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 MISS WAKULLA COUNTYPAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeFor more information on how to enter, please visit www.misswakullacounty.comApril 28, 2012

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Page 9ACLASSIFIEDS $10 Per Week!sports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The NewsFormer Wakulla High School Coach J.D. Jones is among the group of 12 selected for induction into the Florida High School Athletic Hall of Fame. The FHSAA released the names of the inductees last week. The group also includes former Taylor and Bolles School baseball standout Larry Chipper Jones, foursport star Daniel Tharpe, trailblazer and longtime contest official Margaret Busbee and prominent peacemaker during the early days of integration, Eddie Shannon. Other Hall of Famers include Central Florida Of- cials Association member Prince Pollard; Naples girls basketball coach David Walker; Astronaut boys tennis head coach Michael Hoctor; the late football head coach H. Edward Feely; Gainesville girls volleyball head coach Cindy Boulware; Duval County administrator Jon Fox; and the late Vero Beach football head coach William Billy Livings. This is the 22nd group to be inducted. With these 12 inductees, there are 156 individuals in the FHSAA Hall of Fame. The 2012 Florida High School Athletic Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will take place April 29 at 7 p.m. at the Best Western Gateway Grand in Gainesville. John David Jones, 65, had been within the Wakulla High School athletic system for about 33 years. After three years of being an assistant and head JV coach, he eventually became the head coach for boys basketball, football, weightlifting and softball during his tenure at Wakulla. In his 29 years as a football head coach, he had a 219-98 record, made 20 state playoffs and won back-to-back state championships in the 1980-81 seasons. Known for never cutting a student-athlete from a team, Jones was the Wakulla High athletic director from 1982 through 1987 and continued coaching until 2006. He won the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference Coach of the Year for six consecutive years and in 1981 alone, won ve Coach of the Year awards. In 2005 the Wakulla High Football Stadium was renamed the J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. Jones is still an active chapter member of the Childers/Everett Scholarship Program and the Houston Taft Scholarship Program. Two separate committees comprised of active and retired administrators, coaches, of cials, studentathletes and news media representatives evaluated the nominations of the 12 individuals selected for induction to the FHSAA Hall of Fame this year. A seven-member screening committee first reviewed all nominations received and determined which nominees were viable candidates for induction into the Hall of Fame. The nominations of those candidates then were forwarded to a 16-member selection committee, which rated the nomination of each candidate to determine the candidates who would be inducted.Coach J.D. Jones nominated for FHSAA Hall of FameSpecial to The NewsThe state wrestling championship for class 1A was held Feb. 17 and 19 in Lakeland. After two intense days, four of Wakullas six state quali ers earned medals and placed. The team came in 10th out of 77 teams competing in 1A. Zack Malik (junior) led the way by placing third in the 113 pound weight class. Malik pinned Jupiter Christians Elijah Cleary and Troy Reed of Fivay before losing his semi nal match to Somerset Academys Chase Singletary (who won the title). But he bounced back to beat Lake Highland Preps Nick Vestal 4-2 and win again over Fivays Troy Reed 5-1. It feels great to place third, he said. I wish I was on the other side of the bracket because I think I was better than the second place kid. But over the summer me, Kevon (White) and Bill (Morgan) are going to train hard and leave no doubts next year. Ive never wanted anything more than to win a state title, Malik said. Cole Woofter (senior) nished fourth. He beat Scott Riker of Fort Pierce Westwood 4-3 and Kazimeirz Dymek of Sarasota Booker 3-2 to advance to the semi nals in the 220 pound weight class. He lost to Carter Shipley of Lake Highland Prep (who won the title) in the semi nal round. Woofter won his next match 3-2 over Clays Justin Fountain but fell to Raines Kenneth Bynum 3-2 in the consolation nals to take fourth place. Kevon White (junior) placed fth in the 132 pound weight class. His rst match was a 7-1 win against Jonathan Smith of Robinson. Kevons 3-1 loss to Cardinal Gibbons Anthony Vasquez sent him to the consolation bracket. But he battled back to win against Bookers Eric Cabral 7-3, Trace Woxberg of Cocoa 4-1 and beat Vasquez 6-3 in a re-match to earn fth place. Luke Taylor (senior) came in sixth in the 182 pound weight class. He beat David Prindiville of Mulberry 11-2 in his rst match and then lost to St. Pierre Anilus of Key West to fall to the consolation round. Luke pinned Rodney Thomas of Cardinal Gibbons and Robert Kratman of Chaminade before falling to William Norelia of Golden Gate 5-4 and Jerry Willis of Suwannee 3-1 for sixth place. Taylor reached 100 career wins at the Regional tournament. Travis Hinsey (senior) lost to Niko DeAugustino of Pasco 11-5 and came back to pin Andrew Calderwood of Key West and beat Jamarcus Crump of Rickards 11-4 before losing to Bradfords Jarraid Forsyth 13-9, falling one match short of placing in the 138 pound weight class. Bill Morgans (sophomore) rst match was a 5-3 loss to Anthony Patrone of Lake Highland Prep (who nished as state runner-up) in the 120 pound weight class. Morgan came back to beat Daniel Laguna of Key West 2-0 and then lost to Tony Ruggiero of Wesley Chapel. The biggest thing is we nished 10th and we had no guys in the nals, said Coach William Pafford. The finals are where you score the big points. Im superexcited about what this group did, and it will only be getting better. The team earned a district championship, was third at Regionals, had six state quali- ers and four state placers and nished in the top 10 in class 1A. Wakulla returns 10 of 13 starters next season.WRESTLINGWar Eagles come in 10th in state; four wrestlers medal FILE PHOTOCoach J.D. Jones in 2007 with the proclamation naming the stadium in his honor. With him are his wife Sarabeth and daughter Sally Jones.Jones won two state football championships and had an overall record of 219-98By PAUL HOOVER WHS Track CoachThe 2012 Wakulla High School track teams opened their competitive season on Tuesday, Feb. 14, at the Kick Off Meet hosted by Rickards High School in Tallahassee. The WHS girls team emerged as the meet winners and the boys team nished in second place. Emily McCullers (long jump) and Cora Atkinson (1600 meter run) won individual events and the girls 4x400 meter relay team of Alina McCullers, Emily McCullers, Savanna Harris and Madison Harris, also placed rst. Other girls and relays earning points were Alexis Collins (3rd,100/4th, 200), Alina McCullers (2nd, 200), Norma Woodcock (4th, 400/3rd 800), Savanna Strickland (6th, 400/5th 800), Kaylyn Thigpen (7th, 400), Holi Capps (7th, 800), Lydia Wiedeman (2nd, 1600), Tyler Kinard (5th, 1600), Kasey James (2nd, 3200), Raychel Gray (3rd, 3200), Alexandra Cotes (4th, 3200), Taylor Vaughn (2nd, 100 meter hurdles), Lateshia Curry (4th, long jump), Lisa House (5th, shotput), Shelby Alsup (6th, shotput/3rd discus) and the 4x800 relay team (2nd, Cora Atkinson, Emily McCullers, Lydia Wiedeman and Marty Wiedeman). On the boys side, Will Thomas (400) and Stanley Linton (1600/3200) were individual winners and the 4x400 relay team of Brantley Lockwood, Tamarick Holmes, Demetrius Lindsey, Will Thomas also placed rst. Other boys and relays scoring for the team included Demetrius Lindsey (3rd, 100), Justin Goates (5th, 100/7th 200), J.P. Piortrowski (3rd, 800), Gabe Hutchins (4th, 800), Travis Parks (7th, 1600), Nathan Green (8th, 1600), Cody James (3rd, 3200), Br antley Lockwood (2nd, 300 hurdles), Alan Pearson (4th, 300 hurdles), Kaedretis Keaton (5th, long jump/2nd, triple jump), Jamal Gavin (5th, Discus), Logan Hay (8th, discus), the 4x100 meter relay team (2nd, Brantley Lockwood, Tamarick Holmes, Demetrius Lindsey, Will Thomas ), and the 4x800 relay team (4th, J.P. Piotroski, Aaron Smith, Mitchell Atkinson, David Sloan).TRACKFirst meet gets season started Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals Workout, lose weight Each class feelsLIKE A PARTY!Saturdays 9AM-10AM Thursdays 6:30PM-7:30PMat BodyTek 56 Rainbow Dr. (behind El Jaliscos)Kim Crum 251-9195 Pam Chichester 459-5279 visit us on facebook $5 per class CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EAR Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.-----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 926-3281

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBesides guiding, I work with an association that does a conference in New Orleans every year. Its always in New Orleans the week before Fat Tuesday. I got back on Sunday and am glad this conference is over. It was the largest ever and I spent more time on this than any in the past and now Im ready to get down to some serious shing. I just got off the phone with Capt. Randy Peart and he said fishing around the Econ na has been hit and miss. The one thing that surprised me was he said the water temperature was still at 60 degrees. I gured the cold would have dropped it but evidently that was a warm rain we had the other day. Randy said he shed a week and a half ago before the rst cold and he caught 22 trout and ve reds on the ats using the Rapala Twitchin Rap. Two days later it got cold and the sh moved up into the river and he had 13 nice trout and most were 19 inches. He shed yesterday and said things were tough shing-wise and weather-wise. He managed four nice reds and one trout and he also caught two blues and two lady sh. I have been shing down here since 1976 and I dont believe I have ever seen a lady sh caught this early. Capt. David Fife said he fished out of Spring Creek on Saturday and caught some nice reds and a few trout. He was shing the oyster bars between Oyster Bay and Panacea. The St. Marks River is still producing quite a few reds and some trout. The area around East River has been good for both trout and reds using live shrimp, Mirrolures and Gulps. I talked with Capt. Kent Taylor at AMS and about a week ago he and a buddy shed the St. Marks and caught over 100 trout in the turning basin but most were not legal size. Capt. Luke went out to about 35 feet of Dog Island Reef and said he caught some of the biggest black sea bass he has ever caught. Tom Riddle and Mike Pearson from Tifton were down about a week and a half ago and shed the Rotary for sheepshead. Using live shrimp and a -ounce sinker they caught 25 nice sheepshead and three black drum. On Friday he and Dr. Greg Anderson from Tifton went out and didnt catch quite as many sheepshead but he said they were all big. Saturdays weather forecast turned out to be wrong so they went out to K Tower and caught and released some big reds and big gag grouper. On the way in they stopped and caught some big black sea bass. I shed the Thursday before Valentines day with some folks from Indiana who are down here for a month. We shed the oyster bars with live shrimp and the Gulp and at the end of the day shed on the ats. We ended up with 12 nice trout and missed quite a few. The sh on the ats just wanted the live shrimp and didnt bite until the tide started falling good. Kevins Fine Outdoor Gear and Apparel is having their Red Trout Shootout on April 14, 2012. The entry fee is $125 for up to two anglers and over $10,000 in prize money will be awarded. The Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament in Panacea will be April 28 and 29. For more information on this you can go to panacearockthedock.com. The boat show is coming up soon and if youre thinking about buying a boat this is a good time. It will be March 2, 3 and 4 at the fairgrounds in Tallahassee. I just got off the phone with Mike Falk Jr. at Mikes Marine and he said Mike Crum was shing the hole at the mouth of the Ochlockonee River and about a seven-foot bull shark came up and tried to eat one of their sh. That again goes to show how screwed up the weather is. There should not be any sharks around this time of year. Heck, its still February. You better start checking your boat battery, make sure the boats is gonna run. Change the line on your reels and sharpen those hooks. It looks like its gonna be an early shing year. Dont forget to leave that oat plan with someone and know your limits. Good luck and good shing!Lady sh and sharks in February? This weather has everything messed up From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuges continuing First Sunday series will present The Fungus Amongus: Mushroom Basics by Bill Petty on Sunday, March 4. Petty, a Master Gardner, naturalist, author, and past president of the Sarracenia chapter of the Native Plant Society, will discuss mushroom shapes, ecology, nutrients, and relationships between fungi and other organisms. A brief mushroom hunt will follow. The program will begin at 2 p.m. in the Natures Classroom of the Environmental Education Center at the refuge. For more information, call (850) 925-6121 or visit the website, www.fws.gov/saintmarks/ The fth annual Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival will be held at the Ochlockonee River State Park on Friday, Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily. Admission to the festival is $4 per vehicle. Visitors will gather insight into how early man lived and worked; participate in demonstrations of int knapping, projectile point fashioning, deer hide brain tanning, bone, wood, and antler carving, and observe bow and arrow construction, basket weaving and early pottery. Competitions in Atlatl throwing and primitive archery are scheduled. An auction will be held on Saturday to auction off donated artwork. Ochlockonee River State Park is located four miles southwest of Sopchoppy on U.S. Highway 319. For more information, call 962-2771 or visit the website www.knapfest.com.Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival this weekend Refuge will host program on mushrooms on March 4The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety internet-completion course in Gadsden County. The course will be at the Florida Public Safety Institute, Academy Drive, off U.S. 90 W., 7.8 miles north of the Interstate 10 exit. The institute is between Midway and Quincy, across the highway from East Gadsden High School. Instruction is from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 10, in Classroom 120. Students must complete the internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the nal report from the online portion of the course. The nal report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under the age of 16 at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling the FWCs regional of ce in Panama City at 850-265-3676.Free hunter safety course o ered in Gadsden County IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED GROUPER LIMIT IS 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com FWC NewsSome of Floridas commercial fishermen will soon have more fishing opportunities, thanks to changes made by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at its Feb. 8, Commission meeting. Management changes will be made to the oyster harvest in Apalachicola Bay and the king mackerel harvest in southern Florida. The commissioners approved a measure that will allow the harvest of oysters for seven days a week in Apalachicola Bay. Previously, harvest was not allowed on Fridays and Saturdays from June 1 through Aug. 31 and on Saturdays and Sundays from Sept. 1 through Nov. 15. The measure will go into effect June 1. This increased harvesting opportunity comes in response to management changes in 2010 by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services that require oyster harvesters to deliver their oysters by a speci ed time of day during the warmer months of the year. The seven-day work week will allow Apalachicola Bay oyster harvesters the ability to make up for time lost in harvesting because of the new earlier delivery times. Commercial king mackerel shers harvesting from waters off Monroe County will be able to land and sell their harvest in Collier County from April 1 to July 1. The commission took this action because commercial fisherman cant land their catch in Collier County because the season usually closes before April. When the waters off Collier County are closed, commercial fishermen harvesting from Monroe County waters experience economic hardships because they must travel farther distances to sell their sh. The change will allow these shermen to travel a shorter distance to sell their catch. To learn more about these management changes, visit MyFWC.com/Commission and click on Commission Meetings and then Agenda.Harvest of Apalachicola oysters is expanded

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonMany of you may not know the significance of Feb. 15. For members of Flotilla 12 it is a day we celebrate the birth of one of our cherished members. The year I will leave it up to your imagination. Mark Rosen joined the Auxiliary on Jan. 8, 1991, in Tampa. He quickly immersed himself and learned all he could as well as imparted his vast knowledge to all who were willing to listen, and some who were not so willing, but knew they needed to listen. While in Tampa, he earned the former Department of Transportation Secretarys outstanding unit award, received his instructor qualification, several team and unit commendations, multiple sustained service awards (given for every 750 hours of service), several public education service awards, a presidential unit citation, several operations service awards, meritorious team commendations, auxiliary achievement awards, auxiliary humanitarian service award and his certi cate for 20 years of service. During those 20-plus years, Mark has earned crew and coxswain status, lled several positions in the otillas as well as at Division level, completed vessel exams, program visits and is one of our leading instructors. For several years, he used his boat, the nd Love as a facility and the stories so many of us can share about being on that facility are too numerous to write this week. Totaled, Mark has donated over 6,200 hours to the Auxiliary since records for hours began to be tracked electronically in 2000. This is most likely a gross underestimate of the time he has donated since Mark seems to always have the Auxiliary in mind in all that he does. There is not much Mark has not done. In Flotilla 12, as a transfer, he is in the top ve for time served. Two of the other ve, Steve Hults and Rich Rasmussen share this birthday celebration. February seems to be a good month for Flotilla 12. Tim Ashley and Duane Treadon round out the top ve for service to the auxiliary in the otilla. Many of us owe what we know to Mark Rosen. He has taken us in, mentored us and challenged us to be the auxiliarists we are today. Without his dedication, I know I can personally say that I may not have learned as much and been able to apply it when out on the water. It is always a pleasure to share with all of you the milestones we cross as we continue to evolve as a otilla. As we move forward, we are grateful to have members with great knowledge and experience like Mark, Tim, Steve, Rich and Duane; but we are as excited to have our new members who bring to us a fresh outlook and new energy that reminds us all why we joined the auxiliary. If any of you are interested in joining the Auxiliary or just seeing what we are all about, please contact Norma Hill, our human resource staff of cer at FSO-HR@ uscgaux.net As Sherrie says, safe boating is NO accident, educate yourself so that you are part of the solution and not part of the problem. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCoast Guard Auxiliarist Mark RosenI climbed down the slope at a favorite sinkhole and dive site last week only to be met by the stench coming from bags of rotting sh heads. Last month it was the remains of a butchered deer. Every month the trash is different: a broken toilet, soiled diapers, or racks of beer bottles, but the message is the same. Clearly the folks trashing our local sinkholes have not made the connection that these sites are also windows into our drinking water. How could anyone in good conscience soil their drinking water? I would have thought the county commission requirement for universal trash pickup would have made clandestine dumping trash less likely. But I continue to hear this common complaint from other land owners with sinkholes on their property. The problem is not new. Wes Skyles video Water Journey documents a number of sites littered with old batteries, spent antifreeze and tar buckets oozing poisons into the very water that feeds downstream drinking wells. Years ago, a farmer in Central Florida decided to dump old pesticides in a sinkhole on his property. All animal life residing in the downstream passage was killed. Before you say it does not matter because you get your water from Talquin, ask yourself where do they get that water? Thats right, from our local aquifer, exposed to the very sinkholes into which people continue to dump their trash. Archaeologists tell us sinkholes are a wonderful source of historic materials, nicely preserved in the muds of time. They tell us all manner of ancient trash are found there. Sonny Cockrell said of Warm Mineral Springs that 30,000 years of Florida history, including human remains, could be found in the ledges and mud deposits below. Two thousand one hundred feet into the main spring of Jackson County called Jackson Blue is a trash pile, out of which someone found a 1930s stoplight. Someone perched it on top of a stone in the middle of the passage, and to this day its listed on cave maps. Several years ago on an Island in the Bahamas our search for new species of crustaceans was curtailed by an enormous pile of glass bottles pushed into the sinkhole. The heat had actually melted some of them above water. Any chance of penetrating the cave was lost, but Im sure bottle collectors one day will nd this a treasure. Locally, cave explorers have had their progress halted because of an apparent sinkhole collapse that may be explained by the actions of a previous landowner. They did not like the location of a sinkhole on their property, so they lled it in with dirt dug up from another part of their yard. So how can we change? How can we make our sinkholes attractive, not repulsive? We can start by recognizing our caves have an intrinsic value that attracts people (and their money) from around the state, nation and world. We can encourage the Wakulla County Dive Club that happily provides sinkhole clean-up services in exchange for diving privileges. Whenever the club visits dive sites now, they always carry trash bags and clean up the trash before leaving. Is it possible to keep our sinkholes clean or shall we continue to support some future archaeologists quest for our trash? Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday y Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 2:40 AM 3.1 ft. 3:14 AM 2.9 ft. 3:49 AM 2.7 ft. 4:26 AM 2.4 ft. 5:08 AM 2.2 ft. 6:02 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:48 AM 0.1 ft. 9:12 AM 0.3 ft. 9:35 AM 0.6 ft. 10:00 AM 0.8 ft. 10:27 AM 1.1 ft. 10:59 AM 0.4 ft. 12:40 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:55 PM 3.4 ft. 3:17 PM 3.3 ft. 3:39 PM 3.3 ft. 4:01 PM 3.1 ft. 4:25 PM 3.0 ft. 4:54 PM 1.9 ft. 7:25 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:10 PM -0.1 ft. 9:43 PM -0.1 ft. 10:17 PM 0.0 ft. 10:55 PM 0.2 ft. 11:39 PM 1.4 ft. 11:41 AM Low 2.8 ft. 5:32 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 2:37 AM 3.2 ft. 3:11 AM 3.0 ft. 3:46 AM 2.7 ft. 4:23 AM 2.5 ft. 5:05 AM 2.2 ft. 5:59 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:45 AM 0.1 ft. 9:09 AM 0.3 ft. 9:32 AM 0.6 ft. 9:57 AM 0.9 ft. 10:24 AM 1.2 ft. 10:56 AM 0.4 ft. 12:37 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:52 PM 3.4 ft. 3:14 PM 3.4 ft. 3:36 PM 3.3 ft. 3:58 PM 3.2 ft. 4:22 PM 3.1 ft. 4:51 PM 2.0 ft. 7:22 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:07 PM -0.1 ft. 9:40 PM -0.1 ft. 10:14 PM 0.1 ft. 10:52 PM 0.2 ft. 11:36 PM 1.5 ft. 11:38 AM Low 2.9 ft. 5:29 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 3.0 ft. 3:16 AM 2.9 ft. 3:50 AM 2.7 ft. 4:25 AM 2.5 ft. 5:02 AM 2.3 ft. 5:44 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:52 AM 0.1 ft. 10:16 AM 0.3 ft. 10:39 AM 0.5 ft. 11:04 AM 0.8 ft. 11:31 AM 0.2 ft. 12:43 AM 0.3 ft. 1:44 AM Low 3.1 ft. 3:31 PM 3.1 ft. 3:53 PM 3.1 ft. 4:15 PM 3.0 ft. 4:37 PM 2.9 ft. 5:01 PM 2.0 ft. 6:38 AM 1.8 ft. 8:01 AM High -0.1 ft. 10:14 PM -0.1 ft. 10:47 PM -0.1 ft. 11:21 PM 0.0 ft. 11:59 PM 1.0 ft. 12:03 PM 1.3 ft. 12:45 PM Low 2.8 ft. 5:30 PM 2.6 ft. 6:08 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 2:32 AM 2.3 ft. 3:06 AM 2.2 ft. 3:41 AM 2.0 ft. 4:18 AM 1.8 ft. 5:00 AM 1.6 ft. 5:54 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:59 AM 0.1 ft. 9:23 AM 0.2 ft. 9:46 AM 0.4 ft. 10:11 AM 0.6 ft. 10:38 AM 0.8 ft. 11:10 AM 0.3 ft. 12:51 AM Low 2.5 ft. 2:47 PM 2.5 ft. 3:09 PM 2.5 ft. 3:31 PM 2.4 ft. 3:53 PM 2.4 ft. 4:17 PM 2.2 ft. 4:46 PM 1.5 ft. 7:17 AM High -0.0 ft. 9:21 PM -0.1 ft. 9:54 PM -0.0 ft. 10:28 PM 0.0 ft. 11:06 PM 0.2 ft. 11:50 PM 1.0 ft. 11:52 AM Low 2.1 ft. 5:24 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 2:24 AM 2.4 ft. 2:58 AM 2.3 ft. 3:33 AM 2.1 ft. 4:10 AM 1.9 ft. 4:52 AM 1.7 ft. 5:46 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:27 AM 0.1 ft. 8:51 AM 0.3 ft. 9:14 AM 0.6 ft. 9:39 AM 0.8 ft. 10:06 AM 1.1 ft. 10:38 AM 0.4 ft. 12:19 AM Low 2.6 ft. 2:39 PM 2.6 ft. 3:01 PM 2.6 ft. 3:23 PM 2.5 ft. 3:45 PM 2.5 ft. 4:09 PM 2.3 ft. 4:38 PM 1.5 ft. 7:09 AM High -0.1 ft. 8:49 PM -0.1 ft. 9:22 PM -0.1 ft. 9:56 PM 0.0 ft. 10:34 PM 0.2 ft. 11:18 PM 1.4 ft. 11:20 AM Low 2.2 ft. 5:16 PM High Thu Feb 23, 12 Fri Feb 24, 12 Sat Feb 25, 12 Sun Feb 26, 12 Mon Feb 27, 12 Tue Feb 28, 12 Wed Feb 29, 12 Date 2.1 ft. 2:27 AM 2.0 ft. 3:13 AM 1.9 ft. 4:01 AM 1.8 ft. 4:53 AM 1.7 ft. 5:54 AM 1.6 ft. 7:09 AM High 0.2 ft. 8:20 AM 0.4 ft. 8:37 AM 0.6 ft. 8:54 AM 0.7 ft. 9:14 AM 0.9 ft. 9:38 AM 1.1 ft. 10:07 AM 0.0 ft. 12:35 AM Low 2.1 ft. 2:57 PM 2.2 ft. 3:11 PM 2.3 ft. 3:30 PM 2.4 ft. 3:54 PM 2.4 ft. 4:23 PM 2.4 ft. 4:58 PM 1.6 ft. 8:47 AM High 0.3 ft. 8:34 PM 0.2 ft. 9:10 PM 0.1 ft. 9:48 PM 0.0 ft. 10:31 PM 0.0 ft. 11:24 PM 1.2 ft. 10:42 AM Low 2.4 ft. 5:42 PM HighGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacFeb. 23 Feb. 29First Feb. 29 Full March 7 Last March 14 New March 22Major Times 1:41 AM 3:41 AM 2:03 PM 4:03 PM Minor Times 7:48 AM 8:48 AM 8:21 PM 9:21 PM Major Times 2:23 AM 4:23 AM 2:46 PM 4:46 PM Minor Times 8:19 AM 9:19 AM 9:16 PM 10:16 PM Major Times 3:07 AM 5:07 AM 3:29 PM 5:29 PM Minor Times 8:52 AM 9:52 AM 10:09 PM 11:09 PM Major Times 3:51 AM 5:51 AM 4:13 PM 6:13 PM Minor Times 9:26 AM 10:26 AM 11:03 PM 12:03 AM Major Times 4:36 AM 6:36 AM 4:59 PM 6:59 PM Minor Times 10:03 AM 11:03 AM 11:57 PM 12:57 AM Major Times 5:22 AM 7:22 AM 5:46 PM 7:46 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:42 AM 11:42 AM Major Times 6:10 AM 8:10 AM 6:34 PM 8:34 PM Minor Times 12:49 AM 1:49 AM 11:27 AM 12:27 PM Better++ Good Average Average Average Average Average7:10 am 6:31 pm 7:49 am 8:23 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:09 am 6:32 pm 8:20 am 9:17 pm 7:07 am 6:33 pm 8:53 am 10:10 pm 7:06 am 6:33 pm 9:27 am 11:04 pm 7:05 am 6:34 pm 10:03 am 11:57 pm 7:04 am 6:35 pm 10:43 am --:-7:03 am 6:35 pm 11:27 am 12:50 am9% 15% 21% 27% 33% 39% 45% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comCourt shortsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA 70-year-old Miami man was ordered to serve three years probation and pay back more than $27,430 to Medart Assembly of God in money that was intended for a church mission trip. Charles McComas entered a plea in Wakulla Circuit Court on Wednesday, Feb. 15, to a felony charge of grand theft of more than $20,000. McComas owned World Mission Tours, which was arranging the mission trip for the church. The travel business was up for sale and, according to the police report in the court le, McComas told investigators he believed he could use the money for some expenses and, using the money from when he sold the business, have the money back in time to buy the churchs tickets. It did not work out that way. The church ended up losing its money and cancelling the mission trip, which had been planned for August 2010. In January of last year, the matter was reported to the sheriffs of ce. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford accepted McComas plea deal, which called for adjudication to be withheld, meaning he will not have a criminal conviction on his record, and for him to make restitution payments of $500 a month to the church. In other court matters this week: Andrew Wilson, the man accused of two murders in Wakulla Station last year, will likely not go to trial before the end of this year and it will probably be 2013 before his case is heard. Judge Fulford held a hearing on Thursday, Feb. 16, to hear from attorneys on the status of the case. Wilson, who shared a child with Gabrielle McKenzie, is charged with sneaking into McKenzies home with a knife on March 30, 2011, and murdering Gabrielles father, John McKenzie, and her boyfriend, Patrick Pittman. Gabrielle was reportedly left for dead with a cut throat. Deputies who arrived on the scene found Wilson and McKenzies 1year-old son in the house covered in blood and crying inconsolably. Wilson was later arrested in Georgia after wrecking his truck. It was reported by law enforcement at the time that Wilson may have lost consciousness and crashed due to blood loss because of severe wounds to his hands. Assistant State Attorney Lorena Vollrath-Bueno, who is prosecuting the case, announced last year that the state will be seeking the death penalty against Wilson if hes found guilty at trial. Andy Thomas, the chief assistant public defender, told the court at the status hearing that there are more than 60 witnesses in the case and that he and Bueno are scheduling depositions. A former clerks of ce employee, April Wilson Metcalf, pleaded no contest to embezzling more than $6,200 from the of ce between April 2010 and March 2011. Metcalf, 48, pleaded no contest on Wednesday, Feb. 15, to a charge of grand theft and two counts of criminal use of personal information. As part of a plea agreement, she was adjudicated guilty and ordered to serve ve years probation and make restitution. Metcalf had used information, including a Social Security number, for an employee of the county ambulance service to generate payments from the county which she deposited in her account. The ruse came unraveled after the ambulance service employee received two W-2s in the mail and went to the county nance of ce to try to determine what the second payments were for. Jared Millender, an inmate at the Wakulla County jail, led a lawsuit against the jail seeking a court order to have the facility give him the proper medications for bipolar disorder. Millender was on Wellbutrin, but there was concern that he was hoarding his medications and giving it to other prisoners, so it was changed to an XR formula which is crushable. The jail medical staff had considered allowing him to have his regular medication, according to Millenders handwritten complaint, but refused to do so after he was caught with a shank, or homemade knife. In addition to the felony charge of having a knife in jail, Millender was also charged with threatening the medical staff. Millender led the handwritten case on Feb. 1. Continued from Page 1AAt the root of the controversy is the 1994 constitutional amendment that limited net shing the so-called net ban. That amendment, overwhelming approved by voters, outlawed gill and entangling nets and limited shermen to using nets no larger than 500 square feet. The problem is that all nets gill, and over the years the FWC, and its precursor agency, the state Marine Fisheries Commission, had been creating rules and developing an evolving de nition of what constitutes a gill net. In practical terms for shermen, a legal net is 500 square feet or smaller, constructed of nylon (not mono lament) and has a mesh size no larger than two inches stretch. Prior to the net ban, mullet nets were thousands of feet long, made of monofilament, and with a mesh size upwards of three inches depending on the size of mullet being caught. It is the mesh size requirement that shermen have challenged several times in court, arguing that the smaller mesh size harms the resource by catching juvenile mullet and game sh. Fishermen contend that upwards of 90 percent of what they catch they cannot sell which is known as bycatch. And that, they contend, violates what was the single purpose of the net ban amendment which was not to outlaw gill nets, but to stop the unnecessary killing, over shing and waste of marine resources. The fishermen have typically won at the trial court level, but are reversed when the case reaches the First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee. The appeal court has cited the FWCs authority to make whatever rules it sees t to make under a rational basis test. Mowrey contends he will present to the court substantial evidence to show that the net rules are unconstitutional and that fishermen are entitled to injunctive relief. The evidence we present will be overwhelming, he said, that we are destroying the resource with the use of these nets. I think well prevail, he said. Judge will allow net lawsuit to move forwardBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter having met several times and still not being able to sift through all the different data to get accurate numbers, the Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committee decided to hold off meeting next month until it could be resolved. When trying to determine who is the highest energy consumer under the umbrella of the county commission, the committee ran across issues with inaccurate data. The utility companies had different measurements of square footage for buildings from the property appraiser, building names were confusing, etc. We couldnt make sense of the numbers, Commissioner Lynn Artz said. She added that linking it all up has been dif cult. Since the beginning, the committee has been trying to gure out the best way to sort through the data. Bobby Pickels, of Progress Energy, said it seemed like the committees main focus was identifying the highest energy consumers in the county and trying to address the problems. Now, it seems a broader net has been cast. It seems weve lost some momentum, Pickels said. Artz said the committee has also been researching maintenance and energy policies and procedures from other areas, because it was determined that this was desperately needed in Wakulla County. The one thing each policy that Artz has studied has in common is the need to track energy use. Ive been trying to do this for three years, Artz said. Committee Chairwoman Elinor Elfner said the idea of collecting data and identifying the highest energy consumers ts right in with tracking data. We need to get feedback to the people who are responsible, Elfner said. Originally, the idea was to physically go out to each building and measure the square footage and take down the meter numbers, Elfner said. Now, they are trying to re ne a spreadsheet with a listing of all the buildings, their monthly usage and expenditures and kilowatts or gallons consumed. Elfner said she has been working to identify all the buildings the county owns and sort through them. The list will then be grouped by department and will be a good tool to track progress and hold staff accountable for increases or decreases in consumption, Elfner said. One of the problems is guring out who will enter the data on a monthly basis, Artz said. Dan Ard, of Talquin Electric, said they can provide the data to the county, or people can simply pull the information from their bill. Several departments do not see their monthly bills, but pay a set fee for utilities, said Building Of cial Rod Revell. Elfner said the committee has unearthed another administrative issue, inconsistency among departments regarding utility bills. Pickels said historical data can be pulled off their website to enter into the spreadsheet. Artz said that option might be easier for the buildings on Progress Energy. Talquin does not have that option available, Ard said. Representatives from Progress Energy offered to sit down with county staff and show them how to use their website and get the data needed. Elfner suggested the committee start with the administration buildings, and have a representative from each department get the website training. Artz said she would like to speak with County Administrator David Edwards rst and see who should be the person responsible in each department. Until the spreadsheet is complete and the list of the highest offenders is drawn up, Artz suggested the committee not meet. She said the committee needs to know each building, its address and meter numbers and who will be responsible for entering data at each building. Ard said Talquin cant fully help the committee when he had bad data and doesnt have the full scope. Thats an internal problem, Ard said. One of the issues is that many of the accounts predate the 911 addresses, Revell said. When you grow up fast, this is what happens, Elfner said. Pickels said they will make general recommendations of the top few accounts that the committee might want to consider. Artz and Elfner said they plan to meet with Edwards and discuss these items and set priorities for the county.COUNTY GOVERNMENTCommittee tries to analyze data on energy use in county buildingsEnergy committees original focus was on which buildings are highest energy users, but running into inaccurate data stalls them HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. 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Arrested during the investigation was Edward McNeil Harris Jr., 24, of Crawfordville, charged with grand theft of a firearm and dealing in stolen property; Dennis Gustavus Rosier Jr., 25, of Crawfordville, charged with burglary, larceny and criminal mischief; and Justin Andrew Francis, 21, of Crawfordville, charged with burglary, larceny and criminal mischief. The arrests solve a business theft reported in Tallahassee and two vehicle burglaries reported in Sopchoppy and Crawfordville. Detectives have been investigating the case for several weeks. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Feb. 9, Scott Davis of Crawfordville reported an income tax fraud. The victim attempted to le his taxes and discovered that his Social Security number had already been used. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. On Feb. 9, Deputy Ian Dohme investigated a disturbance in Sopchoppy and observed a vehicle tag that had been altered. The deputy seized the tag which contained an altered expiration date. On Feb. 9, Elva Hoffman of Crawfordville reported the theft of a handgun from her vehicle. The rearm is valued at $300 and is owned by a friend. Deputy Mike Crum identi ed a possible time for the theft in another jurisdiction. The stolen gun was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. On Feb. 10, Admiral D. Barwick of Panacea reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle. Someone cut the victims tire. Damage to the tire was estimated at $40. A dog carcass was also found in the driveway. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On Feb. 11 at 8:14 p.m., a 16-year-old female high school student ipped her 2000 Toyota Tacoma on its side while traveling on FH 13 two miles west of Crawfordville. Three other passengers, a 17-year-old male, a 16-year-old female and 17-year-old female, were also riding in the vehicle when the accident occurred. Three of the occupants were transported to the hospital as a precaution by their parents while the fourth juvenile was picked up by parents. Deputy Cole Wells investigated the accident. On Feb. 10, a clerk at the Kangaroo in Wakulla Station reported a retail theft and gasoline driveoff. A suspect driving a green Chevrolet 2500 HD towing a trailer with a red Suzuki Samurai pumped $41 in diesel fuel and failed to pay for the product. The subject used cash to purchase Lotto tickets and soda but failed to pay for the gas. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. On Feb. 10 John Revell of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft of copper. Wire was observed in a dried up pond. A suspect has been identi ed and Progress Energy was contacted about the cut wire. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. On Feb. 10, Frankie Paulk of Santa Rosa Beach reported the theft of a $9,000 root rake that was loaned to a Bainbridge, Ga., man and never returned. The root rake was discovered off Commerce Blvd., but when the owner went to pick up the farm equipment, it was no longer at the same location. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. On Feb. 10, Deputy Nick Gray conducted a traf c stop of a vehicle driven by Admiral Doyle Barwick, 25, of Panacea for a brake light being out. Barwick is alleged to have not had a valid driver license and to have some marijuana in his pocket. Deputy Gray cited Barwick for driving on a suspended license with knowledge and issued him a notice to appear in court for being in possession of three grams of marijuana. On Feb. 11, Brian Rudolph of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief at a Crawfordville home owned by John Collett of Buford, Ga. Many windows were broken at the residence. Rocks and tree limbs were thrown through nine windows and damage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Reed Brown investigated. On Feb. 11, Latoya Smith of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victim lost the card and it was used to create $301 worth of unauthorized charges in Tallahassee. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. On Feb. 11, Christy Spears of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A mini bike, valued at $400, was reported missing from the victims property. PSO Wes Coleman investigated. On Feb. 13, Richard Strickland of Crawfordville reported recovering a cellular telephone on his Crawfordville property. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated the case and was unable to determine an owner of the phone due to it being damaged. On Feb. 13, Kenneth Jones of Crawfordville reported an identity theft. The victim attempted to file his tax return and discovered that someone had already used his Social Security number. Lt. Steve Ganey investigated. On Feb. 14, Marilyn Henderson of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim was completing her tax return when she discovered that her Social Security number was used on another tax return. Lt. Steve Ganey investigated. On Feb. 15, Deputy Joe Page was alerted to a 16-year-old Sopchoppy Second Chance School student reportedly possessing marijuana. The student was detained by Principal Tom Askins and 4.1 grams of marijuana was allegedly discovered in the students boot. He was issued a notice to appear in court and the marijuana was turned in as evidence. On Feb. 14, Denise Deaton of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim attempted to have a mechanic make automotive repairs for her and paid him $800 to do so. The mechanic took apart the victims engine and left the parts in the yard for more than a month. Ultimately it cost the victim another $2,700 to get the engine xed. The case investigation continues. Lt. Steve Ganey investigated. On Feb. 14, Dominique Davis of Tallahassee reported a grand theft of furniture in Crawfordville. Furniture owned by an estate was removed from a Crawfordville residence while the property was in probate. The property is valued at $2,600 and a suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. On Feb. 15, Gary Rinehart of Panacea reported a bank fraud. The victim attempted to open a bank account and discovered that someone used his Social Security number at another bank. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. On Feb. 15, Melissa Quincey of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims Social Security number to file and tax return. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. On Feb. 15, a 20-yearold Crawfordville man reported a criminal mischief to his vehicle and the 15-year-old brother of the victim was listed as the suspect. The victim noted damage on two occasions as dents and scratches were observed. The juvenile was arrested for burglary of a vehicle and two counts of criminal mischief. Damage was estimated at $2,010. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On Feb. 16, Dorothy Mitchell of Crawfordville and the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department reported a theft of a re extinguisher from the recreation park. The equipment is valued at $50. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. On Feb 15, Lt. Sherrell Morrison arrested Jason Scott Harrell, 38, of Crawfordville in connection with a grand theft and burglary at the home of Lesley Hemsworth of Sopchoppy. On Feb. 2, the victim reported the theft of a laptop computer and she has since reported the theft of a GPS and jewelry. The stolen items are valued at $1,755. Harrell was allegedly observed inside the victims home. Deputy Will Hudson and Detective Lorne Whaley also investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 716 calls for service during the past week .Sheri s Report Dennis G. Rosier Jr. Edward M. Harris Jr. Justin A. Francis

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakulla news.comFEBRUARY IS BLACK HISTORY MONTHContinued from Page 1A Thomas opened his speech with a remembrance of being a small child, having just been admitted into the Crawfordville Elementary School, after previously attending the Shadeville School. The textbooks at Shadeville, noted Thomas, were always old and worn. On back of the front cover were the names of students who had used these same books for years on end. However, upon attending Crawfordville Elementary, he received his very rst textbook brand new. His name would be the first ever written in the issued to column of the book. And though students were not allowed to take their books home, he managed to smuggle his out, so that his mother could see it. Dr. Thomas speech brought forth memories for all in the audience particularly African-Americans on how far it is weve actually come as a nation, and more speci cally, as people of Wakulla County. The Arthur L. Andrews Memorial Scholarship committee is currently taking applications to award two seniors the honor of this years scholarship. For more information on how to apply, call (850) 766-3178. Call 866.484.7057Espaol 866.960.7085Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV Now you have a better TV choice.[ The CenturyLink Prism Project. ]GET ON THE COUCH AND SEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Packages starting at $39.99a month for 6 months*CenturyLinkTM PrismTM.Interactive TV you control any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. 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CenturyLink-provided set-top boxes are required to view TV. If a term commitment is required for liste d Prism offer and customer terminates those services before the end of the applicable term commitment, CenturyLink will assess an early termination fee of $120, reduced by $10 for each month that customer has paid in full for those services during that term commitment. Local channel availability varies by market. Caller ID service must be purchased separately to enable the on-screen Caller ID feature; Caller ID feature is not available in all areas. High Definition (HD) available on all TV plans for an addit ional $11.99/month, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of set-top boxes (STBs) in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard definition. Subscription to service precludes customers f rom purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for Prism Premiu m plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Customer may dial 67 (touchtone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to opera te correctly, customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) ST Bs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) rem ote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service dis connection in an undamaged condition, or customer will be cha rged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism TV Plan Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. Staff ReportThe fifth annual African-American Read-In was held at the Wakulla County Public Library on Feb. 19 as part of the Black History Month celebration. The library has hosted the event for several years in partnership with the Wakulla County Christian Coalition. The purpose of the event is to make literacy a signi cant part of Black History Month. Works from several African American authors were read, discussed and honored at the read-in. Several local authors read aloud excerpts from their books and residents were also given the chance to share their favorite books written by African Americans and read a passage from them. There was also an opportunity to check out books from the Doris Clack Memorial Collection of African American materials. Clack was a native of Wakulla County and faculty member of FSUs School of Library and Information Studies. The event is part of the national African American Read In Chain, which is in its 23rd year. The event is endorsed by the International Reading Association. More than a million readers of all ethnic groups from the United States, the West Indies and African countries have participated.African-American Read-in is held Christian Coalition JENNIFER JENSENParticipants at the Read-In at the public library. PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENMore photos online at thewakullanews.net Black History Parade

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Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012The column published last month promoted CELEBRATING LIFE in the Senior Center. It did not discuss health education, screening or exercise. This month we are discussing these issues and some lifestyles that will help you age successfully. The health of your body and your brain depends on many factors. Some are in your control and some are not. Its important to understand both. As you better understand the difference, it becomes especially important to act on the things you can change. Research reinforces the value of a healthy lifestyle. We are what we eat, how we exercise, and if we smoke. A healthy body and a healthy mind appear to go hand-in-hand. Listed below are some activities provided at the Senior Center that are designed to improve the health and welfare of our clients. Diabetes Support Classes. The Wakulla County Health Department presents classes on prevention, risk factors, symptoms, complications, lifestyles and home remedies. Blood Pressure. Every week, we have blood pressure checks and maintain records of each check on each client. Epilepsy. Periodically, the Epilepsy Association presents facts, case management, prevention and education regarding this symptom of a disorder of the brain. It can affect anyone, at anytime, at any age. Nutrition. Every month the Wakulla County Extension Of ce presents classes on the value of foods for a healthy diet. Hospice Services. Both Covenant and Big Bend Hospice present classes on end of life issues including coping with grief and loss. Eyesavers. They avail themselves monthly for eye exams and free repair to glasses. Vision Impairments. The Division of Blind services promotes independent living services to those that have limited vision. They present low-vision devices and training for self-care skills. Parkinson Disease. The Parkinson Center, a satellite clinic of the Nation Parkinson Foundation presents information on the classic signs and other symptoms of this disease. Even though there is no known cure, there are medications to treat the symptoms. ACCESS Florida. This is a software system that enables our staff to assist eligible seniors to obtain food, cash, Medicaid and kidcare provided by the Florida Department of Children and Families Services. Fall Prevention. These presentations encourage evaluation of vision, vestibular system (inner ear), balance and coordination. Emergency Response System. This program explains how pressing a button worn on your body will establish immediate contact with medical emergency help. This allows you to live alone independently. There are many other health and welfare programs such as blood glucose screening, Eden Springs Rehab Center, elder abuse, bone density screenings, lowering Medicare costs, cancer symptoms and management, sexually transmitted diseases, and new programs added regularly. Exercise activities include Yoga, line dancing, chair exercising, brain gym, walking trail and many others. Continued on Page 3B Too few private ayes on prisons in the state SenateWeekly Roundup, Page 7BWhen older drivers need to stop driving AARP Tax tips for 50+ taxpayersSenior News, Page 3BSuccessful aging R.H. CarterSeniors celebrate Chinese New Year, arrange owers, paint watercolors, learn about bears, and sing karaokeBy DIANE LANTER and TAMARA BYRNESof the Senior CenterThe January 2012 New Year brought cooler weather, but not quite the winter cold that we have experienced in past years. We started out the year with decorations commemorating the Chinese New Year. Tamaras Tuesday craft class designed Ikebana ower arrangements for the tables and her watercolor class tried their hand at oriental painting. These paintings adorned the walls and colorful kimonos hung from the ceiling, along with bright Chinese lanterns. Chef Mary served sweet and sour chicken and egg rolls for lunch and all were challenged to try eating with chop sticks donated by a local Chinese restaurant. It was a new experience for many and a fun day for all. Continued on Page 8B SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTamaras craft class works on ower arrangements as part of Januarys focus on the Orient. Im Bob Braman, the Head Coach of Mens Track & Field for Florida State University. I have been a runner since 1973, and while health and tness have alway s been priorities for me, I owe my life to a cardiac procedure performed at Tallahassee Memorial. Almost exactly a year ago, I began experiencing a pain in my throat during my daily, 5-mile run. Normally the pain would strike after the rst mile, and if I slowed down the pace for about thirty minutes I could nish my usual distance. Still, I decided to see my primary care doctor, Hugh VanLandingham, MD about the pain. It turns out, I had a 95 percent blockage in a branch of my left coronary artery. This blockage was preventing healthy blood ow to my heart and placed me at high risk for heart attack or cardiac arrest. I normally run in the woods by myself I could have easily dropped dead. I am so thankful I was diagnosed that day. Dr. VanLandingham referred me to Dr. Frank Gredler, who performed a stress echo, then sent me for a heart catheterization which led to a coronary artery stent being placed. Ive felt great ever since. Through this whole experience, Ive learned that theres no perfect formula for determining whether someone will get coronary heart disease. Im one of those odd cases, but, when the unexpected happened, I saw rsthand that you can count on the cardiac care team right here in town at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. TMH.orgFrankGredler,MD BoardCertified CardiologistBobBraman, HeartPatientAt TMH, Your Heart is in the Right Place...Home.The physician(s) referred to herein are independent practitioners and are not agents or employees of TMH.

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, February 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. at the library. The public is encouraged to attend. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Henry Buddy Wells, supervisor of elections, will be speaking at the meeting. In addition, the Wakulla League has invited Marilyn Wills, former Florida League President, and long-time Leon County member Gaynell Waldo to help explore the implications of the new voting laws, and the dates of the races and the times for early voting which have changed this year. Friday, February 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, February 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, February 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, February 27 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, February 28 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, February 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCO TICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, March 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Special EventsFriday, February 24 WALK TO DEFEAT ALS will be held at 6 p.m. in downtown Tallahassee, 228 S. Adams Street. People will gather to join the ght to nd a cure for a deadly illness. ALS, also known as Lou Gehrigs Disease. Wheelchair-bound patients along with their families and friends will make a 2-mile trek in The Walk to Defeat ALS. Interested walkers should call 888-257-1717, ext. 115 or register online at www.WalktoDefeatALS.org. Registration also begins at 4:30 p.m. the day of the race. FIFTH ANNUAL STONE AGE AND PRIMITIVE ARTS FESTIVAL will be held at the Ochlockonee River State Park from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the festival is $4 per vehicle. Guests will gather insight into how early man lived and worked; participate in demonstrations of int knapping, projectile point fashioning, deer hide brain tanning, bone, wood, and antler carving; and observe bow and arrow construction, basket weaving and early pottery. Competitions in Atlatl throwing and primitive archery are scheduled. For more information, please visit www.knapfest.com. The festival will continue on Saturday and Sunday. Saturday, February 25 INTRODUCTION TO BEEKEEPING SHORTCOURSE, hosted by the Apalachee Beekeepers Association, will be held from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Leon County Extension Of ce. Individual registration with lunch is $50; $35 for ABA members, $25, 14 years and younger when accompanied by an adult attendee. Rotating, hands-on group sessions will include: Hive Assembly, Nutrition, Foraging, Bee Health, Open Hives Demonstration, Tools & Safety, Management, Pests and Integrated Pest Management. For more information, contact Lisa Lazarus at 294-3372. STONE AGE AND PRIMITIVE ARTS FESTIVAL will be held at the Ochlockonee River State Park from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the festival is $4 per vehicle (up to eight occupants). There will be an auction. For more information, please visit www.knapfest.com. DAY OF DIALOGUE ON MINORITY HEALTH will be held at Riversprings Middle School from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. This free event is held annually to promote community health in Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla and Jefferson counties. This event will provide assistance to residents by education and promoting the importance of a health lifestyle. For more information, contact Kenny Manning at 545-5982 or email kmann5_2008@yahoo.com. ANNUAL WAKULLA COUNTY YOUTH FAIR ASSOCIATION SWINE SHOW will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wakulla County Livestock Pavilion, Cedar Avenue in Crawfordville. The show will begin at 9 a.m., with a barbecue lunch at noon. The awards ceremony will be at 1 p.m. The annual Greased Pig Scramble will be held before the awards. For more information, contact P. J. Piland at ppiland@comcast.net or 509-3263. SOPCHOPPY OPRY will feature Wayne Martin and his Country Gold Band at 7 p.m., along with special guest Billy Rader. Sopchoppy Opry is performed at the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. Tickets are $15. Call (850) 962-3711 for tickets and information. SONGWRITERS RICK OTT AND MIMI HEARN will perform at Posh Java at 8 p.m. For reservations call (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Sunday, February 26 STONE AGE AND PRIMITIVE ARTS FESTIVAL will be held at the Ochlockonee River State Park from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the festival is $4 per vehicle. For more information, please visit www.knapfest.com. Monday, February 27 NAMI WAKULLA will hold its monthly meeting on recovery services at 6:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club, 64 Ochlockonee Street. Members of NAMI Connection, along with mental health professionals, will be on hand to discuss support group successes, who is eligible for recovery support groups, how meetings are conducted, and ways to encourage people with a diagnosis to take that dif cult step to attend. For more information, visit namiwakulla.org, or call 926-1033. Tuesday, February 28 AARP DRIVER SAFETY CLASS will be held at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. This program is for seniors 50 years and older. It is a classroom setting and no driving is done. The program discusses how age related physical changes can effect the way seniors drive. The cost for AARP members is $12 Non members $14 Seniors can register by calling 926-4605. The classes are also April 24, June 26, Aug. 28 and Oct. 23. Wednesday, February 29 PUBLIC FORUM will be held at 7 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Lodge on Tallahassee Community College and its future in Wakulla County. The guest speaker will be Dr. Jim Murdaugh, president of TCC. Thursday, March 1 ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS will be held at 5:30 p.m. at Wakulla High School starting with a silent auction. At 6:30 p.m., the performances begin with singing from the elementary students, followed by musical performances and skits from Wakulla Middle, Riversprings Middle, and Wakulla High Schools. Tickets may be purchased at the door and prices are $2 for students and $5 for adults. All proceeds bene t lucky Wakulla High seniors for scholarships in the Arts. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival at Ochlockonee River State Park. Day of Dialogue on Minority Health at Riversprings Middle 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Youth Fair Association Swine Show at Livestock Pavilion 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Community Center Advisory Committee meeting at 1 p.m. in BOCC conference room. All WeekendSaturdaySaturdayMonday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsMonday, February 27 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMUNITY CENTER ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 1 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the library. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim DirectorJust a reminder from last week that on Tuesday Feb. 28, WCPL will be switching to a new automation system. While the vast majority of our patrons wont be affected by this change, there will be the inevitable growing pains as we work out the kinks in the new system so we ask for your patience. The new system will be internet based and will have some neat features for every library card holder to take advantage of, which we will tell you about in the coming weeks as soon as the staff is completely comfortable with the new system. A couple of immediate changes, which you need to be made aware of now, are the way we handle overdue fines will be a little different. While we will still have the current grace period before nes are assessed, starting a week after we go live with the new system, if you turn in material after the grace period ends, you will also owe nes for the entire grace period as well. Currently, the nes begin accumulating starting from one day after the grace period ends. An easy way to avoid this is to return your materials on time of course. In addition, we will be able to send via email reminders when books are coming due, when holds are available, and overdue notices. If you have been receiving my weekly email newsletter, over the next few weeks, your email address will be added to our new system. Once we begin using all the attributes of this new automation system (which is at a third of the cost of our current one) we think we will be able to provide even better service as we will be connected to our patrons even more. Friday Night Movie now with popcorn from Capital City Bank! Our Friday Night Movie this week is the Clint Eastwood directed multiaward nominee lm of the life and career of J. Edgar Hoover. Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Arnie Hammer and Naomi Watts, this lm follows the controversial, nearly 50-year career of Hoovers directorship of the FBI. The face of American law enforcement for a half century had secrets of his own which could have destroyed his career. Beginning with this film, Capital City Bank, as part of their community outreach program, will have popcorn and bottles of water available for a small donation to the library. So please join us for a great lm and the long awaited popcorn on Feb. 24. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing of this R (for language) drama. AARP Tax Prep at WCPL The AARP has begun their free tax preparation service at WCPL on Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This service continues each Thursday and Saturday at the same times throughout tax season. Its intended for low to middle income lers which an emphasis on senior citizens. It is also rst come, rst served so come early. AARP 55 Alive Driving Class On Tuesday, Feb. 28, there will be a AARP 55 Alive driving class held here at the library. This program is for those 50 and older, and is set in a classroom setting so no driving is involved. The class will discuss how age related physical changes can affect the way seniors drive. Many insurance programs offer discounts to those who take this class. The class will be from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a half hour break for lunch and will have a $12 fee for AARP members and $14 for non-members to cover material costs. Rregistration is required by calling Ernie Conte at 926-4605. Seating is limited but this class will be offered in April, June, August and October for those who miss it this time. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Page 3B San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.We will be at Ochlockonee State Park this weekend for Stone Age and Primitive Arts Festival! the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering His name was drawn from OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream ParlorRaymond RichJanuary 2012 Winnerank You So Much! (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Please RecycleContinued from Page 1B Age 65 is often considered a turning point. And so it is as well for Alzheimers disease: with age the greatest risk factor for the brain disorder, the number of people with the disease doubles every five years beyond age 65. However, this milestone can also be looked at positively as a time to really concentrate on successful aging. By incorporating these steps into your daily life, people over 65 ( and under 65) can help protect their bodies and brains as they age: Develop a healthy attitude. Youre never too old to start taking care of your physical and mental health. Doing so can make the difference between another good decade or a decade of disability. Exercise regularly. Studies show that a 30-minute walk each day is optimal. Maintain social contacts. Loneliness is deadly for older people. A network of friends will stimulate the brain and the soul. Quit smoking. Many older people have the attitude, It doesnt make any difference, the harm is done. People can feel better and avoid smokingrelated health problems by quitting cigarettes at any age. Stay trim. Obesity in older persons can increase health problems, including driving up blood sugars and boosting the risk for dementia. Chronic obesity in middle age may increase the risk of dementia in late life. Limit alcohol. Alcohol damages the heart, liver, muscles and nerves, and excess drinking can lead to falls and injuries. Limit consumption to one ounce per day. People with Alzheimers disease should not drink any alcohol. Understand your medications. Frequently, doctors do not talk to other doctors so your medications may interact or overlap. Youre responsible for understanding your medications and asking questions about side effects. Watch your diet. Eat a balanced diet and take an all-purpose vitamin. Calcium supplementation is important to maintain bone strength. Find a doctor you trust. Look for a primary care doctor who understands health problems in older persons, since medication doses, medical management strategies and treatment philosophy is different than for younger individuals. Keep your soul healthy. Spiritual tness is as important as your physical and spiritual health and can reduce the incidence of health problems. Enjoy your life. Humor and joy will lift your spirit, strengthen your body and feed your soul. Prepare in advance. You dont have to wait until your 65th birthday to start on the road to successful aging. Implement a hearthealthy and brain-healthy regimen at any age. Discuss strategies with your primary care provider. R.H. Carter: Successful agingSpecial to The NewsThe Home Instead Senior Care of ce serving seniors in Leon, Gadsden, Jefferson and Wakulla counties has announced the Salute to Senior Service program to honor senior volunteers for the contributions they make to their local communities. The program includes a search for the most outstanding senior volunteer in each state and culminates with the selection of a national winner during Older Americans Month in May. Nominees must be 65 years of age or older and volunteer at least 15 hours a month. Nominations will be accepted at www.SalutetoSeniorService.com through March 15. Nomination forms also can be requested at ckoehler@homeinsteadinc. com. State Senior Hero winners will receive plaques, and their stories will be posted on the SalutetoSeniorService.com website. In addition, $5,000 will be donated to the national winners nonpro t charity of choice. Research shows that 52 percent of seniors volunteer their time through unpaid community service. Nearly 20 percent (one in ve) started volunteering when they reached the traditional age of retirement 65 or older. For more information about the Salute to Senior program or Home Instead, call (850) 297-1897.SENIOR CITIZEN NEWSBy JESSICA EDMONDSON The good news this year is that youve got a couple of extra days. Rather than ling your taxes by April 15, the IRS tax ling deadline is Tuesday, April 17. But thats not the only change. Before ling your taxes, AARP has a few tips that older taxpayers may be able to use to cut taxes and to gain a bigger refund. Tax tips for older taxpayers: If you turned 65 before Jan. 1, 2012, youre eligible to take a higher than normal standard deduction: Single $7,250; married $13,900; head of household $9,950; qualifying widow/widower $12,750. If your adjusted gross income, untaxed interest and half your Social Security bene t add up to less than $25,000 ($32,000 if married and ling jointly or qualifying widow), youll pay no taxes on your Social Security income. If youre in a tax bracket of 15 percent or lower, youll pay no federal taxes on long-term capital gains you racked up during the year. If you work while paying a home health aide to take care of your spouse or dependent, you may be able to claim a credit of up to $3,000 in dependent (or spouse) care expenses. If you pay all or some of your parents medical bills, you can deduct those as health care expenses. If you contributed after-tax income to your retirement account, a percentage of your annual distribution may be tax-free. If your stay at an assisted living facility or nursing home is related to medical care, you may be able to deduct the cost. If you bought hearing aids and batteries, arti cial teeth and prescription drugs, you may be able to deduct some of the medical expenses. If you made certain energy-ef cient improvements to your home, you may get a tax credit for expenses such as installing a new roof or new windows or exterior doors. Some of these tips come with restrictions that may apply to you, so consult with a tax adviser or visit www.aarp.org/ money/taxes/ for more information. Also, check out AARP Foundation Tax-Aide, a free program that offers tax services to low income and senior taxpayers, to make sure that you are taking advantage of every deduction and credit available to you. Dear Savvy Senior, Im worried about my fathers driving. At age 84, his driving skills have diminished signi cantly, but I know hes bound and determined to keep going as long as hes alive. What tips can you recommend that can help me help my dad stop driving? Nervous Daughter Dear Nervous, For many families, telling an elderly parent its time to give up the car keys is a very sensitive and dif cult topic. While theres no one simple way to handle this issue, here are a number of tips and resources you can try to help ease your dad away from driving. Take a Ride. To get a clear picture of your dads driving abilities, the first thing you need to do is take a ride with him watching for problem areas. For example: Does he drive too slow or too fast? Does he tailgate or drift between lanes? Does he have difficulty seeing, backing up or changing lanes? Does he react slowly? Does he get distracted or confused easily? Also, has your dad had any fender benders or tickets lately, or have you noticed any dents or scrapes on his vehicle? These, too, are red ags. Start Talking. After your assessment, you need to have a talk with your dad about your concerns, but dont sound alarmed. If you begin with a dramatic outburst like Dad, youre going to kill someone! youre likely to trigger resistance. Start by gently expressing that youre worried about his safety. For tips on how to talk to your dad about this touchy topic, the Hartford Financial Services Group and MIT AgeLab offers some guides titled Family Conversations with Older Drivers and Family Conversations about Alzheimers Disease, Dementia & Driving that can help, along with a online seminar called We Need to Talk that was produced by AARP. To access these free resources, visit safedrivingforalifetime. com. Like many elderly seniors, your dad may not even realize his driving skills have slipped. If this is the case, consider signing him up for an older driver refresher course through AARP (aarp.org/drive, 888227-7669), your local AAA or a driving school. By becoming aware of his driving limitations, your dad may be able to make some simple adjustments like driving only in daylight or on familiar routes that can help keep him safe and driving longer. Or, he may decide to hang up the keys on his own. Refuses To Quit. If, however, you believe your dad has reached the point that he can no longer drive safely, but he refuses to quit, you have several options. One possible solution is to suggest a visit to his doctor who can give him a medical evaluation, and if warranted, prescribe that he stops driving. Older people will often listen to their doctor before they will listen to their own family. If that doesnt do it, ask him to get a comprehensive driving evaluation done by a driver rehabilitation specialist this can cost several hundred dollars. A driving evaluation will test your dads cognition, vision and motor skills, as well as his on-road driving abilities. To locate a specialist in your area, contact the Association of Driver Rehabilitation Specialists (driver-ed.org, 866-672-9466) or the American Occupational Therapy Association (aota.org/olderdriver). If he still refuses to move to the passenger seat, call your local Department of Motor Vehicles to see if they can help. Or call in an attorney to discuss with your dad the potential nancial and legal consequences of a crash or injury. If all else fails, you may just have to take away his keys. Arrange Transportation. Once your dad stops driving hes going to need other ways to get around, so help him create a list of names and phone numbers of family, friends and local transportation services that he can call on. To locate community transportation services call the Area Agency on Aging. Call 800-677-1116 for contact information. Send your senior questions to Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior. org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy Senior book.When elderly drivers need to limit or stop driving By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior AARP NEWSTax tips for 50+ taxpayersSearch is on for outstanding senior volunteers

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: COLORING PICTURE Flag Day 2012 is Friday, February 24. How many questions about the American flag can you answer correctly?1) The flag has 13 red and green stripes. Fact or Fiction? 2) The number of stripes stands for the original 13 colonies. Fact or Fiction? 3) The colors of the stripes stand for purity and innocence and hardiness and valor. Fact or Fiction? 4) The flag has 60 white stars on a blue background. Fact or Fiction? 5) The blue background stands for the Union. Fact or Fiction? 6) The color of the background stands for vigilance, perseverance and justice. Fact or Fiction? 7) The stars stand for the millions of people living in the United States. Fact or Fiction? 8) Each of the stars has four points. Fact or Fiction? 9) The stars can be placed anywhere on the blue background. Fact or Fiction? 10) A new star and stripe are added to the flag each time a new state enters the United States. Fact or Fiction?Fact or Fiction?American Flag ChallengeAnswers: 1) Fiction, the stripes are red and white, 2) Fact, 3) Fact, 4) Fiction, the flag has 50 stars, 5) Fact, 6) Fact, 7) Fiction, the 50 stars stand for the number of states in America, 8) Fiction, each of the stars has five points, 9) Fiction, the stars must be placed in a certain pattern, 10) Fiction, that practice stopped in 1818 when it became clear that adding stripes was not going to work Jokes and RiddlesQ: What do patriotic monkeys wave?A: Star Spangled bananas!Q: What did the soldiers letter say to the stamp?A: Stick with me, kid, and well go places. Crossword Puzzle

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Page 5BA-1PRESSURECLEANING ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Bryan StricklandsPOOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469850 508-7469Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairsBRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Greens Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.CCC 053 88 7408-8563Residential Commercial Re-Roong Repairs Since 1980 Free Estimates Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 4Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $800mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $750mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2-2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker RowellAuctions.com ONLINE ONLY Rowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc.800-323-838810% Buyers Premium AU 479, AB 296 2% Broker Participation2 Res. Lots, Camelot Subdivision, Crawfordville, FL Res. Lot, Burnt Pine Loop, St. Marks, FLBidding Ends March 6th at 3 pm EST/2 pm CST 63 Bank Foreclosed Properties in North FLMany Selling Absolute! 5137-0223 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, Pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to Fictitious Name Notices engage in business under the fictitious name of, Wakulla Springs Alliance located at 137 Royster Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the FlorFictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices ida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 27th day of February 2012. /s/Ron Piasecki Published one time in The Wakulla News on February 23, 2012 5133-0223 PUBLIC NOTICE MEETING NOTICE A special meeting of the Meeting Notices Apalachee Bay Marine Safety Support Group, Inc., will be held on March 24, 2012, from 12:30-2:00 PM at 1557 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Shell Point Rd. Lunch to follow. Bob Morgan, Secretary 850-926-8074. February 23,2012 5131-0223 March 10, 2012 sale-Callaway Auto & Truck Repair PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given that the following Vehicle will be sold for repairs and storage Charges pursuant to section 713.585 Date of Sale: March 10, 2012 Time: 9:30AM Vehicle: 2000 Ford Ranger Vin# : 1FTYR14V9VTA30970 All sales to be held at Callaway Auto & Truck Repair, 1502 Shadeville, Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Telephone 850-926-1039 February 23, 2012 Lien Notices Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Lost LOST CAT,White, longed haired, 6 months old Off MLK and Wakulla Gardens REWARD (850) 926-3633 Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfordville. Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLEFri Sat Sun 8-3 furniture kids items, antiques, household Mens clothing, fishing, tools 118 Appaloosa RD. Pets Stop Scratching & Gnawing.Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch no More, Apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet.Ashley Feed & Hardware (850) 421-7703www. happyjackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE M/H for rent, 3BR/1BA.$450/mo. includes water, garbage, lawn-care. Quiet neighborhood. No pets. Call after 6pm850-926-3280 Mobile Homes For Sale Mobile Home for Sale2 BR 2 BASW. 938 sq. ft. Fully furnished. 100X176 lot. Panacea. $50,000. 850-984-0182. Real Estate For Rent 2Bedroom/1Bath,Mobile Home for Rent LARGE DECK, SHED ROOMYQUIET NEIGHBORHOOD NO PETSFIRM $525./month, $500./security. 850-926-6212. Apartments Furnished SHELL PointLarge loft style apartment, with separate office, full kitchen, washer, dryer, pets ok $650 month, first, last, security (850) 273-2633 Apartments $99 Move-in-Special OFF First Months RentAsk About our Civil Servant Discount850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses LIGHT BRIGHT CLEAN 2 br. 1 ba in Oyster Bay Private dock, great view, furnished or unfurnished call 850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEConvenient Location 3BR, 2BA, on Large Lot Screened back porch, washer/dryer. Carport, no smoking or pets $775 mo. (850) 508-9928 Mysterious Waters2BR/2BA wood-detail, vaulted ceiling, large-porch, covered parking, short walk to Wakulla River, community park, boat-ramp, dock. $800/mo. 850-926-6289. Real Estate For Sale House for Sale2 BR, 1 BA Up 1 BR, 1 BA Down. 100X200 fenced lot. Panacea. $90,000. 850-984-0182. Commercial Real Estate Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-926-2480 Commercial Real Estate Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300 Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-656-6340 WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Lots For Sale 2-Acre Lots For Sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 Lien Notices Lien Notices 5102-0223 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF VIOLATION/ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINT AND ORDER NWFWMD VS JERRY LAMAR HIERS Notice is hereby given to Mr. Jerry Hiers by the Northwest Florida Water Management District of the following violation of rules and regulations promulgated under Chapter 373, Florida Statues, Chapter 40A-3 and Chapter 62-531. Mr. Hiers is not a licensed water well contractor in the state of Florida, but constructed water wells at 59 Starling Trace, 10 Cardinal Court, and 14 Nuthatch Trail, Crawfordville. Engaging in the business of water well contracting without an active water well contractor license is a violation of Subsection 373.323 and Paragraph 373.33(4)(d) Florida Statues (F.S.) and Rule 40A-3.037(2), Florida Administrative Code. The District orders that within thirty (30) days of this public notification, Mr. Jerry Lamar Hiers will cease and desist from any activities that require a well water contractor license and pay to the District an administrative fine of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000.00). If a written request for hearing (Chapter 120, F.S.) is not made within 30 days after this four-week noticing period is complete, then this order shall be final. February 2,9,16 and 23, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5132-0223 Vs. Merkison, Jimmy R. 65-2011-CA-000331 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000331 DIVISION NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JIMMY R. MERKISON, et al Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION TO: KASEY MERKISON Last Known Address: 311 Trice Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 Current Address: Unknown ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Last Known Address: Unknown Current Address: Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIEDthat an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 73 A DISTANCE OF 33.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 66 FOOT COUNTY ROAD, RUN THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 308.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 217.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET, RUN THENCE SOUTH 72DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 311 TRICE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Albertelli Law, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney, or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the W akulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this court on this 14 day of February, 2012. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Coastal StorageLow Rates / Short Term Contracts!850-509-1740 5X10s and 10X20s spaces for lease. Additional discount on already low rates w/contracts!

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA possible 3BR House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,000 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.65 Fallwood 4BR/2BA on 5 acres Avilable March 1 $900 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets Neg. 203 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd 3BR/2BA MH $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets14 Windy Court 3BR/2BA Available 4/1/12 $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets26 Magnolia Ridge 3 BR/2BA with replace, above ground pool. $1125 Mo, No Smoking or PetsAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstateClerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk **See the Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs assistance in order to participate in a program or service of the State Courts System, you should contact the ADA Coordinator, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone (850)926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770(Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850)926-0905; Fax: (850)926-0901. February 23 and March 1, 2012 GC-11-84561 5132-0223 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5127-0223 Vs. Mccallister, Norman W., 65-2010-CA-000412 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000412 AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY, INC.. Plaintiff, vs. NORMAN W. MCCALLISTER; SHERRY MCCALLISTER;: UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 25, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOTS NUMBERED ONE, TWO, THREE, SIX, SEVEN AND EIGHT (1,2,3,6,7 AND 8), BLOCK M IN THESUBDIVISION KNOWN AS PANACEA PARK, IN SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED AT PAGE 191 OF DEED BOOK 14, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2002 GENERAL DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME HAVING VIN#GMHGA4190128156A, TITLE #89938793 AND VIN #GMHGA4190128156B, TITLE #89939033. a/k/a 107 CHEHAW STREET, PANACEA, FL 32346 at public sale on March 1, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 1st day of February, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. February 16 & 23, 2012. 5125-0223 Estate of Mary Martha Rodgers, 11-15-PR, Notice to Creditors IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.:11-15-PR PUBLIC NOTICE IN RE: ESTATE OF MARY MARTHA RODGERS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Mary Martha Rodgers for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division; the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, having claims or demands against decedents estate, on whom a copy of this notice has been served, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE TIME OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claim with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THIS FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.0702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is February 16, 2012 Personal Representative /s/ Sharon Theofane 2392 Dr. Martin Luther King Pkwy. Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ Sherry D. Walker Attorney at Law, Florida Bar No. 0608461, 8133 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32309 (850)386-5656 fax (850)386-5136(fax) February 16 & 23, 2012 5125-0223 5128-0223 Estate of Newberry, Jr. William Robert, Case No.12-3-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.12-3-CP IN RE: THE ESTATE OF William Robert Newberry, Jr., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of William Robert newberry, Jr., deceased, File Number 12-3-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court, for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: 5129-0223 Estate of Mardella Reichard Lort, CASE NO:12-5-CP, Notice to Creditors IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY COUNTY, FLORIDA PUBLIC NOTICE CASE NO: 12-5-CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF MARDELLA REICHARD LORT Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The ancillary administration of the Estate of Mardella Reichard Lort, deceased, whose date of death was 16 April 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division; Case Number 12-5-CP, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the ancillary personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons, who have claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: FEBRUARY 16, 2012 Ancillary Personal Representative James R/ Brewster 547 N Monroe Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 Attorney for Personal Representative James R. Brewster, Esquire Florida Bar No.; 440787 Suite 203, The Walker Building 547 North Monroe Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301 Telephone :(850)561-1037 February 16 & 23, 2012 5134-0301 Linton, John S.,12-12-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO:12-12-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN S. LINTON, DECEASED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOHN S. LINTON, deceased, whose date of Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5126-0223 03/01 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statues, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday, March 1, 2012 at 11:00 am at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Mickey Somerset Before the sale date of March 1, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 February 16 & 23, 2012. 5126-0223 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices death was February 4, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division under probate file #12-12-CP, the address of which is Courthouse Square, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is requires to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is February 23, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Nancy G. Linton 6081 Pisgah Church Road Tallahassee, Florida 32309 Attorney for Personal Representative /s/ by T. Buckingham Bird, Esq. P.O. Box 247, Monticello, Florida 32345 (850)997-3503 February 23 & March 1, 2012 5134-0301 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF THE DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first Publication of this notice is February 16, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Patricia Athanson 9821 Nicklans Drive, New Port Richey, FL 34655 Attorney for the Personal Representative Allen, Kopet & Associates, PLLC. /s/ Jennifer Haley Gleason, Esquire, Florida Bar No.087653, Post Office Box 14269, Tallahassee, FL 32317 Telephone (850)385-5612 February 16 & 23, 2012 5128-0223 We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1150 per month. 2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. 5Congratulations!Youve successfullyregisteredyour thewakullanews.com user account.Ifyou have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Findyour 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News thatwas deliveredtoyour address.Also, be sure to note howyour street address is printed. 2Goto http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit NewspaperAcct. ID in the box as shown. Now,type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and clickContinue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registrationform.Dont forgetto enter email address and passwor d Also, dontforgetto check the box nextto the user agreement. Click Continue. Trying to sell something?Call and enter aClassi ed Ad for Only $10 in 877-676-1403 Subscribe to your local newspaper!Please Go Towww.thewakullanews.comand click on subscribeor Call877-401-6408

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 Page 7BBy MICHAEL PELTIER and DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 17 .Legislative efforts to privatize a third of Florida prisons fell by the wayside this week in the Senate only to receive a reprieve by Gov. Rick Scott in an ongoing battle pitting unions, prison guards, spending skeptics and civil rights groups against Senate leadership, less-government advocates and for-pro t prisons. Meanwhile, Scott signed into law new congressional district maps, which will be contested in court, just as lawmakers sent briefs to the state Supreme Court to argue that the legislative maps they passed earlier this month are constitutional. And as Senate leaders got down to the serious work of crafting their $70.8 billion budget package, a simmering feud between a powerful Lake Wales Republican lawmaker and University of South Florida of cials boiled over, as Senate Budget Committee Chairman JD Alexander continued his quest to create a new public university in his own backyard. All the while, committees scrambled to move bills to the floor in the face of upcoming deadlines. After next week, most action will take place on the chamber oors. NOT ENOUGH PRIVATE AYES TO PRIVATIZE In a Legislature so overwhelmingly dominated by one party, in Floridas case Republicans, dramatic close votes are pretty rare, and you take them where you can get them. The Senate has seen a few coalition votes that have brought some drama into the process, on SunRail, for example, but there arent many. So this week when Senate President Mike Haridopolos brought a bill (SB 2038) to the oor for a showdown vote on whether to privatize most of the prisons in the Southern third of the state, the Capitol was more tense than X-wing just before a riot. Backers of the bill said it was plain and simple the state needs every dollar it can nd Sen. Don Gaetz said during debate that Florida is stacking pennies to balance the budget. The $16.5 million annual minimum savings required in the contract to run the prisons would buy a lot of textbooks, said another supporter, Sen. Mike Bennett. But a coalition of Republicans joined Democrats in opposing it. The vote came on Tuesday and the 21-19 count against privatizing ended up being a little less dramatic than predicted only because it wasnt a tie. Opponents had said the day before theyd lined up the 20 votes needed to kill the measure. They got one more than they needed when the lone Democrat they hadnt counted on, Sen. Gary Siplin, joined the rest of his party in opposing the measure. The GOP coalition was made up of some members who have lots of corrections officers in their districts even those who wouldnt see their prisons privatized hated the idea. That brought Sens. Charlie Dean, Steve Oelrich and Greg Evers into the no camp. Some, including Dean and Oelrich, both former sheriffs, said privatizing core public safety functions just wasnt a good idea add Sen. Dennis Jones to that group. But the opposition was led by Sens. Mike Fasano, Paula Dockery, and Jack Latvala, all of whom said they didnt really trust that the scheme was a particularly good deal for taxpayers. Fasano and Dockery, in particular, said they just didnt buy the numbers put forth by the Department of Corrections in terms of how much would likely be saved. Meanwhile, a lot of hard-working corrections of cers would likely lose their jobs, or be forced to move, they said. Fasano, Dockery and Latvala have from time-to-time been at odds with their own party, but rarely does leadership lose a vote on one of its priorities. Haridopolos had said for a couple of weeks that it would be extremely close, and even acknowledged his side might not win on the vote. He got kudos from some in the Senate for daring to bring it up for a vote anyway. Haridopolos has often talked and frequently said this week that its just not his style to control the agenda, that he wasnt twisting any arms. But much of the talk around the Capitol was not about how noble Haridopolos was for allowing senators to vote their beliefs publicly, even in voting against him, but why he couldnt get them to agree with him and pass one of his top priorities. But if you think the question was sent to the hole for a year think again. Gov. Scott jumped into the matter later in the week, saying Thursday that he was disappointed the Senate didnt pass the bill, and plans to look into what opportunities he has for pushing the issue forward on his own. The Department of Corrections, which answers to Scott, does have contracting authority, and that was always something backers of the privatization idea noted that the whole legislative exercise might be moot anyway. Its worth remembering that the Legislature tried to privatize prisons in the same 18 counties a year ago and did so, in the budget, but the courts threw out their work. Lawmakers bristled that someone would question their authority to do it. Now, the Legislature says the prisons cant be privatized and the governor may over-ride them anyway. Hows that for separation of powers irony? Besides Haridopolos, one of the other senators who took a hit on the failure of the prison bill was the one guy who has something to hold over the rest of the Senate line items. The biggest backer of the privatization plan was Sen. JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, who was in a perfect position to know just how much that $16.5 million might buy because hes chairman of the Budget Committee. POLYTECHNIC PYROTECHNICS But Alexander had another issue grating on him this week. In an ongoing battle with USF, a proposal to withhold $25 million from the Tampa-based university ended Wednesday in a dispute over independence for the schools Lakeland campus, resolving for now the latest turn in a months-long feud over the creation of Florida Polytechnic University. Alexander had initially tried to force USF to turn over all its property at its Lakeland campus to the Polytechnic before releasing $25 million to USF. He wasnt coy, didnt try to deny he was doing it he said he didnt have any faith that USF would go forward with the move, even though the Board of Governors approved it last year. But following several days of high drama, Alexander backed off, expressing con dence that his point had been made and the $25 million hold was lifted. REDISTRICTING HEADS TO COURT On Friday, briefs were turned into the Supreme Court saying why the Legislatures new redistricting plans either are or arent constitutional. The brief ling deadline came less than a day after Scott signed the Legislatures plan to redraw the states congressional districts. That measure also is being challenged by the Florida Democratic Party in court, and a coalition of voting-rights groups said theyll likely follow suit. The groups intend to challenge the maps under the anti-gerrymandering Fair Districts amendments, approved by voters in the 2010 elections. Those standards require lawmakers to draw the maps without regard for how they might impact incumbents or political parties. Arguments over the once-adecade redrawing of House and Senate maps will be held on a day that only comes around every fourth year. The Florida Supreme Court announced it would hold arguments Feb. 29. TAX EXEMPTIONS: FROM CORPORATE TO BACK TO SCHOOL The House was busy this week, passing a series of tax breaks, freeing thousands of businesses from corporate-income taxes and putting extra money in the pockets of back-to-school shoppers. House members went along with the governors proposal to increase the corporate-income tax exemption from $25,000 to $50,000, passing it as part of a broader economic-development bill. Some Democrats continued to criticize the income-tax proposal, contending that it would primarily help large corporations and do little for small businesses. The House voted 92-22 to approve the economic-development package, which also includes new or expanded tax breaks related to agricultural packing houses, aircraft repairs and industrial machinery and equipment. A House analysis said the package eventually would eliminate about $121 million a year in tax revenues for state and local governments. The House voted unanimously to hold a sales tax holiday from Aug. 3 through Aug. 5 that would allow shoppers to avoid paying sales taxes on items such as clothing, shoes and bags that cost $75 or less and schools supplies valued at less than $15. A LEANER DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH A Senate committee this week approved a wide-ranging plan that would scale back the role of the Florida Department of Health, close the states tuberculosis hospital and block mandatory septic-tank inspections. The 106-page plan, however, stops short of a House bill that calls for transferring public health responsibilities and thousands of jobs from the department to counties. Both bills are part of a three-year effort by lawmakers to more narrowly focus the Department of Health. IMMUNITY OR EVASION The House Judiciary Committee approved a measure Thursday giving lawmak ers complete immunity from civil cases dealing with their legislative duties. The approval came over complaints that the bill was an attempt to undermine legal challenges to the Legislatures redistricting proposals. Republicans painted the measure (HB 7123) as a response to a series of efforts to subpoena lawmakers in civil cases challenging legislative actions. But Democrats see the bill as an attempt to keep lawmakers from having to testify as redistricting cases begin to wind their way through the court system. STORY OF THE WEEK: Despite an all-out press by Senate leadership, a plan to privatize a third of Floridas prisons went down to defeat. Its last hope? Gov. Rick Scott, who said he might do it anyway. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: USF should not and will not be singled out for cuts in their budget. Good news is that we have a bicameral Legislature. Rep. Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, in a tweet, about the push in the Senate to withhold money from the Tampa university.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Too few private ayes on prisons; Polytechnic pyrotechnicsBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 26 32 39 42 49 56 61 65 68 2 27 50 3 23 51 4 40 45 5 33 57 62 66 69 18 28 46 52 6 15 29 43 53 7 24 47 63 8 21 34 64 9 30 41 54 58 10 31 35 55 67 70 22 25 48 11 16 19 36 44 12 37 59 13 38 60ACROSS1.J.FredMuggswas one 6.HenryVIII'shouse 11.Sine__non 14.BookafterDaniel 15.Inflames 16.Cityarea,informally 17.Barrierwhosename waspopularizedby Churchill 19.Self-image 20.Checkerforpoison, maybe 21.Vexed 23.Musicalconclusion 24.Soughtaseat 25."Ifall__fails..." 26.Truckerwitha handle 28.Dundeedenial 30."High__" (Andersonplay) 32.WheretosendIMs 33.Blairof "The Exorcist" 35.Wateryporridge 39.Settingfora resignation announcem ent, maybe 42.Foodofmany shapes 43.HallofFamegrid coach Greasy 44.Corleone's title 45.PINrequester 47.__-Magnon 48.Bitofprogress 49.Abbr.onan envelope 52.Sitcomplanet 54.Anglingarea 56.TheUSS Constitution, notably 58.Slipby 61.Won__(Chinese dumpling) 62.Asphaltflattener 65. Genesisfigure 66.ColumnistJoseph orStewart 67.Theatercapacity 68.Hi-__graphics 69.CheatsatPinthe Tailon theDonkey 70.Motel meeting, maybeDOWN1.Gambler's marker 2.Barmitzvahdance 3.Having twoequal sides 4.Wisecounselor 5.Actedtheexpectant father,perhaps 6.Smoker'sintake 7.Educators'org. 8.ActressDorsor Rigg 9.Pointintheright direction 10.PatronizeU-Haul, e.g. 11.Putdownforcibly 12.Hankerings 13.Whereyoulive 18.Pertaining to element92 22.__Haute, Indiana 24.JeffFoxworthy's "YouMightBea__ If..." 26.DogpatchcreatorAl 27.Whendoubled,one oftheSociety Islands 29.Ever'spartner 31.Folklorefiend 33.Futureatty.'sexam 34. Inthedistance 36.Dealwithsubt ly 37.MBAsubj. 38.ShroveTuesday follower 40.Bespectacled comedianArnold 41.Justiceofthe peace'sclient 46.Patternonapinto bean 48.Holderofall the cards,temporarily 49.Intro tomath? 50.Treasurecache 51.Dinnerforkquartet 53.EbbetsField shortstop 55. "TheLove__" (HaroldMelvin& theBlueNoteshit) 57. "Pronto!"toaCEO 59.Matchdivisions 60.Formerly,formerly 63.NASAgo-ahead 64.AWOLchasersAmerican Prole Hometown Content 1/29/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 23 34567 843 6 492 59 3178 9 81 17536 374 00 9 HtCtt 961 7238 5 4 324518967 785694231 617 489523 548236179 239157648 493 862715 172945386 856371492 C H I T C A P P A F T E R H O R A B O R A T R O V E I S O S C E L E S T I N E S M E N T O R S T A N G P A C E D L S A T A S A P U R A N I C M O T T L E T A R A N O N R E E S E U F T R E D N E C K A O K D I A N A A F A R M P S O R I E N T E L O P E R R E N T O G R E I L O S T T E R R E D E A L E R Q U E L L U N D E R P L A Y U R G E S E C O N S E T S A B O D E L E N T E R S T Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 23, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with side Talk o The Town Deli Choice of Sandwich & DrinkHamaknockers Flatbread HoagiePulled Pork or Chicken EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the the Winner Dr Mark McCoydrawn from Hamaknockers in CrawfordvilleEATIN path Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringWin One Meal from Every Restaurant!OFF the Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m.1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99MixedTues. & urs. Kids EatFree on Wednesday12 & under 926-4329mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Sbt Snfr n bt Gn S Open Mon. Fri. 11 7 Sat. 11:00 3:00 926-3500 fax order to 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy. Across from El Jalisco R Y Pbtn PbttTfbnrM b OA New Yor k Sty le Deli 850-926-4737 C OMEENJO Y GENU INE OLD FASH ION SMOKEHOUS E BBQ $2 $375 Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville Private Party Rooms Private Party Rooms Tuesday Nights Tuesday Nights $ 4 95 $ 4 95 Spaghetti with Meat Sauce Spaghetti with Meat SauceMyra Jeans Restaurant has long been known for their epic hand pressed cheeseburgers and the addicting grilled chicken pita. The place has a welcoming feel to it, and its great to enjoy a nice homestyle breakfast there surrounded by your fellow Wakulla Countians. Kids love the menu, the working choochew train and, of course, the ice cream sundaes. We all know to check the daily special board when we rst enter (or run the risk of missing out on an amazing meal not found on the menu). What you may not realize is that every Friday Myra Jeans does seafood, and each week they offer something different. One week its fried fresh mullet and cheese grits. Next week it could be a blackened gulf grouper sandwich or a grilled shrimp basket with sweet onion hushpuppies. Friday is also the day when they take a dollar off their fresh cut 12 and 16 ounce ribeye steaks. To seal the deal they serve cold beer, wine and champagne to enhance your meal. The prices are very reasonable for these friday delights. It is recommended that you call ahead and ask what the Friday seafood special will be. You do not want to miss the fried Apalachicola oyster basket. MMM mmm. Myra Jeans Restaurant 926-7530 Gotta try the seafood and ribeyes at Myra Jeans OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Win ner!One Meal fro m Every Restau rant Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews Continued from Page 1B Early in the month, local artist Gretchen Hobby taught an advanced collage class. Seniors collected favorite pictures, fabrics and maps to go along with their favorite theme. The Florida Wildlife Commission presented a great educational program called, The Bear Experience. An interesting lm was shown with suggestions on how to keep these bears from bothering our garbage cans, pet feeders and bird feeders. A bear hide was on display so that the seniors could see up close exactly what our Florida black bears look like. Our karaoke sing-along with Lisa Godza was a big hit with the seniors. The Iris Garden Club had donated a karaoke machine several months ago and Lisa volunteered to lead the show. If anyone has any CD+G music that is no longer being used, we would appreciate the donation and put them to good use. Local Green Guide Kent Mayer has agreed to donate walking sticks for the seniors to use when utilizing the walking trail behind the center. This trail is maintained by the sheriffs department and we sure appreciate that. The Senior Center Volunteer of the Year has been awarded to Virginia Davis, who has been volunteering at the center for many years and we are so blessed to have her. Come and join us for our many activities held daily, Monday through Friday at the Wakulla County Senior Center. If you would like to join us for lunch, we ask that you call by 9:30 a.m. on the day you plan to be here. Participating in a bone density scan at the senior center. R.H. Carter with Volunteer of the Year Virginia Davis. A bear hide at the program on bears.Seniors celebrate Chinese New Year, arrange owers, and more