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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00394
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 02-02-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00394
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Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A Comment & Opinion .......................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Community .....................................................................Page 6A School .............................................................................Page 7A Sports .............................................................................Page 8A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 9A Water Ways....................................................................Page 10A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 11A Taking Care of Business (Chamber News) ........................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside The Book ..............................................Page 4B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 5B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B INDEX Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 5th Issue Thursday, February 2, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read DailyThe WakullanewsSpecial to The NewsRiversink Elementary School teacher Megan Crombie is the 2012 Teacher of the Year in Wakulla County. Superintendent David Miller made the announcement on Monday, Jan. 30, surprising Crombie in her classroom. Crombies fourth and fifth grade combination class of students excitedly clapped and cheered as he told them, Now she gets to go to Disney World!Ž She will now go on to compete with the other district teachers of the year for Regional and then State Teacher of the Year. In July, all school districts Teachers of the Year will be honored at the Florida Department of Education-Macys sponsored program in Orlando. Continued on Page 2AMegan Crombie is Teacher of the Year for 2012here are numerous industries throughout the county in which Wakullas black population has played a large role. The local crabhouses have served as places to socialize and retrieve the latest news … and often gossip … about all things Wakulla. The crabhouse has been a quick-cash method for the countys black households for generations. Another once popular line of work was bait-picking, or worm gruntin. Picking peanuts or beans for the late Jack Crum and others throughout the county was hard work, but it provided sustenance for families. Entrepreneurship has always thrived among Wakullas black population, but predominately in their own communities. Other than the juke-joints, there were stores, homebuilders, masons, housekeepers, mechanics, nurses-caregivers, or other creative means of production. Today in Wakulla, the black business owner has begun to branch out in areas that are both traditional, and in some ways, very new. JOSETTE BALKMAN AND JOS DOLLAR WORLD Josette Balkman, from Tallahassee, is owner and operator of Jos Dollar World, located in the North Pointe Centre on Highway 319. All products in the store sell for $1, including costume jewelry, hair accessories, childrens toys, novelty items and more. The location opened July 1 of last year and, as is always the case with new businesses, getting the word out to the public is a key factor. It picked up for us during the Christmas holidays,Ž says Balkman, and hopefully well get more customers coming in.Ž Jos Dollar World is a family owned business, something Balkman “ nds to be a great comfort. Her father owned a grocery store in Tallahassee for more than 50 years with great success. It wasnt until Id grown up that I began to understand and become part of my fathers business operation,Ž she says. Once I did, I was his assistant manager until the day he passed. He raised me in the business, and I want to continue that spirit of entrepreneurship he instilled within me.Ž JEROME ROBINSON AND LINDYS FRIED CHICKEN When traveling further along Highway 319 into Crawfordville, theres the scent of something deliciously deep-fried in the air. This may be due to the work of Jerome Robinson, owner and manager of the franchise store, Lindys Fried Chicken, across from Wal-Mart. Robinson, also from Tallahassee, opened this Lindys location around 18 years ago. After he bought out his original partner, Tracy Warner, Robinson and his wife and brother continued to work in partnership to manage the restaurant. Continued on Page 12AA pro“ le of some local black-owned businessesFEBRUARY IS BLACK HISTORY MONTH Josette Balkman outside Jos Dollar World. Jerome Robinson at his Lindys franchise.TStory and photos by HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The News WILLIAM SNOWDENSuperintendent of Schools David Miller surprises Teacher of the Year Megan Crombie in her classroom.Manna rains down in SopchoppyBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFor no other reason, but that they simply saw a need, Janet and Shawn Culberston decided create a food pantry in Sopchoppy to help those in their community who have been hit so hard by the downturn of the economy. They started Manna Community Mission several months ago and during the month of December, more than 1,800 people waited in line and passed through the doors of the building in Sopchoppy covered in ivy and left with a bag full of food. Theres no jobs,Ž Janet Culbertson says. The need is so great.Ž Culbertson runs the food pantry, while her husband oversees the mission. The name came from the book of Exodus in the Bible, which describes Manna as the food that miraculously fell down from the heavens to the Israelites during their 40 years in the desert after leaving Egypt. We called it Manna because it would be a miracle of food to many people,Ž Culbertson says. The mission distributes at least half a weeks worth of food to families in need every Thursday and every third Saturday of the month. The Culbertsons “ rst got the idea to start a food pantry several years ago, but at that time, the economy was in better shape and people were working. We werent in a “ nancial crisis,Ž she says. Then came the recession and Culbertson says many people in Sopchoppy lost their jobs and businesses started closing. The couple decided it was time to put their plan into action. We just felt like God wanted us to help the people in this community,Ž Culbertson says. They completed all their paperwork and turned it in to become a 501(c)3 nonpro“ t organization, which Culbertson says took over a year. Once that was completed, they were able to buy food from Second Harvest. They buy food for 19 cents per pound, and receive the truck full of food every Thursday. The truck is full of pounds of frozen meats, canned vegetables and cases of desserts and breads. Its packed full of food,Ž Culbertson says. We just take what they give us.Ž It costs $2,000 a month to purchase the food, which is paid for through donations, given by churches, individuals, groups and the city. They all see this need,Ž Culbertson says. They know what these folks are up against.Ž Culbertson says everyone gives a little here and there and it works. One of her granddaughters gave 30 cents out of her allowance and Culbertson told her that it would buy 2 pounds worth of food. No donation is too small,Ž she says. Originally, they planned to hand out food only on the third Saturday of every month. However, Second Harvest called and told Culbertson they had extra food and wanted to know if she wanted it. She says, she told them, Yes, of course well take it.Ž Continued on Page 2A JENNIFER JENSENJanet Culbertson, wearing a vest under the ivy, surrounded by volunteers with Manna Community Mission.Manna Community Mission helps distribute food to those in need SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe crowd outside Manna on a food distribution day. Bettye Lou Barkley Wilfred Wayne Cooper Sr. Marjorie Magadalyn Hamilton Sylvia Ann Nichols Patricia Ann Ostola Bertha Jean Porter Helen Carolyn Strain OBITUARIES New Chamber board See Page 1B Ace High Champions See Page 8A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A Mrs. Crombie is a glowing example of the excellent teachers we have in Wakulla,Ž said Miller. Every time I visit her classroom I am amazed at the extent of learning taking place. Her focus is on student achievement and her love for her students is at the core of that desire to see them succeed.Ž While Mrs. Crombie is academically very strong,Ž said Riversink Principal Jackie High, her true strength lies in the relationships she builds with her students, their families and her peers in the school. She makes learning exciting and fun.Ž Crombie holds a bachelors degree in Elementary Education, a masters degree in Gifted Education, has certi“ cation in Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum, is endorsed in English Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) and is a National Board certi“ ed teacher. This is her seventh year of teaching. She also teaches three of the “ ve college courses needed for the Gifted Endorsement to a cadre of elementary and middle school teachers after school hours. In addition, she has been the Riversink Yearbook sponsor since 2008 and has taken a leadership role in the Wakulla District Writing Committee. Student motivation and academic performance data are two sides of the same coin,Ž said Crombie. I believe analyzing one without understanding the other paints an incomplete picture of my students capabilities and needs.Ž Enthused about building on her students skills in science and math, in the summer of 2010 she participated in the six-week National High Magnetic Laboratorys Research Experience for Teachers in Tallahassee, plus was selected to attend the Phil Mickelson ExxonMobil Teachers Academy for Math and Science in New Jersey. Both emphasized discovery-based learning in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) subjects,Ž she said. Building on this premise, I used inquiry experiences in math all year.Ž Her students showed 100 percent pro“ ciency in math compared to the state average of 74 percent math pro“ ciency on the 2011 FCAT. Eight candidates represented their schools as School Level Teachers of the Year. The other schoollevel Teachers of the Year are Holly Harden, Crawfordville Elementary; Angela Swain, Medart Elementary; Michelle Hunter, Shadeville Elementary; John Kane, Riversprings Middle School; Jeri Jump, Wakulla Middle School; Missy Rudd, Wakulla High School; and Shari Smith, Wakulla Pre-Kindergarten. Crombie is married to Dave Crombie. Her parents, Tim and Beth ODonnell, are both Wakulla School District educators. These representatives and all Wakulla County teachers will be honored at a celebration on March 16 at Wakulla Middle School. WILLIAM SNOWDENCrombie in her classroom with her students after the announcement that she was chosen Teacher of the Year.Megan Crombie is Teacher of the Year for 2012Continued from Page 1A The first Thursday the mission handed out food, they werent able to provide people with much notice. People made phone calls, posted on Facebook and simply spread the word around the county. People showed up and ever since, Manna Mission has been at the building next to Backwoods Bistro every Thursday handing out food to about 100 people. Within an hour or two, its gone,Ž Culbertson says. What started out small has grown rapidly and Culbertson says it was a quick immersion. Its a learning process, with a steep curve,Ž she says. At one point, there were people from nearly every surrounding county coming to Sopchoppy in need of food. There were people from Wakulla, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon and Franklin counties. Once they hear about us, theyll get here,Ž Culbertson says. The amount of food a family receives is based on the number of people in their family. There is a chart up letting people know if they qualify for food assistance. One person who makes $273 or less a week will qualify. For each additional family member, $96 is added. So a family of four would be eligible if they make $551 a week. One family who came for food had 15 members all living in one house. Culbertson says several had lost their jobs and had to move in with the grandparents. Most of the people who seek assistance are unemployed, she says. There are also those who are disabled and unable to work, single mothers and the elderly. A woman came to the mission with her two children and told Culbertson she didnt care about herself, just wanted her children to be able to have some food. That keeps us going,Ž Culbertson says. Its overwhelming sometimes.Ž Culbertson says many of the people standing in line make some money, but not enough to make ends meet. A comment heard often at the mission from those in need is that without the food pantry, they wouldnt be able to feed their families. Its been an incredible blessing to help people you know who need help,Ž Culbertson says. Many people who come to the mission need more than just food and Culbertson says they try and help as much as they can. A woman who was a battered spouse took her four children and left her husband. But, after she left, she didnt have anywhere to go. She came to the mission one day and Culbertson says they made sure she had enough food to feed her family. They also found out that she was living in a tent, so members of the community got together and gave her a camper. They also collected toys to give to her children at Christmas. Everyone came together to help,Ž Culbertson says. We saw how loving this group of people are.Ž There are numerous volunteers who help the mission. They unload the truck on Thursday, distribute the food, take down names of those who need food and help anywhere they are needed. The volunteers keep coming, every week,Ž Culbertson says. Some of these volunteers are her daughter and grandchildren. I love helping,Ž says granddaughter Bailey Dyer. Its a big job.Ž Culbertson agrees and says all the people who volunteer are a tremendous help and they can always use more. We dont turn volunteers away,Ž she says. Culbertson hopes to eventually get a larger space to be able to hold more food and donated clothes, as well as establish a shelter. Were so new and small,Ž Culbertson says. Well see as we go.Ž Those who wish to volunteer their time or donate to the mission, can call 962-5434. Those in need of emergency food assistance can also call the number listed. The mission is located at 110 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy. The food truck arrives every Thursday between 10 a.m. and noon. There is also food distributed every third Saturday of the month from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. For more information, visit their Facebook page, Manna Mission.Manna rains down in Sopchoppy Seniors to receive tax assistanceThe Wakulla County Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman and his staff will be assisting senior citizens with any exemptions they may be eligible for at the Senior Center on every Friday in February. On Friday, Feb. 3, and Feb. 10, Feb. 17 and Feb. 24 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the staff will be at the Senior Center to educate the public about the exemptions and assist in ling these applications for them. The information needed for any exemption will be a valid Florida Drivers License number (if applicable), Social Security number and proof of income for some of the exemptions. Seniors who plan to apply need to have this information if possible but the property appraiser's staff can still le the exemption paperwork and senior citizens have until June 1 to provide the Property Appraiser's office with the necessary documentation and proof of income. The proof of income is required by Department of Revenue on some exemptions. If you have any questions, contact Debra Russell at the property appraiser's of ce at (850) 926-0500. Fish fry for 10-yearold Destiny LewisAshmore Masonic Lodge will hold a bene t sh fry on Sunday, Feb. 5, in front of their building at 25 Yellowjacket Road in Sopchoppy, at noon to bene t Destiny Lewis, a 10-year-old little girl struck and severely injured by a car last week. All proceeds will go to the family to help with mounting medical expenses. Any contributions may be sent to her mother, Tina Sanders c/o Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 610 Crawfordville FL 32326 ATTN Tonya Carter. For information, contact Walter at 591-2773. Friends Fur Life food drive underwayThe fth annual community-wide pet food and supply drive aims to help Big Bend area senior citizens in need by providing pet supplies for their companion animals. Often, this kind of assistance means a senior doesn't have to choose between feeding their pet, buying medicine or relinquishing their animal. We will be accepting donations of pet food and supplies through March 14 at the FFL drop-off locations around the area, including Crawfordville Animal Hospital, 2807 Crawfordville Highway, and Ashley Feed & Hardware, 8056 Wakulla Springs Road. Supplies will be delivered on March 17. Blood drive at TMH WakullaTMH Wakulla will host a blood drive on Wednesday, Feb. 8, from 1:30 to 4 p.m. TMH Wakulla is located at 15 Council Moore Road in Crawfordville. Everyone who gives blood will receive a long sleeve T-shirt.Briefs CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S  222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICE…EVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello € Tallahassee € Quincy € Wakulla r r s TM Dav i d H i nsonSales Representative Author i zed F i rm Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 ASHLEY FEEDSTORE8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROADfor more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY& RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other services ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDelta Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR

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City of Sopchoppy The City Commission of the City of Sopchoppy gives notice of its intent to consider the adoption of the following Ordinance: If adopted, the Ordinance would increase the deposit required from $80.00 to $100.00 for accounts opened by the owner of the property served and $150.00 for accounts opened by anyone other than the owner of the property served and will impose a $15.00 per month service charge on accounts with unclaimed deposits. The Ordinance also proposes to increase both the charge for reconnection of service to accounts involuntarily disconnected and for newly activated accounts from $20.00 to $50.00. It will also impose a convenience fee of $5.00 per transaction for use of credit or debit cards for utility fee payment. A public hearing on the proposal Ordinance will be held on Monday, February 13, 2012, at 6:30 p.m., or as soon as can be heard in the City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. A copy of the Ordinance may be obtained and persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or by writing to the City of Sopchoppy, P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or by phone at 850-962-4611.Colleen Skipper, Mayor Attest: Jackie Lawhon, Municipal Clerk Publication Date: February 2, 2012City of Sopchoppy, Florida NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF ORDINANCEFEBRUARY 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter it was announced that the Wakulla County Health Department would be enforcing a county policy requiring all septic systems that need to be modi“ ed or repaired to be upgraded to performance based treatment systems immediately, people were angry about the lack of notice. However, according to of“ cials with the county and the health department, this was a policy that was already in place, since 2009. County Health Department Administrator Padraic Juarez said his of“ ce was not aware the policy had been amended in 2009 and were recently noti“ ed they were not enforcing the policy properly and had the county attorney legally interpret the policy and informed the county commissioners of the situation. The announcement was then made that the policy would be enforced the next day, because there wasnt a grace period or phase in of the policy. Prior to this announcement, people applied for a modi“ cation permit which meant they did not have to upgrade their system. Now they will be required to apply for an upgrade. Juarez said unless something changes, they are required to enforce the policy. The process of changing that policy began at the Jan. 24 commission meeting. In the past, Commissioner Randy Merritt has expressed his opinion that he feels the policy needs to be modi“ ed. The septic tank regulations are included in the countys comprehensive plan. Under the countys plan, any new septic system or one that needs to be repaired or modi“ ed must be a performance basted treatment system, regardless of where the home is located. However, there is an exemption for will be those who prove a “ nancial hardship and if the property owner is applying for an existing system permit. We threw the baby out with the bath water,Ž Merritt said of the county modifying the septic regulations. Merritt wants to work with the county health department to modify the policy, as well as incorporate a new study done on the nitrogen pollution of Wakulla Springs. A biologist from Tallahassee said the data doesnt support the theory that homeowners created the problem, the data points to Tallahassee. Several citizens spoke at the meeting, telling commissioners the enforcement of this policy will hurt a lot of homeowners “ nancially. These type of performance based systems cost around $6,000. Resident Teresa Beidler was upset because there wasnt any warning. Its not our problem it was improperly interpreted,Ž Beidler said. Commissioner Mike Stewart was also frustrated that there wasnt any leeway. Included at the end of the policy is, as determined by the Department of Health.Ž Stewart said, Theres your loophole. It gives him leeway.Ž Stewart continued that the way he interprets that portion is that Juarez has the authority to do what he was doing before. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said there is a risk that the county could be sued for not being consistent with its comprehensive plan. We can be sued for anything,Ž Stewart said. Stewart was hoping something could be done to halt the enforcement. The commission agreed not to do anything short term, but decided to move forward with amending the comprehensive plan and get it done as soon as possible. The deadline to run for a seat on the St. Marks City Commission was Jan. 31 and current Commissioner Allen Hobbs and resident Ray Stokes were the only residents to qualify. Hobbs is seeking re-election to seat 3 and Stokes is running for seat 4, which is currently held by Commissioner Keith Ward. Ward did not seek re-election. Both seats are for a threeyear term. Since there are only two candidates, St. Marks will not be holding an election. Both candidates will be sworn in at the next meeting. In other news: € At its meeting on Jan. 12, the commission voted unanimously to amend the citys occupational fees. The one-day occupational fee has been increased to $25.-JENNIFER JENSENCOUNTY COMMISSIONSeptic tank rules may be amendedHobbs and Stokes get seat on commissionThe civil lawsuit against former Wakulla Sheriff David Harvey for a 2009 wreck in which he hit a womans car and left the scene has been settled, according to court documents. The terms of the settlement were not released. On Feb. 20, 2009, Harvey was driving on Rehwinkel Road about 9 p.m. when he struck a car driven by Karla Wright. He drove off from the wreck and reportedly stopped at his driveway on the same road. He admitted he had been drinking before the wreck. The lawsuit, filed in 2011, sought damages from Harvey, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and Wrights insurance company, Progressive Select Insurance, for claims of bodily injury due to negligence. Harvey pleaded in March 2009 to a misdemeanor charge of leaving the scene of an accident and was ordered to serve 90 days administrative probation. Harvey stepped down as sheriff on Oct. 1 to accept a position with the Florida Sheriffs Self-Insurance Fund. Donnie Crum was appointed interim sheriff by Gov. Rick Scott to “ ll the remaining year in Harveys term of of“ ce.… WILLIAM SNOWDEN Lawsuit against Harvey over 2009 wreck settled JOB OPPORTUNITYADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR City of Sopchoppy City of Sopchoppy, Florida NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF ORDINANCE Amending the City of Sopchoppy Comprehensive Plan The City Commission of the City of Sopchoppy gives notice of its intent to consider the adoption of the following Ordinance: If adopted, the Ordinance will make several changes to the Citys Comprehensive Plan in accordance with the Citys previously adopted Evaluation and Appraisal Report. The proposed plan amendment addresses the land within the city limits of the City of Sopchoppy, as shown by the following map.AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPY AMENDING THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPY COMPREHENSIVE PLAN IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTIONS 163.3184 AND 163.31.91, FLORIDA STATUTES; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE. A public hearing on the proposal Ordinance will be held on Monday, February 13, 2012, at 6:30 p.m., or as soon as can be heard in the City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. A copy of the Ordinance may be obtained and persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or by writing to the City of Sopchoppy, P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or by phone at 850-962-4611. Colleen Skipper, Mayor Attest: Jackie Lawhon, Municipal Clerk Publication Date: February 2, 2012 The City of St. Marks Board of Commissioners Election Wednesday, February 15, 2012 7:00 am – 7:00 pmNOTICEThe City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224. JANUARY 19, 26, 2012 FEBRUARY 2, 9, 2012 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Applicant:Anne Boynton Investments, LLC Agent:Ben Boynton Proposal:variance to minimum lot width Tax ID Number:part of 00-00-039-000-09766-000 Existing FLU Map:Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4) Existing Zoning:RR-5 (Section 5-26, LDC) FEMA Flood Info:CŽ zone on Panel 0250-B Parcel Size:26.32+/acres Location:west side of Old Bethal Road, across from Windsong Subdivision Applicant:Anne Boynton Investments, LLC Agent:Ben Boynton Proposal:construct 5 lot residential subdivision Tax ID Number:part of 00-00-039-000-09766-000 Existing FLU Map:Rural 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.4) Existing Zoning:RR-5 (Section 5-26, LDC) FEMA Flood Info:CŽ zone on Panel 0250-B Parcel Size:26.32+/acres Location:west side of Old Bethal Road, across from Windsong Subdivision Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 926-0919 or TDD 926-7962. FEBRUARY 2, 2012

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak outComment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Six arrested in drug, burglary cases • Septic tank rule is misinterpreted • 10-year-old girl struck by car • Happy first birthday, Lily Dodson • Oliver to wed Wheeler • Sheriff’s Report for Jan. 26 • Amos Leonard Jr. obituary € Spears and Poppell to marry thewakullanews.comREADERS WRITE: Follow us onEditor, The News: Wakulla Democratic Womens Club Communications Chair Dr. Rachel Pienta has been asked to serve on the North Florida Finance Team for the Obama Victory Fund 2012. She was given an early heads up about a special event happening on Feb. 6 when the Obama Victory Fund will host a reception with Vice President Joe Biden. This reception will be held at the spacious Challenger Center on Kleman Plaza, just steps from the Capitol Building. Besides Biden, the event will include many Florida leaders and luminaries. The event will take place at 2 p.m. Please make plans to join us in Tallahassee as we show all of Florida and the Obama Campaign Team that Democratic Women in Florida are in it to win it in 2012! Please RSVP to Pienta at drpienta@gmail.com for ticket information and event updates. Note: there is also a drawing for early ticket purchasers … you could be entered to win a dinner at a private home in Tallahassee with the vice president during his visit! Thank you, Joan Hendrix SecretaryWakulla Democratic Executive CommitteeEditor, The News: William, I just read your commentary in the Jan. 12 issue of The Wakulla News regarding the Atlanta Falcons (I hereby give up on the Atlanta Falcons.Ž) I enjoyed your brief recap of the Falcons history of post-season performance and the Braves history of post season performance. Some of the details I did not remember. Your writing so closely describes my feelings of disappointment and ultimately anticipation. Nice work. Thanks, Eddie Sosebee resjr1@gmail.com Editor, The News: The other day upon returning from the doctors of“ ce, we were riding along Capital Circle. When we reached the traf“ c light at Woodville Highway, the car went dead. We were going about 10 to 20 mph. Fortunately, no one was ahead of us. My wife took a quick right turn and was able to stop the car. Within 30 minutes, Callaway Auto & Truck Repair was at our car with his tow truck to help us out. Within a little while, his wife was behind our car and she took our wheelchair and walker in her car. She also drove us home to Panacea. We will always be indebted to Mr. and Mrs. Callaway for their help. We will always used Callaway Auto & Truck Repair when anything goes wrong with our car. Sincerely, Jack and Ali Burton Panacea P.S. … When we picked up our repaired car, a dog cookie had been left in the seat for our dog, Maggie. Editor, The News : On Sunday, Jan. 29, around noon, I was driving to Crawfordville. As I passed the construction site at Micheles convenience store, I noticed a Great Blue Heron standing by the road near a driveway. I turned around and went back to shooŽ the heron away from the highway to keep him from getting hit by an automobile. I realized the heron was sick or injured so, luckily, I managed to corner him and catch him. I put the heron in the camper shell and took him to Chris Beatty at Florida Wild Mammal Association. How nice to be able to have a place so close to take injured wildlife. Chris and her staff are truly angels to take care of all these critters. My point is that Florida Wild Mammal may have to close their doors due to lack of funding. Please, if there is anyway you folks out there can help these people, please help them and pass the word around. What a shame if they have to close their doors. Thank you, Mike Kinsey CrawfordvilleReception with vice president will be held Enjoyed column on Atlanta Falcons Callaway Auto & Truck Repair helped us FLAG is a non-partisan local groupEditor, The News: This election year has many citizens concerned with the direction of our country. Many of us are frustrated and would like to feel more involved in the decisions being made. We are not alone! FLAG (Freedom and Liberty Advocacy Group) is a new group that held its “ rst meeting at Myra Jeans Restaurant last week. We are non-partisan, not af“ liated with any political party, and focused on the national elections. It was wonderful that about 25 people showed up, even with little notice. We spent about an hour getting to know each other and expressing our concerns. The next meeting will be Sunday, Feb. 12 at 4 p.m. at Myra Jeans, when we will start making plans for the future. I feel so much better knowing that our community has others who care about our childrens future and the liberty that we are so fortunate to have in our great nation. Everyone is welcome to attend. Hope to see you! Jeannie Beck PanaceaFlorida Wild Mammal needs fundingEditor, The News: I am John Spicer of the Wakulla County Dive Club. We are deeply grateful to the Florida Parks Service for providing the opportunity for the many people to voice their opinion at last weeks special hearing on the subject of recreational cave diving at Wakulla Springs State Park. As citizens of Wakulla County, and many others for whom the park is a very special place, we appreciate and share many of the concerns expressed by those who spoke at the public hearing. We strongly believe, however, that these concerns can be resolved through proper management, mutual understanding and respect, cooperation and oversight of the diving communities … both those that are allowed to dive Wakulla Springs now, the Woodville Karst Plain Project (WKPP), and those who would like the opportunity in the near future. We believe, if allowed to work together logical solutions can be found. The Mission Statement of the Florida Parks Service reads: to provide resourcebased recreation while preserving, interpreting and restoring natural and cultural resources.Ž There is not a single reference in this statement that both divers and other users of Wakulla Springs State Park cannot endorse, and nothing in the statement precludes conducting their activities in harmony with one another and the environment. On the surface, our request to be allowed to dive Wakulla Springs might be considered very sel“ sh and foolhardy by some. I want to dive there. But think about it for a minute: Why do any of us want to walk or ride a bike down a forest trail, paddle a river or along the coast or watch for birds in the wild? Because we are part of Gods creation and this is the very adventure of life for many. Contemplating the wonder and beauty of what God has made, calls us all out of ourselves. We are reminded of our oneness with God and ability to experience and test our human skills with nature. There is also the very real possibility of bringing economic opportunities and more jobs to our county when it is desperately needed. Although admittedly, cave diving is just one nature-based activity to draw people to Wakulla County, it is an emerging enterprise. But believe me it is here now. Or just ask the operator of the recently opened Wakulla Diving Center in Medart and the local hotels, restaurants and other businesses in Wakulla that increasingly cater to their many students and customers. Again, the WCDC is fully committed to work with the Park Service, Friends and anyone else to make common cause and sense with the Park Service mission statement and for the good of the Springs and Wakulla County. Take only pictures and memories. Leave only bubbles! Thank you, The Rev. John Spicer jspicer99@comcast.netSolutions can be found on diving issueThere is a quote I read recently that said, Journalism is the “ rst rough draft of history.Ž The quote was said by the former publisher of The Washington Post, Philip Graham. I read this quote while standing in the Newseum in Washington, D.C., last weekend. This place is like a candy store for journalists, or at least it was to me. I spent four hours there, dragging along my DC friend and my husband. I am thankful to them for humoring me. The Newseum documents journalism from the very beginning up to now, including some of the greatest and most in” uential stories in history. One gallery features a timeline that showcases the last 500 years, with original front pages of newspapers from around the country, as well as the world. Included among these newspapers is the Boston News Letter, the “ rst successful newspaper in the British Colonies. In 1718, its front page consisted of the misdeeds of several pirates, including the famous pirate Blackbeard. This paper lasted for 75 years. This paper was the “ rst successful paper, but was not the “ rst in North America. The “ rst was Publick Occurrences which was shut down by the Colonial Government in 1690 after producing only one edition. It was shut down because the colonial journalists told bold stories that angered and provoked the British. These journalists were the start in a long line of people trying to spread the truth and being punished for it. This story speaks true to the quote, The free press is the cornerstone of democracy.Ž Other news stories in the timeline gallery include the Revolutionary War beginning in 1775, and the Connecticut Gazettes publication, on July 12, 1776, of the Declaration of Independence. The timeline continues with new stories documenting the Bill of Rights, the Boston Tea Party, Andrew Jacksons funeral, the Union dissolving, the Civil War, and several presidents being shot and assassinated, the sinking of the Titanic, World War I, the rise of Hitler, World War II, the man on the moon, Nixon resigning, etc. In this same room, it tells of the “ rst female journalists, those who paved the way for other women, like myself. The “ rst ones struggled to make it into what was a mans world, but did not waver. It tells the story of a female sports writer who was not allowed to go into the mens locker room after the game, while all the male writers were allowed. She sued and won and from then on, women writers and reporters had the same rights as men when it came to sports journalism. I felt a sense of pride to be able to call myself a journalist and be a part of it, even if it is only a small part. While thinking this, I moved on to another portion of the room which talks about small town journalism and how it is often lost in the discussion of big media … even though non-dailies are the fastest growing segment of the news industry. To give a visual of exactly what they mean, there is a stack of daily newspapers next to non-dailies and the non-dailies are probably four or “ ves times taller than the daily stack. The display goes on to state that community newspapers may not have the same statewide or national clout as larger newspapers, but their readers depend on them and they are every bit as in” uential on the local level. As a small town reporter, I know this “ rsthand. Many people feel you arent as important as reporters with large newspapers. However, we are the ones who are here every day, covering all areas of the community. What was interesting to see in this room was the number of newspapers in this country from year to year. In 1910, there were 2,600 newspapers. In 1990 that number was down to 1,611 and in 2000, the number of newspapers fell to 1,480. On the ground level, there are eight sections of the original Berlin Wall. Surrounding the wall are newspaper articles and displays outlining the history of the wall, its creation as well as its destruction. The wall is covered with drawings and graf“ ti, done by those in West Germany. The other side of the wall is blank and behind that portion stands a three-story guard tower. There are several stories of people attempting to escape over the wall, but who were gunned down by the East German Army. Another powerful and moving exhibit was the one for Sept. 11. There is a World Trade Center antenna in the middle of the museum that rises two stories. Behind the antenna, the entire wall is covered with front pages of newspapers from around the country describing the horri“ c events. Even 10 years later, images of that day still give me goose bumps and bring me to tears. As I stood there, staring up at the newspapers, a group of school kids came into the gallery. Most of them probably too young to remember that day and some of whom probably werent even born. Depictions like this one are necessary, so that younger generations can know our history, even those events we wish never happened. In another gallery, there is a display for each of the “ ve freedoms guaranteed to every citizen: freedom of speech, press, religion, petition and assembly. Behind these displays stands a map of the world. Countries on the map are in green, red or yellow, representing the degree of freedom of the press, whether the country is completely free, partly or not at all. We are lucky enough to live somewhere that is green, completely free. The best nation for freedom of the press is Finland and the worst is North Korea. Not only are there newspapers in the museum, there is also a huge collection of Pulizter Prize photographs. Some of the pictures show children with smiles on their faces, while others show the horror of war and destruction, people being beaten, dying. The pictures are moving and almost too emotional to see all at once. In the Newseum, there is a wall dedicated to those men and women journalists and photojournalists who died while doing their job. I have such respect for those journalists who feel compelled to go into danger to take photos or report news. These people are truly brave and know that, although what they are doing is dangerous, people have a right and a need to know what is happening. And, we, as journalists, have a right to tell.Jennifer Jensen is a reporter for The Wakulla News.Visit to Newseum is emotional Jennifer Jensenjjensen@thewakullanews.net

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 – Page 5Areligious views and eventsChurchBettye Lou Barkley Wilfred Wayne Cooper Sr. Marjorie Magadalyn Hamilton Sylvia Ann Nichols Patricia Ann Ostola Bertha Jean Porter Helen Carolyn StrainObituaries Church NewsMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Regular Sunday Services and Times8:30 am Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship Service 6 pm Evening Service 7 pm Discipleship Training(On Hwy. 319 one block south of the Courthouse)850-926-7896 office www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES TallahasseeWilfred W. W.W.Ž Cooper Sr. died on Jan. 16 in Tallahassee after a lengthy illness. He was born on Nov. 23, 1928, in Quincy, and lived most of his life in the Tallahassee area, spending the last 40 years in Crawfordville. After graduating from high school, he joined the military and proudly served his country in both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Marine Corps. A celebration of life memorial service was held, Sunday, Jan. 22, at Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home Chapel on Timberlane Road in Tallahassee. In lieu of ” owers, memorial donations may be made to the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville FL 32327 or Second Harvest Food Bank, 110 Four Points Way, Tallahassee FL 32305. Survivors include his wife of 60 years, Margaret; a son, Wayne Cooper of Sopchoppy; three daughters, Terresa Haskew (Ben) of Greenville, S.C., Lisa Cooper of Crawfordville and Denise Skipper of Crawfordville; and a brother, Jim Cooper (Sharon) of Havana; as well as seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his father, Charles Cooper; his mother, Louise Clark Cooper Chester; and two sisters, Betty Cooper Beam and Helen Cooper Cook. Marjorie Magadalyn Hamilton, 78, of Crawfordville died on Tuesday, Jan. 17. She was born in Swain County, N.C.. She had lived in Crawfordville for the past 25 years. A memorial service will be held Saturday, Feb. 4, at 1 p.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Survivors include six children, Rena Passani of Vero Beach, Clyde W. Hamilton Jr. of Crawfordville, James Hamilton of Crawfordville, Daniel Hamilton of Tallahassee, Timothy Hamilton of Crawfordville and Michael Hamilton of Crawfordville; a sister, Reona Cannaster of Tennessee; and 16 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband of 45 years, Clyde W. Hamilton Sr. in 1995; her parents, Joseph Arthur Russell and Ollie Freeman Russell; and eight brothers and sisters, Maxine, Edith, Gladys, Phillip, Bill, Fred, Joe and Buddy. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is in charge of the arrangements. Sylvia Ann Nichols, 58, of Crawfordville, died on Saturday, Jan. 28. She was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. She was a Baptist and a homemaker. Visitation was held Tuesday, Jan. 31, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services were held Wednesday, Feb. 1, at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, with burial at Panacea Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include her father, Herbert Brown of Sopchoppy; a daughter, Leslie Strickland of Tallahassee; two grandchildren, Phillip Lee Highsmith Jr. and Micheal Wren Highsmith; a brother, Terry Wayne Brown of Crawfordville; four sisters, Jane Hodge of Forrest, Miss., Cindy Green of Sopchoppy, Paula Annette Brown of Crawfordville and Patricia Michelle Johnson of Crawfordville; and aunt, Sherry Quigg of Crawfordville. She was preceded in death by her mother, Nora Brown, in 2005. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Patricia Ann Ostola, 85, of Crawfordville, died on Wednesday, Jan. 18. She has lived in this area 15 years coming from Elkridge, Md. She was a CPA. Memorial services were held Sunday, Jan. 22, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include her husband of 40 years, Henry Ostola; a son, Dennis Seymour, Annapolis, Md.; and a niece, Susan Wilke, Oscoda, Mich. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Bettye Lou Barkley, 70, died on Thursday, Jan. 26, in Tallahassee. She was born in Tyler, Texas, and had lived in this area for 10 years. She was a Baptist. Survivors include a sister, Vonceal Brackins of Sopchoppy; three nieces, Donna Davis, Jennifer Bradley, and Marie Rudd; as well as numerous great nieces and nephews. Bertha Jean Porter, 71, died on Friday, Jan. 27, after a long illness. She was born March 26, 1940, in Havana. She lived in Wakulla County for 12 years. Graveside services were held on Tuesday, Jan. 31, at Fellowship Cemetery in Wiamauma. Survivors include three daughters, Elaine Hernndez of Ruskin, Debbie Hernndez of Wiamauma and Connie Gilleon of Ona; two sisters, Betty Ann May“ eld and Mary Sue Smith, both of Crawfordville; and eight grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her parents, M.L. and Susie Jones; her daughter, Elizabeth Ann Logan; and her sister, Kathryn Burdette. Helen Carolyn Strain, 71, died on Sunday, Jan. 29, in Crawfordville. She was born in Bainbridge, Ga., and had lived in this area more than 25 years. She was a truck driver. Survivors include two sons, Franklin Hutto of Bainbridge, Ga., and Fredrick Strain of Crawfordville; two daughters, Tammy Newberry of Crawfordville and Tina Heuring of Woodville; two brothers, Sonny Kelly and Frankie Kelly, both of Bainbridge; two sisters, Frances Hatton and Betty Martin, both of Bainbridge; as well as eight grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Richard Strain; a daughter, Deborah Lanier; and a brother, Lamar Kelly. Wilfred Wayne Cooper Sr. Helen Carolyn StrainPatricia Ann Ostola Sylvia Ann Nichols Marjorie M. Hamilton Bettye Lou Barkley Bertha Jean PorterA homecoming revival will be held at Odom Memorial Campground in Sopchoppy the week of Monday, Feb. 6 through Friday, Feb. 10. Services will begin at 7:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be the Rev. Henry Thornton. For more information, please call (850) 984-5579.Revival at Odom CampgroundSome upcoming events at Wakulla United Methodist Church, located at 1584 Old Woodville Highway in Wakulla Station: Thursday, Feb. 2, 10 a.m. … Quilting Group. Saturday, Feb. 4, 6 p.m. … Youth Group, middle school through high school, meets in the Alford Building. Sunday, Feb. 4, 4:30 p.m. … Chancel Choir practice. Tuesday, Feb. 7, 6 p.m. … Praise Team practice. Wednesday, Feb. 8, 6 a.m. … Mens Bible Study with Breakfast following at 8 a.m. in the Alford Building. On Saturday, Feb. 11, at 6 p.m. … the church youth will host a Valentines Dinner in the Alford Building. Please call (850) 421-5741 for reservations. Tickets are $15 per person and $25 per couple.Upcoming events at Wakulla UMCBuckhorn NewsBy ETHEL SKIPPER There are many celebrations going on in our towns and city to remember those who have done great things in the world. But it is also a time to remember the one who made the world and all in it. Every day in full of activity from sunrise to sunset and into the night. As you carry out the responsibilities of every day life, meditate on the example of Christ and the assistance of the spirit of God in prayer for all your needs. Set time aside to pull away and commune with the Lord God, your Father. The 2012 Womens Conference held at Skipper Temple Church in Sopchoppy had more than 100 women attend. It was an icebreaker for some, and a blessing for all. Let us pray for all our sick and shut-in, those in the hospitals and nursing homes, the prisons, and those who have lost loved ones, and let us pray for one another.

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappeningsCommunityChoi marries BacotPeter Choi of Chicago, Ill., and Lauren Bacot of Crawfordville, were married on October 1, 2011. The bride is the daughter of Chris Bacot and Rebecca Ferrell. She graduated from Wakulla High School in 2001, University of Central Florida in 2005, and Southeastern Louisiana University in 2008 with a Masters degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders. She is currently employed as a speech pathologist with a home health agency in Melbourne. He graduated from Virginia Military Institute in 2003 with a degree in Electrical Engineering and earned a Masters degree from the Air Force Institute of Technology in Engineering Management. He is actively serving as an Explosive Ordnance Disposal Of“ cer in the United States Air Force. The couple would like to thank all friends and relatives who were able to attend. Lauren Bacot and Peter ChoiHappy “ rst birthday, EthanEthan William Meister celebrated his “ rst birthday on Jan. 28. He is the son of Jessica and Jacob Meister of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are Cindy and Wendell Miller of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Judy and John Meister of Crawfordville. His maternal great-grandmother is Martha Clenney of Tallahassee. Ethan W. MeisterHabitat for Humanity holds ra e and drawing for Christmas turkeySpecial to The NewsThroughout the year, Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County had several free drawings and hot dog and coke days at the ReStore. Alice Stokley won the Half and Half Raffle and Marilyn Swedberg won the Christmas Turkey presented by the ReStore volunteer, Mary Appleton. We are grateful for a prosperous year and thankful for the people of Wakulla County for your support. Your donations and support have been the reason for our success. We are looking forward to 2012 as we will be starting our next house in February or March. We thank you for you support in 2011 and continued support in 2012. Please watch our marquee for special events. Please be sure to visit the Habitat ReStore located at 940 Shadeville Road, open Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. or call 9264544. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHabitat for Humanity holds half and half raf” e.BirthsJohn and Deana Vause Walker, of Tallahassee, announce the birth of their daughter, Kayden Bryce Walker, on Jan. 6. She weighed 8 pounds and was 18.5-inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Eugene and June Vause of Crawfordville. Her paternal grandparents are Beth Amundsen of Hayesville, N.C., Paul Amundsen of Tallahassee and the late John Walker. Her maternal greatgrandparents are Virginia Creel Barnes and the late Bill Barnes and Jackie Vause and the late Durwood Vause.Kayden WalkerAaron and Sherri Parsons of Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughter, Kara Briann Parsons, on Dec. 16. She was 8 pounds, 6 ounces and 21-inches long. She has a sister, Leila Jane Parsons, who is 4. Her paternal grandparents are Mark and Karen Parsons of Sopchoppy. Her maternal grandparents are Owen Bellamy and Karen Bellamy, both of Crawfordville. Her paternal greatgrandparents are Clay Parsons of Sopchoppy and the late Jane Parsons. Her maternal greatgrandparents are Jerry and Myra Wood of Valdosta, Ga., and Louis and Chris Bellamy of Swainsboro, Ga., and Alma Kirby of Tallahassee. Her maternal greatgreat-grandparent is Marzell Burrell of Alger, Ohio.Kara B. ParsonsNAMI o ers family-to-family classNAMI-Wakulla will be offering a free, 12-week course for families, friends and partners of individuals who have a mental illness. The Family-to-FamilyŽ class will meet Mondays, beginning on Feb. 6 from 5:30 to 8:00 p.m. in Myra Jeans Restaurant conference room. The course covers scienti“ c “ ndings about mental illness and teaches techniques for handling mental illness within the family. For more information and to pre-register call the of“ ce at 926-1033. The class will run Feb. 6 through April 23. 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 LUNCH PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 reo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 – Page 7A education newsSchoolCoach Tomaini honored for accomplishments First graders gather donations for animal shelter SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFirst grade students at Medart Elementary School donate money to help the animal shelter. Special to The NewsThe “ rst grade classes of Medart Elementary School donated $200 to the Wakulla Animal Shelter. They collected Pennies for PuppiesŽ in December, in lieu of exchanging gifts. We wanted our students to experience the joy of giving, and chose a worthy group for our efforts,Ž said the “ rst grade team. The first graders then received a kind thank you note from Heide Clifton, vice president of CHAT of Wakulla. The students plan a Doggie DialogueŽ as they write letters to the pups in the shelter. They hope the letters and drawings will brighten the puppies home as they await adoption.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSchool board members Jerry Evans, Greg Thomas, Coach Buddy Tomaini, School Board Chair Mike Scott, Superintendent David Miller and school board members Becky Cook and Ray Gray.Special to The NewsDenny BuddyŽ Tomaini was honored at the Jan. 17, School Board Meeting for his lifetime career of making a difference in the lives of Wakulla County students as a teacher, coach, athletic director, and dean of students. A Proclamation of Recognition noted his accomplishments and of“ cially named the Wakulla High School wrestling facility The Buddy Tomaini Wrestling Room.Ž Buddy Tomaini is considered the catalyst for shaping wrestling programs in the entire Big Bend of Florida. His has positively in” uenced untold students and other coaches,Ž stated Superintendent David Miller. The Proclamation of Recognition cited such accomplishments as starting the “ rst wrestling program at Wakulla High School in 1976. He went on to win four District Championships in seven years and to coach the “ rst individual State Champion at Wakulla High School. Coach Tomaini was also issued the Lifetime Achievement Award for Athletic DirectorsŽ by the Florida High School Athletic Association. Friends, former students, and family, including his wife Janice, attended to honor him at the School Board recognition.WCS selling strawberriesWakulla Christian School has begun its annual strawberry sale. These delicious, Plant City strawberries are being presold, in 12-pint ” ats for $20 until Tuesday, Feb. 7. All strawberries will be delivered and ready for pickup, Friday, Feb. 10 at Wakulla Christian School, 1391 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Order the strawberries today. Any questions, please contact the school of“ ce at 850926-5583.Wakulla ranks highest in Big Bend on FCAT scoresSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Department of Education released an official ranking of state school districts on Monday, Jan. 23, and the Wakulla County School District ranked No. 11 and had the tenth highest scores in the state as two districts above Wakulla tied in total points. The numerical ranking is based on each schools total points derived from FCAT (Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test) scores. The total is the sum of scores for students in grades 3 through 11 for reading, math, science and writing; learning gains in reading and math; and scores for learning gains in reading and math among the lowest quartile of students in each school. Stated Superintendent David Miller, I am proud of Wakullas high ranking in the state. The Wakulla schools thrive because of our dedicated teachers, staff, administrative leadership, involved parents, supportive community, and of course our hard-working students. Even with more rigorous standards in reading and math, our students performed well on the new FCAT 2.0 last spring. We continue to look for ways to maintain and to improve on our high standards for excellence in educating our children. They are our No. 1 priority.Ž Wakulla ranked higher that any of the surrounding counties and was the highest in the Big Bend. Superintendent Miller acknowledged that there are many other factors that make a school district successful, but noted, There will always be accountability in education, so we try to embrace that as one way we can assess that we have faithfully taught the state standards.Ž He went on to say, I look to additional means beyond FCAT to validate the success of our school system, such as passing 5year District Accreditation with ” ying colors this year; having an outstanding graduation rate; and seeing students engagement with hands-on lessons in so many endeavors like Project Learning Tree.Ž This is Wakullas sixth consecutive year as an AŽ rated school district.Send your school news to editor@thewakullanews.net or jjensen@thewakullanews.net Classes$20 each from 6 -9 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center February 20 Ecotourism Business Basics February 28 North Florida Trees March 14 Weather and Tides March 19 Wakulla Landscape March 21 Florida Archaeology & Pre-history Field Trips$40 each on Saturdays Times vary February 25 St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge March 3 River Ecosystems/Tree ID March 17 Kayaking March 24 Fort San Marcos March 31 Leon SinksWakulla Ecotourism InstituteExplore the natural history of the Big Bend area and learn the basics of starting a nature-based business with TCCs ecotourism classes and guided eld trips. Or take the entire 90hour Green Guide Certication Program for only $320! For the complete class schedule or more information, call(850) 922-6290or visitworkforce.tcc..edu/WakullaTCC is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access campus. Visit www.tcc..edu for full statement. JUMP START THIS SCHOOL YEAR TODAY! ELEMENTARY & MIDDLE SCHOOLIntroduction to concepts & skills for each grade level Algebra 1 End-of-Course Exam Prep(Passing score required to earn credit for the class)Algebra 2 One-on-One & Small Group TutoringACT & SAT PrepSAT Test Date … Prep Class Register by February 27 March 3 March 10 ACT Test Date … Prep Class Register by April 1 April 7 April 14Locally owned/operated by Melisa Taylor3119-B Crawfordville Hwy.850-926-2179 Carolina Bandannas850-524-9103GOTCHARACTER PANACEA HATSAFACT CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNE D JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 IF DON TLET 2012 SLIPAWAY ƒONLY IHADCALLED L AST Y EARƒ

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com sports news and team views SportsSpecial to The NewsCrossrails Beginning Rider Champion Victoria Stewart, a student at Riversprings Middle School, moved up a level in June to Short Stirrup Hunter & Equitation. She went on to win champion in both of those divisions, as well riding A.H. Confetti. Stewarts personal horse, Just Rowdy, was champion in the Green Horse Crossrails division ridden by Bethany Haucke. Tory Russell a part-time resident of Wakulla County had an outstanding season. She was champion in the Childrens Pony Hunter division and the 11 and under Equitation riding A.H. Thief of Hearts. A.H. Thief of Hearts was also named the High Point Pony Hunter for 2011. Russell was also the recipient of one of four scholarships awarded by SHJA. Bethany Haucke, who apprentices under Gay Allen at Ace High, was also a scholarship winner. As well as winning Champion in the Baby Green Hunter and Pleasure Pony Division on A.H. Rolling In Clover, and Intermediate Hunter Champion on A.H. Sharp Dressed Man. Bethany also won the prestigious SHJA Mini-Medal and best of all the Lawson May“ eld Memorial Award for Sportsmanship. Also receiving awards for 2011 were Destiny Stephens, Abby Jameson and Kai Wagner for Walk Trot, Tyler Vickers for Lead line and Chloe Wagner for Ground rails. Other Wakulla County riders winning awards in Southern Hunter Jumper while riding at Ace High Stables were Katelyn Whit“ eld in Schooling and Low Hunter on A.H. Stonewashed, and Reserve Champion on Kay Cees Fancy Switch in Children Hunter. Marissa Rossetti was Champion in Long Stirrup Hunter and Reserve in Equitation while riding A.H. Stonewashed. Kayla Rossetti won in Beginning Rider Crossrails. To top the evening off, A.H.Confetti was awarded the SHJA Horse of the year. Wakulla County horses and riders were well represented in the Southern Hunter Jumper Association.EQUESTRIANAce High Stables is Southern Hunter-Jumper championsGIRLS SOCCERLady War Eagles fall SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAward-winning riders from Ace High Stables.Staff reportThe Lady War Eagles made a great run, but fell to Pensacola Catholic 2-0 in the regional semi-“ nals on Friday, Jan. 27, in Pensacola. The Crusaders scored with 13:28 remaining in the “ rst half, and again with 7:38 left in the game. Wakullas goalkeeper Alicia Porter had 16 saves. Several days earlier, on Tuesday, Jan. 24, the Lady War Eagles had rallied back from being down 2-0to defeat Panama City Bay by a score of 3-2 to win the quarter“ nals. Scoring for Wakulla were Madison Harris, who had the game-winning goal, and Bre Williams and Margaret Wiedeman. The Lady War Eagles “ nished the season 19-8-2.BOYS SOCCERBoys make it to quarter“ nalStaff reportThe War Eagles were scheduled to host Pensacola Catholic in the regional quarter“ nals on Tuesday, Jan. 31. The team beat Florida High in the district “ nal on Friday after a 1-1 tie came down to penalty shots. The War Eagles got off to a 1-0 lead with a goal by Hunter Phillips in the 13th minute, but Florida High tied it eight minutes later. The second half was scoreless, as were two overtime periods. In the penalty kicks, Wakullas John Drake, Josh Vick and Jacob Martinez scored; while goalkeeper Brandon Trussell stopped three of the four shooters he faced to seal the district title.WRESTLINGWar Eagles win championshipSpecial to The NewsThe War Eagle wrestling team cruised to a win at the Big Bend Championships held at Godby High School. Wakulla placed “ rst with a team score of 247.50, well ahead of Lincoln with a score of 201. Seven champions … Zack Malik (112), Bill Morgan (120), Kevon White (132), Travis Hinsey (138), James Douin (170), Luke Taylor (182) and Cole Woofter (220) … lead the team to the “ rst place “ nish. Rounding out the score was Chris Grif“ n (HW) in second, Drew Delong (160), DyJuan Carney (126) and Keith Goddard (195) placing third, and Joshua Douin (106) and Carl Atkinson (145) both placing fourth. According to Coach William Pafford, many would have been shocked at that news at the start of the season. We were the underdogs going into this and now all of a sudden, at a regional tournament, everyones scared of us.Ž Going into the next round, Coach Pafford simply looks to keep his team focused. The biggest thing is not to overlook anyone. I think a couple of my guys did that today and just need to give it 110 percent every match.Ž The District tournament is Saturday, Feb. 4, at Florida High School at 10 a.m. Special to The News After much anticipation, the International Gold Gymnastics world-class training center is finally open. This Wakulla gymnasium will train top gymnasts, as well as provide the county with a fun place for children of all ages to safely learn gymnastics under the expert supervision of IGGs caring and supportive staff. IGG has built a facility in Wakulla County that Tallahassee and the rest of the country envies. The new gym proudly displays mounds of “ rst-rate equipment that has been certi“ ed by the USA Gymnastics Federation. International Gold Gymnastics offers a variety of recreational and competitive programs for students ages 12 months to adult with the mission to build the strength, flexibility, coordination, con“ dence, discipline, and self-esteem of each participant. The new Wakulla facility also features before and after school programs, birthday parties and summer and winter camps. IGG prides itself on quality coaching and technique with an excellent student/ coach ratio and providing your child with the best gymnastics training available in the Big Bend area. All IGG coaches are safety certified and trained. The gym is owned and operated by Alexander and Olga Babakhin, former Russian Olympic coaches. IGG … Crawfordville has already had quite a few successes, including Wakulla County gymnasts working their way to be a top-six team in the entire state of Florida and have won many individual state titles. If you have any questions or want to come try out a free trial class, IGG can be contacted by phone, at (850) 926-4431, or by email, at Go-IGG@hotmail. com. Visit the website, IGGymnastics.com, or stop by their location at 54 Feli Way in Crawfordville.GYMNASTICSIGG opens state-of-the-art facility Young gymnasts at International Gold Gymnastics new Crawfordville facility. WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT2012 SPRING SPORTS REGISTRATIONSaturdays, Feb. 4 & Feb. 11 SPORTAGEFEE T-BALL MINOR LEAGUE4&5$40.00 T-BALL MAJOR LEAGUE6&7$40.00 PITCHING MACHINE LEAGUE7&8$45.00 WAKULLA CAL RIPKEN LEAGUE Minor *9&10$95.00 WAKULLA CAL RIPKEN LEAGUE Major*11&12$95.00 (All Cal Ripken players must attend the Skills Assessment being conducted during registration times. Please bring your child with baseball gearglove, batting helmet and bat to registration so he may run, throw, catch and hit.) BABE RUTH ASSOCIATION *13 to 15 $85.00 GIRLS SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION *7 to 9$55.00 GIRLS SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION *10 to 13 $55.00 Means a Copy of Birth Certi cate Required All leagues age determining dates are April 30th, except Girls Softball age determining date is January 1st. All children must provide proof of health insurance or purchase the $10.00 policy. Registration DEADLINE for T-ball and Pitching Machine League is 2/11/12 12:00 P.M. All of the Associations deadlines may vary so please sign up early so your child secures a spot. You may also call 926-7227 for more information or go to our webpage at www.WCPRD.com. Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.-----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 926-3281 FEBRUARY 9TH AT 6:30 PMApalachee Bay Volunteer Fire DepartmentShell PointCOME JOINS US FOR You could be the Winner of$25000Dont worry about snacks. We will have a Snack Bar! There will also be a 50/50 Raf”e and a Door Prize. 6-Pack Packets $10.00 • Interior Remodeling • Doors • Floors • Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling • Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS dress store50%-60% OFF850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE) The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree All Ladies ApparelThe best Alterations, Furniture Upholstry & Re nishing

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 – Page 9A Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsBy TODD W. SCHROEDER Florida Forest ServiceOver the past weekend, the Florida Forest Service hosted wounded warriors on Lake Talquin State Forest as part of Operation Outdoor Freedom. Through the program, four wounded veterans were treated to a special opportunity deer hunt on the Lines Tract at Lake Talquin State Forest. The hunters were provided a weekend full of outdoor adventure, from guided hunts to “ shing … all of which was made possible through donations from businesses and families in Gadsden, Liberty, Leon, and Wakulla counties. The Operation Outdoor Freedom hunting camp was based out of the Florida Forest Services Bear Creek Educational facility, which is a fully capable ADA facility allowing veterans with limited mobility to participate in the event. Oversize shooting houses were constructed and placed in locations to allow for easy travel and accessibility for the hunters. Operation Outdoor Freedom is a program of the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services that allows the Florida Forest Service to designate special areas on Florida state forests for use by wounded warriors of the U.S. Armed Forces. Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam worked with Senator Alan Hays and Representative Greg Stuebe to pass the measure during the 2011 legislative session that established Operation Outdoor Freedom. This program builds on an existing partnership between the Florida Forest Service and the Wounded Warrior Project, which has hosted hunts on Florida State Forests in recent years. With the fall deer hunt completed, plans for the Operation Outdoor Freedom spring turkey hunt on Lake Talquin State Forest are underway. If you are interested in supporting this project, or need more information, contact Chris Worrell, Florida Forest Service, at (850) 627-6156 or email chris.worrell@freshfrom” orida.com.. For updated information about the Florida Forest Service, visit www.FloridaForstService.com or follow the Service on Facebook or Twitter. EDITORS NOTE: Capt. Jody Campbells fishing column, From the Dock, is now published every other week.Operation Outdoor Freedom hosts wounded warriors at Lake Talquin SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWounded warriors camped at the Florida Forest Service Bear Creek Educational facility to enjoy a weekend of hunting with the Operation Outdoor Freedom program.from U.S. Forest Service WASHINGTON, Jan. 26, … U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today signaled the U.S. Department of Agricultures intent to issue a new planning rule for Americas 193-million acre National Forest System that seeks to deliver stronger protections for forests, water, and wildlife while supporting the economic vitality of our rural communities, by releasing online a Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for the National Forest System Land Management Planning Rule. Todays action honors the commitment made by Secretary Vilsack in his 2009 speech on forest management, and by the President in the Americas Great Outdoors Report. USDA and the Forest Service carefully considered nearly 300,000 comments received on the proposed rule and draft environmental impact statement issued last February, to develop the agencys preferred course of action for “ nalizing the planning rule. This is included in the PEIS released today as USDAs preferred alternative. The most collaborative rulemaking effort in agency history has resulted in a strong framework to restore and manage our forests and watersheds and help deliver countless bene“ ts to the American people,Ž said Secretary Vilsack. Our preferred alternative will safeguard our natural resources and provide a roadmap for getting work done on the ground that will restore our forests while providing job opportunities for local communities.Ž The preferred alternative emphasizes collaboration and strengthens the role of public involvement and dialogue throughout the planning process. It also would require the use of the best available scienti“ c information to inform decisions. Highlights of the preferred alternative include: € Plans must include components that seek to restore and maintain forests and grasslands. €Plans would include requirements to maintain or restore watersheds, water resources, water quality including clean drinking water, and the ecological integrity of riparian areas. € Plans would be required to provide habitat for plant and animal diversity and species conservation. These requirements are intended to keep common native species common, contribute to the recovery of threatened and endangered species, conserve proposed and candidate species, and protect species of conservation concern. €Plans would provide for multiple uses, including outdoor recreation, range, timber, watershed, wildlife and “ sh. € Plans would be required to provide opportunities for sustainable recreation, and to take into account opportunities to connect people with nature. € Opportunities for public involvement and collaboration would be required throughout all stages of the planning process. The preferred alternative would provide opportunities for Tribal consultation and coordination with state and local governments and other federal agencies, and includes requirements for outreach to traditionally underrepresented communities. € Plans require the use of the best available scienti“ c information to inform the planning process and documentation of how science was used in the plan. € The planning framework provides a more efficient and adaptive process for land management planning, allowing the Forest Service to respond to changing conditions. This approach requires plans to conserve and restore watersheds and habitats while strengthening community collaboration during the development and implementation of individual plans,Ž said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell. Special to The NewsOn Jan., 25, 10 Shallow SeagrassŽ caution markers were installed delineating shallow seagrass beds from Carrabelle to the east end of Lanark Reef to protect seagrasses from being scarred by boaters unfamiliar with the area depths and habitats. The caution markers will greatly help protect 900 acres of fragile seagrass beds along Lanark Reef. Instrumental in the installation process were Apalachicola Riverkeeper and faculty, students and president of the board from AMIkids Panama City Marine Institute and AMIkids West Florida. The installation would not have been a success without AMIkids Panama City Marine Institute and AMIkids West Florida,Ž said Dan Tonsmeire, Riverkeeper and Executive Director of Apalachicola Riverkeeper. These groups were absolutely the best thing we could have had to do that installation. It went like clockwork.Ž AMIkids started in 1969 doing environmental research and restoration projects with juvenile offenders and 43 years later, the kids still “ nd that working in the outdoors and doing good for the environment helps them reset and start over fresh and with a new outlook. Seagrasses are ” owering plants that live underwater in shallow coastal areas. Seagrass habitats, which may take many decades to form, provide many bene“ ts to the “ sh, wildlife and people of Florida. These seagrass beds provide foraging and nursery habitat for over 2 million juvenile grouper and other Gulf species that spend part of their life cycle in near shore waters and return to the Gulf when more fully grown. According to the Department of Environmental Protection, 70 percent of Floridas marine recreational “ sh depend upon seagrass communities at some time in their lives. Seagrass is fragile and can be inadvertently harmed by human activities in and around our coastal waters. Caution should be taken by boaters when motoring through seagrass beds. Not all shallow seagrass beds are marked so if in doubt, boaters should go slow and pole the boat through grasses if necessary to protect the seagrass beds. The Apalachicola Riverkeeper is a non-pro“ t organization that monitors the Apalachicola River. For more information, visit www.apalachicolariverkeeper.org.Shallow Seagrass markers installed near Lanark ReefNew planning rule seeks to restore forests through science IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 26 o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED GROUPER LIMIT IS PARTNE R… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service *Take 60% off Tender Hugs and Kisses with ChocolatesŽ and 20% off all products over $29.00. Discounts: (i) apply to the regul ar price of the products, (ii) will appear upon checkout and cannot be combined with other offers or discounts, unless speci“ ed, and (i ii) do not apply to gift cards or certi“ cates, same-day or international delivery, shipping & handling, taxes, or third-party hosted prod ucts (e.g. wine). Discounts not valid on bulk or corporate purchases of 10 units or more. Images in this advertisement may include upgraded, prem ium containers which are available for an additional charge. Prices valid while supplies last. Offer expires 2/28/2012. SAVE60% Show a little love this Valentines Day with this ruby red tulip and deep blue iris bouquet coupled with delicious chocolates! Hurry! Order now! Visit www.pro” owers.com/glow or call 866.691.2033 Site Price: $49 98 +s/h+s/hYou Pay:$1999

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Underwater WakullaBy Travis Kersting Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org A vast selection of options is available to properly personalize your car today. Most cars come with a standard package of conveniences including power locks, mirrors and windows while others such as GPS can be added if not already included. Safety features, like airbags, are now available on nearly every model, but just 15 years ago they were rare. Diving is no different. Safety has come full circle and now a large portion of the kit you carry is there to function as your personal airbag.Ž Did you learn to dive 40 or 50 years ago? If so, you may have learned to dive without a buoyancy compensatorŽ or BCD. Now its uncommon to see a diver without one. The modern BCD functions is much more than a buoyancy device. Most come with pockets, attachment points, even integrated breathing devices (an extra regulator). The BCD is designed to work like a life vest on the surface and to help the diver remain neutrally buoyant while underwater. It should be thought of as little more than a bag which can have air added or removed from it and by doing so increase or decrease your buoyancy. The BCD comes in a variety of con“ gurations but there are three basic foundations. The most common is what divers call the jacketŽ BCD. The bladder wraps around the divers torso and promotes an upright position in the water, when fully in” ated. This is of course a favorable thing when on the surface, especially in rough conditions. Most modern jacket style BCD systems have some way of adding lead to the diver to help keep them down (known as integrated weights), though the less expensive versions still require a weight belt. They usually have a few attachment points in the form of D-rings and they come in various sizes. If you should grow/shrink, a jacket BCD will not grow/shrink with you. The second standard in BCD systems is the back in” ationŽ type. The system consists of a harness that is sewn to the buoyancy bladder which lies parallel to the divers back torso. This allows the diver the advantage of a more horizontal pro“ le while at depth which makes the diver more ef“ cient. However, on the surface the diver can be forced face down in the water if they over-in” ate the buoyancy bladder. This can be overcome with practice. These BCDs are usually available with integrated weights and accessory pockets but like their jacket cousin, they lack much for size adjustability. The third option is a system consisting of nothing more than a buoyancy bladder, or wing.Ž This wing can be purchased in many sizes to suit various cylinder sizes or con“ gurations or other requirements. The diver must then also have a way to attach the wing to themselves. This comes in the form of a backplate and harness. Together we call this system a backplate and wing (BP/W). The system allows for lots of modularity and customization. The plate is available in several materials including a soft version, stainless steel or even fancy composites. The plate allows the user to thread harness material through to make a harness to “ t a diver of nearly any size. If you grow/shrink then you need only take in a bit of harness webbing or buy a longer piece and rethread it. Either way the cost is free to $15 versus buying a whole new BCD system like with a jacket or back in” ation system. This allows the user to adjust the harness for different suit thicknesses also. Like the back-in” ation BCD the BP/W has a risk of pushing the face down on the surface if over-in” ated. If you want pockets or integrated weights they can be added but many times the plate can be made of a material which eliminates the need for lead. The ridged plate helps to stabilize heavy cylinders on the divers back and the whole system promotes better trim in the water. Better trim equates to more ef“ ciency, comfort, and lower air consumption which equates to longer bottom times. The cost works out to be about the same, up front. If you wear out a component of a BP/W then you need only replace that component so the savings over time can be enormous. If you upgrade to double cylinders, as with cave diving, you need only buy a larger wing but retain the rest of the system. If you grow your diving needs to cave or wreck penetration or rebreathers, a BP/W will grow with you. Dont be afraid to try something new, it could change the way you experience the underwater world.It is hard to think about boating with this latest cold spell we are having as I write this, but soon we will all be wondering where the winter has gone. With one of the primary missions of the Coast Guard Auxiliary being that of public education (PE), our Flotilla staff Of“ cer for PE has been hard at work preparing for an exciting year. Last year, the Auxiliary struggled nationally to have a successful PE program. The down economy and everyone trying to save where they can, class enrollment was minimal. However, we are part of the Coast Guard, and we cannot be deterred easily! We are Semper Paratus, always ready to meet the challenges put before us. This year has started out with a goal to get our public education off the ground once again. Mark Rosen sent in the following from Saturday: The first Public Education class of the year presented by USCG Auxiliary Flotilla 12 was well attended at the of“ ces of the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission of“ ces in Tallahassee on Saturday, Jan. 28. Led by Public Education Of“ cer Alex Gulde, the course covered subjects such as Emergencies on the Water, Boating Safely, The Legal Side of Florida Boating, Water Sports and other related topics. The class was assisted by FWC Capt. Tom Shipp. The instructors were members of the ” otilla: Bob Asztalos, Chuck Hickman, Larry Kolk, Duane Treadon, Tim Ashley and Mark Rosen. Vice Flotilla Commander Bill Wannall lent support. Members of the public seeking information on future classes should call Alex Gulde at 9801963 or contact him via email at fso-pe@ uscgaux.net. From what I have also heard from others assisting, the presentation by Capt. Shipp was a nice blend of the USCG materials as well as local rules and regulations. There was a great turnout with 15 students attending, including three teenagers. All passed the class and are now better prepared to hit the water and enjoy all our area has to offer. For many of us, joining the Auxiliary was due to our love of being out on the water and wanting to share our knowledge with others so that they can also enjoy the water and return home safely. Until next week, remember safe boating is no accident. It is our hope that we can help make sure no boaters in our area are part of the statistics! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA safe boating class in Tallahassee with Coast Guard Auxiliarys Bob Asztalos. Coast Guard Auxiliarys Tim Ashley instructing at the safe boating class in Tallahassee.Special to The NewsMarinas, yacht clubs, boat dealers, “ shing clubs, marine equipment companies, and other companies in the maritime industry across America are sponsoring fund-raising parties to help launch the Wounded Nature … Working Veterans Coast Guard boat. Miami maritime attorney David Neblett wants each facility hosting a party to help finance an environmental cleanup vessel honoring the U.S. Coast Guard. On an average day the Coast Guard saves 12 lives, responds to 64 search and rescue cases, and investigates 13 marine accidents and 10 pollution incidents. They screen 720 commercial vessels and 183,000 crew and passengers, and inspect 68 containers, keeping 842 pounds of cocaine off the streets each day. Your Coast Guard works hard for you 24/7! As the smallest branch of the military, the USCG does not always have the same level of support for their causes as the other branches. Therefore, support for Coast Guard related projects need the support of the general public. The fundraisers will provide an opportunity for the public to show support for our CG. Every participant in this national campaign will receive a Team Coast GuardŽ sticker for their boat or car. Each individual donating $2,500 will receive a bronze appreciation plaque, for $5,000 a gold level plaque, and $10,000 for platinum level plaque. Facilities raising a total donation of $25,000 (ticket sales and member donations) will receive a bronze level plaque, for $50,000 a gold level plaque, and platinum level plaque for raising $100,000. Members of the general public and companies who do not belong to a yacht club or marina also have an opportunity to participate online by making a direct donation at www.woundednature.org and entering USCGŽ in the comments section. All 2012 donations will be used to fund the houseboat (Victory Vessel) honoring the Coast Guard. This boat will be used on the East Coast to clean beaches and educate the public about litter. It will be staffed by recently discharged veterans. Wounded Nature … Working Veterans is an independent 501(c)3 non-pro“ t that is not a component of the U.S. Coast Guard. This event is not sponsored by the USCG and is not utilizing tax payers dollars or active duty CG personnel to promote these events. If any organization is interested in hosting a Coast Guard event, please contact Rudy Socha at rudy@ woundednature.org or call (440) 452-1042.Wounded Nature Working Veterans boat fundraiser Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday y Thu Feb 2, 12 Fri Feb 3, 12 Sat Feb 4, 12 Sun Feb 5, 12 Mon Feb 6, 12 Tue Feb 7, 12 Wed Feb 8, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 12:26 AM 3.3 ft. 1:08 AM 3.5 ft. 1:49 AM High 0.1 ft. 4:41 AM -0.2 ft. 5:36 AM -0.4 ft. 6:18 AM -0.7 ft. 6:54 AM -0.8 ft. 7:27 AM -0.8 ft. 7:57 AM -0.8 ft. 8:27 AM Low 2.1 ft. 11:34 AM 2.4 ft. 12:18 PM 2.7 ft. 12:53 PM 2.9 ft. 1:25 PM 3.0 ft. 1:54 PM 3.2 ft. 2:22 PM 3.3 ft. 2:48 PM High 1.7 ft. 3:36 PM 1.6 ft. 4:58 PM 1.3 ft. 5:54 PM 1.1 ft. 6:38 PM 0.8 ft. 7:18 PM 0.4 ft. 7:57 PM 0.1 ft. 8:36 PM Low 2.5 ft. 9:30 PM 2.7 ft. 10:48 PM 2.9 ft. 11:41 PM High Thu Feb 2, 12 Fri Feb 3, 12 Sat Feb 4, 12 Sun Feb 5, 12 Mon Feb 6, 12 Tue Feb 7, 12 Wed Feb 8, 12 Date 3.2 ft. 12:23 AM 3.4 ft. 1:05 AM 3.5 ft. 1:46 AM High 0.1 ft. 4:38 AM -0.2 ft. 5:33 AM -0.5 ft. 6:15 AM -0.7 ft. 6:51 AM -0.9 ft. 7:24 AM -0.9 ft. 7:54 AM -0.8 ft. 8:24 AM Low 2.2 ft. 11:31 AM 2.5 ft. 12:15 PM 2.7 ft. 12:50 PM 2.9 ft. 1:22 PM 3.1 ft. 1:51 PM 3.3 ft. 2:19 PM 3.4 ft. 2:45 PM High 1.8 ft. 3:33 PM 1.7 ft. 4:55 PM 1.4 ft. 5:51 PM 1.1 ft. 6:35 PM 0.8 ft. 7:15 PM 0.5 ft. 7:54 PM 0.1 ft. 8:33 PM Low 2.5 ft. 9:27 PM 2.7 ft. 10:45 PM 3.0 ft. 11:38 PM High Thu Feb 2, 12 Fri Feb 3, 12 Sat Feb 4, 12 Sun Feb 5, 12 Mon Feb 6, 12 Tue Feb 7, 12 Wed Feb 8, 12 Date 2.7 ft. 12:17 AM 2.9 ft. 1:02 AM 3.1 ft. 1:44 AM 3.2 ft. 2:25 AM High 0.1 ft. 5:45 AM -0.2 ft. 6:40 AM -0.4 ft. 7:22 AM -0.6 ft. 7:58 AM -0.7 ft. 8:31 AM -0.8 ft. 9:01 AM -0.7 ft. 9:31 AM Low 2.0 ft. 12:10 PM 2.2 ft. 12:54 PM 2.5 ft. 1:29 PM 2.7 ft. 2:01 PM 2.8 ft. 2:30 PM 3.0 ft. 2:58 PM 3.1 ft. 3:24 PM High 1.5 ft. 4:40 PM 1.4 ft. 6:02 PM 1.2 ft. 6:58 PM 1.0 ft. 7:42 PM 0.7 ft. 8:22 PM 0.4 ft. 9:01 PM 0.1 ft. 9:40 PM Low 2.3 ft. 10:06 PM 2.5 ft. 11:24 PM High Thu Feb 2, 12 Fri Feb 3, 12 Sat Feb 4, 12 Sun Feb 5, 12 Mon Feb 6, 12 Tue Feb 7, 12 Wed Feb 8, 12 Date 2.3 ft. 12:18 AM 2.5 ft. 1:00 AM 2.6 ft. 1:41 AM High 0.1 ft. 4:52 AM -0.1 ft. 5:47 AM -0.3 ft. 6:29 AM -0.5 ft. 7:05 AM -0.6 ft. 7:38 AM -0.6 ft. 8:08 AM -0.6 ft. 8:38 AM Low 1.6 ft. 11:26 AM 1.8 ft. 12:10 PM 2.0 ft. 12:45 PM 2.2 ft. 1:17 PM 2.3 ft. 1:46 PM 2.4 ft. 2:14 PM 2.5 ft. 2:40 PM High 1.2 ft. 3:47 PM 1.1 ft. 5:09 PM 1.0 ft. 6:05 PM 0.8 ft. 6:49 PM 0.5 ft. 7:29 PM 0.3 ft. 8:08 PM 0.1 ft. 8:47 PM Low 1.9 ft. 9:22 PM 2.0 ft. 10:40 PM 2.2 ft. 11:33 PM High Thu Feb 2, 12 Fri Feb 3, 12 Sat Feb 4, 12 Sun Feb 5, 12 Mon Feb 6, 12 Tue Feb 7, 12 Wed Feb 8, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:10 AM 2.6 ft. 12:52 AM 2.7 ft. 1:33 AM High 0.1 ft. 4:20 AM -0.2 ft. 5:15 AM -0.4 ft. 5:57 AM -0.6 ft. 6:33 AM -0.8 ft. 7:06 AM -0.8 ft. 7:36 AM -0.8 ft. 8:06 AM Low 1.7 ft. 11:18 AM 1.9 ft. 12:02 PM 2.1 ft. 12:37 PM 2.2 ft. 1:09 PM 2.4 ft. 1:38 PM 2.5 ft. 2:06 PM 2.6 ft. 2:32 PM High 1.7 ft. 3:15 PM 1.5 ft. 4:37 PM 1.3 ft. 5:33 PM 1.0 ft. 6:17 PM 0.7 ft. 6:57 PM 0.4 ft. 7:36 PM 0.1 ft. 8:15 PM Low 1.9 ft. 9:14 PM 2.1 ft. 10:32 PM 2.3 ft. 11:25 PM High Thu Feb 2, 12 Fri Feb 3, 12 Sat Feb 4, 12 Sun Feb 5, 12 Mon Feb 6, 12 Tue Feb 7, 12 Wed Feb 8, 12 Date 2.4 ft. 12:25 AM 2.4 ft. 1:18 AM High -0.4 ft. 4:04 AM -0.5 ft. 4:58 AM -0.6 ft. 5:44 AM -0.7 ft. 6:23 AM -0.7 ft. 6:59 AM -0.6 ft. 7:30 AM -0.5 ft. 8:00 AM Low 2.2 ft. 8:19 PM 1.8 ft. 1:32 PM 1.9 ft. 1:56 PM 1.9 ft. 2:19 PM 1.9 ft. 2:39 PM 1.9 ft. 2:56 PM 1.9 ft. 3:12 PM High 1.3 ft. 3:49 PM 1.3 ft. 4:57 PM 1.2 ft. 5:47 PM 1.0 ft. 6:29 PM 0.8 ft. 7:09 PM 0.6 ft. 7:49 PM Low 2.2 ft. 9:24 PM 2.3 ft. 10:29 PM 2.3 ft. 11:29 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacFeb. 2 Feb. 8First Feb. 29 Full Feb. 7 Last Feb. 14 New Feb. 21Major Times 8:18 AM 10:18 AM 8:43 PM 10:43 PM Minor Times 3:00 AM 4:00 AM 1:34 PM 2:34 PM Major Times 9:09 AM 11:09 AM 9:35 PM 11:35 PM Minor Times 3:52 AM 4:52 AM 2:24 PM 3:24 PM Major Times 10:01 AM 12:01 PM 10:27 PM 12:27 AM Minor Times 4:42 AM 5:42 AM 3:20 PM 4:20 PM Major Times 10:53 AM 12:53 PM 11:19 PM 1:19 AM Minor Times 5:29 AM 6:29 AM 4:19 PM 5:19 PM Major Times --:---:-11:46 AM 1:46 PM Minor Times 6:13 AM 7:13 AM 5:21 PM 6:21 PM Major Times 12:11 AM 2:11 AM 12:37 PM 2:37 PM Minor Times 6:54 AM 7:54 AM 6:23 PM 7:23 PM Major Times 1:02 AM 3:02 AM 1:28 PM 3:28 PM Minor Times 7:33 AM 8:33 AM 7:27 PM 8:27 PM Average+ Average Average Better Better Best Best7:27 am 6:14 pm 1:34 pm 3:01 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:26 am 6:15 pm 2:25 pm 3:53 am 7:26 am 6:16 pm 3:21 pm 4:42 am 7:25 am 6:17 pm 4:20 pm 5:29 am 7:24 am 6:18 pm 5:22 pm 6:13 am 7:24 am 6:19 pm 6:25 pm 6:55 am 7:23 am 6:19 pm 7:28 pm 7:33 am63% 69% 75% 82% 89% 96% 97% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 – Page 11A reportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Jan. 19, a concerned citizen picked up a pedestrian in Sopchoppy after the woman, who was struggling to maintain her balance, fell down near traf“ c on U.S. Highway 319. Deputy Cole Wells unsuccessfully attempted to “ nd her a ride back to Franklin County after she attended a local funeral. But when nobody agreed to transport Marjorie Louise Boozer, 50, of Carrabelle she was charged with battery on a law officer. Boozer kicked and struck Deputy Wells while he attempted to transport her to Tallahassee. He transported her to jail instead. In other activity reported this week: € On Jan. 19, David Funderburke of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim noted that $2,100 worth of property, including “ rearms, tools, a knife and CDs, were missing. A person of interest was identi“ ed. € On Jan. 19, Richard Murray of Eastpoint reported the theft of copper from Progress Energy in Sopchoppy. The wire is valued at $160 and was taken from a substation. € On Jan. 19, Deputy Ryan Muse and Detention Deputy Jeff Carroll investigated a report of a Wakulla County Jail inmate possessing a weapon. A toothbrush that had been fashioned into a shank was found in inmate Jared Joseph Millenders sock. The 31year-old Carrabelle man was charged with possession of a weapon by a convicted felon and smuggling contraband into a jail. Two days later, on Jan. 21, Millender was charged with making a threat against a public servant. Millender threatened a member of the WCSO medical unit over a dispute over medications. Millender threatened to make another shank and use it on the medical staff member. € On Jan. 19, Lt. Sherrell Morrison served an arrest warrant for grand theft of a “ rearm on David Durrant Pelt, 40, of Crawfordville in connection with the theft of a firearm reported on Sept. 16. The “ rearm was recovered and returned to the victim. On Jan. 20, a retail theft was reported at Wal-Mart when Robert Dale Campbell, 21, of Tallahassee, allegedly removed $47 worth of sporting goods paying for them. The suspect was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. € On Jan. 22, Deputy Nick Gray responded to a reckless vehicle complaint on the Old Woodville Highway. Deputy Gray stopped David Loy Reynolds, 56, of Panacea and discovered the vehicle tag did not match the vehicle to which it was assigned. The driver did not have a driver license. He was arrested for DUI, attached tag not assigned and driving while license is suspended-habitual offender. Reynolds also refused to submit a breath sample. € On Jan. 23, Robert Langford of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief in Panacea. Windows were broken and doors and walls were kicked at his home. Liquid was poured on the ” oor and paper was thrown about the house. Damage was estimated at $1,000. € On Jan. 22, Jason Roberts of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at Hydra Engineering. Somebody spray painted the business sign and mailbox. Damage is estimated at $500. A speed limit sign and stop sign on Jasper Thomas Road were also defaced. € On Jan. 22, Larry Brock of Crawfordville reported a vehicle “ re. The victim was dragging a dirt road with chain link fence when his vehicle caught fire. The vehicle was a total loss. Neighbors helped the victim extinguish the ” ames. € On Jan. 20, Kenneth Hills of Tallahassee reported a burglary in Sopchoppy. A forced entry was discovered at a building on the Mount Trial Primitive Baptist Church property. The building is used as a meeting area for a Masonic Lodge and a sword and Masonic compass were stolen. The stolen property is valued at $100. € On Jan. 20, Rudy Huling of Dollar General in Medart reported a forgery. A counterfeit bill was received by the business and sent to a bank in Crawfordville which discovered the fake money. The forgery was a $20 bill. € On Jan. 20, three traf“ c crashes were reported at the same location of 2173 Crawfordville Highway. None of the accidents involved injuries. After the original crash at 7:18 a.m., a second crash occurred at 7:25 a.m. and the third crash occurred at 8:25 a.m. The drivers were looking at the original crash when they crashed into other motorists themselves. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated the “ rst crash while Lt. Mike Kemp investigated the second and Sgt. Mike Helms investigated the third accident. € On Jan. 24, a 17-yearold juvenile at the Sopchoppy Second Chance School was suspended from school pending a school board review after Deputy Joe Page observed a compound bow in plain view in his vehicle. The bow is classi“ ed as a weapon by the school board and the school district has a zero tolerance policy for weapons on school grounds. Un“ red shotgun shells and un“ red .22 caliber cartridges were also found in the vehicle. € On Jan. 20, a 46-yearold Crawfordville victim reported receiving numerous harassing telephone calls and text messages. The victim counted approximately 90 contacts which included derogatory remarks and curses. Lt. Steve Ganey called the suspect and encountered the same vile language. The suspect was informed a warrant for his arrest would be pursued and the case was sent to the Criminal Investigations Division for further action. € On Jan. 23, Edward Carlson of Havana reported an individual trespassing on his relatives property in Crawfordville. Surveillance video was taken of the suspect as he left the scene. € On Jan. 23, Jack Delauter of Panacea reported a criminal mischief at the restrooms at Woolley Park in Panacea. Stall doors were damaged along with a toilet seat. Damage is estimated at $50. € On Jan. 24, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after Karla Reshae Wood, 33, of Panacea, was allegedly spotted trying to leave the store without paying for items. She was detained outside the store with $266 worth of merchandise and charged with felony larceny-third or subsequent offense. € On Jan. 25, Jeramy Noble of Crawfordville reported an automotive burglary as someone stole a vehicle bumper from inside his vehicle. The missing automotive part is valued at $350. € On Jan. 25, Carldrek Herring of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of an air conditioner from his back yard. The unit is valued at $300. € On Jan. 25, Charles Pate of Tallahassee reported the theft of a “ rearm from Crawfordville. The ri” e is valued at $200. € On Jan. 25, a Crawfordville man reported a fraud as someone stole his food assistance card. The victim checked with the Department of Children and Family Services and discovered that the card was activated and $200 on the card was already used. € On Jan. 25, John Collins of McKenzie Tank Lines in St. Marks reported a business burglary. The victim reported the theft of metal from the property. The stolen property is valued at $2,000. € On Jan. 25, Pamela Power of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary at Bridlewood Apartments. Someone entered a vacant apartment and sprayed fire extinguisher contents on the ” oors and walls. Damage was estimated at $200. € On Jan. 25, Frank Caretura of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Several windows were broken at a Neeley Road home. Nine windows were broken but the amount of the damage has not been determined. The owner of the home has also not been determined. € On Jan. 25, Eunice Selewski of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the residence through a broken window. Cigarettes were reported missing and evidence was collected at the scene. € On Jan. 25, Byron K. Linton of Crawfordville reported the theft of a chain saw, valued at $300. The property was taken from a trailer in a wooded area. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 852 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportFraud case solved; prisoner transported from South DakotaSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office sent the husband and wife team of Sgt. Ronald and Deputy Vicki Mitchell to South Dakota on Sunday, Jan. 22 to bring a 40-year-old Crawfordville woman back to the county. The woman, Teresa Mae Ehrisman, faces charges of grand theft and exploitation of the elderly in connection with an 18month investigation by law enforcement of“ cials in Wakulla and Leon counties, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Ehrisman left Florida during the investigation and law enforcement officials with the Hughes County Sheriffs Of“ ce in Pierre, S.D., arrested her on Jan. 5. She was held for WCSO deputies before waiving extradition which allowed her to be brought back to Florida to face the charges. The Mitchells drove to South Dakota in the dead of winter, waited out a severe storm in the St. Louis, Mo., area on the way north and eventually arrived back in Wakulla County on Wednesday, Jan. 25. Detective Matt Helms of the WCSO Financial Crimes Unit discovered that Ehrisman was appointed by the Florida court system to be a guardian for the 77-yearold victim in August 2007. The victim was living in Crawfordville at the time and has since moved to an assisted living facility in Tallahassee. The case was originally reported to the Leon County Sheriffs Office because the victim moved to Tallahassee. But LCSO detectives determined that the alleged crimes actually took place in Wakulla County. Temporary guardians were appointed by the court to represent the victim from October 2009 until May 2010 when a new guardian was appointed by the courts. She began researching the victims “ nances at that time. During the time Ehrisman was guardian, checks were written to the suspects company for the same amount as others approved by the court indicating that Ehrisman was double-paying herself. The total amount of missing money from the victims bank account totaled nearly $28,000. Ehrisman is being held in the Wakulla County Jail on a $10,000 bond. Teresa Mae Ehrisman Sgt. Ronald and Deputy Vicki Mitchell HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA SUPERBOWLBLOWOUTYARD SALEFRI. & SAT.FEB. 3 & 4 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org You’ve got questions… we have answers Q: Where are the best places to eat? A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF the EATIN’ path… a monthly page inThe WakuulanewsContinued from Page 1AI started working for the original owner of Lindys while in high school,Ž Robinson says. Ive been with the company now for about 30-plus years.Ž What inspired him to open the business in Wakulla? I found that there were quite a few people Id served in Tallahassee locations that lived down here who transported their meals over 20 miles before they could even eat it,Ž he says. So I thought: Why not put one in Wakulla?Ž Though there have been a number of restaurants moving into the area, Lindys appears to stand on its own when it comes to chicken, and the full menu of other items puts them in a fairly nice position. Robinson and his family live in the area (his wife is from Wakulla originally) and hes grateful that he no longer has to break down the stores in Tallahassee and do the long drive to Wakulla at one in the morning. However, his is one of the few more prominent black businesses in the area. What is it like being a black business owner when … on the surface … those numbers appear to be few? Before we opened,Ž he says, ŽI was told by a good friend of mine, born and raised here, that as long as you put out a good product and good service, you wont have a problem. Thats been true for me going on 18 years. And its a blessing.Ž MARKLY CESAR AND GAMERZ PARADISE Markly Cesar, owner of GamerZ Paradise, is from Haiti by way of New Jersey and New York. He and his family moved to Wakulla about six years ago. GamerZ Paradise, located off Highway 319, across from Capital City Bank, is a console video gaming loft where one can play their favorite Xbox, Playstation 3 and Wii as well as online gaming. Theres a small pool table and soon foosball will be available. GamerZ charges $3 an hour, or $15 for a whole day. Its cheaper than babysitting,Ž says Cesar. Its a positive place where gamers of all ages can come play and interact with others, even online. Its the ultimate gaming experience in a positive atmosphere.Ž Before this endeavor, Cesar spent more than 24 years working in corporate America, mostly in corporate management. After trying his hand at a few trial business endeavors, he decided on something different. The idea was spur of the moment, and came from the least likely source. He talks about going to WalMart one afternoon when his son mentioned that he wanted to take a look at the latest video games. I asked him if there was anything to do in Wakulla for children,Ž says Cesar, and he said no. I told him then and there that we were going to open up a video game store. We discussed it on the way to Wal-Mart and back home. Later that night we exchanged a few ideas, and GamerZ Paradise was born.Ž Of course, nothing happens that quickly, but slowly he formulated the ideas, put them on paper, gathered a team of friends and family, and once in agreement, they all went for it. Buses drop students off daily across the street from GamerZ. A safe location for kids has been a welcome addition for many parents, along with the development of the GamerZ afterschool program that not only ensures the kids are fed, but assists them with homework. The need for something like this in the community is re” ected by the pick-up in GamerZ business. Gaming has taken on a form of its own. Mothers and daughters, fathers and sons … they all come out. I think its awesome to see the interactions with families and the connections they make while here.Ž GREG JACKSON AND G SIGNSThere are people throughout Wakulla County that are legends of an uncommon sort. Visual artist Greg Jackson is one. His drawings and paintings are known to a number of people in the community, a majority of them African-American. Though he has always loved to draw … and can do wonders with a pencil … he started dabbling in color at the instruction of his “ rst art teacher, Florence Head. Later, another arts instructor, Diane Carney, would become an in” uence as well. He would learn about ceramics, clay and much more. I guess I didnt realize my talent at the time,Ž Jackson admits. I just loved to draw and back then I gave all my pictures away because people seemed to liked them.Ž The type of work he does now is mainly through commission, or by request. This means that when the work is done, people want it right away. He currently does portraits, signs for local companies, among other specialties. Though he does not have a large enough catalogue … he feels … to present an arts showcase at the location, he wants to use the space to encourage the work of other artists in the county. Hes also a member of HAWC (Healing Arts of Wakulla County) for which he will be designing their of“ cial logo. The notice in front of his new business, G Signs, is hard to miss. It appears almost rustic, yet vibrant in color at the same time. The G Signs building … located across the street from the main courthouse … is also a place of legend. It was the site of the countys “ rst pharmacy, owned and operated by druggist, Harold Smith. Jackson went to FAMU on an arts scholarship, and later into the military. My work didnt really gel until I was in the military,Ž he says, and later, in Germany. Once I was in the military and others learned I was an artist, I became the company artist, and I learned a great deal from painting murals. But it was while in Germany that I learned the most about art. I like to say it was the art that was teaching me … showing me colors I could use as well as what I couldnt.Ž His goal is to work with other artists in the community to make the space, as he puts it, the hottest place on the planet.ŽListen to more of these interviews during The Wakulla Sundays Black History Month broadcasts on WAVE 94.1 beginning Friday and Monday at 8 p.m., and Sundays at 4 p.m.A pro“ le of some local black-owned businesses Markly Cesar at GamerZ Paradise. Greg Jackson of G Signs with one of his artworks. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011…2012.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, February 10 Friday, February 24 Friday, March 9 Friday, March 23 Friday, April 13 Friday, April 27 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. 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T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 Workforce Plus’ new ‘Jobs = Paychecks Now’ offers job training Page 8B Networking luncheon held at El JaliscoSpotlight on Cook Insurance AgencyBusiness, Page 3B Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 C a n ’ t Can’t a c c e s s access T h e The W a k u l l a Wakulla n e w s ews o n l i n e online c o n t e n t ? content? S u b s c r i b e Subscribe t o d a y a n d today and g e t f u l l get full a c c e s s access! By AMY GEIGERChamber PresidentI am very excited to be your 2012 Chamber President and look forward to a challenging and yet rewarding year. My goals as your Chamber president are to follow in the footsteps of our past leaders and continue with our mission … to promote, improve and enhance the business community we serve. During this year I will focus on the following: MEMBERSHIP Our membership revenue has decreased signi“ cantly and we are not unlike any other business in our county; we too are feeling the impact of this economy. Therefore we will continue to ensure value exceeds member investment. To attract and retain members, we will concentrate on the following: € Create a young professionals group to engage our future leaders. € Focus on our disengaged members by developing an ambassadors program to invite them to participate so they too can enjoy the many bene“ ts we offer. EDUCATION A quali“ ed workforce is one of the most essential components of a strong business community. Wakulla County has the distinction of having an A-rated public school system. Through the Burt Poole Scholarship Program, we assist Chamber members and their employees by providing opportunities to enhance their skills through ongoing education. In addition, Workforce Plus will continue to offer training seminars for the business community. ADVOCATE FOR BUSINESS I would appreciate hearing from you, our membership, any comments, concerns, needs, educational requests and suggestions on how we can make the Chamber an even more dynamic organization to assist you with making sure your business grows and thrives. Our Chamber plays a vital role in ensuring our businesses are successful. In closing, I would like to thank John Shuff, past president, for his leadership and endless commitment to our business community. Looking forward to the years challenges Presidents MessageChamber’s new board installed PHOTO BY MARY KATHERINE WESTMARK/Courtesy wakulla.comMembers of the Chambers Board of Directors take the oath of of“ ce at the recent installation banquet. PHOTO BY MARY KATHERINE WESTMARK/Courtesy wakulla.comOutgoing Chamber President John Shuff is presented with a gift by new President Amy Geiger. By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar“ eld@thewakullanews.netIts of“ cial. The Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce has a new slate of of“ cers and directors for 2012. On Thursday night, Jan. 19, Wakulla Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond led the swearing-in ceremony for the new board. Opening remarks were delivered by R. H. Carter who did not disappoint by interjecting a little history and wit. New Chamber President Amy Geiger introduced the evenings guest speaker, Kelly Robertson, who is with BowStern Marketing in their Tallahassee of“ ce. Robertson said her father always told her, If you catch on “ re with enthusiasm, people will come from miles to watch it burn.Ž Her discussion centered around taking a look at the fundamentals of why we do what we do,Ž and explored moving people beyond their comfort zoneŽ in terms of motivation, writing business plans and advertising. Outgoing Chamber President John Shuff extended appreciation to the heavy hittersŽ for 2011 naming speci“ cally Pam Albritton for her work on the Low Country Boil, Sharol Brown for doing anything anytime,Ž Paul Johnson for his contribution on legislative issues, Jo Ann Palmer for coordinating the Business Excellence Awards event, Chuck Robinson for his work on the chambers website, Ralph Thomas for keeping the chamber informed from the Government and Commerce Committee, Kevin Vaughn for his work on the Economic Development Council, Mary Wallace for coordinating the monthly luncheons, Mary Ellen Davis for initiating the idea of the Business Excellence Awards and many other contributions during her time on the board, Tammie Bar“ eld for her assistance with publicity, Kimberly Moore for bringing her organizational skills to the meetings, Amy Geiger for her work on the standing committees, Leonard Bembry for being on our side at the legislature, and Petra Shuff for being the glue that holds us all together.Ž Geiger then enthusiastically introduced her goals for the upcoming year and expressed her excitement about the opportunity to work with each member of the board. She cautioned everyone to fasten your seatbeltsŽ and get ready for a challenging, but rewarding year for the chamber.December new members:  Rock Landing Marina – full service marina, wet slips, boat barn, boat shed, yard, ramp  Capital Regional YMCA – Camp Indian Springs – Community Programs, Aquatics, Camps, Health & Fitness, Banquet facility rental January new members:  Critter Control – Brandon Lynch, specializing in Humane Wildlife Removal, Termite and Pest Control, Exclusion & Repairs  First Bank –Senior Products Division, Michel J. Weltman, MBA, SRES, CSA – specializing in Reverse Mortgages, notary services  El Jalisco – Maria Carranza, specializing in Mexican cuisineNew members Call 866.484.7057Espaol 866.960.7085 Like us on Facebook facebook.com/CenturyLinkPrismTV Now you have a better TV choice.[ The CenturyLink Prism Project. ]GET ON THE COUCH AND SEE THE DIFFERENCE FOR YOURSELF! Packages starting at $39.99a month for 6 months*CenturyLinkTM PrismTM.Interactive TV you control … any show, any time, from any room. Its a combination of features that outshine cable and satellite. Prism Project … Demonstrations are with non-Prism’ TV customers using basic CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV service with standard featur es in High Definition on an HD-ready television on 11/12/11 in Las Vegas, NV. Participants were not acting as professional acto rs, but were compensated by CenturyLink for their participation in the demonstration and this advertisement. *Offer ends 5/31/2012. Offer and stated rates are available to new, first-time CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV residential customers onl y. The stated monthly rate of $39.99 applies to Prism’ TV programming package, and applies only for the first six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional i nstallation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. An $8.99 monthly DVR serv ice fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with the Prism’ TV programming package. Promotional offer cannot be combined with any other Prism of fers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees and surcharges will apply. Custome r must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the 3-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges or the standard monthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to spec ific locations. General … Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them b y service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. 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CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV … All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box, one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct vid eo streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided set-top boxes are required to view TV. If a term commitment is required for liste d Prism offer and customer terminates those services before the end of the applicable term commitment, CenturyLink will assess an early termination fee of $120, reduced by $10 for each month that customer has paid in full for those services during that term commitment. Local channel availability varies by market. Caller ID service must be purchased separately to enable the on-screen Caller ID feature; Caller ID feature is not available in all areas. High Definition (HD) available on all TV plans for an addit ional $11.99/month, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of set-top boxes (STBs ) in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard definition. Subscription to service precludes customers f rom purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for Prism’ Premiu m plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purchases, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscripti on services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Customer may dial 67 (touchtone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to opera te correctly, customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Equipment … Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) ST Bs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) rem ote control per STB installed. All equipment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service dis connection in an undamaged condition, or customer will be cha rged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism’ TV Plan … Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. 2012 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the pro perty of their respective owners.

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, February 2  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  GENEAOLOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Friday, February 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited to partake in community projects, personal work and informative workshops, as well as eld trips. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, February 4  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE will be available for low and moderate income taxpayers at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sunday, February 5  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, February 6  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, February 7  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Welcome Center, 1505 Coastal Highway in Panacea. Speakers will be Becky Sanders Finch, Cathryn Sanders Beaty and others who will share their memories and stories about growing up in Panacea.  IRIS GARDEN CLUB will meet at 1 p.m. for its board meeting at the library. All interested members of the Iris Garden Club are invited to come and give input on upcoming events. Wednesday, February 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low and moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the Senior Center from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will meet at noon at the TCC Wakulla Center in Crawfordville. Lunch is provided. Call (850) 926-9005 for more information. Thursday, February 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FREE AARP TAX-AIDE for low to moderate income taxpayers will be offered at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Special EventsFriday, February 3  ANNUAL CHILI COOK-OFF will be held at Crawfordville Elementary School starting at 5:15 p.m. There will be chili of all kinds to satisfy everyone’s taste buds. The categories that will be judged are the following: traditional, non-traditional, spicy but pleasing and presentation. Set up will begin at 5:15 so that the judging can begin promptly at 5:30 p.m. and continue until 6:15 p.m. The event will of cially begin at 6 p.m. with both Wakulla High School and Wakulla Middle School’s jazz bands entertaining and delighting the crowd.  EXEMPTION ASSISTANCE will be available to senior citizens from Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman and his staff at the Senior Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Senior citizens need to bring a valid driver’s license, Social Security number and proof of income. For more information, contact Debra Russell at 926-0500.  FAMILY FUN DAY will be held at Wakulla Pre-K from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla Pre-K Education Center, located at 87 Andrew J. Hargrett Sr. Road in Crawfordville. The event will feature, food, games and entertainment. Autographed FSU footballs will be given away, as well. All proceeds will help fund the Wakulla Pre-K program. For more information, please call the Wakulla Pre-K at 850-926-8111. Saturday, February 4  SPRING SPORTS REGISTRATION will be held from 8 a.m. to noon at Medart Park by the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. For more information, visit www.WCPRD.com or call 926-7227.  BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA FUNDRAISER will be held from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the library. Thousands of books, audio, video and more will be given away. Monetary donations aren’t required, but are appreciated. Proceeds bene t children’s programs at the Library. Limit of ve plastic bags per patron.  WILDLIFE HERITAGE AND OUTDOORS FESTIVAL will be held at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be outdoor activities from the past and present. A youth turkey calling contest will start at 1 p.m. Participants must sign up by 12:45 p.m. There will also be wild animal exhibits.  AUSTRALIAN SINGER AND SONGWRITER, Audrey Auld, will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Her debut EP, Audrey, was released in 1997. It offered 4 tracks of hillbilly, swing, torch and honky-tonk. Visit Audreyauld. com. Reservations requested for all shows. For tickets or more information, call 962-1010. Sunday, February 5  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will offer Whoop-De-Doo! Here Come The Cranes!, a presentation especially for families, at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge’s Nature’s Classroom. Since 2001, Operation Migration has been teaching endangered Whooping Cranes a migration route using ultralight aircraft. The project helps re-establish this species and enables their reintroduction to the wild at places like St. Marks Nat’l Refuge. Presenters will be Christine Barnes and Gordon Perkinson, Educators and Crane Handlers. Both children (ages 8 and up) and adults will enjoy this presentation. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Pre-registration is required due to limited seating. Call the Refuge at 925-6121.  FISH FRY fundraiser will be held by the Ashmore Masonic Lodge at 25 Yellowjacket Road in Sopchoppy at noon. The fundraiser will bene t Destiny Lewis, a 10year-old struck and severly injured by a car last week. All proceeds will go to the family to help with mounting medical expenses. Any contributions may be sent to her mother, Tina Sanders c/o Centennial Bank P.O. Box 610 Crawfordville, Fl 32326 attn Tonya Carter. For information, contact Walter at 591-2773. Monday, February 6  WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 2:30 p.m. in room 130. For more information, contact Angie Gentry, Chairperson at angela.gentry@ wcsb.us Tuesday, February 7  FEBRUARY FULL MOON CLIMB at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. It will include light hors d’oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15 for the public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at 927-7744 or toll free at 888-927-7744. Thursday, February 9  MEET AND GREET will be held at the library by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee and the Wakulla Democratic Women’s Club for Democratic candidates for Congressional District 2. The event will begin at 7 p.m. with refreshments, followed by the 7:30 p.m. business meeting. For more information, contact Rachel Pienta at 321-3582 or drpienta@gmail.com.  “EXPLORING IMPROVISATION: HARLEM IN THE JAZZ AGE,” will be held at 9:30 a.m. at NFCC/Green Industries in Monticello. The class will use literature, music and the arts to examine the results of cultural contact zones in New York City during the Roaring Twenties. Participants will have a chance to create their own improvisations. The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at FSU is offering these classes that may be of interest to residents over 50. The enrollment deadline is Feb. 2. For more information visit www.olli.fsu. edu or call 644-7947 or 644-3520 or e-mail taaronson@ fsu.edu or dherman@fsu.edu. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Free AARP tax help at the library from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Chili Cook-Off at Crawfordville Elementary at 5:15 p.m. Wildlife Heritage and Outdoors Festival at the Refuge from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fish Fry Fundraiser at Mason Lodge, Sopchoppy, at noon. ThursdayFridaySaturdaySunday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsMonday, February 6  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, February 8  PUBLIC RECORDS COMMITTEE will meet at 2 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room, 3093 Crawfordville Highway. Call 926-0919 for more information. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorBook Extravaganza Fundraiser Our “ rst Book Extravaganza of the year will be on Saturday, Feb. 4 from 9 a.m. to noon. As usual we have thousands of books, audio and video available for your browsing pleasure. While monetary donations are not required, all funds raised go directly to the Friends of WCPL. The Friends pay for our Summer Reading programs, part of our collection, and just paid for the 12 brand new public computers in the library, along with much more! Over the past two years, the Friends have saved Wakulla taxpayers more than $50,000 by assisting WCPL with needed expenses. Please join us Saturday and help support this great organization. New at WCPL Among the great new items at WCPL are two new thrillers. TakenŽ by Robert Crais and for fans of the FX Network show Justi“ edŽ (like myself), RaylanŽ by Elmore Leonard. In addition to these two we have: To Hell on a Fast Horse,Ž a double biography of Billy the Kid and Pat Garrett by Lee Gardner, If You Ask MeŽ by Betty White, and 18 new (to us) Geronimo Stilton books and Princess Smartypants RulesŽ by Babette Cole for the youngsters. These are only a few of the new things we have this week for our patrons so please come by and check them out (pun intended). AARP Tax Prep at WCPL Just a friendly reminder that the AARP will begin their free tax preparation service at WCPL on Thursday Feb. 2 from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and on Saturday, Feb. 4 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This service will continue each Thursday and Saturday at the same respective times throughout tax season. The free preparation is intended for low to middle income “ lers which an emphasis on senior citizens. It is also “ rst come “ rst served so come early. Friday Book Club As Im typing this, the Friday afternoon Book Club is “ lling up all the seats around our conference room table. Wed like to have even more join up! Theyre currently reading and discussing the Senator Edward Kennedy autobiography True Compass. WCPL provides the books for the book club members at cost and we have one copy of True Compass left, but would be more than happy to order more! Stop by at 3 p.m. on Fridays for all the fun. Computer Classes Both our classes this week are on Wednesday, Feb. 8. At 9:30 a.m., we have Windows 7: Getting Started followed by Skype Getting Started at 1:30 p.m. Both these classes are free but do require early registration so give us a call or stop by! A schedule of classes through the end of February is on our website at www.wakullalibrary.org, our FaceBook page, or at the front desk. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 – Page 3B MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONAngelique and Bryan 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. in the Log Cabin (850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 Tax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals 20% off in February!20 % OFFINFEBRUARY! 20% OFFIN F EBRUARY 850-576-5552jacksbquick.com Hours:Tu-W & F 10 6 Th 12 8 Sat 8 NOON Sun & Mon Closed850.926.83192809 Crawfordville Hwy across from Hudson Parkwww.root319salon.com A full service hair and nail salon.W elcomesW elcomes aime esterling Now AvailableƒHave a Manicure or Pedicure in between your color sk bout our pecials! Certi“ed Nail Tech Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEAN¨WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 9268116 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Please Recycle S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight on Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Tell us about your business: Cook Insurance Agency was established in 1913 by John Henry Cook, and has been in continuous operation since, making us one of the oldest insurance agencies in Florida. Along with our of“ ce here in Crawfordville, we have a second location in Apalachicola. What services, products do you offer? We sell all lines of insurance … personal, commercial, life and health insurance. What sets your business apart from the competition? We take great pride in our customer service, our experience and knowledge of products we offer. What should the community/customer expect when they visit your business? To be treated as a person, and not as a policy count. We also like to build relationships with our clients. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 2007. Why did you join the Chamber? To be part of the local business community, and take advantage of the networking opportunities, which have helped a great deal in getting to know other business owners. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? We have participated in the Brown Bag Lunch & Learn Series, and attend networking events regularly. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? There is NO reason not to. In order to grow our local economy, you have to believe in it, and spend locally. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Call (850) 926-6612. Visit www. cookinsuranceagency. com. Mary Wallace, Managing Agent, 2932 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, inside Centennial Bank. Fax is (850) 926-6617. Additional Comments: I am proud to be part of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. This group of volunteers freely gives its time to address business concerns and educational needs, and to foster a positive relationship with local government. I especially enjoy hosting our networking luncheons, giving our members yet another opportunity to network.Name: Cook Insurance Agency, Inc.Name of owner: Centennial Bank A crowd of 42 attended the networking luncheon held at El Jalisco Restaurant on Jan. 25, and staff handled the orders … anything off the luncheon menu … with ease and smiles on their faces. We continue to see different folks at these luncheons each time, which makes for great networking. New members in attendance had the opportunity to introduce themselves and let guests know about their business. You have probably seen the yellow Critter Control signs all over Wakulla County … Critter Control is a national company, and recently opened a local franchise in Crawfordville. Brandon Lynch with Critter Control informed us about their humane wildlife removal (anything except bears and alligators). In addition, Critter Control offers termite and pest control, and exclusions and repairs. Dick Woodrum, with Rock Landing Marina LLC., informed our guests about taking over the marina in Panacea, which offers slips and boat storage, repairs, fuel, bait and tackle and ice. Dorothy Inman Johnson announced Capital Area Community Action Agencys biggest fundraiser of the year … Pigfest, to be held at the North Florida Fairgrounds in Tallahassee on Feb. 18-19. The barbecue cookoff offers $8,500 in cash prizes, and the Battle of the Bands, offering $2,500 in cash prizes, and promises to be very entertaining. There will also be arts and crafts vendors, a custom car show and a Kid Zone. A Chamber member, Costco Wholesale Club, gave out ” yers to visit Costco over Jan. 28 and 29, and shop without being a club member. If you like the store, you can use the ” yer to become a member. Receive a $10 cash card for a new $55 Gold star membership or a $20 cash card for a new $110 Executive membership. For more information, contact Ashley at (850) 219-2522 or w01026mkt01@costco.com Jo Ann Palmer, wearing her Rotary hatŽ today, let everyone know about the upcoming annual Valentines Day parade and festivities. Raf” e tickets are available from all Rotary members for $1 donation. Always an exciting part of the hour are the door prizes, and cash drawing. Today the $42 cash was won by one of our new board members, Alan Wise with Preble-Rish. Alan immediately donated his winnings back to the Chamber. We would like to thank the following for contributions to the prize drawing: Critter Control, Rainbow International, JoAnn Palmer, Susan Schatzman, Costco, Cook Insurance Agency, Marianne and Lionel Dazevedo, Petra Shuff and The Wakulla News. Plan to join us for the next networking luncheon on Feb. 22 at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. RSVPs are strongly encouraged. For any questions, please contact Petra 9261848, or Mary 926-6613.Networking luncheon is held at El Jalisco SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChamber members gather at El Jalisco for the January network luncheon. Ed2Go Online Learning offered January through June 2012 through the Burt Poole Scholarship Fund, established by the Chamber of Commerce. Enrollment is FREE to Chamber members and employees. Please email the Chamber office for registration form and enrollment instructions. All registrations have to be submitted to the Chamber of ce for member veri cation. Please contact the Chamber of ce for class requirements. Class dates are as follows: Feb 15 | Mar 21 | Apr 18 Additional dates provided by request. Administrative Assistant Fundamentals Administrative Assistant Applications Speed Spanish I, II, III Intro to CSS & XHTML Small Business Marketing on a Shoestring Marketing your Business on the Internet Writing effective Grant ProposalsEd2Go online classes o ered

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com From Candlemas to Groundhog DayCan groundhogs really determine when winter will end? Nah, but that’s what people thought long ago when there was no technology to predict the weather. At the time, people celebrated what was known as Candlemas. If the day was sunny and an animal like the groundhog could see its shadow, winter would continue for six more weeks. If the day was cloudy and the groundhog could not see its shadow, winter would soon end. Over time, Candlemas became Groundhog Day and many people today look forward to watching the groundhog on February 2. One of the best-known Groundhog Day celebrations takes place in Punxsutawney, PA. There, thousands of visitors come from all over the world to see what groundhog Punxsutawney Phil will do. COLORING PICTURE Q: What do you call a groundhog s laundry?A: Hogwash. HAHA Jokes and RiddlesHAHA Q: What happens when a groundhog see its shadow on a log?A: Six more weeks of splinters. Answers: 1) Fiction, groundhogs have short tails, 2) Fiction, groundhogs have gray hair tipped with brown or red, 3) Fiction, groundhogs weigh 5 to 15 pounds, 4) Fact, 5) Fact, 6) Fact, 7) Fact, snakes sometimes get into groundhogs’ burrows, 8) Fiction, groundhogs whistle when danger is near, 9) Fact, groundhogs will not attack unless necessary, 10) Fiction, groundhogs live six to eight years in the wild and two to three years in captivityEvery year on Groundhog Day, people can t wait to see what the groundhog will do when it pops out of its hole. Will it see its shadow and return underground for six more weeks of winter or not? Whatever the result, the groundhog is an interesting animal. Here are some questions about groundhogs. How many can you answer correctly?1) Groundhogs have short legs and long tails. Fact or Fiction? 2) Groundhogs have coarse black hair. Fact or Fiction? 3) Groundhogs weigh about two pounds. Fact or Fiction? 4) Groundhogs move about 700 pounds of dirt to dig a burrow. Fact or Fiction? 5) Groundhogs prefer open country and woodland edges and never stray far from their burrows. Fact or Fiction? 6) Groundhogs like to keep an eye out for large animals like wolves, bobcats, coyotes, hawks and owls. Fact or Fiction? 7) Groundhogs are sometimes attacked by snakes. Fact or Fiction? 8) Groundhogs howl when danger is near to let other groundhogs know. Fact or Fiction? 9) Groundhogs return to their burrows when they sense danger. Fact or Fiction? 10) Groundhogs live about two to three years in the wild. Fact or Fiction?Fact or Fiction?Groundhog Challenge Answers: 1) Grasses, 2) Vegetables, 3) Leaves, 4) Dandelions, 5) Berries, 6) Twigs, 7) CloverEach of the following is something that groundhogs like to eat. Fill in the blanks to name that food.Name That Food 1) G __ A S __ E __2) __ E G __ T A __ L __ S3) L __ A V __ S4) D __ N __ E __ I O __ S5) B E __ __ I E __6) T __ I __ S7) C __ O __ E R List 10 words that rhyme with “dig.” 1. ___________ 2. ____________ 3. ___________ 4. ____________ 5. ___________ 6. ____________ 7. ___________ 8. ____________ 9. ___________ 10. ____________ Some answers: big, brig, fig, gig, jig, pig, rig, swig, trig, twig, wig,zigWhat Rhymes with Dig? This page sponsored in part by:

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Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 Can pick-up or will deliver850-274-4538Call Tommy at with Dolly MoodyYoga Gain ”exibility, strength, energy. Call for class schedule and rates.YogaFORSENIORSFocusyoga@yahoo.com or call 228-380-0140Focus on a healthier you. BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED SEMINOLE ROOFING CO.CCC 0538 87408-8563Residential Commercial Re-Roo“ng Repairs Since 1980 Free Estimates Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 9267561 Lost Remember to always check the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. 850-926-0902. 9 Oak Street, Crawfor dville. Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 122 weekly newspapers, 32 websites, 25 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)742-1373, www. florida classifieds.com RED GREEN LIVE Experience this hilarious one-man show. April 5,Tampa Theatre 800-745-3000. April 7, News-Journal Centre, Davidson Theatre, Daytona State College. 800-595-4849 www.redgr een.com WANTED 10 HOMES needing siding Windows or sunrooms. Save hundreds of dollars. All credit accepted. Payments $89/ month. Senior/Military discounts.Call Now!! (866)6688681 FCAN Trades/ Skills A FEW PRO DRIVERS NEEDED. Top Pay &401k 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. 877-258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Trades/ Skills Drivers: Run 5 States Regional! Get home weekends, earn up to 39cent mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp. require d. Sunbelt Transport, LLC 800-5725489 X 227 Driver-Start out the year with Daily Pay and Weekly Home Time! Single Source Dispatch. Van and Refrigerated.CDL-A, 3 months recent experience requires. (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com Career Opportunities Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877) 7419260 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. Call Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)3143769 Schools/ Instruction ALLIED HEALTHCareer training -Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.Centura Online.com Schools/ Instruction EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINEOnline from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Miscellaneous Financial $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!! $$$As seen on TV. Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++ within 48/hours? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com Garage/ Yard Sales CrawfordvilleSat Feb 4 8am-1pm Multifamily salesomething for everyone! 920 Spring Creek Road MedartSat Feb. 4 8am-2pm Dinglers Barber Shop on 319. Household items, bedding, pictures, and crafts. Small camper shell for S-10 size truck. Mobile Homes For Rent Crawfordville2/2 Nice, Well kept, Near beautiful Lake Ellen & Great schools, Quiet area, 32 Merwyn Dr. $550/mo RENT TO OWN OPTION (850) 4433300 CRAWFORDVILLE 3BR/2BA DWMHWakulla Gardens, CHA,good floor plan,$650/month+deposit, application, references, 1 year lease Available now! Call for appointments (850) 524-4090 (727) 642-6049 Mobile Homes For Rent North Wakulla County. 2 BR/1BA mobile home on 2 acres. Rent $475, water & garbage included in rent. 850-2287197 SOPCHOPPY2 BR, 1 BA, MH Screened Porch, large private lot, $475. Mo. + Dep. Includes garbage pickup (850) 5664124 Wakulla Station 2BR.2BA. on 3 beautiful acres, convenient to Tallahassee & Crawsford ville. Lrg screened porch, decking, covered parking, outside workshop & covered storage area.$650/mo Criminal background and credit check will be conducted prior to leasing. Call (850) 4452672 Mobile Homes and Land Mobile Home with acreage! Ready to move in, great for pets, lots of space for the price, 3 br/2ba. Serious offers only No renters. Call 850-3086473 Real Estate For Rent CRAWSFORDVILLEfurnished cottage 2BR/1BA, kitchen, Liv/DR area. CHA & W/D. No pets/ smoking. $670/mo.+ $670 sec dep (850) 9262293 Apartments Furnished Shell PointLarge loft style apartment, with separate office, full kitchen, washer, dryer, pets ok $650 month, first, last, security (850) 2732633 Apartments Unfurnished Accepting applications for 1 bedrooms. Starting @$562 month. Equal Housing Opportunity. Office open Monday-Friday 9-230 Call 850-984-4811 TDD 1-800-955-8771. Summer Trace Apartments Apartments Move in Special $99 Deposit $300 Special on 2BR ONLY OFF 2nd month rent Local Hero Discount $99 Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BR as LOW as $630/mo 2BR as LOW as $730/mo 3BDR as LOW as $830/mo. Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675. per mo Call Linda 850 9260283 Rental Houses Bring your boat! 2br/1ba, on canal with a private dock on Oyster bay Furnished, new floors, porch, laundry. Electricity, yardwork and Wi-Fi provided Rent is $1250 a month plus deposit Call 850-5241026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA house on 90 Spokan Trail. Handicapped master bath. One car garage. $750/month, plus deposit. References required. Call Pat at 850-926-5830 or 850-5107983 CRAWFORDVILLEConvenient Location 3BR, 2BA, on Large Lot Screened back porch, washer/dryer. Carport, no smoking or pets $775 mo. (850) 508-9928 Storage/ Warehouses Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,8x10 and 10x12 now available. Come by or call Wakulla Realty, (850) 9265084 Vacation Rentals ALLIGATOR POINT2/Bedroom, 2/Bath 1,200 sf, Gulf Front, Vacation Rental 3 blks to white sandy beach, 75ft. to Gulf of Mexico. Beautiful Sunsets $1,000. Wk. (904)6873397 Commercial Real Estate Affordable Office Space at the Barry Building. Great atmosphere! Includes all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen use, conference room. Rates start at $250/mo. 850-210-5849 or our website at www.BarryBuilding.com Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-9262480 Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300  Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-6566340 Restaurant Space Available Soon!!Fully equipped. Can assume full liquor license and equipment if you act quickly! Call 850-421-5039 for mor e info WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-4215039 Vacant Property CrawfordvilleLots-Magolia Garden, Melody Ln .2 adj. lots high & dry, $12,000 (possible 3rd lot) (850) 926-7807 (850) 5441962 Lots For Sale 2-acre lot for sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-5563765 Motorcycles 2007 Kawasaki 900Classic, bought new in 2008, Extras included, 6050 miles, garage kept,$4800. Call between 5pm-8pm, serious inquires only ( 850) 5242095 Care For the Elderly Senior care in your home. Let me care for your loved ones while you work or have a day off. I have clean background,CPR trained, licensed, insured, references and dependable transportation. Call Tammy at (850) 5706322 for info. Heating/AC HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR Sales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in CrawfordvilleDoug & Sherry Quigg, OwnersLic. Nos ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 9265790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 9263546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Pressure Cleaning A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed-John Farrell 926-5179 5667550 Services ALL ABOUT...CONCRETEBLOCKS, BRICKS, PAVERSLANDSCAPEPLANTS, SOD, TRACTOR WORK Call JOSEPH FRANCIS 850-556-1178 OR 850-5563761 Harold Burse Stump Grinding 9267291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 Heating/AC Commercial Real Estate 3Br 2Ba Twnhs $800 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Hs 1-car garage $900 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Hs. $775 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba Hs. $725 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615 mo. + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 – Page 5B The Wakul la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com CONTRACTOR:I have new TGI Beams. All 3.5 wide by 14 inches tall. Theres three at 16 feet long and 11 at 10 feet long. Yours for $200. Call 850-962-9092 or 732828-2632. SUPERBOWL BLOWOUTYARD SALE FRI-SAT, FEB. 3-4, 8AM-2PMNO EARL Y BIRDSNO EARL Y BIRDS

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 4062-0209 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO SECTION 328.17 F.S., NON-JUDICIAL SALE OF VESSEL Notice is hereby given that unless sooner paid or redeemed, Rock Landing Marina, LLC, Inc. intends a public sale of the following vessels by brief description and apparent owners: 1. Vessel: 21 ft. Shamrock Cleveland Engine 351, SHAO 5290483, Reg. #5221DN Owner: Estate of James E. Torgerson, II 2. Vessel: 27 ft. 1976 Columbia, Reg. #3499PA Owner: Scott Synar 3. Vessel: 25 ft. Hunter Marine Outboard, Reg. #9947CV Owner: Josh Davis 4. Vessel: 28 ft. 1971 John Allman, Reg. # VA3193AB Owner:Jimmy Collins and Cecil Wilson Said sale will take place February 24, 2012 beginning at 10:00 a.m. and shall be held at the location of Rock Landing Marina, 99 Rock Landing Road, Panacea, Florida 32346. The mailing address and contact number of said Marina is P.O. Box 653, Panacea, Florida 32346; telephone # (850) 984-5844. Publication dates: February 2 & 9, 2012 5090-0207 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR DESOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: (1) Gr een Utility T railer Serial #5K1B4222061005938 CASE NO. 11-105CC CARL WAYNE COTNER 3166 SMITH CREEK RD SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 Plaintiff. NOTICE OF ACTION YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for establishment of ownership of personal property described as : One Green Utility Trailer, Serial 5K1B42220601005938, has been filed and it is required that a copy of your written defenses, if any, be served on Plaintiff, Carl Wayne Cotner, whose address is : 3166 Smith Creek Rd., Sopchoppy, Wakulla County, Florida, on or before February 2, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court immediately thereafter; otherwise a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.. DATED on January 5, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, as Clerk of the Court (seal) /s/ By Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk January 12, 19, 26, 2012 and February 2, 2012 5099-0216 PUBLIC NOTICE INVITATION TO BID DATE :January 27, 2012 TO:Trade Contractors as listed: Bid Package 2-AGeneral Demolition & Disposal Bid Package 2-BAsbestos Abatement Bid Package 6-AGeneral Trades Bid Package 6-BMillwork Bid Package 9-BAcoustical Ceilings Bid Package 9-CPainting Bid Package 15-AHVAC & BAS Controls Bid Package 15-BPlumbing Bid Package 15-CHVAC, BAS Controls & Plumbing Combo Bid Package 15-ETest & Balance Bid Package 16-AElectrical & Fire AlarmBid Package 17-A Telecommunications FROM:Childers Construction Co. PROJECT: Wakulla Middle School HVAC Renovations Wakulla County Schools Crawfordville, Florida Childers Construction Company, The Construction Manager state license number CGC45514, invites your firm to submit proposals for the above referenced project. BID DOCUMENTS will be available electronically on Friday, January 27, 2012 at Childers Construction Company FTP site: http://www.childers-construction.com:81/login. html. Please contact Ms. Tawni ONeill at (850) 222-2281 or to toneill@childers-construction.com for user name and password for access. PRE BID CONFERENCE will be held on Wednesday, February 8, 2012 at 3:30 PM at the Wakulla County Middle School, 22 Jean Street, Crawfordville, FL. A maximum of 2 representatives per company. SEALED BIDS will be received by the Construction Manager at the offices of Childers Construction Company, 3472 Weems Road, Unit 1, Tallahassee, FL 32317, as follows: Bid Packages 2-92:00 PM Tuesday, February 28, 2012 Bid Packages 15-173:00 PM Tuesday, February 28, 2012 Childers Construction Company reserves the right to reject any and all bids, and waive informalities in any bid. Information on bid documents is available by contacting Childers Construction Company, Tawni ONeill at (850) 222-2281. February 2, 9 and 16, 2012 5102-0223 PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF VIOLATION/ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINT AND ORDER NWFWMD VS JERRY LAMAR HIERS Notice is hereby given to Mr. Jerry Hiers by the Northwest Florida Water Management District of the following violation of rules and regulations promulgated under Chapter 373, Florida Statues, Chapter 40A-3 and Chapter 62-531. Mr. Hiers is not a licensed water well contractor in the state of Florida, but constructed water wells at 59 Starling Trace, 10 Cardinal Court, and 14 Nuthatch Trail, Crawfordville. Engaging in the business of water well contracting without an active water well contractor license is a violation of Subsection 373.323 and Paragraph 373.33(4)(d) Florida Statues (F.S.) and Rule 40A-3.037(2), Florida Administrative Code. The District orders that within thirty (30) days of this public notification, Mr. Jerry Lamar Hiers will cease and desist from any activities that require a well water contractor license and pay to the District an administrative fine of fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000.00). If a written request for hearing (Chapter 120, F.S.) is not made within 30 days after this four-week noticing period is complete, then this order shall be final. February 2,9,16 and 23, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5101-0209 Vs unknown Heirs of Lillian T. Williams, Case No.:10000405CA, Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ,CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 10000405CA FIFTH THIRD MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS OF LILLIAN T. WILLIAMS A/K/A LILLIAN TAMIKKA WILLIAMS, DECEASED, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS PROPER TY TO: UNKNOWN HIERS OF LILLIAN T. WILLIAMS A/K/A LILLIAN TAMIKKA WILLIAMS, DECEASED; ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: N/A Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to Foreclose a Mortgage on the following property to wit : LOT 4 (5.00 ACRES) COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 734.97 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 797.41 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 273.14 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 797.34 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 273.14 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 13 5104-0209 Vs. Bay Springs Community Mortgage 2011-CA-000231Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000231 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Gulf State Community Bank, a Florida Banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. BAY SPRINGS COMMUNITY MORTGAGE, LLC, a Florida limited liability corporation, BOBBY RAY SMITH, and PATTIE F. SMITH, husband and wife, DEFENDANTS. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure and Reformation of Mortgage dated January 9, 2012, entered in Case No. 2011-CA-231 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Gulf State Community Bank, a Florida banking corporation, is the Plaintiff, and BAY SPRINGS COMMUNITY MORTGAGE, LLC, BOBBY RAY SMITH, and PATTIE F. SMITH, are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00a.m. on February 23, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus form the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 24th day of January, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) /s/ By Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ File Number :20060712a Lot 2 Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, R1W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Corner Record #32915, and run South 89 degrees 56 minutes 25 seconds West along the Section line 653.09 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 01 degrees 00 minutes 43 seconds West 874.57 feet to a iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 119, page 984 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, run thence South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said South boundary 377.09 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said Southerly boundary 201.89 feet, thence leaving said South boundary run North 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds West 563.50, thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds East 253.30 feet, thence North 02 degrees 42 minutes 56 seconds East 387.20 feet, thence South 78 degrees 41 minutes 46 seconds East 288.09 feet, thence South 02 degrees 34 minutes 25 seconds West 321.59 feet, thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds West 275.92 feet, thence South 02 degrees 42 minutes 56 seconds West 20.02 feet, thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds West 60.76 feet, thence South 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds East 552.44 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with and subject to the following roadway and utility easement: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Comer Record # 32915, and run South 89 degrees 56 minutes 25 seconds West along the Section line 653.09 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 01 degrees 00 minutes 43 seconds West 874.57 feet to a iron pipe marking the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 119, Page 984 on the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNlNG. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run thence South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said South boundary 735.82 feet to the Easterly right of way boundary of Revadee Spears Road, thence North 04 degrees 03 minutes 35 seconds West 40.10 feet along said right of way, thence leaving said right of way boundary run North 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds East 697.97 feet, thence North 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds West 500.65 feet, thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds West 31.04 feet, thence North 02 degrees 34 minutes 25 seconds East 502.11 feet, thence South 87 degrees 25 minutes 35 seconds East 30.00 feet, thence South 02 degrees 34 minutes 25 seconds West 470.84 feet, thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds East 39.15 feet to a concrete monument marking the Easterly boundary of said lands described in Official Records Book 119, Page 984, thence South 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds East along said Easterly boundary 570.45 feet to the POlNT OF BEGINNING. Subject to the following described conservation easement: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Corner Record # 32915, and run South 89 degrees 56 minutes 25 seconds West along the Section line 653.09 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 01 degrees 00 minutes 43 seconds West 874.57 feet to an iron pipe marking the Southeast comer of lands described in Official Records Book 119, Page 984 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, run thence South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said South boundary 377.09 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue South 89 degrees 53 minutes 33 seconds West along said Southerly boundary 201.89 feet, thence leaving said South boundary run North 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds West 563.50 feet, thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds East 253.30 feet, thence North 02 degrees 42 minutes 56 seconds East 10.01 feet, thence South 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds East 10.01 feet, thence South 02 degrees 42 minutes 56 seconds West 20.02 feet thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 17 seconds West 60.76 feet, thence South 00 degrees 59 minutes 21 seconds East 552.44 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO: Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Comer Record # 32915, and run North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line 1425.26 feet to the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along said Quarter Section Line 1068.95 feet, thence leaving said Quarter Section Line run South 88 degrees 15 minutes 58 seconds West 466.25 feet to the Easterly boundary of lands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96; thence along said Easterly boundary the following two courses: South 00 degrees 12 minutes 02 seconds West 74.40 feet to a concrete monument, thence South 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds West Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 431.10 feet to the Southeast corner of said lands, thence leaving said Easterly boundary run North 77 degrees 02 minutes 35 seconds East 232.21 feet, thence South 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds East 617.30 feet to the South boundary of said Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, thence run North 88 degrees 59 minutes 35 seconds East 334.41 feet along said Southerly boundary to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO the following two Roadway and Utility Easements: 30 Foot Roadway and Utility Easement Commence at the Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Corner Record #32915, and run North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line l389.83 feet, thence continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West 35.43 feet to the Southeast comer of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, thence continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section Line 959.35 feet to the North Boundary of Lands Described in Official Records Book 192, Page 427, continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line 109.60 feet to the North boundary of lands described in Official Records Book 64, Page 110, thence run South 88 degrees 15 minutes 58 seconds West along said North boundary 466.25 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 12 minutes 02 seconds West 74.40 feet to the Northeast comer of lands in Official Records Book 321, Page 96, thence run South 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds West along the Easterly boundary of said lands 413.79 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNlNG. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run thence North 47 degrees 40 minutes 10 seconds West 122.36 feet; thence North 57 degrees 25 minutes 47 seconds West 222.60 feet, thence North 82 degrees 37 minutes 06 seconds West 124.32 feet, thence South 80 degrees 10 minutes 54 seconds West 323.79 feet to the Easterly right of way boundary of Revadee Spears Road (50 foot right of way), thence run South 00 degrees 52 minutes 21 seconds West along said Easterly right of way 30.53 feet, thence leaving said Easterly right of way run North 80 degrees 10 minutes 54 seconds East 324.92 feet, thence South 82 degrees 37 minutes 06 seconds East 113.08 feet, thence South 57 degrees 25 minutes 47 seconds East 213.33 feet, thence South 47 degrees 40 minutes 10 seconds East 128.44 feet, thence North 42 degrees 19 minutes 50 seconds East 15.00 feet to the Southeast corner of lands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96, thence run North 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds East along said Easterly boundary 17.31 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. and having a width of 30 feet, and begin 15 feet North of, and 15 feet South of the Southerly boundary of lands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. Roadway and Utility Easement Commence at the Southeast comer of the Southwest Quarter of Section 18, T3S, Rl W, as marked by a concrete monument #1254, and accepted by Certified Corner Record # 32915, and run North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line 1389.83 feet, thence continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West 35.43 feet to the Southeast comer of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, thence continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section Line 959.35 feet to the North Boundary of Lands Described in Official Records Book 192, Page 427, continue North 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds West along the Quarter Section line 109.60 feet to the North boundary of lands described in Official Records Book 64, Page 110, thence run South 88 degrees 15 minutes 58 seconds West along said North boundary 466.25 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 12 minutes 02 seconds West 74.40 fed to the Northeast corner of Iands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96, thence run South 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds West along the Easterly boundary of said lands 413.79 feet to the POlNT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 47 degrees 40 minutes 10 seconds East 0.79 feet, thence North 77 degrees 02 minutes 35 seconds East 243.11 feet, thence South 00 degrees 14 minutes 57 seconds East 30.75, thence South 77 degrees 02 minutes 35 seconds West 252.06 feet, thence North 47 degrees 40 minutes 10 seconds West 7.86 feet, thence North 42 degrees 19 minutes 50 seconds East 15.00 feet to the Southeast comer of lands described in Official Records Book 321, Page 96, thence run North 12 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds East along said Easterly boundary 17.31 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. February 2 & 9, 2012 We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1150 per month. 2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $825 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 455 Old Bethel Road 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre. $900 mo. No Smoking or Pets107 Wildwood 3BR/2 BA with possible 4 -BR or den. Includes replace, above ground pool and hot tub. Large screened back porch. $1200.Mo. No Smoking/Pets with approval. 26 Magnolia Ridge 3BR/ 2 BA with replace, above ground pool. $1125. Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 116 Magnolia Ridge 3BR/2 BA with in-ground pool and replace $1100. Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 235 Webster 3BR/2BA MH $595 Mo. No Smoking/ Pets ok w/approval 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $475 Mo. No Smoking or Pets.29 Horseshoe Trail 3BR/2BA MH on 1 Acre $750 mo. No Smoking/Pets ok w/approval269 Forest Lane 1BR/1BA Home on 7 acres with 2 Car Garage $600 mo. No Smoking/Pets ok w/approvalAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate Please Recycle Susan Jones, GRIRealtor566-758426 Magnolia Ridge Gated Community in Crawfordville! Cozy 3BR/2BA well maintained home on 1/2 acre. Trellis w/ owing water garden. Spacious living area w/wood burning stove. Dining area w/Bay windows & Kitchen w/bar. All kitchen appliances included & ample cabinet space. Master bedroom w/nice walk-in closet & bay window. Master bath completely tiled w/jetted tub. Nice back deck w/above ground swimming pool... Great for entertaining. Close to downtown, beaches & shopping. Quiet Neighborhood and A-rated schools.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 – Page 7B MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 431.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 398.93 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 33.00 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 368.90 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 1655.69 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF LUKE SMITH ROAD, THENCE NORTH 67 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 32.52 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHWEST QUARTER 1698.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. More commonly known as 64 Effie Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327-0240 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiffs attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after the date of the first publication, response due by March 4,2012, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 23rd day of January, 2012. Brett X Thurmond as Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis as Deputy Clerk February 2 & 9, 2012 in The Wakulla News. File No:CA11-04249 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5096-0202 Vs. Hammock, Michael .09-CA-273 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 09-CA-273 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLM1 TRUST SERIES 2006-WMC1, Plaintiff, vs. MICHAEL HAMMOCK, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL HAMMOCK, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC.(MIN#1000136300113755994), OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2and ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 28, 2009 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated January 12, 2012,entered in Civil Case No.: 09-CA-273 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLM1 TRUST SERIES 2006-WMC1, Plaintiff, and MICHAEL HAMMOCK, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL HAMMOCK, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. (MIN# 1000136300113755994), OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC, FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 23rd day of February 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 6, OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE REPLAT, A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 102, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record 5100-0209 Vs. Truxell, III, Clyde W., Case #11-285-CA, Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE#11-285-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. CLYDE W. TRUXELL, III, ET. AL; Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Partial Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated January 23, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-285-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and CLUDE W. TRUXELL, III, CLYDE W. TRUXELL, III REVOCABLE TRUST AGREEMENT DATED MARCH 4, 1983; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00 oclock a.m. on February 23, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 23rd day of January, 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court (seal) /s/ BY Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at an old angle iron marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run South 89 degrees 48 minutes 28 seconds West 1317.48 feet to an axle, thence run South 02 degrees 48 degrees 03 minutes seconds West 970.96 feet to an angle iron, thence run South 02 degrees 46 degrees 03 minutes seconds West 970.96 feet to an angle iron, thence run South 02 degrees 00 minutes 42 seconds West 222.87 feet to the Northerly right-of-way boundary of the old G.F. & A. Railroad, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 01 degrees 25 minutes 42 seconds West 316.67 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said railroad, thence run South 60 degrees 25 minutes 25 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 171.49 feet to a re-rod(marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence continue South 60 degrees 25 minutes 25 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 122.30 feet to a re-rod(marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 30 degrees 32 minutes 43 seconds East 251.49 feet to an angle iron, thence run North 59 degrees 45 minutes 11 seconds East 242.18 feet to a 4 inch iron pipe, thence run North 32 degrees 24 minutes 02 seconds West 124.73 feet to a 4 inch pipe, thence run South 55 degrees 54 minutes 03 seconds West 117.25 feet to a 4 inch iron pipe, thence run North 30 degrees 02 minutes 33 seconds West 133.29 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.03 acres more or less. A 15.00 foot wide access easement being 7.50 feet each side of the following described line: Commence at an old angle iron marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run South 89 degrees 48 minutes 28 seconds West 1317.48 feet to an axle, thence run South 02 degrees 48 minutes 03 seconds West 970.96 feet to an angle iron, thence run South 02 degrees 00 minutes 42 seconds West 222.87 feet to the Northerly right-of-way boundary of the old G.F. & A. Railroad, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 01 degrees 25 minutes 42 seconds West 116.67 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said railroad, thence run South 50 degrees 25 minutes 25 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 350.54 feet to a re-rod(marked #4261) said Point being on a curve concave to the Southwesterly and marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning and leaving said right-of-way boundary run Northwesterly, Westerly and Southwesterly along the centerline of a proposed 15.00 foot access easement the following 23 courses: run Northwesterly along said curve concave to the Southwesterly having a radius of 42.33 feet, through a central angle of 116 degrees 31 minutes 46 seconds for an arc distance of 86.09 feet (chord being north 27 degrees 01 minutes 02 seconds West 72.00 feet) to a point of compound curve to the left having a radius of 142.65 feet, through a central angle of 28 degrees 31 minutes 23 seconds for an arc distance of 71.02 feet)(chord being south 80 degrees 27 minutes 23 seconds West 70.29 feet), South 66 degrees 11 minutes 42 seconds West 240.30 feet, South 63 degrees 14 minutes 35 seconds West 354.78 feet, South 60 degrees 21 minutes, 16 seconds West 260.51 feet, South 72 degrees 35 minutes 31 seconds West 302.58 feet, South 80 degrees 08 minutes 45 seconds West 510.30 feet, South 79 degrees 59 minutes 28 seconds West 229.03 feet, South 81 degrees 21 minutes 16 seconds West 377.45 feet, South 81 degrees 57 minutes 41 seconds West 230.25 feet to a Point of curve to the left having a radius of 99.00 feet, through a central angle of 66 degrees 30 minutes 53 seconds for an arc distance of 114.9. feet)(chord being south 48 degrees 42 minutes 15 seconds West 108.58 feet), South 15 degrees 26 minutes 49 seconds West 63.62 feet, South 19 degrees 46 minutes 47 seconds West 71.70 feet, South 27 degrees 04 minutes 04 seconds West 79.03 feet, South 35 degrees 14 minutes 15 seconds West 118.54 feet, South 22 degrees 50 minutes 35 seconds West 54.41 feet, South 12 degrees 17 minutes 38 seconds West 79.83 feet, South 28 degrees 53 minutes 40 seconds West 36.11 feet, South 48 degrees 27 minutes 10 seconds West 32.83 feet, South 59 degrees 05 minutes 38 seconds West 99.13 feet, South 52 degrees 38 minutes 01 seconds West 41.66 feet, South Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 41 degrees 18 minutes 53 seconds West 88.46 feet to the approximate Easterly maintained right-of-way of Oak Park Road(Forest Road No:36.5) said Point being the Point of Terminus. February 2 & 9, 2012 5098-0202 (02/24 Sale-Sopchoppy Mini-Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is given pursuant to FloridaSelf-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV, that Sopchoppy Mini Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on February 24,2012 at 10:00 a.m at Sopchoppy Hwy., Sopchoppy, FL. 32358, of the contents of Mini Warehouse containing personal property of: Andres Morris, Sharon Taube or Adrian Collier Payments must be made by 10:00 a.m. before the sale date of Saturday, February 24, 2012. The owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by contacting Sopchoppy Mini Storage at 850-962-4742 or by paying in person at the warehouse location. January 26 & February 2, 2012. Self Storage Notices 5103-0209 (02/18/2012 Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage) PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage FaSelf Storage Notices Self Storage Notices cility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, February 18,2012, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: ROSA LEE GREEN JACQUELYN GODBOLT Before the sale date of Saturday, February 18, 2012, the owners my redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. February 2 & 9, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on January 13, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Telephone (954)360-9030 Facsimile:(954)420-5187. January 26, & February 2, 2012 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 33 40 44 47 52 63 68 71 2 34 64 3 35 65 21 29 41 60 4 15 18 42 61 5 30 36 48 53 6 24 45 54 66 69 72 7 37 55 8 38 49 22 31 43 62 9 16 19 32 39 50 56 10 25 51 11 26 46 57 67 70 73 12 27 58 13 28 5ACROSS1.Guy'spartner 4.Blue-haired Simpson 9.Sci-fivillain__ Vader 14.Regretbitterly 15.Winning,forthe moment 16.Kindofacidin protein 17.Prepareforwar 18.Dida440ora5K 19.Chophouse selection 20."TheLiberator"of SouthAmerica 23.Closecall 24."Ofcourse!" 25.Workplace watchdogorg. 29.Belgiansongsmith Jacques 31.SingerSheena 33.Moldaviaor Azerbaijan,once: Abbr. 36.Hair-care purchases 39.Somethingtasty 40.TheBeaver, formally 44.__birdspecial 45.Pea ude__(silk cloth) 46.Languagesuffix 47.Artfuldodger 49.Maneuvercarefully 52.Phnom__, Cambodia 53.Blissfulstate 56.Antipastomorsel 60."FutureShock" author 63.HewasBenin "Bonanza" 66.Countrysinger Black 67.Discountrackabbr. 68.Whereyoulive 69.Supporterofthe arts? 70.Pressintoservice 71.CapitalofBelarus 72.Scatterbrained 73.Club__DOWN1.Hulaskirt material 2.Containinggold 3.Auxiliarytheorem 4.Eliot'sSilas 5.Melville'swhaler 6.Pistols, whenfired 7.SomeCelts 8.AceRickenbacker 9.Flashdrivefiller 10.Foodofthegods 11.SouthAmerican cruisestop 12.Networkthat'snow Spike 13.Weeder'sneed 21.Regaliaitem 22.Churchillian gesture 26.Barrelpiece 27.Putsanedgeon 28.ConductorPrevin 30.Freudian topic 32.Hadrian's"Hail!" 33.Tough toclimb, perhaps 34.Excise thestubble 35.Airedagain 37.Nameof13popes 38.Fahrenheitor Faraday 41.Seasonedpros 42.Batikingneed 43.Pastoralspot 48.Ministerial nickname 50.p, toapianist 51.Arcticdrudg e 54.Cutintocubes 55.China'sZhou__ 57.Pelvicbone 58.Chapter'spartner 59.Blewit 61.Chivekin 62.Vendingmachine input 63.Hastyescape 64.Kimonoaccessory 65.'90sSecretaryof CommerceBrown American Prole Hometown Content 1/8/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 23 4 3567 2895 9 4 5762 48 8 725 5471 5934 200 9 HtCtt 178 2359 4 6 395647128 642189357 869 372415 537418692 214956873 486 721539 923564781 751893264 G R A S S S T E E P L A M A U R I C S H A V E O B I L E M M A R E R A N R O N O R B O L D H A N D S M A R N E R D Y E L E E K A H A B E G O R E V R E C O I L E R S D I C E D G A E L S L E O E N L A I E D D I E S C I E N T I S T V E E L E A O N E S D A T A A V E S O F T L Y A M B R O S I A E L F R I O S T A V E I L I U M T N N H O N E S V E R S E H O E A N D R E E R R E D Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com 5100-0209 Vs. Truxell, III, Clyde W., Case #11-285-CA, Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE#11-285-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. CLYDE W. TRUXELL, III, ET. AL; Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Partial Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure dated January 23, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-285-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and CLUDE W. TRUXELL, III, CLYDE W. TRUXELL, III REVOCABLE TRUST AGREEMENT DATED MARCH 4, 1983; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00 oclock a.m. on February 23, 2012 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale,if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 23rd day of January, 2012 BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court (seal) /s/ BY Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at an old angle iron marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest quarter of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run South 89 degrees 48 minutes 28 seconds West 1317.48 feet to an axle, thence run South 02 degrees 48 degrees 03 minutes seconds West 970.96 feet to an angle iron, thence run South 02 degrees 00 minutes 42 seconds West 222.87 feet to the Northerly right-of-way boundary of the old G.F. & A. Railroad, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 01 degrees 25 minutes 42 seconds West 116.67 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said railroad, thence run South 60 degrees 25 minutes 25 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 171.49 feet to a re-rod(marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence continue South 60 degrees 25 minutes 25 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 122.30 feet to a re-rod(marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 30 degrees 32 minutes 43 seconds East 251.49 feet to an angle iron, thence run North 59 degrees 45 minutes 11 seconds East 242.18 feet to a 4 inch iron pipe, thence run North 32 degrees 24 minutes 02 seconds West 124.73 feet to a 4 inch pipe, thence run South 55 degrees 54 minutes 03 seconds West 117.25 feet to a 4 inch iron pipe, thence run North 30 degrees 02 minutes 33 seconds West 133.29 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.03 acres more or less. A 15.00 foot wide access easement being 7.50 feet each side of the following described line: Commence at an old angle iron marking the Northeast corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 31, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, thence run South 89 degrees 48 minutes 28 seconds West 1317.48 feet to an axle, thence run South 02 degrees 48 minutes 03 seconds West 970.96 feet to an angle iron, thence run South 02 degrees 00 minutes 42 seconds West 222.87 feet to the Northerly right-of-way boundary of the old G.F. & A. Railroad, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 01 degrees 25 minutes 42 seconds West 116.67 feet to the Southerly right-of-way boundary of said railroad, thence run South 60 degrees 25 minutes 25 seconds West along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 350.54 feet to a re-rod(marked #4261) said Point being on a curve concave to the Southwesterly and marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning and leaving said right-of-way boundary run Northwesterly, Westerly and Southwesterly along the centerline of a proposed 15.00 foot access easement the following 22 courses: run Northwesterly along said curve concave to the Southwesterly having a radius of 42.33 feet, through a central angle of 116 degrees 31 minutes 46 seconds for an arc distance of 86.09 feet (chord being north 27 degrees 01 minutes 02 seconds West 72.00 feet) to a point of compound curve to the left having a radius of 142.66 feet, through a central angle of 28 degrees 31 minutes 23 seconds for an arc distance of 71.02 feet)(chord being south 80 degrees 27 minutes 23 seconds West 70.29 feet), South 66 degrees 11 minutes 42 seconds West 240.30 feet, South 63 degrees 14 minutes 35 seconds West 354.78 feet, South 60 degrees 21 minutes, 16 seconds West 260.51 feet, South 72 degrees 35 minutes 31 seconds West 302.58 feet, South 80 degrees 08 minutes 45 seconds West 510.30 feet, South 79 degrees 59 minutes 28 seconds West 229.03 feet, South 81 degrees 21 minutes 16 seconds West 377.45 feet, South 81 degrees 57 minutes 41 seconds West 230.25 feet to a Point of curve to the left having a radius of 99.00 feet, through a central angle of 66 degrees 30 minutes 53 seconds for an arc distance of 114.93 feet)(chord being south 48 degrees 42 minutes 15 seconds West 108.58 feet), South 15 degrees 26 minutes 49 seconds West 63.62 feet, South 19 degrees 46 minutes 47 seconds West 71.70 feet, South 27 degrees 04 minutes 04 seconds West 79.03 feet, South 35 degrees 14 minutes 15 seconds West 118.54 feet, South 22 degrees 50 minutes 35 seconds West 54.41 feet, South 12 degrees 17 minutes 38 seconds West 79.83 feet, South 28 degrees 53 minutes 40 seconds West 36.11 feet, South 48 degrees 27 minutes 10 seconds West 32.83 feet, South 59 degrees 05 minutes 38 seconds West 99.13 feet, South 52 degrees 38 minutes 01 seconds West 41.66 feet, South 41 degrees 18 minutes 53 seconds West 88.46 feet to the approximate Easterly maintained right-of-way of Oak Park Road(Forest Road No:365) said Point being the Point of Terminus. February 2 & 9, 2012 Tell Someone You Love How Much You Love Them In Valentine's issue! Only $14 For up to 30 Words Ad a Photo for an additional $5 ( 850 ) 926-71023119-A Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Contact Denise Folh by February 10email: denise@thewakullanews.net or call 926-7102

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 2, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChamber NewsElite Flooring LLC is a local ” oor coverings business established in 2005 that is dedicated to providing a personalized Shop at Home ServiceŽ at competitive prices. There is no need to carry samples back and forth; let us visit you in your home, at your convenience, daytime or evening. Our extensive sample collection, covering everything from carpet and vinyl to natural sisal, sea-grass, coir, laminate and hardwood ” ooring will impress you. Visiting you in your home enables us to offer you ef“ cient, helpful and personalized advice. We can suggest the best approach to any given job including advice on sub-” oors, barrier matting, thresholds, seam positions (if needed), wear, and maintenance and budget requirements. Naturally, all our price quotes are free of charge. We strive to achieve complete customer satisfaction from initial free estimate through completion of installation. Whatever your needs, please contact us to arrange a free day or evening appointment to discuss how we can help you. For more information, call Donnie at (850) 2512698. Elite Flooring is located at 4525 Capital Circle No. j20 in Tallahassee. You may have known us as That Place on 98 down on the coast for the last 14 years. We couldnt be more pleased with our move up to Wakulla County. We have been received with open arms and have made a lot of new friends. When we came up here I wanted to do some test marketing on what the people in the area wanted. The test marketing is over in about two weeks and our new menu will be here. Check the marquee for updates. There will be a lot more choices. We will have cat“ sh, mullet, country fried steaks, hamburger steaks and many more new and exciting items. We are going to have a lot of items on the new dinner menu for under $10. Give us a call at 926-2242 for our new to go promotion. Come check us out and have my friendly wait staff take care of all your dining needs. Debbie, Lynn and I want to thank you for all the kindness you have shown since we moved here. I only wished we would have moved sooner. Chamber NewsWe are delighted to welcome R. Jai Gillum to the Big Brothers Big Sisters family. Her positive energy is infectious. Originally from Montgomery, Ala., R. Jai has lived in Tallahassee for more than 13 years. She received her undergraduate degree and Master of Public Health from Florida A&M University. Gillum has previous non-profit development experience and has also worked for Citizens Property Insurance and the Florida Department of Health. She served as the staff director of the Florida Financial Literacy Council and most recently served as the Director of Board Appointments for former Florida Chief Financial Of“ cer Alex Sink. Gillum is very active in the Tallahassee community and has served on the board of directors for the United Way of the Big Bend, Friends of the Leon County Public Library, Brokaw-McDougall House, Junior League of Tallahassee, Tallahassee Community College Foundation and 211 Big Bend Inc. Her other affiliations include Leadership Tallahassee and the Tallahassee Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Gillum will be managing fundraising efforts including agency events such as the BIG Deal, the BIG Catch, Bowl for Kids Sake, and the BIG Bash. To welcome her. please call (850) 386-6002 or email her at r.jai@bigbendmentoring.org. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMikes Seafood Grille owner Mike Keller cuts the ribbon.Mikes Seafood has ribbon cuttingCHAMBER MEMBER UPDATE:R. Jai Gillum joins Big Brothers, Big Sisters as development director R. Jai GillumSpecial to The News TALLAHASSEE … Workforce Plus knows that a ” awless resume, an eye-catching cover letter and enthusiastic references are important, but for job seekers in a challenging job market, sometimes more is needed. Training and certi“ cations represent what most employers want but what not every job seeker has,Ž said Kimberly A. Moore, CEO of Workforce Plus, whose nonpro“ t secures no-cost trainings for hundreds of job seekers every month. Our Jobs = Paychecks Now program bridges that divide by providing the credentialing that employment hopefuls need to get back to work.Ž Jobs = Paychecks NowŽ is a $1 million investment in the local economy that approaches workforce development from multiple angles. It reimburses up to $1,250.00 to employers for training costs related to training new hires who were unemployed or involved in a layoff; it pairs eligible job seekers with a career counselor who will develop and help implement an individualized employment strategy; and it pays for the training, credentialing and certi“ cations that Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla job seekers need to secure employment. Training, licensure and credentialing are available in healthcare, commercial driving, information systems/technology, program management, clerical, accounting and more through the Jobs = Paychecks NowŽ program now until mid-March. This initiative both provides valuable resources to businesses as well as equips those out of work with the proof they need to communicate their value to employers,Ž Moore said. I would advise every employer and job seeker to take advantage of Jobs = Paychecks Now and not to miss out on what can only lead to job creation and a well-prepared workforce.Ž Those interested should contact Workforce Plus at 1-866-WFP-JOB1 or email wfp@ wfplus.org. Job seekers looking forward to taking advantage of Jobs = Paychecks NowŽ should contact Workforce Plus to determine if they are eligible for enrollment in the program. Employers are encouraged to use the same contact information to cultivate a talented team of eligible candidates through the Jobs = Paychecks NowŽ program. Workforce Plus program makes job training available at no costElite Flooring o ers di erent concept in customer serviceCHAMBER MEMBER UPDATE: ValentineCelebration Saturday, February 11at Hudson Park in CrawfordvilleParade line-up will begin at 9 a.m. Sweetheart parade will begin at 10 a.m.Immediately following parade until 3 p.m.Rafe drawing will be held at 3 p.m. 1st Prize $1,000 CASH 2nd Prize $500 CASH Th e r e will b e food, e nt e rtainm e nt, arts and crafts, e xhibits & kids activiti e s. Rafe tickets can be purchased from any Rotary member; cost is $1 each; they can be purchased ahead of time or at the park on day of festival. Celebration in The Park Breakfast in the Park will begin at 8 a.m.14TH ANNUALWAKULLAROTARY Wakullacountychamber.com The Wak u lla Ne ws F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com