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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00391
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 01-12-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00391
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA push by cave divers to allow recreational diving at the crown jewel of Florida springs has promoted the state to hold a public workshop on the proposal. Members of the Wakulla County Dive Club met with upper management from the Florida Park Service in March about opening the Wakulla Springs to cave diving. Wakulla Springs is the largest and deepest freshwater spring in the United States. The Florida Park Service will take comments from the public at a meeting on Jan. 19 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce Arena, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville. The announcement of the meeting has caused quite a stir in the county, with many people taking a strong stance on one side or the other. Those in support of the proposal say it will bring needed revenue to Wakulla County. Those against say the amount of money it might bring isnt worth the possible negative impacts. Some are worried opening the springs to recreational diving could interfere with ongoing research in the cave system. Casey McKinlay, project director for the Woodville Karst Plain Project and diver, says WKPP divers have been working with scientists, local, state and federal agencies, as well as landowners and resource mangers, for the last 20 years gathering data to understand the sources and pathways of the water feeding Wakulla Springs. Scienti“ c studies are being performed on the water quality and quantity. The goal is to make sure Wakulla Springs is protected and conserved for future generations, McKinlay says. As a cave diver in Florida for the past 20 years, I can tell you the damage and vandalism occurring at other state parks that allow cave diving and cave diving instruction is tragic,Ž McKinlay says. Gregg Stanton, member of the Wakulla County Dive Club and owner of Wakulla Diving Center, says trained cave divers are one of the safest types of divers, as well as a very responsible group who do not want to see the spring vandalized or trashed. In fact, when a diver carved his name into a wall of a particular cave, the cave diving community tracked the diver down and he was brought to justice, Stanton says, and divers went into the cave and removed his name. We have a proven track record,Ž Stanton says. Ron Piasecki, chairman of the Hydrogeology Consortium/ Wakulla Springs Alliance, says the problem is the possibly disturbance or destruction of not only expensive equipment, but also artifacts, like the mastodon bones that have been found.Continued on Page 3A By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsAlmost 10 years ago, Medart resident Delores Nelson saw the legend of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. celebrated annually across the U.S. However, more than 30 years after his assassination, Wakulla had less than a handful of participants and events dedicated to observing the holiday. Other than scattered church assemblies, no event brought the county together, as a whole, to recognize a man who encapsulated more than the civil rights battle, and whose life shed light on the deepseated human struggle of an entire nation. It was this need to honor Dr. King, and continue his legacy of equal rights, that brought the Wakulla County Christian Coalition into existence, and continues this coming Jan. 16 with a brief service at the courthouse monument, along with breakfast in Hudson Park afterwards. At the start,Ž says Jennie V. Jones, chairperson of the coalition, Mrs. Nelson searched the county for people who would get involved in making MLKs work important to the black people of this county.Ž The coalition had its “ rst meeting at the Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church (No. 1), in Medart. To garner interest, the meetings traveled to different churches throughout the county. We had our “ rst event in Hudson Park around February of 2003,Ž says Jones. There was a small parade. We held pageants where young ladies that raised the most funds to aid the coalition were crowned queen.Ž Their effort to educate the young on Americas black history does not exist in the form of lectures, but active participation in the future of the students. Continued on Page 2A INDEX Public Notices ...........................................Page 2A Comment & Opinion .................................Page 4A Church.......................................................Page 5A People ........................................................Page 6A School .......................................................Page 7A Sports .......................................................Page 8A Outdoors ..................................................Page 9A Water Ways .............................................Page 10A Sheriffs Report .......................................Page 11A Green Scene ..............................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ........................................Page 2B Health & Fitness............................................Page 3B Classi eds ..................................................Page 5B Legal Notices .............................................Page 6B Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 2nd Issue Thursday, January 12, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily OBITUARIES Billie Jo Hartsfield Barksdale Bonnie Rae Brinson Pamela Lawhon Evans Harry Samuel Smith Vonysea ‘Vony’ Lee Sparkman Marvin L. Thomas The WakullanewsA Martin Luther King Jr. church service is being hosted by Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church, 223 Triplett Road, in the Hyde Park community on Monday, Jan. 16, at 7 p.m. Keynote speaker will be Elder Alfred Nelson. Wakulla High scores a ‘B’ gradeShould diving be allowed at Wakulla Springs?By BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentHigh school grades for 2010-2011 were recently released by the Florida Department of Education. Wakulla High School scored 1,128 points, well above the 1,050 needed to earn an A rating. However, one of the fourteen areas assessed lowered the grade to a B for not improving “ ve points or more from the previous year. Wakulla High School excelled in the 2011 graduation calculation for all students at 91 points, increasing from 87 points in 2010. It is the highest graduation rate in the surrounding counties and ranks 11th in the state. Improving by 20 points in 2011 was the WHS participation rate in students taking Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment and Career and Technical Education courses for college credit opportunities and industry certi“ cation. Overall, WHS improved 18 points over the previous year. Only the graduation rate for at-risk students changed the A rating to a B because no matter how many points a high school earns, it cannot be an A without that one category improving by five points each year or staying at 75 percent or above. WHS improved by two points over the previous year, which translates into 1.5 at-risk students. At-risk status is determined from the 2011 graduating seniors FCAT scores from 8th grade. These students must graduate in four years or the school cannot be deemed an A. I think Wakulla High School teachers and administrators have done a tremendous job of focusing on successful college and career preparation for our students,Ž stated Superintendent David Miller. It does seem a shame that the entire school is penalized a letter grade for the performance of one student. To me, the rightful score is still an A.Ž A new grading system for high schools was used for the second year in Florida since schools began earning letter grades in 1999. Florida high school scores now derive 50 percent of their school grade from Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) scores in Reading, Math, Science and Writing. The other 50 percent is now comprised of the following areas: graduation rate; graduation rate for at-risk students; participation in Advanced Placement courses, college dual enrollment courses and career/technical courses; performance in Advanced Placement courses, college dual enrollment courses and industry certi“ cation earned in career/technical courses; and College ReadinessŽ in reading and math, as assessed on the American College Test (ACT), the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and the Common Placement Test (CPT). Overall, the Wakulla County School Districts total points for all schools made for an A district rating. Wakulla County has a string of six consecutive A district grades. Wakulla is also in its fourth consecutive year of being deemed an Academically High Performing DistrictŽ due to meeting requirements for school grades, “ nancial audits and class sizes. It does seem a shame that the entire school is penalized a letter grade for the performance of one student. … Superintendent of Schools David Miller, contending the grade should have been an ASchool-level Teachers of the Year, see photo on Page 3A. PHOTO BY DAVID RHEA/WKPPA diver in a tunnel at Wakulla Springs shows a mastodon bone. Opponents to allowing recreational divers in the spring argue that such artifacts could be put at risk while those in favor of diving counter they would take steps to stop vandalism. e lines are being drawn between those who want access to dive at Wakulla Springs, and those who believe the spring could be put at risk by allowing more divers in WHAT: Hearing to take public comment on opening Wakulla Springs to recreational diving. WHERE: Extension of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue. WHEN: Thursday, Jan. 19, at 7 p.m. Group grew from need to honor Dr. King e Wakulla Christian Coalition formed in an effort to bring the community together to honor the slain civil rights leader Wakulla Christian Coalition’s Celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday, Jan. 16, will include a road cleanup along MLK Memorial Road at 8 a.m. A program will be held at the courthouse monument at 9 a.m. Breakfast at Hudson Park will be at 10 a.m. Changes in how we light our homesSee Page 1B See Page 12A POSEY’S DEMOLISHED

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe city of Sopchoppy was recently awarded a $600,000 Community Development Block Grant to improve drainage at Gulf Street and Park Avenue. Consultant Andy Easton said he received the award letter in late December. Easton was awarded the bid for administrator of the grant. Back in November, Easton said the odds were high that the city would receive the grant and they were ranked third or fourth out of 15. Its great for the city,Ž Easton said. Easton was at the Jan. 9 Sopchoppy City Commission meeting to present the contract to the commission and obtain signatures. Easton said the grant should be funded within 60 to 90 days. Vice-Mayor Richard Harden said a few improvements will also be made to Sopchoppy City Park with the funds. In other news: € Commissioner Lara Edwards gave an update on the Sopchoppy River Bridge repairs. Edwards said she was told it should be open on Friday. The bridge was damaged after a dump truck plunged over the side on Dec. 12. and had been closed. The man, Freeman Pigott was severely injured in the crash. Pigott is now home and must undergo rehabilitation. The bridge is 70 years old and there was some concern that it might not be able to be replaced. € Also at the meeting, the commission agreed to have staff look into a grant through the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to improve the boat ramp at Sopchoppy City Park. Harden said the commission has discussed extending the ramp and this could be a way to do so. Harden said the money comes from the tax on marine fuel. The commission agreed to have staff see if it is worthwhile to the city. The next commission meeting is Feb. 13 at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt has been almost seven months since the groundbreaking ceremony was held for the proposed Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail and construction “ nally began on Monday, Jan. 9. Its been a 10-year trek,Ž said Assistant County Administrator Tim Barden. The 11-mile bike trail will connect Mashes Sands to Sopchoppy and will be constructed in five phases. The “ rst phase is 2.12 miles, starting at the Mashes Sands trailhead. The Wakulla County Commission awarded the bid for construction of the project at its June 21 meeting and the groundbreaking was held June 24 at what will be the Mashes Sands trailhead. However, the county received a formal bid challenge from Ben Withers Inc. who claimed he submitted all that was asked for, but was told he did not meet the criteria, which he said the county misinterpreted. The county contended that Ben Withers bid was properly rejected as noncompliant and non-responsive for failure to attach a copy of the required FDOT Qualifications Letter for the four required pre-quali“ cations. Withers then protested the bid and the commission decided to throw out all bids and re-advertise. The winning bid was Peavy and Son Construction for $450,853. The commission approved the bid at its Dec. 5 meeting. This project is 100 percent reimbursable through the Florida Department of Transportations Transportation Enhancement Funding Program.Continued from Page 1A We want the young people of Wakulla to know that there is something larger out there for them,Ž says Queen Webster, an active member of the Coalition from its inception. Mrs. Webster has developed a number of educational opportunities for Wakulla youth within the school system, and outside of it, for years. We feel it our duty to provide them with a sense of direction,Ž she says. We do this by offering external programs, scholarships … anything that encourages their personal value.Ž Every February, in honor of Black History Month, the Coalition works with liaisons within the schools to provide information on the overall accomplishments of AfricanAmericans. Poster and essay contests are open to all, and morning announcements are made, along with other activities. The Sopchoppy Education Center, which houses the Second Chance School and other programs, was adopted by the coalition to provide students in need with materials and supplies to make sure their school years were productive ones. Arthur Lee Andrews, born July 25, 1946, grew up in Sopchoppy and attended the Buckhorn school. During the 1960s, hed planned to marry his sweetheart upon return from Vietnam. That union never took place. On Feb. 25, 1969, he became a ground casualty, killed in the line of duty in the Phu Yen Province of South Vietnam. The Sgt. Arthur Lee Andrews Scholarship, initiated by the coalition, is awarded each year to two deserving students. Though Sgt. Andrews was African-American, not all scholarship recipients have been. Race is in no way a factor when it comes to the scholarships,Ž says Jones. The content of character, the hard work placed on their studies, and a proven commitment to making their community a better place, is what in” uences our decision.Ž The coalition was integral in renaming the Buckhorn Creek Bridge in honor for Sgt. Andrews. They also aid the communitys elderly in receiving medical care, and families whove experienced loss, or “ nd themselves in need, are also assisted. The name change of Lower Bridge Road, to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road was also the work of the coalition. This particular endeavor took almost six years to accomplish. Though there were many in the community who supported the attempt, some appeared fearful of being involved. There were others … many who didnt live on the road itself … who opposed the effort outright. And at one point … even in the new millennium … signs that had been placed to announce the renaming were removed under cloak of night. These things come with the territory and are minor compared to other challenges that lie ahead for the coalition. One would be their name, which is often confused with the national Christian Coalition of America, whose tagline is Defending Americas Godly Heritage.Ž They represent a highly conservative agenda. The Wakulla County Christian Coalition is no way af“ liated with this group, and do not see the name similarity their main obstacle. Our major concern,Ž says member George Green, is participation. There has to be a way that inspires people to have a hand in remembering their history.Ž Weve been slow in stepping forth,Ž he says, and grabbing hold of the terri“ c opportunities provided by the Coalition. People simply are not clear on who we are and what we do for Wakulla residents.Ž Within pockets of the black community, there remains a sense of division and lack of trust. In a country whose sole purpose appears, as of late, to be individual selfpreservation, the call to unity, and the need to educate remains the Coalitions rallying cry. For those of us whove bene“ ted tremendously from the efforts of the civil rights movement,Ž says Jones, the last position we should ever “ nd ourselves in, is forgetting it ever occurred. If we forget, then what … really … is left for our children to remember, or even strive for?Ž For information on the Jan. 16 MLK ceremony and breakfast, call (850) 926-7547CITY OF SOPCHOPPY$600,000 grant awarded to improve road drainage e grant will go towards relieving drainage problems on Gulf Street and Park Avenue, plus some city park improvementsWakulla Christian Coalition grew from need to honor Dr. King Christian Coalition members Bossie Hawkins, Sandra Porter, George Green, Ruth Francis Hugh Taylor, Jennie V. Jones, Anne Van Me ter and Howard Kessler.Bike Trail work is “ nally underway JENNIFER JENSENThe sign at the Mashes Sands Trailhead The Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Recreation and Parks announce a public workshop to which all persons are invited. DATE AND TIME: Thursday, January 19, 2012,7:00 p.m. (ET) PLACE: Wakulla County Agriculture Extension Of“ce, The Arena, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 GENERAL SUBJECT MATTER TO BE CONSIDERED: Public workshop regarding the proposed inclusion of recreational cave diving at Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park A COPY OF THE AGENDA MAY BE OBTAINED BY CONTACTING: Brian Fugate, Park Manager, Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park at 550 Wakulla Park Drive Wakulla Springs, FL 32327. PHONE: (850) 561-7279 or email Brian.Fugate@dep.state.f1.us. Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this workshop/meeting is asked to advise the agency at least 48 hours before the workshop/meeting by contacting: Brian Fugate, Park Manager, Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park at 550 Wakulla Park Drive Wakulla Springs, FL 32327 PH# (850) 561-7279 or email Brian.Fugate@dep.state.f1.us. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the agency using the Florida Relay Service, 1(800)955-8771 (TDD) or 1(800)955-8770 (Voice).Florida Department of Environmental Protection Division of Recreation and ParksJANUARY 5, 12, 2012 PUBLIC NOTICE The City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Interested parties may inspect ordinance at 788 Port Leon Drive and be heard at the meeting. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Office at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 925-6224. JANUARY 12, 2012 Effective March 1, 2012, Tallahassee Community College announces its intent to designate the Associate Vice President of Institutional Effectiveness as a Senior Management Service Class (SMSC) position. NOTICE OF INTENT TO DESIGNATE POSITION TO SENIOR MANAGEMENT SERVICE CLASSTallahassee Community College is an Equal Opportunity/Af“rmative Action Employer.JANUARY 12, 19, 2012

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 – Page 3AContinued from Page 1A Its a living museum,Ž Piasecki says. McKinlay adds, Wakulla Springs is a working laboratory, the most instrumented cave system in the world and a time capsule with evidence of humans dating back to more than 10,000 years.Ž Stanton says cave divers do not want to interfere with any research or artifacts, but have offered to help with research and pay for cameras in the caves to ensure no one disturbs anything. The dive club plans to collect fees to pay for expenses that the park cannot afford, such as steps or platforms. Which, he says, was already done at Emerald Sink. Piasecki also worries how diving could affect other activities at the park, such as swimming and jumping from the dive tower, as well as the glass bottom boat tours. The entrance to the cave system is near the dive tower and swimmers and boaters are required to be 100 feet away from a dive flag. This could possibly mean closing the dive tower when a dive is in progress, Piasecki says. The glass bottom boat tours also go to that area as part of the tour, he says. You would preclude that experience,Ž Piasecki says. Stanton says the proposed dive area is out of the way of jumpers from the dive tower and boat traf“ c. He says they do not want to disrupt any activities of the park. This is our park too,Ž Stanton says. Members of the Wakulla County Dive Club contend that divers share resources with swimmers, boaters and manatees all across Florida and and are willing to work with each group to share access. The club points out that boats killed 83 manatees last year, but still operate at the park. Piasecki says he isnt against diving, just diving in this particular area. And, he says, there are three other locations were diving is allowed. They are Cherokee Sink, Emerald Sink and Clear Cut Sink, all which he says arent utilized very often. The Wakulla County Dive Club argues that Cherokee Sink has been closed since 2009 and is only available for scuba instruction and Emerald Sink has many requirements, including permission from private individuals, diver gear manufacturers, divers insurance and only elite divers are considered eligible. Stanton says the amount of people who dive Emerald Sink is extremely small compared to those who dive at Peacock Springs. Members of the club have pointed out that allowing access would bring in much needed revenue for Wakulla County and Wakulla Springs could be marketed as a diving destination. Stanton says economic studies have shown that nearby areas where diving bring in $2.5 million to their community, thanks to divers staying in their hotels and eating at their restaurants. There is a dramatic international economic opportunity,Ž Stanton says. People from different countries want to know why they cant dive at Wakulla Springs, he says. Its no surprise they are kind of amused were not interested,Ž Stanton says. Wakulla Springs State Park and the state of Florida cant afford to continue to exclude scuba divers from access, it is not sustainable, Stanton says. The impact is state wide,Ž Stanton says. A study on the economic potential of opening Wakulla Springs to cave diving was performed by William Huth and O. Ashton Morgan in 2011. They estimated an annual willingness to pay of approximately $500,000 for cave diving at Wakulla Springs. McKinlay says he questions the validity of the study. According to McKinlay, Huth is a local cave diver and member of the Wakulla County Dive Club and he says only a small sample of mostly North Florida cave divers were used in the study. For many, Wakulla Springs is considered the Mount Everest of cave diving and members of the dive club say that there is a lucrative stakeholder group eagerly waiting for the chance to explore it and they believe they should have the right to do so. Piasecki says it is considered the Mount Everest because of its depth, challenge, artifacts and uniqueness, which he says is the reason it should be preserved. McKinlay says there is a less known side to Mount Everest, which is the amount of money it costs, the amount of garbage on it, and the number of people who have died attempting to conquer it. Unlike an attraction at Disney that can be torn down and something new built, once Wakulla is damaged, it is gone,Ž McKinlay says. Interested parties unable to attend the public workshop on Jan. 19 may send written comments to the Division of Recreation and Parks Of“ ce of Park Planning, 3900 Commonwealth Blvd, Mailstation 525, Tallahassee, FL 32399.Should diving be allowed at Wakulla Springs? WILLIAM SNOWDENSchool-level Teachers of the Year attended a meeting last week with Superintendent of Schools David Miller and Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell. The teachers are, front row, Angela Swain, Michelle Hunter, Missy Rudd, Megan Crombie; back row, Miller with Jeri Jump, Holly Harden, John Kane, Shari Smith and ODonnell. The eight teachers will be interviewed by a panel in a couple of weeks and the Teacher of the Year will be announced Jan. 30 and will compete against teachers in the other 66 districts to be statewide Teacher of the Year.Teachers of the Year gatherCompanies donate a van, signage to Cauzican rescue Special to The NewsIt takes quite a while to feed all the mouths at the Cauzican Rescue farm. Bonnie Brinson and her crew take care of dogs and horses from Wakulla and the surrounding counties that have been thrown out or dropped off at any number of places, with no one and no home to call their own. Cauzican Rescue has one purpose: to save as many lives as possible and place these unwanted, unloved animals into homes where they will stay, healthy and happy, for the remainder of their lives. If these animals need medical care, Cauzican sees that they receive it. The animals stay at the farm until they are healthy enough to go to a new home. Before they go to their new lives, all the dogs are spayed or neutered, receive a clean bill of health, and get all required immunizations. Hundreds of animals are in their care at any given time, constantly changing and bringing in new faces. To be able to transport all these animals where they need to be to stand the best chance at life has been a daily battle. Two companies in Crawfordville who believe in Cauzican Rescues work have banded together to provide this group what they need. Callaway Auto & Truck Repair has provided a 2002 Ford cargo van that is large enough to allow the maximum number of animals to be moved in the safest manner possible. Auto Trim Design & Signs donated all the signage on the van and turned it into an outstanding testament to Cauzicans work. Marsha and her team took a plain white van and transformed it into quite a vision. Callaway Auto will be providing all the maintenance on the van to make sure that it stays in good condition. With continued support, Cauzican Rescue can continue to provide a second chance for hundreds of animals each year. Cauzican accepts and appreciates any and all donations, whether it is food, bedding, housing or funding. They can be contacted at 528-7535 or online at www.cauzican.org. The donated van and signs for Cauzican Care Rescue.BriefsLane closures set on U.S. Highway 319 for road workMotorists traveling U.S. Highway 319 in Wakulla County will encounter lane closures from south of Wakulla-Arran Road to the Leon County line beginning Sunday, Jan. 8, at 6:30 p.m. as crews from C.W. Roberts Contracting, Inc. begin resurfacing the roadway. This work is part of a $2.8 million construction contract to resurface the corridor, perform minor shoulder work, improve drainage, improve highway signage, upgrade guardrail at Jump Creek and other safety improvements. Turn lanes will also be installed at Wakulla-Arran, Ivan Church and East Ivan roads. Weather permitting, work requiring lane closures will take place at night from 6:30 p.m. until 6 a.m. The project is expected to be completed summer 2012. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the work zone. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter @ myfdot_nw .Traffic Shift on County Road 375 at Syfrett Creek Bridge Weather permitting, traffic on County Road 375 at the Syfrett Creek Bridge in Wakulla County will shift to a temporary bridge Tuesday, Jan. 10 while crews construct a new bridge. Drivers are reminded to pay attention to the speed limit when traveling through the construction area, and to use caution, especially at night when driving in work zones. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter at www.twitter.com/myfdot_nw No change in garbage service for MLK HolidayThere will be no changes to solid waste collection for the Martin Luther King Holiday on Monday, Jan. 16, for Wakulla County Waste Pro customers. All services will be completed on your normal scheduled day. – Staff Reports Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 C apital C ircle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain THG-11909

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak outComment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Billie Jo Hartsfield Barksdale obituary • Coast Guard Auxiliary for Jan. 12 •Sheriff’s Report for Jan. 5 • Lane closures to begin Sunday on Highway 319 • Thelma Langston Grimes obituary • Three People You Should Know • Vonysea ‘Vony’ Lee Sparkman obituary • Benjamin Perez Puzon obituary thewakullanews.comI hereby give up on the Atlanta FalconsREADERS WRITE:Dont let visions of money decide dive issue Follow us onEditor, The News: Sometimes the business community seems overwhelmed by dollar signs. They dance in front of their eyes; the jingle in their pockets. The phrase almighty dollarŽ in this day and age seems antiquated albeit not irrelevant. Scheme after scheme is introduced to the community to tout the bene“ ts of naturebased tourism. Hotels were built in Wakulla County based on dancing dollar signs, only to be auctioned a couple of years later as the call to enjoy nature goes unheeded. The dancing dollar signs are back again, wrapped in a package of trophy dives at the main Wakulla spring within Wakulla Springs State Park. The 150,000 plus people who paid to enter the park in 2010 might be in for a rude awakening when they return to “ nd the riverboat does not operate over the spring boil. They might enjoy the red and white diver down ” ags bobbing on the water instead of the boats. The visitor experience at the park for the thousands who might be told not to jump off the dive tower because they could endanger themselves as they land on a scuba diver is a reality. Not to mention, of course, the jolt to the diver. So here is my personal list regarding the public having access to recreational diving at Wakulla spring. If you have answers to alleviate these concerns, please bring them and voice them at a public hearing on Thursday, Jan. 19, at the Crawfordville Livestock Pavilion (Cedar Avenue). Get there early, around 5:45 or so, because scuba equipment attached to a human takes up a lot of room. Concerns regarding open water scuba divers in Wakulla Spring: € Inability to monitor activities under the surface of the spring boil. € Diving underneath people who regularly jump off an historic dive tower that could result in accidents to young swimmers and divers. € Vandalism to cave structure. € Vandalism to archaeological remains. (Unauthorized removal of artifacts in the 1950s and 1960s resulted in thousands of pages of dive logs but no artifacts. The spring provides evidence of some of the oldest inhabitants in North America.) € Interference with endangered wildlife such as manatees that congregate in the spring for many months and give birth in some of the main springs tributary spring ” ows. € Increased turbidity through careless, unmonitored divers. € Interference with wildlife. € Diminished quality of life of the wildlife community. € Diminished ability of tour boats to navigate freely. € Interference with scienti“ c equipment placed in caves. Madeleine H. Carr CrawfordvilleSheri Crum disregarded board vote Editor, The News:First, I would like to say thank you, Sheriff Crum, for personally responding to my letter with concerns about the namingŽ of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office building. (Who approved sheriffs of“ ce sign?Ž in Dec. 15 issue, with Crums response, Sheriff Harvey deserving of honorŽ in Dec. 29 issue.) But I would like to respond to his reply as my question and concern was not addressed in his letter. I would like refer back to the Board of County Commission meeting regarding this issue. The board approved, with a 4/1 vote, the naming of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Building as the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Center to be placed on a plaque and mounted on the building.Ž The plaque was to be similar to the one on the County Commission Complex honoring Anita Townsend. Again, my simple question is, does the sheriff, who is the top law enforcement authority in our county (and who admitted the decision to alter the wishes of the board was my decision onlyŽ) have the authority to disregard the decision of the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners? When I read the letter from Sheriff Crum with no answer to my question, I looked up in the Florida Statues and here is what I found: 2011 Florida Statutes Title V JUDICIAL BRANCH Chapter 30 SHERIFFS 30.15 Powers, duties, and obligations (d) Execute all orders of the boards of county commissioners of their counties, for which services they shall receive such compensation, out of the county treasury, as said boards may deem proper. It bothers me that one person, the sheriff of our county, did completely disregard the board vote and by doing so apparently broke the law. If, in fact, the sheriff is not willing to uphold the letter of the law, then who in this county will or should? Who can the citizens of this county count on?Mary Cortese Crawfordville Editor, The News: I read a letter in your paper a few weeks ago from a citizen, Mary Cortese, regarding the approval by our county commissioners for a plaque to recognize the past sheriff, David Harvey, for his service. According to her, what was approved, isnt what took place. The appointed interim sheriff, Donnie Crum, responded to Cortese in his Letter to the Editor the following week. I became interested in this situation, as I think all citizens should take notice when issues arise that are out of the expected. According to Crums letter, he alone made the decision to substitute the plaque, similar to the one honoring Anita Townsend on the Administration Building, that was approved by the board with a display more suitable to his liking. The physical comparison here is a plaque about 18 inches by 23 inches in size, verses a brick wall 16 feet by 4 feet dedicating the complex. What concerns me the most is not an issue with the size of the recognition in question but a respect for the decision of the board. When the board issues a determination, it must be followed and is not up to individual preference or interpretation. When the Sheriffs Department ignores board directive, where does this leave us? Who can we, as citizens, expect to stand up and do the right thing? Mr. Crum, you may have felt that your heart was in the right place, but in truth, you did not follow the direction of our elected of“ cials as you should. This is an issue that you need to address. Gail Hickman CrawfordvilleSheri s o ce didnt follow board directiveOn the plaque at sheriffs of“ ce:Enough. Im tired of having my heart broken. Over and over. Youd think Id have learned my lesson by now. But I never do. Until this past Sunday. Thats when the Atlanta Falcons broke my heart for the last time when they were humiliated by the New York Giants 24-2 in the playoffs. I was born in Tallahassee but was whisked away to Atlanta as a small child where my brain was warped by Georgia Public Schools and my idea of professional sports was twisted by growing up with the Atlanta Braves and Atlanta Falcons. When I was a kid, neither the Braves nor the Falcons was very good. I can remember seeing a bumper sticker that said: Go Braves -and take the Falcons with you.Ž Back in those days, it was a source of community pride when Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruths home run record. That was back when Chief Noc-A-Homa still patrolled the back of old Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium and the chief would perform a war danceŽ after every Atlanta home run -a tradition that was retired in a nod to modern sensitivities in that some Native Americans might “ nd it a tad offensive. I can remember having an old AM transistor radio with an earplug and I would listen to the Braves game on a summer night when I was supposed to be asleep. Those were the days of Darrell Evans and Davey Johnson. Later, Dale Murphy. I dont remember them winning very much, but they were My Braves. Winning baseball came to Atlanta in 1991 with the pitching greats John Smoltz, Steve Avery and Tom Glavine … and later Greg Maddux. In 1995, they won the World Series. A lot of people razz the Braves about not winning since, but theyve won. The Falcons, on the other hand, have never been very good. Yes, its true they made it to the Super Bowl back in 1998 but they were soundly trounced by the Denver Broncos. That was followed by the Michael Vick years in which, yes, he was an exciting player on the “ eld, but he had some off-the-“ eld problems that got him sent to federal prison for a couple of years. Yes, the current Falcons have managed to put together back-to-back winning seasons -something no previous Falcon team has managed. The usual course of events was for the Falcons to be good one year, perhaps even make it to the playoffs, then go back to their horrible ways the following year, which usually required them to “ nd a way to wrench defeat from the jaws of victory in game after game. Being a Falcon fan is exasperating. Every year Im drawn into a fans optimism … this will be the year the team goes all the way. And every year, my hopes are dashed. Last year, the Falcons had the best record in the NFL at 13-3 and got humiliated by the Green Bay Packers in the playoffs. The Packers went on the win the Super Bowl, but thats no consolation. So, Ive had enough. Im looking forward to spring training and the Braves (who are going all the way this year) and Im completely swearing off the Falcons. At least until the preseason games start up in August.William Snowden is editor of The Wakulla News. William Snowdenwsnowden@thewakullanews.net Wow, this microwave really does nuke it.ŽLetters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.This was a great holiday season and I was lucky to have only two items that needed to be returned. It takes all my internal fortitude to be able to declare in a public forum the reason for the returns. The items in question were too … (oh, I just cant say it) … I will try again… they were just too … small. (Wow, that was painful!) They would have fit me,Ž Nurse Judy interjects as I “ nally get that last line typed. Its only you who have let yourself go. I am still my same sylph-like self.Ž She lives in a dream world where she is still the Mud Queen at the University of Buffalo back in 19@# (oh dear, another typo). I try to be diplomatic and tell her, Well, I guess if I get a larger size we both can wear them.Ž She shrugs. I guess so,Ž she says, but theyll just bag on me and wont show off my svelte “ gure.Ž I gaze at this middleaged (I use the term lightly) matron, who hasnt seen svelte in decades and cant believe how mistaken her self-image is. Still, sharing makes two people happy,Ž I say, so why dont you ride along with me to return these.Ž Disgruntled though she is, she agrees. We ride along in complete silence and I know she is not happy. As we walk into the store, I notice that she is lagging further and further behind me. I step to the clerk to explain the problem and she is lovely and motions me towards the clothing rack to pick out something else, giving only a slightly curious look at the pudgy Nurse Judy cowering there. I pick out two new shirts in a larger size and then we spend an hour looking at treasures for Nurse Judy. When she “ nally gets some fur-topped boots (so necessary in sunny Florida) and a cashmere sweater with feathers dripping from the neck and hemline, we go to check out. Im so glad you found some replacements,Ž the clerk said, ignoring the cowering Nurse Judy. Someone should have told whoever purchased your gifts that those particular items run very small.Ž I knew it all along,Ž Nurse Judy said. She grabbed our purchases and marched out the door. I looked at that silly creature, who felt so exonerated by the clerks comment. Then I stepped back and looked at myself. I was feeling pretty good myself. More later, Judy and Nurse Judy www.nursejudyinfo.com Judy Conlin is a nurse in Gadsden and Wakulla counties. e challenge of gift returns Judy ConlinNurse Judy’s Nook

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Bonnie Rae Lindsey, 51, of Crawfordville, passed away peacefully during the early morning of Saturday, Jan. 7, at Centre Pointe Health and Rehab. She was born to late Rae and Bonnie Lou Lindsey, June 9, 1960, and is survived by a daughter, Emily Lou Allred. For more than 20 years as a licensed Massage Therapist in Tallahassee, Bonnie used her healing hands and passionate desire to nurture each clients mind, body and soul. She spent decades investing her skillful knowledge of massage therapy, combined with her heartfelt spirit of healing, to transform hundreds of peoples personal wellness, and ultimately lives. After helping so many clients, the tables turned in November 2010 when Bonnie was diagnosed with Lou Gehrigs disease (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: ALS). A service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Jan. 14, at the Pioneer Baptist Church located at 486 Beechwood Drive in Crawfordville (850) 926-6161. In lieu of flowers, the family and friends request donations be made to Friends of Bonnie Lindsey, 1223 Mitchell Ave., Tallahassee FL 32303 or www.friendsofbonnielindsey.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 – Page 5Areligious views and eventsChurchBillie Jo Hartsfield Barksdale Bonnie Rae Brinson Pamela Lawhon Evans Harry Samuel Smith Vonysea ‘Vony’ Lee Sparkman Marvin L. ThomasObituariesMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers Coastal Wakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey... Billie Jo Harts“ eld Barksdale, 44, of Spring Creek, passed away Saturday, Jan. 7, at her residence following an extended illness. She was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County and a legal assistant. Survivors include her sons, Craig (Ashlyn) Stevens of Valley View, Texas, and Josh (Rebecca Williams) Conrad of Crawfordville; her father, Billy Harts“ eld of Panama City; brothers, Ronald Barwick of Spring Creek and Tony Harts“ eld of Tallahassee; sister, Sherry Smith of Panacea; her life partner, Lee Allen Spears of Spring Creek and his four children, Crystal, Casey, Led and Mattie. She is also survived by numerous aunts, uncles, other family and friends. She was preceded in death by her mother, Yvonne Smith Harts“ eld; and her brother, Mike Barwick. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 10, at Christian Worship Center, 3922 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville with the Rev. B.B. Barwick of“ ciating. Interment will follow at Smith Family Cemetery in Spring Creek. The family recieved friends Monday, Jan. 9, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Christian Worship Center. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home 850-559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome. net. Harry Samuel Smith, 72, of Crawfordville passed away Sunday, Jan. 8, in Pensacola. He attended and graduated from Crawfordville High School and served in the U.S. Navy for “ ve years where he learned his lifes trade of being a Dental Prosthetics Technician. A graveside service was held on Wednesday, Jan. 11, at 3 p.m. at Smith Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to American Cancer Society, 241 John Knox Road, Suite 100, Tallahassee, FL 32303 or Hospice. Survivors include two sons, Matthew Samuel Smith and Johnny Harry Smith of Tallahassee; a brother, Willie Gene Smith of Gulf Breeze; three sisters, Ruth High (Dan), Judy Larson (Al) and Joanne P. High (James). He is survived by many nieces, nephews, cousins and many friends. He was married for more than 20 years to Denise Gonatos-Smith of Tallahassee, who remained a good friend to Harry. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) Vonysea VonyŽ Lee Sparkman, 86, of Tallahassee passed away at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital on Thursday, Jan. 5. She was born on Nov. 25, 1925, in Medart to the Thomas Daniel and Mary Colvin Sparkman. On Oct. 4, 1952, she married Clyde H. Lee, who survives. She was a secretary for the Board of Education with the State of Florida. She was a Charter Member of Seminole Baptist Church in Tallahassee. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m., on Monday, Jan. 9, at Seminole Baptist Church in Tallahassee. The Rev. Art Bruce and the Rev. Gary Linton will of“ ciate. Interment followed in Gainey Cemetery in Cairo, Ga. Active pallbearers were her grandchildren, Joel Bruce, Nathan Bruce, David Bruce, Michael Cleary, Bobby Lee and Savannah Lee. The family received friends at the church from 10 a.m. until the funeral hour on Monday, Jan. 9. In lieu of ” owers, memorials may be made to Seminole Baptist Church, 3330 Mission Road, Tallahassee FL 32303, or a charity of your choosing. Survivors include her husband, Clyde H. Lee of Tallahassee; daughters and son-in-law, Dian and Art Bruce of Bainbridge, Ga., Linda Cleary of Tallahassee; son and daughter-in-law, Terry and Kris Lee of Tallahassee; grandchildren and spouses, Joel and Emily Bruce of Jacksonville, Nathan Bruce of Tallahassee, David and Kayla Bruce of Atlanta, Michael Cleary of Tallahassee, Savannah Lee of Tallahassee and Bobby Lee of Tallahassee; a brother and sister-in-law, Delous and Clara Sparkman of Wakulla; and a host of nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, Thomas and Mary Sparkman; sisters, Pauline Durrance and Annie Sparkman; and a brother, T. D. Sparkman. Clark Funeral Home, 334 South Broad Street, Cairo Ga. was in charge of the arrangements, (229) 377-1414 www. clarkfuneral.com clarkhome@syrupcity. net. Guests may sign the online register at www.clarkfuneral.com. By ETHEL SKIPPER Happy New Year and best wishes to everyone as you enter into this new year, 2012. We all are looking for a better year as we always do. Skipper Temple Church of Christ, 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy, will hold Womens Conference 2012 with the them Women of Excellence. There will be Holy Spirit“ lled speakers on Friday, Jan. 20, at 7:30 p.m. On Saturday, Jan. 21, from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., we will have one speaker and a workshop. Free materials, refreshments and lunch provided. We welcome you to these services. There is a blessing for everyone. Happy birthday to Colleen Skipper on Jan. 11, Glenda Simmons on Jan. 16, Wanda Bailey on Jan. 9, Betty Green and Mother Josephine Allen. The annual Charlotte and John Rosier Family Celebration for 2012 will be held on Feb. 10 and 11 at Macedonia Church of Christ in Buckhorn. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Rosier said the church is where they got much of their Christian training. Pamela Lawhon Evans passed from this life on Monday, Jan. 9, at home in Sopchoppy. She attended Stetson University in Deland where she met the love of her life. She and Jerry were married July 3, 1982. She graduated from Florida State University with a degree in Home Economics Education. For most of her teaching career she taught at Wakulla High School inspiring and loving the many students that passed through her classroom. While teaching at Wakulla High, Pam was the cheerleading and student government sponsor. After teaching Home Economics and Culinary Arts for 23 years, she spent the “ nal two years of her teaching career at Sopchoppy Pre-K teaching 3-4 year old children. Pam was a founding member of Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church and a member of Sopchoppy Homemakers. She served as Honorary Chairperson of the Wakulla County 2010 Relay for Life. Pam loved her Lord, her family, Dr. Pepper, and Snickers. She was loved by many and will be missed by all. She is survived by her husband of 29 years, Jerry S. Evans, daughters Lindsay and Bethany Evans, and son Chandler Evans, all of Sopchoppy. Also survived by her mother, Oleta Lawhon; two sisters, Jackie Lawhon (Wayne) and Pollie Lawhon, a brother Maxie Lawhon (Lori), niece Jessica Mapes (Shawn), nephews Chris Lawhon (Michele), Jeffery Lawhon (Kristi), Shawn Lawhon (Laura), Josh Lawhon (Niki), Jeremiah Creech, and Jacob Thomas, as well as a host of great nieces and nephews whom she loved and spoiled beyond measure. Pam was preceded in death by her father, Frank M. Lawhon; grandparents, Commodore and Winifred Taff and John and Viola Lawhon. Visitation will be Wednesday, Jan. 11,at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Funeral Services will be Thursday, Jan. 12, at 3:30 p.m. at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. Burial will follow at Arran Cemetery. Memorial donations to Relay for Life Wakulla are welcomed. Go to www.relayforlife.org/wakulla” Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com)Harry Samuel Smith Bonnie Rae LindseyBonnie Lindsey with her daughter EmilyPamela Lawhon Evans Vonysea ‘Vony’ L. Sparkman Billie Jo H. BarksdaleBuckhorn NewsObituaries continued on Page 6A

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our communityPeopleMarvin L. Thomas, 84, of Panacea died on Dec. 23 in Tallahassee. He was a native of Tarpon Springs and had lived in Panacea since 1999. He was a World War II veteran, and a great boat builder. A memorial service will take place at Bottoms at a later date. Survivors include his wife. Clara M. Thomas of Panacea; daughters, Betty Lou Collier and Clara Jean Autenrieth and a special niece Sharon Shumate; stepchildren, Paul Wesley Funderburk (Kim), Marvin Allen, David Thomas, Pamela J. Edwards (Jerry), Penny M. Barton (Melvin); numerous grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his parents Tony Thomas and Irene Kasmussen Thomas; and a brother, Joseph Adrian Thomas. Fairchild Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. A memorial service will take place at Bottoms at a later date.Marvin L. ThomasObituariesContinued from Page 5A Jared and Amber Greene, of Crawfordville, are pleased to announce the birth of their daughter, Emma LeAnn Greene, on Dec. 24 at 12:06 p.m. She weighed 7 pounds, 13 ounces and was 20.5-inches long. She has an older brother, Landon Green, who passed away last year. Her maternal grandparents are Jai Evans, Barbara Wallace and Phillip Wallace, of Crawfordville. Her paternal grandparents are Rick and Lavonne Greene of Crawfordville. Her great-grandparents are Bobbi and Ed Evans, the late Lyle and Betty Rinkel, Bob and Betty Shivers and Winnie McCarthy and the late Henry McCarthy. NAMI Wakullas second annual Night of All-American Fun,Ž featuring Bob Milne, renowned pianist, author, and American music ambassador, performing ragtime at Wakulla Springs Lodge will be held on Jan. 20 at 7 p.m. Dinner and music are $30 per person. Tickets are available through NAMI Wakulla members, or by calling the NAMI Wakulla of“ ce, 926-1033. David Sellers, of Crawfordville, was promoted to the rank of chief petty of“ cer on the USS New York in September 2011. He is a 1999 graduate of Wakulla High School. He is married and has three sons. He is the son of Adrian and Diana Sellers of Crawfordville.Sellers earns promotion Kadence DNavyian Gavin celebrated her “ rst birthday on Dec. 31. She is the daughter of Kiona Tyker and Kendell Gavin of Crawfordville. Her maternal grandparents are Michelle Rosier of Crawfordville and Darrick Tyler of Virginia. Her paternal grandparents are Tawanna Gavin and Kenneth Gavin Sr. of Tallahassee. Her maternal great-grandparents are Linda Rankin and Savannah Tyler of Crawfordville. Her paternal great-grandparents are Donna Rollins, Betty White and Carless Rollins, all of Tallahassee. Her maternal great-greatgrandparent is Mary Bell of Sopchoppy. Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program needs volunteers to join its corps of advocates who protect the rights of elders residing in nursing homes, assisted living facilities and adult family care homes. The local council is seeking additional volunteers to identify, investigate and resolve residents concerns. Special training and certi“ cation is provided. Interested individuals should call (888) 831-0404 or visit the website at ombudsman.my” orida.com. Natalee Ann Spears-Dickey celebrated her “ rst birthday on Sept. 28. She is the daughter of Candace Spears of Spring Creek and Robert Dickey of Crawfordville. Her maternal grandparents are Susie and Chris Vuoso from Spring Creek and Nelson and Shanna Nichols of Crawfordville. Her paternal grandparents are Robert and Cynthia Dickey from Crawfordville. Her maternal great-grandparents Doodle Bug and Tenny Spears of Spring Creek and Clyde and Mary Nichols of Crawfordville. Her paternal great-grandparents are Robert Dickey from Georgia and Nicole Dickey from Crawfordville and Sevelle Porter from Panacea. Florida long-term care ombudsman program is seeking volunteersHappy “ rst birthdayKadence Gavin David Sellers Kadence GavinNatalee Spears-DickeyNatalee Spears-DickeyNight of All-American Fun will be held Jan. 20Greenes announce birth of baby girl, EmmaChunn is chosen as Sunshine State ScholarJonathan Chunn, a junior at Wakulla High School, has been chosen to represent Wakulla County at the annual Sunshine State Scholars Program in Orlando for 2012. Each school district is allowed to send one scholar representative to Orlando. The focus of the Sunshine State Scholars program is to have each of the states 67 school districts identify their top 11th grade students in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). These students, along with their parents and a teacher who had been a signi“ cant in” uence on them, will attend the statewide recognition and recruiting conference in Orlando on Feb. 16-17. According to a Sunshine State Scholars informational video, the programs goal is to keep intellectual student talent from leaving the state for post secondary education and professional careers. The program has invited representatives from Floridas colleges and universities to meet with the students in Orlando to discuss career and post secondary opportunities available to them in their home state. Chunn is also the captain of the Wakulla High Fellowship of Christian Athletes and member of the Wakulla High School War Eagle football team. Jonathan ChunnParmers celebrate their 70th wedding anniversaryCharles Allen and Marion Dixon Parmer celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary on Jan. 9 with a dinner with their children. A second celebration is planned for a later date. The couple was married Jan. 9 in Prattville, Ala.. At the time, Charles Parmer was a member of the U.S. Army Air Forces, 8th Air Force; he served in Africa and England. Since then, the couple has resided in Greenville, Ala., Tallahassee and Crawfordville. Charles Parmer is retired from The Tallahassee Democrat and Marion Parmer is retired from Winn Dixie. Their children are Charles Wayne Parmer (Margaret) of Crawfordville, Janice Parmer Edwards (deceased), Joseph Allen Parmer (Elaine) of Tallahassee, and Edie Parmer Harrison (Charles) of Whigham, Ga. Grandchildren are Jeffrey Wayne Palmer (Rita), of Crawfordville, Janice Parmer James (Roy) of Tallahassee, Dr. Tye OHara Boynton (Jillian) of Athens, Ga., Matthew Parmer Harrison and Taylor Ashley Harrison of Whigham, Ga. Great-grandchildren are Jeremy Wayne Parmer and Amy Ann Parmer of Crawfordville, Clinton Perdue of Tallahassee and Addison Michelle Capps of Tallahassee. Their family is very thankful for the blessing of this special couple. Charles and Marion ParmerEmail community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Notice of Change in Policy of White Church Cemetery a/k/a Woodville CemeteryFor everyone who has Reserved plots in White Church Cemetery or who plans to be buried in White Church Cemetery, notice is provided that:1. All plots that are RESERVED must be paid for by February 29, 2012, or the reservation will become void. Plots may be nanced for a six-month period and they will stay reserved in your name during the nancing period as long as payments are made on time. 2. Reservations that people have based on oral family history will become void on March 1, 2012, unless proof is provided of some agreement or transaction with the Church or a previous cemetery manager showing that the plots were given to the family. Contact our Cemetery Manager to provide her the proof, or to show her which plots in your RESERVED section you are turning back in and which ones you want to purchase. 3. Plot price will go up on January 1, 2013. 4. People who have PAID plots are requested to provide the Cemetery Manager with the name of the person to be buried in each plot. This is for your protection so no mixups occur in large families. 5. We have contracted with a professional Cemetery Manager to manage all aspects of the cemetery operations and to assure compliance with the cemetery rules. Her name is Angela Cassidy, and her telephone number is 694-8774. E-mail: Ancestor_Lady@ yahoo.com E-mail her for a copy of the REVISED Cemetery Rules effective November 2011. White Church Cemetery is a private cemetery and you must be a member in good standing of the Church or have family buried in the cemetery to be eligible to be buried there. Make checks for plots or donations for cemetery maintenance to White Church Cemetery, and mail to P. O. Box 112, Woodville, FL 32362.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 – Page 7Anews from local schoolsSchoolTeachers and employee of the month for December announcedSpecial to The NewsDecember Teachers of the Month are Riversink Elementary Schools Stan Ward and Wakulla Education Center Pre-Ks Meredith Lawrence. The Employee of the Month is the Maintenance Departments Robert Thompson. Stan Ward has been teaching “ fth grade at Riversink since they “ rst opened their doors in August 2008. Prior to teaching, he worked with the Florida Department of Health while simultaneously attending evening college classes at Flagler College. Ward is a product of the Wakulla County School District, graduating from Wakulla High School, Shadeville Elementary School and Wakulla Middle School. Ward said, Every day is a new adventure when you work with students. I enjoy teaching my students realworld skills they will need to be productive citizens.Ž Team Building activities have been incorporated into the “ fth grade team behavior plan. Building social skills, teamwork and sportsmanship creates a strong learning environment that is incorporated into the classroom,Ž said Ward. Ward has contributed those same team building skills to the District Teacher Appraisal Advisory Team, the Riversink Science Night and the Riversink Brain Brawl. RES Principal Jackie High adds, It is a pleasure to have Mr. Ward on the Otter team. He adds a touch of humor to every situation. He enjoys his job and it carries over into everything he does. It has been a joy to watch him develop into a leader at our school. His dedication is appreciated.Ž Meredith Lawrence is a pre-kindergarten teacher at Wakulla Education Center. She began her teaching career in January 2008. Before that time she was a waitress at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Lawrence “ rst became a part of the Wakulla School System as a kindergarten student. She grew up in Wakulla County, graduated from Flagler College and completed her internship at Medart Elementary School. Lawrence said, Every day is a new adventure filled with reading, playing, singing, dancing, cooking and arts and crafts. I love that my students are continually learning essential school readiness skills, while they believe theyre just having fun.Ž Lawrence shared interesting views about Santa from her students following a Christmas story she recently read to them. They included: Santa has binoculars that can see through the roof so that he can watch me at all times. I believe in Santa. I keep telling my mom that Santa is real, but she just wont trust me. Santa has to use the back door at my house since I dont have a CHIMEE. Santa is a little bit circlely and has a ” uffy belly. Reindeer use their hooves to knock Santa down the chimney. Santa likes to eat pizza, peanut butter sandwiches and even worms. My mom doesnt know that Santa is real, but everyone else does. Santa gets fat; thats all he does.Ž Wakulla Pre-K Principal Kim Dutton shares, Ms. Lawrence is well respected by her peers. She practices self-composure in the classroom to develop self-esteem with students and creates a true classroom community. The students in her classroom learn to take responsibility for their actions and begin thinking of others with acts of kindness. She is a leader with technology lessons in the use of the Mimio machine. Students practice literacy and mathematical thinking skills with the use of digital Mimio lessons. Students cant wait for their turn to use the stylus pen to click and drag the correct object on the whiteboard during a lesson. She is such a gift to Wakulla Pre-K.Ž When not busy enjoying the many delights of her students Ms. Lawrence contributes to the school community as a member of the calendar committee, the coordinator of Bingo for Books, the technology representative and a mentor. The December Employee of the Month is the District Maintenance Departments Supervisor, Robert Thompson. Thompson is a graduate of Sopchoppy and attended the Apostolic Bible Institute in St. Paul, Minn., where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Theological Studies. After 24 years of dedicated service as a supervisor, he retired in December. Thompson is the “ rst employee to receive his retirement plaque and employee of the month plaque on the same day. During his tenure, the School District has increased by “ ve new schools, as well as major renovations and additions to two others. His department also advanced HVAC systems from a simple mercury thermostat to electronic thermostats controlled and scheduled by an Energy Management System. Thompson has many memories; some of those include going to schools in the middle of the night during hurricanes, providing housing for the Bradwell Bay “ re“ ghters, unclogging sewer drains, receiving calls when electricity was out and many, many more. However, Thompson cites the most enjoyable part of his job is the interaction with the maintenance staff. He said, I have been privileged to help select and supervise the men that are the District Maintenance crew. They are a credit to the Wakulla County School District. I am appreciative that I have worked for and with my supervisor, Randy Bristol, Superintendent David Miller and our School Board. Their con“ dence in me has enabled me to do my job to the best of my ability.Ž Executive Director of Maintenance and Facilities, Randy Bristol, said, Mr. Thompson has shown a lot of growth and leadership as our maintenance supervisor over the past 24 years. The department has relied on his knowledge and skills. His leadership and friendship will be missed. We all wish him good luck in his retirement.Ž Stan Ward Robert Thompson Meredith LawrenceRiversink Student Council takes cookies to public service agenciesSpecial to The NewsOn Dec. 20, Riversink Elementary Student Council representatives, Guidance Counselor Diane Price and Art Teacher Jennifer Brooks delivered DoubleTree cookies to the public service agencies in Crawfordville. The students mission was to thank the members of the community who do so much for them. The students delivered cookies to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, Wakulla County Fire Department, Wakulla County Animal Control, Wakulla County Senior Center, Wakulla County Health Department, Wakulla County Extension Office, Wakulla County Courthouse, Wakulla County Public Library, Wakulla County Public Works building, Wakulla County E.M.S., and the Wakulla County School Board of“ ce. This trip couldnt have been possible without the help of Bus Driver Frank Loney. Thank You Mr. Frank!Ž Jennifer Brooks has participated in C.A.R.E. committee projects with the DoubleTree Hotel of Tallahassee for the past two years, and this year she was able to help the DoubleTree Hotel of Tallahassee deliver 2,500 of their famous cookies. The year 2011 was the DoubleTree Cookies 25th anniversary. What better way to celebrate the cookie, by having Riversink Elementary student council representatives deliver them to all who we appreciate in our community,Ž Brooks said. Thank you DoubleTree Hotel of Tallahassee for letting us say thank you to our community with such a sweet treat,Ž Brooks said. Riversink Elementary Student Council representatives deliver cookies to Wakulla County of“ ces before the holidays. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Riversink students visit the Wakulla County Fire Department to deliver a special treat, Doubletree cookies. Crawfordville chili cook-o Feb. 3Special to The NewsOn Friday, Feb. 3, Crawfordville Elementary School is having its third Annual Chili Cookoff. The categories that will be judged are traditional, non-traditional, spicy but pleasing and presentation. Judges are still being recruited. Set up will begin at 5:15 p.m. and judging will start at 5:30 and continue until 6:15 p.m. The event will of“ cially begin at 6 p.m. with Wakulla High School and Wakulla Middle Schools jazz bands entertaining the crowd. The winners will be announced at the end of the night, at 7:30 p.m. JUMP START THIS SCHOOL YEAR TODAY! ELEMENTARY & MIDDLE SCHOOLIntroduction to concepts & skills for each grade level Kindergarten CollegeStart the New Year Right!FCAT Prep EOC Exam Prep: Algebra 1, Geometry, Biology Tutoring in ALL SUBJECTS JUNIORS & SENIORS: ACT & SAT Prep for February, March, April, May TestsCALL MELISA TAYLOR850-926-2179 850-524-9103GO TO HELLHATS$12.00-$26.00 PANACEA HATSAFACT GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOyst ers Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Wed. & Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun.

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsBy JOHN HINSEYSpecial to The NewsWakulla Wrestling team is improving and now at full strength. Wakulla placed seventh in the 32-team Capital City Classic Dec. 9-10. Zack Malik (112) went undefeated and placed “ rst in his weight class. Bill Morgan (120) “ nished second, and Travis Hinsey (138) placed third. We had a strong showing from our JV team with several “ nishing in the top four places although the placement matches were not completed due to time constraints. The grapplers traveled to Fort Walton for the Beast on the Beach Dual tournament Dec. 15-16. Wakulla forfeited six weight classes as many of the big boysŽ were on the football “ eld playing for the state championship. The lightweight boys held their own with Austin Runyan (106), Zack Malik (116), Bill Morgan (120) and Kevon White (132) going undefeated. At 6-0. Keith Godden (195) went undefeated as well. Travis Hinsey (138) went 5-1. On Dec. 30-31 Wakulla trekked to Valdosta to compete in the Viking Invitational tournament. At the end of the “ rst day on the mat Wakulla was third in the 16-team tournament with seven wrestlers advancing to the “ nal round. Wakulla was the only Florida team in the top “ ve. Wakulla came home with a third place “ nish after a strong showing in the championship round. Bill Morgan won by a pin to take first place. Kevon White also went undefeated and took “ rst. Zack Malik took second, going 2-1 for the tourney. Travis Hinsey placed third with a pin in the final round “ nishing 5-1. Cole Woofter (220) took third and went 4-1. Chris Grif“ n (HW) came in fourth and James Douin (170) placed “ fth. Wakullas JV had an outstanding tournament with all three wrestlers in the championship rounds. Austin Runyan (106) went 41 and placed third, Dywan Carney (120) 2-2 in fourth, and Cody Davis (126) 2-1 for a second place “ nish. Wakulla traveled to Springstead High School, the Defending 2A state champs, to participate in their invitational tournament on Jan. 6 and 7. Coach Pafford anticipated this would be a good test for Wakulla as this will be the first tournament all season with the full lineup in place. The football players who play a key part in the upper weight classes have joined the team. The boys have worked hard during Christmas break practicing every day. There was no break for them. The next few weeks are critical to get ready for the post-season run.Practices for the 2012 Wakulla High School track and “ eld teams are set to begin next week on Tuesday, Jan. 17, at the high school track. All interested athletes, both boys and girls, should report to the track at 2:45 p.m. and should be prepared to start practicing that day. A current physical is required before an athlete is allowed to participate in practices. Soccer players are asked to check in on Tuesday or Wednesday and let the coaches know that they are intending to come out after the end of their current season. Questions can be directed to Coach Hoover at 509-7861 or Coach Amos at the High School. WRESTLINGWar Eagles are at full strengthTRACK AND FIELDPractice set to begin at WHS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSJohn Cooper, 57, from Wakulla, and other members of the Faulkner offensive line.FOOTBALLWakullas John Cooper is part of a record-setting teamStaff ReportJohn Cooper, Wakulla High Class of 2010, played in a record-setting football game in November … the highest scoring game in an NAIA game as the Faulkner Eagles of Montgomery, Ala., defeated Union 95-89. The 194 total points scored in the game was the second-highest scoring game in college football history, surpassed only by Georgia Techs 222-0 victory over Cumberland in 1916. Cooper, who is starting guard on the offensive line, got one of three game balls after the victory. Also playing for Faulkner is Caleb Vernon, a backup guard, who graduated from Wakulla High School Class of 2011. CHEERLEADINGCheerleaders take part in anksgiving paradeSpecial to The NewsBrooke Allen and Mattie Spears, eighth grade cheerleaders at Wakulla Middle School, were two of 250 UCA All-American cheerleaders invited to participate in the Walt Disney World Magic Kingdom Main Street USA Parade on Thanksgiving. In addition to the Thanksgiving Day parade, Allen and Spears visited several theme parks and Thanksgiving dinner was provided at one of the resorts.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsDAYTONA BEACH, Fla. … In preparation for the Eagles “ rst season of competition in 2013, EmbryRiddle Head Softball Coach Sarah Lockett is continuing to build her roster. The latest additions are Waycross College transfers Mandy McClendon and Alex Wood. Both studentathletes were part of the start-up program at Waycross and will be looked to for leadership when the Eagles begin competition in 2013. Last season, McClendon, a right-handed pitcher, posted a 7-3 record in her first season playing for the Swamp Foxes. The Wakulla High School product fanned 31 batters and compiled a 1.58 earned run average to help Waycross to a 22-21 record in its inaugural season of competition. Her high school career saw McClendon pitch a pair of no-hitters to help her team to the 2009 District title. During that campaign she was 18-3 with 132 strikeouts and a 0.53 ERA. McClendon also garnered several honors, including the teams Coaches Leadership, Most Improved and Defensive awards as well as All-State recognition. A two-sport athlete, she served as team captain in both soccer and softball as a senior in high school and was named Team MVP in both sports. Mandy brings a lot of depth to our team as she can play “ rst base, out“ eld and pitch,Ž Lockett said. ŽHer experience as part of the inaugural softball program at Waycross and what it takes to be successful starting from scratch will be invaluable to our team. Ill be looking to Mandy to use her versatility on the “ eld and her experience at Waycross to help lead our inaugural softball team.Ž Wood is currently a sophomore at Waycross and is coming off a freshman campaign that saw her hit .360 with three home runs and more than 50 RBI. Both Wood and McClendon plan to major in Homeland Security at Embry-Riddle.SOFTBALLMcClendon transfers to Embry-Riddle SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMandy McClendon (front row, second from left) and Alex Wood (front row, second from right) are latest signees for ERAU softball. dress store50%-60% OFF850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE) The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree All Ladies ApparelThe best Alterations, Furniture Upholstry & Re nishing NEED FAST CA$H? SHORT-TERM LOANS UP TO $1000Deposited into your bank account overnight!Just need a job and direct deposit € Call for quick approval! 1-877-290-0052 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 – Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsThis past weekend was a good day to stay in the house and watch the playoffs or your favorite “ shing show on television. It didnt rain but the fog was so thick along the coast it felt like it was raining. Here it is Monday morning and foggy again. About six or seven years ago we had fog for about two weeks in a row and it felt like we were living in Seattle. One of our neighbors was a retired doctor and everyday about 10 a.m. he would hop in his car and leave the neighborhood. About two hours later he would return. I asked him one day where he was going every day and he said he would drive up to the convenience store at 98 and Spring Creek Highway. He did that because the fog wasnt that far inland and he could sit in the sun for two hours and it would help him not feel so depressed every day. Despite the fog there were plenty of folks “ shing out of Shell Point and the Spring Creek area. Mike Pearson “ shed with his wife Kelly and they caught several nice trout and some reds on Friday. Tom Riddle from Tifton “ shed with his wife and aunt and they caught some trout, reds and sheepshead. As the water and air temperature rose he said the “ shing got slower. Bob McCullough and Wade Melton of Tallahassee “ shed out of the Ochlockonee River on Friday and caught 11 nice sheepshead, two big black drum and a 26 and 28 inch red. They were “ shing live shrimp on the bottom. Capt. David Fife of Spring Creek “ shed four days last week and averaged about six trout a day and his limit of reds. He said the “ sh have moved out of Spring Creek and onto the bars in Oyster Bay and over near Piney Island. He fished with Mirrolures, live mud minnows and live shrimp. The cold last week should have pushed the “ sh into the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers though I havent talked to many folks who have “ shed there. Dr. Jim ONeil said he fished Friday and caught one 22-inch red on a gold spoon and didnt get another bite. This is the toughest time of the year around our area to have a really good day on the water. The water temperature going up and down has most of the “ sh thinking one day spring is here and they need to head to the ” ats and the next its so cold they need to look for deep holes in the rivers where its a little warmer. The warm weather were having this week is probably going to keep the fog around so the water temperature will rise but not like if it was sunny outside. Remember that trout season is now open year round but the size and bag limits in our area stay the same. The size limit for reds stays 18 through 27 but you will be able to keep two on Feb. 1. Dont forget to leave that ” oat plan with someone and be careful out there, especially if youre “ shing in this fog. Good luck and good “ shing!Tough to nd sh in this heavy fog From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFirst deerElliott Peavy, age 12 of Panacea, killed his “ rst deer on Saturday, Jan. 7, in Smith Creek. It was a four-point buck.Special to The NewsThe Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will meet Jan. 30 to Feb. 2 at the Renaissance Mobile Riverview Plaza Hotel in Mobile, Ala. Agenda highlights are summarized below. For a copy of the detailed agenda or to review briefing book materials, please visit the Council web site at www.gulfcouncil.org or call (888) 833-1844. The Mackerel Management Committee will meet Monday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. to review scoping documents for Amendments 19 and 20. Amendment 19 considers no sale of recreationally caught “ sh and various permit issues, Amendment 20 considers boundary changes and transit provisions. The Shrimp Management Committee will meet at 4 p.m. to review data from the 2011 Texas Shrimp Closure and determine whether to continue the closure in 2012. At 4:30 p.m. the Council will hear a brief update on the Marine Recreational Information Program). The Reef Fish Committee will meet all day Tuesday and part of Wednesday to hear a presentation on the Red Snapper IFQ Five-Year Review Survey Results. The Committee will also review and discuss: € Final Red Snapper Regulatory Amendment Fall Closed Season Revision and 2012 Annual Catch; € Options Paper for a Regulatory Amendment for Red Snapper Weekend/ Weekday Openings; € Gray Trigger“ sh Update Assessment; € Final Action on Amendment 34 Crew Size and Income Requirement; € Final Action on Amendment 35 Greater Amberjack; € Option Paper for Vermilion Snapper ACL Framework Action; € Scoping Document for Amendment 36 Red Snapper IFQ Transferability; € Reef Fish Amendment 33 LAPP Program; € Reef Fish Framework Action for Red Snapper Payback Provisions for Overages; Also on Tuesday, the Council and NOAA Fisheries will hold an informal Question and Answer session on general fishery management issues. On Wednesday, the Joint Mackerel/Reef Fish/ Red Drum Management Committee will meet to discuss starting an amendment to develop biomassbased stock status de“ nitions, followed by the Data Collection Committee and the Artificial Reef Committee. The Spiny Lobster Management Committee will meet to take “ nal action on Amendment 11 which considers two actions: 1) Creating new closed areas to reduce the impacts of lobster traps on protected coral species, and 2) Requiring markings for spiny lobster trap lines to allow identi“ cation of trap lines entangling protected species. The full Council will convene Wednesday at 3 p.m. Public comment will begin at 3:15 p.m. Testimony will be heard on the following: € Reef Fish Amendment 34 Crew Size and Income Requirement; € Reef Fish Amendment 35 Greater Amberjack; € Red Snapper Regulatory Amendment Fall Closed Season Revision and 2012 Annual Catch Limit; € Spiny Lobster Amendment 11; € Exempted Fishing Permits (if any). The Council will also hold an open public comment session immediately following public testimony, until 6:15 p.m. Comment cards must be completed before the start of public testimony. Open public comment gives members of the public an opportunity to address the Council on “ shery issues that may not be on the agenda. Beginning Thursday, the Council will deliberate and take action on committee recommendations made earlier in the week. The meeting is expected to conclude Friday by 4:45 p.m. Although other nonemergency issues not on the agenda may come before the Council and Committees for discussion, in accordance with the M-SFCMA, those issues may not be the subject of formal action. Actions of the Council and Committees will be restricted to issues speci“ cally identi“ ed in the agendas and any issues arising after publication of this notice that require emergency action under Section 305(c) of the M-SFCMA, provided the public has been noti“ ed of the Councils intent to take action to address the emergency. The established times for addressing items on the agenda may be adjusted as necessary to accommodate the timely completion of discussion relevant to the agenda items. In order to allow for such adjustments and completion of all items on the agenda, the meeting may be extended from, or completed prior to, the date established in this notice. Meetings are physically accessible to people with disabilities. Requests for sign language interpretation or other auxiliary aids should be directed to Kathy Pereira at the Council of“ ce at least “ ve days prior to the meeting. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council is one of eight regional Fishery Management Councils established by the Fishery Conservation and Management Act of 1976. The Council prepares “ shery management plans, which are designed to manage “ shery resources within the 200-mile limit of the Gulf of Mexico.Gulf Fishery Council will meet in MobileFrom FWC NewsA cold-related die-off of manatees in early 2011 set the stage for a third straight year with high numbers of deaths for the species. Biologists with the research arm of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission documented 453 manatee carcasses in state waters in 2011. During the past three years, biologists documented the highest levels of cold-related manatee deaths, with the cold stressŽ category accounting for 112 in 2011, 282 in 2010 and 56 in 2009. In the previous “ ve years, cold stress accounted for an average of 30 manatee deaths per year. The total number of reported manatee deaths in 2011 was the second-highest on record. Biologists documented a record 766 manatee deaths in 2010 and recorded the third-highest total of 429 in 2009. We are concerned about the number of manatee deaths the past three years, including those resulting from exposure to cold weather,Ž said Gil McRae, director of the FWCs Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. Over the next few years, we will use data from monitoring programs to better understand any long-term implications for the population. We will continue to work with our partners to enhance the availability of natural warm-water sites, which are important habitats for the species survival,Ž McRae said. FWC researchers, managers and law enforcement staff work closely together to evaluate mortality data and identify necessary actions. The FWCs Division of Law Enforcement, in cooperation with partner agencies, uses knowledge of local boating habits, well-posted speed zones and up-to-date manatee information as part of its on-the-water enforcement operations. Informing boaters about manatee conservation and enforcing manatee-protection zones are priorities for the FWC. To learn more about manatee conservation, go to MyFWC.com/Manatee. To view the 2011 preliminary mortality numbers, visit MyFWC.com/Research/ Manatee and click on Manatee Mortality Statistics.Ž Florida residents can help manatees by purchasing the manatee specialty license plate, available at county tax collectors of“ ces. The funds collected for these plates go directly to manatee research and conservation. To report a dead or distressed manatee, call the FWCs Wildlife Alert Hotline at 888-404-FWCC (3922).Annual manatee death count shows cold weather a factor Two manatees swim near the surface.FWC PHOTO $1395 OYSTE RS$4D O Z. 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For those of you who know Sherrie Alverson, you know surprising her is not an easy feat. As many of you are aware, Sherrie has made the very hard decision to retire from the Coast Guard Auxiliary after serving for more than 40 years! With the many commitments Sherrie has going on in her life, trying to pin her down to a day that we could honor her and her service was difficult at best but, alas, we found that the day of our meeting she would be able to come. The week before, an e-mail went out inviting anyone in Division 1 and beyond to attend to honor Sherrie. With the Florida State Button Show fast approaching, for which Sherrie has been a judge for about 20 years, Sherrie was extremely busy and anxious about being ready. When I called her the night before our meeting to make “ nal arrangements, she asked to graciously decline the invite, but knowing the surprise we had in store for her, I asked her to please come even if just for a little while. After our staff meeting Saturday morning, Pattie Fritchie and I went to get Sherrie. Little did she know that we had an over” owing room waiting for her! Past District Commodore Bill Crouch along with his wife BJ came over with Past Division Captain John Clark. Past Division Commander and current District Captain East Jeff Brooks and his wife Tampa arrived as well. Pattie Fritchie came over the night before due to the dense fog to make sure she was prepared and ready. Patti is not only the historian for our division, but also the branch chief for eLearning and a part of the National Public Affairs Staff. She is the editor of Behind the Eighth, our Division Newsletter as well as the Public Affairs staff officer for the division. If you ask me, she is not far behind Sherrie in the positions she has within the Auxiliary. Also attending were Marge and Tom Jones who brought with them Jack Rosenau, John Sykes, and Bob Morgan and John Edgrington from Former Flotilla 13. As Sherrie was asked to tell us about her time in the Auxiliary, she shared with all of us the love and dedication she had had since joining the Auxiliary in December 1971. She has served in every position the Flotilla, Division and District had to offer with the exception of elected of“ ces, which she only held in the Flotilla. In 2005 (or thereabout), Sherrie shared a conversation she had with the then-Division Commander about all she had done, stating the only position she had not held was Chaplain. The next year, she was our Chaplain! Past District Commodore Bill Crouch presented Sherrie her retirement certi“ cate and pin along with a Flotilla 13 ballcap past Flotilla Commander John Sykes had brought for her. It was an emotional presentation for all involved as he recounted the many years of service Sherrie has offered. During his tenure with the Division, Sherrie was treasurer and he reminisced that she always made sure bills were paid and folks did what they were supposed to do, making sure everyone stayed on the up and up! She had been recruited after it was apparent to everyone that if you wanted something done, ask Sherrie! Jack Rosenau remembered Sherrie from when he joined Flotilla 13 in 1974. Sherrie made sure everyone had a plan and helped (although some may say insisted) everyone get through the training classes to become AUXOP quali“ ed. In the best description I have heard of Sherrie, he called her a spark plug who never quit! Jack was an AUXAir who ” ew for the Auxiliary and helped many in search and rescue missions. I can only imagine what it would have been like to be a part of such an amazing team back then! Sherrie concluded saying to all of us, that she had been so worried about her beloved Flotilla 13 going away and the hard work of the Auxiliary being lost, but seeing all who came out for her and the work of local Auxiliarists still continuing in Flotilla 12 she had hope once again. She was also reminded that a retirement status did not mean she was going to be forgotten, for we all know how to “ nd her and will continue to welcome her with open arms into Flotilla adventures. Her “ nal send off was given by Patti Fritchie, who had promised her the next time they were together, she would bring her a lemon meringue pie, so she got two! Patti also took a lot of great photos that I am sharing with you too! After such an amazing event, Flotilla 12 got back down to business. We are excited about upcoming events and looking forward to an exciting year ahead! All new staff of“ cers and elected of“ cers took the oath of of“ ce. Alex Gulde our Public Education Staff Of“ cer discussed our upcoming About Boating Safely on Jan. 28. Anyone interested in taking the class can contact Alex at fso-pe@ uscgaux.net We cut our business meeting a bit short due to all the festivities and excitement, but always make sure to get in our awards to recognize the accomplishments of our members. This month the following awards were presented: Ray Willis, sustained service award; Mark Rosen, sustained service award; Duane Treadon, navigation aide veri“ er, 10 years of service and completing over 60 vessel safety checks; Chuck Hickman, annual service award for completing over 60 vessel safety checks; Mike Harrison, annual service award for completing over 60 vessel safety checks; Norma Hill, navigation aide veri“ er; Phil Hill, navigation aide veri“ er; Raye Crews, navigation aide veri“ er, sustained service award and annual service award for completing over 60 vessel safety checks; Larry Kolk, sustained service award and Bill Wannall, sustained service award. We have been busy! Until next week, Safe Boating is no Accident (thanks for the mantra, Sherrie!). Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSherrie Alverson is presented with two lemon meringue pies by Pattie Fritchie. Tuesday, Jan. 10was Dive In Day at the Florida Capitol, an event sponsored by the Dive Equipment and Marketing Association (DEMA). Retail diving operations had an opportunity to display their offerings and support regulations that promote our industry. Fresh out of a 160-foot dive and followed by a 200-foot dive with my deep diving rebreather class from Switzerland, I entered this event somewhat tired and skeptical. We, the Florida diving support community, face daunting challenges. Will the Florida Legislature care? My summer diving community is an open water, open circuit group, either scalloping or spear“ shing. Both are coming off a Gulf spill tragedy that did not quite make it to Wakulla County physically, but did emotionally. Most local folks just quit diving, or went south for their underwater adventures, leaving the support facilities in the North Florida area with little action (income). We went for weeks with no customers. New facilities like ours did not qualify for compensation as we did not have a year of operations with which to compare our losses. Last summer was better, but still way under the forecasted potential. Over the last year we have seen a migration away from the area of quali“ ed dive boats with ever more restrictive “ shing regulations. Of course protecting the “ shery is important, but every restriction sends another boat and their business elsewhere. What this community needs is a paradigm shift. A paradigm shift is a dramatic shift in the way we do something or in a technology. A classic example is the analog watch that dominated the world for centuries shifting to the inexpensive digital watch that altered the industry. Offshore spearfishing is costly because the diving technology is heavy, bulky and awkward requiring a large footprint (and thus a large and expensive boat). We need to shrink this footprint to bring this community to their dive sites with less expense. I will expand on this in a later column. My winter diving community is an overhead and often rebreather group, either strolling through countless known underwater passages or exploring and mapping new ones. Most are international and seek training from us. They were immune to the Gulf spill as our aquifer was unaffected by ocean pollutants. Unlike our summer community, these folks seek a diving destination. For example, during the past week Keith Tice from Zrich, Switzerland, has been telling me about the many diving destinations he has visited, from the Red Sea to the Maldives. He is convinced we have such a destination right here in Wakulla County and will say so next week at the Public Hearing on opening Wakulla Springs State Park to equal access diving, hosted by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 19, at the Livestock Pavilion next to the Crawfordville Fire Department. He recognized Wakulla Countys unique contribution to the Cave Divers Trail that stretches from Marianna through Wakulla to Peacock Springs State Park, High Springs, Eagles Nest and ending in Weeki…Wachi Springs. I hope the seeds I planted on Dive-In Days at the Capitol will encourage our Legislature to recognize and support the job creating economic opportunity people who enjoy underwater adventure bring to our state and especially to Wakulla County. Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday y Thu Jan 12, 12 Fri Jan 13, 12 Sat Jan 14, 12 Sun Jan 15, 12 Mon Jan 16, 12 Tue Jan 17, 12 Wed Jan 18, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 3:16 AM 3.2 ft. 4:03 AM 2.9 ft. 4:57 AM High -0.6 ft. 9:51 AM -0.3 ft. 10:25 AM 0.1 ft. 11:01 AM 0.0 ft. 12:02 AM -0.1 ft. 1:13 AM -0.2 ft. 2:36 AM -0.5 ft. 3:59 AM Low 3.2 ft. 4:18 PM 3.2 ft. 4:48 PM 3.2 ft. 5:22 PM 2.5 ft. 6:03 AM 2.2 ft. 7:29 AM 2.1 ft. 9:16 AM 2.3 ft. 10:51 AM High 0.3 ft. 10:13 PM 0.1 ft. 11:03 PM 0.6 ft. 11:43 AM 1.0 ft. 12:34 PM 1.4 ft. 1:41 PM 1.6 ft. 3:08 PM Low 3.1 ft. 6:02 PM 3.1 ft. 6:52 PM 3.0 ft. 7:59 PM 3.0 ft. 9:24 PM High Thu Jan 12, 12 Fri Jan 13, 12 Sat Jan 14, 12 Sun Jan 15, 12 Mon Jan 16, 12 Tue Jan 17, 12 Wed Jan 18, 12 Date 3.4 ft. 3:13 AM 3.2 ft. 4:00 AM 2.9 ft. 4:54 AM 2.6 ft. 6:00 AM High -0.6 ft. 9:48 AM -0.3 ft. 10:22 AM 0.1 ft. 10:58 AM 0.6 ft. 11:40 AM -0.1 ft. 1:10 AM -0.3 ft. 2:33 AM -0.5 ft. 3:56 AM Low 3.3 ft. 4:15 PM 3.3 ft. 4:45 PM 3.3 ft. 5:19 PM 3.2 ft. 5:59 PM 2.3 ft. 7:26 AM 2.2 ft. 9:13 AM 2.3 ft. 10:48 AM High 0.3 ft. 10:10 PM 0.1 ft. 11:00 PM 0.0 ft. 11:59 PM 1.1 ft. 12:31 PM 1.5 ft. 1:38 PM 1.7 ft. 3:05 PM Low 3.1 ft. 6:49 PM 3.1 ft. 7:56 PM 3.1 ft. 9:21 PM High Thu Jan 12, 12 Fri Jan 13, 12 Sat Jan 14, 12 Sun Jan 15, 12 Mon Jan 16, 12 Tue Jan 17, 12 Wed Jan 18, 12 Date 3.1 ft. 3:52 AM 3.0 ft. 4:39 AM High -0.5 ft. 10:55 AM -0.3 ft. 11:29 AM 0.1 ft. 12:07 AM 0.0 ft. 1:06 AM -0.1 ft. 2:17 AM -0.2 ft. 3:40 AM -0.4 ft. 5:03 AM Low 3.0 ft. 4:54 PM 3.0 ft. 5:24 PM 2.7 ft. 5:33 AM 2.3 ft. 6:39 AM 2.1 ft. 8:05 AM 2.0 ft. 9:52 AM 2.1 ft. 11:27 AM High 0.2 ft. 11:17 PM 0.1 ft. 12:05 PM 0.5 ft. 12:47 PM 0.9 ft. 1:38 PM 1.3 ft. 2:45 PM 1.4 ft. 4:12 PM Low 3.0 ft. 5:58 PM 2.9 ft. 6:38 PM 2.9 ft. 7:28 PM 2.8 ft. 8:35 PM 2.8 ft. 10:00 PM High Thu Jan 12, 12 Fri Jan 13, 12 Sat Jan 14, 12 Sun Jan 15, 12 Mon Jan 16, 12 Tue Jan 17, 12 Wed Jan 18, 12 Date 2.5 ft. 3:08 AM 2.4 ft. 3:55 AM 2.2 ft. 4:49 AM High -0.4 ft. 10:02 AM -0.2 ft. 10:36 AM 0.1 ft. 11:12 AM 0.0 ft. 12:13 AM -0.1 ft. 1:24 AM -0.2 ft. 2:47 AM -0.4 ft. 4:10 AM Low 2.4 ft. 4:10 PM 2.4 ft. 4:40 PM 2.4 ft. 5:14 PM 1.9 ft. 5:55 AM 1.7 ft. 7:21 AM 1.6 ft. 9:08 AM 1.7 ft. 10:43 AM High 0.2 ft. 10:24 PM 0.1 ft. 11:14 PM 0.4 ft. 11:54 AM 0.7 ft. 12:45 PM 1.0 ft. 1:52 PM 1.2 ft. 3:19 PM Low 2.4 ft. 5:54 PM 2.3 ft. 6:44 PM 2.3 ft. 7:51 PM 2.3 ft. 9:16 PM High Thu Jan 12, 12 Fri Jan 13, 12 Sat Jan 14, 12 Sun Jan 15, 12 Mon Jan 16, 12 Tue Jan 17, 12 Wed Jan 18, 12 Date 2.6 ft. 3:00 AM 2.5 ft. 3:47 AM 2.2 ft. 4:41 AM 2.0 ft. 5:47 AM High -0.6 ft. 9:30 AM -0.3 ft. 10:04 AM 0.1 ft. 10:40 AM 0.5 ft. 11:22 AM -0.1 ft. 12:52 AM -0.2 ft. 2:15 AM -0.5 ft. 3:38 AM Low 2.5 ft. 4:02 PM 2.5 ft. 4:32 PM 2.5 ft. 5:06 PM 2.5 ft. 5:46 PM 1.7 ft. 7:13 AM 1.7 ft. 9:00 AM 1.8 ft. 10:35 AM High 0.3 ft. 9:52 PM 0.1 ft. 10:42 PM 0.0 ft. 11:41 PM 1.0 ft. 12:13 PM 1.4 ft. 1:20 PM 1.5 ft. 2:47 PM Low 2.4 ft. 6:36 PM 2.3 ft. 7:43 PM 2.4 ft. 9:08 PM High Thu Jan 12, 12 Fri Jan 13, 12 Sat Jan 14, 12 Sun Jan 15, 12 Mon Jan 16, 12 Tue Jan 17, 12 Wed Jan 18, 12 Date 2.2 ft. 2:52 AM 2.0 ft. 3:49 AM 1.7 ft. 4:56 AM 1.4 ft. 6:20 AM High -0.5 ft. 9:20 AM -0.2 ft. 9:50 AM 0.1 ft. 10:19 AM 0.5 ft. 10:48 AM -0.0 ft. 1:08 AM -0.3 ft. 2:37 AM -0.5 ft. 3:54 AM Low 2.0 ft. 4:49 PM 2.0 ft. 5:10 PM 2.1 ft. 5:35 PM 2.2 ft. 6:03 PM 1.2 ft. 8:14 AM 2.4 ft. 7:20 PM 2.4 ft. 8:13 PM High 0.6 ft. 9:36 PM 0.4 ft. 10:34 PM 0.2 ft. 11:44 PM 0.8 ft. 11:12 AM Low 2.3 ft. 6:38 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJan. 12 Jan. 18First Jan. 30 Full Feb. 7 Last Jan. 15 New Jan. 22Major Times 3:11 AM 5:11 AM 3:35 PM 5:35 PM Minor Times 9:35 AM 10:35 AM 9:40 PM 10:40 PM Major Times 4:00 AM 6:00 AM 4:24 PM 6:24 PM Minor Times 10:11 AM 11:11 AM 10:42 PM 11:42 PM Major Times 4:49 AM 6:49 AM 5:14 PM 7:14 PM Minor Times 10:47 AM 11:47 AM 11:45 PM 12:45 AM Major Times 5:39 AM 7:39 AM 6:05 PM 8:05 PM Minor Times --:---:-11:25 AM 12:25 PM Major Times 6:31 AM 8:31 AM 6:58 PM 8:58 PM Minor Times 12:49 AM 1:49 AM 12:06 PM 1:06 PM Major Times 7:25 AM 9:25 AM 7:54 PM 9:54 PM Minor Times 1:54 AM 2:54 AM 12:51 PM 1:51 PM Major Times 8:23 AM 10:23 AM 8:52 PM 10:52 PM Minor Times 3:00 AM 4:00 AM 1:41 PM 2:41 PM Average Average Average Average Average+ Average Average+7:34 am 5:56 pm 9:40 pm 9:36 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:34 am 5:57 pm 10:42 pm 10:12 am 7:34 am 5:58 pm 11:46 pm 10:48 am 7:34 am 5:59 pm --:-11:26 am 7:33 am 6:00 pm 12:50 am 12:07 pm 7:33 am 6:00 pm 1:55 am 12:52 pm 7:33 am 6:01 pm 3:00 am 1:42 pm80% 72% 65% 58% 51% 43% 36% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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On Dec. 29, Darryl Beadle of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft where a handgun and cigarettes were stolen. Patricia Beadle reported that her vehicle was also entered, but nothing was taken. Both vehicles were left unlocked. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: € On Dec. 29, Robert Grider of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Coins, gloves and CDs, valued at $515, were reported missing. € On Dec. 28, John Stevens of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash at his home. The victim heard a loud crash and discovered damage to his front lawn and bushes. A telephone box was also damaged as a motorist was driving too fast for the conditions. The vehicle left the scene after a short period of time. Damage to the private property and telephone box was estimated at $1,000. € On Dec. 29, Marquett McCurdy of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A purse and contents, valued at $1,354, was reported missing. The victim reported the loss of gift cards and a Blackberry. €On Dec. 29, William Poole of Crawfordville reported “ nding a computer bag sitting in the roadway. The bag identi“ ed Charles Stanley Garrett as the owner through Progress Energy. The company vehicle was entered and an air card was stolen. The computer and work papers were recovered. € On Dec. 29, Joseph Serpico of Crawfordville reported a fraud on his bank account. Seven bogus charges were observed for a total of $198 from a Memphis business. The victim also received an overnight envelope that contained counterfeit money orders that may have been part of a scam involving a Los Angeles suspect. € On Dec. 29, Emiliano Oseguera of Crawfordville reported a theft. Automotive tools, valued at $299, were taken from the victims storage closet. € On Dec. 29, Scott Thomas of Jacksonville reported a residential burglary in Panacea. A forced entry was discovered into a shed. Lawn mowers, crab traps, bicycles, a tool box and a propane tank, valued at $820, were reported missing. € On Dec. 29, Jamie Yeomans of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Two televisions and a bicycle, valued at $500, were reported missing. A forced entry was discovered and damage to the home was estimated at $200. € On Dec. 30, Logan Claypool of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim was spending the night with a friend when she failed to remove her purse from an unlocked vehicle. Two cameras, personal items and medication were stolen. The property is valued at $250. € On Dec. 30, Julie Bickford of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim had mail, candy canes and cats taken and thrown into a shed. The shed door was damaged and a cat was rescued out of a tree. Damage to the shed was estimated at $100. Three juveniles, ages 7, 6 and 7, were identi“ ed as suspects. The victim dropped the case when the juveniles apologized. € On Dec. 30, Ida Robbins of St. Marks reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered. A silver urn was stolen. It is valued at $150 and someone also slept in a bed in the home. € On Dec. 31, a 17-yearold Apalachicola juvenile was issued a notice to appear in court following a traf“ c stop. Deputy Rachel Oliver stopped a vehicle on Crawfordville Highway due to a burned out headlight. Deputy Oliver smelled marijuana coming from the vehicle and observed drug paraphernalia in plain view. A search of the vehicle allegedly turned up two bags of marijuana, a burned marijuana cigarette and loose marijuana. The juvenile was turned over to a guardian. The marijuana weighed 9.7 grams. € On Jan. 3, a Wakulla County motorist escaped serious injury at 7:08 p.m. when a horse ran in front of her vehicle at 118 East Ivan Road. Gennie D. Mitchell, 53, of Crawfordville was involved in a head-on collision with the horse. The victims truck was a total loss as a result of the accident and the horse was killed on impact. WCSO deputies contacted owner Bailey Lynn Russom of Crawfordville about the accident and arrangements were made to remove the horse from the road. € On Dec. 31, Rickey Head of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A vehicle stereo, GPS and electronics, valued at $1,250, were reported missing. € On Dec. 31, Richard Lynn of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Two firearms, valued at $700, were stolen from the unlocked vehicle. A person of interest has been established in the case. € On Dec. 31, Donald Battle of Crawfordville reported the theft of a game camera from his hunting property. The camera is valued at $150. The camera was recovered and a juvenile suspect admitted to taking and damaging the camera. The victim agreed not to prosecute the case if the juvenile replaces the camera. € On Dec. 31, Ruth Williams of Crawfordville reported a structure “ re in her kitchen. The victim heard a tree fall in her back yard and went to investigate while heating grease in the kitchen. The “ re started on the stove and spread to the exhaust fan and cabinets above the stove. Wakulla County “ re“ ghters put out the blaze and determined the damage to be $6,500. € On Jan. 1, Christopher Tomaini reported a vehicle theft taken the previous night. The vehicle was located two miles away and had been involved in an accident. € On Jan. 1, Roger Horton of Sopchoppy was injured in a one vehicle accident involving a motorcycle. Horton was riding a motorcycle on Surf Road when he left the roadway and overcorrected causing him to crash. The victim was taken to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital with facial injuries and a possible broken arm. € On Jan. 1, Janice Porter of Sopchoppy reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and the suspect ate and drank while in the home. Damage to the home was estimated at $160 and the value of the food and beverages is $90. After collecting evidence at the scene, Willie James Scott, 54, of Sopchoppy was arrested for burglary, criminal mischief and larceny and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. € On Jan. 1, Betty Harts“ eld of Panacea reported a grand theft of an air condition unit. It was valued at $1,500. Damage at the scene was estimated at $200. € On Jan. 2, Heather Metcalf of Crawfordville reported the loss of her wallet at Murphy Oil. The wallet and contents are valued at $200. The investigation continues. € On Jan. 2, Janith Anderson of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone damaged the victims mailbox by driving over it with a truck. Damage is estimated at $20. € On Jan. 2, Rita Abarbanel of Tallahassee reported a grand theft of air conditioning units from the Wakulla Station Pharmacy. The value of the stolen items is still to be determined. € On Jan. 2, Meredith Flanders of Crawfordville reported leaving her wallet at Dollar General Store in Crawfordville. The wallet was recovered but cash had been stolen from it. € On Jan. 3, Cory Crum of Crawfordville reported a fraud as he discovered three unauthorized charges on his bank account. The charges were for $261 and originated in Germany. € On Jan. 3, Denise Cunningham of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as someone cut her vehicle tire with a knife. Damage was estimated at $150. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. € On Jan. 3, a retail theft was repored at Wal-Mart when a suspect allegedly left the store without paying for $91 worth of goods. Deputy Clint Beam recognized the suspect through surveillance video. The deputy is preparing a notice to appear in court for the 27-year-old suspect. € On Jan. 4, Robert Underwood of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and electronics, cash and jewelry was reported missing. The exact amount of property loss is still to be determined but is more than $1,200. € On Jan. 4, Angela Gardner of Crawfordville reported the theft of a boat from property near her home. Gardner noticed that her yard was disturbed and the boat was missing. The value of the aluminum boat and the owner are still to be determined. € On Jan. 4, Michael Esser of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was observed and $2,041 worth of currency, jewelry, a “ rearm and magazines were reported missing. Deputy Rachel Oliver, € On Jan. 4, Meredith Gaynor of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and two “ rearms were stolen. The “ rearms are valued at $1,800. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 765 calls for service during the past week. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 – Page 11AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report From the Wakulla Sheriffs Of“ ceUnderage drinkers have been known to celebrate during special holidays or sometimes they like to celebrate with an adult beverage following a football game, dance or other activity. If the teenagers decide to host their house party under the roof of their parents home, they could be exposing their parents to criminal and civil liabilities they may be unaware of. What some teenagers and parents dont know is that liability laws can leave parents vulnerable to lawsuits, “ nes and even jail time if underage drinking is found to be going on under their roof. Parents can even get in trouble with the law even if they dont know about the drinking. According to research co-sponsored by Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) and the insurance company Liberty Mutual, more teenagers report that their parents allow them to go to parties where alcohol is being served. The percentage has increased “ ve percent from 2009 to 2011 and is now at 41 percent of those questioned. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce conducts routine Party PatrolsŽ and a number of teenagers have been reported drinking at locations within the Apalachicola National Forest and elsewhere. Undersheriff Maurice Langston said the sheriffs of“ ce has received a number of tips over the years about teenagers who are drinking at popular locations in the national forest and has aggressively worked to combat the problem of underage drinking. Deputies will go to the location to investigate and break up the gathering while disposing of the alcohol,Ž said Langston. Deputies make sure parents come to the location to pick up their children and give them safe transportation home. We have had great cooperation within the community informing the sheriffs of“ ce about the locations of these outdoor parties so we can go and break them up.Ž If the parties are being held in a home it is possible that the parents can be charged under state statutes with contributing to the delinquency of a minor and child abuse. The degree of civil liability can increase if one of the teenagers drinks at the home and is injured or killed or creates bodily harm while driving under the in” uence of alcohol. Where the parties are taking place at the parents home, liability depends on the parents level of knowledge or involvement,Ž said Major Shepard Bruner of the WCSO. It often comes down to did you know and should you have known what was happening at your home. In Florida, parents can also be held civilly liable for their juvenile childs DUI related vehicle crash.Ž The safest thing to do is make sure your teenagers are not drinking,Ž said Langston. It is always better to not allow drinking at all rather than taking the attitude that it is safer to allow underage drinking under your roof rather than having it occur at some unknown outside location.ŽParents warned about liability of underage house parties INCOMETAXPREPARATION-NOWFILING 2011 INCOMETAXRETURNSSUSAN BROOKS SHEARER850-545-6678B.S. Accounting, B.S. Marketingsmbshearer@aol.com SBSAccounting, Tax & Consulting, LLC Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA • Interior Remodeling • Doors • Floors • Bathroom/Kitchen Remodeling • Decks/Barns/Fences35 Years ExperienceFREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968 JESUS The Wakulla News

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comPosey’s, a St. Marks landmark, is torn down BY WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was one of the oldest businesses in Wakulla County, and a landmark for St. Marks. But Poseys Oyster Bar is no more. The old restaurant and bar was demolished beginning a couple days after Christmas. It had achieved a level of regional fame … and the quaint old front of the bar with its Home of the Topless OysterŽ was a frequent subject for area painters. Poseys was reportedly buillt in the 1920s. The building was added on to, including a riverfront deck that drew lots of people on warm weekends to watch the St. Marks River ” ow and eat local seafood. It was also visited by people using the St. Marks Rail Trail as it sat at the end of the trail. In 2005, storm surge from Hurricane Dennis ” ooded the building and caused structural damage. Because of the extent of damage, major structural improvements to the building were required under the countys Building Code. Although they tried several different plans to re-open, the owners of Poseys were never able to make it. With the City of St. Marks making more of an effort to promote itself as a destination, several options were discussed about trying to preserve Poseys as a recognizable part of the citys recent past. But the old building was becoming a hazard as it sat unused for years: The big plateglass windows on the front had cracked and broken, and there was increasing concern about liability if somebody went into the derelict building and was injured. On Dec. 27, crews started taking the building down. The rubble of what was once Poseys Oyster Bar in St. Marks. The restaurant had closed in 2005 because of structural damage fro m ” ooding caused by Hurricane Dennis. Demolition crews began taking down Poseys Oyster Bar a couple days after Christmas.PHOTOS OF POSEYS BY MICKEY CANTNER Special to The News For More Information Contact From The Heart of Sopchoppy (850) 962-5282 www.fromtheheartofsopchoppy.com fromtheheartrecordingstudio@gmail.com WORLD SPONSORS Jefferson County Tourism Development Council Shoreline Medical Group INDEPENDENT SPONSORS Sopchoppy Preservation & Improvement Association Avera-Clarke Bed & Breakfast Wakulla News Wakulla.com Executive Producers ~ Rick Ott and Nelle McCall From The Heart of Sopchoppy Cash Bar by the Monticello Opera HouseCash Dinner & Desserts by Carrie Ann & Co.Friday Night Happy Hour Galen Curry Theatre Show Hot Tamale Frank Lindamood with guest Chelsea Dix KesslerSarah Mac Band Jim White After Party Sarah Mac Bandwith guests Galen Curry & Rick Ott Experience a Live Music Film Production for Broadcast on WFSU-TV at the Monticello Opera House January 27 & 28, 2012Happy Hour 6:30 7:30 PM Theatre Show 8:00 -10:00 PM After Party 10:00 PM MidnightSaturday Night Happy Hour Hot Tamale Theatre Show Brook Sessions & Rick Ott The Currys Steve Dean, Bill Whyte & Lisa Shaffer(Hits & Grins Trio) After Party Rick Ott Band with guests Ralph Pelletier & The Currys TICKET LOCATIONSMonticello Opera House (850) 997-4242 www.monticellooperahouse.org and From The Heart of Sopchoppy (850) 962-5282Ticket Price $20 per night Each Ticket Sale Directly Bene ts WFSU-TV IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 NOW STOCKING MUCK BOOTS & FEATHER FLAGECAMO 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 WEHAVECHILDRENSWHITEBOOTS! RED GROUPER LIMIT IS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 Green Scene What’s the story on Echinacea?EarthTalk, Page 8B Resolutions: In with the new... Get FitQuiet your breath... Yoga For LifeHealth & Fitness, Page 3B Oh the far reaching effects of our government. Are you aware of the Energy Independence and Security Act, which became law in 2007? The law mandated new ef“ ciency standards to be set for appliances which included new energy-efficiency standards for general service incandescent light bulbs. But on January 1 of this year, the day set by Congress for the 100-watt bulb to become more energy ef“ cient, enforcement of the new law was delayed until October 2012. What does this mean for the consumer? It means that the standard 100-watt light bulb was to become obsolete and its lower-wattage cousins were soon to follow. The laws ban on standard 75-watt bulbs takes effect Jan. 1, 2013 and a year later for standard 40and 60-watt bulbs. Shelves have been stocked with high-efficiency choices but the stores can sell the banned bulbs until their inventory is exhausted. The new bulbs will require more money up front. The purchase of the new light bulbs is more like an investment, with the need to balance higher up-front costs against longer-term electricity savings. Some of the newest high-ef“ ciency bulbs cost more than $20 each and are designed to last more than 20 years. The light bulb is moving from a 60-cent commodity that you throw into your grocery cart to an investment just like a refrigerator or major appliance,Ž said Terry McGowan, Director of Engineering for the American Lighting Association, an industry trade group. It costs more money and you expect it to do more, and if you move, you might even take it with you.Ž Not all the bulbs available to consumers will be banned. Thousands of specialty bulbs, including 100-watt incandescence designed to stand up to rough treatment, are exempt from the manufacturing ban. Other exempted bulbs include three-way bulbs and flame-shaped lamps for chandeliers. WHY CHANGE? The shortcoming of our present bulbs is that only 10 percent of the energy is converted to light; the rest lost as heat. EnergyStarquali“ ed light bulbs pay for themselves in about six months. Then they start paying you back. Change one bulb and save $40 or more over the lifetime of the bulb. Consider the savings when you note that an average household has approximately 30 light “ xtures. Continued on Page 3B By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Changes in how we light our homes Some upcoming gardening eventsYour local garden club invites the Wakulla County community to join us at the library on Tuesday, Jan.17 to preview and learn about the trees that will be given away for Arbor Day 2012. Well have pictures, fact sheets and a sample of each tree to help everyone make an informed decision about which trees to choose for their yards. The meeting will begin at 1 p.m. in the large meeting room at the Wakulla County Public Library in Medart. Call Jeannie Brodhead at 926-2264 or email us at irisgardenclub.wakulla@gmail.com for further information. The Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at the Wakulla County Public Library on Tuesday, Jan. 17, at 6:30 p.m. The program, Landscaping with Native Plants for Wildlife,Ž will be presented by Donna Legare, owner of Native Nurseries in Tallahassee. The program is free and open to the public. Come early at 6 p.m. and enjoy our social time with great snacks, a slide show of beautiful pictures of area plants taken by local photographers, and some good fellowship.Iris Garden Club to o er Arbor Day Preview Native Plant Society program set on landscaping PHOTO BY LOU KELLENBERGER / Special to The NewsSpecial to The NewsRelay for Life Chair Kristin Dow announced today that the Wakulla County Relay for Life committee will host a Paint the Lion Relay PartyŽ on Saturday, Jan. 14, from noon to 3 p.m. at Azalea Park in Crawfordville. The mane eventŽ will be the painting of the concrete lion statue. The event will include food, games, vendors and fun! Join us for an afternoon of fun while learning how we can all help rid the world of cancer,Ž said Dow. The American Cancer Society Relay For Life is a life-changing event that gives everyone in communities across the globe a chance to celebrate the lives of people who have battled cancer, remember loved ones lost, and fight back against the disease. At Relay, teams of people camp out at a local high school, park, or fairground and take turns walking or running around a track or path. Each team is asked to have a representative on the track at all times during the event. Because cancer never sleeps, Relays are overnight events up to 24 hours in length. The 2012 Wakulla Relay for Life is scheduled for April 20 … 21 at the Wakulla High School track. Each year, more than 3.5 million people in 5,000 communities in the U.S. and 20 other countries, gather to take part in this global phenomenon and raise much-needed funds and awareness to save lives from cancer. Thanks to Relay participants, the American Cancer Society continues to save lives. A chance drawing will be held at the Paint the Lion Party. Two winners will be selected to have their handprints painted on the lion. There is a minimum donation of $1 to enter the drawing. For more information call Dow at (850) 9268854.HEALTH Relay for Life will hold a Paint the Lion Party FILE PHOTOYoull have a chance to paint your handprints on the Lion in Azalea Park on Saturday as part of a fundraiser for Relay for Life. Here the Lion is a Wakulla War Eagle. LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, January 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, January 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, January 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. Sunday, January 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, January 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, January 17  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Welcome Center, 1505 Coastal Highway in Panacea. Speakers will be Becky Sanders Finch, Cathryn Sanders Beaty and others who will share their memories and stories about growing up in Panacea. Wednesday, January 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, January 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 7 p.m. in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. This meeting is for everyone, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, January 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsFriday, January 13  BEGINNING BRIDGE CLASS will be held at 12:30 p.m. at the Senior Center. This is the rst class of eight sessions. There is no charge for those 60 years or older. There is a $2 charge for everyone else. Lunch can be purchased for $2. The rst session will be for fun and introductions and the remaining will be for master points, if there are at least three tables. For more information call Jerry Brelage at 228-6669 or Shirley Anne at 926-1566. Saturday, January 14  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA will meet from 10 to noon at 29 Sarah Court, Crawfordville. Children are to be accompanied by an adult at all times and are asked to bring their favorite snack and train. Children of all levels of autism and ages are invited to attend, as well as siblings. For more information or to RSVP, contact Carrie Stevens at 274-9474 or carriejstevens@comcast.net.  PAINT THE LION RELAY PARTY will be held from noon to 3 p.m. in Azalea Park in Crawfordville. There will be food, games and vendors. There will also be a chance drawing and the winners will be selected to have their handprints painted on the lion. The event is sponsored by Relay for Life. For more information, contact Kristin Dow at kdv6@mail.com or 926-8854. Monday, January 16  MARTIN LUTHER KING CELEBRATION will be held by the Wakulla County Christian Coalition starting at 8 a.m. with a road cleanup along Martin Luther King Road at the corner of Spring Creek Road. A service will follow at 9 a.m. on the courthouse lawn. There will also be a breakfast at 10 a.m. at Hudson Park.  DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. CHURCH SERVICE will be held at 7 p.m. at Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church at 223 Triplett Road in the Hyde park Community. The keynote speaker is Elder Alfred Nelson. Everyone is invited and encouraged to attend. Tuesday, January 17  IRIS GARDEN CLUB ARBOR DAY PREVIEW will be held at 1 p.m. at the library. Participants can learn about and view the trees that will be given away at the Arbor Day festival. For more information, call Jeannie Brodhead at 926-2264 or email irisgardenclub.wakulla@gmail.com. Thursday, January 19  NINTH ANNUAL JOBS=PAYCHECKS NOW JOB FAIR AND EXPO will be held 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Leon County Civic Center in Tallahassee. The event is hosted by Workforce plus. To learn more about opportunities at WORKFORCE plus call (866) WFP – JOB1 today or visit the website at www.wfplus.org.  INSTALLATION DINNER FOR CHAMBER BOARD OF DIRECTORS will be held from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Wakulla Senior Center. RSVP to the Chamber of ce (850) 926-1848. Friday, January 20  NAMI WAKULLA’S SECOND ANNUAL NIGHT OF ALL-AMERICAN FUN will feature pianist and American music ambassador Bob Milne, who will perform ragtime music at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. Tickets are $30 each and include dinner and the performance. To purchase tickets, call the NAMI Wakulla of ce at 926-1033.Upcoming EventsSaturday, January 21  GRANT PEEPLES, Americana/Roots, singer/songwriter, will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. For more information, call (850) 962-1010.  ANNUAL ARBOR DAY FESTIVAL will be held at Hudson Park from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Artisan and craft vendors are invited to display their wares. Nature art and outdoor items such as gardening tools, plants, outdoor furniture, wind chimes, and bird feeders will appeal to festival goers. Sunday, January 22  WAKULLA COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will hold a steering committee meeting at El Jalisco Restaurant starting at 5 p.m. All members are invited to attend. Tuesday, January 24  VIEWING PARTY FOR PRESIDENT OBAMA’S State of the Union Address will be hosted by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee at Beef O’Brady’s in Crawfordville. A meet and greet will begin at 7:30 p.m. For more information, contact Joan Hendrix, secretary for the WDWC, at 926-7473 or at granpetunia@comcast.net. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com St. Marks City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at City Hall. Paint the Lion Relay Party at Azalea Park from noon to 3 p.m. Martin Luther King Celebration. Historical Society meeting at 7 p.m. at the Welcome Center, PanaceaThursdaySaturdayMondayTuesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Government MeetingsThursday, January 12  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Welcome Center in Panacea.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, January 17  WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD will meet at 5:45 p.m. in the school administration board room. Thursday, January 19  PUBLIC WORKSHOP will be held at 7 p.m. at the Extension Of ce Pavilion, 84 Cedar Avenue, by the Florida Park Service on the proposed inclusion of cave diving at Wakulla Springs State Park. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorThe beginning of 2012 means the start of a new Legislative session in Tallahassee. Among the many issues being decided will again be the funding of the State Aid to Libraries program. Just as a reminder, the State Aid that we receive accounts for nearly a third of our budget and pays for the majority of our book and materials purchases, our Childrens Coordinators salary, high speed internet, supplies, among other needed services. If the program is reduced or cut entirely, our expenses will have to be cut accordingly, which will mean the loss of many of the services and programs which we are proud to provide the citizens of Wakulla County. In addition, if State Aid is cut, WCPL, along with all the other public libraries in the State, will also no longer be eligible for Federal grants and funding. All were asking is that our great supporters once again contact our Legislative delegation, Representatives Marti Coley and Leonard Bembry, and State Senator Bill Montford, along with the leadership of both houses throughout the Session, to tell them how important libraries are to the community and to continue to fund State Aid at least at the current minimum amount. With your support, were certain that once again the citizens of Florida (and Wakulla County in particular) will convince the Legislature of this importance and that there will not be reduction in the needed services to the community which we provide. I, along with members of my staff, will be going to the Capitol on Library Day on Feb. 1 along with other times during session so if you wish to join us, please do. For more information please contact me at 9267415. Friday Night Movie We are showing our “ rst Friday Night Movie of the year on Jan. 13 at 7 p.m. The latest film by Woody Allen stars Owen Wilson and Rachel McAdams tells the tale of Gil and Inez who travel to Paris as a tag-along vacation on her parents business trip. Gil is a successful Hollywood writer but is struggling on his “ rst novel. He falls in love with the city and thinks they should move there after they get married, but Inez does not share his romantic notions of the city or the idea that the 1920s was the golden age. When Inez goes off dancing with her friends, Gil takes a walk at midnight and discovers what could be the ultimate source of inspiration for writing. Gils daily walks at midnight in Paris could take him closer to the heart of the city but further from the woman hes about to marry. This delightful “ lm is up for numerous awards and has been called Woody Allens best in nearly 20 years. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for this PG-13 rated “ lm. Free Tax Prep & Tax Forms The AARP will begin their free tax preparation service at WCPL on Thursday Feb. 2 from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and on Saturday Feb. 4 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This service will continue each Thursday and Saturday at the same respective times throughout tax season. The free preparation is intended for low to middle income “ lers with an emphasis on senior citizens. It is also “ rst come, “ rst served so come early. We have begun receiving tax forms from the IRS and are putting them out for your use as we receive them. If we havent been sent the forms you need well be more than happy to assist you in downloading them from the IRSs website. We ask for your patience and understanding during tax season as we try to provide you with the forms and instructions that you need. Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 – Page 3BHEALTH & FITNESSEvery year we make New Resolutions on a range of health topics, weight loss, better eating habits, going to the gym, or watching our calories, etc. Everyone knows that this is the time of the year for health and “ tness and its big business. Right now there is an over-abundance of commercials and infomercials wanting to assistŽ you in your goals of weight loss and living healthy and to be “ t. Its that time of year, we buy treadmills, spin bikes, rowing machines, thousands of exercise and weight loss DVDs, not to mention the Ab Roller, Ab Loungers, Ab Crunchers. Its crazy, but what is more crazy is that we buy them. Did you know that almost half of our country makes New Years resolutions, but only about 10 percent of us are actually keeping them? So in other words most of that stuff we buy for our health is now a hanger for our clothes, in the closet or in a dusty box. There are numerous reasons that we lose our commitment, lack of motivation, lack of resources, or we just lose interest. So if you are going to make that New Years Resolution here are some hints to help you succeed: Dont Do It Alone: Find someone that has the same goal. Statistics show that support group actually has higher success rate in achieving goals. A workout partner will help motivate and keep you focused, not to mention to have someone that you are now accountable to. Plain and simple, its just nice to have someone to workout with, that two mile jog goes a lot faster when you have a friend! Be realistic: If you are going to make a weight loss resolution, make sure that you can actually achieve your goal. Choose an achievable goal weight that is attainable with your lifestyle, for instance a person with sedentary lifestyle and not such a healthy eater may want to try maybe 2 … 5 pounds a month, not 5 pounds a week, or settle for running down the block instead of running a 5K the “ rst week. Just keep it simple! Take baby steps: You know the old saying Slow and steady wins the raceŽ … its true with “ tness. Instead of a total transformation of your lifestyle in one week try taking out bad habits and slowly add good ones. For instance, if you eat McDonalds four times a week, try to change to maybe once or twice until you feel comfortable to remove it completely. You want to make it where you can achieve your goal and not feel overwhelmed, so take it slow, remember you did not gain the weight in a day and you will not lose the weight in a day, it takes time. Have fun with your exercise: Studies show that if you like your exercise regimen you will stick to it. For instance, if you like to dance there are a number of cardio classes that are designed speci“ cally with dance in mind, Hip Hop Abs, Zumba, Step, they are excellent sources of muscie and dance, but you can burn over 600 calories. If you like to ride a bike then do a spin class, if you like to run there are running clubs. If exercise was easy we would all be doing it, so since you need to exercise then why not make it fun and interesting while you are achieving your goals. Drink more water … even if you hate it: Water is crucial when it comes to losing weight especially when the water is ice cold. Drinking more water will allow your body to release excess water weight which will result in a weight loss. There is nothing better than cool clear water. Dont weigh yourself: This is one of the hardest things for most of my clients to stay away fromƒthe scale! It is a huge addiction, your outlook on life can actually be determined by the number on the scale. The best way for you to see if your body is changing is how you feel in your clothes. When your clothes are looser then you know you have lost weight, the scale is just a number. How you look in the mirror or how the pants “ t is more of a positive indicator of your weight loss. One of the things I tell my clients is to “ nd a pair of pants that are snug on them when they begin the weight loss program and every two weeks try them on, they are amazed at how good they feel when those pants start getting loose and eventually need a belt to keep them on! Dont starve yourself: One of the worst things you can do is wait until you are already hungry before you eat, your body will go into starvation mode and you are more likely to binge eat or eat the wrong things in attempt to satisfy that relentless hunger. Try eating small meals throughout the day or every three hours, for instance eat three meals and two snacks this way you will never be hungry. In addition, always keep healthy snacks, such as apples, rice cakes or almonds with you, just in case you get delayed and are not able to get a meal in time. Be con“ dent: No this isnt one of those self help posters that says Believe in yourselfŽ You actually need to believe that you can lose the weight, the more will power you have the easier it will be for you. The minute you doubt that you can do it, is when you start to fail. So instead of contemplating failure, just believe that you can achieve. Look at the big picture, literally: This is actually one of the hardest things we have to do. That picture is not there to make fun or ridicule it is simply there to show parts of the body that need change. So if you see the double-chin, jiggley arms, or thunder thighsƒ dont be disgusted with it all. Be honest with yourself and treat your body like a work in progress. By doing this, you go beyond saying that youre just overweight, treat it like a motivational tool to “ x the problem areas and you will have more reasons to stick to your resolutions. Accept that you might make mistakes: Life gets in the way, we were made with imperfections, if you have a temporary lapse in judgment and eat that Big Mac, dont let it be the downfall of your weight loss plan. If you fall off the wagon, just jump right back on and keep trying till you get it right! And Last But Not Least Have a Great and Healthy New Year!Pamela Chichester, CFT is Body-Tek Gym Manager. She can be reached at (850) 926-BFIT.In yoga, we are asked to pay careful attention to every aspect of our breath. Sometimes we have to match our breathing to our movements in and out of the postures. At other times, we use the breath to go deeper into a posture „ for example, when we exhale into a twist. Whether we are working on our breathing as we practice postures or on its own, we should understand that the inhale breath is very different from the exhale breath. The inhale is more energizing and is appropriate for movements that expand and extend. The exhale is more calming and is appropriate for movements that deepen and grounds. When you extend your exhalation, making it longer and slower, you create a calming effect by activating the relaxation responseŽ„ the physiologic opposite of the stress-induced “ ght or ” ightŽ reaction. Try this for yourself. Stand with your arms down along side the body. As you inhale, rolling your thumbs out, lifting the arms over the head. Exhale lowering the arms back down along side the body drawing your belly towards the spine, welcoming the next breath. Do this a few more times. Notice the calming effect your own breath has. Notice the energy you can create on the inbreath. Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140.Resolutions: In with the new, out with the old GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERQuiet your breathContinued from Page 1BResearch indicates that if every American home replaces just one light bulb with an EnergyStar-quali“ ed bulb, we would save enough energy to light more than 3 million homes for a year, more than $500 million in annual energy costs, and prevent greenhouse gases equivalent to the emissions of more than 800,000 cars. The Act of 2007 aims to save consumer nearly $6 billion annually on electricity costs by 2015. How to shop for the new bulbs? For consumers, a trip to the store for bulbs will likely be more confusing and costly because of the array of new, longer-lasting options. New labels offer guidance on lumens, or light output, and long-term cost savings on electricity. The most useful new vocabulary word for many is lumens,Ž a measure of the amount of light a bulb produces. An existing 100-watt bulb gives about 1,600 lumens. The new light bulb label will have a new Lighting Facts section that lists brightness in lumens, so you can compare. If you are looking to replace a 100-watt bulb, for example, look for a bulb with 1,600 lumens. The choice might be a compact ” uorescent (CFL) bulb, which uses up to 75 percent less energy. A second option looks like a traditional bulb but has a halogen core that uses 23 percent less energy. Another emerging contender is the light-emitting diode, or LED, bulb that “ ts into a standard socket. They are energy ef“ cient and long lasting, but cost more than $20 each. LEDs dont offer an equivalent to the 100-watt standard bulb, but one is being developed. There is a chart posted on our website called How to Choose the right bulb. It shows the “ xtures and then offers suggestions for a replacement bulb. I would encourage you to utilize it at www.wakulla. ifas.u” .edu. Call me with your additional questions or for a copy of the chart!Swenson: Changes in how we light homesYOGA FOR LIFE Celebrate Crawfordville Arbor DayFree Trees!Saturday, January 2110:00 am 1:00 pmHudson Park Rain or ShineHundreds of young trees (in pots) will be given away!Dogwood, River Birch, Bald Cypress, Chicasaw & Flatwoods Plum, Sugarberry, Turkey & Red Oak, Longleaf Pines, & more. Fun Festival!Bring empty, black plant pots to enter a raf”e for a large tree.Organized by the Iris Garden Club with the support ofFlorida Division of Forestry, Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society, Just Fruits & Exotics,Purple Martin Nursery, & Wakulla County Parks & Recreation Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Monday, January 23, at 10:30 amWakulla Senior Center 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville Hosted by: Anna Johnson RiedelThe Savvy Senior is a program for individuals who want to learn more about creating and maintaining healthy, happy, and active lifestyles. OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. If you have questions or for accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943), 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications for Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) plans. There is no charge. To RSVP, please call (850) 523-7333 or go to www.capitalhealth.com.H5938_DP 067 File & Use 06272011Capital Health Plan Proudly Presents: Presented by: Mary Goble, MSN, RN

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Who did all of this and more? Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., that’s who. Sadly, Dr. King’s life was cut short on April 4, 1968, when he was assassinated in Memphis, TN. His legacy, however, was preserved on November 2, 1983, when Congress signed a bill into law declaring the third Monday of every January Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Please join us in celebrating the achievements of Dr. King, this Monday, January 17. Who... Who... Who...• Was born in Atlanta, GA, on January 15, 1929? • Studied at Morehouse College and was ordained to the Baptist ministry in 1948? • Was elected president of the Montgomery Improvement Association in 1955 and became the official spokesman for the Montgomery bus boycott? • Helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957 to fight for civil rights? • Was arrested at a sit-in at a restaurant in Atlanta in 1960? • Led the March on Washington in 1963, the largest civil rights demonstration ever? • Was named Time magazine’s Man of the Year for 1963? • Attended the signing ceremony of the Civil Rights Act of 1964? • Was the youngest person ever to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964? • Participated in a voting rights demonstration in Selma, AL, in 1965 and was arrested? • Was concerned with socioeconomic problems and moved into a Chicago slum tenement in 1966 to bring attention to the living conditions of the poor? • Started the Poor People’s Campaign in 1967 to push for employment and better housing for the poor of all races? Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by:

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 – Page 5B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars  Real Estate  Rentals  Employment  Services  Yard Sales  Announcements 877-676-1403 ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 with Dolly MoodyYoga Gain ”exibility, strength, energy. Call for class schedule and rates.YogaFORSENIORSFocusyoga@yahoo.com or call 228-380-0140Focus on a healthier you. BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUY€SELL€TRADE€REPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @ comcast.net Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Lost Little White fluffy dog male last seen Sun 1/8/12 at gas station in front of Walmart Reward sad daughter (850) 591-9827 850-508-6744 LOST DOGLost black lab -4 years old. Name is Duke. Lost in Crawfordvilles Amelia Wood-Marie Circle area (behind Winn Dixie) on Sunday morning. Please call Gail or Paul McGhee at 850-408-4930 if you have any information on Dukes whereabouts. Announcements Huge discounts when you buy 2 types of advertising! 122 weekly newspapers, 32 websites, 25 daily newspapers. Call now to diversify your advertising with Advertising Networks of Florida (866)742-1373,www. florida classifieds.com Health Information The most complete superfood ever discovered. Watch the amazing video titled Another DayŽ at:www.for ever gr een.or g/cinema.html and purchase the Frequensea product at:www.6570244.myfor ev er gr een.ORG Trades/ Skills Apply Now, 12 Drivers needed Top 5% Pay 2Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp. (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com DRIVER NEEDEDFull time with benefits available, CDL with Hazmat certification, Inquire at Wakulla Gas Company or call 850-926-7670 DRIVER Run 5 States Regional! Get Home Weekends, Earn up to 39 cent/Mi, 1 yr OTR Flatbed exp. reqd SUNBELT TRANSPORT, LLC 800-572-5489 ext 227 Driver-Start out the year with Daily Pay and Weekly Home Time! Single Source Dispatch. Van and Refrigerated.CDL-A, 3 months recent experience requires. (800)414-9569 www.melontruck.com Driver-Weekly Hometime. Dry and Refrigerated. Daily Pay! 31 Service Centers. Local Orientation. newer trucks. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. (800)414-9569 www.driveknight.com General Help Freight Up = More $ 2 Mos.CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. meltontruck.com Career Opportunities Heat & Air JOBSReady to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877) 359-1690 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. Call Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction ALLIED HEALTHCareer training -Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.Centura Online.com EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINEOnline from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Business Opportunities EARN $100-$3200 a month to drive our new cars with ads www. FreeCarDriver.com Restaurant Space Available Soon!!Fully equipped. Can assume full liquor license and equipment if you act quickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info Miscellaneous Financial $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!! $$$As seen on TV. Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++ within 48/hours? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com $$$ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!!! $$$As seen on TV.$$$ Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++ within 48/hrs? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com Appliances LG Window unit air conditioner. 8,000 B.T.U.s. Like new. $150.00. Call 850-697-4408. Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLESATURDAY 14, 8am-4pm LOTS OF EVERYTHING 78 Nelson Road General All Yard and Garden Tools, some furniture and household 107 Infield Dr./ Lanark (850) 697-4408 Shed for sale, 6x8, with floor, aluminum, good condition, $300 obo,$600 new (850) 697-4408 Mobile Homes For Rent 3BR/2BA DWMHWakulla Gardens, CHA,good floor plan,$650/month+deposit, application, references, 1 year lease Available now! Call for for appointments 850-508-8783, 727-642-6043 Crawsfordville2/2 nice well kept, near beautiful Lake Ellen & great schools, quite area, 32 Merwyn Dr. $500/mo RENT TO OWN OPTION (850) 443-3300 Crawsfordville4/2, DW on 2 acres, just renovated 1800 sf. storage/workshed, close to great schools, just 10 miles to Tallahassee $850/mo RENT TO OWN OPTION (850) 443-3300 M/H for rent, 3BR/1BA.$450/mo. includes water, garbage, lawn-care. Quiet neighborhood. No pets. Call after 6pm 850-926-3280 SOPCHOPPY2/1, Covered Porch, large wooded lot, $475. Mo. + Dep. (850) 566-4124 Mobile Homes and Land Mobile home with acreage! Ready to move in, great for pets. Lots of space for the price, 3br/2ba, serious offers only, no renters, 850-308-6473 Real Estate For Rent 2BR/1BA, MHRor Rent. Large deck, shed, roomy! Quiet neighborhood. No pets-FIRM! $525/month, $500/security. 850-926-6212. Real Estate For Rent 3BR/2BA, MHfor rent. Large deck, shed, recently remodeled, updated appliances. All electric. No pets-FIRM! $595/month, $500/security. 850-926-6212. Apartments Unfurnished Accepting applications for 1 bedrooms. Starting @$562 month. Equal Housing Opportunity. Office open Monday-Friday 9-230 Call 850-984-4811 TDD 1-800-955-8771. Summer Trace Apartments Large Room/Efficiency Furnished Apartment for rent, $90. week or $400 month, Long term rental, inc utilities, water, garbage, access to Wakulla River, 850-926-2783 Apartments Move in Special $99 Deposit $300 Special on 2BR ONLY OFF 2nd month rent Local Hero Discount $99 Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BR as LOW as $630/mo 2BR as LOW as $730/mo 3BDR as LOW as $830/mo. Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675.per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses 3BR/2BA in Mysterious Waters$695/rent, same deposit, no pets. Call Jim at 566-5165 On Sopchoppy River Cute 1br w/ cath. ceilings, new carpet,large screen porch overlooking river $465 per mo. plus dep.Call 850-524-1026 Storage/ Warehouses Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,8x10 and 10x12 now available. Come by or call Wakulla Realty, (850) 926-5084 Real Estate For Sale Mill Creek Estates3 Bedroom 2 Bath with Den, 1,700 sf, with seperate game room/mother in law suite, borders Nation Forest on culdesac $1,100 mo. plus dep. 1 year lease Call (850) 251-2549 Leave Message Commercial Real Estate Affordable Office Space at the Barry Building. Great atmosphere! Includes all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen use, conference room. Rates start at $250/mo. 850-210-5849 or our website at www.BarryBuilding.com Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-926-2480 Commercial Real Estate Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300  Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-656-6340 Commercial Real Estate WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 5Br 2Ba DWMH $950 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Twnhs $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Hs. $850 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Hs. $775 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba Hs. $725 mo. + Sec. Dep.2Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $775 mo.+ Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Hs. $750 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650 mo. + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615 mo. + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Susan Jones, GRIRealtor566-7584$110,000 Immaculate 4BR/2BA DWMH nestled on 5 acres centrally located in Wakulla County. New HVAC. Enjoyall nature has to offer in this private location with beautiful acreage. Assumable Mortgage if qualify. Call for more details. Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceTree Trimming, Tree Removal, Flower Beds, Sprinkler Systems & More Call today for a free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and InsuredWE DO IT ALL! TheWakulla newsLook Us Up Online for Classi“ ed ads from The Wakulla News.www.thewakullanews.comAlso check out the Community Calendar

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Out of Town Real Estate 7 ACRES WITH LAKE FRONTAGE! Buy Off-Season-BARGAIN only $39,900!(was $89,900) Wooded setting, dockable shoreline, on 4 season recreational lake! Boat, ski, fish, camp, more. Paved roads, power, phone. Excellent financing! Wont last, call now (866)952-5302 20 ACRES -Live on Land ONLY $99/mo. $0 down,Owner Financing. NO CREDIT CHECKS! Near El Paso, Texas. Beautiful mountain views! Free Color brochure 1-800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches .com Lots For Sale 2-acre lot for sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Trucks FORD 05F250 Diesel, 4x4, 4 dr. burgundy 178k Mi. exc cond. full power $14,900 850-508-6744 Heating/AC HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR Sales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in CrawfordvilleDoug & Sherry Quigg, OwnersLic. Nos ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926-5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Pressure Cleaning A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed-John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 Services ALL ABOUT...CONCRETEBLOCKS, BRICKS, PAVERSLANDSCAPEPLANTS, SOD, TRACTOR WORK Call JOSEPH FRANCIS 850-556-1178 OR 850-556-3761 Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 Fictitious Name Notices 5091-0112 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious name law pursuant to section 865.09, Florida statues NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the underFictitious Name Notices Fictitious Name Notices signed, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Discovery Place located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., in the County of Wakulla, in Crawfordville,Florida 32327, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 5th day of January, 2012. /s/Rita Haney January 12, 2012 5072-0112 THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT : Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Tuesday January 17, 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE : Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065January 12, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5088-0112 PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(7)-(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: JOSEPH D. NORRIS Last known address of 114 NEWTON ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 5090-0207 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR DESOTA COUNTY, FLORIDA IN RE: (1) Gr een Utility T railer Serial #5K1B4222061005938 CASE NO. 11-105CC CARL WAYNE COTNER 3166 SMITH CREEK RD SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 Plaintiff. NOTICE OF ACTION YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for establishment of ownership of personal property described as : One Green Utility Trailer, Serial 5K1B42220601005938, has been filed and it is required that a copy of your written defenses, if any, be served on Plaintiff, Carl Wayne Cotner, whose address is : 3166 Smith Creek Rd., Sopchoppy, Wakulla County, Florida, on or before February 2, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court immediately thereafter; otherwise a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.. DATED on January 5, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, as Clerk of the Court (seal) /s/ By Glenda Porter, As Deputy Clerk January 12, 19, 26, 2012 and February 2, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices The above individual is notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 January 12, 2012 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5083-0119 Vs. Reilly, Curt E.65-2009-CA-000385 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000385 DIVISION BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, Plaintiff, vs. CURT E. REILLY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated December 14, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000385 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A is the Plaintiff and CURT E. REILLY; ROXANNE M. REILLY; SHELL POINT RESIDENCES, INC.A DISSOLVED COPR.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 2nd day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: 5084-0119 Vs. Velazquez, Luz 65-2011-CA-000042 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000042 DIVISION HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOMURA ASSET ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, SERIES 2006-WF1, Plaintiff, vs. LUZ VELAZQUEZ A/K/A LUZ M. PEREZ, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 22, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000042 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOMURA ASSET ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, SERIES 2006-WF1, is the Plaintiff and LUZ VELAZQUEZ A/K/A LUZ M. PEREZ; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LUZ VELAZQUEZ A/K/A LUZ M. PEREZ N/K/A PEDRO VELAZQUEZ; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the23rd day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 40, BLOCK 7, WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 71 KLOWA CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on December 22, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. January 12 and 19, 2012. F11003467 5085-0119 Vs. Branch, Earnest 65-2010-CA-000068 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000068 DIVISION US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CSFB HEAT 2006-3, Plaintiff, vs. ERNEST BRANCH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 22, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000068 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CSFB HEAT 2006-3 is the Plaintiff and ERNEST BRANCH; DEBRA J. BRANCH; are the Defendants, The Clerk of 5086-0119 Vs. Dedmon, Heidi L..09-CA-500 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 09-CA-500 HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE ELLINGTON TRUST SERIES 2007-1, Plaintiff, vs. HEIDI L. DEDMON, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HEIDI L. DEDMON, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. (MIN#100144300010887910), HAL COUNCIL, YVONNE COUNCIL, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 AND #2, AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 28, 2010 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated December 22, 2011,entered in Civil Case No.: 09-CA-500 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR THE ELLINGTON TRUST SERIES 2007-1 Plaintiff, and HEIDI L. DEDMON, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HEIDI L. DEDMON, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. (MIN #1001944300010887910), HAL COUNCIL, YVONNE COUNCIL, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 26nd day of April 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: TRACT 2, OF EVERGREEN ACRES, UNIT NO. 2, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 77, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on December 27, 2011 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Telephone (954)360-9030 Facsimile:(954)420-5187. January 12, & 19, 2012 5087-0119 Vs. White, Alvin 11-312CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No: 11-312CA BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION, STRUCTURED ASSET INVESTMENT LOAN TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2003-BC-13, Plaintiff, vs. Alvin White a/k/a Alvin D. White, Nakisha R. White, Centennial Bank successor by merger of Wakulla Bank, Unknown Tenant #1, and Unknown Tenant #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Alvin White a/k/a Alvin D. White Nakisha R. White Residence Unknown Residence Unknown Unknown Tenant #1 Unknown Tenant #2 37 Concord Road 37 Concord Road Crawfordville, FL 32327 Crawfordville, FL 32327 If living: if dead, all unknown parties claiming interest by, through, under or against the above named defendant(s), whether said unknown parties claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, or other claimants; and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property herein described. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 1 & 2, Block 9, Grieners Addition to the Town of Crawfordville, as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida Street Address: 37 Conrad Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Steven J. Clarfield, Esquire, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 500 Australian Avenue South, Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, within 30 days after the date of the first publication of this notice on or and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on December 29, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of said Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk January 12 & 19, 2012. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the23rd day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: TRACT NUMBER 94 AND ALL OF TRACT NUMBER 93, EXCEPT THE SOUTH 50 FEET OF TRACT NO. 93 OF GOLDEN GATE FOREST, AS PER PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED ON PAGE 3 OF PLAT BOOK 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 46 PEARL AVENUE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on December 22, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. January 12 and 19, 2012. F09121197 CLASSIFIED Ads As Low As $10 Per Week! 877-676-1403GRANTS COORDINATOR We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1150 per month. 2 BR 2 BA House on Ochlockonee Bay. Bayside home with deck, dock, porch and a boat house. $1,200 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/ Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets 455 Old Bethel Road 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre. $950 mo. No Smoking or Pets107 Wildwood 3BR/2 BA with possible 4 -BR or den. Includes replace, above ground pool and hot tub. Large screened back porch. $1200.Mo. No Smoking/Pets with approval. 26 Magnolia Ridge 3BR/ 2 BA with replace, above ground pool. $1125. Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 116 Magnolia Ridge 3BR/2 BA with in-ground pool and replace $1100. Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 235 Webster 4BR/2BA MH $475. Mo. No Smoking or Pets. 165 Sam Smith Circle 2 BR/1BA $595. Mo. No Smoking or Pets.AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 – Page 7BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 23 27 33 39 43 50 56 61 66 69 2 24 51 3 20 52 4 28 46 5 25 34 44 21 29 40 57 62 67 70 6 15 18 41 58 7 30 35 59 8 31 47 53 9 32 48 22 26 45 54 63 68 71 10 16 19 42 49 60 11 36 55 12 37 64 13 38 65 A CROSS 1 Carbo-loader's fare 6 Essen's region 10 Carbo-loader's fare, slangily 14 Steer clear of 15 Twin to Jacob 16 Pitchfork prong 17 Al __ ( 1 -Across order) 18 Three-piece suit part 19 "__ bitten ..." 20 Try for rst place in Minnesota? 23 Slap the cus on 25 "High __" (Anderson play) 26 Golf course halves 27 Lotion additive 29 Cold War follower 33 Plants 35 Stereotypical lab assistant 36 "Go back!" on a PC 39 Considered true in Ne w Hampshire? 43 Ques. response 44 Sahara sight 45 Clutch, for one 46 Rap sheet data 49 "As you __" 50 Pitch the ninth inning, maybe 53 Rubber-stamped 55 Vicksburg ghter 56 Inquiry regarding a cute Indiana companion? 61 Singer Stuarti 62 Goneril's father 63 Oslo is located on one: Var. 66 Antiquing agent 67 Presidential daughter __ Baines Johnson 68 Broncos great John 69 Historian's interest 70 Made like 71 Monopoly collectionsDOWN1 Mouse's milieu 2 Greeting to Galba 3 Hymnals and such 4 Yugoslav patriot 5 Expert 6 April 18 1775 rider 7 __-friendly 8 Biblical verb form 9 Pitcher-turnedslugger 10 Cheap cigar 11 Assign, as blame 12 Fester or Wiggily 13 Owners' papers 21 Bricklayer's burden 22 Lure into crime 23 Gore / Perot debate topic 24 Detective Pinkerton 28 Before, to bards 30 Rubber, so to speak 31 Heckler's missile 32 Easter lead-in 34 Gromyko or Sakharov 36 Pillow ller 37 Rubberneck 38 Paparazzo's quarry 40 Astor's line 41 Saw buck fraction 42 Just out 46 Classify 47 Steamy 48 Enjoy Vail 50 Tight-sted51 "Ars __, vita brevis" 52 Moves like the Blo b 54 Put o 57 Cinders of the comics 58 Do another hitch 59 It's sometimes hard to keep a straight one 60 Aswan Dam river 64 No-goodnik 65 Bad start? American Prole Hometown Content 12/18/2011 E a ch puzz le is d i v i d e d i n t o n i n e se c ti on s a nd ea ch se c ti on h as n i n e b la nk s qu a r es F ill i n all 81 s qu a r es on t h e puzz le w it h numb e r s 1 t o 9. You m ay no t r e p eat a n y numb e r s i n a n y on e of t h e n i n e se c ti on s t h at y ou’v e al r ea d y u se d else wh e r e i n t h at se c ti on. Als o, y ou c a n u se ea ch numb e r 1-9 on ly onc e i n ea ch hor i zon tal li n e of n i n e s qu a r es a nd i n ea ch v e r ti c al co l umn of n in e s qu a r es Th e puzz le is comp lete d wh e n y ou corr e c tly ll e v e r y s qu a r e .S o l u ti on s 200 9 HtCtt 1 2 3 4156 7541 5 284 62 2961 9 134 8473 269 200 9 HtCtt 156 2984 3 7 498317256 372654981 735 921864 614785392 289463175 967 132548 841579623 523846719 P A D N A F T A C H E A A V E A L L A N L O N G S O N G B O O K S O O Z E T I T O E R E A S S O R A D E P T A N D R E I H O D F U R E L L R E V E R E O N E R E U U S E R T I R E S F A C H A S T E G G T O R R I R U T H N O R S K I E N T R A P D E F E S T O G I E N E W N I L P I N O N E I D E R D O W U N C L E S T A R E R A D E E D S C E L E B D Y Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com LOT 8, BLOCK A OF THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT, UNIT 2, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 79 THRU 82, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A LOT 8 BLOCK A DOCKSIDE D, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on December 28, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Irvene Kimbrel, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. January 12, 2012 and January 19, 2012 F09084761 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5069-0119 Vs. Fields, Judith. 2010-CA-037 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2010-CA-037 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI, Plaintiff, vs. JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 AND #2, AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 28, 2010 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated December 14, 2011,entered in Civil Case No.: 2010-CA-037 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR THE MLMI TRUST SERIES 2007-MLMI Plaintiff, and JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JUDITH M. FIELDS F/K/A JUDITH M. TOOLE, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 22nd day of March 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOTS 6 AND 7, BLOCK 1, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on December 14, 2010. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A., 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Telephone (954)360-9030 Facsimile:(954)420-5187. Published in The Wakulla News on December 29, 2011 and January 5,12, & 19, 2012 5076-0105 Vs. Flanders, Houston, Case No. 65-2011-CA-000127 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO.:65-2011-CA-000127 WELLS FARGO BANK,N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR STANLEY DEAN WITTER CAPITAL 1 INC. TRUST 2002-OP1, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-OP1; Plaintiff, Vs. HOUSTON FLANDERS, A/K/A HUSTON FLANDERS, IF LIVING AND IF DEAD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HOUSTON FLANDERS, IF LIVING AND IF DEAD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DAWN FLANDERS, IF ANY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; ATTENTION FUNDING & TRUST, AS ASSIGNEE OF BANK OF AMERICA; AND UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE PROPERTY Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): HOUSTON FLANDERS, A/K/A HUSTON FLANDERS Last Known Address : 67 ELIZABETH STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HOUSTON FLANDERS, A/K/A HUSTON FLANDERS Last Known Address : 67 ELIZABETH STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for foreclosure if Mortgage on the following CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000127 Our File Number: 11-01003 described property: TRACT NUMBERED THIRTY (30), UNIT II, OF EVERGREEN ACRES SUBDIVISION, AS PER PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 AT PAGE 77 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. MOBILE HOME DESCRIPTION: 1998 PIONEER #(S) PH2602GA3705A AND PH2602GA3705B a/k/a 67 ELIZABETH STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of you written defenses, if any to it on Marinosci Law Group, P.C. Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 100 W Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 on or before February 4, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the publication of this Notice in the WAKULLA NEWS and file the original with the Clerk of Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demand in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing Notice of Filing was mailed to all the parties in the attached mailing list. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 19th day of December, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (seal) /s/ by Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk Publish in the WAKULLA NEWS on January 5 and 12, 2012 CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000127 Our File Number 11-01003 5079-0112 Vs Dekle, Peggy Sue. Case No.11-207-CA, Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:11-207-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, N.A. by and through its sub-servicing agent, VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff vs. BRYAN A. DEKLE and PEGGY SUE DEKLE, husband and wife; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, a Delaware limited liability company authorized to transact business in Florida, as successor in interest to Household Finance; FAMILY DOLLAR STORES OF FLORIDA, INC., a Florida corporation; UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) and/or UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: PEGGY SUE DEKLE YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose that mortgage, originally in favor of Ford Consumer Finance Co., Inc. dated October 8, 1996 and recorded on November 1, 1996, in Official Records Book 286, Page 583; as assigned to Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc. by Assignment of Mortgage recorded on April 26, 2011, in Official Records Book 850, Page 822, as subsequently assigned in Official Records Book 854, Page 664, and finally assigned to the Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A., in Official Records Book 854, Page 665, all of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, encumbering the following real property located in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 24 Millers Way South Commence at a concrete monument marking to the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 52 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 72 degrees 50 minutes 52 seconds West 915.00 feet, thence run North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 402.50 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 524.40 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road No. S-368, said point lying on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 1091.74 feet thru a central angle of 01 degrees 34 minutes 41 seconds for a arc distance of 30.07 feet (chord of said arc being South 77 degrees 12 minutes 43 seconds West 30.04 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 291.97 feet to a point on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Northwesterly along said curve having a radius of 1382.74 feet thru a central angle of 31 degrees 08 minutes 57 seconds for an arc distance of 751.73 feet (the chord of said arc being North 87 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds West 742.51 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 484.05 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 50 minutes 52 seconds East 728.96 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO a roadway easement over and across the Southerly and Easterly 30 feet thereof. ALSO SUBJECT TO a 50.00 foot cul-de-sac easement in the Southwest corner thereof. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to SONYA K. DAWS, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Sonya Daws, P.A. 3116 Capital Circle NE, Suite 5, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within thirty (30) days, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on November 1st, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County (seal) /s/ By Desiree D Willis, as Deputy Clerk January 5 & 12, 2012 5081-0119 Notice of Sale By the Clerk of Circuit Court PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE BY THE CLERK OF CIRCUIT COUR T Notice is hereby given that the undersigned BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, will on February 2, 2012, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time,at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Square, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash the following described property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: 87 ESTELLE DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 TOGETHER WITH A 1993 DESTINY DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME VEHICLE ID NO. 034092A AND 034092B LOCATED ON SAID PROPERTY ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA DESCRIBED AS BEING TRACT 8, UNIT 2 OF EVERGREEN ACRES, AS SHOWN BY PLAT THERE OF RECORD ON PAGE 77 OF PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. SUBJECT TO RESTRICTIONS OF RECORD, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, FLORIDA PUBLIC RECORDS. LESS AND EXCEPT THE SOUTH 134 FEET OF TRACT 8 WHICH WAS CONVEYED IN DEED RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 38, PAGE 502, AFORESAID PUBLIC RECORDS. PARCEL NUMBER R 20-3S-01W-039-04575-000 At the time of the sale, as set forth hereinabove, the successful high bidder shall 5082-0119 Vs. Brown, Michael,deceased.65-2010-CA-000345 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000345 DIVISION BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH UNDER, MICHAEL R. BROWN A/K/A MICHAEL RAY BROWN, DECEASED, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated December 14, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000345 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP is the Plaintiff and THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LEINORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, MICHAEL R. BROWN A/K/A MICHAEL RAY BROWN, DECEASED; CANDACE MIKEL HICKS A/K/A CANDACE A. BROWN, AS AN HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL R. BROWN A/K/A MICHAEL RAY BROWN, DECEASED; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 2nd day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: ALL OF LOT 43 AND A PART OF LOT 42 OF BLOCK 4, OF THE TOWN OF ARRAN, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 1, PAGE 601, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND A PARCEL OF LAND ADJOINING SAID LOTS AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 43, BLOCK 4 OF THE TOWN OF ARRAN, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 1, PAGE 601 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 38DEGREES 55 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST, 99.7 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 368, A DISTANCE OF 135.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 38 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST, 99.70 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 43 OF BLOCK 4 OF SAID TOWN OR ARRAN, THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 43, A DISTANCE OF 135.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A DAMON CIRCLE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on December 28, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Irvene Kimbrel, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. January 12, 2012 and January 19, 2012 F10055601 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices post with the Clerk a deposit equal to five percent (5%) of the final bid. The deposit shall be applied to the sale price at the time of payment. The balance of the sale price shall be paid in full to the Clerk by 4:30 p.m., on the same day as the sale. This sale is made pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment entered in a case pending in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, the style of which is: TCF NATIONAL BANK MINNESOTA, Plaintiff, vs. DELORES JEAN GRACE-KENYON a/k/a DELORES J. KENYON a/k/a DOLORES J. KENYON; JESTON C. KENYON, JR.; CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. successor by merger with CITIFINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. 344 LLC, successor by merger with ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL SERVICES COMPANY OF FLORIDA, INC., successor by merger with ASSOCIATES FINANCIAL SERVICES OF AMERICA, INC. as assignee of SPRAY-TECH INC.; UNKNOWN OCCUPANT A residing at 87 Estelle Drive, Crawfordville, Florida and UNKNOWNN OCCUPANT B residing at 87 Estelle Drive, Crawfordville, Florida, Defendants. and the docket number of which is Case No. 2011-000101-CA If you are a person with a disability who needs accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Square, 3056 Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at (850)926-0905 within 2 working days of your receipt of this Notice; if you are hearing impaired, call 1 (800) 955-8771; if you are voice impaired, call 1 (800) 955-8770. IF THIS PROPERTY IS SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION, THERE MAY BE ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE SALE AFTER PAYMENT OF PERSONS WHO ARE ENTITLED TO BE PAID FROM THE SALE PROCEEDS PURSUANT TO THE FINAL SUMMARY JUDGMENT. IF YOU ARE A SUBORDINATE LIENHOLDER CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. IF YOU ARE THE PROPERTY OWNER, YOU MAY CLAIM THESE FUNDS YOURSELF. YOU ARE NOT REQUIRED TO HAVE A LAWYER OR ANY OTHER REPRESENTATION AND YOU DO NOT HAVE TO ASSIGN YOUR RIGHTS TO ANYONE ELSE IN ORDER FOR YOU TO CLAIM ANY MONEY TO WHICH YOU ARE ENTITLED. PLEASE CHECK WITH THE CLERK OF COURT, WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, COURTHOUSE SQUARE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 AT (850)926-0905 WITHIN (10) DAYS AFTER THE SALE TO SEE IF THERE IS ADDITIONAL MONEY FROM THE FORECLOSURE SALE THAT THE CLERK HAS IN THE REGISTRY OF THE COURT. IF YOU DECIDE TO SELL YOUR HOME OR HIRE SOMEONE TO HELP YOU CLAIM THE ADDITIONAL MONEY, YOU SHOULD READ VERY CAREFULLY ALL PAPERS YOU ARE REQUIRED TO SIGN, ASK SOMEONE ELSE, PREFERABLY AN ATTORNEY WHO IS NOT RELATED TO THE PERSON OFFERING TO HELP YOU, TO MAKE SURE THAT YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU ARE SIGNING AND THAT YOU ARE NOT TRANSFERRING YOUR PROPERTY OR THE EQUITY IN YOUR PROPERTY WITHOUT THE PROPER INFORMATION. IF YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO PAY AN ATTORNEY, YOU MAY CONTACT LEGAL SERVICES OF NORTHWEST FLORIDA, 2119 DELTA BOULEVARD, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 (850)385-9007 FOR ASSISTANCE, YOU SHOULD DO SO AS SOON AS POSSIBLE AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court on December 28, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk, Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) /s/ By Irvene Kimbrel as Deputy Clerk January 12 & 19, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5080-0112 Estate of Yvonne Council, File No.11-75-PR, Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number 11-75-PR IN RE : ESTATE OF YVONNE COUNCIL, a/k/a GLORIA YVONNE COUNCIL, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of YVONNE COUNCIL, deceased, File Number 11-75-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FL 32327. The name and address of the co-personal representatives and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5092-0119 1/28/12 Sale-Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON JANUAR Y 28,2012 A T 10:00A.M AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: JENNIFER BABCOCK MONICA ROSIER CASEY LARSON BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF JANUAR Y 28,2012 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. January 12 & 19, 2012 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate,including unmatured, contingent, or unliquidated claims, must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITH ST ANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FOR TH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER DECEDENTS DEA TH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of the Notice is January 5, 2012. /s/ Lori Farkas Co-Personal Representative P.O. Box 156 Crawfordville, Florida 32326 /s/ Susan Council Co-Personal Representative 23 Purple Martin Cove Crawfordville, Florida 32327 /s/ Robert S. Hightower Robert S. Hightower, Florida Bar No. 199801, P.O. Box 4165, Tallahassee, Florida 32315 Telephone: (850) 222-3363 Facsimile:(850) 222-0992 January 5,& 12, 2012 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state P lease Go To www. t h e w a ku lla n e w s .com a nd c li ck on s ub s cr i b eorCall877-401-6408

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 12, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Sharon SchraderDecember 2011 Winner Her name was drawn fromI am getting ready to retireƒ So this certi“cate is just in timeŽ OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winn er!One Meal fr om Every R estaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! Rescue the ReefThroughout the tropics, coral reefs protect countless marine species and provide food and livelihoods for 500 million people, but who protects the reefs? Assaulted by pollution, over“ shing and climate change, coral reefs are being destroyed so quickly that 70% of the worlds reefs may disappear within 50 years. Who can Rescue the Reef? You! Act now at nature.org/rescue Dear EarthTalk: Whats the story with Echinacea? Many herb teas contain it, and many people swear by it as a cold remedy. But Ive also seen headlines saying that the herb has no medicinal value whatsoever. Can you set the record straight? Arlene Hixson Portland, Maine Echinacea, also known as purple cone” ower, has gained popularity in recent years as a nutritional supplement that proponents believe is helpful in staving off the common cold and shortening its duration. But given the variation between dosages and formulations … such herbs are not regulated as medical drugs by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and so makers have little incentive to standardize … its hard to get definitive answers as to Echinaceas effectiveness. Historically, Native Americans relied on the root of Echinacea to numb toothache pain and treat dyspepsia as well as snake, insect and spider bites. While some modern day folks rely on Echinacea just based on this anecdotal evidence, scienti“ c studies have veri“ ed that the herb can be effective. To wit, a 2008 University of Connecticut review of 14 different clinical trials of Echinacea use found that taking the supplement reduced the chances of getting a cold by 31 percent, and helped people get over cold and ” u symptoms a day and a half earlier than those who didnt take it. Researchers initially thought Echinaceas effectiveness was due to its immune-boosting traits, but they now believe instead that the herb works more as an anti-inflammatory agent. A 2009 University of British Columbia study found that typical commercially available Echinacea preparations are effective in reducing the bodys production of in” ammatory proteins in human bronchial cells. In laymans terms, this means that Echinacea can help lessen the annoying symptoms of common colds, the flu and other respiratory ailments. Furthermore, the study found that Echinacea is just as effective in reducing bronchial in” ammation whether it is consumed before or after a viral infection sets in, indicating that taking moderate doses on a regular basis during cold season can help prevent some bronchial irritation if and when cold symptoms begin. Interestingly, though, a 2010 study of 719 participants in Wisconsin focusing on illness duration and severity found that the duration of the common cold could be shortened by taking a pill of some sort, whether Echinacea or a placebo with no active ingredients. But this study merely underscored the importance of psychological factors in “ ghting illness and did not say that Echinacea isnt effective. Given the lack of FDA oversight of herbs, different formulations may contain vastly different amounts of Echinacea. A 2004 evaluation of 19 different Echinacea brands by the non-pro“ t Consumers Union and published in Consumer Reports found that the amount of Echinacea actually present in supplements varied considerably from brand to brand … and even in some cases from bottle to bottle of the same brand. The magazine recommended a few brands as best picks,Ž including Spring Valley, Origin and Sundown, all which featured high concentrations of Echinacea and reliable dosage amounts from pill to pill. Before taking the Echinacea plunge, beware that the herb can cause allergic reactions in some people and may interact negatively with some common medications. Researchers warn that anyone with autoimmune disease or a handful of other illnesses should not take Echinacea without “ rst consulting with their doctor. Dear EarthTalk: There are a number of companies out there now doing energy auditsŽ for the home, after which they try to sell you attic insulation and other products and services. Is this just a scam or would it be wise for me to look into this? Bill Richards New York, N.Y. For the most part, companies offering energy audits are reputable and legitimate and will help you both save money and reduce your carbon footprint if you follow their advice in regard to upgrading things like insulation, windows and appliances. A home energy assessment, also known as a home energy audit, is the first step to assess how much energy your home consumes and to evaluate what measures you can take to make your home more energy efficient,Ž reports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). An assessment will show you problems that may, when corrected, save you signi“ cant amounts of money over time.Ž During the assessment, you can pinpoint where your house is losing energy,Ž adds DOE. Energy assessments also determine the ef“ ciency of your homes heating and cooling systems [and] may also show you ways to conserve hot water and electricity.Ž You can conduct your own energy audit if you know where to look for air leaks (drafts), water waste and other key areas of a homes inef“ ciencies. The DOEs energysavers.gov website has guidelines to help homeowners conduct their own do-it-yourself home energy assessments. For instance, DOE recommends that homeowners make a list of obvious air leaks, such as through gaps along baseboards or at the edges of ” ooring and at wall and ceiling junctures. The potential energy savings from reducing drafts in a home can be as high as 30 percent per year, reports DOE. (The DOE website also provides information on other ways to save money and resources through less obvious things such as outdoor landscaping. It also posts guidelines for energy-ef“ cient designing and remodeling.) You should also check the “ lters on heating and cooling equipment to see if they need to be changed so as to keep your furnace and air conditioners functioning at maximum ef“ ciency. And if these or other appliances are more than 15 years old, consider replacing them with newer models that meet federal EnergyStar ef“ ciency criteria. Also, swapping out older incandescent bulbs in light fixtures with higher efficiency compact ” uorescent or LED bulbs will save money and energy. A professional energy auditor with dedicated assessment tools and the knowledge of how to use them will in all likelihood carry out a more comprehensive assessment than you can do yourself. Thorough assessments often use equipment such as blower doors, which measure the extent of leaks in the building envelope, and infrared cameras, which reveal hard-to-detect areas of air in“ ltration and missing insulation.ŽIf you are concerned about enlisting a for-pro“ t “ rm that upsells its own energy ef“ ciency upgrade services based on a freeŽ energy audit, check with your utility to see whether it offers unbiased, independent energy audit services (which it may do for free or for a nominal cost). The assessor from your utility may be able to recommend window and door replacement companies, heating and cooling specialists and other vendors nearby that do reputable work to make your home is not only energy ef“ cient but warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Whats the story with Echinacea? Echinacea has gained popularity in recent years as a remedy for the common cold. But because it is not regulated as a medical drug by the FDA and given the variation between dosages and formulations available to consumers, its dif“ cult to get de“ nitive answers as to its effectiveness.Echinacea, also known as purple coneflower, has gained popularity in recent years as a nutritional supplement that proponents believe is helpful in staving o the common cold and shortening its duration.