<%BANNER%>
Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00395
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 02-09-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00395
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A Comment & Opinion .......................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....................................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Green Scene ....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B INDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 6th Issue Thursday, February 9, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read DailyThe Wakullanews OBITUARIES Diving plan moves forwardBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter hearing from the public on whether recreational cave diving should be allowed at Wakulla Springs State Park, the Florida Park Service has decided the best way to move forward is by developing a draft plan of what the inclusion of recreational cave diving might look like. The plan would address all the concerns expressed by those in opposition and propose a way to manage those situations, said Florida Park Service Assistant Director Scott Robinson on Thursday, Feb. 2. Although there were strong feelings on both sides of the issue, there was not an overwhelming public sentiment one way or the other, Robinson said. After seeing the public was split on the issue, the Park Service decided to look into all the concerns and fears people expressed about allowing recreational cave diving … including interference with other activities, wildlife, ongoing research and artifacts … and see if there is a solution that doesnt have an adverse effect on the park. We want to work through the issues we heard,Ž Robinson said. Robinson said the park service does not want to interfere with the things the park is so well know for, such as the wildlife viewing experience. If were going to add anything else, we want to make sure we dont mess that up,Ž Robinson said. There is no deadline for when the plan will be completed. We want to get it right,Ž Robinson said. Well take as much time as necessary.Ž They plan to use experts on staff in dealing with the management side of the proposal and the best way to meld all the different activities. We are experts in park management,Ž Robinson said. We deal with access issues all the time in state parks.Ž They do not have experts on staff in the area of cave diving, so they plan to seek out members of the diving community who can answer the more technical and safety questions. Robinson said they will look in Wakulla County, as well as other areas to get a well rounded view point. Robinson stressed that a “ nal decision had not been made. Once the plan is complete, the park service will hold another meeting to get public input and make sure they have addressed all the issues. Following the meeting, the director of the park service, along with park staff will make the “ nal decision of whether to allow recreational cave diving or not. We have a great track record of being able to balance the use of facilities and reuse without degrading them for future use,Ž Robinson said. Ron Piasecki, who has expressed his strong opposition to allowing Wakulla Springs to be open to recreational cave diving, said he will continue to oppose it. Piasecki is the chairman of the Hydrogeology Consortium and Wakulla Springs Alliance, as well as the president of the Friends of Wakulla Springs. Both groups oppose the proposal. We are adamantly opposed to general purpose diving,Ž Piasecki said. And added that he would like to see greater use of Cherokee, Emerald and Clear Cut sinks, which are open to recreational diving.Crawfordville woman wins $200,000 in scratch-o Special to The NewsThe Florida Lottery announced on Tuesday, Feb. 7, that Rebecca Harrod, 49, of Crawfordville, claimed a $200,000 High RollerŽ scratch-off game top prize at the Florida Lottery Tallahassee of“ ce. She purchased her $200,000 winning scratch-off ticket at Stop-N-Save, located at 1475 Bloxham Cutoff Road in Crawfordville. Harrod says she enjoys playing scratch-off games and will continue to play. After winning the High Rollers top prize, she said she feels blessed and like she is on a roll. Harrod says she has a son in high school so she appreciates how the Florida Lottery contributes to public education in Florida. Continued on Page 12A FLORIDA LOTTERYRebecca Harrod won with a High Roller scratch-off ticket she bought at the Stop-N-Save on Bloxham Cutoff.Randy Nelson is a role model for younger generation Coalition sees community in needBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netDuring Operation Santa, it became apparent that the needs of the families that were helped went way beyond Christmas wish lists. Operation Santa, led by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, helped 150 families this Christmas with gifts for their children, food, clothes, household items and other donated items thanks to generosity of those in the community. Executive Director Gail Campbell said there were other needs Operation Santa was unable to provide, such as rental and utility assistance and food. And for Wakulla County, there is a lack of services available for those in need. Campbell said there is a need for the community to do a better job at meeting these basic needs to people in this county. This is a community issue,Ž Campbell said. The underlying issue is poverty and its growing, Campbell said. In Wakulla County, 18 percent of people under the age of 18 are below the poverty level, Campbell said. Hunger has snuck up on communities,Ž Campbell said. Its biting us all right now.Ž Campbell told the members of the coalition at its Feb. 1 meeting, that now, a month since Operation Santa wrapped up, they are still getting calls every week about someone needing help. We arent equipped to deal with it,Ž Campbell said. Her hope is to open up the communication lines with all service providers and also provide a central coordinating council to deal with the issue. Following Operation Santa, Campbell contacted Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida about the need to do something about the social service needs that arent being met in Wakulla County. She was put in contact with Brunie Emmanuel, the project manager for the Fund for Gulf Communities, which is an initiative under Catholic Charities of Northwest Florida. The fund is working in other communities to build the resilience of individuals and families affected by the BP oil spill. Emmanuel agreed to come to Wakulla County for a community meeting to listen to its needs and offer possible solutions. Continued on Page 5AFEBRUARY IS BLACK HISTORY MONTHBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to the NewsWhen looking at the young black males of Wakulla County, what exactly do you see? This was the initial question posed to Randy Nelson, who was born and raised here. He attended Florida A&M on a basketball scholarship, and after his sophomore year, transferred to Eckerd College in St. Petersburg. He later moved back to the area for a doctoral program at Florida State. Upon graduating, he started his own company, 21st Century Research and Evaluation. The company looks into programs that are geared towards working with kids who are at-risk and develops strategies to keep them out of the juvenile justice system. The company takes a particular interest in the over representation of African American males within that system. While in the midst of getting his company off the ground, Nelson saw growth occurring in many areas of Wakulla County and realized one startling fact: As far as homes and subdivisions,Ž says Nelson, the minorities here were not fully a part of that growth. At that point I went and got my contractors license and became a contractor. I set out to build homes.Ž He started with the trailers that his father, Randolph Nelson, rented out to families for years. He began a process of helping those families go from renting a trailer to owning a home that he built. If you look over in the area where I grew up,Ž he explains, it used to be nothing there but trailers and woods. Now its actual subdivisions. I encourage those I work with to rent if they have to, but that ownership is the next step. For the average American,Ž he says, the most wealth is what they have in their home, so Im proud of the fact that people “ nally have a chance to have a place of their own, and that I had a hand in the process.Ž Nelson grew up in a double-wide trailer with anywhere from 10 to 12 people living in it at the same time. Such an environment can alter the spirit of a child at the root of their existence. However, as with many communities, the family, years ago, seemed much larger than just those con“ ned within four walls of a house.Ž When I grew up,Ž he says, we didnt have much. But we did have a sense of community. And now, you have middle class blacks that once they get their education, they leave the place where they grew up. I call it leavin the hood and … although theres no such thing as a hood in Wakulla … in many ways weve left where we were.ŽContinued on Page 5A RANDY NELSON: Having role models within the school system that (young black males) can emulate alerts them that if they can see it, they can achieve it. David Dawane Carter Frank Herrington Teresa R. Porter Lowell Douglas Raker Francis Lamar Zorn Sr. Gail CampbellThe youth coalition’s listening session to discuss social service needs will be held Monday, Feb. 13, at the extension of ce at 10 a.m. The youth coalitions Operation Santa drive shows how deep the need is for help among residents, and leads them to ask what can be done The state will draft a plan to allow recreational cave diving at Wakulla Springs, but will seek public comment before a “ nal decision is made PHOTO BY GUEA cave diver at the Wakulla Springs main vent in a research dive. The state park service is considering allowing recreational cave divers access to Wakulla Springs. FIVE PLAYERS COMMITSee Page 9AWildlife heritage festival See Page 14A

PAGE 2

By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 6 … A House panel Monday approved a proposal to overhaul the states public-health system, shifting responsibilities … and potentially thousands of jobs … from the Florida Department of Health to counties. The proposal (PCS for HB 1263) drew concerns and, in some cases outright opposition, from pediatricians, a statewide public health group and county of“ cials. They raised questions about issues such as funding for county health departments and the future of the Childrens Medical Services program, which serves children with serious and chronic health conditions. We feel like its really not ready for prime time, Leon County Commissioner Bryan Desloge told the House Health & Human Services Quality Subcommittee. But sponsor Matt Hudson, R-Naples, said the bill is part of a three-year effort to revamp and more narrowly focus the Department of Health. He said county commissioners are in a better position than the state to know local health needs. We stand here today with the opportunity to do something bold, innovative and right for Florida, said Hudson, who is a key player on health issues because he is chairman of the House Health Care Appropriations Subcommittee. The subcommittee voted 7-4 to approve the bill, which emerged as lawmakers get ready to hit the halfway point of the legislative session Wednesday. It remains unclear whether the Senate would support such a bill, as its committees have not considered similar proposals. The bill calls for the Department of Health to put together a plan by Oct. 1 to decentralize publichealth services, including transferring responsibilities and employees to county health departments. The decentralization would take effect in January 2014, with the state sending block grants to counties to pay for services. The 152-page proposal includes numerous other changes such as merging two divisions that are part of the Childrens Medical Services program. Also, it would allow the department to establish a provider-service network, a form of managed care, to serve children in the program. Other changes in the bill include calling for the long-debated closure of the A.G. Holley state tuberculosis hospital in Palm Beach County and repealing a 2010 law that would require septic-tank inspections across the state. Lucy Gee, acting deputy secretary at the Department of Health, said the changes could lead to eliminating 12,000 state jobs, though subcommittee Chairman John Wood, R-Winter Haven, said a lot of those jobs would simply be transferred to counties. Gee said department of“ cials were still studying the rami“ cations of the bill, which was released late last week. But she suggested that the department should do a feasibility study before the state moves forward with decentralizing publichealth services. Chris Nuland, a lobbyist for the Florida Public Health Association, which includes public health of“ cials from various parts of the state, said his group has a fundamental disagreement with the direction of the bill and is concerned it could jeopardize public health. We believe that public health should be a state-directed function, he said. But people on both sides of the issue recounted frustrations Monday in dealing with the department. Wood said more local involvement would be an improvement. We all know that reform is very, very dif“ cult, and the biggest dif“ culty with reform is fear, he said. A key question centered on the block grants and whether rural counties would receive enough money to meet their health needs. Chris Doolin, a lobbyist for a coalition of small counties, said public health departments are critical in regions that have few doctors and a lack of nearby hospitals. We want to close the gap, Doolin said. There is a health-care gap in this state, and it exists in dramatic fashion in our rural areas. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA local octopus successfully guessed the winner of Super Bowl XLVI. Paula the octopus lives at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea and made her pick for the New York Giants, on Feb. 3. The Giants beat the New England Patriots, 21-17, in the Super Bowl on Sunday, Feb. 5. Two blue crabs were picked out of equal size to be placed into two different chambers, one that was marked New England Patriots and one marked New York Giants. Its appropriate that the octopus gets to eat its favorite meal,Ž said Jack Rudloe, founder of Gulf Specimen. Rudloe said the experiment is not scienti“ c, but they tried to be as scienti“ c as possible, On Feb. 3, the chambers were placed in the tank with about nine octopuses. Although the octopuses seemed intrigued, they were more concerned about preventing one another from getting the crab than getting it themselves. After positioning the chamber in several different spots, the octopus eventually made its of“ cial choice and ate the crab in the Giants chamber. The crab that was in the Patriots chamber was saved and was taken back to his home. During three trial runs, the same octopus, which was named Paula, opened the lid of the Giants chamber. This time, Paula approached the chamber and hugged the Giants chamber, but was chased off by a large male octopus, said volunteer Natalie Gordon. She got stage fright,Ž Gordon said. Rudloe got the idea from Paul the octopus who predicted the winners of the World Cup.Paula the octopus picks the winner of the Super Bowl PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENJack Rudloe, center, after Paula the octopus picked the New York Giants to win the Super Bowl. With him are his son, Cypress Rudloe, and Paige Killeen, representing the Panacea Blue Crab Festival Paula the octopus picks the blue crab in the Giants tank, picking the Giants to win, as another octopus watches. CCOW will host forum with county administratorConcerned Citizens of Wakulla (CCOW) will hold a public service forum and County Administrator David Edwards will speak on the challenges facing Wakulla’s county government. The forum will be held on Thursday, Feb. 16, at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. Everyone is welcome to attend.  Author to portray Civil War veteran at Woodville libraryThe Woodville Branch of the Leon County Public Library will present James Huffstodt, author of “Hard Dying Men,” as he portrays Capt. James Hazzard, a Union Civil War veteran in about 1911 as he recalls Shiloh, Vicksburg and the fall of Mobile. The program will be presented on Thursday, Feb. 16, at 6:30 p.m. The program is free and open to the public. Big Bend Hospice hosts event to remember those lost to suicideBig Bend Hospice, in partnership with the Florida Suicide Prevention Coalition and Statewide Office of Suicide Prevention, will host its third annual Lighting the Darkness: An Evening to Remember Lives Lost to Suicide on Wednesday, Feb. 15, at 6 p.m. The event will be held at the Early Learning Coalition, 1940 N. Monroe St, Suite 70 in Tallahassee. It’s free and open to individuals, families and the community as a time and place to mourn and remember lives lost to suicide. Guests are invited to bring a photo to share and to stay for refreshments and fellowship after the program. For more information please contact Pam Mezzina, manager of bereavement services at (850) 878-5310 x 799 or (800) 772-5862 or email pam@bigbendhospice.org.  Rep. Southerland returns portion of of ce budgetWASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressman Steve Southerland joined a group of freshman House Republicans for a Capitol Hill press conference Wednesday announcing the members’ commitment to return more than $1.43 million in shared of ce savings with the intent to pay down America’s national debt. Southerland vowed to return more than $160,000 in 2011 cost savings, in addition to the roughly $73,000 that Southerland voted to cut from his personal of ce budget last year, for a total of $233,000. “As North and Northwest Florida families struggle to do more with less, it’s high time that Washington adopt this same common sense approach to money management,” Southerland said. BriefsRomney wins Florida; Wakulla supports GingrichStaff ReportFormer Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney stormed to a convincing win in Floridas Republican presidential primary Tuesday, bolstering the front-runners argument that he is the best candidate to compete with President Barack Obama in swing states in the general election. With 98 percent of precincts reporting, Romney had 46 percent of the vote to former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrichs 32 percent. Former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum and Texas Congressman Ron Paul were running far behind, with 13 and 7 percent of the vote, respectively. The win allowed Romney to show off his ability to win a state that will be the largest competitive prize in the November showdown with Obama. In Wakulla County, Republican voters overwhelmingly supported Gingrich with almost 40 percent of the vote. Romney was second with nearly 25 percent, followed by Santorum with 24 percent. Ron Paul garnered just over 9 percent of the vote. Wakulla Supervisor of Elections Henry BuddyŽ Wells estimated the local turnout at about 30 percent for the Republican primary.… News Service of Florida contributed to this report.Sweeping health department overhaul advances in House 962-2920 2209 Sopchoppy Hwy. LUNCH BUFFET Tues. Fri. 11 a.m. 2 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. 2 p.m. EVENING DINNER SPECIALS Tues. 12oz Ribeye............................................. $12.95 Wed. AUCE Buttery Shrimp............................ $12.95 Thurs. AUCE Pork Chops Prepared Your Way.... $9.95 Fri. 16 oz. Ribeye..................................................... $16.95 AUCE Mullet..................................................... $12.95 Soft Shell Crab.................................................. $14.95 Fresh & Local Shrimp Dinner............................ $13.95 Sat. Surf & Turf (Your choice of Seafood).................. $17.95 Seafood Items are available as market allows Please check availability of your favorites! Valentines Special Friday, Saturday & Valentines DaySweetheart Rib-Eye Dinner for Two or Sweetheart Prime Rib for Two $39 $39 Sign up for FREE Valentine Goodies to be given away Carolina Bandannas850-524-9103GOTCHARACTER PANACEA HATSAFACT850.224.4960www.fsucu.org CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ƒONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EARƒ Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain THG-11909

PAGE 3

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSeveral months ago, County Commissioner Lynn Artz sought approval from the rest of the commission to apply for a grant for technical assistance regarding smart growth. Artz pursued the grant and wrote the application. On Feb. 6, Wakulla County received word from the Environmental Protection Agency that it was one of 56 communities, out of 350 applicants, that was awarded the grant through the Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities program. Artz said, Im very pleased.Ž Before June, a team will come for a site visit and there will be a one-day workshop which will consist of a driving and walking tour of the county and a hands-on working session. Following the workshop, the county will receive a written summary of the day and recommendations. The focus of the assistance is on smart growth zoning for small cities and rural areas. The workshop will provide ideas on local policies and procedures to improve the local economy, environment and quality of life. Each community will receive a short next steps memo outlining options the community can consider as it moves forward, according to the EPAs website. Some examples may include improving pedestrian access and safety, incorporating green infrastructure, or conducting an economic and fiscal health assessment, according to EPA. Artz said she hopes numerous community partners will be involved in the workshop. I think it will be helpful,Ž Artz said. The grant is completely free and does not require a match, Artz said. Building Blocks for Sustainable Communities is a project of the Partnership for Sustainable Communities among EPA, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). The interagency collaboration coordinates federal investments in infrastructure, facilities, and services to get better results for communities and use taxpayer money more ef“ ciently. The partnership is helping communities across the country create more housing choices, make transportation more ef“ cient and reliable, reinforce existing investments, and support vibrant and healthy neighborhoods that attract businesses. In other news: € The commission voted to approve the scheduling of a public hearing to modify the subdivision road acceptance ordinance. The Land Development Code would be amended to include an 80-percent buildout threshold for all new subdivisions platted after the ordinance is passed. It also will require the developer or owner to provide a warranty for street improvements for two years after the county accepts the roads. There is also a section added that will require an inspection and any needed repairs on a street abutting property where a building has been constructed prior to the issuance of a certi“ cate of occupancy. The amended ordinance will be brought back before the commission at a public hearing. € County Administrator David Edwards brought up House Bill 1263 which deals with the Department of Health. The bill would move control of the county health department from the state to completely under the county, Edwards said. This would be an unfunded mandate, Edwards said. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he would like to get the commission to agree to send a signed letter opposing the change. This would require the county to come up with $500,000, Merritt said. Artz suggested the commissioners and county staff also make phone calls to their elected of“ cials. During the commission meeting, the Health and Human Services Quality Subcommittee voted 7 to 4, in favor of the bill. Edwards said the bill is not being discussed in the Senate. The commission agreed to act fast and send the letter and make phone calls right away. The next county commission meeting is Feb. 21 at 5 p.m.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe St. Marks City Commission unanimously approve a settlement agreement between the city and the owner of the Villages of St. Marks. Originally, the city had agreed to pay the owner $170,000 for putting in the infrastructure, now they will only pay up to $50,000. The city will pay $1,000 when someone pays for the tap fee. “It will take him developing 50 more lots to get there,” said Mayor Chuck Shields. It is a good thing for the city and cuts down on the debt, Shields said. The city commission approved the settlement at a meeting on Jan. 12. In another matter, City Manager Zoe Mans eld gave the board an update on the boardwalk promised by the Of ce of Greenways and Trails that will be funded by the Florida Department of Transportation. The project went out to bid and should be back soon. The boardwalk has been discussed for three years and construction has yet to begin. The city constructed it’s portion of the boardwalk and is waiting for its connector. The next city commission meeting will be Feb. 9 at 7 p.m. at city hall.By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter taking a class in planning as an undergrad at Florida State University and really enjoying it, Luis Serna was hooked. He graduated from Florida State with a degree in economics and then went on to the University of Miami to study urban and regional planning. Planning is a good mix of science and art,Ž Serna said. Right out of graduate school, he started as an entry level planner for St. Lucie County. Now, with more than 20 years of experience in planning, he “ nds himself in Wakulla County serving as the new director for planning and community development for the county. Serna took his post on Jan. 24 after being unanimously chosen by the hiring committee and approved by the county commission. He grew up in Tallahassee and is very familiar with the area. He said he felt the position was a good “ t. The planning department has been whittled down to only four employees, but Serna said he likes being in a small office because it allows him to be involved in the day to day affairs and not just serve in an administrative role. Theres plenty to do,Ž Serna said. He is involved with day to day permits, as well as looking at long term planning, including updating the comprehensive plan and Land Development Code. Serna said there are a lot of inconsistencies and things that dont work that are in the Land Development Code. He has also taken a strong interest in the Crawfordville Town Plan. Thats a priority,Ž Serna said. He said he wants to continue where former Assistant County Administrator Lindsay Stevens left off, as well as interim Planning Director Melissa Corbett. Serna said he is working on the language of the Crawfordville Town Plan so it can be included in the Land Development Code. As it stands now, the planning staff can recommend someone follow the plan when developing in Crawfordville, but they are not required to follow it. It needs to be in the code,Ž Serna said. Serna said he also wants to focus on the similar plan drafted for Panacea. He doesnt want that plan to be forgotten. His overall goal is to build on the progress that has already been made. Theres tremendous potential,Ž Serna said. He hopes his of“ ce can have a real impact in the community. Serna worked for St. Lucie County for six years, working his way up to land use and economic development planner. It was a fairly small of“ ce,Ž Serna said. It was real good experience.Ž He then moved back to Tallahassee and became the development review coordinator for Leon County. He eventually became the development review administrator. After Leon County, he went into the private sector, working for Vertical Solutions as its land planner and project manager. He also worked for GPI Southeast Inc., an engineering firm, as a land planner and project manager. He was the planning consultant for the “ rm. Prior to coming to work for Wakulla County, he was doing consulting on his own. Serna feels his experience in both the private and public sector is a tremendous asset. I understand how planning offices work,Ž Serna said. But he also understands getting a permit and going through the process from the other side. Serna said he has been lucky in his career because he has done several different jobs in the planning “ eld. Theres so much to learn,Ž Serna said. Im still learning new things.Ž Serna has recently learned about green building design and construction, as well as smart growth. He hopes to educate the community and promote these new techniques, by letting developers know what options are available. Serna said he wants to be available to the community to answer questions or address concerns. Everybody is passionate about this community and I want to let everyone know Im on the same page,Ž he said. Serna lives in Tallahassee with his wife, Suzie, and their two children, Christian and Joy. He can be reached at 926-0919 ext. 404.COUNTY COMMISSIONBoard gets federal grant for smart growth zoningCounty’s new planning director is Luis SernaCity approves settlementST. MARKS JENNIFER JENSEN Planning Director Luis Serna in his of“ ce. Serna feels his experience in both the private and public sector is an asset. I understand how planning offices work, he says. But he also understands getting a permit and going through the process from the other side. PUBLIC NOTICECity of St. Marks will hold a Special Meeting on February 16, 2012 at 6:30 pm to install commissioners for Seats 3 and 4The City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of“ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.FEBRUARY 9, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICENotice of the Wakulla County, Canvassing Board to meet and hold the Manual Audit for a selected Precinct and Candidate from the Presidential Preference Primary Election on February 17, 2012 at 1:00 p.m., in the Supervisor of Elections Ofce located at 3115-B Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Fl 32327. The public is invited to attend.FEBRUARY 9, 2012

PAGE 4

Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak outComment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• State moving forward with plan on recreational diving at Wakulla Springs • Teresa R. Porter obituary • Ruby Lee Snyder obituary • Bettye Lou Barkley obituary • Marjorie Magadalyn Hamilton obituary • Patricia Ann Ostola obituary € Bertah Jean Porter obituary thewakullanews.com Follow us onEditor, The News: The family of John F. Brown Sr. would like to extend their deepest appreciation to every one who called, stopped by, visited, brought food, sent ” owers, gave us words of encouragement and prayers, medical personnel at TMH and Hospice who helped and gave us support. Each and every one of your acts of kindness meant so much. Special thanks to Pastor Pat McArthur, Jim and Vernie Hodges, family members, Forbes Funeral Home and many others for helping us carry out Johns “ nal wishes. Any donations can be made to Big Bend Hospice or Shady Sea Baptist Church. Alaska Brown and family Editor, The News: At their last meeting, the county commission passed a resolution requesting the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission provide an exemption from pending rule changes that would set the recreational “ shing season for gag grouper to be July through October. In last weeks edition of this paper, a letter writer urged local recreational “ shermen to pressure the FWC to grant an exemption for Wakulla County citing an alleged existing exemption for Monroe County (Gag Grouper exemption is being sought,Ž Letters, Jan. 26). There is no existing exemptionŽ for Monroe County in which they were granted some special condition or status. Monroe County falls within the south Atlantic management jurisdiction, so the FWCCs proposed rules simply includes language clarifying that the rules do not apply to Monroe County. In the Gulf of Mexico, gag grouper is primarily caught along west Floridas coast. The population in the Gulf has been declared over“ shed by federal managers based on a 2009 study that showed it is at about 40 percent of the level considered healthy. This study analyzed seven different sources of long-term data from the FWC, Florida State University, and federal scientists. In response to the study, federal regulators recently adopted new regulations which are expected to take effect soon. The FWC is considering adopting rules consistent with federal regulations for the fourth time in just over a year in order to help rebuild the gag population. An exemption from pending state regulations would allow additional pressure of a natural and public resource that is already over-exploited throughout the species range. Each county, and even the entire western coast of the state, cannot feasibly have its own set of regulations and expect FWC law enforcement of“ cers to do their job effectively. Regulations across the various species and waters are already confusing enough for anyone just trying to enjoy a day on the water “ shing with friends or family. Imagine trying to now keep up with different regulations within some arbitrary county line extending out to federal waters. That is no way to spend a day “ shing, nor the best way to manage a coast-wide “ shery resource. Management of our public resources is a collaborative and cooperative effort. An exemption in one or more counties would necessitate additional restrictions for everyone in federal waters because the recovery plan considers the grouper population as one management unit. I own a 19-foot boat, love “ shing for gag grouper in our local waters when weather, work and open seasons cooperate, and certainly wish I could catch more “ sh more often. As a conservationist, I also realize there is more to the equation than my own personal interests. If we want future generations to have an ocean worth living near like we do today, we would be wise to focus our gaze farther out than just the deck of our own boat. Michael Keys Mysterious Waters Editor, The News: An open letter to the FWC: Please, do not further harm Floridas gag grouper “ shery and Floridas economy! After the FWC created the two-inch mesh seine rule over 15 years ago, we reported to the FWC and biologists that over 50,000 juvenile gag grouper were dying as bycatch in seines each year from using two-inch mesh seines. The FWC mandated the unnecessary killing and it can stop. € The BP disaster impacted the coastal economy. € The housing bubble impacted the coastal economy. € High-priced fuel impacted the coastal economy. € High unemployment impacted the coastal economy. € Marinas are at less than 50 percent occupancy. € Offshore “ shing effort has been reduced 50 percent. This totals up to business failures and a stagnant economy! Only you can stop the unnecessary killing and save Floridas coastal economy. Respectfully, Ronald F. Crum Panacea Editors Note: The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is holding a meeting in Havana this week. Among items under consideration is an exemptionŽ for gag grouper. The Wakulla County Commission was one of several boards that passed a resolution in favor of the exemption. The FWC was scheduled to take testimony on the matter on Tuesday and vote on Wednesday. The News received a couple of letters on the issue:Two-inch nets impact juvenile grouperProposed gag grouper rule:Fishing interests shouldnt guide rulesEditor, The News: Gas is at $3.60 and climbing daily. Why did our president axe the pipeline that would have lowered the price of oil and created all kinds of jobs? … not to mention eased our dependency on the Middle East, where there just happens to be a mad man soon to have a bomb. When Israel takes care of this, what happens then? This administration isnt going to handle this during a election year or any other time for that matter. Last I heard the pipeline in Alaska works just “ ne. Hope all the tree huggers are happy for another serious blow to America and her well being. Russell A. Smith CrawfordvillePipeline would have created jobs Family extends their thanks for support By HERB DONALDSON Its that time again: the Palaver Tree Theater, and the Wakulla County Historical Society are partnering once more for the performance of WakullaStory, and are asking you to participate in this years performance. Last years show focused on the 1500s up to March 11, 1843, when Wakulla was “ rst established as a county. This years presentation visits the world of Elizabeth Fisher Smith and her magazine of news, features and history about Wakulla County … The Magnolia Monthly. Smith came to Wakulla as a teacher around 1954 and was immediately involved in collecting stories of the elders from our area. By 1963, she collected stories of family histories, the goings-on of local politics, education, hog-slaughtering and kettle-boiling, bee-keeping, real court room dramas, county commissioner meetings … and so much more. This homemade magazine was copied and mailed monthly to local residents and across the country. She continued this vast work until her death in the mid 1970s. Her efforts would make the Magnolia Monthly and its content basic research material for anyone interested in the county in which we live. Smiths catalogue is so vast that our production will cover only October 1963 through December 1965, the early years of her work. Our title of A Hankerin for HeadhuntinŽ is derived from an article Smith wrote about her research of all the graveyards in Wakulla. Headhunting,Ž as Smith uses it, is the search for tombstones, and the stories they hold. In the future, we plan to explore and present her entire catalogue in a number of upcoming productions. There will be only a few rehearsals for our presentation, which will be performed on Friday, March 9 at 7 p.m., and on Saturday, March 10 at 3 p.m. in the historical old Sopchoppy School Auditorium. There will be a small cast get-together afterwards on Saturday (possibly at Posh, our fingers are crossed), leaving you just enough time to make it to the start of the Low Boil festivities later that evening … so everybody wins! But in order to do this, we need YOU … people of all ages, races and temperaments. This is a story about our county, its history and, chances are, some of your past relatives. There will also be a panel discussion on Thursday, March 8, titled A Womans Work in Wakulla.Ž March is also Womens History Month, and this would be a time to celebrate and discuss the role of women in the world, starting with those in our county. The moderator for this event will be Rachel Sutz-Pienta. Panelists include Andrea Carter, Susan Solburg, Anginita Rosier, Madeleine Carr, Colleen Skipper, Tammie Bar“ eld, and Betsy Smith, daughter of Elizabeth Fisher Smith. Our first read-through will be this Saturday, Feb. 11, at 3 p.m., at the Wakulla County Public Library. Wed love to have musicians onboard to add to this work, so if youd like to play in this event, we welcome you. If you plan to attend please contact Herb at palavertreetheater@gmail.com, or call (718) 682-3870 (cell). No matter your level of performance … or no performance … theres a place for you with us. Herb Donaldson is a local playwright and director of Palaver Tree Theater.Locals needed for readers theatreIf youre interested in performing in the WakullaStory production, contact Herb Donaldson at (718) 682-3870 or email to palavertreetheater@gmail.com. Nurse Judy, that overly con“ dent alter ego of mine, thinks she is a modern woman, up on all the latest technological advances. Because of her illusion, I am surrounded with all types of technological gadgets, which I cannot operate. After several years, I “ nally was able to use my ” ip-top phone and actually take a photograph with it. Then it was time for a new phone. Nurse Judy talked me into a touch model. Ive had it six months now and still dont know how to use it. Well, thats not exactly true. I do know how some of the functions are supposed to work, I just cant make them work for me. I have a list of contacts, which you are supposed to roll down with your “ nger. I can make it roll, but I cant get it stopped at the name I want. I roll right by it. That leaves me with the option of pressing on Go To and then press on a letter of the alphabet that their name begins with. This method is fraught with problems also, as the space is tiny and my “ nger either hits the initial above or below it. An incorrect list of contacts comes up and the only thing I know how to do is turn the phone off and start over. By then Ive forgotten why I was calling. Nurse Judy gets very frustrated with this procedure and always grabs the phone from me to show me how it should be done. Her “ rst problem is her inability to decode my “ ling system. I dont use peoples given names. For instance, there are two Dianes in my directory. Neither is under D. One is under LŽ for Little Diane and one is under SŽ for Sister Diane. I cant find anyone here,Ž Nurse Judy shouts in frustration. You dont have some names in here.Ž She tells me who she is looking for. Oh, look under Fi“ ,Ž I tell her. We dont know anyone named Fi“ ,Ž she says. Thats the name of the dog they used to have,Ž I say. I cant repeat her rude reply. I ignore her and tell her to show me how to use the phone by calling my hairdresser. She begins rolling and touching, rolling and touching. Soon the phone begins ringing and ringing with people she has called by mistake, but wanting to know why I called. I take the phone away from Nurse Judy and tell her she can give me another lesson later. In the meantime, please call me as I cant call you. Once I master calling, I expect to learn some of the other great features on this phone, which is so much smarter than I am. Judy Conlin is a nurse in Wakulla and Gadsden counties.My smart phone is smarter than me Judy ConlinNurse Judy’s NookBy Steph Larsen Center for Rural AffairsAn estimated 9 million Americans could receive rebates from their health insurers in 2012. Will you be one of them? The Affordable Care Act, passed nearly two years ago in March 2010, protects consumers by requiring health insurance companies to spend between 80-85 percent of their premium dollars on medical care or improvements, instead of on administration, advertising or executive salaries. The purpose of this provision is to protect consumers from insurers who increase prices without good reason or justi“ cation. If insurers fail to meet this standard … one that many insurers already achieve now … they will be required to issue rebates to their customers. The federal Health and Human Services Department estimates these rebates could average $165 per individual. The customers most likely to receive rebates are those who are not part of a large plan through their employer, but instead purchase their insurance on the individual market. This will include many rural small business owners and self-employed workers, such as farmers and rural mainstreet entrepreneurs. Insurers will be required to publish the costs of their medical claims costs, administrative costs and taxes by June 1. Those who qualify for a rebate will receive checks this summer. Of course, insurance companies can avoid paying rebates by lowering premiums. Either way, consumers win. To “ nd out more, contact Steph Larsen at (402) 687.2100 or StephL@cfra.org.The Center for Rural Affairs was established in 1973 as a non-pro“ t to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities.Is a health insurance rebate in your future?

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 5A Tell Some one You Love How Muc h Y ou Love Th em In Valentine's issue! Only $14 For up to 30 W ords Ad a Pho to for an ad dition al $5 ( 850 ) 926-71023119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Contact D eni se Folh b y Fe bruary 10ema il: de nise@thew akull anew s.n et or call 926-7102 Special to The NewsThe Rotary Club of Wakulla Countys 14th Annual Valentine Celebration and Parade will be held Saturday, Feb. 11, in Hudson Park in downtown Crawfordville. Breakfast in the Park begins at 8 a.m. with a breakfast of eggs, sausage, biscuits and hot coffee for $5. Thats followed by the Sweetheart Parade at 10 a.m. This year parade entries will be judged and the top three places will receive a cash prize … $100 for “ rst place, $50 for second and $25 for third. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will also be awarding a $100 cash prize for the best float decorated with recyclable materials. After the parade, a variety of vendors … including arts and crafts, food and concessions, non-pro“ t organizations, churches and others … will be open in Hudson Park. From 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. a variety of live entertainment will take place on the stage in the pavilion. At 3 p.m., two lucky citizens will win a cash prize … “ rst place is $1,000, second place is $500. The Valentine Celebration and Parade is the annual fundraiser for the Wakulla Rotary Club. Over the past 10 years, the club has been able to donate more than $150,000 to local organizations including the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, Habitat for Humanity, Big Bend Hospice, Wakulla County Public Library, Wakulla Academic Boosters, Wakulla Special Olympics, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and many others. In addition, the club conducts a Dictionary Project every year, through which every third grade student in Wakulla County receives his or her very own dictionary. It’s time for the Valentine Parade e 14th Annual Rotary Valentine Celebration and Parade is Saturday, Feb. 11, at Hudson Park The schedule for performers includes: € The opening ceremony at 11 a.m. with the ” ag raising by Cub Scout Pack 5 and the National Anthem sung by Rod Stelter. € At 11:15 a.m., COAST Charter School will perform. € At 11:40 a.m., Rod Stelter will take the stage. € At noon, the Coon Bottom Creek Bluegrass Band will perform. € At 1 p.m., Monica Thorpe. € At 1:30 p.m., the Shepherd Creek Band. € At 2:30 p.m., Sharon Fox. € At 3 p.m., the drawing for two cash prizes … $1,000 “ rst place and $500 second place … will be held. FILE PHOTOA ” oat in last years Valentine Parade. This years parade will have a $100 prize for best ” oat, $50 for second place and $25 for third; and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will offer a $100 prize for best ” oat featuring recycled materials.Live entertainmentContinued from Page 1AAlong with this physical leave-taking, is the departure of other things once held dear within the black community of Wakulla County. In particular, that sense of oneness, or unity, with others not af“ liated with ones church or social circle. Songs such as Im Black and Im Proud,Ž or Young, Gifted, and BlackŽ dont ring the inner bells of sentiment they once did. Its a curious thing to wonder whether or not Wakullas black youth are aware of those lyrical af“ rmations that changed the face of American culture. Even more curious, is what would they begin to think … of themselves … if af“ rmations of that recent past were placed alongside todays vocally-robotic remixes. Its almost like the middle class blacks left and took the moral compass with them,Ž says Nelson. Young black males … like any other young person … emulate what they see. They dont see those of us that mapped our way out and helped ourselves to a better life through education. They may see JoJo the drug dealer with money, flash and baggy pants … thats who theyre going to emulate. They dont see the black teachers, professors and so forth as something they can achieve. These role models need to be made available … at the very least … in a classroom setting.Ž In many communities throughout the U.S., mentoring programs and more are set in place for young black males teaching them more than how to play basketball, or giving instruction on tying a tie. To simply look the part does not ensure that one is mentally equipped to play the game. In the realm of role models, one has remained popular, ” ooding the nation for the last two decades. However, it is not in the form of a person, but a fashion: Sagging pants worn below the waist, exposing ones underwear is so common that no one really thinks about the origin of the trend. Though it was made popular by such rap and hip-hop artists as Ice-T, Too Short, and 90s duo, Kriss Kross, it originated in the American prison system. Often inmates were issued uniforms too large for them. Belts (along with shoestrings) were no longer allowed due to the body count of suicide, strangulations, and outright murder in which belts were the weapon of choice. Back when our grandparents and parents were having a lot of kids … and having them while young … they were still passing things down,Ž says Nelson. There was community, family, and something larger than just the person raising the kid. Now you have 15-year-old mothers, 30-year-old grandmothers and 45-year-old great grandmothers … and all of them are at the club together. Thats a mentality that wasnt there before. You have people that never learned how to be parents themselves, raising children, which makes it dif“ cult for them to pass anything … of moral value …along. Add to that the 60 to 70 percent of head of households that are single parents. Imagine raising a young black male … in todays world … when the father isnt there. It is most important that black males see other black males in the educational system,Ž Nelson explains. I know they say its hard to get them, but theyll get these black males to play sports … theyll play football all day … and love it. But having someone there to show them the other side … the educational aspect … is so important. Having role models within the school system that they can emulate alerts them that if they can see it, they can achieve it. The Wakulla County school system is excellent … overall,Ž Nelson says. But if you drill down to the young black male, you see a lot of kids that go through the school system who, once theyre out, are walking around here aimless, not doing well at all. We have to be concerned about that.Ž Nelson goes around the U.S. speaking to groups of young adults about his own life in an effort to inspire them toward education and overcoming obstacles. To think that you cant make it is not the norm,Ž he says. I think that you can. My brother, Simeon (Director of Discipline at Wakulla High School) and I used athletics to get us a free education. It doesnt have to be athletics … that was all we had to go on at the time. We knew our parents couldnt pay for it. But with athletics youve got to have the academics to go with it,Ž Nelson says. Feeding that to young folks and getting them to understand, is needed. But there has to be more of us doing it. It cant just be two or three of us trying to redirect the focus of this next generation.Ž What ” ipped the switch … turned on a light … for Nelson? I was in the seventh grade,Ž he remembers, Žand Mr. Hobbs, our science teacher, picked me to be in a science contest. I had to write about rocks. He pulled me aside and said, Man, youre smart, you just gotta believe in yourself. Dont let anybody tell you any different. That did it for me in terms of being able to compete,Ž Nelson says. Somebody believed in me.ŽRandy Nelson is role model for younger generationContinued from Page 1ACampbell asked the group members if they felt the meeting was necessary. The group was in agreement that it was. President Bruce Ashley said the issue is bigger than the coalition and people need to know where to go for help or who to call. Well always be a match that lights the “ re,Ž Ashley said. The group agreed it would get the ball rolling, but that the community needed to come together as a whole to deal with the problem. The meeting will be held on Monday, Feb. 13 at 10 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. The coalition is asking all pastors, youth pastors, counselors, people providing social services and primary health care, community leaders and anyone who is involved in the health and well being of people in Wakulla County to attend this meeting. In other news: € Campbell also discussed three grants she has applied for on behalf of the coalition. She is working on the Ounce of Prevention grant which is strictly prevention focused. If awarded, the money would be put into the community center and help with utilities, phone, insurance, etc. The two other grants are the Prevention Partnership Grant and Drug Free Communities Support Program. The first grant has been awarded to the coalition in the past, and they hope it will continue to be funded. The application was written by the coalition and Disc Village. The grant funds substance abuse prevention programs and strategies intended to impact underage drinking at the community level. The coalition has applied for the Drug Free Communities grant the last three times and been denied, Campbell said. It focuses on community, enforcement and school based services. The next coalition meeting will be March 7 at 12:30 p.m. at the library.Youth coalition sees community in needThe Wakulla County school system is excellent … overall, Nelson says. But if you drill down to the young black male, you see a lot of kids that go through the school system who, once theyre out, are walking around here aimless, not doing well at all. We have to be concerned about that. John H. Curry Concerned About Your Retirement?Attend A FREE Planning WorkshopJohn H Curry, CLU, ChFC, AEP, MSFS, CLTC, Registered Representative and Financial Advisor of Park Avenue Securities LLC (PAS) 3664 Coolidge Court, Tallahassee, FL 32311. Securities products/services and advisory services are offered through PAS, a Registered Broker-Dealer and Investment Advisor. 1 (850) 562-9075. Financial Representative, The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America (Guardian), New York, NY. PAS is an indirect, wholly owned subsidiary of Guardian. North Florida Financial Corporation is not an af liate or subsidiary of PAS or Guardian. PAS is a member FINRA, SIPC. Guardian, its subsidiaries, agents or employees do not give tax or legal advice. You sho uld consult your lax or legal advisor regarding your individual situation. Not af liated with the Florida Retirement System.Go toJohnHCurry.com/WNor CALL:850.562.3000RegisterFREE TODAY!Date:February 9th5:30p Refreshments 6:00p-7:30p Workshop Seating is LIMITED, Reserve yours today!You’ll learn:Aging trends that impact retirement The best retirement option for YOU! Planning for a LIFETIME Income How to coordinate your FRS Pension Social Security, Deferred Comp DROP and your IRA’s

PAGE 6

Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com religious views and events ChurchObituaries Church NewsMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey... By ETHEL SKIPPERThe Charlotte and John E. Rosier Family Celebration will be on Feb. 10 and 11. Friday night will be grandchildren and greatgrandchildren night. There will be singing and praising the Lord. All family and friends are welcome to come and fellowship. On Saturday will be another great time with more of the same. Pastor Ruth Easter from Seattle, Wash., will extend a hearty welcome to all. She is the youngest of the Rosier children. Come for an old time, Holy Ghost, shouting, singing and telling of the goodness of the Lord. After the service will be a great feast. Continued on Page 7ABuckhorn NewsDavid Dawane Carter Frank Herrington Teresa R. Porter Lowell Douglas Raker Francis Lamar Zorn Sr.Teresa R. Porter, 70, of Spring Creek, passed away Sunday, Feb. 5. She was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. She enjoyed spending time with family and friends, reading her Bible, singing and playing the piano and doing crossword puzzles. Survivors include her husband, Albert (Cooter Bill) Porter; sons, Bobby Porter of Spring Creek, Isadore Porter of Calvary, Ga., and Edwin Porter of Thomasville, Ga.; daughters, Debbie Nichols of Wakulla, Kellie McIntosh of Tallahassee and Anna Wittig of Wakulla; and 11 grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. She was predeceased by her parents, Douglas and Eva Roberts; a brother, John Roberts; and a son, Bill May“ eld. A funeral service will be held on Thursday, Feb. 9, at 11 a.m. at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church in Medart with the Rev. Michael Hall of“ ciating. The family will receive friends from 6 to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 8, at the church. Interment will follow the funeral service at Debra Nell Cemetery in Spring Creek. The family requests, in lieu of ” owers, donations be made to Promise Land Ministries, 20 Church Road, Crawfordville FL 32327 or Big Bend Hospice of Crawfordville, 2889 Crawfordville Hwy. #C, Crawfordville FL 32327. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home (850) 559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www. forbesfuneralhome.net. Lowell Douglas RoosterŽ Raker, 69, went to be with the Lord after a lengthy illness, on Tuesday, Jan. 31, at his home in Ivan. He was a member of Whiddon Lake Primitive Baptist Church. He was a lifetime resident of Wakulla County. He attended college in Madison County. He was self-employed as a farmer. He owned and operated Raker Farm, and won the title of Farm Family of the Year in 1980. He pursued various other “ elds of employment, such as insurance salesman, elected school board member of Wakulla County for eight years, real estate broker who owned and operated Raker Realty, a “ sherman with his Uncle Maurice Raker, aka Uncle Brother,Ž at West Goose Creek and owner and operator of Rakers General Store on Highway 319. But his passion was riding his tractor. Visitation was held on Thursday, Feb. 2, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. The funeral was held on Friday, Feb. 3, at 2 p.m. at Whiddon Lake Primitive Baptist Church. Burial followed at Whiddon Lake Cemetery. He had chosen his pallbearers to be Fred Strickland, Carl Stokley, Joe Duggar, Archie Simmons, Robin Sapp and Pate Reynolds. Survivors include his dedicated wife of 50 years, Janie Glover Raker; two daughters, Jan Raker and Linda Diane Vause (Wesley); a son, Lowell Douglas DougŽ Raker Jr. (Mitzi McElree); four grandchildren, Pamela Leigh Raker, Dustin Heath Raker, Gregory Wilson GWŽ Stelter aka George,Ž and Trey Dalton Raker; three great-grandchildren, Mahaleigh Jane Raker, Ethan Fate Raker and Easton Gage Raker; a brother, Dural Wendell Raker (wife Mary Esther); a sister, Gail Winona Dallis (husband Alan); an uncle Maurice Raker; three aunts, Winnie Raker, Hester Smith and Lavern Stokley; three nephews, Aric and Derrick Voorting and Dural Wendell ChipŽ Raker Jr.; and a host of other nieces, nephews, cousins and friends. He is also survived by several dear friends, Henry Vause, Tommy Posey, William Glover, who was his farming instructor, and Barry Glover, who was his farming equipment manager. He also had four step-grandchildren, Hailey McElree, Sydney McElree, Jessica Vause and Jamie Vause; and a stepgreat-grandchild, Jayden Vause. He has left behind so many more special people that meant the world to him throughout his lifetime and all the visitors during the past few months, as well as those who worked for him or helped him on the farm. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Lowell Douglas Raker Teresa R. PorterFrancis Lamar Zorn Sr., 75, passed away Sunday, Feb. 5, in Tallahassee. He retired from the U.S. Navy as a Master Chief E-9, after 23 years. He has been in this area 12 years coming from California. He was a member of First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. He loved sports. After retiring from the Navy, he went to work in Military Civil Service and retired in 1998 after 20 years. He was a wonderful husband and father and was devoted to his church. Family will receive friends Thursday, Feb. 9, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services will be held, Friday, Feb. 10, at First Baptist Church of Crawfordvilleat 2 p.m. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include his wife of 50 years, Mary Catherine Zorn of Crawfordville; three sons, Michael Zorn of Oklahoma, Francis Lamar Zorn Jr. of Jacksonville, and Wayne Zorn of Crawfordville; two grandchildren, Joshua Zorn and Justin Zorn; and one great-grandchild; two sisters, Loretta Huggins Zorn (Sonny Edwards) of North Charleston, S.C., and Lori Jane Huggins Orozco, North Charleston, S.C.; nieces, Trinka and Terri; and a nephew, Artie. He was predeceased by his parents, Frank and Ophelia Zorn. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) is in charge of arrangements.Francis L. Zorn Sr.For the last three years several Wakulla County churches and ministries have worked together and hosted a multi-denominational Christian music event, the Jesus River Festival. This years festival will be held on Saturday, March 10, at Myron B. Hodge City Park in Sopchoppy. The festival begins at 11:30 a.m. and runs until 8 p.m. There will be musicians and speakers from Wakulla and Leon counties. In addition to the music, there will be programs for children, a tent for those wishing to receive the Word in a more private atmosphere, and space for churches to share information about themselves and their ministries. Drinks and grilled hamburger and hotdog plates will be available. There is no cost for anyone to attend or participate in the Festival. This year, the festival has adopted the Feed Wakulla Task Force as a service project and will be collecting nonperishable food items to help support food banks in Wakulla County. For more information, visit our website, www. jesusriverfest.com, or email us at jesusriverfestival@ live.com. Barbara Benton will be at Ivan Assembly of God on Feb. 26, in the 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. services. She is a gifted Bible teacher who brings the Word of God alive. Her ability to teach Scripture in a way that is relevant to everyday life has opened many doors for her to speak at seminars, retreats and churches both nationally and internationally. From the moment Benton steps up to the platform, you can feel her intensity for Jesus Christ and her desire to see people set free. For more information, contact the church at 9264826. Ivan Assembly is located at 202 Ivan Church Road in Crawfordville.Barbara Benton to preach at Ivan on Feb. 26 Jesus River Festival will be held March 10 Barbara BentonObituaries continued on Page 7A

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunityContinued from Page 6A The event will be held at Macedonia Church of Christ in Buckhorn. Skipper Temple Church will have a Valentine service. You can wear your red. We will have a Valentine Queen. Last year, the queen was Mother Josephine Allen. You can show love to someone with a box of candy, a card, red roses and many other ways. You are welcome to fellowship with us. On Feb. 25, at 7:30 p.m., a Black History program will be held. The speaker will be the Rev. Rodney Smith from St. John M.B. Church in Tallahassee. Everyone is welcome to attend. David Dawane Carter, 38, died on Saturday, Feb. 4, after a long illness. Born May 23, 1973, in Quincy, he was a resident of Tallahassee. He was a former employee of the City of Tallahassee and owner of Carters Tree Service. A service celebrating his life will be held on Thursday, Feb. 9, at 2:30 p.m. at River of Life Church, 445 DonaldsonWilliams Road, Crawfordville, with burial following at the Woodville Cemetery. The viewing will be immediately before services beginning at 1 p.m. Survivors include his daughters, Cedar Lyn and Sydne Jade; his parents, Jack Carter and DeRenda Carter; his second mother, Bette Strickland; grandmothers, Allene Faircloth and Mary Carter; brother, John Carter; and sisters, DaRanda Elkins (Nick), Joanna Barnes (Jason), Jessica Carter and Leanne Crowson (Jonathon); six nieces and eight nephews. He was predeceased by his grandfathers, John Carter and Hubert Faircloth; and his brother, Richard James Carter. Frank Herrington, 77, died at Marin General Hospital in California with his wife and son at his side after a lengthy illness. He was born in Columbus, Ga., to Willie E. and Velma Mae Herrington, and was raised in Panacea, and graduated from Sopchoppy High School. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps and then he served in the U.S. Navy for 20 years. He was a 50-year member of the Ashmore Masonic Lodge in Sopchoppy, and the Fairfax Lodge in Larkspur, Calif. Private interment was at Skylawn Memorial Park in San Mateo. A Masonic Memorial Service was held on Jan. 27 at the Asiya Shrine Center in San Mateo. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be sent to Shriners Hospital for Children Northern California, 2425 Stockton Blvd., Sacramento CA 95817 or Asiya Transportation Fund, 1925 Elkhorn Court, San Mateo CA 94403. Survivors include his wife, Dianne; son, David Herrington of Woodside, Calif.; sisters, Frances Macarages Eaton (Cecil) of Crawfordville and Barbara Freeman (Robert) of Panacea; a stepdaughter, Sally Robba (Walter) of Redding, Calif.; stepson, Keith McLellan (Deborah) of Petaluma, Calif.; four step-granddaughters; “ ve great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews in Florida and California. He was predeceased by a brother, Edward Herrington.ObituariesContinued from Page 6ADavid Dawane Carter Frank HerringtonBuckhornTaylor and Anderson will wed March 10Rikki Michelle Taylor, of Panacea, and Michael Allen Anderson, of Crawfordville, announce their engagement. The bride-elect is the daughter of Robby Taylor of Panacea and Mark and Betina Delosreyes of Jacksonville. He is the son of Julie Anderson and Bryan Green, both of Crawfordville. The bride-elect is the granddaughter of Robert and Maryann Taylor and Ellen Sessor and the late Roger Sessor. She is employed as an of“ ce administrator at Baskerville Donovan. The groom-elect is the grandson of Culen McDougal of Blountstown and the late Billy McDougal. He is employed as a repair technician for THA. The couple will be married on March 10 at 3:30 p.m. at Wakulla River Park in St. Marks with a reception to follow. Rikki Taylor and Michael Anderson Brandy Nicole Pigott and Cole Oliver Brandy Nicole Pigott and Cole Oliver, both of Crawfordville, announce their engagement. The bride-elect is the daughter of James Pigott of Crawfordville. The groom-elect is the son of Lynn Williams Lynn and Andy Lynn and Mark Oliver, all of Crawfordville. She is a nurse at TMH. He owns Anytime Electric with his father. The wedding date is April 14 at 6 p.m. in Tallahassee.Pigott and Oliver to wedEddie and Christine Wester of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Dane Edward Wester, born on Oct. 28, 2011, at 8 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He was 10 pounds, 20.5 inches long. He has two sibling, Laina who is 7, and Reagan who is 3. His maternal grandparents are Roy and Fay Lollie of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Jerry Wester of Lavergne, Tenn., and the late Relette Wester. His great-grandparent is Rebecca Gardner. David and Kathleen Dias of Crawfordville announce the birth of their son, Carson Lyle Dias, on Dec. 1, 2011, at 8:24 p.m. at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. He was 6 pounds, 12 ounces, and was 19.3-inches long. His maternal grandparents are Gary and Judy Tehan of Tallahassee. His paternal grandparents are Robin and Lea Dias and Barbara Wallace, all of Crawfordville. His great-grandparents are Nell Horsell and Carolyn Olah. Birth announcementsCarson L. Dias Dane E. WesterBennett earns a spot on the commandants listSpecial to The NewsMary Eve Rochelle Bennett of Crawfordville has been named to the fall 2011 Commandants Distinguished Service List at The Citadel, The Military College of South Carolina. Citadel cadets named to the Commandants List are recognized for having made the most positive contributions to their platoon, company, battalion, or staff, the South Carolina Corps of Cadets and The Citadel. Bennett, a English major, was recommended by Regimental Staff for the Commandants List. The Citadel, founded in 1842, is a public, coeducational military college in Charleston, S.C., that offers a classic military education for young men and women seeking a college experience that is intense, meaningful and academically strong, with the core values of honor, duty and respect, The Citadel prepares principled leaders for the military as well as the global workplace.Sewing parlor starting soonSpecial to The News Have you ever wanted to sew your own clothes or learn how to quilt An opportunity is coming up on Monday, Feb. 13 at 6 p.m. The Wakulla County 4-H Sewing Parlor Club is having an open house at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce and is inviting all interested parents and young people to come by and see what they have to offer. Club Leader Anna Lopez will be leading a demonstration on getting familiar with sewing machines and invites everyone to bring their own model to learn with. They will be providing light refreshments and encourage everyone to come by and see what exciting things there are to learn in the 4-H Sewing Project. For more information, please contact 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft at sjkraeft@u” edu or 926-3931.ZBT Trio to perform at PoshThe Zach Bartholomew Trio (ZBT), an instrumental jazz band, will perform at Posh Java on Saturday, Feb. 11 at 8 p.m. Performing in The ZBT are Zach Bartholomew, piano; Brandon L. Robertson, stand-up bass; and Miles Bozeman, drums. The group has been performing together as ZBT since 2009. They have played many venues in the Southeast, and throughout Europe. The group has recently recorded a new CD and will be performing compositions from that CD. To reserve seats contact Posh at (850) 962-1010. Tickets are $10. Limited seating available. the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering His name was drawn from OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Raymond RichJanuary 2012 Winnerank You So Much! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 TWO FRIENDSGOINGOUTOF BUSINESSEVERYTHING GOES!MIRRORS,SHELVING, MANIKINS,ETC.At the light in downtown Crawfordville. 850-926-182550%OFF making the gift Bevis Funeral Home-Harvey-Young Chapel honors the memory of Johnny Ray Cantrell 2889 C Crawfordville Highway | Crawfordville, Florida 32327 850.926.9308 • 800.772.5862 | www.bigbendhospice.org Tree of Remembrance2011 Big Bend Hospice Many thanks to all who contributed to the Big Bend Hospice Tree of Remembrance. Your gifts allow Big Bend Hospice to provide care, comfort and hope to over 266 patients each day. The following person was unintentionally omitted from the list of those honored FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATIONSEEKING ITEMS FOR GIANT YARD SALE!Its time to go through those closets....FWMA is preparing for its biannual yard sale that will be held at Nads storage onMarch 15th, 16th, and 17thNads is located at 59 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. All proceeds from this event will be used to care for sick, injured and orphaned wildlife! Donations of yard sale items can be dropped off at Nads storage in number 33 at any time before the sale or can be brought to the sale on Thursday March 15 after 12:00 noon. If you have items but are unable to drop them off or you would like to become a volunteer for our fundraising committee please email Jeff at jeffstudio54@yahoo.com.All donations are tax deductible and greatly appreciated. Thank you so much for helping us help our local wildlife! October 27, 1935 February 10, 2007In Loving MemoryIf love could have saved you, you would have lived forever. Your ever loving wife, Shirley & Family Robert Charlie Armstrong

PAGE 8

Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolStudents learn importance of trees SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsOn Wednesday, Jan. 18, both Shadeville Elementary and Crawfordville Elementary Schools fourth and fifth grade students participated in the Trails for Trees ProgramŽ sponsored by the Florida Urban Forestry Council. The students enjoyed listening to the entertaining presenter and learned many interesting facts concerning the importance of trees in their lives. Each school received a large oak tree that was planted on their campus which in years to come will provide some shade, homes for animals, and natural beauty. Students at Shadeville and Crawfordville Elementary Schools plant a tree on campus as part of the Trails for Trees Program. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsWakulla Middle School was extremely excited to have a guest author on Wednesday, Jan. 25, during Celebrate Literacy week. Local writer Leo Lovel was interviewed by Principal Mike Barwick on the morning announcements and also visited classrooms to read a selection from one of his books and answer questions. Lovel is the owner of Spring Creek Restaurant and the creator of The Spring Creek ChroniclesŽ and the All Florida Reader.Ž Wakulla Middle School Principal Mike Barwick interviews author Leo Lovel. Local author visits Wakulla MiddleDarnell, Strickland and Kelley win big at the annual chili cook o Special to The NewsChili, jazz and lots of fun filled the cafeteria of Crawfordville Elementary while they hosted their Third Annual Chili Cook Off on Feb. 3. There were more than 43 entries hoping to win the coveted title of Best in CategoryŽ and take home the trophy and sombrero for a years worth of bragging rights. The judges, Dod Walker, Robert Pearce, Frank Mingledorff, Charlie Creel, Karen Wells, Bobby Wells and Darcy Brazier, had a dif“ cult time selecting the best in each category. Best Non-TraditionalŽ went to Crawfordvilles very own Laura Kelley, Best TraditionalŽ Chili went to Crawfordvilles very own Chelsea Strickland and Best Spicy but PleasingŽ went to Larry Darnell who also won last years Chili Cook Off. Darnell has participated in the chili cook off all three years and keeps coming back with bigger and better recipes each year. Our last category, Presentation,Ž brought the judges to an unbreakable tie between the kindergarten teachers and the “ fth grade teachers. Both grade levels decided to share the trophy and sombreros for a week on, week off arrangement for the remainder of the school year. With the aroma of the chili lingering in the air and the sounds of the Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School jazz bands delighting the crowd, the evening was spectacular. Crawfordville Elementary School would like to thank all of the participants, the families who attended, the jazz bands for the incredible talent, the judges for the use of their tummies and their time and the many volunteers who made the evening a sensational one. We hope to see everyone back again next year. Students enjoy the chili at Crawfordville Elementary Schools Annual Chili Cook Off. The winners, above, of the chili cook off. NJROTC take “ rst place at “ eld meetBy ZACHARY AZZARITO Public Affairs O“ cerAs students returned to school at the beginning of 2012, the War Eagle Navy didnt waste any time getting prepared for the FAMU “ eld meet which was held Jan. 28. The variety of different competition teams practiced every day to prefect their drill routines, knowledge and athleticism. Over the course of the month, the seniors made sure the uniforms were in top shape, captain and lieutenant quizzed the platoons on their military knowledge and the unit worked on making sure the Personnel Inspection was practiced. Finally, the day was here. The female cadets arrived earlier to prepare their hair and the guys for shaving inspection. Soon everyone changed into their uniforms, loaded up on the bus and headed to FAMU. Cadets started off with the Personnel Inspection before transitioning into the different drill competitions. There were several times that the cadets thought they had messed up big time, only to discover at the end of the day that the outcome was much different than they expected. Push ups and sit ups were held just before lunch which was catered by Mr. Robinson, one of the managers at a local Zaxbys. Abby Gordon, an older sister of one of the cadets Allison Gordon, provided leg massages to the runners as part of her massage therapy certi“ cation. It was a huge help to the runners. Finally the award ceremony was here. Wakulla took home trophies in every category at the “ eld meet. The Cadets took 4th place in Personnel Inspection, Unarmed Basic, Armed Exhibition, and Unarmed Exhibition. The Color Guard team and the Academics took 2nd place overall. The Cadets placed in 3rd for the 200 meter relay, Armed Basic and overall drill, with a 5th place “ nish in the 100 meter relay. With “ rst place in push ups, sit ups and overall athletics, it placed Wakulla in the No. 1 spot at the end of the day, winning the FAMU “ eld meet. It was a huge success. Cadets Hutchins, Linton and Kerce received medals for being the top 3 in male push ups. Cadets Egler and Hill received medals for being the top females in push ups and sit ups. It was a joyous ride home for the cadets, as they celebrated their victory. One of the biggest highlights was watching the captain and lieutenant do the gigolo on the ride home. It was a great day for the Unit and the cadets as they represented Wakulla High and Area 7. Next up for the cadets is the State Championship Field Meet in Orlando on March 3. Changes considered in early learning billsBy MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 1 … A handful of bills that would either gut or revitalize Floridas early learning programs have been filed in the last two weeks. Supporters say the measures are a response to a report by the Auditor Generals Of“ ce published in late December, which criticized the state Of“ ce of Early Learning and 10 early learning coalitions with “ ndings ranging from faulty monitoring to thousands of payment errors. The House Business and Consumer Affairs Subcommittee, which passed a bill (PCB BCAS 12-04) Tuesday that would allow private early learning providers to choose a curriculum other than the one now approved by the state. The measure also would reduce the number of statewide early learning coalitions from 31 to 25, cut their boards of directors from 30 to 18, cap administrative costs and establish an order of priority for children served. A related bill, HB 5103 by Rep. Marti Coley, R-Marianna and chair of the House Pre-K12 Appropriations Subcommittee, is on Wednesdays agenda in House Appropriations … its only committee stop. Coleys bill would address how providers are paid. HB 5103 sets a ” at rate and prioritizes which children should receive priority for school readiness funding. Coley said standardization is a logical step for the state to take. Other bills on the issue, HB 7055 and SB 1758, are awaiting committee hearings. Classes$20 each from 6 -9 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center February 20 Ecotourism Business Basics February 28 North Florida Trees March 14 Weather and Tides March 19 Wakulla Landscape March 21 Florida Archaeology & Pre-history Field Trips$40 each on Saturdays Times vary February 25 St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge March 3 River Ecosystems/Tree ID March 17 Kayaking March 24 Fort San Marcos March 31 Leon SinksWakulla Ecotourism InstituteExplore the natural history of the Big Bend area and learn the basics of starting a nature-based business with TCCs ecotourism classes and guided eld trips. Or take the entire 90hour Green Guide Certication Program for only $320! For the complete class schedule or more information, call(850) 922-6290or visitworkforce.tcc..edu/WakullaTCC is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access campus. Visit www.tcc..edu for full statement. Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.-----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 926-3281 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netFive Wakulla athletes signed with college football programs at a ceremony at the high school on Wednesday, Feb. 1 … which was National Signing Day. Running back-cornerback Marshane Godbolt signed with Florida A&M in Tallahassee. Linebacker Ryan Henderson signed with Butler Junior College in Kansas. Running back-cornerback Deonte Hutchinson signed with Northwest Oklahoma State. And defensive linemen Luke Taylor and Nic Walker both signed with Faulkner University in Alabama. Head Coach Scott Klees praised the “ ve players and attributed the War Eagles making it to the state championship game to the efforts of these players. He anticipated they would be impact players at the college level, and he held up the “ ve seniors as examples to underclassmen that Hard work pays off.Ž Klees anticipated more scholarship signings in the coming weeks. Wakulla Athletic Director Mike Smith, noting that Superintendent of Schools David Miller was unable to attend the signing, quoted Millers usual comments, saying he was going to steal Mr. Millers thunder.Ž When you get paid to play, thats special,Ž Smith said, quoting Miller. And these colleges are paying for these guys to play.Ž The War Eagle Cafe at Wakulla High School was packed with students and family for the signings, held immediately after school on an early release day.FOOTBALLFive players commit on National Signing Day PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENThe “ ve players, joined by their families, at a signing ceremony held at Wakulla High School last week.Players Marshane Godbolt, Ryan Henderson, Deonte Hutchinson, Luke Taylor and Nic Walker get scholarships Ryan Henderson signs with Butler Junior College. Marshane Godbolt signs with FAMU. Deonte Hutchinson signs to play with Northwest Oklahoma State. Luke Taylor and Nic Walker will play for Faulkner. The year is only a little more than a month old, but Wakulla High School cross country and track runner Stanley Linton has already racked up three overall road race wins in Tallahassee. On Jan. 7, Linton won the Bowlegs 5K Run For Scholarships in Innovation Park. A week later, he won the Gulf Winds Track Clubs 15K. This past weekend, on Feb. 5, Linton won the Tallahassee Half Marathon. In the Bowlegs 5K, Linton jumped out to an early lead over the other 165 runners and cruised to the win by almost one minute, “ nishing in 17:10. Linton was on the starting line the next weekend, Jan. 14, in the Gulf Winds Track Club 15K (9.3 miles) race on Old Centerville Road in north Leon County. This race is run almost exclusively on the dirt portion of Old Centerville Road and is known for its numerous long and challenging hills. Once again, Linton was the aggressor and took the lead almost immediately and battled a contingent of Leon High School cross country runners and Maclay coach Gary Droze throughout the race. Linton again prevailed over the 176 runners and “ nished in an excellent time of 53:28. Then on Sunday, Feb. 5, Linton ran a little more conservatively … he didnt take the lead in the Tallahassee Half Marathon (13.1 miles) until approximately the three-mile mark, but once that move was made, he never looked back and kept extending his lead over the other 576 runners, crossing the “ nish line in the outstanding time of 1:15:42, almost three minutes ahead of his nearest rival. Ive been involved in the Tallahassee racing community since 1979 and I dont recall a high school runner ever starting a year with three consecutive overall wins in road races,Ž noted WHS Coach Paul Hoover. Stanley has worked so hard this year and kept up his training in the period between cross country and track and it shows. His performances have been absolutely outstanding.Ž Other WHS runners have also tested the “ tness they gained during cross country season by running a half marathon: Cody James, Raychel Gray, Cora Atkinson and Coach Greg James all traveled to Warner Robbins, Ga., on Jan. 14 to compete in the Museum of Aviation Half Marathon. Raychel and Cora both “ nished in 1:51:16 and placed third and fourth respectively in their age group. Cody “ nished in 1:37:24 and placed fourth in his age group. Coach James, however, led the way by “ nishing in 1:29:52 and placed second in the very competitive 4044 age group. Coras dad, Michael Atkinson, also ran and “ nished in 1:55:28. PHOTO BY ROBERT DOUINWakulla War Eagle wrestlers celebrate their district win last weekend.District champions!RUNNINGLinton makes it three in a row ASHLEY FEEDSTORE8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROADfor more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY& RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other services all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

PAGE 10

Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWhat did you think about the beautiful spring weekend we just had? Oh, thats right, its still winter. You sure cant prove it by the weather, and the 10-day forecast calls for more of the same. The water temperature on the ” ats off Shell Point this past weekend was 64 degrees and this time last year it was around 53 degrees. This is usually the temperature when trout start moving out onto the ” ats but it doesnt usually happen at least until the middle or end of March. I talked with Bucky at Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks and he said “ shing is pretty good. He was able to sneak out for a few hours on Sunday and he “ shed around Stoney Bayou and around Cabbage Island using live shrimp and the Gulp Jerk Shad in the white/pink color. He said he caught several nice reds and three good trout. There are still quite a few reds up in the St. Marks River but most of the trout have moved out towards the mouth of the river and around the oyster bars. The bars at Big and Little Pass are good spots right now, as well as East River. The bars at the mouth of the creeks around Wakulla Beach should also be holding some “ sh. Quite a few trout are still being caught up the Ochlockonee River around the state park and lots of reds, though mostly small, are being caught up past the state park at the old railroad pilings and the mouth of Crooked River. Lots of sheepshead are also being caught up there and live or fresh shrimp on the bottom is going to be your best bet. The old bridge at St. George is producing quite a few sheepshead and some nice whiting and a few reds are being caught in the surf. I just got off the phone with JR at the Aucilla and he said the same thing I said, Those “ sh should not be on the flats.Ž He said on Saturday he told folks to “ sh the creeks and shoreline but said most of the “ sh came from three to four feet of water on the ” ats and most were nice size trout. Live shrimp and the Gulp Jerk Shad have been working best. JR said two weeks ago he went up in a creek on a low tide, got out of his boat and started “ shing in a fairly deep hole. Three hours later when he was leaving he had caught and released over 100 trout and most were legal. He said it was one of those days he will always remember. Jack Fenwick from Oyster Bay was out on Sunday and said he used a gold spoon to catch about “ ve or six nice reds up to 26 inches. The day before he had “ shed back in the creeks and caught quite a few reds using a gold spoon. Last week I went a couple of times and caught a few fish but the tide probably didnt move over eight or nine inches all day. When its like that “ shing is just tough. On Sunday tides started moving better and I caught and released 12 trout in a couple of hours. Five of them were caught around the oyster bar throwing a quarter-ounce lead head with a white Gulp and the rest were caught in about five feet of water on the ” ats. I missed a lot of “ sh on the ” ats and was “ shing a white Gulp under the Cajun Thunder on the “ rst of the falling tide. This week should be a great time to “ sh and were coming up on some real good tides. Well, I guess if youre an offshore “ sherman and dont like “ shing for rock bass you might as well stay at the dock. I believe everything is closed right now which makes a whole lot of sense with the economy like it is right now. Not too many folks are gonna spend money on gas and ice and run out 30 miles to catch seabass. It makes it tough on folks selling bait and tackle and fuel. Trout season didnt close in February and the bag and size limits stay the same. The size limit on reds is still 18 to 27 but you can now keep two. Remember to leave that float plan with someone and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL With warm weather, will trout move onto the ats?Special to The NewsThe Florida Forest Service and Leon County Extension are offering a workshop entitled: Longleaf, Loblolly and Slash: A Comparison of Southern Pines.Ž The program is being offered on Thursday, Feb. 16, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Leon County Extension Of“ ce, 615 Paul Russell Road in Tallahassee. The cost for the workshop is $5 which includes lunch, snacks and seedlings! Learn more about our native pines, their planting, management and the products they produce. To register, call (850) 606-5202 or email Genice Harris at Harris@leoncounty” .gov. Southern pines workshop o eredBy A.B. SIDIBECitrus County ChronicleAn intrepid female crane led the insurgency that scuttled the always anticipated sojourn of whooping cranes to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, as well as the marshes of Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Citrus County. This winter, after several hurdles that had the annual man-led migration from Wisconsin grounded in northern Alabama, a mutiny led by a female crane identi“ ed as No. 7 has ended the trip toward Florida. It was announced Thursday that the nine migrating cranes will now be moved to Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, some 60 miles from where the cranes have been stranded for weeks. According to the Operation Migration website, the organization trying to forge an Eastern route for the endangered cranes, several attempts were made to head south to the cranes winter homes in Florida, but each time No. 7 would thwart their efforts. Its all kind of interesting, isnt it,Ž Michael Lusk, the manager of the Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge said. Sometimes we try to mess with nature and this happens. But No. 7 was a feisty one, but sometimes when they are done, they are done and that is what seems to have happened here,Ž Lusk said. Lusk said while it will be unfortunate that cranes will not make it to the area this year, the most important thing is the safety and survival of the cranes. The pilots and young whooping cranes were grounded in December in northwestern Alabama because of a Federal Aviation Administration investigation into the use of ultralight aircraft which are used to help guide the avian ” yers. Operation Migration pays its pilots for ” ying the crafts, but FAA rules say they are sport planes and therefore can only be ” own for personal use. FAA of“ cials noti“ ed the conservation groups pilots in late November that the agency had opened an investigation. Just before Christmas, Operation Migration voluntarily grounded the plane and the birds in northwestern Alabama „ more than halfway to their destination. The FAA eventually granted a waiver to Operation Migration, a conservation organization. The group is trying to re-establish an Eastern ” yway or route for whooping cranes by teaching young birds how to make the ” ight. The Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge and the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Wakulla County are the destinations the ” yers and their young students are trying to reach. Most of the whooping cranes spend the summer in central Wisconsin, where they use areas on or near Necedah National Wildlife Refuge, as well as other public and private lands. Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s. Today, there are only about 570 birds in existence, approximately 400 of them in the wild, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Whooping cranes, named for their loud and penetrating unison calls, live and breed in wetland areas, where they feed on crabs, clams, frogs and aquatic plants. They are distinctive animals, standing “ ve feet tall, with white bodies, black wing tips and red crowns on their heads, according to U.S. Fish and Wildlife. Ten cranes left Wisconsin this fall. But one young bird detoured and was later found with a ” ock of migrating sandhill cranes in Florida.Whooping cranes stop migration in AlabamaA conservation e ort involving an ultralight plane leading endangered whooping cranes south for the winter has been forced to stop short of its Florida destination, with o cials deciding to stay in Alabama. San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED GROUPER LIMIT IS

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org It is hard to believe we are already into February and yet it feels like spring. This is the time of year when things begin to really pick up for us in Flotilla 12. We are already thinking about Springtime Tallahassee, the start of boating season, and many other activities we participate in. This year we are also trying to expand our role in the Apalachicola area, as our area of responsibility (AOR) goes from the Econ“ na River to Apalachicola. The Wildlife Heritage and Outdoor Festival has traditionally been our annual kick off to our Public Affairs (PA) events. Flotilla Staff Officer for PA Alex Gulde sent in the following report about the days events. The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge could not have chosen a nicer day to hold its annual Wildlife Heritage and Outdoors Festival. As in years past, Flotilla 12, St. Marks, of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary supported the festival by setting up and staf“ ng a public affairs display. The flotillas outreach centers around the following elements: recreational boating safety, public education and outreach, marine environmental protection, and information on the Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary. The flotillas display was set up near the iconic St. Marks Lighthouse and many of its visitors stopped to talk with an Auxiliarist about boating safety. Many festival visitors were also drawn in by Auxiliarist Larry Kolks vessel, the Georgiana, a hand-built wooden boat that invokes the style of the classic lifeboats used by the Coast Guard in its early years. Auxiliarist Chuck Hickman provided another attraction by demonstrating vintage Coast Guard radio communications equipment. Other Auxiliarists staffing the public affairs display and providing information to visitors were Tim Ashley, Mike Harrison, Dave Rabon, Bill Wannall and Alexander Gulde. Also helping out were Auxiliarists Ann and Ed Gesteland, members of Flotilla 45 08, out of Wisconsin, who kindly offered their support and assistance while wintering in Florida. Many thanks to Tim Ashley and Alex Gulde for taking the pictures this week as well! For more information on the Coast Guard Auxiliary and Flotilla 12, St. Marks, please contact Alexander Gulde, Staff Officer for Public Affairs at (850) 583-1863 or via email at asg.cgaux@ gmail.com. As an interesting side note, Duane and I were chatting about the Flotilla after he came home from the Flotilla meeting on Saturday evening. His “ rst meeting back in 2001 was when our Flotilla was moving out of the lighthouse after many years of operation. Due to the changing of ownership of the lighthouse, we were no longer able to utilize the space. It seems “ tting that it still plays such a big part of our activities all these years later. The meeting Saturday night was attended by 18 members and much business was attended to. Several awards were handed out to members for exemplary service. While none of us are in the Auxiliary for recognition, it is still nice to be recognized for the hard work and dedication we provide. My sincere apologies for those who received an award that I do not have your names to print this week. Prior to the meeting Member Training Of“ cer Mark Rosen presented on Cold Water Survival. Even though the air may be warm, the water is still chilly and can be unexpectedly dangerous. Until next week, remember: Safe boating is no accident. You are the “ rst line of defense for your safety and those around you. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAuxiliarist Larry Kolk with visitors at the Wildlife Heritage festival last weekend at the St. Marks Refuge. David Rabon of Flotilla 12 and Ann Gesteland of Flotilla 45 08 prepare for more visitors. Mike Harrison providing educational materials to visitors at the Wildlife Heritage festival. Historic conveyor belt Several of our springs in Wakulla County have naturally steep slopes leading down to their caves. A mystery has unfolded, as yet untested, regarding how these slopes function in the transport and deposition of anything dropped in their basins. So lets take a closer look at the life of a spring basin. Spring basins attract all manner of wildlife. After all, water has always been a precious resource. One can expect just about every creature to visit for a drink or to prey upon those that do. Many of those that fall or are chased in or get stuck while trying to get out end up perishing, their remains settling underwater to be further consumed by any number of water-borne carrion-eaters. Before long only bones remain. Most of these bones are still articulated, a term meaning con“ gured as they were in life, with few alterations due to predation. If excavated thousands of years later, they would look like the dinosaur skeletons we see protruding from rock or reassembled in a museum. And there they would rest except that the spring basin is a dynamic machine. Water pressure exiting the cave exerts friction on the slope of sediment that leads up to the springs basin. The greater the ” ow, the larger the expected sediment found in the slope. Springs like Wakullas main vent have a history of great variability. As the ” ow lessens, the basins sediments actually migrate more quickly toward the cave, increasing the angle of the slope. Until one day, something begins an underwater avalanche. Within a short time, tons of sediment race toward the opening of the spring. With the slope sediment depleted, the basin moves its contents to the slope along with any deposits made in the recent past. If the spring ” ow is great enough, such as Wakulla Springs, the sand surrounding the deposits is quickly redeposited upon the newly moved basin material on the slope. The bones recently transported down on the last avalanche are found newly exposed in the cave. This process is repeated over and over effectively transporting the history of the basin down a conveyor belt of sediment to what is called the bone room. We know of this process because divers have reported them. Wakulla has had at least two avalanches reported, one by Wally Jenkins back in the 1950s and one in 1987 by Dr. Bill Stone, as part of the Cave I exploration. Wally told me that he used heavy objects like bricks or steel to pull him down rapidly before entering the cave. One day he noticed after he dropped the weight, he was pushed towards the cave unexpectedly. He survived by grabbing the ceiling and climbed out while a vast sediment river rushed beneath him. Dr. Stone accidentally dropped a 300-pound lead anchor used to control the buoyancy of his underwater habitat. When it hit the slope, the avalanche was considerable. And Parker Turner, founder of the WKPP, perished in Indian Springs just down the street from Wakulla Springs, when the ceiling of that cavern collapsed on its steep slope, effectively sealing off the cave entrance and trapping two people within. Parker dug his way out but did not have enough gas to reach the surface. His efforts save his partner is one of the more heroic chapters of that organization. What do you expect to “ nd in the bone room of Wakulla Springs? If articulated bones are found, they must have walked in and died in place. If disarticulated, they must have been deposited on the historic conveyor belt. Anyone taking bets? UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday y Thu Feb 9, 12 Fri Feb 10, 12 Sat Feb 11, 12 Sun Feb 12, 12 Mon Feb 13, 12 Tue Feb 14, 12 Wed Feb 15, 12 Date 3.5 ft. 2:32 AM 3.4 ft. 3:16 AM 3.2 ft. 4:02 AM 2.8 ft. 4:54 AM 2.5 ft. 5:55 AM High -0.6 ft. 8:57 AM -0.3 ft. 9:26 AM 0.0 ft. 9:57 AM 0.4 ft. 10:29 AM 0.8 ft. 11:04 AM -0.3 ft. 12:50 AM -0.3 ft. 2:16 AM Low 3.4 ft. 3:14 PM 3.5 ft. 3:40 PM 3.5 ft. 4:08 PM 3.5 ft. 4:38 PM 3.3 ft. 5:14 PM 2.1 ft. 7:17 AM 2.0 ft. 9:09 AM High -0.2 ft. 9:16 PM -0.4 ft. 9:59 PM -0.4 ft. 10:47 PM -0.4 ft. 11:42 PM 1.3 ft. 11:47 AM 1.6 ft. 12:51 PM Low 3.2 ft. 5:59 PM 2.9 ft. 7:09 PM High Thu Feb 9, 12 Fri Feb 10, 12 Sat Feb 11, 12 Sun Feb 12, 12 Mon Feb 13, 12 Tue Feb 14, 12 Wed Feb 15, 12 Date 3.6 ft. 2:29 AM 3.5 ft. 3:13 AM 3.2 ft. 3:59 AM 2.9 ft. 4:51 AM 2.5 ft. 5:52 AM High -0.6 ft. 8:54 AM -0.4 ft. 9:23 AM 0.0 ft. 9:54 AM 0.5 ft. 10:26 AM 0.9 ft. 11:01 AM -0.3 ft. 12:47 AM -0.3 ft. 2:13 AM Low 3.5 ft. 3:11 PM 3.5 ft. 3:37 PM 3.6 ft. 4:05 PM 3.5 ft. 4:35 PM 3.4 ft. 5:11 PM 2.1 ft. 7:14 AM 2.0 ft. 9:06 AM High -0.2 ft. 9:13 PM -0.4 ft. 9:56 PM -0.5 ft. 10:44 PM -0.4 ft. 11:39 PM 1.4 ft. 11:44 AM 1.7 ft. 12:48 PM Low 3.2 ft. 5:56 PM 3.0 ft. 7:06 PM High Thu Feb 9, 12 Fri Feb 10, 12 Sat Feb 11, 12 Sun Feb 12, 12 Mon Feb 13, 12 Tue Feb 14, 12 Wed Feb 15, 12 Date 3.3 ft. 3:08 AM 3.2 ft. 3:52 AM 3.0 ft. 4:38 AM 2.6 ft. 5:30 AM High -0.5 ft. 10:01 AM -0.3 ft. 10:30 AM 0.0 ft. 11:01 AM 0.4 ft. 11:33 AM -0.4 ft. 12:46 AM -0.3 ft. 1:54 AM -0.2 ft. 3:20 AM Low 3.2 ft. 3:50 PM 3.2 ft. 4:16 PM 3.2 ft. 4:44 PM 3.2 ft. 5:14 PM 2.3 ft. 6:31 AM 2.0 ft. 7:53 AM 1.8 ft. 9:45 AM High -0.1 ft. 10:20 PM -0.3 ft. 11:03 PM -0.4 ft. 11:51 PM 0.8 ft. 12:08 PM 1.1 ft. 12:51 PM 1.5 ft. 1:55 PM Low 3.1 ft. 5:50 PM 2.9 ft. 6:35 PM 2.7 ft. 7:45 PM High Thu Feb 9, 12 Fri Feb 10, 12 Sat Feb 11, 12 Sun Feb 12, 12 Mon Feb 13, 12 Tue Feb 14, 12 Wed Feb 15, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 2:24 AM 2.6 ft. 3:08 AM 2.4 ft. 3:54 AM 2.1 ft. 4:46 AM 1.8 ft. 5:47 AM High -0.4 ft. 9:08 AM -0.2 ft. 9:37 AM 0.0 ft. 10:08 AM 0.3 ft. 10:40 AM 0.6 ft. 11:15 AM -0.2 ft. 1:01 AM -0.2 ft. 2:27 AM Low 2.5 ft. 3:06 PM 2.6 ft. 3:32 PM 2.6 ft. 4:00 PM 2.6 ft. 4:30 PM 2.5 ft. 5:06 PM 1.6 ft. 7:09 AM 1.5 ft. 9:01 AM High -0.1 ft. 9:27 PM -0.3 ft. 10:10 PM -0.3 ft. 10:58 PM -0.3 ft. 11:53 PM 0.9 ft. 11:58 AM 1.2 ft. 1:02 PM Low 2.4 ft. 5:51 PM 2.2 ft. 7:01 PM High Thu Feb 9, 12 Fri Feb 10, 12 Sat Feb 11, 12 Sun Feb 12, 12 Mon Feb 13, 12 Tue Feb 14, 12 Wed Feb 15, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 2:16 AM 2.7 ft. 3:00 AM 2.5 ft. 3:46 AM 2.2 ft. 4:38 AM 1.9 ft. 5:39 AM High -0.6 ft. 8:36 AM -0.3 ft. 9:05 AM 0.0 ft. 9:36 AM 0.4 ft. 10:08 AM 0.8 ft. 10:43 AM -0.3 ft. 12:29 AM -0.2 ft. 1:55 AM Low 2.6 ft. 2:58 PM 2.7 ft. 3:24 PM 2.7 ft. 3:52 PM 2.7 ft. 4:22 PM 2.6 ft. 4:58 PM 1.6 ft. 7:01 AM 1.5 ft. 8:53 AM High -0.2 ft. 8:55 PM -0.3 ft. 9:38 PM -0.4 ft. 10:26 PM -0.4 ft. 11:21 PM 1.2 ft. 11:26 AM 1.6 ft. 12:30 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:43 PM 2.3 ft. 6:53 PM High Thu Feb 9, 12 Fri Feb 10, 12 Sat Feb 11, 12 Sun Feb 12, 12 Mon Feb 13, 12 Tue Feb 14, 12 Wed Feb 15, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 2:12 AM 2.2 ft. 3:08 AM 2.0 ft. 4:09 AM 1.7 ft. 5:18 AM 1.5 ft. 6:45 AM High -0.3 ft. 8:28 AM -0.0 ft. 8:55 AM 0.3 ft. 9:22 AM 0.6 ft. 9:47 AM 0.9 ft. 10:10 AM -0.2 ft. 12:46 AM -0.3 ft. 2:19 AM Low 2.0 ft. 3:28 PM 2.1 ft. 3:47 PM 2.2 ft. 4:08 PM 2.4 ft. 4:35 PM 2.4 ft. 5:08 PM 1.4 ft. 8:55 AM 2.4 ft. 6:41 PM High 0.4 ft. 8:31 PM 0.2 ft. 9:18 PM -0.0 ft. 10:13 PM -0.1 ft. 11:20 PM 1.1 ft. 10:17 AM Low 2.5 ft. 5:48 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacFeb. 9 Feb. 15First Feb. 29 Full March 7 Last Feb. 14 New Feb. 21Major Times 1:53 AM 3:53 AM 2:18 PM 4:18 PM Minor Times 8:10 AM 9:10 AM 8:31 PM 9:31 PM Major Times 2:44 AM 4:44 AM 3:09 PM 5:09 PM Minor Times 8:47 AM 9:47 AM 9:36 PM 10:36 PM Major Times 3:35 AM 5:35 AM 4:01 PM 6:01 PM Minor Times 9:26 AM 10:26 AM 10:41 PM 11:41 PM Major Times 4:28 AM 6:28 AM 4:55 PM 6:55 PM Minor Times 10:06 AM 11:06 AM 11:47 PM 12:47 AM Major Times 5:22 AM 7:22 AM 5:50 PM 7:50 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:50 AM 11:50 AM Major Times 6:18 AM 8:18 AM 6:47 PM 8:47 PM Minor Times 12:53 AM 1:53 AM 11:39 AM 12:39 PM Major Times 7:16 AM 9:16 AM 7:45 PM 9:45 PM Minor Times 1:57 AM 2:57 AM 12:32 PM 1:32 PM Better++ Average Average Average Average Average Average7:22 am 6:20 pm 8:32 pm 8:11 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:21 am 6:21 pm 9:37 pm 8:48 am 7:20 am 6:22 pm 10:42 pm 9:27 am 7:20 am 6:23 pm 11:48 pm 10:07 am 7:19 am 6:23 pm --:-10:51 am 7:18 am 6:24 pm 12:53 am 11:40 am 7:17 am 6:25 pm 1:57 am 12:34 pm90% 83% 75% 68% 61% 53% 46% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA crash report developed by an accident reconstruction specialist working for the attorney representing former Sheriff David Harvey contends that the woman whose car was hit by Harvey in 2009 was blocking the roadway, and sitting at an angle that made her car dif“ cult to see in the dark. Joseph Abal, a forensic transportation and safety consultant, released his report on the 2009 traf“ c crash to The Wakulla News after the lawsuit against Harvey was resolved with an undisclosed settlement. On Feb. 20, 2009, Harvey was driving on Rehwinkel Road about 9 p.m. when he struck a car driven by Karla Wright. Harvey drove off from the wreck and reportedly stopped at his driveway on the same road. He admitted he had several drinks in the hours before the wreck. Abal was hired to do a report on the wreck by Harveys attorney, John Jolly, in response to a 2011 civil lawsuit “ led by Wright against Harvey, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce and Wrights own insurance company, Progressive Select, with a claim of bodily injury due to negligence. Abals report does not deal with Harveys drinking before the crash. And the report also doesnt note Harveys subsequent misdemeanor charge of leaving the scene of an accident that he faced as a result of the crash. But Abals report offers a different perspective of the crash than the one that was reported at the time … which was that Wrights 2004 Suburban was in a driveway off Rehwinkel Road and that Harveys 2008 GMC Denali left the roadway and hit her car. Abal contends that the evidence shows that Wright was largely responsible for the crash … that her Suburban was three feet on the roadway, blocking the driving lane, and sitting at an acute angle that blocked the view of the tail lights on the unlighted road. The impact, according to Abals report, was a sideswiping of Wrights Suburban at the rear right corner with impact on the right front fender of Harveys Denali and damaged the passenger side mirror. In an interview, Abal commented that damage to the right front chrome wheel of Harveys vehicle led him to believe that Harvey was taking evasive action -steering hard away from Wrights vehicle -before the crash. Based on physical evidence for this impact con“ guration to have occurred, the Wright vehicle would have to be stopped in the roadway of Rehwinkel Road with its right rear bumper protruding three feet onto the roadway,Ž Abals report states. A calculation of the speed of Harveys vehicle at the time of the wreck, based on the impact damage, shows his car was traveling at 29 to 34 mph, according to Abals report. Of the drinking prior to the crash, Harvey acknowledged having some drinks while playing golf at Wildwood earlier in the day. And he said he had some drinks later at Spring Creek Restaurant. A month after the crash, in March 2009, Harvey pleaded to a misdemeanor charge of leaving the scene of an accident in front of Senior Judge William Gary and was ordered to serve 90 days administrative probation. Harvey stepped down as sheriff on Oct. 1, 2011, to accept a position as executive director of the Florida Sheriffs Self-Insurance Fund. Donnie Crum was appointed interim sheriff by Gov. Rick Scott to “ ll the remaining year in Harveys term of of“ ce.Report says Harvey’s 2009 crash was other driver’s faultContinued from Page 1A The $5 scratch-off game, High Roller, offers more than $22 million in prizes, including “ ve top prizes of $200,000 and more than 1.5 million prizes ranging from $5 to $25,000. Three $200,000 top prizes remain. The overall odds of winning are one in 4.03. The Florida Lottery offers more than 40 scratchoff games at any given time through instant ticket vending machines or on-counter displays at more than 13,000 retailers statewide. Scratch-off games are an important part of the Lotterys portfolio of games, making up approximately 56 percent of ticket sales and generating more than $455 million for the Educational Enhancement Trust Fund in “ scal year 2010-11. Florida voters, by a twoto-one margin, approved a constitutional amendment in 1986 authorizing the state to operate a lottery for the purpose of generating signi“ cant additional moneys for education. To date, the Florida Lottery has funded Bright Futures scholarships for more than 500,000 Florida students to attend college in our state. Floridians continue to show their support by purchasing billions of dollars in Lottery products per year, resulting in contributions of more than $23 billion to the Educational Enhancement Trust Fund since 1988. For more information regarding the Florida Lottery, its games and its contributions to education, visit www.” alottery.com.Crawfordville woman wins $200,000Special to The newsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputies responded to an alarm call at the Stop-N-Save at 1497 Bloxham Cutoff Road in Crawfordville at 1:22 a.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 7, and discovered a forced entry at the establishment, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Deputy Sean Wheeler discovered the front door of the business completely destroyed and glass scattered all over the parking lot. The front panel of an ATM machine was located in the parking lot along with newspaper racks that had been inside the store. Lt. Sherrell Morrison and Sgt. Danny Harrell determined that a white male, dressed in black and wearing gloves and a ski mask, used a sledge hammer to break the glass of the entrance door. The suspect attached a chain to the ATM and snatched the machine out of the store. During the burglary, the entire door frame was destroyed. Evidence was collected at the scene. Damage to the store was estimated at $3,000. The ATM was valued at $2,500. It has not been determined how much money was inside the ATM at the time it was stolen. Detective Lorne Whaley and Crime Scene Investigator Rae Eddens also investigated. The investigation continues.ATM theft and store burglary investigated at Stop-N-SaveSpecial to The NewsAs local health departments nationwide strive to protect the public from new and infectious diseases, bioterrorism, natural disasters and other public health threats, the National Association of County and City Health Of“ cials (NACCHO) has recognized Wakulla and Leon County Health Departments for their ability to respond to public health emergencies. Both county health departments met the comprehensive preparedness benchmarks required by Project Public Health Ready (PPHR), a unique partnership between NACCHO and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We are proud to have been recognized by Project Public Health Ready for our high level of preparedness,Ž said Padraic Juarez, administrator of Wakulla County Health Department. We will continue to improve our ability to quickly and effectively respond to any public health crisis in Wakulla County.Ž Homer J. Rice, administrator of Leon County Health Department concurred. We have worked hard to earn the Public Health Ready designation and are very proud to have succeeded. However, the key to whether we succeed in responding to an emergency will be the actions of our citizens in advance planning, cooperating with authorities and helping each other in a time of duress.Ž NACCHO commends Wakulla and Leon County Health Departments for being models of public health emergency preparedness,Ž said Robert Pestronk, Executive Director of NACCHO. The public health system is making great strides thanks to the good work of leaders in local public health preparedness such as Leon and Wakulla counties.Ž Local health departments recognized by PPHR undergo a thorough evaluation process by peer review. PPHR required Leon and Wakulla County Health Departments to meet expectations in public health preparedness in three key areas: preparedness planning; workforce competency and demonstration of all-hazards readiness through exercises or a response to a real event. The recognition con“ rms that the sister public health departments have emergency response plans in place, the plans are connected to other jurisdictional emergency response plans, agency staff members are trained, and the plans are exercised and used during public health emergencies. The mission of NACCHO is to be a leader, partner, catalyst and voice for local health departments in order to ensure the conditions that promote health and equity, combat disease and improve the quality and length of all lives. For more information on all Project Public Health Ready recognized sites and project tools and resources, go to www. naccho.org/topics/emergency/pphr.cfm.Wakulla, Leon health departments earn emergency preparedness recognition Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 C apital C ircle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com OWNER OPERATORSDo you want to be part of a winning team? Do you want to make $$$ and be home on weekends? Get on the road to a rewarding future! $2,000 SIGN-ON BONUS!! Additional bene“ts include: Call 888-714-0056 for detailswww.newlinetransport.com M a n a t e e T i m e s Adver sing Networks of Florida Statewide advertising—one low price Reach a wide audience (866)742-1373 LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs.

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 13A Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351reportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Feb. 1, Deputy Cole Wells was involved in a traf“ c wreck that revealed the driver of the other car had a revoked driver license and multiple warrants from Leon County. Wells was responding to a domestic disturbance complaint and was relaying information to another deputy about the location of the complaint from his in-vehicle computer. When Wells looked down at the computer he struck the back of the vehicle that had turned left from Shadeville Highway to Grif“ n Road. The vehicle Wells struck continued down Eastgate Way before finally stopping. The driver of the other vehicle, Lamar White, 33, of Crawfordville, had his driver license revoked and had multiple warrants out of Leon County. The Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce was contacted about the subject and advised they would make contact with him. White requested EMS transportation to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Jan. 26, Scott Rich of Thomasville, Ga., reported a residential burglary in St. Marks. The front door of the residence was found open and damaged along with a 55-gallon aquarium and a fan. € On Jan. 26, Melissa Hudson of Crawfordville reported a fraud involving her income tax return. The victim attempted to file her tax return and discovered that someone already “ led a return in her name. She discovered that the tax return was sent in from another community in Florida but outside Wakulla County. € On Jan. 26, a concerned citizen from Crawfordville reported a residential burglary on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Road. A forced entry was discovered at the home but Deputy Ian Dohme was unable to determine who owns the property or the amount of property damage. € On Jan. 27, Bruce Amnott of Tallahassee reported a theft of newspapers from the Coastal Highway Express Lane. The victim reported that since October 2011 he is missing approximately $400 worth of Tallahassee Democrats due to theft of the newspapers. € On Jan. 27, Billy Avery of Panacea reported the theft of a boat propeller from his property. The prop is valued at $200. € On Jan. 27, James Newton of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed a fraudulent charge of $115 on his bank statement. € On Jan. 27, Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated a suspicious vehicle that pulled into two driveways on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Road. The two occupants remained seated in the vehicle each time. Sgt. Johnston observed a clear bag of prescription pills inside the vehicle in plain view. Elizabeth Anne Caudill, 39, of Tallahassee was charged with possession of Schedule II narcotics and possession of drug paraphernalia. Lauren Katherine P“ rrman, 22, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of Schedule II narcotics. Ecstasy and Oxycodone was discovered during the investigation. € On Jan. 27, Deputy Cole Wells approached three males loading up scrap metal at an abandoned house in Crawfordville. The men told the deputy that the property owner had given them permission to take the property. Due to a question over the property ownership, the men were asked to leave the property and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. € On Jan. 27, Robert Heindel of St. Marks reported a vehicle burglary. Five boat batteries were taken from three vessels on the victims property. The batteries are valued at $460. € On Jan. 27, Deputy Cole Wells investigated a DUI and traffic crash on Ace High Stables Road. A female victim reported being backed into by the suspect who stopped his vehicle in the road before backing the vehicle into her. The suspect left the scene on foot. Deputy Wells had a relative of the suspect retrieve him from his nearby home. Larry John Olszewski, 50, of Crawfordville was given “ eld sobriety exercises and charged with DUI with property damage. The suspect allegedly refused to provide a breath sample. € On Jan. 28, Charles Chason of Tallahassee reported a grand theft of ATV harrows from a hunting camp in Sopchoppy. The property was stored under a shed and is valued at $700. € On Jan. 28, Laura Gentry of Crawfordville reported a trespass when a forced entry was discovered at the home. The victim reported that she did not “ nd any additional damage. € On Jan. 29, Spencer D, Fleming of Sopchoppy reported a traf“ c crash at 3332 Crawfordville Highway. The victims vehicle suffered damage while parked in the Dux parking lot. Damage was estimated at $500. Some information has been obtained about the suspect vehicle and driver. € On Jan. 29, Ralph Carter Jr., 41, of Crawfordville was arrested and charged with obstructing an of“ cer without violence. Deputy Scott Powell was investigating a reckless vehicle and discovered the suspect on Horseshoe Trail in Crawfordville. As Powell and Deputy Will Hudson approached him, Carter ran into a wooded area. Deputy Hudson overtook the suspect after a brief chase. € On Jan. 29, Michelle Mansfield of St. Marks reported a grand theft of railroad track from her property. The track was part of an old rail line. The suspects used a cutting torch to cut the track. It is valued at $1,000. € On Jan. 29, Prudence M. Bruno of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run accident at Eden Springs. Damage was observed to her car mirror and two doors at a cost of $1,000. € On Jan. 31, Walter Roberts of Ace Hardware in Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his laundromat. Someone discharged the “ re extinguisher inside the business. Damage was also reported to a door, clock and security camera. Damage to the property is estimated at $2,000. € On Jan. 30, Frances Harley of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A backpack was removed from the victims vehicle which was parked in her yard. The value of the backpack and contents is $350. € On Jan. 30, James Frassrand of Crawfordville reported a fraud as he paid a suspect $1,700 to dig a well. The suspect began the job, but ended up leaving after two days. The case has been sent to the Criminal Investigations Division. € On Jan. 30, Angel Carraway of Crawfordville reported the theft of a homemade trailer from her yard. The trailer is valued at $300. € On Jan. 30, Christina Fewell of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A bank contacted the victim alerting her that someone attempted to open two credit card accounts in her maiden name. The suspect had the victims name, Social Security number and address. € On Jan. 31, Ruth Murphy of Marietta, Ga., reported a grand theft in Panacea. The inside materials from the victims air conditioning unit were stolen. The value of the stolen copper wire was estimated at $800. € On Jan. 31, Edna Wilson of Crawfordville reported a sweepstakes scam. A telephone caller told Wilson that she had won a $1.2 million sweepstakes and would be receiving a check in the mail. The caller instructed Wilson to go to Wal-Mart and put money on multiple gift cards which she did not do. WCSO Victim Advocate Laurie Langston helped Wilson contact the credit bureau to prevent future problems or thefts. Deputy Matt Helms investigated and made contact with an individual at one of the numbers used to call the potential victim. The check mailed to Wilson did not have sufficient funds to cover $1.2 million and was seized as evidence. € On Jan. 31, W.L. Harper of Crawfordville reported the theft of a marine gas tank and outboard hose from his boat at a relatives home. The stolen items are valued at $115. € On Jan. 31, Michael Pafford of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief. A home under construction was damaged. A forced entry was attempted on the garage and substantial damage was observed on the outside of the structure. € On Jan. 31, a search warrant was served at the residence of Andrew Travis Carter, 30, of Crawfordville. Detectives were investigating burglary cases that previously occurred in the county and discovered a chain saw, winch and sledge hammer that were on their property list. Carter was charged with possession of burglary tools, grand theft from a construction site and burglary. Additional charges are pending as detectives investigate other burglary cases. Detective Derek Lawhon and Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. € On Feb. 1, Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated a case involving a Tallahassee man who was seeking assisted living arrangements in the county and who was in possession of narcotics. As the man was being processed at the facility, a white substance was found. The substance tested positive for crack cocaine. The narcotic was turned into evidence for destruction. The cocaine weighed one gram. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 843 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA Crawfordville man was found guilty of sexual battery in a one-day trial last week and was immediately sentenced to 15 years in prison. Willie Melton, 51, claimed at his trial on Thursday, Feb. 2, that the sex with the woman was consensual … and that he had hooked up with the woman for sex a few times in the past in exchange for money and beer. The woman had gone over to the Crawfordville trailer of a friend on Dec. 4, 2010, for a party. People were drinking and socializing and playing cards. The woman, who admitted she had a history of memory problems, said she drank a half-gallon of Lord Calvert that night and then went back to a back bedroom to sleep on the ” oor. She said she awoke to “ nd Melton having sex with her. Her friend heard her yelling and rushed in the room … at which point Melton pulled up his pants and left. The friend called the sheriffs of“ ce to report a rape. Melton was picked up a short distance away at Hickory Park. In his videotaped interrogation with Detective Erica Buckley, he “ rst denied having any contact with the victim … but when Buckley suggested there might be DNA evidence of sexual contact, Melton changed his story and said there was consensual sex. Melton took the stand at his trial and contended he had given the woman beer or money for beer in exchange for sex in the past. Assistant State Attorney Lorena Vollrath-Bueno presented DNA evidence that con“ rmed Melton and the victim had intercourse. Meltons attorney, Brian Higgins, argued in his closing statement to jurors that the case came down to whether or not the sex was consensual. Higgins contended that the fact that the alleged victim acknowledged having consumed a half-gallon of whiskey that night and had an admitted history of memory problems should be enough to create reasonable doubt in the minds of the jury. In her rebuttal, Bueno became emotional, refuting Higgins characterization, asking what the victim had to gain by lying. Go through a rape exam and come up here and testify?Ž Bueno contended that Melton couldnt keep his story straight when he testi“ ed because its not the truth. The truth,Ž she said, is he raped her. She said no. Theres a witness who heard her say no.Ž The six-person jury was out less than 30 minutes before returning a guilty verdicts. With Meltons past criminal record that includes more than 10 previous felony convictions, Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford, who presided over the trial, went directly to sentencing and ordered him to serve 15 years in state prison. € A jury trial on Friday, Feb. 3, of Edward Palmer on three counts of tampering with physical evidence and possession of controlled substance with intent to sell, all felonies, as well as misdemeanor charges of possession of cannabis and paraphernalia ended with Palmer being found guilty only of the misdemeanors. Palmer was one of three passengers in a car that was stopped by law enforcement and which officers saw plastic-wrapped drugs being thrown from the car. Palmer, 35, was sentenced by Judge Fulford to 364 days in jail on the misdemeanors with time considered served. He has been in the Wakulla County Jail for more than 600 days on the charges, and is still being held on a Wakulla burglary charge plus violations of probation in Leon County.Man found guilty at trial for sexual battery Willie Melton MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95

PAGE 14

Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWildlife Heritage and Outdoors Festival celebrated at refugeThe Sixth Annual Wildlife Heritage and Outdoors Festival was held on Saturday, Feb. 4 at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and provided numerous activities for children. Children could make their way through the Animal Olympics Trail to learn about various animals in the area and try physical challenges, learn how to throw a cast net, shoot a BB gun, “ sh for carnival prizes, dig for treasure or participate in the turkey calling contest. There were also several informational booths and live animal exhibits. Guests could also visit the St. Marks Lighthouse, which was open for tours. For more information about the refuge, visit www.fws. gov/saintmarks or call 925-6121. Steve Carbol, director of education at the Tallahassee Museum, shows the crowd a horned owl, above. Participants wait in line, at left, for a tour of the inside of the St. Marks Lighthouse. Children try to name the different “ sh on the chart set up by the U.S. Forest Service, below. A young boy, near bottom, tries to catch a prize. In the bottom photo, several children look at the different furs and turkey feathers on display at the National Wild Turkey Federation booth. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN More photos online at thewakullanews.net My name is Sherry Hinderer and recently, I underwent the “rst Percutaneous Balloon Mitral Valvuloplasty performed in Tallahassee at TMH. After being diagnosed with Rheumatic Mitral Valve Stenosis following a stroke in March of last year, I was faced with a very tough decision: open heart surgery or traveling to Orlando for a specialized procedure and recovery. My initial reaction was, How am I going to do this? My family, my job, my house...they need me!Ž Because of TMH, I didnt have to make that tough decision. My cardiologist, Dr Akash Ghai, and cardiac interventionalists, Dr. Thomas Noel and Dr. Wayne Batchelor, worked together to determine that they could fix my heart right here at home, without an incision to the chest. I was home two days following the surgery and back to work a week later. My doctors are a blessing and so was finding a treatment that immediately improved my quality of life right here at home... its where my heart is! TMH.orgAkash Ghai, MD Board Certied Cardiologist Thomas Noel, MD Cardiac InterventionalistAt TMH, Your Heart is in the Right Place...Home.SherryHinderer, HeartPatientThe physicians referred to herein are independent practitioners and are not agents or employees of TMH.

PAGE 15

Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 Cable TV boxes use a lot of energy, even when not actively being used EarthTalk, Page 8B Get Fit: Change your heart healthYoga for Life: Moves to help bring on sleepHealth & Fitness, Page 3B Concerns about Bisphenol AHas it been suggested to you through your reading or conversations that you might want to give up eating canned foods due to the Bisphenol A or BPA that is contained in the linings? What is BPA? Why is there this concern? Lets consider some of the facts as they are presently available before you decide to ban the can. I turned to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration for the research-based information upon which to make informed suggestions. Bisphenol A is an industrial chemical that has been used to make certain hard plastics, metal-based food and beverage cans, and resins since the 1960s. One type of this plastic is polycarbonate plastic which is often used in containers that store food and beverages, such as water bottles and baby bottles and cups. Epoxy resins can be used to coat the inside of metal products, such as food cans, baby formula cans, bottle tops and water supply lines. Research has shown that BPA can seep into food or beverages from containers that are made with BPA or into your body when you handle products made with it. The possible health effects of BPA may affect the brain, behavior and prostate glands of fetuses, infants and children. Infants are a potentially sensitive population for BPA because their neurological and endocrine, elimination and detoxi“ cation systems are immature. In 2008, the FCDA conducted a review of toxicology research and information on BPA, and at that time, judged food-related material containing BPA on the market to be safe. But recent studies have reported subtle effects of low doses of BPA in laboratory animals. While it is not proven to harm children or adults, the newer studies have led federal health of“ cials to express some concern about the safety of BPA. Studies employing standardized toxicity tests have thus far supported the safety of current low levels of human exposure to BPA. The FDA feels there still is enough concern about the possible health effects that they are taking steps to reduce human exposure to BPA in the food supply by “ nding alternative to BPA in food containers. The FDA is doing the following things to reduce human exposure to BPA in the food supply: € Supporting the industrys actions to stop producing BPA-containing baby bottles and infant feeding cups for the U.S. market; € Facilitating the development of alternatives to BPA for the linings of infant formula cans; € Supporting efforts to replace BPA or minimize BPA levels in other food can linings; and € Shifting to a more aggressive regulation framework for oversight of BPA. Continued on Page 3B By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Special to The NewsThe TCC Wakulla Centers new semester of ecotourism classes start Monday, Feb. 20. Students will have an opportunity to share their passion for ecology and love of nature with others by getting a Green Guide Certi“ cation from TCC. Offered in a combination of a traditional classroom setting and handson field trips, the Green Guide Certification program creates an atmosphere that increases environmental awareness and a nature-centered network. The ecotourism program provides students with hands on experiences through nature-based classes and “ eld trips throughout Big Bends rural areas. The spring semester also offers two new classes and an additional “ eld trip: North Florida Trees, on Feb. 28, teaches students how to recognize common trees, plants and vines in the Big Bend area; Weather and Tides in Nature, on March 14, teaches students about weather patterns, cloud formation and the reasons behind tides and currents; and a Nature Photography field trip, on March 24, teaches students techniques for obtaining eye-catching photographs of landscapes, waterscapes and wildlife in nature. Classes may be taken separately or as part of the certi“ cation program and will be held at the TCC Wakulla Center in Crawfordville from 6 to 9 p.m. Featured weekend “ eld trips to a variety of local natural areas, including the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, Leon Sinks and Fort San Marcos will also be offered. We attract many different kinds of students,Ž said Bonnie Holub, director of the TCC Wakulla Center. (There are) entrepreneurs looking for the resources and knowledge to start their own natured-based businesses, those who are looking for work in a naturebased “ eld, and those who are working in a nature-based “ eld and want to enhance their knowledge and those who take the classes for personal enrichment.Ž Those interested in becoming certi“ ed Green Guides may take the entire 90-hour program for $320. Individual ecotourism courses are $20 each and “ eld trips are $40. For more information on TCCs ecotourism classes and the TCC Wakulla Center, call (850) 922-6290 or visit workforce.tcc. ” .edu/Wakulla.Ecotourism classes start at TCC Wakulla on Feb. 20 Wakullacountychamber.com ValentineCelebration Saturday, February 11at Hudson Park in CrawfordvilleParade line-up will begin at 9 a.m. Sweetheart parade will begin at 10 a.m.Immediately following parade until 3 p.m.Rafe drawing will be held at 3 p.m. 1st Prize $1,000 CASH 2nd Prize $500 CASH Th e r e will b e food, e nt e rtainm e nt, arts and crafts, e xhibits & kids activiti e s. Rafe tickets can be purchased from any Rotary member; cost is $1 each; they can be purchased ahead of time or at the park on day of festival. Celebration in The Park Breakfast in the Park will begin at 8 a.m.14TH ANNUALWAKULLAROTARY

PAGE 16

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, February 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is free and is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Friday, February 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832 for more information. Saturday, February 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, February 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, February 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  FREE RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church, 4495 Crawfordville Highway, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Tuesday, February 14  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at library. The guest speaker will be Joe Shingles, a retired teacher and the rst principal of Buckhorn Elementary School. He will tell the history of that time. Wednesday, February 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday, February 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. County Administrator David Edwards will discuss the challenges facing the county.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 7 p.m. in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. This group meeting is for everyone, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050.Special EventsThursday, February 9  MEET AND GREET for DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES for Congressional District 2 will be held at the library by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee and the Wakulla Democratic Women’s Club. The event will begin at 7 p.m. with refreshments, followed by the meeting. For more information, contact Rachel Pienta at 321-3582 or drpienta@gmail.com.  “EXPLORING IMPROVISATION: HARLEM IN THE JAZZ AGE,” a six-week course will be held at 9:30 a.m. at NFCC/Green Industries in Monticello. The class will use literature, music and the arts to examine the results of cultural contact zones in New York City during the Roaring Twenties. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at FSU is offering these classes that may be of interest to Wakulla residents over 50. For more information, visit www.olli.fsu. edu or call 644-7947 or 644-3520. Friday, February 10  EXEMPTION ASSISTANCE will be available to senior citizens from Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman at the Senior Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Senior citizens need to bring a valid driver’s license, Social Security number and proof of income. For more information, contact Debra Russell at 926-0500. Saturday, February 11 ANNUAL VALENTINE’S DAY CELEBRATION AND PARADE will be held by the Rotary Club at Hudson Park from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. The day starts with a breakfast in the park from 8 to 10 a.m. Followed by the parade at 10 a.m. There will also be food and arts and crafts vendors.  SPRING SPORTS REGISTRATION will be held from 8 a.m. to noon at Medart Park by the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. For more information, visit www.WCPRD.com or call 926-7227.  BAKE SALE Will be held by the Train Club for Spectrum Children of Wakulla County from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Wal-mart. Join them in support of this cause and purchase some delicious homemade baked goods.  THIRD ANNUAL SONGS OF SUPPORT will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. at The Mockingbird Cafe, Tallahassee. This event supports the Refuge House, honoring the life of Leslie Drew. The News 76ers, Drew Matiluch and Josh Thompson, Scott Campbell, The Crawlers Big Band, Danny Goddard and The Feraltones will perform. Suggested donation is $8. For more information, contact kymiid35@embarqmail.com.  ZACH BARTHOLOMEW TRIO, an instrumental jazz band, will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Performing in The ZBT are Zach Bartholomew (piano), Brandon L. Robertson (stand-up bass) and Miles Bozeman (drums). To reserve seats, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010. Tickets are $10. Sunday, February 12  FLAG, Freedom and Liberty Advocacy Group, is a new group that will meet at 4 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. It is nonpartisan. The focus will be on the upcoming elections. Email ag1776news@gmail.com for more information. Monday, February 13  LISTENING SESSION to learn how other rural communities are addressing social service needs, facilitated by Brunie Emmanual, project manger for the Fund for Gulf Communities, will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. He will listen to the issues facing people in Wakulla County and help with nding solutions.  OPEN HOUSE FOR THE 4-H SEWING PARLOR will be held at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Club Leader Anna Lopez will be leading a demonstration on getting familiar with the sewing machine and invites everyone to bring their own machine. There will be light refreshments. For more information, please contact 4-H Agent Sherri Kraeft at sjkraeft@u .edu or 926-3931.  HEALING ARTS OF WAKULLA COUNTY meeting will be held at 4:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Health Department. The team will report on their training experience and HAWC’s plans into the ve months ahead. Tuesday, February 14  WAKULLA COUNTY TRANSPORTATION DISADVANTAGED COORDINATING BOARD will meet at 10 a.m. at the library. The agenda will include the adoption of the TDSP and Rates and review of the FTA applications.  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the library. The meeting is open to the public. Thursday, February 16  FREE PROGRAM at LeRoy Collins Leon County Public Library, Woodville Branch, at 6:30 p.m. will feature James Huffstodt, author of “Hard Dying Men,” who will portray Captain James Hazzard, Union Civil War veteran recalling Shiloh, Vicksburg and the fall of Mobile. Friday, February 17  EXEMPTION ASSISTANCE will be available to senior citizens from Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman at the Senior Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Senior citizens need to bring a valid driver’s license, Social Security number and proof of income. For more information, contact Debra Russell at 926-0500. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Exemption assistance for seniors from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Senior Center. Rotary Valentine’s Day Celebration at Hudson Park from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. FLAG meeting at 4 p.m. at Myra Jean’s. Listening Session on needs of Wakulla at 10 a.m. at Extension Ofce. FridaySaturdaySundayMonday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, February 9  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet at 7 p.m. at city hall.  RECYCLING TASK FORCE will be held at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room, 3093 Crawfordville Highway. Call 926-0919 for more information.  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop at 5 p.m. on economic development in the commission chambers. Friday, February 10  PUBLIC RECORDS COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room, 3093 Crawfordville Highway. Monday, February 13  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Thursday, February 16  PUBLIC WORKSHOP will be held on the Wakulla County Bicycle, Pedestrian and Blueway Facilities Master Plan from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Senior Center. This workshop is open to everyone. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim DirectorI participated in the Florida Library Associations Library Day at the Legislature on Feb. 1 and came away with a cautiously optimistic view on library funding. As of this writing, both the Governors and the Houses budgets have the $21.3 million funding for the State Aid to Libraries program, which is the minimum level the funding must be at in order for Florida Libraries to remain fully eligible for Federal Grants and funding. I either gave information to or met with more than 20 legislators who are on the committees which decide on the funding for the State Aid program and all were more optimistic than they were at the same time the last two years. The budget is far from being decided though so those yearly letters/emails/ calls to the Legislature may still be needed. Keep an eye out for the Librarys article or give us a call for more information. Friday Night Movie On Friday, Feb. 10, we are showing a “ lm that will give you a different take on William Shakespeare. This thriller posits the theory that a British Earl actually wrote Shakespeares plays, but because of his position could never admit it. Add this to the drama surrounding the early reign of Queen Elizabeth I and you have the makings of a great period piece. Starring Rhys Ifans, Vanessa Redgrave and her daughter Joley Richardson (playing Elizabeth I in two different time periods), this PG-13 (for some violence and sexual content) “ lm should satisfy fans of the Bard and movie fans alike. As always doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing. New at WCPL Pineapple Grenade,Ž a novel by Tim Dorsey, Lunatics,Ž a novel by Dave Barry and Alan Zweibel, Vigilante,Ž a Shane Scully novel by Stephen J. Cannell, Elizabeth the Queen: the Life of a Modern Monarch,Ž by Sally Bedell Smith and Phillis Wheatley: Biography of a Genius in Bondage,Ž by Vincent Carretta are just a few of the new items you can “ nd on our shelves this week. Come by and browse or give us a call to put a copy on hold for you. AARP Tax Prep at WCPL The AARP has begun their free tax preparation service at WCPL on Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This service will continue each Thursday and Saturday at the same respective times throughout tax season The free preparation is intended for low to middle income “ lers which an emphasis on senior citizens. It is also “ rst come “ rst served so come early. Library News...

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 3B Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Hours:Tu-W & F 10 6 Th 12 8 Sat 8 NOON Sun & Mon Closed850.926.83192809 Crawfordville Hwy across from Hudson Parkwww.root319salon.com A full service hair and nail salon.W elcomesW elcomes aime esterling Now AvailableƒHave a Manicure or Pedicure in between your color sk bout our pecials! Certi“ed Nail Tech dress store50%-60% OFF850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE) The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree All Ladies ApparelThe best Alterations, Furniture Upholstry & Re nishing • Interior Remodeling • Doors • Floors • Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling • Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS PARTNE R… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Continued from Page 1B FDA is supporting recommendations from the Department of Health and Human Services for infant feeding and food preparation to reduce exposure to BPA. They are not recommending that families change the use of infant formula or foods, as the bene“ t of a stable source of good nutrition outweighs the potential risk from BPA exposure. They suggest the following: Seek out BPA-free products. This is not easy. Some manufacturers label their products as BPA-free. If not labeled, keep in mind that most aluminum cans or bottles have linings that contain BPA, while steel bottles or cans dont. Polycarbonate plastics are generally hard, clear, lightweight plastic. It often has the No. 7 recycling symbol on the bottle. It is advised that we should not microwave polycarbonate plastics. The plastics can break down over time, possibly causing BPA to leach into food. Do not wash polycarbonate plastics in the dishwasher using harsh detergents. Examine bottles and discard them if worn or scratched. Scratches can both harbor germs and, in BPA-containing bottles, lead to greater release of BPA. For those who want to use baby bottles and feeding cups not made with BPA, consumers should know that such products are now widely available in the U.S. market. Use alternatives such as glass, porcelain or stainless steel containers for hot foods and liquids instead of plastic containers. Given that these are preliminary steps being taken as a precaution, it is important that we dont expect changes in the way industry packages food or even the foods we eat that would jeopardize either food safety or reduce eating food needed to provide good nutrition, particularly for infants. Please let me know if you would like additional information on this topic or any other that the UF/ IFAS has available to Florida citizens. HEALTH & FITNESSIf you can change your mind, you can change your heartWe as Americans wake up running from the time our feet hit the ” oor until we are back in bed. We never stop; we have busy lives and we just go. But if you could, just for an instant, try to imagine not being there. We never think we are going to have a heart attack, we are invincible. That is until we are sitting faceto-face with that doctor on that cold exam table explaining that you have heart disease … or worse, you just suffered a heart attack. Heart disease is the single largest killer of American men and women. The clear-cut de“ nition for heart disease is what is usually meant as coronary artery disease. The coronary arteries become blocked and oxygen to the heart is blocked and your heart cant get the nutrients it needs to function; thus resulting in a heart attack or even death. So, what risks should we be aware of? (1) Being overweight or obese; (2) Smoking; (3) Family history of heart problems; (4) Stress; (5) Being sedentary; (6) Eating a high fat diet; (7) Hypertension; (8) Depression; (9) High cholesterol. Are any of these risks familiar to you, maybe one, two or even four? Good news is that a lot of the risks on this list can be changed just by changing your lifestyle or beginning a consistent exercise program, learning stress techniques, stopping smoking, or watching what you eat. However the “ rst thing that has to change is YOU. You are the key and you have to do it. I know it is hard to change old habits and change is dif“ cult to stay with, but just by reducing your risk you can increase your chances and improve your heart health immediately. With all of these risk factors the one thing that will help them all and that is exercise! Regular exercise lowers your Resting Heart Rate (RHR). A heart thats in good shape actually beats fewer times when youre at rest. So now you know why athletes have heart rates as low as 40 or 50 beats per minute. As you exercise, youll “ nd your RHR will decrease as you get into better shape. With consistent exercise your heart becomes more ef“ cient, which means normal activities become easier as your heart does not have to work as hard and you will feel better doing them. Regular cardio exercise makes your heart stronger just like lifting weights, the more blood your heart can pump with each beat means your body gets oxygen faster and more ef“ ciently. Your heart recovery time becomes quicker with improved “ tness levels. So your heart gets stronger, thereby reducing your risk of heart attack, stroke, diabetes and high cholesterol. Another plus with exercise is that you increase good cholesterol and decrease bad cholesterol (LDL). Which means less plaque built up in the arteries and the blood will ” ow easily to and from the heart. Can you believe all the media, medical and health studies that have been conducted proving that people can improve lives by exercising? Even a little exercise can have overwhelming effect on the heart and dramatic bene“ ts to your health. It boggles the mind to see that the American population is still not exercising. Does it sound familiar to you? What are you waiting for? JUST MOVE! This is National Heart Month, please visit the American Heart Associations Website to get more information on their Wear RedŽ campaign; or the Center for Disease Control Be One in a Million this American Heart MonthŽ launched in September 2011 by the Department of Health and Human Services to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by the end of 2016 through education. Please go to either website for more information on both of these life saving programs and many more. Maybe you can save a life … yours.Pamela Chichester, CFT is BodyTek Gym Manager. She can be reached at (850) 926-BFIT. GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERIf youve already tried everything from a warm bath to a warm glass of milk but youre STILL lying awake counting sheep, here is another tip that could help you get a good nights sleep. As a yoga instructor, Ive practiced two easy and effective yoga moves that anyone can do, whether youre a yoga pro or have never done yoga before. The “ rst move is getting for bed, whatever ritual you have for yourself, then sit on the bed and place two pillows or a folded blanket to your left side. Bend your knees toward the pillows and let your feet go to your right. Place your chest and side of your head on the blanket. Close your eyes and relax for “ ve to eight breaths. Repeat on the other side. Why this works: According to the traditions of yoga, when you lie on your back, your brain tends to stay more alert, so its not conducive to falling asleep. But when you are face down or curled up, your brain senses a drawing in and a calming down. If you like to sleep on your back, thats “ ne … just start out on your side until you get drowsy, then you can turn over. The second move is the total body tensing and releasing.Ž Lie on your bed, face up. Tense your whole body, making “ sts, and clench every muscle tight. Hold this position and hold your breath for a few seconds, then release everything. Repeat a total of three times. This helps squeeze out the last remaining bits of physical and emotional tension that can lead to insomnia. Youre going to feel such a sense of relief after doing these simple moves, that your body is naturally going to enter the sleep zone so you can wake up refreshed and ready to take on the day!Ž In Yoga.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga Teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140.Moves for sleep YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Special to The NewsWhen was the last time you thought about your heart health? If youre over 40 years old, a leading expert in cardiovascular care suggests that NOW is the time to pay close attention to the factors which most often trigger heart attacks and learn what you can do to reduce your risks. Approximately every 25 seconds an American will experience a coronary event, and every 60 seconds one will die as a result,Ž says Dr. Debra Braverman of the Cardiology Department of the Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. Fatal heart attacks often come without warning, but most of us dont realize they are preventable.Ž In addition to making lifestyle changes such as exercise, healthy diet, no smoking and managing the stress in your life, Dr. Braverman says new technology for heart health has emerged to help Americans get relief from the symptoms of angina and heart failure, chest pain, fatigue and shortness of breath, while improving the quality of their lives. Have a talk with your doctor about a simple treatment called EECP (Enhanced External Counterpulsation), which is a painless noninvasive, outpatient procedure for improving circulation to the heart,Ž Braverman says. Braverman says some physicians familiar with EECP therapy say it could eventually replace most of the drugs and invasive surgical procedures currently used to treat cardiovascular disease. Patients receiving EECP therapy lie down on a padded table while three sets of in” atable cuffs are wrapped around their calves, thighs and buttocks,Ž Braverman says. Triggered by the patients own heart beat the cuffs are in” ated with air during the hearts resting phase, gently squeezing the lower body and pumping extra blood throughout the body, especially to the heart and coronary arteries.Ž Just before the pumping phase of the heart, the cuffs de” ate, making it easier for the heart to pump blood throughout the body. Swenson: Concerns about Bisphenol AFebruary is American Heart Month

PAGE 18

Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Tear out this page and save it for your grandchildren. Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Little Tupper Lake in New Yorks Adirondack State Park. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 3 … When the 2012 legislative session started, it would have been safe to predict that redistricting would be the most-dif“ cult … and politically divisive … issue to resolve. But with House votes Friday, the Republicandominated Legislature is close to “ nalizing its redistricting plans. The maps likely will face court challenges from Democrats and other critics, but Speaker Dean Cannon, R-Winter Park, praised what he described as a careful, thoughtful and deliberative process. Supporters of resort casinos and prison privatization can only wish their proposals had moved so smoothly. The controversial casino idea appears dead this session, after House sponsor Erik Fresen, RMiami, decided Friday against taking his chances with a vote in the Business & Consumer Affairs Subcommittee. Senate President Mike Haridopolos, meanwhile, had to put off a vote this week on privatizing prisons across the southern half of the state after running into bipartisan opposition. DISTRICTS COMING INTO FOCUS House members voted along party lines Friday to pass legislative and congressional maps and send them back to the Senate for “ nal approval next week. Republican leaders said the maps follow constitutional requirements, including complying with a 2010 ballot initiative aimed at eliminating gerrymandering. They said, for example, the maps will lump some incumbent Republicans into the same districts and also split fewer cities and counties than in the past. At the end of the day, this decision is bigger than us, this map is bigger than us, the Constitution is bigger than any one of us,Ž said House Redistricting Chairman Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel. But Democrats blasted the maps, saying they were designed to help elect Republicans and violate the 2010 ballot initiative, which was known as the Fair Districts amendment. The Democratic arguments also set the stage for a legal fight in the coming months. This vote by the GOP is nothing less than a slapin-the face to the 63 percent of Florida voters who approved Fair Districts … the maps passed today by the Florida House are unconstitutional, pure and simple, state Democratic Party Executive Director Scott Arceneaux said in a statement Friday. They represent just the type of partisan gerrymandering and incumbent protection voters rejected in 2010. CASINOS BILL GOES OUT WITH A WHIMPER For weeks, swarms of lobbyists and public-relations people waged a battle in Tallahassee about destinationŽ resort casinos. Meanwhile, folks at home turned on their TVs and saw ads touting … or criticizing … the proposed move into a new realm of gambling. But after all of that, the issue appeared to die Friday without House members taking a vote. House sponsor Fresen decided against having the Business & Consumer Affairs Subcommittee vote on the bill (HB 487), after it looked like the panel would reject it. Barring a miracle, that dooms the issue for the 2012 session. The bills opponents, such as Florida Chamber of Commerce President Mark Wilson, praised the move. For all intents and purposes, todays decision to postpone consideration of the gambling legislation is a decision to let what happens in Vegas stay in Vegas and frees up the Florida Legislature to address critical issues facing our state, Wilson said in a prepared statement. But supporters signaled they would keep working on the issue, which could come back next year. Private investment is critical to the health of our industry and our states economy, and we “ rmly believe that this great opportunity should not be put to the wayside, said Carol Bowen, a vice president of Associated Builders and Contractors Florida East Coast Chapter. Its important that the conversation continues on this issue and the job-creating efforts in Florida never rest.Ž PRISON PRIVATIZATION SHACKLED Haridopolos and Budget Chairman JD Alexander have pushed since last years session to privatize prisons across the southern part of the state, arguing it would save money that could be used for other needs such as education. But when Haridopolos brought the issue to the Senate ” oor this week, he ran into opposition from a coalition of Democrats and Republicans. That forced Haridopolos to twice postpone moving forward with the privatization bill, as he tried to gather enough votes to pass it. The standoff intensified Wednesday, when Haridopolos stripped Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New Port Richey, of his role as chairman of the Senate Criminal Justice Appropriations Subcommittee. Fasano has been perhaps the mostoutspoken critic of the privatization plan. Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, said he didnt think Fasano was committed to making needed budget cuts, which includes the prison-privatization plan. Im asking other budget chairmen to make dif“ cult cuts,Ž Haridopolos said. It became clear to me that Sen. Fasano was not willing to make those dif“ cult cuts.Ž But Fasano harshly criticized the decision and said he was standing up for the little guy and gal. No matter how big the bully in the schoolyard may be, if the loss of a chairmanship is the result of taking a stand for what is right, I wear that loss as a badge of honor,Ž Fasano said. Haridopolos acknowledged this week what was obvious when the vote was postponed … the votes may not be there to pass it. Its super-close,Ž he said. Theres a good chance we could bring it up and not win.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: The proposal to allow up to three mega-resort casinos in Florida appeared to die, when the House sponsor pulled it from consideration in a House subcommittee. The subcommittee chairman and House Rules chairman both indicated the bill will not come up again this session in the House. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Its also a comfort today as I hear testimony and debate that Im not the only one moving. I hope it will help the housing market in Florida, what were doing here today.Ž … Rep. Dennis Baxley, an Ocala Republican whose home was drawn into a district with another incumbent.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government and politics)Know when to hold ‘em, know when to fold ‘emTwo consulting rms hired last year by the Florida Department of Transportation projected that the high speed train that Florida eventually decided not to build would have eventually made money, the Tampa Tribune reported Monday. One rm, Steer, Davis, Gleave, projected that while there would be a $9.1 million de cit in 2016, the rst year of operation, by 2026 the high-speed rail would be carrying nearly 5 million passengers a year and generate an annual surplus of $31.1 million. Another rm, Wilbur Smith Associates, estimated 3.6 million riders in 2016, producing a $17.6 million operating surplus. By 2026, it would have carried more than 5 million riders and would produce a $44.8 million surplus, according to its analysis, cited by the Tribune. Gov. Rick Scott rejected federal money for the project largely because he said the opposite would be true that the studies he looked at showed the train would lose money. The FDOT sent the report to the Federal Railroad Administration in November, according to the Tribune. The governor's of ce has said Scott was "verbally briefed" on highlights of the study before it was completed, but stands by his decision.… NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDADOT studies: Train would have made moneyBy DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 3 … Some customers of Citizens Property Insurance could see their homeowners policies taken over by surplus lines insurers under a bill that passed the House on Friday. Passage came over the objection of many coastal legislators who said that surplus lines companies, because theyre largely unregulated by the state, could end up raising rates, and also may still not have enough money to pay claims. Republican backers of the bill responded that the marketplace will work it out: if people dont like being a customer of a surplus lines insurer, they can always ask to return to Citizens, the state-backed company that is now the states largest property insurer. The measure, sponsored by Rep. Jim Boyd, R-Bradenton, passed 66-48 and now goes to the Senate. The bill (HB 245) is aimed at shrinking Citizens. The companys growth … and years of trying to keep its rates low to be palatable to customers who have no choice about who insurers their coastal property … makes many lawmakers nervous at best, outraged at worst. Because the state underwrites the companys liability, a massive storm would result in the states residents being assessed fees to make up any shortfall, and the states taxpayers could be on the hook as well. Many conservatives say the state shouldnt be in the insurance business … that its essentially a socialist model. The bill, backers say, will give some customers a choice of remaining in Citizens or going into an unregulated surplus lines company thats willing to take on their policy. Opponents say its a false choice for a couple reasons. One, customers will be noti“ ed by letter if a surplus lines company is taking over their policy, and many of them may never see that letter. Opponents said during Fridays debate that non-English speakers, or even people who will think the letter is junk mail, could easily miss the notice. And the bill requires home owners to opt-out of the switch, rather than to opt-in. That is, theyll be switched, unless they af“ rmatively ask not to be. But the bigger objection was that customers could be unprotected if they are covered by some surplus lines companies. The companies could raise rates, and may not have enough in reserves to guarantee theyll be able to pay claims either in the event of a big storm. And theres no state backing if the company were to fail. I would have to hope and pray...that my carrier did not become insolvent because if they did I would have no safety net and I would be out of luck,Ž said Rep. Rick Kriseman, D-St. Petersburg. Insolvencies happen. They happen all the time.Ž Republican backers of the bill said not only could customers return to Citizens, but that the solution to the insurance problem in Florida has to come from the private marketplace. At some point, they argue, the state has to stop being the main insurer of property. Three Tallahassee area Democrats, Reps. Michelle Rehwinkel Vasilinda, Alan Williams and Leonard Bembry, split with their caucus and voted in favor of the bill. Sen. Mike Fasano Senate President Mike HaridopolosSurplus Lines bill passes House

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 5B This page sponsored in part by:

PAGE 20

weather weather Valentines VALENTINE ROSESEligant Wooden Roses that Last By the dozen arrangements or Gift Baskets. Your choice of colors(850)933-9162 see display at Menagerie Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 9267561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfor dville. Announcements Advertise in Over 100 Papers throughout Florida. for One Low Rate Advertising Networks of Florida, Put us to work for You! (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida classifieds. com ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM HOME Medical, Business, Criminal Justice, Hoepitally, Job Placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-206-5165 www. CenturaOnlineline.com Medical Trainees Needed! Train to become a Medical. Train to become a Medical Office Assistant! No experience needed! Job training and local placement assistance. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! 888-374-7294 Announcements RED GREEN LIVE Experience this hilarious one-man show. April 5,Tampa Theatre 800-745-3000. April 7, News-Journal Centre, Davidson Theatre, Daytona State College. 800-595-4849 www.redgr een.com Trades/ Skills DRIVERUp to $.42 mile plus $.02/mile safety bonus. Daily Pay, Weekly Home time. Van and Refrigerated. CDL-A 3 months, recent experience required 800-414-9569 www. sunsetranches.com Drivers: Run 5 States Regional! Get home weekends, earn up to 39cent mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp. require d. Sunbelt Transport, LLC 800-5725489 X 227 HIRING EXPERIENCE/ INEXPERIENCE TANKER DRIVERS! Great benefits and Pay! New fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 year OTR Exp. Req.-Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www.OakleyT ransport .com General Help Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos.CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. meltontruck.com Career Opportunities Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877) 3591690 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. Call Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction ALLIED HEALTHCareer training -Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.Centura Online.com Business Opportunities Restaurant Space Available Soon!!Fully equipped. Can assume full liquor license and equipment if you act quickly! Call 850-421-5039 for mor e info START NOW! OWN A RED HOT DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, Mailbox, Discount Party,Discount clothing, Teen Store, Fitness Center From $51,900 Worldwide WWW .DRSS20.COM 800-5183064 Miscellaneous Financial $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!! $$$As seen on TV. Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++ within 48/hours? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com Pets Stop Scratching & Gnawing.Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch no More, Apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet.Ashley Feed & Hardware (850) 421-7703 www. happyjackinc.com Mobile Homes For Rent 2/2 14x 72 SW mini farm for rent, outbuildings, chicken pen, garden area, $550 month and $550 deposit, available now. 850-9265192 Crawfordville2/2 Nice, Well kept, Near beautiful Lake Ellen & Great schools, Quiet area, 32 Merwyn Dr. $550/mo RENT TO OWN OPTION (850) 4433300 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE 3BR/2BA DWMHWakulla Gardens, CHA,good floor plan,$650/month+deposit, application, references, 1 year lease Available now! Call for appointments (850) 524-4090 (727) 6426049 North Wakulla County. 2 BR/1BA mobile home on 2 acres. Rent $475, water & garbage included in rent. 850-2287197 Wakulla Station 2BR.2BA. on 3 beautiful acres, convenient to Tallahassee & Crawsford ville. Lrg screened porch, decking, covered parking, outside workshop & covered storage area.$650/mo Criminal background and credit check will be conducted prior to leasing. Call (850) 4452672 Mobile Homes For Sale Mobile Home for Sale2 BR 2 BASW. 938 sq. ft. Fully furnished. 100X176 lot. Panacea. $50,000. 850-9840182. Real Estate For Rent CRAWSFORDVILLEfurnished cottage 2BR/1BA, kitchen, Liv/DR area. CHA & W/D. No pets/ smoking. $670/mo.+ $670 sec dep (850) 9262293 Apartments Move in Special $99 Deposit $300 Special on 2BR ONLY OFF 2nd month rent Local Hero Discount $99 Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BR as LOW as $630/mo 2BR as LOW as $730/mo 3BDR as LOW as $830/mo. Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Rental Houses Crawsfordville88 Hickory Dr. 3/2/1, privacy fenced back yard.large storage shed, walking distance to parks, $1025/mo (850) 9265591 LIGHT BRIGHT CLEAN 2 br. 1 ba in Oyster Bay Private dock, great view, furnished or unfurnished call 850-5241026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLEConvenient Location 3BR, 2BA, on Large Lot Screened back porch, washer/dryer. Carport, no smoking or pets $775 mo. (850) 5089928 CrawfordvilleGeorgeous 3 BR, 2 BA By Lake Ellen Energy efficient features throughout, low utility bills, private fence, quiet neighborhood $900, mo 39 John David Drive Lease purchase Opt. (850) 4433300 Mysterious Waters2BR/2BA wood-detail, vaulted ceiling, large-porch, covered parking, short walk to Wakulla River, community park, boat-ramp, dock. $800/mo. 850-9266289. Real Estate For Sale House for Sale2 BR, 1 BA Up 1 BR, 1 BA Down. 100X200 fenced lot. Panacea. $90,000. 850-9840182. Auctions Estates Cepcot Angus Fqarm Liquidation 464+ Ac Homes & Cattle 2/18/12 10am Erve Williams Rd. Moultrie, Ga. Rowell Auctions 800-323-8288 RowellAuctions.com Commercial Real Estate Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-9262480 Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300  Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-6566340 Vacant Property 20 ACRES -Live on Land ONLY $99/mo $0 down,Owner Financing. NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas. Beautiful mountain views! Free Color brochure 1-800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches .com CrawfordvilleLots-Magolia Garden, Melody Ln .2 adj. lots high & dry, $12,000 (possible 3rd lot) (850) 926-7807 (850) 5441962 Care For the Elderly Live in Caregiver for Your Loved Ones References Call(850) 6289572 Senior care in your home. Let me care for your loved ones while you work or have a day off. I have clean background,CPR trained, licensed, insured, references and dependable transportation. Call Tammy at (850) 570-6322 for info. 5122-0209 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Providence Christian Academy located at 710 Shadeville Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in the county of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 2nd day of 2012. /s/ David Allen Folsom Owner Published one time in The Wakulla News on February 9, 2012. Fictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices 5110-0209 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statues. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: CARRIES COVE located at 3338 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 30th day of January 2012. /s/ Louise Krueger Owner Published one time in The Wakulla News on February 9, 2012 5111-0209 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statues. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: KINSEY GLASS located at 213 White Oak Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 30th day of January 2012. /s/ Michael Kinsey Owner Published one time in The Wakulla News on February 9, 2012 5121-0216 02/28Sale-Wakulla Realty PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Wakulla Realty will hold a sale by sealed bid on Tuesday, February 28, 2012 at 10:00 a.m. at 2655-B U.S. Highway 319 of the contents of Mini-warehouse containing personal property of: Monica Lowe Donna Branch Before the sale date of February 28, 2012, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 535, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 or by paying in person at 2655 U.S. Highway 319, Crawfordville, Florida. February 9 & 16, 2012 Self Storage Notices 5103-0209 (02/18/2012 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, February 18,2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: ROSA LEE GREEN JACQUELYN GODBOLT Before the sale date of Saturday, February 18, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. February 2 & 9, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5119-0209 PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075((2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: MARCIA D. MITCHELL Last known address of 78 SPOKAN TRL., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 The above individual is notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 February 9, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 3Br 2Ba Twnhs $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Hs 1-car garage $900 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Hs. $775 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba Hs. $725 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Hs. $700 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $425 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615 mo. + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Can pick-up or will deliver850-274-4538Call Tommy at with Dolly MoodyYoga Gain ”exibility, strength, energy. Call for class schedule and rates.YogaFORSENIORSFocusyoga@yahoo.com or call 228-380-0140Focus on a healthier you.BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you”LICENSED AND INSURED SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.CCC 0538 87408-8563Residential Commercial Re-Roo“ng Repairs Since 1980 Free Estimates Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net ESTATE SALE!Friday, Feb. 10 & Saturday, Feb. 11 --NO EARLY BIRDS! --Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week Bryan Strickland’s POOL SERVICE POOL SERVICE Licensed & Insured Green Pool Cleanup Green Pool Cleanup 850 508-7469 850 508-7469 Monthly Fee Weekly Service Includes Chemicals & LaborAlso offering minor repairs

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 7BSelling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week877676-1403 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $825 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 455 Old Bethel Road 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre. $900 mo. No Smoking or Pets107 Wildwood 3BR/2 BA with possible 4 -BR or den. Includes replace, above ground pool and hot tub. Large screened back porch. $1200.Mo. No Smoking/Pets with approval. 26 Magnolia Ridge 3BR/ 2 BA with replace, above ground pool. $1125. Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 116 Magnolia Ridge 3BR/2 BA with in-ground pool and replace $1100. Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.29 Horseshoe Trail 3BR/2BA MH on 1 Acre $750 mo. No Smoking/Pets ok w/approval269 Forest Lane 1BR/1BA Home on 7 acres with 2 Car Garage $600 mo. No Smoking/Pets ok w/approvalAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1150 per month. 2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. JOB OPPORTUNITYADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR 4062-0209 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 328.17 F.S., NON-JUDICIAL SALE OF VESSEL Notice is hereby given that unless sooner paid or redeemed, Rock Landing Marina, LLC, Inc. intends a public sale of the following vessels by brief description and apparent owners: 1. Vessel: 21 ft. Shamrock Cleveland Engine 351, SHAO 5290483, Reg. #5221DN Owner: Estate of James E. Torgerson, II 2. Vessel: 27 ft. 1976 Columbia, Reg. #3499PA Owner: Scott Synar 3. Vessel: 25 ft. Hunter Marine Outboard, Reg. #9947CV Owner: Josh Davis 4. Vessel: 28 ft. 1971 John Allman, Reg. # VA3193AB Owner:Jimmy Collins and Cecil Wilson Said sale will take place February 24, 2012 beginning at 10:00 a.m. and shall be held at the location of Rock Landing Marina, 99 Rock Landing Road, Panacea, Florida 32346. The mailing address and contact number of said Marina is P.O. Box 653, Panacea, Florida 32346; telephone # (850) 984-5844. Publication dates: February 2 & 9, 2012 5099-0216 PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID DATE :January 27, 2012 TO:Trade Contractors as listed: Bid Package 2-AGeneral Demolition & Disposal Bid Package 2-BAsbestos Abatement Bid Package 6-AGeneral Trades Bid Package 6-BMillwork Bid Package 9-BAcoustical Ceilings Bid Package 9-CPainting Bid Package 15-AHVAC & BAS Controls Bid Package 15-BPlumbing Bid Package 15-CHVAC, BAS Controls & Plumbing Combo Bid Package 15-ETest & Balance Bid Package 16-AElectrical & Fire AlarmBid Package 17-A Telecommunications FROM:Childers Construction Co. PROJECT: Wakulla Middle School HVAC Renovations Wakulla County Schools Crawfordville, Florida Childers Construction Company, The Construction Manager state license number CGC45514, invites your firm to submit proposals for the above referenced project. BID DOCUMENTS will be available electronically on Friday, January 27, 2012 at Childers Construction Company FTP site: http://www.childers-construction.com:81/login. html. Please contact Ms. Tawni ONeill at (850) 222-2281 or to toneill@childers-construction.com for user name and password for access. PRE BID CONFERENCE will be held on Wednesday, February 8, 2012 at 3:30 PM at the Wakulla County Middle School, 22 Jean Street, Crawfordville, FL. A maximum of 2 representatives per company. SEALED BIDS will be received by the Construction Manager at the offices of Childers Construction Company, 3472 Weems Road, Unit 1, Tallahassee, FL 32317, as follows: Bid Packages 2-92:00 PM Tuesday, February 28, 2012 Bid Packages 15-173:00 PM Tuesday, February 28, 2012 Childers Construction Company reserves the right to reject any and all bids, and waive informalities in any bid. Information on bid documents is available by contacting Childers Construction Company, Tawni ONeill at (850) 222-2281. February 2, 9 and 16, 2012 5102-0223 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF VIOLATION/ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINT AND ORDER NWFWMD VS JERRY LAMAR HIERS Notice is hereby given to Mr. Jerry Hiers by the Northwest Florida Water Management District of the following violation of rules and regulations promulgated under Chapter 373, Florida Statues, Chapter 40A-3 and Chapter 62-531. Mr. Hiers is not a licensed water well contractor in the state of Florida, but constructed water wells at 59 Starling Trace, 10 Cardinal Court, and 14 Nuthatch Trail, Crawfordville. Engaging in the business of water well contracting without an active water well contractor license is a violation of Subsection 373.323 and Paragraph 373.33(4)(d) Florida Statues (F.S.) and Rule 40A-3.037(2), Florida Administrative Code. The District orders that within thirty (30) days of this public notification, Mr. Jerry Lamar Hiers will cease and desist from any activities that require a well water contractor license and pay to the District an administrative fine of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000.00). If a written request for hearing (Chapter 120, F.S.) is not made within 30 days after this four-week noticing period is complete, then this order shall be final. February 2,9,16 and 23, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5114-0216 Vs. Linton, Gary 65-2010-CA-000396 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000396 DIVISION REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE, Plaintiff, vs. GARY LINTON A/K/A GARY F. LINTON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 25, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000396 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE is the Plaintiff and GARY LINTON A/K/A GARY LINTON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; REGIONS BANK D/B/A AMSOUTH BANK; AUDUBON FOREST HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; TENANT #1 N/K/A DAVE MITCHELL; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 5th day of April 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 17, AUDUBON FOREST ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 62, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 135 DUNCAN DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 27, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905 February 9 and 16, 2012. F10072894 5116-0216 Vs.Air Supply, Inc. Case No.:2011 CA 201 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2011 CA 201 AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 2628 Crawfordville Hwy P.O, Box 1240 Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Plaintiff vs. AIR SUPPLY, INC., a Florida Corporation, and NATIONAL FRANCHISE DEVELOPMENT GROUP, INC., a Florida Corporation Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment For Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla, Florida, described as follows, to wit: 5120-0216 Vs. Boomtown, LLC. Case No.11-251-CA, Notice of Judicial Sale I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-251-CA PREMIER BANK, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. BOOMTOWN, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, RICKY R. REGISTER, CARLTON JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON L. JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON LEON JACKSON, VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2, Defendants. NOTICE OF JUDICIAL SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 45.031(1) OF THE FLORIDA ST A TUTES TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: Notice is hereby given that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on January 26, 2012, in Case No. 11-251-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit for Wakulla County, Florida, in which PREMIER BANK, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and BOOMTOWN, LLC, a Florida limited liability company, RICKY R. REGISTER, CARLTON JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON L. JACKSON a/k/a CARLTON LEON JACKSON, VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, UNKNOWN TENANT 1 and UNKNOWN TENANT 2 n/k/a STEVEN MARTIN, are the Defendants, that the undersigned, Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida, will sell at public sale the following described real property: W akulla County: Lot 64, Villages of St. Marks, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 70, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. and Lot 131, Villages of St. Marks, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 70, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Franklin County Lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, Block DŽ (113), Range 11, Picketts Addition to the City of Carrabelle, Florida, said land situate, lying and being in Franklin County, Florida. and All that tract of parcel of land lying and being in Franklin County, Florida, identified as Lot Number (5), Block D (113), Range Eleven (11), Picketts Addition, Carrabelle, State of Florida. The sale will be held on March 1, 2012, at 11:00 a.m., to the highest bidder for cash, at the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated January 31, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND Wakulla County Clerk of Court /s/Becky Whaley Deputy Clerk Copies furnished to: Jack E. Kiker, III, Esq. James Joseph Hughes, Esq. Villages of St. Marks Property Owners Association, Inc. Steven Martin February 9 & 16, 2012 5124-0216 Vs. Panacea Motel, LLC 11-CA-000196 PUBLIC NOTICE I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 11-CA-000196 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Apalachicola State Bank, a division of Coastal Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. PANACEA MOTEL, LLC, a Florida limited liability corporation, ANNE B. MORGAN and Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices HEATHER M. CLARK, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 23, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA-196 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Apalachicola State Bank, a division of Coastal Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and PANACEA MOTEL, LLC, a Florida limited liability corporation, ANNE B. MORGAN and HEATHER M. CLARK, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m. onFebruary 23, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 6th day of February, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court (seal) /s/By:Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ Lots 1, 2, 3, 12 and 20 in Block 3 of the First Unit of PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS, as shown by plat thereof on record on Page 5 of Plat Book Number 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, LESS AND EXCEPT a strip of land five feet wide off the West end of Lots 12 and 20 of said Block 3, which said strip of land has heretofore been conveyed to the State of Florida for right-of-way for the Coastal Highway February 9 & 16, 2012 SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT AŽ at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on March 1,2012, at 11:00a.m.(Eastern Standard Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 7, at the W akulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy., Crawfor dville, Florida 32327 If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk February 9 & 16, 2012 EXHIBIT AŽ PARCEL B Commence at a concrete monument marking the intersection of the Easterly boundary of Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida with the Southeasterly right of way boundary of U.S. Highway 98; thence run along said right of way South 30 degrees 04 minutes 31 seconds West 200.92 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said right of way run South 59 degrees 57 minutes 04 seconds East 134.81 feet; thence North 30 degrees 02 minutes 56 seconds East 15.29 feet for the Point of Beginning; thence from said Point of Beginning run North 30 degrees 09 minutes 29 seconds East 72.03 feet; thence South 59 degrees 56 minutes 24 seconds East 105.00 feet; thence South 30 degrees 09 minutes 29 seconds West 72.33 feet; thence North 59 degrees 46 minutes 22 seconds West 105.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with an undivided 48% interest in the following described parcel: PARCEL C Begin at a concrete monument marking the intersection of the Easterly boundary line of Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and the Southeasterly right of way of U.S. Highway 98, said point being the Point of Beginning; thence run South 59 degrees 52 minutes 17 seconds East 272.44 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 00 degrees 06 minutes 35 seconds East 231.93 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 59 degrees 57 minutes 04 seconds West 389.00 feet to a concrete monument lying in the Southeasterly right of way of U.S. Highway 98; thence run along said right of way North 30 degrees 04 minutes 31 seconds East 200.92 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT PARCEL A: Commence at a concrete monument marking the intersection of the Easterly boundary of Section 25, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida with the Southeasterly right of way boundary of U.S. Highway Number 98; thence South 59 degrees 52 minutes 17 seconds East 134.79 feet; thence South 30 degrees 07 minutes 43 seconds West 29.94 feet to the Point of Beginning; thence from said Point of beginning run South 30 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds West 80.21 feet; thence South 59 degrees 56 minutes 24 seconds East 105.00 feet; thence North 30 degrees 05 minutes 00 seconds East 79.91 feet; thence North 59 degrees 46 minutes 22 seconds West 105.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. February 9 & 16, 2012

PAGE 22

house pg 1 5100-0209 Vs. Truxell, III, Clyde W., Case #11-285-CA, Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE#11-285-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. CLYDE W. TRUXELL, III, ET. AL; Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Partial Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated January 23, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-285-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and CLUDE W. TRUXELL, III, CLYDE W. TRUXELL, III REVOCABLE TRUST AGREEMENT DATED MARCH 4, 1983; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00 oclock a.m. on February 23, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 23rd day of January, 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court (seal) /s/ BY Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at an old angle iron marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run South 89 degrees 48 minutes 28 seconds West 1317.48 feet to an axle, thence run South 02 degrees 48 degrees 03 minutes seconds West 970.96 feet to an angle iron, thence run South 02 degrees 00 minutes 42 seconds West 222.87 feet to the Northerly right-of-way boundary of the old G.F. & A. Railroad, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 01 degrees 25 minutes 42 seconds West 116.67 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said railroad, thence run South 60 degrees 25 minutes 25 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 171.49 feet to a re-rod(marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence continue South 60 degrees 25 minutes 25 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 122.30 feet to a re-rod(marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 30 degrees 32 minutes 43 seconds East 251.49 feet to an angle iron, thence run North 59 degrees 45 minutes 11 seconds East 242.18 feet to a 4 inch iron pipe, thence run North 32 degrees 24 minutes 02 seconds West 124.73 feet to a 4 inch pipe, thence run South 55 degrees 54 minutes 03 seconds West 117.25 feet to a 4 inch iron pipe, thence run North 30 degrees 02 minutes 33 seconds West 133.29 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.03 acres more or less. A 15.00 foot wide access easement being 7.50 feet each side of the following described line: Commence at an old angle iron marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run South 89 degrees 48 minutes 28 seconds West 1317.48 feet to an axle, thence run South 02 degrees 48 minutes 03 seconds West 970.96 feet to an angle iron, thence run South 02 degrees 00 minutes 42 seconds West 222.87 feet to the Northerly right-of-way boundary of the old G.F. & A. Railroad, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 01 degrees 25 minutes 42 seconds West 116.67 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said railroad, thence run South 60 degrees 25 minutes 25 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 350.54 feet to a re-rod(marked #4261) said Point being on a curve concave to the Southwesterly and marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning and leaving said right-of-way boundary run Northwesterly, Westerly and Southwesterly along the centerline of a proposed 15.00 foot access easement the following 22 courses: run Northwesterly along said curve concave to the Southwesterly having a radius of 42.33 feet, through a central angle of 116 degrees 31 minutes 46 seconds for an arc distance of 86.09 feet (chord being north 27 degrees 01 minutes 02 seconds West 72.00 feet) to a point of compound curve to the left having a radius of 142.66 feet, through a central angle of 28 degrees 31 minutes 23 seconds for an arc distance of 71.02 feet)(chord being south 80 degrees 27 minutes 23 seconds West 70.29 feet), South 66 degrees 11 minutes 42 seconds West 240.30 feet, South 63 degrees 14 minutes 35 seconds West 354.78 feet, South 60 degrees 21 minutes, 16 seconds West 260.51 feet, South 72 degrees 35 minutes 31 seconds West 302.58 feet, South 80 degrees 08 minutes 45 seconds West 510.30 feet, South 79 degrees 59 minutes 28 seconds West 229.03 feet, South 81 degrees 21 minutes 16 seconds West 377.45 feet, South 81 degrees 57 minutes 41 seconds West 230.25 feet to a Point of curve to the left having a radius of 99.00 feet, through a central angle of 66 degrees 30 minutes 53 seconds for an arc distance of 114.93 feet)(chord being south 48 degrees 42 minutes 15 seconds West 108.58 feet), South 15 degrees 26 minutes 49 seconds West 63.62 feet, South 19 degrees 46 minutes 47 seconds West 71.70 feet, South 27 degrees 04 minutes 04 seconds West 79.03 feet, South 35 degrees 14 minutes 15 seconds West 118.54 feet, South 22 degrees 50 minutes 35 seconds West 54.41 feet, South 12 degrees 17 minutes 38 seconds West 79.83 feet, South 28 degrees 53 minutes 40 seconds West 36.11 feet, South 48 degrees 27 minutes 10 seconds West 32.83 feet, South 59 degrees 05 minutes 38 seconds West 99.13 feet, South 52 degrees 38 minutes 01 seconds West 41.66 feet, South 41 degrees 18 minutes 53 seconds West 88.46 feet to the approximate Easterly maintained right-of-way of Oak Park Road(Forest Road No:365) said Point being the Point of Terminus. February 2 & 9, 2012 5108-0216 Vs. Suhor, Laura Bheth 65-2011-CA-000053 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE COUNTY CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2011-CA-000053 Division BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. LAURA BHETH SUHOR, JAMES M. DOONER, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE 5115-0216 Vs. Anderson, Lowell F.. 65-2010-CA-000140 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE COUNTY CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2010-CA-000140 Division BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. LOWELL F. ANDERSON AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 25, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as:: LOT 12, IN BLOCK 18, OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT THREE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 42 CROATAN STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held on lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on March 1,2012 at 11am.. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 27th day of January, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk February 9 and 16, 2012. 286750/1002724/bfc1 Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 25, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as:: LOT 1, IN BLOCK FŽ, UNIT 2 OF OYSTER BAY ESTATES, ACCORDING TO THE PALT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 10 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 47 GULF BREEZE DR., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held on lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on March 1,2012 at 11am.. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of January, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk February 9 and 16, 2012. 266400/1034104/bmt Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. Cindy Jones was recognized as Employee of the Month, Scott Klees and Kerry Adams were recognized as Teachers of the Month. All were congratulated and presented with a plaque by Chairman Scott. All Board Members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the agenda as amended. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve a Proclamation of Recognition proclaiming the Wakulla High School Wrestling Room as the Buddy Tomaini Wrestling Room.Ž Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the following consent items: 1. Approved the Minutes of the Meeting held on December 19, 2011. 2. Approved the following Employment of Personnel: New Hires: 12 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Hines, KevinWECCustodian01/09/12-06/30/12 10 Month Employee NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Green, TerriMESTeacher01/04/12-06/04/12 Jackson, GabrielleWHSTeacher08/26/11-06/04/12 9 Month Employee NameProgram/CentePositionTerm of Service Watson, KendallWMSParaprofessional01/04/12-04/27/12 Wood, WhitneePre-K/WECCDA01/04/12-06/04/12 Transfers: 9 Month Employee Time Limited NamePosition FromProgram FromPosition To Program ToTerm of Service Carranza, AshleyParapro *T.L.Pre-K/WECParaprofessional Pre-K/ SEC 01/04/12-06/04/12 Wilson, LisaClinic Aid *T.L. Pre-K/WECParaprofessionalPre-K/ WEC 01/04/12-06/04/12 Other Personnel (including temporary, PT & current employees hired to a second position) NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Becker, PatrickRMSA/S Remediation Teacher 01/11/12-05/31/12 Commander, NancyRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/11/12-05/31/12 Dutrow, JefferyRMSA/S Remediation Teacher01/11/12-05/31/12 Franklin, HeidiWCSB Annex/Adult Ed Part-time Instructor 01/04/12-06/04/12 Franks, DonWCSB Annex/Adult Ed Part-time Instructor 01/04/12-06/04/12 Hillmon, LeonRMSA/S Remediation Teacher 01/11/12-05/31/1 Holt, JoanWCSB Annex/Adult EdPart-time Instructor 01/04/12-06/04/12 Kane, JohnRMS A/S Remediation Teacher01/11/12-05/31/12 Myhre, ElenaWCSB Annex/Adult EdPart-time Instructor 01/04/12-06/04/12 Myhre, JudyWCSB Annex/Adult EdPart-time Instructor 01/04/12-06/04/12 Nicholson, LauraCESSpeech Pathologist … Time Limited 01/12/12-03/16/12 Pearson, F. AnitaWakulla Library/Adult EdActivity Leader 01/04/12-06/04/12 Price, Olive AnnŽWCSB Annex/Adult EdPart-time GED Examiner01/04/12-06/04/12 Ray, Michael RMS A/S Remediation Teacher01/11/12-05/31/12 Smith, Pamela D.WCSB Annex/Adult EdPart-time Instructor 01/04/12-06/04/12 Solburg, AlaineSEC/Adult Ed Activity Leader 01/04/12-06/04/12 Supplemental Positions: NameProgram/CenterPositionTerm of Service Britt, NoreenWHSHead Varsity Girls Tennis Coach2011-2012 Brown, ThomasWHSAssistant JV Football Coach2011-2012 Moore, DwayneWHSAssistant JV Girls Basketball Coach2011-2012 3. Approved the following Letters of Resignation: Tonya Law/effective January 18, 2012 Bill Springer/effective January 6, 2012 J. Brian Dow/effective January 2, 2012 Brittany Geiger/effective February 20, 2012 Roberta Evans/effective January 2012. 4. Approved a Retirement Letter on John Harris/effective April 1, 2012 and enter DROP. 5. Approved Illness in the Line of Duty/FMLA. (See Supplemental File #21) 6. Approved the following requests for Leave of Absence: Amber McIver/extend LOA to December 20, 2011 Glenda Hance/effective January 3 … April 27, 2012. 7. Approved Budget Amendments #11/12 1-3. 8. Approved the Disposal of Equipment. (See Supplemental File #21) 9. Approved the December 2011 “nancial statement. 10. Approved the Warrants for payment. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to appoint Mary Katherine Westmark as the Wakulla County School Boards representative on the newly formed Parks Advisory Committee. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the Amendment to the 20112012 Inter-Institutional Articulation Agreement between Tallahassee Community College and Wakulla County Schools. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2011-2012 Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Secondary Grant Amendment Request. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the revisions to School Board Policy 6.545* Military Leave for advertising. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Evans. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the revisions to School Board Policies 6.18*, 6.40, and 6.91 as advertised. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Evans, seconded by Mr. Thomas to approve the Wakulla County 4-H Program to use two school buses to transport children to Camp Cherry Lake in June, 2012. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the agreement with Childers Construction for the Wakulla Middle School HVAC renovations … Bid #11/12-05 and execute the contract. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve the 2011-2012 Out of Field teachers. (See Supplemental File #21) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Wakulla High School 20122013 Curriculum Guide. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve Wakulla High School students to be dually enrolled for the second semester. (See Supplemental File #21) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mrs. Cook to approve the Non-Certi“cated Personnel. (See Supplemental File #21) Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas.MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON JANUARY 17, 2012 FEBRUARY 9, 2012Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 33 41 44 47 59 65 68 71 2 34 60 3 35 61 18 36 50 66 4 15 27 48 62 5 24 42 45 51 6 21 28 52 69 72 7 25 37 53 8 38 49 63 19 39 54 67 9 16 29 46 64 10 26 40 43 55 11 22 30 56 70 73 12 31 57 13 32 58ACROSS1.Broorsis 4.Pesto,forone 9.Wreckbeyond repair 14.Have__at (try) 15.Partoftheimmune system 16.Awaken 17.CORN 20.Title rolefor Madonna 21.Takepotshots 22.Feline,toTweety 23.Pullupstakes 25.Comenext 27.Moundstat 29.Makeone'scase 33.CORN 40.Logicalbeginning? 41.Barney'ssitcom boss 42.Plowpioneer 43.Critterwithascut 44.Looklikeawolf 45.CORN 47.Yuletidecandy shapes 49.Pilot's announcement, briefly 50.Theaterfloorlitter 54.Caughtina trap 59.B-52'shome 62.Bitsofnews 64.Frank work 65.CORN 68.Short-sheeting, e.g. 69.Bignameinmetals 70. Obsoletemap abbr. 71.Cassiuswhupped himin'64 72.Muchteen talk 73.TabloidaviatorsDOWN1.Keptoutofthenet 2."__attheoffice" 3.__acid(mild antiseptic) 4.Stanley__ (early auto) 5.Vaudevillebit 6.One-eighties 7.Geneticist's creation 8.LikeaKeebler spokesman 9.Putinalignment 10.Sock-in-the-gut response 11.Endofalion's tail 12.Home tomost Turks 13.AshWednesday startsit 18."Give__whirl!" 19.AWOLchasers 24.Gi vesapoketo 26.YaleorRoot 28.Beanaccessoryto 30.Bigcheesein Holland 31.Flyingstart? 32.Noslacker,he 33.Thesoftendof the Mohsscale 34.Fitfordrafting 35.Earlyevictionsite 36.Funerealfires 37.ActressSalongaor Thompson 38.Perry'screator 39.Chancesupon 46.PlaceforMace 48.LikeLimburger 51.Hagenofstage andscreen 52.B&B? 53.Locker room emanation 55.Oneofthe classicalelements 56.Sweetenthepot 57.DadaistMax 58.Batikworkers 59.Fuseunits 60.Casinocardgame 61.Sourceoffiber 63.Directo rVittorioDe __ 66.B&B 67."Smokingor__?" American Prole Hometown Content 1/15/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 123 245617 87 89 34 76 1452 81 689245 579 200 9 HtCtt 967 1245 8 3 234985617 158367294 895 632741 472591368 316748952 743 856129 689213475 521479836 S A V E D T A L C A M P S I G A V E O N E A F A R O B O R I C E D E N B R A N I T A P Y R E S I N N S T E A M E R S T I N K Y A C T P R O D S U T A U E Y S A B E T B E T A S C L O N E L E A S M E L L E L F I N E R L E S I C A M P S M E E T S N O N T R U E U P H A N D B A G O O F E L I H U A I R T U F T E D A M R A I S E A S I A A E R O E R N S T L E N T D O E R D Y E R S Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 – Page 9B Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5101-0209 Vs unknown Heirs of Lillian T. Williams, Case No.:10000405CA, Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ,CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 10000405CA FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS OF LILLIAN T. WILLIAMS A/K/A LILLIAN TAMIKKA WILLIAMS, DECEASED, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPER TY TO: UNKNOWN HIERS OF LILLIAN T. WILLIAMS A/K/A LILLIAN TAMIKKA WILLIAMS, DECEASED; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: N/A Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to Foreclose a Mortgage on the following property to wit : LOT 4 (5.00 ACRES) COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 734.97 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 797.41 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 273.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 797.34 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 273.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 431.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 398.93 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 33.00 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 368.90 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 1655.69 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF LUKE SMITH ROAD, THENCE NORTH 67 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 32.52 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 1698.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. More commonly known as 64 Effie Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327-0240 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiffs attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after the date of the first publication, response due by March 4,2012, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 23rd day of January, 2012. Brett X Thurmond as Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk February 2 & 9, 2012 in The Wakulla News. File No:CA11-04249 5104-0209 Vs. Bay Springs Community Mortgage 2011-CA-000231Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000231 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Gulf State Community Bank, a Florida Banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. BAY SPRINGS COMMUNITY MORTGAGE, LLC, a Florida limited liability corporation, BOBBY RAY SMITH, and PATTIE F. SMITH, husband and wife, DEFENDANTS. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage dated January 9, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA-231 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Gulf State Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and BAY SPRINGS COMMUNITY MORTGAGE, LLC, BOBBY RAY SMITH, and PATTIE F. SMITH, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00a.m. on February 23, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus form the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 24th day of January, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) /s/ By Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ File Number :20060712a Lot 2 Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, R1W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Corner Record #32915, and run South 89 degrees 56 minutes 25 seconds West along the Section line 653.09 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 01 degrees 00 minutes 43 seconds West 874.57 feet to a iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 119, page 984 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, run thence South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said South boundary 377.09 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said Southerly boundary 201.89 feet, thence leaving said South boundary run North 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds West 563.50, thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds East 253.30 feet, thence North 02 degrees 42 minutes 56 seconds East 387.20 feet, thence South 78 degrees 41 minutes 46 seconds East 288.09 feet, thence South 02 degrees 34 minutes 25 seconds West 321.59 feet, thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds West 275.92 feet, thence South 02 degrees 42 minutes 56 seconds West 20.02 feet, thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds West 60.76 feet, thence South 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds East 552.44 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with and subject to the following roadway and utility easement: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Comer Record # 32915, and run South 89 degrees 56 minutes 25 seconds West along the Section line 653.09 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 01 degrees 00 minutes 43 seconds West 874.57 feet to a iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 119, Page 984 on the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNlNG. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run thence South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said South boundary 735.82 feet to the Easterly right of way boundary of Revadee Spears Road, thence North 04 degrees 03 minutes 35 seconds West 40.10 feet along said right of way, thence leaving said right of way boundary run North 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 697.97 feet, thence North 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds West 500.65 feet, thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds West 31.04 feet, thence North 02 degrees 34 minutes 25 seconds East 502.11 feet, thence South 87 degrees 25 minutes 35 seconds East 30.00 feet, thence South 02 degrees 34 minutes 25 seconds West 470.84 feet, thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds East 39.15 feet to a concrete monument marking the Easterly boundary of said lands described in Official Records Book 119, Page 984, thence South 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds East along said Easterly boundary 570.45 feet to the POlNT OF BEGINNING. Subject to the following described conservation easement: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Corner Record # 32915, and run South 89 degrees 56 minutes 25 seconds West along the Section line 653.09 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 01 degrees 00 minutes 43 seconds West 874.57 feet to an iron pipe marking the Southeast comer of lands described in Official Records Book 119, Page 984 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, run thence South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said South boundary 377.09 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said 5105-0216 Vs.McKinney, Scott Case No.:2011 CA 317 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2011 CA 317 AMERIS BANK 2628 Crawfordville Hwy P.O, Box 1240 Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Plaintiff vs. SCOTT E. MCKINNEY, PENNY MCKINNEY A/K/A PENNY LANE MCKINNEY, DEER TRAIL ACRES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment For Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 3 OF DEER TRAIL ACRES PHASE II AS PER MAP OR PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGE 117, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on February 23,2012, at 11:00a.m.(Eastern Standard Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 7, at the W akulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy., Crawfor dville, Florida 32327 If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk February 9 & 16, 2012 5106-0216 Vs. Taylor, Alix N. 65-2011-CA-000001 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000001 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION. Plaintiff, vs. ALIX N. TAYLOR; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALIX N. TAYLOR; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 25, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 62, BLOCK 22Ž, OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 168 CHICOPEE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2721. at public sale on March 1, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 26th day of January, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. February 9 & 16, 2012. 665091192 5107-0216 Vs. Bradford, Glenna L. 65-2010-CA-000242 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000242 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.. Plaintiff, vs. GLENNA L. BRADFORD; MARSHALL W. BRADFORD: UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under or against the above named Defendant(s), who (is/are) not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, spouses, or other claimants; HARRISON FINANCE COMPANY, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 25, 2012, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOT 24, ELLENWOOD SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED ON PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 10-11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1995 DESTINY DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME HAVING VIN #044075A, TITLE #68520192 AND VIN #044075B, TITLE #68520193 a/k/a 32 CAROLINA COURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327. at public sale on March 1, 2012, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, WAKULLA County, Florida 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statues, using the following method: At the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the Front Lobby, beginning at eleven oclock a.m. (11:00 a.m.), on the prescribed date. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 26th day of January, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN TWO WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 1-800-955-8771. February 9 & 16, 2012. 888101089 5108-0216 Vs. Herndon, Linda K. 65-2011-CA-000053 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE COUNTY CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2011-CA-000053 Division NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. LINDA K. HERNDON AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on January 25, 2012, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as:: ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND IN WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 515, PAGE 774, ID#10-55-03W-000-00621-001, BEING KNOWN AND DESIGNATED AS METES AND BOUNDS PROPERTY. COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 0223 WEST 660.43 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 27 DEGREES 1514Ž WEST 1199.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 27 DEGREES 1514Ž WEST 774.47 FEET TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD S-299, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 26 DEGREES 0835Ž WEST 552.64 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1482.69 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 4756Ž FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 150.06 FEET, THE CHORE OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 19 DEGREES 0233Ž WEST 150.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 84 Southerly boundary 201.89 feet, thence leaving said South boundary run North 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds West 563.50 feet, thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds East 253.30 feet, thence North 02 degrees 42 minutes 56 seconds East 10.01 feet, thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds East 10.01 feet, thence South 02 degrees 42 minutes 56 seconds West 20.02 feet thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds West 60.76 feet, thence South 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds East 552.44 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Comer Record # 32915, and run North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line 1425.26 feet to the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along said Quarter Section Line 1068.95 feet, thence leaving said Quarter Section Line run South 88 degrees 15 minutes 58 seconds West 466.25 feet to the Easterly boundary of lands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96; thence along said Easterly boundary the following two courses: South 00 degrees 12 minutes 02 seconds West 74.40 feet to a concrete monument, thence South 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds West 431.10 feet to the Southeast corner of said lands, thence leaving said Easterly boundary run North 77 degrees 02 minutes 35 seconds East 232.21 feet, thence South 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds East 617.30 feet to the South boundary of said Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, thence run North 88 degrees 59 minutes 35 seconds East 334.41 feet along said Southerly boundary to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO the following two Roadway and Utility Easements: 30 Foot Roadway and Utility Easement Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Corner Record #32915, and run North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line l389.83 feet, thence continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West 35.43 feet to the Southeast comer of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, thence continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section Line 959.35 feet to the North Boundary of Lands Described in Official Records Book 192, Page 427, continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line 109.60 feet to the North boundary of lands described in Official Records Book 64, Page 110, thence run South 88 degrees 15 minutes 58 seconds West along said North boundary 466.25 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 12 minutes 02 seconds West 74.40 feet to the Northeast comer of lands in Official Records Book 321, Page 96, thence run South 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds West along the Easterly boundary of said lands 413.79 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNlNG. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run thence North 47 degrees 40 minutes 10 seconds West 122.36 feet; thence North 57 degrees 25 minutes 47 seconds West 222.60 feet, thence North 82 degrees 37 minutes 06 seconds West 124.32 feet, thence South 80 degrees 10 minutes 54 seconds West 323.79 feet to the Easterly right of way boundary of Revadee Spears Road (50 foot right of way), thence run South 00 degrees 52 minutes 21 seconds West along said Easterly right of way 30.53 feet, thence leaving said Easterly right of way run North 80 degrees 10 minutes 54 seconds East 324.92 feet, thence South 82 degrees 37 minutes 06 seconds East 113.08 feet, thence South 57 degrees 25 minutes 47 seconds East 213.33 feet, thence South 47 degrees 40 minutes 10 seconds East 128.44 feet, thence North 42 degrees 19 minutes 50 seconds East 15.00 feet to the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96, thence run North 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds East along said Easterly boundary 17.31 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. and having a width of 30 feet, and begin 15 feet North of, and 15 feet South of the Southerly boundary of lands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. Roadway and Utility Easement Commence at the Southeast comer of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Corner Record # 32915, and run North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line 1389.83 feet, thence continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West 35.43 feet to the Southeast comer of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, thence continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section Line 959.35 feet to the North Boundary of Lands Described in Official Records Book 192, Page 427, continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line 109.60 feet to the North boundary of lands described in Official Records Book 64, Page 110, thence run South 88 degrees 15 minutes 58 seconds West along said North boundary 466.25 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 12 minutes 02 seconds West 74.40 fed to the Northeast corner of Iands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96, thence run South 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds West along the Easterly boundary of said lands 413.79 feet to the POlNT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 47 degrees 40 minutes 10 seconds East 0.79 feet, thence North 77 degrees 02 minutes 35 seconds East 243.11 feet, thence South 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds East 30.75, thence South 77 degrees 02 minutes 35 seconds West 252.06 feet, thence North 47 degrees 40 minutes 10 seconds West 7.86 feet, thence North 42 degrees 19 minutes 50 seconds East 15.00 feet to the Southeast comer of lands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96, thence run North 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds East along said Easterly boundary 17.31 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. February 2 & 9, 2012 5123-0216 Estate of John Probert, File No. 12-6-CP, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION PROBATE File No.12-06CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN PROBERT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of John Probert, deceased, whose date of death was December 2, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Courthouse Square, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first publication of this notice is February 9, 2012. Personal Representative /s/ Dolores Probert 52 Division Street, Panacea, Florida 32346 Attorney for Dolores Probert /s/ Belinda T. France Florida Bar Number: 0745189, France Law Firm, PA, 2073 Summit lake Drive, Ste 154, Tallahassee, FL 32317 Telephone: (850)224-1040 Fax:(850)681-0069 E-mail: btf@francelawfirm.com February 9 & 16, 2012 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration DEGREES 4702Ž EAST 673.77 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. and commonly known as: 295 CURTIS MILL RD., SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held on lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on March 1,2012 at 11am.. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of January, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (Court Seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk February 9 and 16, 2012. 110650/1009122/bmt

PAGE 24

Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 9, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 C a n ’ t Can’t a c c e s s access T h e The W a k u l l a Wakulla n e w s ews o n l i n e online c o n t e n t ? content? S u b s c r i b e Subscribe t o d a y a n d today and g e t f u l l get full a c c e s s access! Dear EarthTalk: Is it true that cable and other pay TV boxes that sit atop television sets consume massive amounts of energy, in part because they are always on, even when the TV is off? Sam Winston Metarie, La. We hear a lot about how much energy modern day flat screen TV sets consume, but the innocuous set-top boxes that drive them, along with their built-in digital video recorders, may be even more to blame. A recent analysis conducted by the consulting firm Ecos on behalf of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) found that the average new cable high-de“ nition digital video recorder (HDDVR) consumes more than half the energy of an average new refrigerator and more than an average new ” at-panel television.Ž Overall, set-top boxes in the U.S. consume some 27 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity. This is equal to the annual output of six average (500 megawatt) coalfired power plants and accounts for the emission of 16 million metric tons of carbon dioxide. Part of the reason these boxes are such energy hogs is that they typically operate at nearly full power even during the two-thirds of the time when they are not actively in use driving TV screens or recording to built-in DVRs. As a nation, we spend $2 billion each year to power these boxes when they are not being actively used,Ž reports NRDC. To make matters worse, American consumers have little if any choice about which set-top boxes they get from their cable or satellite service providers. Since the providers usually own the boxes yet dont have to pay consumers electric bills, they have little incentive to utilize or develop more ef“ cient models. In Europe, Sky Broadcasting is beginning to distribute more ef“ cient equipment to subscribers there. NRDC is urging the largest pay-TV service providers in the U.S. (Comcast, Time Warner, DirecTV, Dish Network, Verizon and AT&T) to heed the ef“ ciency call with their own set-top box and DVR offerings. Redesigning set-top boxes to power down when not in use is perhaps the biggest opportunity for energy savings. Innovation to reduce power consumption when not in active use … such as has occurred with mobile phones, which also work on a subscriber basis and require secure connections … is sorely needed in set-top boxes,Ž counsels NRDC. Also, re-jiggering content delivery systems so that only one main settop box sends signals to all the televisions in the house (or to lower power thin clientŽ boxes) could also cut down household electric bills and carbon footprints. The group adds that better designed pay-TV set-top boxes could reduce the energy use of the installed base of boxes by 30 percent to 50 percent by 2020.Ž Last year the U.S. government released new energy efficiency standards for set-top boxes within its EnergyStar appliance ef“ ciency rating program. While this new speci“ cation is a step in the right direction, consumers have little knowledge about such options. NRDC urges pay-TV subscribers to request that their providers make available set-top boxes and DVRs that meet the newer EnergyStar 4.0 standards. The more of us who request such improvements, the likelier they are to happen. And the cable or satellite provider that can save customers money while reducing overall environmental impact may just win over an increasingly large sector of the American people that actually cares about being green. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. Subscribe at www. emagazine.com/subscribe.EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www. emagazine.com). Set-top boxes in the U.S. consume 27 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity each year, equivalent to the annual output of six coal-“ red power plants. Part of the reason is that they typically operate at nearly full power even during the two-thirds of the time when they are not in use.Photo by iStockPhoto/THINKSTOCKIs it true that cable TV boxes use massive amounts of energy?As a nation, we spend $2 billion each year to power these boxes when they are not actively being used. Call 866.484.7057Espaol 866.960.7085 Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV Now you have a better TV choice.[ The CenturyLink Prism Project. ]GET ON THE COUCH AND SEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Packages starting at $39.99a month for 6 months*CenturyLinkTM PrismTM.Interactive TV you control … any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. Prism Project … Demonstrations are with non-Prism’ TV customers using basic CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV service with standard featur es in High Definition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/11 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional acto rs, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. *Offer ends 5/31/2012. Offer and stated rates are available to new, first-time CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV residential customers onl y. The stated monthly rate of $39.99 applies to Prism’ TV programming package, and applies only for the first six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional i nstallation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. An $8.99 monthly DVR serv ice fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with the Prism’ TV programming package. Promotional offer cannot be combined with any other Prism of fers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees and surcharges will apply. Custome r must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the 3-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to spec ific locations. General … Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them b y service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restric tions apply. Terms and Conditions … All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at http://about.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees and Surcharges … Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply, including a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time High -Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charg es for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicab le taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate for All Service Bundles … The monthly rate for all bundled services will apply while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more s ervices are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV … All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box, one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct vid eo streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided set-top boxes are required to view TV. If a term commitment is required for liste d Prism offer and customer terminates those services before the end of the applicable term commitment, CenturyLink will assess an early termination fee of $120, reduced by $10 for each month that customer has paid in full for those services during that term commitment. Local channel availability varies by market. Caller ID service must be purchased separately to enable the on-screen Caller ID feature; Caller ID feature is not available in all areas. High Definition (HD) available on all TV plans for an addit ional $11.99/month, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of set-top boxes (STBs ) in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard definition. Subscription to service precludes customers f rom purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for Prism’ Premiu m plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscripti on services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Customer may dial 67 (touchtone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to opera te correctly, customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Equipment … Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) ST Bs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) rem ote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service dis connection in an undamaged condition, or customer will be cha rged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism’ TV Plan … Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the pro perty of their respective owners. Ribits Ceramics NOWOPEN 850926-3704 Creative Fun for the Whole Family ANTIQUES CARRIE’ S COVEC ARRIE’SC OVE Now Open…NEW& OLD…926-50133338 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY Bath & Body Collectibles China & Gifts