<%BANNER%>
Wakulla news
ALL ISSUES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00387
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 12-15-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00387
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles are in the title game. They defeated the Pasco Pirates in the state semi-“ nals in triple overtime on Friday, Dec. 9, by a score of 41-38, in front of a packed J.D. Jones Stadium. The War Eagles will play Miami Norland in the Citrus Bowl this Friday for the state 5A championship. Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees had said before the Pasco game that the two teams matched up pretty evenly. Both, he said, were fast and game planned to get their athletes out in space to make plays. After the game, Klees praised both teams, saying they were also alike in that neither had any quit in them. The main difference was that, where Wakulla focuses on a ground-and-pound attack, Pasco relied on short seam passes. While Pasco scored “ rst on their opening drive, Wakulla was leading at halftime by a score of 21-7. But Pasco battled back with a touchdown in the third and another in the fourth to tie it up. Both teams scored touchdowns in the first and second overtimes. In the third overtime, Wakullas defense came up with a big stop and Pasco kicked a “ eld goal to go up 38-35. On Wakullas next possession, the War Eagles faked a speed sweep to Marshane Godbolt and handed the ball to Deonte Hutchinson. The Pirates had overloaded to the left, keying on Godbolt -who had scored four touchdowns in the game, twice on passes, and twice on the ground -and Hutchinson went into the end zone untouched. The home crowd erupted in cheers after the score -some players embraced, some fell to their knees. Klees said of Godbolts performance: He dominated the game. He was just incredible. He caught two touchdowns and ran two. He just had a great football game.Ž Wakullas all-time rushing leader, Will Thomas, was knocked out of the game late in the fourth quarter with a deep thigh bruise and did not play in overtime. Klees said he expected Thomas to play in the championship game. Defensive player Nic Walker suffered a shoulder stinger, but is also expected back. Some other players were dinged up, and Klees attributed that to a physical, physical game.Ž Continued on Page 11A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 50th Issue Thursday, December 15, 2011 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsThe Wakullanews P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read Daily INDEX Public Notices ...........................................Page 3A Comment & Opinion .................................Page 4A Church.......................................................Page 6A Community ...............................................Page 7A Holiday Guide ...........................................Page 8A Sports .....................................................Page 12A Outdoors ................................................Page 13A Water Ways .............................................Page 14A Sheriffs Report .......................................Page 15A Arts & Entertainment .................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ........................................Page 2B Classi eds ..................................................Page 5B Legal Notices .............................................Page 6B OBITUARIES Brenda Joyce Baggett Madelyn Joyce Crowson Joan E. Harrison Katie Whetstone WAR EAGLES WIN IN TRIPLE OVERTIMEHeaded to state championship in Citrus Bowl KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMarshane Godbolt leaps up to make the catch over the Pasco defender. Godbolt scored a touchdown on the play … one of four touch downs he scored in the game for Wakulla, including two in overtime. Dump truck plunges over Sopchoppy River bridgeStaff ReportA 73-year-old Crawfordville man was seriously injured in a one vehicle accident Saturday, Dec. 10 as his dump truck plunged over the side of Sopchoppy River Bridge at 11:44 a.m., according to Interim Sheriff Donnie Crum. Freeman Pigott was taken by medical helicopter to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital where he was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with multiple broken bones and lacerations. About six hours later, a large crane was used to lift the truck off the bank of the Sopchoppy River. WCSO investigators determined that Pigott was northbound on Highway 375 when his right front tire struck the bridge curb and crashed through the bridge guardrail into the river. The victim was hauling dirt at the time of the accident and dropped approximately 20 feet nose “ rst into the bank of the river. Rescue workers took several minutes to free Pigott from the truck. The Tallahassee Fire Department Haz-Mat Unit was called to the scene to put up booms and collected less than 40 gallons of diesel fuel that leaked into the river. The river clean-up continued into Monday, Dec. 12. The bridge was damaged and has been closed inde“ nitely by the county public works department, ESG. A detour has been set up while the bridge is closed. Motorists can access West Sopchoppy and all addresses north of the bridge by utilizing Rose Street (County Road 22). They should take CR 22 to Curtis Mills Road and then take a right back to 375. Addresses 8201 to 8415 along Smith Creek Highway, as well as all addresses along Cherokee Drive, Trebor Lane, Seminole Lane and Blackhawk Drive will be south (left) from the intersection of Curtis Mill and 375. Continued on Page 2A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netLawmakers representing Wakulla County held their annual meeting last week to hear issues of local concern before the start of the legislative session. Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, and Reps. Marti Coley, R-Marianna, and Leonard Bembry, D-Greenville, heard a lot of the same concerns as in the past: educators worried about more cuts, local governments looking for help and fishermen angry about the unfairness of how they are treated. The session begins on Jan. 10 this year … earlier than usual because the legislature must approve redistricting. But there were fewer citizens and fewer elected of“ cials at this years delegation meeting, which prompted Sen. Montford to joke that people must not have any complaints. Superintendent of Schools David Miller warned lawmakers that, the district cannot take anymore cuts. Were on the precipce of cutting programs that help kids,Ž Miller said. Weve cut to the bone. Theres nothing else to cut.Ž Wakullas school budget, which relies heavily on state dollars, has been reduced more than 15 percent since 2007, Miller said. More than $5.6 million cut since 2007s budget of $38 million to this years $32 million. He also warned of eroding morale amongst school personnel. Our employees have taken a pretty good hit over the past several years,Ž Miller said. Except for a one-time bonus, employees havent had a step increase in pay for four years. He urged the lawmakers to look for new sources of revenue, suggesting they go after internet sales tax … saying Thats not a tax increase, its a tax due.Ž He also suggested a tax on bottled water, suggesting it was justified because the current taxes on bottled drinks is unfair. Continued on Page 5ALegislative delegation visits WakullaWILLIAM SNOWDENPlayers embrace and react to the overtime win that sends the War Eagles to the state title game for the “ rst time since the 1981 team won the championship.UP NEXT: The Division 5A state championship game will be played at the Citrus Bowl in Orlando on Friday, Dec. 16 beginning at 1 p.m. Visiting Pasco locker rooms burglarized during game. See Page 15A. Former Sheriff David Harvey’s retirement party results in $25,000 contribution to scholarship fund for Wakulla athletes. See Page 11A. The dump truck driven by 73-year-old Freeman Pigott after it went over the Sopchoppy River Bridge. Pigott was LifeFlighted to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. (Photo by WCSO) Kitsune Books created by Anne Petty See Page 1B GO, WAKULLA WAR EAGLES! Show your support for the Wakulla War Eagles at the Citrus Bowl with the War Eagle Banner on Page 10A

PAGE 2

Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsMore than 300 people jammed into Azalea Park Friday, Dec. 9 for the annual Christmas in the Park celebration featuring Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus and their elves. Santa and entourage arrived at the park escorted by Public Service Officer Nancy Watts as they arrived in a horse-drawn carriage. Many visitors to the park were festively dressed and children were excited for an opportunity to tell Santa Claus their Christmas wishes. The event is sponsored by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, WCSO Volunteers, Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department and Centennial Bank and features a kiddie train, games, food, prizes, and Christmas decorations. This year the event had an outstanding turnout despite direct competition from the Wakulla War Eagle football playoff game. Dozens of children and their parents lined up in cool and dry weather to create a long line to visit with Santa Claus. WCSO Captain Larry Massa has organized the event for several years as a way for the sheriffs of“ ce to give back to the community. McGruff the Crime Dog visited with children and there were decorations all over the park to indicate that Christmas was just two weeks away. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHundreds turn out for Christmas in the ParkSanta and Mrs. Claus arrive at Azalea Park in a horse-drawn carriage.Dump truck plunges over bridgeContinued from Page 1A In addition to the WCSO and Wakulla EMS, Tallahassee Fire, Wakulla “ re“ ghters, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, ESG and Jackson Cook Crane Company assisted at the scene. The bridge will be closed for a while, if not forever, according to County Administrator David Edwards. Edwards gave a report to the Sopchoppy City Commission at its Dec. 12 meeting and told them an engineer had been out to inspect the bridge and to see what could be done. However, the bridge is 70 years old and might not be able to be replaced. Edwards said they plan to explore all their options, but it was good their was another bridge next to it.Boardwalk project may resumeBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter being delayed for several years, city commissioners in St. Marks are hopeful that construction of a boardwalk promised to the city by the state could start in the middle of February. City Manager Zoe Mans“ eld gave the commissioners an update on the project at its Dec. 8 commission meeting. Mans“ eld said the state bid out for the project on Nov. 30 and it should be awarded within three weeks. She said she was also told construction could begin the second week in February 2012. Of“ ce of Greenways and Trails committed to building a boardwalk in St. Marks three years ago. The boardwalk will be funded by the Florida Department of Transportation. The city constructed its portion of the boardwalk already and has been waiting on its connector. The city was also told an observation tower would be constructed along with the boardwalk, but was recently told the tower did not get funded. In other news: € The city also discussed the design for the streetscape that is being drafted by the engineering “ rm, HydroEngineering. Mans“ eld said the design includes sidewalks, lighting and benches. The sidewalk will also connect to the recently repaved bike trail. The city received a Community Development Block Grant for the improvements. Mans“ eld said once the design is “ nished, she would set up a workshop for the commissioners to go over the plan. € Two tenants have already rented space at the old re“ nery site, now known as St. Marks Innovation Park, and Mans“ eld said several other companies have also shown some interest. The companies are interested in renting of“ ce space in the larger building, but Mansfield said there are repairs needing to be made before that can happen. The electric in the buildings needs to be replaced and Mans“ eld said an electrician quoted $2,100 to “ x it. She added that she also needs to make the restroom handicap accessible, get a back door for the building and “ x the windows. I cant rent it until I “ x it,Ž Mans“ eld said. Mayor Chuck Shields said if the city had the money to go ahead and do the repairs necessary to start making some money off the rental space. Money received for rent can be earmarked and paid back, he added. The commission agreed and said the larger building could also be split up to allow for more businesses to utilize the space. The city also plans to repair the dock on the site so it can be used as well. € The commission voted four to zero, Commissioner Keith Ward was absent, to increase the burial fees charged to out-of-town residents from $1,000 to $2.500 and also require them to be in a certain location in the cemetery. To qualify for the resident fee of $500, one must have been a resident for a minimum of three months. € The commission also voted in favor of increasing its one-day occupational fee from $10 to $25. The next meeting is Jan. 12 at 7 p.m. at city hall. CITY OF ST. MARKS Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 2012 – 7 PMNEWS-JOURNAL CENTER DAVIDSON THEATER DAYTONA STATE COLLEGETHURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2012 7 pmTAMPA THEATRE Call: 1-800-745-3000 or www.tampatheatre.org Call: 1-800-595-4849 or http://redgreen.tix.comMakes A Great Christmas Gift Makes A Great Chri stmas Gift Makes A Great Christmas Gift

PAGE 3

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter discovering the plan for the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council was not in the possession of the Wakulla County Commission or the Clerk of Courts back in September, the commission was urged to adopt a plan immediately. On Dec. 5, that plan was adopted unanimously by the commission. State law requires the county to adopt an ordinance which includes the plan which lays out how the revenues obtained from the bed tax will be used. According to a memo sent out by Finance Director Greg James in September, he said it was clear there was a plan in place throughout the years, but he did not know who was in possession of it. In the ordinance, the plan includes an anticipated revenue of $150,000 for the next year. Included in the use of revenue is 75 percent to promote tourism through partnerships, events and advertising. Twenty percent will be used to create promotional programs and materials that will create awareness and attract visitors to Wakulla County. Three percent will be used to educate the citizens about the potential financial impact of nature and heritage based tourism. The remaining 2 percent will be used to develop short term and long range strategic plans for tourist development. Several people have commented that the plan is too general. Resident Hugh Taylor said the plan is loose and there arent any speci“ c line items. If this was a private plan, I dont believe it would ” y,Ž Taylor said. Commissioner Lynn Artz said she has heard concerns that the plan has a lack of detail and spoke with TDC Director Pam Portwood about it. Portwood told her the TDC plan also includes an annual action plan which lists the speci“ c ways the revenue will be used. Artz added that if those people with concerns looked at the TDC plan and annual action plan together, they would no longer be concerned. Also on the table at the commission meeting was to adopt an ordinance creating the Wakulla County Airport Committee which would administer the development and operation of the airport. Previously there had been some discussion of turning the airport back over to the Tarpine community, however, it was decided the airport remain county owned so it could still be eligible for state and governmental grants. Due to lack of resources and staff to operate the airport, the commission decided to create this committee made up of volunteers to run the airport. The committee will have seven members: one selected by the commission with management experience, one selected by the TDC, one selected by the commission who has “ nancial experience, one by the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership, two selected by the Tarpine Homeowners Association who have at least a sports pilot certificate and one by the commission who may be a county employee. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he didnt want to see the county spending money on the airport or being required to provide matching funds for a grant obtained by the committee. The commission voted unanimously to create the committee. Relating to the airport, the committee also approved the joint participation agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation for runway lighting. This is a $75,000 grant that does not require any matching funds from the county. The county originally requested $1 million for engineering design and construction of the runway, but FDOT only allocated the $75,000. The current lighting is old and needs to be upgraded, according to county staff. In other matters: € The commission approved the hiring of Michael Morgan, of Dade City, as the new “ re chief. Morgan started on Dec. 12 and replaced Interim Chief Louis Lamarche. Morgan will receive a starting salary of $55,000. Morgan started as a volunteer “ re“ ghter and then became a career “ re“ ghter. He has also been a chief of“ cer and instructor. € The commission approved the award of the Ochlockonee Bay Bicycle Trail Phase I to Peavy and Son Construction Co. who were determined to be the most quali“ ed and lowest bidder at $450,853. The project is for a 11.63 mile multi-use trail on County Road 372. € Another bid that was awarded was for the consulting services for the Big Bend Scenic Byway Wayshowing and Interpretation Plan. It was awarded to Applied Sustainability Enterprises LLC in the amount of $28,000 which will be paid for from the Local Agency Program Agreement funds provided for Phase 1 of the project. The next county commission meeting is Jan. 10 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.com By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Historical Society is hoping a revision to a land use plan for a proposed subdivision off Zion Church Road will be accepted by the state. If accepted, the society will have a home for its dream of creating the Heritage Village. The village would be a community of about 12 historic buildings, including two community schools, that have been donated by Wakulla County families. The homes were built in the late 1800s and the society is trying to save them from being destroyed and have a living museum of Wakullas history. The society was trying to “ nd a location for the homes, but had been unsuccessful, until they were approached by developer Ben Boynton. Boynton agreed to donate 40 acres of his property off Zion Church Road, which will be the home of the subdivision Bloxham Plantation. However, Boynton said he would only donate the property if it was also bene“ cial to him. He wanted to get approval to have larger lot sizes, going from one unit per 1 acre to one unit per 2 acres. Boynton said he was looking for sellability. If I cant make money, I wont do it,Ž Boynton said. In doing this, the amount of natural state area surrounding the properties would be reduced from 45 to 20 percent. The natural state requirement is 45 percent. So there was a need for a text amendment to change this policy. Also what would need to be changed is the policy that allows 60 units when water and sewer is not available to now allow 33 units if infrastructure is not available. This text amendment would have to be sent to the state for review and if accepted, would come back before the County Commission. At the Dec. 5 County Commission meeting, the decision was made to proceed with sending the text amendment to the state, under the stipulation that Boyton enter into a written agreement with the historical society prior to coming back before the commission. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he would like to see an easement placed on the natural area so there are some form of restrictions and the county is the ultimate authority. County Attorney Heather Encinosa suggested the commission put the easement with the homeowners association so the maintenance responsibility would fall to them. Moore agreed with adding the natural state easement and said he liked that there was one on Hwy. 98. Moore said Boynton brought forth the idea about donating the land to the society and without the donation, Boynton could have gotten this amendment done faster. This is like a half a million dollar gift,Ž Moore said. He added that this wasnt the only reason for him agreeing with the text plan amendment. Commissioner Lynn Artz said, Thats the only reason Im doing it.Ž Artz had wanted the commission to wait until a new planning director was hired before sending the amendment to the state. However, the other commissioners did not agreed. Boynton urged the commission to move forward. Time is of the essence,Ž Boynton said. He added that there was no reason to delay since it will come back before the commission anyway. The commission agreed to send the amendment to the state. Chairman of the Heritage Village, Murray McLaughlin, said the society would like the opportunity to develop the village. We believe we can create something that will be a tremendous bene“ t,Ž McLaughlin said. It will attract people to the area.Ž The conceptual plan for the park includes an educational center, signs and kiosks, interpretive exhibits, amphitheater and hiking trails.Heritage Village moves a step closerCOUNTY COMMISSIONBoard adopts TDC plan for spending bed tax monies Developer Ben Boynton offers to donate 40 acres to the county, in exchange for larger lot sizes for homes The Tourist Development Council lays out its plan for promoting visitors to Wakulla County If this was a private plan, I dont believe it would ” y, says one critic about he lack of detail in the TDC plan.BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REGULAR BOARD MEETING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2011Board of County Commissioners in and for Wakulla County, Florida met for a regular scheduled Board Meeting on Monday, November 21, 2011 with Chairman Mike Stewart presiding. Present were Commissioners Brock, Artz, Merritt, and Moore. Also, present were County Administrator David Edwards, County Attorney Heather Encinosa and Deputy Clerk Evelyn Evans. Invocation and Pledge of Allegiance led by Commissioner Stewart Swearing-In Ceremony of Chairman and Vice Chairman for 2011/2012 … Judge Jill Walker Judge Walker administered the Oath of Of“ce as Vice Chairman to Commissioner Merritt and administered the Oath of Of“ce as Chairman to Commissioner Brock. Seating arrangements were changed at this time with Chairman Brock and Vice Chairman Merritt taking their perspective places on the Dias. Chairman Brock presided over the meeting from this point APPROVAL OF AGENDA (CD5:12) Commissioner Merritt moved to approve the Agenda with the following changes/modi“cations: Commissioner Stewart … requests to add under Awards and Presentations a brief comment regarding a Volunteer County Attorney … Table item (7) on the Consent Agenda for a future meeting, under Awards and Presentations Our TownŽ presentation tabled to the next meeting Commissioner Artz … requests to add an Announcement and pull item (11) on the Consent Agenda for discussion Under Awards and Presentations, add Operation Santa Second by Commissioner Stewart and the motion carried unanimously, 5/0. PUBLIC HEARING (CD5:13) 1. Request Board Approval to Conduct the Public Hearing and Consider Adopting the Proposed Ordinance Amending the Commissioner Districts of Wakulla County Commissioner Merritt moved to approve to conduct the Public Hearing and adopt the proposed Ordinance adjusting the Boundary Lines for the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners. Second by Commissioner Artz and the motion carried unanimously, 5/0. DISTRICT 1 The boundary lines of District One are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Wakulla Springs Road and the northerly county line of Wakulla County; thence easterly along the county line to its intersection with the Tallahassee-St. Marks Bike Trail (old Tallahassee to St. Marks railroad); thence southerly along the county line and the Tallahassee-St. Marks Bike Trail to a point at which the county line runs easterly; thence leaving the Tallahassee-St. Marks Bike Trail run easterly along the county line to a point at which the county line runs southerly; thence southerly along the county line to its intersection with Coastal Highway; thence westerly along Coastal Highway to its intersection with the northeastern most point of Census Block 3019 within Tract 0102.02; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3019 to its intersection with River Plantation Road; thence northerly along River Plantation Road to its intersection with Hunters Trace; thence northerly along Hunters Trace to its intersection with the eastern boundary of Census Block 3012 within Tract 0102.02; thence run Northerly along the Eastern boundary of said Census Block 3012 to the Northeast corner of said Census Block 3012; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3012 to its intersection with River Plantation Road; thence northerly along River Plantation Road to the intersection with Shadeville Road; thence westerly along Shadeville Road to its intersection with Casseaux Road, thence northerly along Casseaux Road to its intersection with Wakulla Arran Road; thence easterly along Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with the western point of Census Block 1071 within Tract 0102.03; thence northerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 1071 to its intersection with Wakulla Springs Road; thence northwesterly along Wakulla Springs Road to its intersection with Bloxham Cutoff Road; thence northwesterly along Bloxham Cutoff Road to its intersection with old Shell Point Road; thence northeasterly along said Old Shell Point Road to its intersection with Wakulla Springs Road; thence northerly along said Wakulla Springs Road to the intersection with the county line and the place of Beginning. DISTRICT 2 The boundary lines of District Two are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Wakulla Springs Road and the northerly county line of Wakulla County; thence southerly along Wakulla Springs Road to its intersection with Old Shell Point Road; thence southwesterly along Old Shell Point Road to its intersection with Bloxham Cutoff Road; thence southeasterly along Bloxham Cutoff Road to its intersection with Wakulla Springs Road; thence southeasterly along Wakulla Springs Road to its intersection with the northern boundary of Census Block 1071 within Tract 0102.03; thence southerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 1071 to its intersection with Wakulla Arran Road; thence westerly along Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with Casseaux Road; thence southerly along Casseaux Road to its intersection with Shadeville Road; thence westerly along Shadeville Road to its intersection with Cajer Posey Road; thence northerly along Cajer Posey Road to its intersection with Wakulla Arran Road; thence westerly along Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with Birch Court and also being the westerly boundary of Census Block 3078 within Tract 0102.03; thence northwesterly along the west boundary of said Census Block 3078 to its intersection with the southeasterly corner of Census Block 3076 within Tract 0102.03; thence westerly along the southern boundary of said Census Block 3076 to the most western boundary of said Census Block 3076; thence northeasterly along said Census Block 3076 to the southeastern corner of Census Block 3061 within Tract 0102.03; thence northerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 3061 to its intersection with the northern boundary of said Census Block 3061; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3061 and the northern boundary of Census Block 3067 within Tract 0102.03 to its intersection with Government Road; thence northeasterly along said Government Road to its intersection with Forest Road 313; thence northerly, westerly and easterly along Forest Road 313 to its intersection with Bloxham Cutoff Road; thence northwesterly along Bloxham Cutoff Road to its intersection with the northerly county line of Wakulla County; thence easterly along the county line to its intersection with Wakulla Springs Road and the place of Beginning. DISTRICT 3 The boundary lines of District Three are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Crawfordville Highway and Wakulla Arran Road; thence easterly along Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with Cajer Posey Road; thence southerly along Cajer Posey Road to its intersection with Shadeville Road; thence easterly along Shadeville Road to its intersection with Hickorywood Drive; thence southerly along Hickorywood Drive to its intersection with Maplewood Drive; thence easterly along Maplewood Drive to its intersection with Beechwood Drive; thence southerly and easterly along Beechwood Drive to its intersection with Spring Creek Highway; thence southerly along Spring Creek Highway to its intersection with Coastal Highway; thence westerly and southerly along Coastal Highway to its intersection with Casora Drive; thence westerly along Casora Drive to its intersection with Evalee Road; thence northerly along Evalee Road to its intersection with Glover Daddy Road; thence westerly along Glover Daddy Road to its intersection with Casora Drive; thence northerly and westerly along Casora Drive to its intersection with Crawfordville Highway; thence northerly along Crawfordville Highway to place of Beginning. DISTRICT 4 The boundary lines of District Four are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Coastal Highway with the easterly County line of Wakulla County; thence southerly along the County line to the boundary line of the State of Florida in the Gulf of Mexico; thence westerly to a point directly north of the easternmost point of St. James Island (Bald Point); thence westerly to the center point of the U.S. 98 Bridge across Ochlockonee Bay; thence westerly along the County line to the southernmost point of Census Block 3034 within in Tract 0101.00, thence northerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3034 and along Surf Road to the intersection with the western boundary of Census Block 3035 within Tract 0101.00; thence northerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 3035 and along the right of way of Surf Road; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3035 to its intersection with the western boundary of Section 34 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence northerly along the western boundary of said Section 34 to the northwest corner of said Section 34; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Section 34 to the northeast corner of said Section 34, also being the southwest corner of Section 26 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence northerly along the western boundaries of Sections 26, 23 and 14 of Township 5 South Range 2 West to the northwest corner of said Section 14; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Section 14 and also Section 13 in Township 5 South Range 2 West to the northeast corner of said Section 13 and also being the southeast corner of Section 12 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence northerly along the eastern boundary of said Section 12 to the southwest corner of Harts“eld Survey Lot 111; thence easterly along the southern boundary of said Lot 111 to its intersection with the eastern boundary of Census Block 3085 within Tract 0101.00; thence northerly along the meanders of said Census Block 3085 and along a portion of Purify Bay Road to its intersection with the southern boundary of Census Block 2057 within Tract 0102.00; thence easterly, southeasterly and easterly along the southern boundary of said Census Block 2057 to the western boundary of Harts“eld Survey Lot 114; thence northerly along the westerly boundary of Harts“eld Survey Lots 114, 104 and 94 to the intersection with Jack Crum Road; thence easterly and southeasterly along Jack Crum Road to its intersection with Spring Creek Highway; thence northerly along Spring Creek Highway to its intersection with Beechwood Drive; thence westerly and northerly along said Beechwood Drive to its intersection with Maplewood Drive; thence westerly along Maplewood Drive to its intersection with Hickorywood Drive; thence northerly along Hickorywood Drive to its intersection with Shadeville Road; thence easterly along Shadeville Road to its intersection with River Plantation Road; thence southerly along River Plantation Road to the northern boundary of Census Block 3012 within Tract 0102.02; thence easterly along the northern boundary and southerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3012 to its intersection with Hunters Trace; thence southerly along Hunters Trace to its intersection with River Plantation Road; thence southerly along River Plantation Road to its intersection with the northern boundary of Census Block 3019 within Tract 0102.02; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3019 to its intersection with Coastal Highway; thence easterly along Coastal Highway to the Point of Beginning. DISTRICT 5 The boundary lines of District Five are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Bloxham Cutoff Road and the northerly boundary of the county line of Wakulla County; thence southeasterly along said Bloxham Cutoff Road to its intersection with Forest Road 313; thence southerly, easterly and westerly along said Forest Road 313 to its intersection with Government Road; thence southwesterly along Government Road to its intersection with the northern boundary of Census Block 3067 within Tract 0102.03; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3067 and also along the northern boundary of Census Block 3061 within Tract 0102.03 to the intersection with the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3061; thence southerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3061 to the intersection with the northernmost point of Census Block 3076 within Tract 0102.03; thence southwesterly and easterly along the boundary of said Census Block 3076 to the intersection of the western boundary of Census Block 3078 within Tract 0102.03; thence southerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 3078 to its intersection with Birch Court and Wakulla Arran Road; thence northeasterly along said Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with Crawfordville Highway; thence southerly along Crawfordville Highway to its intersection with Casora Drive; thence easterly along Casora Drive to its intersection with Glover Daddy Road; thence northeasterly along Glover Daddy Road to its intersection with Evalee Road; thence southeasterly along Evalee Road to its intersection with Casora Drive; thence southeasterly along Casora Drive to its intersection with Coastal Highway; thence northeasterly along Coastal Highway to its intersection with Spring Creek Highway; thence southerly along Spring Creek Highway to its intersection with Jack Crum Road; thence westerly and northwesterly along Jack Crum Road to its intersection with the northwest corner of Harts“eld Survey Lot 94; thence southeasterly along the western boundary of said Lot 94 and the western boundaries of Harts“eld Survey Lots 104 and 114 to its intersection with Census Block 2057 within Tract 0102.00; thence westerly, northerly and westerly along the southerly boundary of said Census Block 2057 to its intersection with Purify Bay Road and the eastern boundary of Census Block 3085 within Tract 0101.00; thence southerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3085 to a point where it intersects with the southerly boundary of Harts“eld Survey Lot 111; thence westerly along the southern boundary of said Lot 111 to a point on the eastern boundary of Section 12 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence southerly along the eastern boundary of said Section 12 to the southeast corner of said Section 12, and also being the northeast corner of Section 13 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence westerly along the northern boundaries of Sections 13 and 14 in Township 5 South Range 2 West to the northwest corner of said Section 14; thence southerly along the western boundaries of Sections 14, 23 and 26 in Township 5 South Range 2 West to the southwest corner of said Section 26, also being the northeast corner of Section 34 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Section 34 to the northwesterly corner of said Section 34; thence southerly along the western boundary of said Section 34 to its intersection with the northern boundary of Census Block 3035 within Tract 0101.00; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3035 to its intersection with Census Block 3034 within Tract 0101.00 and with the right of way of Surf Road; thence southerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3034 to the most southerly point of said Census Block 3034; thence westerly and northerly along the county line and the meanders of Ochlockonee River to a point at which the county line runs easterly; thence easterly along the county line to its intersection with Bloxham Cutoff Road and the place of Beginning. AWARDS AND PRESENTATIONS Update Regarding Our Town Committee … John Shuff This item was tabled to a future date (CD5:17) Announcement of Wakulla County Swine Show … Todd Carlton The Swine Show is February 25, 2012 and support is requested from the BOCC and citizens (CD5:21) Commissioner Stewart … Mr. George Crump was not present, but Commissioner Stewart wanted to thank him publicly for volunteering his time in raking, mowing and picking up pine straw at Azalea Park (CD5:22) Operation Santa … Bruce Ashley Requesting Community support with November 25, 2011 as the last day to sign a family up for Adoption, please call 926-3526. Donations may be made at the Library, Wakulla County Sheriffs Department on Oak Street or the Sheriffs Of“ce annex on Shadeville Highway Commissioner Artz announced Tuesday, November 22, 2011 is the Community Thanksgiving at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens from 4:00 … 7:00 p.m. These minutes approved by the Board on December 5, 2011, as presented by Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk.DECEMBER 15, 22, 2011

PAGE 4

Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• War Eagles win in triple overtime •Dump truck plunges over Sopchoppy River bridge • School board keeps salaries at $25,416 • RMS students collected food for holiday •Thank you for helping with fundraiser • Coast Guard Auxiliary for Dec. 15 •Wakulla UMC to hold annual Christmas Bazaar thewakullanews.com Follow us onBy SHERIFF DONNIE CRUM Many residents of Wakulla County may not be aware that for the last 20 years the Wakulla County Jail has been producing revenue for the countys General Fund. The General Fund is the county commissions bank accountŽ that provides funding for the board to operate the county. Former Sheriff David Harvey determined that the only way the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office could fund a new jail that was being mandated in the late 1980s was to rent jail bed space to federal agencies. The jail-bed rental revenue has allowed the sheriffs of“ ce to operate the jail and corrections budget but also provide money back to the county commission. The jail-bed rental concept was important years ago when Harvey suggested the funding option, but it has become even more critical as Florida and Wakulla County have been hit by hard economic times. After reviewing the Fiscal Year 2011-2012 budget “ gures it was determined that revenue from rented jail-bed space amounts to more than 13 percent of the total General Revenue account. Additional statistics show the Wakulla County Jail supporting more than 56 percent of the WCSOs total budget. It has never been an easy task to house approximately 115 Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detainees and U.S. Marshals Of“ ce inmates. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Corrections Division must meet additional standards as well as supplying inmates with special medical attention, providing for special dietary needs and even television privileges. The federal jail-bed contract helps our local economy because the funding supports jobs at the WCSO and within the community where local physicians and vendors all bene“ t. Wakulla County has also come out ahead “ nancially as a result of these efforts. ICE officials recently inspected the Wakulla County Jail over a three-day visit and were pleased to continue the contract. During the late summer months, Wakulla County Commissioners were faced with a budget shortfall and revenue from the Jail-Bed Rental or Rainy Day FundŽ helped rescue the county from a state of financial emergency. A transfer of $750,000 from the fund in August 2011 helped the county and the General Fund meet current obligations. The Wakulla County JailBed Revenue has played a large role over the 20 years the contact has been in place. The Jail-Bed Revenue brought in $544,856 more than anticipated for Fiscal Year 2010-11 and allowed for the $750,000 to be transferred from the Jail-Bed Rainy Day Fund to the county this year which funded the Fiscal Year 20092010 de“ cit. It is important to also note that the county auditor stated that the existence of $1,375,795 in the Rainy Day Fund prevented the county from falling into a state of “ nancial emergency status in the most recent audit. Harveys original insight saved the county from a more dire “ nancial condition. Hopefully, Florida and Wakulla Countys economy will begin to strengthen. Wakulla has lost one-third of what the millage rate brought in during the boom year of 2005. Fortunately, the federal jail bed revenue has been a relatively consistent source of revenue and an economic boost. Donnie W. Crum is sheriff of Wakulla County.Jail-bed contract helps economy Editor, The News: At the last BOCC meeting, I addressed one issue, the condition of the Tourist Development Councils Visit WakullaŽ website. However, after thinking it over, I have concluded it is an indication of a major problem with our board. Two commissioners, Mr. Stewart and Mr. Brock, have exhibited in the past and again now, their willingness to accept what they are told by staff without checking for themselves. My initial attempt two weeks earlier was to just call attention to the TDC web page. I was totally unprepared for the reaction and lack of decorum that erupted in that workshop. These two commissioners, the director of TDC and audience were permitted to inject their lack of respect to the podium. At the following BoCC meeting, Dec. 5th, I came prepared with a CD and printed documentation for each commissioner of what is on the TDC web page. Note: The last date a change is made on a page, is automatically entered by Joomla, the public domain platform on which this website is developed. Reviewing the site seven days later, after the debacle, I printed examples of what potential visitors will “ nd by looking at this site and found nothing had been changed since the meeting. It is “ lled with errors, omissions, inaccuracies, incomplete statements and nepotisms. Going to various links reveal many dont work, there is lack of information and the coupons I viewed were out of date. Calling several of the listed phone numbers indicated that they had been changed or disconnected! A picture of the largest ” athead cat“ sh caught in Milton, or an advertisement for Alligator Point does not stimulate interest in this county. There is no link for all the other businesses or the Chamber of Commerce or FWC. I found no mention of hosting the Whooping Cranes in winter, a world class birding event. Nor did I “ nd Sopchoppy Opry and the Worm Gruntin Festival mentioned, both events rapidly becoming a national interest. Commissioners Stewart and Brock, you have had your chance; it is time to leave before you infect other commissioners with your inability to accept the truth. It is not professional for Ms. Portwood to report to the BOCC that the tourist information for our county is current and complete when it is not. Wakulla County Citizen, Charles Hickman CrawfordvilleTDCs website doesnt promote WakullaREADERS WRITE:Who approved sheri s o ce sign?Editor, The News: I saw the photo, New sign at sheriffs of“ ceŽ in last weeks paper. I remembered the meeting and agenda item and was under the impression that the Board of County Commissioners voted for a plaque on the sheriffs of“ ce administration building not some big old ugly wall decoration. I wanted to make sure and I watched the tape of the meeting. It is on YouTube. The commission did vote for a plaque, just like the one on the BOCC administration building. I went to the meeting video online and there it was … after much discussion it was decided to put a plaque on the building that did not cost much. Instead of a plaque, though, was this wall lettering at the entrance to the complex. I asked my husband to “ nd out if he could get the cost of doing the wall. Imagine my surprise when I found out it cost $1,447.26 and that was just for the lettering, not counting labor taking off the old and putting on the new. I thought the commission made the right decision at the time, but their vote was ignored. If the sheriffs department wanted the wall, why didnt they say so at the meeting? The tape shows them saying a plaque was OK. And heres the item from the minutes with the vote: COMMISSIONER AGENDA ITEMS 12. COMMISSIONER MOORE (CD6:36) a. Request Board Approval to Name the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Building as the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Center Commissioner Moore moved to approve to name the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Building as the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Center. The name to be on a plaque and mounted on the Building. Second by Commissioner Brock with Commissioners Stewart, Brock, Merritt and Moore in favor, Commissioner Artz opposed, and the motion carried, 4/1. (The plaque to be similar to the one on the County Commission Complex honoring Anita Townsend) Why were the wishes of the commission ignored? Because its better to ask for forgiveness than permission? The commission voted because it was a public building, so who ignored them and gave the go ahead? More importantly, why was their vote ignored? I did my homework and have documented everything. I guess the bigger question is the law. Is it against the law to ignore a vote of the county commission? And, if it is, who broke it, the person ordering the letters or someone higher up? And why? Mary Cortese CrawfordvilleA Christmas present we didnt wantEditor, The News: This was going to be about Christmas. In a way it is, because we almost received a present we really wouldnt want. It was the hold my beer and watch thisŽ moment for Commissioner Alan Brock and the Chamber of Commerce on Dec. 5th, when they tried to get alcohol permitted in public buildings and parks. Many believe it was just a way to get drinking allowed at the old courthouse,Ž which is a county building, but that would never ” y. So for one action, disguised as a special eventsŽ ordinance, they wasted a lot of the attorneys time and our money. For leading this effort, Chairman Brock, given the season, should be spanked and coal put in his stocking! And the other commissioners should be thanked for stopping the half-baked proposal that was offered. At this meeting Commissioner Brock, in concert with the chamber, tried to slip this thing through. This whole thing subverted normal processes and was hidden from the public. And while special eventsŽ was the topic, the real aim was drinking at the old courthouse, with special exemptions,Ž appeals and co-sponsorships,Ž which means if youre connected, you dont have to pay. Taxpayers pay and were liable. No one but those in favor of this proposal was solicited. The churches were ignored. Teachers were ignored. Citizens concerned with taxpayer liability were ignored. Heck, the sheriffs department was ignored! All the stakeholdersŽ contacted were only those in favor. Make no mistake, there was no concern for the public stake.Ž Over time, this thing, besides changing the whole culture of Wakulla County, would come back to haunt us. Just as barrel racingŽ in Gretna is not about barrels or racing, but about casino gambling, the special eventsŽ item pushed on this agenda was about alcohol, the word used more than 100 times in the proposal. More simply, it was about the use of alcohol in our publicly-owned old courthouse which the chamber rents for $1 per year, making the liability doubly dangerous. Something happens, we pay. Dr. Martin Luther King said the arc of history always bends towards justice but I guess he never made it to Wakulla County, where history has bent towards inequity and special privilege, and where selective enforcement has been the rule. And why are Chairman Brock and the chamber pushing this anyway? This policy puts them in direct competition with businesses they are supposed to be supporting … all those private businesses that could use a good wedding reception or party to help their business. So the next time youre thinking wheres the jobs?Ž … think Chairman Brock. Wanna drink? Drink at home, all you want. Not on public property where taxpayers have to pick up the tab if anything happens. The chamber wangled the old courthouse for $1 a year that the taxpayers already subsidize and now are trying to present the falsehood that beer and wine are somehow differentŽ from that demon, hard likkerŽ and privatize their gains and subsidize their losses with taxpayer money. So the next time you hear about the War on ChristmasŽ remember this moment in time and this Christmas season, when Commissioner Brock and the chamber … the folks who are bringing you higher taxes disguised as fees,Ž tried to bring you, once again, a Christmas gift of expanded and unfunded liability, special treatment and selective entitlement and enforcement. I dont want to accuse them of the total and systematic destruction of Wakulla culture and life here, just the good parts. Their Christmas gift to us will be the never-ending attempt at drinking in public buildings and parks. So make your list. And check it often. This naughtiness will never end. Hugh Taylor Crawfordville Family appreciates prayers after lossEditor, The News: The Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee hosted the 2011 WDEC Gala at Wakulla Springs Lodge on Saturday, Dec. 10. Much time, effort and planning helped us to create an inspirational evening. Our program featured Democratic leaders from near and far who alternately brought us to tears, made us laugh, left us inspired and prepared to elect Democrats in 2012. Thank you to our featured program speakers including Tallahassee City Commissioner Andrew Gillum, Representative Scott Randolph and Susannah Randolph, and Wisconsin State Senator Jessica King. The support of our business community and elected of“ cials contributed to the success of this event. Special thanks are expressed to Commissioner Alan Brock, Commissioner Randy Merritt, Superintendent David Miller, Mayor Colleen Skipper, Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman, Clerk of Court Brent Thurmond, Representative Leonard Bembry and Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells. Numerous silent auction donors gave generously to support the Gala. Thank you to Robbie Baker, Alan Brock, Verna Brock, Glen Campbell, Audrey Franklin, Joan Hendrix, Ken Hendrix, Dan Hinchee, Jane Jones, Tony Livingston, Clay Lovell, Jo Ann Palmer, Jane Parker, Al Pasini, Stefan Pedlar, Rachel Pienta, Beverly Roberts, David Roddenberry, Jack Rudloe and Diane Wilson. The next meeting of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee is at 7 p.m. on Jan. 12, at the Wakulla County Public Library. We invite you to join us … we will be making plans for 2012 and each meeting, on second Thursdays in 2012, will feature elected of“ cials and candidates. Come at 6:30 p.m. to enjoy cookies and fellowship with other Wakulla Democrats. For more information, please visit us on Facebook or visit our website at www. wakullademocrats.org. Thank you. The 2011 WDEC Gala Committee Editor, The News: Thank you to everyone for the encouraging words, prayers, food and ” owers during our recent bereavement. We will always miss our mother, but your kindnesses helped ease the pain of her passing. A special thanks to Spirit Life Church and the Southern Baptist Church in Sopchoppy. Family of Madelyn J. Crowson anks for support of Democratic Gala

PAGE 5

Continued from Page 1A Miller asked for support for his usual requests: sparsity funding for schools and support for regional education consortia, as well as support for district transportation programs. He also urged the legislature to reauthorize allowing school boards to levy local option taxes. The .25-mill levy that the Wakulla School Board passed, and local voters approved, sunsets this year and cannot be levied again. Formerly, school boards could pass a local-option tax levy of up to 2 mills, but the legislature has whittled away at that. The bulk of the millage approved by the Wakulla School Board now is required local effort taxes, required to be passed to get state education dollars, and some to pay off outstanding bond debt. Miller noted that nearly 80 percent of the money to operate Wakullas schools comes from the state, not local taxes. Legislators appeared sympathetic to Millers comments. Before being elected senator, Montford retired as Leon Countys Superintendent of Schools and was a principal for years. Rep. Coley still lists her occupation on her state website as a teacher, and is employed by Chipola Junior College in Marianna. COMMISSIONER ALAN BROCK County Commission Chairman Alan Brock noted that the countys government also relies on state funds to operate, and asked that there be no cuts in that money. This years budget includes $4.5 million in state funding in the countys general fund. In Wakulla County, where 1 mill equals $1 million, it would mean commissioners would have to levy more than 4.37 mills to try to replace that money … which they couldnt do, he said, because it would put them above the 10 mill cap. Brock urged the local delegation to support state workers, noting that a large number of Wakulla residents are employed by the state and that the local economy depends on them. He also asked for continued support for state programs for roads and other infrastructure. Brock introduced the countys new administrator David Edwards, and said that staff members including Tim Barden and Jessica Welch will be working closely with legislators this year. Other commissioners who attended the meeting were Mike Stewart and Jerry Moore. They did not speak. Besides Brock and Miller, the only other elected official who spoke at the meeting was Sopchoppys vice-mayor, Richard Harden, who told of the citys goal of making Sochoppy a destination, and asked for any assistance identifying grants that could be used for improving the small community. FISHERMEN As he has for years, commercial “ sherman Richard Van Munster urged legislators to do something to help “ shermen get a legal net. Since the constitutional amendment that limited net “ shing … the so-called net ban … passed in 1994, local “ shermen have been “ ghting for a legal mullet net. Much of the battle has been fought in the courts and has focused on what constitutes a gill net. As it now stands, the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has rules that limit seine nets to a maximum net size of two inches stretched. Fishermen contend, and have a pending lawsuit in circuit court arguing, that those small-mesh nets violate the intent of the net limitation because the gear catches only juvenile mullet before they have had a chance to spawn. Van Munster asked legislators to do something to curtail the power of the FWC, which he charged is answerable to no one. He asked the lawmakers to take away the FWCs budget in order to force them to see reason. Ronald Fred Crum, the Panacea businessman who operates Crums Mini-Mall and is president of Wakulla Fishermens Association and has been the driving force behind years of the “ shing battles, didnt talk about net “ shing … instead he bemoaned the impact of the state and federal closure of the gag grouper season. Its not a “ shing issue,Ž Crum told lawmakers. Its an economic issue.Ž He complained that Gulf coast communities, already strained by the downturn in the economy and then compounded by last years BP oil spill, now face the challenge of the grouper season being closed … and that its keeping tourists away. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 5A PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENWakullas legislative delegation was in Crawfordville last week: Rep. Leonard Bembry, D-Greenville, Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, and Rep. Marti Coley, R-Marianna.Legislative delegation visits Wakulla Ronald Fred Crum makes a point about grouper rules. Rep. Marti Coley responds to a question.Democrats hold a gala at Wakulla SpringsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netMore than a hundred people turned out for a fundraising reception for the local Democratic Party on Saturday, Dec. 10, at Wakulla Springs Lodge. Wisconsin State Sen. Jessica King told the audience how she was elected to of“ ce and her vigorous opposition to the policies of Wisconsins Republican Governor Scott Walker. Gov. Walker and Wisconsin drew national attention with proposals to do away with collective bargaining rights of state employees there. King ran for the state Senate seat held by a Republican supporter of Walkers. For all the politics of the evening, Kings personal story of overcoming obstacles to reach elected of“ ce was heart-wrenching. At 4 years old, growing up in Oshkosh, Wis., she was told by a policeman that her father was sick and she needed to live with her mom. When she was 15, her mother also became ill and she had to live with a foster family. One week of the month, we would eat good,Ž she said. The last week, not so sure.Ž She would come home at age 17 to perhaps “ nd the electricity off. She went to work in a factory and was later accepted into the University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh. She has since been elected to the Oshkosh City Council, and is currently a lawyer. In her life, King credits those state employees who helped her at each of the transitional moments of her life: policemen, social workers, teachers. I wouldnt be where I am without them,Ž she said. Those are precisely the people who would be affected by the Wisconsin effort to stop collective bargaining, she said. She closed her speech by saying what Wisconsin Democrats were saying to their governor: Wisconsin is open for business, but our values are not for sale.Ž It drew a standing ovation from the crowd. Besides a dinner at the lodge, the event featured a silent auction with numerous items for sale. Commission Chairman Alan Brock acted as Master of Ceremonies for the evening. Other local elected of“ cials at the gala included Superintendent of Schools David Miller, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah and Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper. Guests included Tallahassee City Commissioner Andrew Gillum and state Rep. Scott Randolph of Orlando and former Rep. Curtis Richardson. Wisconsin State Sen. Jessica King gave the keynote speech, telling her emotional story of overcoming obstacles.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENDemocratic women Verna Brock, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, Shirley Howard and Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper at the gala. Notice of Change in Policy of White Church Cemetery a/k/a Woodville CemeteryFor everyone who has Reserved plots in White Church Cemetery or who plans to be buried in White Church Cemetery, notice is provided that:1. All plots that are RESERVED must be paid for by February 29, 2012, or the reservation will become void. Plots may be nanced for a six-month period and they will stay reserved in your name during the nancing period as long as payments are made on time. 2. Reservations that people have based on oral family history will become void on March 1, 2012, unless proof is provided of some agreement or transaction with the Church or a previous cemetery manager showing that the plots were given to the family. Contact our Cemetery Manager to provide her the proof, or to show her which plots in your RESERVED section you are turning back in and which ones you want to purchase. 3. Plot price will go up on January 1, 2013. 4. People who have PAID plots are requested to provide the Cemetery Manager with the name of the person to be buried in each plot. This is for your protection so no mixups occur in large families. 5. We have contracted with a professional Cemetery Manager to manage all aspects of the cemetery operations and to assure compliance with the cemetery rules. Her name is Angela Cassidy, and her telephone number is 694-8774. E-mail: Ancestor_Lady@ yahoo.com E-mail her for a copy of the REVISED Cemetery Rules effective November 2011. White Church Cemetery is a private cemetery and you must be a member in good standing of the Church or have family buried in the cemetery to be eligible to be buried there. Make checks for plots or donations for cemetery maintenance to White Church Cemetery, and mail to P. O. Box 112, Woodville, FL 32362. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PA RTN ER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUNCH PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS • Interior Remodeling • Bathroom • Kitchens • Doors • Floors30 Years Experience Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827 (850) 745–8771 • Cell (850) 570–1968

PAGE 6

Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Brenda Joyce Baggett Madelyn Joyce Crowson Joan E. Harrison Katie WhetstoneCoastal Church NewsWakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Madelyn J. CrowsonMadelyn Joyce Crowson, 86, died on Thursday, Dec. 8, at Tallahassee Memorial Regional Medical Center. She was a lifelong resident of Sopchoppy and was a retired bookkeeper and secretary at Wakulla High School. She was a founder and member of Spirit Life Church in Sopchoppy, formerly known as Ochlockonee Christian Center. Services will be held at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist on Sunday, Dec. 11 at 2 p.m. Burial will follow at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. Viewing will be held Saturday, Dec. 10 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Survivors include two sons, Roger Dale Crowson (Nancy) and Robert Walker Crowson (Linda) both of Sopchoppy; “ ve daughters, Belinda Marlene McElroy (Mitch) of Sopchoppy, Marcia Ray Bishop of Florida City, and Brenda Joy Wilson, Wanda Sue Teat (Eric) and Beverly Ann Parish (Dan) all of Apalachicola; four sisters, Mildred Willis of Sopchoppy, Mahaley Ruth Smith of Panacea, Janelle Crawford of Pensacola and Donna Dees of Tampa; one brother, Bobby Sanders of Pelham, Ga.; 16 grandchildren and 28 great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Oscar W. Crowson; her parents, Nathaniel Walker and Gladys Sanders; two sisters, Marcia Inez Vause and Marjorie Gray; a brother, Nathaniel Walker Sanders Jr.; and a grandson, Justin Wilson. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333).Joan E. HarrisonJoan E. Harrison, 80, passed away Saturday, Dec. 10, in Tallahassee. She had been in this area 11 years, coming from Lakeland. She was a Catholic. She loved baking and square dancing. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Visitation will be Thursday, Dec. 15, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville. A mass will be held Friday, Dec. 15, at 11 a.m. at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church in Crawfordville. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis TN 38105-1942. She is survived by her husband of 45 years, Urban E. Harrison of Crawfordville; two daughters, Paulette McElroy of Havana and Terri Volsch (Donald) of Crawfordville; three grandchildren, Matthew McElroy, Daniel McElroy (Jana) and Donnie Volsch; and great-grandchild, Kaylee McElroy. She was predeceased by two sisters and one brother. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) is in charge of arrangements. Brenda J. BaggettBrenda Joyce Baggett, 64, of Crawfordville, died Dec. 8, at Shands University of Florida Hospital in Gainesville. Survivors include two sons, Kevin Baggett of Graceville and Chris Baggett of Crawfordville; a daughter, Deanna Revell of Crawfordville; brothers, Bobby Moran of Marianna and Jim Moran of Tallahassee; sisters, Sherry Forehand (Don) of Tallahassee and Mary Ann Ham of Niceville; and eight grandchildren. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 17, at Maddox Chapel in Gainesville. Interment will follow at Riverside Cemetery with James and Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www. jamesandsikesfuneralhome.com. Katie WhetstoneKatie Whetstone, 84, passed away Tuesday, Dec. 13. She was born in Racepond, Ga., to Fred Tucker and Nancy (Grif“ n) Tucker but they moved to Florida shortly afterwards. After her mom passed away at the age of 9 she moved to Panacea with her sister Bessie who raised her with her daughters, Dorothy, Joy, Shirl and Nancy. After having a heart attack she stayed with her daughter in Port Charlotte but her beloved Panacea was always home and she returned as often as she could. In her early years, she was a nurses aide at W.T. Edwards Tuberculosis Hospital and Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Then she ran three restaurants in Panacea at different times in her life: the Blue Willow Lodge, Katies Coastal Restaurant and the B&K that she and her sisters Bessie and Bertha operated together. She was a longtime member of the First Baptist Church of Panacea and also a member of the Visually Impaired Persons in Port Charlotte. She will be greatly missed by her son Danny (Darleen) Whetstone; her daughter, Kathy (Wayne) Richardson; her “ ve grandchildren who were the joy of her life, Danny (Marilyn) Whetstone, Andy (Kim) Richardson, Daynna (Bobby) Mitchell, Danae (Steven) Ollila and David Whetstone; 18 greatgrandchildren; her sisters, Dorothy Stephens, Shirley Brown and Nancy Barwick; and many beloved nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband of 43 years, Woodrow Whetstone. She uniquely loved each of her sisters and brothers, Bessie Revell, Bertha Reynolds, Rosa Lee Crum, Grace Hall, Joy Carraway, Theodore Tucker, Jack Tucker, Cicero Tucker, Joe King and Melton Tucker. She was predeceased by nephews, Buddy Hall, Glenwood Crum and Derrick Barwick; and by her great niece, Debbie Armstrong. She loved life, loved people and always wanted to help those in need. She would always say when a person is in need try to help them. Youll never go wrong caring and sharing. Visitation will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Friday, Dec. 16 at Panacea First Baptist Church. A memorial service to celebrate her life will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 17 also at Panacea First Baptist Church. Her son, Danny Whetstone, Pastor David Carraway and grandson, David Whetstone will of“ ciate. Burial will follow at Panacea Cemetery. Bevis Funeral Home/Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of the arrangements. Christmas is supposed to be a joyous time, but each year some people … the grieving, the lonely, the hopeless … dread the approach of the holiday season. They have no heart for the cheer and the bustle, the anticipation and the excitement. Crawfordville United Methodist Church will offer a time of remembrance and recognition of those struggles as well as a message of comfort and hope for the future during a Service of Hope for the Holidays on Friday, Dec. 16 at 7 pm. The service is open to anyone in the community who knows this Christmas will be a hard one because of a death in the family, a broken relationship, “ nancial struggles or other life challenges. A time for refreshments and fellowship will follow the service. If you or someone you know is not feeling the joy of this season, we encourage you to join us. Contact the church at 926-7209 for more informa-tion.Service offers hope for the holidays Panacea Full Gospel Assembly 12 Taylor Street, Panacea ParkCOME CELEBRATEWITH U STHEBIRTHOF JESUS GOSPEL SIN GSATURDAY, DEC 17 •7 P.M. Special Singing by Lewis & L ewis L ocal singing and fellowship EVERYONEISI NVITED

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunity Tree of Remembrance 2011 Big Bend Hospice2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.org Please visit the Wakulla County Trees located in Crawfordville: Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial BankDedicate a bell, bow, or angel in honor or memory of someone you love! Barrett graduates from FlaglerOn Dec. 11, Allison Barrett graduated magna cum laude from Flagler College with a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting. She has been an employee with Wakulla Bank, now Centennial Bank, for the past six years and recently supervisor at the branch in St. Marks. Husband, Derrick, works for General Dynamics at St. Marks Powder and daughter, Taylor, is in third grade. She “ nished her Associates degree at Tallahassee Community College two years ago at night school and then transferred to Flagler. She is the daughter of Ralph and Debby Brooks of Crawfordville, and George Fasthoff and Lisa Vince of Panacea and Tallahassee. The Barrett familyWakulla County is well represented at fairBy SHERRI KRAEFTWakulla County 4-H AgentFor those of us at the Extension Of“ ce lucky enough to be involved in the planning and production side of the North Florida Fair, this year was particularly exciting. Each year, we are responsible for installing two booths at the fair that highlight our county and feature our Farm Bureau Farm Family of the Year. Our theme this year was centered on honeybees and we were proud to represent this thriving industry here in Wakulla County. This year, the 4-H booth displayed items that represent us from Seas to BeesŽ and included representations from our community clubs, as well as our educational outreach in honeybee education through a grant with Florida Ag in the Classroom. We had 105 items entered into the fair from 4-H participants including those from “ ve different clubs. There were a total of 24 blue ribbons, 39 red ribbons, 6 white ribbons and 36 Cloverbuds participating this year. For the Wakulla County booth, we displayed a hydroponics unit, a video on education and what it means in Wakulla County, as well as items and pictures related to the beekeeping industry on loan from our Farm Family of the Year and others. Each year, both booths are designed and constructed in a collaboration between agents, staff and volunteers and this year, the Extension Of“ ce would like to acknowledge the help that we received from Marc Bowerman and his TV Production students and Susan Solburg and her stagecraft students at Wakulla High School. Jo Ann Palmer, Woody Palmer, Allison Green, Palmetto Expeditions, as well as the Tourist Development Council contributed to the booth as well. Our thanks goes out to all of these volunteers for their time and help putting this years booth together. For further information about any Wakulla County Extension program or activity, please contact the of“ ce at 926-3931 or Sherri Kraeft atsjkraeft@u” .edu. Wakulla County 4-H booth at the North Florida Fair represented Seas to Bees.ŽChristmas recital is scheduled for Dec. 16 and 17The students of Michelle Snow School of Music will perform their Christmas recital on Friday, Dec. 16 and Saturday, Dec. 17 at Christ Church Anglican on Coastal Highway 98 in Medart. The Friday performance is at 7 p.m. and on Saturday at 11 a.m. The students will be playing a variety of musical styles and instruments. The recital will feature performances by Danyelle Dias, Morgan Terry, Shannon Egler, Joey Rickards, Summer Padgett, Landon Turner, Jason Paris, Steven Kinsey, Zoie Hill, Makenzie Thompson, Yese Reyes, Jacob Rardin, Jonah and Marina Harvey, Oliver Robinson, Emily May, Erin Petrucelli, Jack and Maxwell Mispel, Desmond Maxwell, Ryan Crawford, Allison Gordon, Rebecca and Riley Blankenship, Loranda Hutton, Wesley Kyle, Hunter Myers, Tanner Pafford, Joy Li, Jason Westmark, Precision Rudd, Randi Revell, Derisha Joney, Sydney Colvin, Chloe Choquette and Abbott Gauger. The recital is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the performance. For more information, call 926-7627.Wilton Booth is attending West Hill CollegeWilton Booth Jr. started this past semester at West Hill College in California. He is majoring in business. He plays forward for the basketball team. He is a 2009 graduate of Wakulla High School. He is the son of Victoria and Wilton Booth of Sopchoppy. dress storecustom jewelry • alterations upholstery • furniture re nishing850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE)“come see our new holiday arrivals” The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree 850745-85452615 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite 101 WINN-DIXIE PLAZA PIG ROASTFriday, Dec. 16, 5-9PM.Come enjoy a delicious roast with sides and bread included$800for just per personWe have something for every appetite. Come try our large variety of Latin and American cuisine, large portions, low prices. PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Holiday fun at WinterFEST!Jacksonvilles annual Winter on the Water celebration is back. New for this year, you wont want to miss WinterFEST at Adventure Landing with ice-skating, alpine slides and nightly snowfalls! For all of the details, a complete list of holiday events and for special vacation packages, visit winteronthewater.com! Find exclusive vacation package deals here. Scan with your QR reader LAST CHANC E TOSA V EIN 2011 !9 MONTHS$20.11 with your friends and neighbors about local news & events! is your source for Local News, Sports, Local Events, Government News, Community News, School News, Church News and moreƒ Talk Turkey FOR Talk Turkey! 877-401-6408 $ 20.11 r r s TM in cou nty new s ubscripti ons on ly

PAGE 8

For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, autographed books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, and ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking Stuffers Too! Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium222 Clark Dr. Panacea Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm Sat. 10am 4pm Sun. 12pm 4pm(850) 984-5297www.gulfspecimen.org Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Over 3000 rods & reels in stock *Rec eive 10% back on every purchase of $10 or m ore added to a Crum’s Gi ft Card *exc lud es purc has es of shi ng l icen se, lot tery gas di esel, bee r and toba cco products. WITHTHE CRUM’S GIFT CARDYOUCANCONTINUE TOADDYOURDISCOUNTSTOITANDUSEITWHENEVERYOUWANT... ONWHATEVERYOUWANT!NOEXPIRATIONDATEONTHECARD.WEWILLGIVETHEDISCOUNTBEGINNING11-25-11 TIL 12-25-11. Mens CALCUTTA Neoprene Stocking Foot/Chest Waders Dra wings f or Prizesto be held weekl yƒ sto p i n and r egis ter.(NO PURCHASE NECESS ARY) GIFT CARD GIFT CARD850-98 4-55011321 Coas tal Hwy Panac ea, F lorida 850-984-5501 1321 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, Florida full line of & $7995Sale Reg. 89.99 Gift Ideas Reminiscent of WAKULLA SPRINGS

PAGE 9

(850)926-9100theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com635WakullaArranRoad Crawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live PS3 | Wii | Wi-fi facebook.com/GamerZParadise WESELLGAMESFOR LESSNEW& USED P etStop Pet Stopr all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pet Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC L P A ALL Y P N. CommunityFINANCE, LLC Wide Selection of Puppies Special Orders AvailableA A F Stocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 9A Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce SALESTHROUGHWEBSITE and atUPCOMINGLOCAL FESTIVALS:Crawfordville Womans Club Dec. 9 & 10 Mission San Luis Winter Festival Dec. 17850926-6115 ( 850 ) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEK FROM 9 A.M. 6:30 P.M.8056 WAKULLA SPRING SROADASHLEYFEEDSTORE Practical Chr istmas g ift idea s i n s tor e. Gift Ce rti ca tes !We thank our loyal customers for their business, wish you all a Merry Christmas and look forward to continuing to serve you in 2012. New& NO CONTRACT CELLULAR SERVICE AS LOW AS $35 MO.Starting at $12999ANDROID PHONES 850212-0392 5113 Capital Circle SW Unit 4 In between Crawfordville Hwy. and Woodville Hwy. G OLD B UYERS OF CRAWFORDVILLE2106CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. NEAR WAL-MART850-566-7348 850-566-7344*Not valid with any other offers or prior purchases. Expires: Dec. 31, 2011Receive an additionalGold and Silver Jewelry! with this coupon*for your Hair By Doreen 850933-67463278 Crawfordv i lle Hwy., Crawfordv i lle Now at EVOLU T ION DaySpa 20%discounton all services provided by Doreen.Call for an appointment LIGHTHOUSELADYCLEANINGSERVICESINC.COMPREHENSIVE JANITORIAL SERVICESDeedee Pritchard OWNER 30 Year Experience 509-0623 Trained-Screened Employees LICENSED-INSURED WORKERS COMP BONDEDOFF“rst time cleaning $20 It’s A POSH Christmas at Large Variety of Gift Ideas for you and your loved ones! Open 10AM-5PM... or call for a later appointment. December 16 and 17!926-3338 10 Vendors Featuringƒ Antiques, Uniques, Collectibles, Jewelry, and Custom Made Items. Mon.Fri. 10-6 • Sat. 10-5 • 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B 850 926-6241 TreatYOURSELF! www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service TheWakulla news GIVE THE GIFT THAT LASTS ALL YEAR IN PRINT AND ONLINE OR ONLINE ONLY877-401-6408 A History of the St. Marks Lighthouse and the Gresham Family, by Myrna Roberts K anekkebergThe author, a member of the Gresham family, relates their lifes history as well as the history of the lighthouse and surrounding area s. The book is available at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge gift shop, The Wakulla County Historical Society, Posh Gifts and Organics, Bo Lynns Store and Shell Island Fish Camp. For more information on how to obtain this book, call (850) 5 56-2362. Call me & let me give your TradeWindsRemodeling and Decorative Services• Stage Homes For Quick Sale • Increase Your Rental Income • No Jobs Too Small • Work Within Your Budget • Great Gift For Anniversary, Christmas, Birthdays or Man Caves • Individual Rooms or Entire Homes • Simple to Complex • Beach Homes, Rentals • Fishing Camps, Mobile Homes WeCanDoAnything! Wha t a Gr eat Chri stm as Pre sent Complete Consultation With OwnerPamela Cannon404.387.7288hopes & dreamslife!

PAGE 10

GO EAGLES! Were Proud of You!my100bank.com € 850-926-7111A Home Bank Shares CompanyMember FDIC Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICERS OF WAKULLA COUNTY F r a n c e s C a s e y L o w e P A Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.850-926-8245 – LETS ROLL WAR EAGLES – 850-926-8777 CONGRATULATIONS! WE ARE BEHIND YOU ALL THE WAY! 850-926-3300 € www.3youtdoorequipment.com850-544-0238 € www.3yranch.com GOOD LUCK WAR EAGLES! Skip, Trey, Brian, & Trip Young GOOD LUCK BOYS! The Dazzles Staff850-926-6772Clerk of Courts BRENT THURMOND County Judge JILL WALKER Supervisor of Elections BUDDY WELLS Sheriff DONNIE CRUM Superintendent of Schools DAVID MILLER Property Appraiser DONNIE SPARKMAN Tax Collector CHERYLL OLAH WE’RE PROUD OF YOU !GO, WAKULLA WAR EAGLES! 1 Dillon Norman, 2 Sheldon Johnson, 3 Garrett Wheeler, 4 Quanzee Davis, 5 Deonte Hutchinson, 6 Luke Taylor, 7 Tamarick Holmes, 8 Dalton Norman, 9 Caleb Stephens, 10 Evan Mccoy, 11 Demetrius Lindsey, 12 Brandon Nichols, 13 Conner Smith, 14 James Douin, 15 Dequon Simmons, 17 Jacob Walker, 18 Damonta Morris, 20 Mikal Cromartie, 21 Marshane Godbolt, 22 Ryan Hender son, 23 Kevin James, 24 Clarence Morrison, 25 Lyntonio Bowdry, 26 Joshua Hawkins, 28 Willie Thomas, 34 Fredrick Cummings, 42 Jordan Asbell, 44 John Brown, 50 Brandon Busby, 52 Robert Dulgar, 53 Cole Woofter, 55 David Buckridge, 57 John Cole, 58 Nicholas Walker, 59 Michael Sarvis,61 Caleb Brown, 66 Calvin Roberts, 69 Tyrell Garmon, 70 Jonathan Chunn, 72 Christopher Grif“ n, 75 Justin Fisher, 76 Zachery Harrell, 77 Russell Carter-Shields Wakulla Inn & Suites GO WAR EAGLES! 850926-3737www.WakullaInnHotel.com

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 11A sports news and team viewsSportsContinued from Page 1A He also praised his defense. After giving up a score on Pascos opening drive, they settled down and, he said, They played very, very well in the “ rst half.Ž They played well in the second half as well, he said. Klees said he had heard some questions about the decision to continue the bend, dont break-style of defense rather than trying to pressure Pasco when they were deep in their own territory. His concern, he said, was not wanting to give up the big play. He didnt expect, he said, Pasco to mount a long drive by dinkin and dunkinŽ with short passes to move up the “ eld. There were some mishaps in scoring with the War Eagles as well: kicker Conner Smith, who had been so reliable coming in to the game, missed two extra points. But he certainly redeemed himself with a 43-yard long “ eld goal that just went over the crossbar and inside the right upright. He also had some great punts, including one that rolled out of bounds at the Pasco 2 to pin them deep in their own territory in the fourth quarter. He also made the two extra points in overtime. It was a weird night for him,Ž Klees said of his kicker. It was just emotionally rough. Cause he had some great plays too.Ž The War Eagles also went for a two-point conversion after their second touchdown, but referees ruled the pass was caught by Antonio Bowdrie out-of-bounds. GAME RECAP Pascos “ rst score came on their opening drive when a Pirate receiver got behind Wakullas defensive backs and went in for a score to go up 7-0. Wakulla couldnt move the ball on their next series and punted, but the Pirate punt receiver fumbled and the War Eagles recovered near mid“ eld. After a 20yard Godbolt run, the War Eagles scored on the next play when Evan McCoy tore off a 21-yard scamper to the end zone. The extra point was no good, and the score was 7-6 with 1:21 remaining in the “ rst period. In the second quarter, War Eagle quarterback Caleb Stephens threw a long bomb down the right sideline and Godbolt lept up and caught the ball over the Pirate defender and raced in for the score. The two-point try was no good, but the War Eagles were leading 12-7. Later in the second half, the War Eagles pushed the ball close enough to try a 48-yard long field goal. Smiths kick fell short, but the Pirates were called on a roughing the kicker penalty and the ball moved five yards closer. On the next try, the ball fell just inside the crossbar for the War Eagles to go up 15-7 with 1:45 remaining in the half. On Pascos next offensive series, defensive back Antonio Bowdrie sniffed out a pass and jumped the route, intercepting it and returning it for a touchdown. The extra point was missed, but Wakulla was on top, 21-7, at halftime. In the third period, a punt was fumbled by the War Eagles Deonte Hutchinson and recovered by Pasco deep in Wakulla territory. That bullet was dodged, though, as the defense held and a “ eld goal attempt by the Pirates was well short. But with 1:28 left in the third, Pasco started its comeback when a seam pass over the middle turned into a 50yard touchdown run. In the fourth quarter, Smith dropped a perfect punt that rolled out of bounds at Pascos 2, seeming to pin them deep. But the Pirates showed patience, and took short passes right down the “ eld for a score to tie it at 21 all. In overtime, the ball is placed at the 10 yard line and the offense given four chances to score. Then the other team is given the same opportunity. In the first overtime, Pasco hit a seam pass for a quick score and got the extra point to go up 28-21. On Wakullas try, they seemed to be digging a hole, called for a holding penalty that backed them up to the 16 … but Godbolt scored again. Klees decided to go for 2 at that point and the win. He said afterwards that he believed Godbolt could score on the speed sweep and had called that play … but of“ cials whistled the play dead before the snap for a false start on Wakulla. Some Pasco players apparently didnt see the ” ags and stormed the field to celebrate believing they had won the game … including one Pirate player who drove a cheer ” ag into the ground at mid“ eld. After the field was cleared by officials, and with Wakulla backed up “ ve yards for the penalty, Klees decided to kick the extra point, which tied it at 28. In the second overtime, Pasco elected to defend “ rst … and Wakulla scored on another Godbolt run and added the extra point to go up 35-28. Pasco scored on fourth down when a ball thrown into double-coverage was attempted to be batted down by a Wakulla defender and fell into the arms of a Pirate receiver. The extra point was good to tie it at 35. Wakulla elected to defend “ rst in the next overtime, and Wakullas defense refused to yield. On fourth down, Pasco kicked a “ eld goal to go up, 38-35. It was absolutely the right coaching decision,Ž said Klees. If Pasco hadnt made a touchdown on fourth down, he could have just lined up and kicked a “ eld goal to win it. Pasco keyed on Godbolt on the next series, overloading the defense to the left side … but Stephens faked to Godbolt and handed the ball to Deonte Hutchinson on the counter and he bounced in, untouched, for the touchdown. UP NEXT: MIAMI NORLAND The War Eagles will face the unbeaten Norland Vikings at the Citrus Bowl on Friday afternoon for the Division 5A state title. The 14-0 Vikings are ranked No. 1 in 5A, 7th in Florida overall and 48th in the nation. Wakulla, with a record of 12-2, comes in to the game as a big underdog, ranked fourth in the division, 20th overall in the state, and 221 nationally. They are very good and very big,Ž said Klees, who noted they have several players who are Division I college commitments. Asked about Norlands reputation as intimidators, Klees scoffed that Wakulla has seen it before. Our kids are focused,Ž he said. Well stay within ourselves and do what we do.Ž I think the Lord has really blessed this team,Ž he said.War Eagles win in triple overtime Players of the WeekO enseDefense Special TeamsMARSHANE GODBOLT Four touchdowns in the game … 2 pass, 2 run DALTON NORMAN Caused a fumble, 3 tackles TAMARICK HOLMES Five sacks, now has 19 sacks on the yearSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Seminole Boosters National Chairman Steve Brown and former Sheriff David Harvey presented a $25,000 check to Superintendent of Schools David Miller before the start of the Wakulla War Eagle football playoff game Friday, Dec. 9. The money was part of what the Wakulla Seminole Boosters have raised through the Houston Taff Memorial Scholarship and a gala retirement party for the retiring sheriff held at the FSU University Center in October. The contribution raised the total scholarship contributions in the bank to $167,000. Attending the presentation were Beth Taff, widow of the late Coach Houston Taff and sister of the former sheriff, and Windy Taff-Jones, daughter of the late coach and a faculty member at Wakulla High School. Also attending the presentation was Sheriff Harvey’s wife, Rhonda, who was homecoming queen and valedictorian at WHS in 1968. Also at the presentation was FSU linebacker and former Wakulla War Eagle Nigel Bradham. Harvey said his brother-in-law had a love for Wakulla County, WHS and Florida State University. “He loved the War Eagles and the Seminoles and he had an impact on both male and female athletes,” said Harvey. “He helped me get my scholarship to Chipola so I could go to college.” Anyone who would like to help by making a contribution to the Taff Scholarship may do so through Harvey, Steve Brown or Superintendent Miller. The next Taff Memorial Golf Tournament will be held in April 2012. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTeammates Marshane Godbolt and Will Thomas after the triple overtime win.WILLIAM SNOWDENFormer Wakulla Sheriff David Harvey, with his hand raised, prepares to present a check for $25,000 for FSU scholarships for Wakulla athletes. $25,000 for scholarships Above, Deonte Hutchinson carries the ball against the Pasco Pirates. Hutchinson would score the winning touchdown in the third overtime. Left, Defensive Player of the Week Tamarick Holmes gets one of his “ ve sacks of the night. ACTION PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS The home crowd cheers on the War Eagles, above. After the game, the band plays the school song on the “ eld. The “ nal score is visible in the background.WILLIAM SNOWDEN

PAGE 12

Special to The NewsEvelyn and Tom Vlasak of Ochlochonee Bay were at the Atlanta RRC held at Road Atlanta where Evelyn won her class, H Production, in her 1960 Austin Healy Sprite. Evelyn has only been racing for two years after supporting Toms racing for more than 40 years. The Vlasaks are both members of the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) and Vintage Drivers Club of America (VDCA) and hold road racing competition licenses. In addition to racing the Sprite, Evelyn also is racing in vintage events in a 1970 Lynx Formula Vee (FV) single seat race car. The couple work on their cars in a private race preparation and vintage car restoration shop in Tallahassee. A photo of some of the Vlasaks cars was recently published in UnconqueredŽ the FSU Alumni magazine including her Sprite, the Lynx FV, a 1965 Mustang GT350 and Toms GT2 class Porsche Carrera. The Vlasaks are retired from the State of Florida. Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The News After a disappointing 5-4 loss in the previous weeks championship game at the Georgia ASA State Championships in extra innings, the Next Level 14U team won the Gobbler ExtravaganzaŽ in Valdosta, Ga., last weekend. The team started off very strong beating the Blue Angels 8-0 in the opening game. Continuing with strong pitching and defense, Next Level beat the Black Water Bandits 4-0. Unfortunately, the bats hit a dry spell and lost to the X-Plosion 5-3 in the third game of the day. Next Level fought its way back through the losers bracket beating the Columbia Crushers 8-2, and avenging its earlier loss by beating the X-Plosion 12-0 in “ ve innings. This set up the Championship game against the Georgia Bombers. Next Level started off very strong with a three-run home run by Karli Woolington in the bottom of the “ rst. The team never looked back, beating Georgia Bombers 9-1 to force the if gameŽ tie breaker. In the top half of the inning, Georgia Bombers had a runner on third with no outs, but the defense was able to get the next three batters out to end the inning. In the bottom half of the inning, the offense wasted little time by scoring the winning run to win its “ rst tournament of the new season. Amber Winkler, Gabby Ekberg and Karli Woolington led the team offensively, with Woolington amazingly hitting four home runs on the day. Both Ekberg and Woolington combined to not give up an earned run all day pitching. Next Level will be playing this weekend in Clearwater in the ASA 14U A Regional Quali“ er trying to win a bid to next years USA/ASA 14U A Nationals in South Dakota in August 2012. Special to The NewsWakulla High School Senior, Caleb Stevens participated in the high school rodeo, Southeastern Showdown in Perry, Ga., on Nov. 4-6. Contestants were from six states including, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. Stevens competed in the team roping and calf roping events at the Showdown. He and his partner, Beau Williams of Georgia, placed third in round two of Team Roping with a time of 8.73 seconds and “ fth place in the average for the weekend. He also placed eighth in round two of Calf Roping with a time of 12.41 seconds. Stevens is competing for points to qualify for State Rodeo Finals where they take the top 20 contestants and National Finals in Wyoming where they take the top four contestants from each event. Front row, Hannah Wilde, Amber Winkler, Brooklyn McGlamory, and Gabby Ekberg. Back row, Coach Staci Smith, Brielle Dozier, Karli Woolington, Adrianne Van Atta, Hannah Hilaman, Madison Williams, Caley Chappel and Head Coach Bob Van Atta. Not pictured: Coach Eddie Ekberg and Chelsey Murray.SOFTBALLNext Level 14U wins tournamentSPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCaleb Stevens dismounts his horse during calf roping.RODEOCaleb Stevens competes in Southeastern Showdown RACINGEvelyn Vlasak wins her classSPECIAL TO THE NEWSEvelyn Vlasak and her 1960 Austin Healy Sprite. JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GUNSMITHING F ASTTURNAROUND! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED Located on Main Street in St. Marks WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid for your gun! $ We do Special Orders and Layaways! Selling Guns Since 1999 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome 850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe Center Full Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3 Values to $100.00Aussie/Western Outback/Wools$26.00 incl. tax PANACEA HATSAFACT $1395 OYSTE RS$4D O Z. ALL YOU CAN EATShrimp Oysters or ScallopsIncludes Cheese Grits & Cole Slaw 1506 Scenic Coastal Hwy. 98Panacea850984-5243 10OZ. NEWYORKSTRIPDINN ERIncl udes 2 sid es$1195

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 13Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsMan, I cant wait until spring. I guess this cool weather wouldnt be too bad if the sun was shining but that hasnt happened for what seems like a week or so. When I was a lot younger the cold didnt bother me but now I guess the blood is thinner and it cuts right through me. We have had some extremely low tides the last week and if you were able to get out you could catch “ sh. I talked with Capt. David Fife who “ shes out of Spring Creek and he said he had to push and pole to get out of his canal last week but it was all worth it when they “ nally got where they wanted to be. He had a customer with his 10-year-old grandson and he said they probably caught and released at least 50 legal reds using mud minnows on the bottom. They left them biting and went and caught several trout using top water baits. Capt. Randy Peart took his son Wes and Bruce Johnson to the Econ“ na last week and every creek mouth they “ shed had “ sh holding at the front of them. He said they caught about 10 red and 14 trout using the Rapala Twitch and Rap. On Thursday and Friday he went back with charters and on Thursday after the front came through they caught six reds and four trout. They went back the next day and caught seven reds and 18 trout. He said all of the trout they caught those three days were nice and only a few of the reds were small. Most were between 22 and 25 inches and several were too big to keep. Randy said he heard there were lots of trout in the Aucilla and quite a few reds were also being caught there. I “ shed on Friday with Bob McCullough, and we caught about 10 trout and six or seven reds but only one of those was legal. We caught some “ sh on shrimp but they seemed to prefer the white Gulp that day. I saw Trey Wollington on the water the other day and had not seen him in probably 10 or 15 years. He was “ shing with his younger daughter and they caught 39 reds and she caught most of them. He said that the way it generally is when he takes his girls, they out-“ sh him. Sometimes theyll hook one and let him reel it in. This is the time of year when the “ sh you catch are gonna be in the river or creeks or at least at the mouth of the creeks way east of here. The Wakulla River, St. Marks River, East River, Carrabelle River, Aucilla, Econfina, Ocholockonee River and Spring Creek are the places to “ sh. Live bait is my choice of baits though I would rather catch them on arti“ cial. Whatever you fish you need to “ sh it very slow because the water is so cold. The water is also clear right now a light leader is best and I would probably use ” uorocarbon. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Look for some changes to come the “ rst of the year on trout and red“ sh regulations. Good luck and good “ shing!It’s cold, the sh are in the creeks From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL This is a hard one … I usually write on the many forms of wildlife in our region, and normally have little trouble coming up with a subject, be it a bat or buzzard, mink or weasel. However this article may raise some eyebrows, perhaps turn off some of my readers, or perhaps win me some too. Im sure it my possibly even offend some, but I feel obligated to get it out.Ž So here goes. As most of you know Ive been a bird watcherŽ (a term I nearly hate) all my life, and also have a fascination with insects like butter” ies, and snakes, “ sh, amphibians and of course our native mammals. Ive written about them since 1972 nearly every week for various newspapers. But did you know I also HUNT. I can hear the gasps of horror: No, not him too!Ž Hang in there … it gets worse … I even enjoy eating them! Actually perhaps only one in a 100 out there is a true vegetarian, never eating any ” esh of any kind except eggs and cheese. Fish have ” esh too remember, and though they dont scream or cry when caught (though some like grunts grunt,Ž and croakers croakŽ) most lie there silently in the boats bottom gasping for air as their gills dry out, slowly suffocating to death. Some say any “ sh you catch and plan on keeping and eating should be bopped in the brain area to prevent them from suffering. Can you picture a commercial “ sherman out at sea with a big haul in a mile long net doing this? Certainly not. So my point is even if you only eat “ sh, they still have to die. And as most of you know all store meat comes ” oating down from heaven all neatly packaged, and does not relate to the big-eyed, sweet old cow you see in the pasture. Now Im getting cynical, but I beg of you to hear me out. For any person to judge anyone prematurely, simply because they prefer to eat wild game occasionally rather than domestic animals is (to me) unfair. I can understand in this age when few folks out there have ever been raised on a farm (as I have), and been brought up butchering hogs, goats, cattle and chickens they cant relate to the idea of skinning a critter, much lees gutting it and preparing the meat into chops, back straps and sausage, etc. They couldnt stomach it. No problem. How many have ever read any book on animal factories. I have, and the conditions most meat animalsŽ are raised in make me nauseated. At least most wild game is safe to eat, and certainly healthier for one to eat, as it has less saturated fat, and more protein per ounce, not to mention all chemicals found in factory raised meats are missing. And the wild animal is just that … wild and free, not crammed into a tiny area so small it cant even turn around, and forced feed unnaturally to grow exceptionally fast and put on weight quickly. Domestic animals raised for meat are stressed almost from the day they are born. And for that matter so are wild creatures too, constantly looking for danger for out there in the jungle,Ž it is a eat or be eaten world! For eons, we have been predators. We have our eyes positioned to look forward … binocular vision like predators, not monocular vision as those preyed upon have. We over the millennium have turned nearly naked, allowing us to sweat, and keep cool, literally running our prey down, as is still being done in more primitive parts of the world. There are many ways to hunt. What may seem right for one, may not appeal to another. In Indiana where I was raised, because many rural homes were fairly close to another, only shotguns with a close killing range could be used for deer. In other states that have more open range, and less homes per square mile a high powered ri” e is often preferred. Here in our area, since we have miles and miles of swamps, areas that are often extremely hard to walk through, because of the dense vegetation or water, most hunters in this area tend to hunt with dogs that bring the deer to them. Hunting with deer dogs is also is a social manner of procuring meat. And that has been mans nature also for eons … for man to hunt in groups, like other top predators (wolves and lions, for example). These guys are constantly on their walkie talkies or CB radios, keeping track of their radio-collared dogs through telemetry. Most of them use their trucks to sit on, so they can see a deer out over the palmettos, and nearly all hunt along forest roads, where this type of hunting is legal. I prefer to hunt by myself, and prefer to use what is called traditional archeryŽ to get game. That is an old recurve or stick bow Ive made myself. I rarely connect, but when I do, I feel Ive really pulled off a feat few could duplicate. And when Im slipping through a swamp with bow in hand as quietly as possible, I feel more in tune with nature than at any other time. Im not a spectator of nature, Im a participant! Its like it is in my veins! Like it is part of my genetic makeup, and rightfully so, for in mans existence on earth about 99 percent of his existence, he has been a predator! Keep in mind even a total vegetarian has an impact on wild creatures, for though they may not kill creatures, the acres of land used to raise vegetables, is displacing wildlife and keeping them from even breeding! Anyway you cut it, our very presence, in this country especially, has an impact on wildlife.Hunting wild game appeals to man as natural predatorWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHFrom FWC News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety internet-completion course in Wakulla County. The course is at Otter Creek Range, 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 17. To gain admittance, students must complete the internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the “ nal report from the online portion of the course. The “ nal report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under 16 years of age at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satisfies huntersafety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling the FWCs regional of“ ce in Panama City at (850) 265-3676.FWC to o er hunter safety course in Wakulla IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTING & SAFETYEQUIPMENT ORANGE BLAZE VESTS • BUCKSHOT • RIFLE SHELLS • COVER SCENT 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 GEAR UP FOR Swallow-Tailed Kites by George WeymouthA GicleeŽ Non-Fading, Signed & Numbered Call George Weymouth To Order Shipping Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 BOGOSIGNUP FORYOURSELFƒ RECIEVEONE TOGIVEAS AGIFT!

PAGE 14

Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD It is cold outside again. But underwater on-shore (under Wakulla County lands) the temperature is still the same. Underground, Wakulla County temperatures remain a toasty 69 degrees year around until you reach sea water (which is warmer). A current meter I placed in Wakulla Springs several decades ago measured ” ow rate changes that matched local marine tides. At other cave sites closer to the coast we routinely encounter a salt water lens at between 160 feet and 250 feet below the water table. This warmer body of water intrudes northward in Wakulla based upon rain fall, water use and tides. Knowing this constant temperature 30 years ago, I built my home underground. With a plus or minus 10 degrees ” uctuation of the 69-degree ground temperature, I need only heat the entire house in the winter with a small wood burning stove and dry the summer air with a dehumidi“ er to be comfortable. But when we locals dive (spending 100 minutes underwater on the average) in our caves, most of us wear dry suits. Our Northern European and American visitors on the other hand, “ nd our water like a bath tub and LOVE IT! Thus, our winters are their summers. Off-shore, Wakulla County is a different matter. Off-shore we refer to surface and below the thermocline temperatures within recreational diving depths. A thermocline is a rapid change of temperature over a few feet and usually de“ nes a different body of water. Surface waters are dependent on seasonal surface air temperatures, which in the winter can get down around 10 degrees. Wind mixes the exposed surface waters dropping the water temperature down around 50 degrees above the thermocline. Our off-shore depths of the thermocline will vary depending upon storm intensity and ocean currents. Usually below the thermocline down to preferred recreational diving depths (around 130 feet) in the winter we “ nd temperatures warmer than surface temperatures. But upwelling and ocean currents can bring in very cold waters at our deeper recreational depths. Winter diving off-shore in our area is far less stable underwater than the conditions under our county. Summer off-shore underwater conditions reverse the temperature regime. Warm surface conditions, down to the thermocline, heat up to the mid to upper 80 degrees. In the Florida Keys, that temperature exceeds 90 degrees. No wet suit is required if you stay shallow off-shore. But below the thermocline temperatures are cooler even though they may be warmer than the winter months and wet suits are popular. Cave divers routinely wear dry suits year round while ocean divers have a much larger wardrobe to stay warm underwater. And they both have seasonal interests and pressures to diving in Wakulla County. Our store at Wakulla Diving Center shifts our inventory from thin wet suits in the summer, when the ocean divers dominate, to thick wet suits and dry suits in the winter, when the cave divers dominate our attention.Throughout the year, Ellena Rolland, the Publications Staff Of“ cer for our Division puts together our newsletter Salt Spray. This is no small feat and she has done an amazing job this year. In the “ nal edition of the newsletter for 2011, Division Commander Mo Davis submitted the following letter. I thought it “ tting to share his letter as well as Vice Commander Gordon Schmidts letter as we re” ect on the past year and look forward to the year ahead. Mo wrote: On Oct. 9, 2011, the Division 1 Board elected Gordon Schmidt as Vice Division Commander and me as Division Commander for our second term. We both want to thank the Board for this vote of con“ dence and we especially want to thank all of the Division 1 members for working so hard to make Division 1 the elite division that it is. In addition to achieving virtually all of our Silver Oar Goals this year, Paul Shurte, Flotilla 17, earned the Commodore Charles S. Greanoff Inspirational Leadership Award, an award that only one Auxiliarist in the Nation can win. Also, Flotilla 17 was awarded the Flotilla of the Year Award for the entire Auxiliary, Beverly Whaley, Flotilla 19, awarded the Atlantic Area West Recreational Boating Safety Award and Harry Sweezey, Flotilla 19, placed “ rst place in the Boat U.S. Foundation Grassroots Grant for the a Water Safety Discussion and Activity Booklet for Parents and Kids. In addition, Ellena Roland and Patti Fritchie teamed up to organize and direct the best ever Joint Area Rescue Exercise (JAREX) which included members from four ” otillas, Station Panama City and representatives from all of the “ rst responders. Following the JAREX, at our November Division Conference, we were fortunate enough to have Commander Hellstern, Director of Auxiliary, address us at our Awards Banquet. I would like to share with you his four priorities: 1. Compliance with Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary policy. Virtually every situation that we may face whether as an Elected Of“ cer, Appointed Of“ cer or general member is addressed in the Auxiliary Manual. It is our responsibility to read the manual, know it and follow the policies. 2. Standardization throughout the Auxiliary Do it the right way, the same way, the “ rst time and every time. Whether we are on a safety patrol in Pensacola or St. Marks on an Auxiliary facility the basic methods and procedures for that entire mission should be the same. 3. Safety Everything we do has some risk associated with it. We need to know what the risks are, keep aware of changing risks and reduce risks where we can. If the risks out way the bene“ ts, dont do it. 4. Education/Member Training The “ rst three priorities are dependent on and can only be realized with properly trained members. Again, I want to thank all Division Members for the excellent work you are doing and will continue to do in the upcoming year. Any organization is only as good as its people, thats why Division 1 continues to be one of the best, if not the best in the Eighth Coastal Region. Gordon Schmidt reflected on the significance of the uniform we are wear: Is it me or the uniform which will make the difference? We put on the United States Coast Guard uniform; but do we really know what it means? How do the active duty personnel look at us every day? Are we just a bunch of old folks wandering around knowing that since we were there and done that we can live with just being so impressed with ourselves that we really do not need to contribute or participate with the United States Coast Guard active duty? Look around you, these are the young people that are the future of America and some day they will be right where you are today. Ask yourselves, How can we contribute to help them with their future?Ž We have many people in our Flotillas with a broad spectrum in background experience able to contribute to their futures. We have accountants, executives, retired military of“ cers and enlisted personnel, plus other personnel with a plethora of backgrounds and experiences which will be a great resource for these young people of today. It is my personal goal to make sure that everyone with knowledge and/or the talent shares it with the active duty (Gold side). We are their backup; let us put it to good use beginning today. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! Please be safe when out on the water. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 3.3 ft. 4:03 AM 3.0 ft. 5:00 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:54 AM 0.0 ft. 11:37 AM 0.7 ft. 12:27 AM 0.5 ft. 1:42 AM 0.1 ft. 3:01 AM -0.3 ft. 4:14 AM -0.8 ft. 5:18 AM Low 3.1 ft. 5:34 PM 3.1 ft. 6:15 PM 2.7 ft. 6:12 AM 2.5 ft. 7:44 AM 2.5 ft. 9:27 AM 2.6 ft. 10:53 AM 2.8 ft. 12:00 PM High 0.9 ft. 11:21 PM 0.4 ft. 12:28 PM 0.8 ft. 1:27 PM 1.2 ft. 2:35 PM 1.4 ft. 3:46 PM 1.5 ft. 4:52 PM Low 3.1 ft. 7:02 PM 3.1 ft. 7:56 PM 3.2 ft. 8:55 PM 3.3 ft. 9:56 PM 3.4 ft. 10:54 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 3.3 ft. 4:00 AM 3.1 ft. 4:57 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:51 AM 0.0 ft. 11:34 AM 0.8 ft. 12:24 AM 0.5 ft. 1:39 AM 0.1 ft. 2:58 AM -0.4 ft. 4:11 AM -0.8 ft. 5:15 AM Low 3.2 ft. 5:31 PM 3.1 ft. 6:12 PM 2.8 ft. 6:09 AM 2.5 ft. 7:41 AM 2.5 ft. 9:24 AM 2.7 ft. 10:50 AM 2.9 ft. 11:57 AM High 1.0 ft. 11:18 PM 0.5 ft. 12:25 PM 0.9 ft. 1:24 PM 1.3 ft. 2:32 PM 1.5 ft. 3:43 PM 1.6 ft. 4:49 PM Low 3.1 ft. 6:59 PM 3.2 ft. 7:53 PM 3.2 ft. 8:52 PM 3.4 ft. 9:53 PM 3.5 ft. 10:51 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 3.0 ft. 4:39 AM High -0.3 ft. 11:58 AM 0.8 ft. 12:25 AM 0.7 ft. 1:31 AM 0.4 ft. 2:46 AM 0.1 ft. 4:05 AM -0.3 ft. 5:18 AM -0.7 ft. 6:22 AM Low 2.9 ft. 6:10 PM 2.8 ft. 5:36 AM 2.5 ft. 6:48 AM 2.3 ft. 8:20 AM 2.3 ft. 10:03 AM 2.4 ft. 11:29 AM 2.6 ft. 12:36 PM High 0.0 ft. 12:41 PM 0.4 ft. 1:32 PM 0.8 ft. 2:31 PM 1.1 ft. 3:39 PM 1.3 ft. 4:50 PM 1.4 ft. 5:56 PM Low 2.9 ft. 6:51 PM 2.8 ft. 7:38 PM 2.9 ft. 8:32 PM 2.9 ft. 9:31 PM 3.1 ft. 10:32 PM 3.2 ft. 11:30 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 2.4 ft. 3:55 AM 2.3 ft. 4:52 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:05 AM 0.0 ft. 11:48 AM 0.5 ft. 12:38 AM 0.3 ft. 1:53 AM 0.1 ft. 3:12 AM -0.2 ft. 4:25 AM -0.6 ft. 5:29 AM Low 2.3 ft. 5:26 PM 2.3 ft. 6:07 PM 2.0 ft. 6:04 AM 1.9 ft. 7:36 AM 1.8 ft. 9:19 AM 2.0 ft. 10:45 AM 2.1 ft. 11:52 AM High 0.7 ft. 11:32 PM 0.3 ft. 12:39 PM 0.6 ft. 1:38 PM 0.9 ft. 2:46 PM 1.0 ft. 3:57 PM 1.1 ft. 5:03 PM Low 2.3 ft. 6:54 PM 2.3 ft. 7:48 PM 2.4 ft. 8:47 PM 2.5 ft. 9:48 PM 2.6 ft. 10:46 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 2.5 ft. 3:47 AM 2.3 ft. 4:44 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:33 AM 0.0 ft. 11:16 AM 0.7 ft. 12:06 AM 0.5 ft. 1:21 AM 0.1 ft. 2:40 AM -0.3 ft. 3:53 AM -0.7 ft. 4:57 AM Low 2.4 ft. 5:18 PM 2.4 ft. 5:59 PM 2.1 ft. 5:56 AM 1.9 ft. 7:28 AM 1.9 ft. 9:11 AM 2.0 ft. 10:37 AM 2.2 ft. 11:44 AM High 0.9 ft. 11:00 PM 0.4 ft. 12:07 PM 0.8 ft. 1:06 PM 1.2 ft. 2:14 PM 1.4 ft. 3:25 PM 1.5 ft. 4:31 PM Low 2.4 ft. 6:46 PM 2.4 ft. 7:40 PM 2.5 ft. 8:39 PM 2.6 ft. 9:40 PM 2.7 ft. 10:38 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 2.3 ft. 3:35 AM 2.0 ft. 4:40 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:23 AM -0.1 ft. 11:01 AM 0.8 ft. 12:11 AM 0.5 ft. 1:33 AM 0.1 ft. 2:52 AM -0.3 ft. 4:00 AM -0.6 ft. 5:00 AM Low 2.1 ft. 6:20 PM 2.1 ft. 6:45 PM 1.7 ft. 6:03 AM 1.5 ft. 7:49 AM 1.4 ft. 10:03 AM 1.7 ft. 12:22 PM 1.9 ft. 1:51 PM High 1.0 ft. 10:54 PM 0.3 ft. 11:41 AM 0.6 ft. 12:24 PM 1.0 ft. 1:15 PM 1.3 ft. 2:20 PM 1.5 ft. 3:38 PM Low 2.2 ft. 7:12 PM 2.3 ft. 7:41 PM 2.4 ft. 8:14 PM 2.5 ft. 8:52 PM 2.6 ft. 9:37 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDec. 15 Dec. 21First Jan. 2 Full Jan. 11 Last Dec. 17 New Dec. 24Major Times 4:25 AM 6:25 AM 4:49 PM 6:49 PM Minor Times 10:57 AM 11:57 AM 10:44 PM 11:44 PM Major Times 5:13 AM 7:13 AM 5:37 PM 7:37 PM Minor Times 11:33 AM 12:33 PM 11:46 PM 12:46 AM Major Times 6:01 AM 8:01 AM 6:26 PM 8:26 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:08 PM 1:08 PM Major Times 6:50 AM 8:50 AM 7:16 PM 9:16 PM Minor Times 12:48 AM 1:48 AM 12:45 PM 1:45 PM Major Times 7:42 AM 9:42 AM 8:08 PM 10:08 PM Minor Times 1:52 AM 2:52 AM 1:24 PM 2:24 PM Major Times 8:36 AM 10:36 AM 9:04 PM 11:04 PM Minor Times 2:57 AM 3:57 AM 2:07 PM 3:07 PM Major Times 9:33 AM 11:33 AM 10:03 PM 12:03 AM Minor Times 4:05 AM 5:05 AM 2:56 PM 3:56 PM Average Average Average+ Average Average Average Average7:25 am 5:39 pm 10:45 pm 10:58 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:26 am 5:39 pm 11:46 pm 11:34 am 7:26 am 5:39 pm --:-12:09 pm 7:27 am 5:40 pm 12:49 am 12:46 pm 7:27 am 5:40 pm 1:52 am 1:25 pm 7:28 am 5:41 pm 2:58 am 2:08 pm 7:28 am 5:41 pm 4:06 am 2:57 pm69% 62% 55% 48% 41% 33% 26% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org Get 40 100mg/20mg pills for only $99.00CALL NOW AND GET 4 BONUS PILLS FREE! BUY THE BLUE PILL NOW!1-888-746-5615 SATISFACTION GUARANTEED SAVE $500! VIAGRA or CIALIS?D o you take Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 15AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Dec. 1, Joey Melton of Panacea reported a grand theft. The victim planned a yard sale in Crawfordville and covered items overnight with plans to hold the sale the next day. When he arrived at the Crawfordville property in the morning, people were already shoppingŽ and leaving with items. Witnesses said a white truck loaded up with goods and returned several times for additional loads of goods. The victim stated that $5,000 worth of items was removed from the property including tools, games, clothing, household goods, bicycles and more. € On Dec. 1, Deputy Nick Gray and Deputy Mike Zimba responded to a two vehicle crash at Brown Boulevard and Cajer Posey Road in Crawfordville. Myrtle Martin McKenzie, 73, of Crawfordville was driving a 2002 Toyota Corolla and made a left hand turn off Brown Boulevard onto Cajer Posey Road. Robin Leslie Ruby, 23, of Crawfordville was driving a 2006 Chevrolet truck on Cajer Posey Road. McKenzie did not see Ruby coming and Ruby crashed into the side of McKenzies vehicle. No one was injured. McKenzie was found at fault but was not cited. The Toyota was towed away from the scene while the truck was drivable. € On Dec. 1, Carol Allen of Ochlockonee Bay reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $2,040 worth of jewelry and coins. € On Dec. 1, David Moss of Sopchoppy reported an animal incident where his dog was attacked by two other dogs. A neighbor used a shovel to scare off one of the dogs and separate the second. The Animal Control Unit was called to the scene and contacted the victim and witness. € On Dec. 2, Sara Wilkinson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from her home. The mountain bike is valued at $50. € On Dec. 3, a Crawfordville woman reported an animal incident involving her 7-year-old son. The child was jumped by a neighbors dog and suffered abrasions. EMS treated the victim at the scene. Animal Control Of“ cer Ivanhoe Carroll responded to investigate and quarantine the dog. Her investigation continues. € On Dec. 3, Deborah Revell of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft at a Crawfordville rental property. A water well tank and pump was stolen. The stolen property is valued at $1,500 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Dec. 3, Deputy Ward Kromer investigated a suspicious person at County Line Road. Deputy Kromer identi“ ed the male subject as someone reported missing from Leon County. The man was considered missing and endangered due to lack of medications and was turned over to a relative. € On Dec. 2, a Crawfordville man reported a residential burglary and battery as a suspect forced himself into the residence. Two victims sustained minor injuries when they subdued the suspect inside the home. Tyson Lynn Scott, 22, of Crawfordville was charged with burglary with assault and battery. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Scott thought he was locked out of his own home. € On Dec. 2, Dishawn Scott of Sopchoppy reported a structure “ re on Dinosaur Lane. Scott and two other individuals, including a juvenile, escaped the “ re. The “ re appeared to start in a bedroom electrical outlet. Damage to the mobile home and furnishings are estimated at $35,000. The home is owned by Kevin James of Sopchoppy. € On Dec. 4, Andrew Edmonds of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victims vehicle was left unlocked overnight and a CD player, valued at $179, was stolen. Three other vehicle burglaries were reported within a mile of each other during the same timeframe. € On Dec. 4, Christopher Deason of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone entered the victims unlocked vehicle and removed $1,320 worth of property including a shotgun, GPS and gun case. € On Dec. 4, Cori Revell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone entered her unlocked vehicle and removed $148 worth of items including a GPS, satellite radio and electronic chargers. € On Dec. 3, Valencia Statam of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of livestock. Two baby pigs were reported stolen. The pigs were taken from a pen and are valued at $60. € On Dec. 4, a female Sopchoppy victim reported a battery and criminal mischief. A juvenile became angry with the victim and hit her vehicle with an axe. She also struck the woman. The juvenile was arrested for battery and felony criminal mischief and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $1,500. The juvenile was released to the custody of her mother. € On Dec. 4, Deputy Jeremy Johnston stopped Skylar Dylan Heller, 20, of Tallahassee for speeding at Bob Miller Road and Old Woodville Highway. The driver was traveling 47 miles per hour in a 35 mile per hour zone. The driver could not produce his license because it was suspended for failure to pay court “ nes. He was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge and was given a warning for excessive speed. € On Dec. 4, Evester Britt of Panama City reported a grand theft at Burneys Temple First Born Church in Crawfordville. Part of an air conditioning unit and copper were reported missing. The copper tubing was removed from a propane tank and was approximately 30 feet long. The missing property was valued at $4,100. € On Dec. 5, Shara Harvey of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a cellular telephone. The victim was paying for gas at Murphy Oil when she put her telephone down on a counter. She returned a short time later and the phone was missing. The phone is valued at $100. € On Dec. 5, Melissa Hudson of Crawfordville reported a structure fire to a neighboring property owned by Louis Andrew Sutton of Crawfordville. Sutton and Wakulla Fire“ ghters were “ ghting the fire when Deputy Vicki Mitchell arrived on the scene. The victim was burning off fuel from a boat motor when he left the burning fuel unattended. He returned to find the northeast side of the mobile home on “ re. The home was used for storage. € On Dec. 5, an 11-yearold female juvenile was arrested and charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill after she threatened family members with kitchen knives. A family relative subdued the juvenile. With knives in both hands, the juvenile threatened two relatives. The juvenile was transported to the juvenile detention facility. € On Dec. 1, Cobb H. Adams of Crawfordville reported a vehicle crash at Highway 61 and Rosa Shingles Road. There were no injuries to the driver after a deer ran into his path. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. € On Dec. 6, WCSO inmate Paul Mitchell Porretto, 54, of Tallahassee was arrested for battery for getting into an altercation in the Wakulla County Jail bathroom area. Porretto and a 61-year-old victim got into an altercation in front of a restroom sink and Porretto struck the victim several times with a closed hand. € On Dec. 7, Ashley Rogers of Crawfordville contacted the WCSO about a traffic crash at Wal-Mart. The victim reported damage to her vehicle which was parked in the parking lot at the time it was struck. Damage to the victims truck was estimated at $450. € On Dec. 7, Dustin Raker of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The vehicle was recovered in Altha and a suspect has been identi“ ed. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 770 calls for service during the past week.Special to The NewsTwo Crawfordville teenagers were arrested for the burglary of the Pasco County High School football locker room after the Pasco-Wakulla football playoff game on Friday night. The two teens, Travis Anthony McCullough, 18, and Christian Robert Payne, 18, were each charged with 10 counts of grand theft, one count of burglary and 22 counts of petit theft in the incident. Deputies discovered that dozens of items were taken including watches, clothing, electronics, shoes, wallets, sunglasses, telephones and cash,Ž according to Undersheriff Maurice Langston. In all, 32 victims were identi“ ed and $7,587 worth of stolen property was reported missing.Ž Investigators established McCullough and Payne as suspects through video evidence collected at the scene. A road patrol deputy located the suspects about “ ve miles away at a Crawfordville fast food restaurant. McCullough gave deputies consent to search his vehicle and many of the stolen items were recovered. Investigators determined that the two teenagers entered the school at 9:10 p.m. and left about 15 minutes later. It is unfortunate that on a night when Wakulla High School earned a berth in the Class 5A State Championship game that the thrill of a triple overtime victory was partially negated by having something like this happen to the visiting team,Ž said Undersheriff Langston. Two arrested for thefts at football game Travis A. McCullough Christian Robert Payne Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Office (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Office (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Office (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New auto rates as low as 2.75% for qualified applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and floor rate of 2.75%No payments for the first 90 days! Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011 our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL Mini-Warehouses Boats RV’s519-5128 • 508-51772 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSEYARD SALEDEC. 16 & 178AM 2PMNO EARLY BIRDSFRI. & SAT. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.-----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 926-3281

PAGE 16

Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com CASH IN FOR THE HOLIDAYSBUYING: GOLD SILVERJEWELRYCOINS PAID ADVERTISEMENT PAYING CASH FOR ALL TYPES OF GOLD, SILVER, DIAMONDS AND MORE! WE ALSO PURCHASE SILVERWARE SETS POCKET WATCHES ANDWRIST WATCHESSILVER SCRAP GOLD POCKET & WRIST WATCHES .999 FINE SILVERSCRAP SILVER *This amount depends upon rarity, condition and what collectors are willing to pa yINDIAN CENT UP TO $500* MERCURY DIME UP TO $3,600* 3 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,500* MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR UP TO $100,000* LIBERTY VŽ NICKEL UP TO $2,800* BARBER DIME UP TO $2,800* JEFFERSON WARŽ NICKEL UP TO $2,000* WHEAT BACK CENT UP TO $1,500* STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER UP TO $4,400* SHIELD NICKEL UP TO $4,000* WALKING LIBERTY HALF DOLLAR UP TO $4,700* CAPPED BUST HALF DIME UP TO $10,000* BARBER QUARTER UP TO $3,200* 2 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,000* PEACE DOLLAR UP TO $3,000* BUFFALO NICKEL UP TO $1,800* BRAIDED HAIR LARGE CENT UP TO $3,800* SEATED LIBERTY DIME UP TO $6,500* BARBER HALF DOLLAR UP TO $6,750* KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR MANY TIMES FACE VALUE* PAYING CASH FOR PRE-1970 COINS & CURRENCY Other Items of Interest COSTUME & GOLD JEWELRY PAPER CURRENCY GOLD COINS Bring this pass and beat the lines Dont miss your chance of cashing in at these Record High Gold & Silver Prices Express Pass GOLDIS TRADING AT ALL TIME HIGHS NOW IS THE TIME TO CASH IN! Express PassGOLD & SILVEREXPRESS PASSŽNO WAITING IN LINE ALL JEWELRY ACCEPTED DIAMONDS CHECK IT OUT!WHOINTERNATIONAL GOLD, SILVER & DIAMOND BUYERSWHATOPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO SELL THEIR GOLD, SILVER, DIAMONDS & TREASURESWHEREPERRY HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 601 EVERETT WAY DIRECTIONS: 850.584.3200TALLAHASSEE STAYBRIDGE SUITES TALLAHASSEE I-10 E 1600 SUMMIT LAKE DR. (HWY 90 EAST) DIRECTIONS: 850.219.7000CRAWFORDVILLE BEST WESTERN PLUS WAKULLA INN & SUITES 3292 COASTAL HWY 98 DIRECTIONS: 850.926.3737WHENDECEMBER 12TH 17TH MON…FRI 9AM…6PM SATURDAY 9AM…4PMINFORMATION 217.787.7767 That old class ring could buy the Flat Screen TV youve been wanting. Odd gold earrings & broken jewelry could pay for a new PlayStation or Xbox! CASH INON YOUR SCRAP GOLD & JEWELRY

PAGE 17

& Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Dance pros from New York teach local classes Page 3B Spotlight falls on main eventsWeekly Roundup, Page 4B Kitsune Books was created by Anne Petty By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter getting several of her own books and short stories published, Crawfordville resident Anne Petty decided she wanted to help other writers who were being overlooked by mainstream publishers. The big publishing companies are extremely hard to break into, even if the book is wonderful, Petty says. So in 2006 she created Kitsune Books, a publishing venue for books of high quality that are not mainstream or found on a best-seller list. She publishes poetry collections, literary “ ction, novels, short story collections, literary memoirs and non-“ ction literary commentary from “ rst time authors, as well as published authors. The name Kitsune comes from Japanese culture and means fox. Petty says it is based on the fox spirit character from folklore which is a shapeshifter who can transform into a woman and is considered a trickster. Petty says the whole idea of the fox spirit is about playfulness, creativity, cleverness and unpredictability, which she felt represented her company well. Petty has enjoyed writing ever since she was little when she created books out of cardboard. She has also written three horror/dark fantasy novels, three books on literary criticism and many essays. She is currently working on her fourth novel. She also has a PhD in English and has taught at the high school and college level. Ive been a wordsmith all my life,Ž Petty says. She left teaching after being recruited by a private industry publication to become its editorial director. And Ive been doing that ever since,Ž Petty says. In the “ rst year of Kitsune Books, she published three books. It then increased to four a year and then seven a year and now she publishes around 10 a year. She does not accept hard copies of manuscripts because it slows the entire process down. She only accepts them via email. Writers also must follow all the guidelines for submitting their work. If not, Petty says she screens those books out because those writers cant follow directions, or dont care to and will probably be dif“ cult to work with. Petty says in the beginning, she received about a dozen submissions a week. That number has increased drastically and is up to about 100 a week. Its a ” ood,Ž Petty says. When it gets to be too much, Petty says she stops taking submissions. Currently, she isnt taking manuscripts until June 2012. That way I can turn the spigot off,Ž Petty says. When she receives a submission, Petty says she does a quick screen and determines if the books falls into one of the categories she publishes and also if it is something she is looking for. After that, she reads only the “ rst three pages. I can guarantee within three pages, if its something I can use,Ž Petty says. She reads those three pages and waits for the book to grab her. I listen for the authors voice and then for the author to disappear,Ž Petty says. A books has to be well written and also not require lots of editing, she says. It needs to come to me ready to go,Ž Petty says. She says she will work with a “ rst-time author and help them if they are extremely talented. If the book doesnt grab her in the “ rst three pages, sometimes she will look at the ending and the synopsis to see if she missed something. Continued on Page 3B PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENAnne Petty, founder of Kitsune Books, in her Wakulla of“ ce. e Wakulla-based publisher puts out about 10 books a year, ranging from poetry and novels to literary commentaryA fox mask … Kitsune means fox in Japanese … along with some of the award-winning books the small company has published. e name Kitsune comes from Japanese culture and means fox. Petty says it is based on the fox spirit character from folklore which is a shapeshifter who can transform into a woman and is considered a trickster. TravelingJarforChange! Give To Sponsored by Donate Your Change atNew Location EVERY Week! Tallahassees Most Preferred HospitalFor the7thYear in a RowOnce each year, the National Research Corporation polls the toughest critics in the health care industry … the public. And for the 7th year in a row, consumers in the Tallahassee Metropolitan Statistical Area have named Tallahassee Memorial as the most-preferred hospital in the region. Tallahassee Memorial HeathCares vision is to provide recognized world class health care. It is a vision we keep “rmly in sight each and every day. And, the biggest winners of all are our patients. Our Vision: RECOGNIZEDWORLDCLASSHEALTHCARE TMH.org

PAGE 18

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, December 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla office, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, December 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, December 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 2242321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Vendors wanting to participate, call Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or 528-5838, or email posh_faery@ yahoo.com.  ORDER OF CONFEDERATE ROSE “Mary C. Gwaltney” chapter will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405.  SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS “Wakulla Guards Camp” will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405. Sunday, December 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, December 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, December 20  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at noon at the Historic Wakulla County Courthouse on High Drive in Crawfordville. Wednesday, December 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, December 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. Friday, December 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 5451853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 5451853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsThursday, December 15  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will have its Christmas Dinner at Wakulla Springs Lodge at 6 p.m. Survivors, spouses, caregivers, friends, all are invited to share this time with them. For details, call Marge Kinder at 926-6050. Saturday, December 17  A CELTIC CHRISTMAS will be held at Posh Java featuring Aisha Ives on violin, Katie Geringer on violin and Aaron O’ Rourke on guitar. Reservations requested. Call (850) 962-1010 for tickets or more information. Friday, December 23  BLOODMOBILE WILL BE AT WALMART from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A $10 gift card will be given to all donors. For questions, call 877-7181. By JO ANN PALMERKWCB DirectorKeep Wakulla County Beautiful has received a $1,000 cash award from Keep America Beautiful (KAB). This was part of a nationwide effort sponsored by Nestl Waters North America to encourage local PET (plastic bottle) recycling during the 2011 Great American Cleanup. This event is the nations largest community improvement program and takes place annually from March 1 through May 31. Nestl Pure Life Puri“ ed Water, the of“ cial national bottled water sponsor of the Great American Cleanup, worked with KAB to further energize PET recycling activities. A new Great American Cleanup record for PET recycling was set … a grand total of 290 million bottles were recycled. KWCB contributed more than 2,400 pounds to the overall effort, thereby receiving a Nestl Pure Life PET Recycling Award as one of the top PET recyclers during the 2011 campaign. Keep America Beautiful congratulates Keep Wakulla County Beautiful for its plastic bottle recycling accomplishments during the 2011 Great American Cleanup,Ž said Gail Cunningham, senior vice president of Keep America Beautiful, and managing director of the Great American Cleanup. Through your PET recycling efforts and the efforts of other organizations in communities across America, a record-breaking number of bottles were recycled … a record that KWCB should be proud of.Ž Nestl Pure Life PET Recycling Awards were awarded to 25 KAB af“ liates that collected the most pounds of PET for recycling based on population served. Eight awards were given in three population categories: small (under 50,000), medium (50,000… 250,000) and large (more than 250,000), and one award was given in the State KAB affiliate category. I am excited that KWCB was the winner in the less than 50,000 population. There were only two winners from the state of Florida. Nestl Waters also partners with KAB on community recycling programs, and serves as a National Sponsor for Keep America Beautiful Great American Cleanup and America Recycles Day. Keep America Beautiful, Inc., established in 1953, is the nations largest volunteer-based community action and education organization. To join the Great American Cleanup and let green start with you, visit www. kab.org. If you would like to get involved with KWCB, email helpkwcb@gmail.com or call (850) 745-7111. Remember, reuse when possible, reduce your personal trash and recycle, its good for everyone. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comKeep Wakulla County Beautiful... Cancer Support Group Christmas Dinner at the Lodge at 6 p.m. Tip a Cop fundraiser at Posey’s Steam Room 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Celtic Christmas at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Wakulla Economic Development Council at noon at the old courthouse. ThursdayFridaySaturdayTuesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingThursday, December 15  WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the county administration conference room.  WAKULLA COUNTY RECYCLE TASK FORCE will meet from 4 to 6 p.m. at the library. By MARJ LAW Last week, Joe and I met our friend Barry at the WCSO range in Sopchoppy. Joe was going to show Barry how to hit those orange disks they call birdiesŽ out of the air, and I was going to try out a beautiful antique 16-gauge shotgun. Joe pops the 16-gauge open, slips in a shot, and calls pull.Ž The orange bird ” ies into the air, maybe 20 yards away. Joe pulls the trigger and the birdie disintegrates into bits. The guys kindly allow me to try it out next. I take the shotgun, ” ip the lever to open it andƒ nothing. I try to pull the stock and barrel towards each other, but am not strong enough to open it. Darn. Joe takes it back and pops it open. Maybe its a little stiff,Ž he says. O-Kay. I call pullŽ and shoot. The birdie sails in a graceful arc and ” oats to the ground. In one piece. I ” ip the lever again, and again cant open it to eject the shell. I consider whapping it in my leg and yanking both ends to get the darn thing opened, but “ gure thats probably not good range etiquette. So Joe takes the gun, ejects the shell, and loads it again. I call pullŽ and watch the birdie sail again unharmed. Now Barry has never shot skeet or trap before. Joe shows him how to load his new gun, gives a couple words of advice and steps back. Barry calls pull.Ž I watch the birdie ” y into a million pieces. Humph. Beginners luck,Ž I think dejectedly. Barry loads again, a bit slowly and thoughtfully. Pull!Ž he calls again, and again the birdie dies. And again. And again. Im going over to the ri” e range,Ž I tell the guys, and collect my trusty 10/22 which is like a small ri” e with a scope. Its easy to use and will soothe my disgruntled feelings. And OK, OK, Im happy for Barry. The WCSO range has lots of places to shoot. You can also shoot at metal targets. They are fun, because you can hear the pingŽ when you hit them, and then they have the grace to fall over, so you really know you whomped them. Then theres a pistol range for handguns, a practice range for law enforcement, the ri” e range and more. Theres a young man at the ri” e range. I slide into the seat on his far side. He gives a 2 finger wave and smiles. I wave slightly and load the 22s magazine. Then I plop down a sandbagŽ which is a place to rest the barrel so your shooting is more accurate. After my dismal display at the clays, I needed that accuracy. I aim, and shoot 5 rounds. At 50 yards, I cant see the target, so I break out my binoculars. Yep. A couple holes mark the center of the target and 3 more are close by. Im feeling better. Joe and Barry come over. 18 out of 20!Ž Barry says with satisfaction. Im still ” abbergastered. His “ rst time. Hes a natural. The boy waves at Joe and Barry. Joe looks at me strangely. Why didnt you shoot next to Danny?Ž Joe asks me. Danny? My youngest son who lives in Tallahassee? That young man is Danny? I look at him. He smiles again. Well, glory be. I go over and hug him. You didnt recognize me, did you?Ž he asked. Your own son and you didnt recognize me?Ž What can I say? I hug him harder. Despite some guilty maternal feelings, the day is turning out really well. Being with Joe, a good friend and my son? Im happy. We spend the afternoon going from the ri” e range, to the metal targets and then to the pistol range. Theres nothing more relaxing than aiming for targets with your family on a nice sunny day. Christmas is coming. If my son werent already a member, Id have bought him a membership if only to spend companionable time with him. And hed have liked it a lot more than sweaters and socks.Home on the Range... Its a family thing

PAGE 19

Continued from Page 1B She says she also looks at the writers credentials, but that doesnt typically sway her either way. I dont care if you are the cousin of Dolly Parton,Ž Petty says. She adds that name dropping happens quite often. Sometimes after reading a book she becomes frustrated because it is extremely well written, but she published something similar within the past year. When that happens, she emails the writer back and praises them and sends them names of other publishers who might be interested. Petty says there is a great network of small press publishers who hand off manuscripts to each other. We keep things in circulation,Ž Petty says. If she likes a submission, she sends it off to her assistant editor, Lynn Holschuh, who will do the “ rst read through and then give her feedback. Holschuh and Petty went to school together and Petty says they have a long wordsmithing history.Ž If the book fits into an opening they have, they contact the author and enter into a contract. It then takes about a year for the book to be published. Were small,Ž Petty says. And when we take somebodys book, we may have two other balls in the air. You have to get in the queue.Ž Once Petty takes the book, they also must decide on a cover. Sometimes the author has a specific picture they want to use or has a basic idea and sometimes they arent sure what to use for the cover and Petty helps them decide and may contract with an artist to design the cover. One books cover was done by a local artist, another was done by a tattoo artist. Occasionally we get lucky,Ž Petty says. You never know what will happen with a cover.Ž For the book, Florida Gothic StoriesŽ by Vicki Hendricks, Petty says they got extremely lucky and had a photograph by well-known photographer Clyde Butcher featured on the cover. Petty says Hendricks wanted to use one of Butchers photographs, but Petty didnt think she would be able to afford them. Hendricks had a friend who knew Butchers sister and his sister agreed to ask him. Petty says Butcher let them use the photograph for free and all he wanted was credit for it. Prior to the book being published, she also enlists her husband Bill to do some fact checking. Bill Petty is a local mycologist, as well as a scientist and mathematician. Petty has him check references in the books that relate to science, technology and astronomy, such as if its possible for a certain ” ower to be blooming in a certain environment during a speci“ c season. I really rely on him to catch stuff like that,Ž Petty says. Once the books are published, they can be ordered on Amazon and through Kistune Books website. About half of them are also available as e-books. A book she is currently working on is called Blood Red DawnŽ and is a collection of poetry written by a solider who did tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. The soldier was told he should get therapy for his post-traumatic stress disorder, but decided instead to write. He then obtained a degree in English and submitted his manuscript to Petty. I read it with jaw dropped,Ž Petty says. Petty says she was blown away by his writing. Most large publishers wouldnt publish a collection like this one because it is somewhat controversial, and it is poetry by a solider, Petty says. But she says it was well written, edgy and had a very unique voice. The cover of the book is a photograph one of the soldiers friends took while they were on tour. Recently, “ ve of the books she has published won gold and silver medals from the Florida Publishers Association 2011 Book Awards in the poetry, memoir, adult “ ction and middle grades fiction categories. The high quality has been recognized,Ž Petty says. For more information, visit www.kitsunebooks.com or email anne@kitsunebooks. com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 3BDance pros from New York teach at local studio Kitsune Books was created by Anne PettySpecial to The NewsIt was a dream come true for local dance students at Crawfordvilles Studio 88 Dance Productions when they hosted performers-choreographers Ashle Dawson, Jim Cooney and Jessica Seavor. Studio 88 is led by Lauren Manning and Denise Jefferson. Ashle Dawson captivated America as a Top Four “ nalist on Foxs smash So You Think You Can Dance.Ž With 10 years of teaching experience under her belt, after her appearance on the TV show, she continued on traveling the world as an internationally acclaimed and respected performer, choreographer and instructor while being based in Los Angeles. This past fall season, Dawson appeared on MTVs MadeŽ As the Latin Dance Coach. Jim Cooney has taught jazz, tap and musical theater across the world and has established himself as one of the most popular theater dance faculty members at Broadway Dance Center in New York City. He is the faculty advisor of BDCs elite Professional Semester training program and the Summer Intern Program. He also has been the dance captain for eight productions including the “ rst national tour of Tony Award winner Susan Stromans Broadway revival of The Music ManŽ and the original company of Nights on Broadway,Ž directed and choreographed by Tony Award winner Andy Blankenbuehler and starring former Miss America Kate Shindle. How did they end up in a little town called Crawfordville? Jessica Seavor was an instructor at the Crawfordville dance studio when it was formerly known as Dancing With Miss Denise, and taught for two years. While with Miss Denise, Seavor had applied for a scholarship program with The Pulse and Broadway Dance Center. She was awarded both and has been training in New York City since September 2010. Seavor quickly made a name for herself at BDC. While taking more than 12 classes a week, multiple teachers took note of her hard work and talent. In late November, Seavor was featured in Of“ ce Max: Elf YourselfŽ campaign, directed and choreographed by Cooney, was promoted as their spokesperson and asked to travel to Chicago for multiple promotions. In February, Dawson took Jessica to Washington, D.C., to perform for an Audi Event along with two fellow dancers. Chio Yamada, a Jazz Funk teacher at BDC and the Pulse, also took Jessica and her other assistant to Pennsylvania, where they both assisted at the Motion Dance Convention, as well as performed along side Yamada at their Gala. In March, Seavor made her way back down to Tampa where she assisted Cooney. Along with assisting, she has performed with dancers from all over the world, back-up danced for Aisha, Japanese pop star, and with Run-DMC, among others. Seavor recently auditioned for a role in the Broadway production Nine to FiveŽ and found out just before she arrived in Crawfordville that she made the cast. This news came of no surprise to Miss Denise or Miss Lauren and the rest of their dance family. Seavor and Lauren have remained great friends and talk often about the plans for our new Studio 88. Lauren will be traveling with a few of the Studio 88 dancers to complete an internship program in New York City at the BDC in summer 2012. Lauren is artistic director at Studio 88 and Miss Denise is now the business director. Studio 88 dancers will be traveling to Atlanta in March to compete against the best studios at Access Broadway and will be performing in different events in the spring.Jessica Seavor returns to her home dance studio after much success in New York, and brings two well-known instructors with herSPECIAL TO THE NEWSVisiting artists Ashle Dawson and Jim Cooney with local dance students at Studio 88. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Carolyn HarveyNovember 2011 Winner Her name was drawn fromis was the “rst time entering my name for this contest and I won just a few days later. ank You! Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! St. MarksRIVER CANTINA “We Have The Best Hamburgers Around”Prize for Best Dressed Golf Kart Dress Up Your Golf Kart & Join The Parade Call for FREE registration925-9908 5th Annual Golf Kart Christmas ParadeFriday, Dec. 16 @ 6:30 p.m. St. Marks Toy DriveBring an unwrapped giftgifts will be distributed by St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department Join the Cantina for Thanksgiving Dinner on Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish… If you can’t… Join us Anyway! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 We accept most major insurance plans. Transfer today!Your Publix Pharmacy accepts the State of Florida Employees program, TRICARE,Express Scripts, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and many more.publix.com/pharmacyTransfers are easy! Just bring in your prescription bottle or new prescription. Well take care of the rest.TRICARE is a registered trademark of the TRICARE Management Activity. All rights reserved.

PAGE 20

Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com List 10 words that rhyme with “bear.” 1. ______________ 2. ______________ 3. _____________ 4. ______________ 5. ______________ 6. _____________ 7. ______________ 8. ______________ 9. _____________ 10. _____________ What Rhymes with… Some answers: care, chair, dare, fare, glare, hair, pair, rare, scare, tear Almost every household with young kids has a box of crayons. The first crayons, however, were a lot different than those of today. Made of charcoal and oil, they broke easily and were hard to use. They were also toxic! In the early 1900s, cousins Edwin Binney and C. Harold Smith created their own version of crayons. Made of wax and pigments, the crayons were stronger and safer. Binney’s wife, Alice, named the crayons “crayolas,” and the first box of eight was sold for a nickel in 1903. Binney and Smith’s crayons were a hit, and today, over five billion in 120 colors are made every year. That’s a lot of crayons for a lot of coloring. Color Kids Happy Many companies all over the world make toys. How familiar are you with toymakers? Fill in the blanks to name that toymaker.Answers: 1) Mattel, 2) Hasbro, 3) Playmobil, 4) Lego, 5) Bandai, 6) LeapFrog, 7) Radio Flyer1) M A __ __ E L2) H A __ __ __ O3) __ L A __ __ O B __ L4) L __ G __5) B A __ D __ I6) __ E A __ __ R O __7) R __ D I __ F __ Y E __ Name That Toymaker Name That Toymaker COLORING PICTURE 1) Gramma Nut and King Kandy are from Chutes and Ladders. Fact or Fiction? 2) Butterflies and spare ribs can be found in Operation. Fact or Fiction? 3) The object of Connect Four is to get four pieces of the same color in a row first. Fact or Fiction? 4) Players must twist their bodies all around in Battleship. Fact or Fiction? 5) Hungry Hungry Hippos has five hippos. Fact or Fiction? 6) Simon has four buttons. Fact or Fiction? 7) Players roll dice to move around the board in Sorry. Fact or Fiction? 8) The object of Monopoly is to gain property while keeping cash reserves low. Fact or Fiction? 9) Mr. Mouth is a frog. Fact or Fiction? 10) Colonel Mustard and Miss Scarlet are from Boggle. Fact or Fiction?FACT OR FICTION?Board Game Challenge Many a kid has spent hours playing board games. How much do you know about board games? Take this quiz and find out.Answers: 1) Fiction, the characters are from Candy Land, 2) Fact, 3) Fact, 4) Fiction, they must twist all around in Twister, 5) Fiction, there are only four, 6) Fact, 7) Fiction, they draw cards to move, 8) Fiction, the object is to gain property and money, 9) Fact, 10) Fiction, the characters are from Clue Q: Why did the doll act so silly on Christmas?A: She was wound up. Q: What’s red and white and gives toys to good little fish?A: Sandy Claus. Jokes and Riddles This page sponsored in part by:

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 5B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars  Real Estate  Rentals  Employment  Services  Yard Sales  Announcements 877-676-1403 ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 24 HOUR EMERGENCYRESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALSERVICEALLMAKESANDMODELSMAINTANCECONTRACTSSTOCKALLSIZE FILTERSANDMEDIA 850-926-4676North Pointe Center • 1606-B Crawfordville Highwaylic# CAC1816154 WWW.TALLYSENERGYSTAR.COM Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Cornerstone CookingWant a SMOKED TURKEY or HAM for your holiday get-together? Maybe you don’t want to cook at all. Let Cornerstone Cooking take some of the hassle out of the holidays for you.We also o er FULL CATERING SERVICES! Morris Pigo at (850) 661-1117 with Dolly MoodyYoga Gain ”exibility, strength, energy. Call for class schedule and rates.YogaFORSENIORSFocusyoga@yahoo.com or call 228-380-0140Focus on a healthier you. BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can “x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Douglas MOBILEMARINE• Outboard Repair & Service • Electronics Installation • Fiberglass RepairFactory trained: Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki and Tohatsu850-228-0889 LICENSED & INSURED 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com.FOXTROT FARM Learn: horse care, equipment, safety with some riding time. for private lessons on our new school ponies. English lessons on your horse; will come to your place. Call -LAURIE WESTBROOK 850-926-2004 TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Do leaves have you bogged down this fall then call Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceCall today for a free quote! They have all the modern equipment to rid you of all those falling leaves.(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUY€SELL€TRADE€REPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @ comcast.net Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net wakulla realty Free Offers CATS, KITTENS & PUPPIES ( Mal-chi) NEED good HOMES (850) 210-2841 Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Lost Lost Dog-Red Peek-a-poo on 11/22 between 10AM-3PM near Hwy 98, We miss our dog! Companion for senior, please call (850) 926-4075 Announcements SAVE $$$ on Advertising! Run your classified ad in over 100 Florida newspapers reaching over 4 MILLION readers for $475-that is less that $4 per newspaper. Call this newspaper or (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida -classifieds.com Professional CJIS GROUP Inc.,a Market Research firm, has a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting /training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUP benefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgr oup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills DRIVER NEEDEDFull time with benefits available, CDL with Hazmat certification, Inquire at Wakulla Gas Company or call 850-926-7670 Driver-Dry & Refrigerated. Single source dispatch. No tractor older than 3 years. Daily Pay! Various hometime options! CDL-A, 3 months currentOTR experience 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers: Run GA, AL, MS, & TN & FL HOME WEEKENDS, earn Up to 39 cents a mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp. Call: SUNBELT TRANSPORT,LLC (800)572-5489 EXT 227 HOME WEEKLY 100% O(/Op Company O/Ops CDL A Drivers/ Reefer $1,000 sign on bonus! Call 800-237-8288 or visit www.suncocarriers.com Trades/ Skills RV & MOTORIZED DELIVERY DRIVERŽS Needed NOW! See the Country side! Deliver Motorhomes, boats, and other trailers to the 49 states & Canada. Detailswww.horizontransport.com Career Opportunities A Better CareerWith Melton Great Equipment & Benefits 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. meltontruck.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877) 359-1690 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. Call Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction ALLIED HEALTHCareer training -Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.Centura Online.com EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINEOnline from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Schools/ Instruction EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINEOnline from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Miscellaneous Financial $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!! $$$As seen on TV. Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++ within 48/hours? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com General Commercial Bakery equipment for sale,2-3 years old, excellent cond, 2 gas confection ovens,Globe mixer,2 prep tables, pans ect. $7000 for all 850-364-4545 or 850-320-5323 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWSFORDVILLE32 Merwing Dr 2 BR 2 BA. Nice, well kept, near lake & great schools, nice area $550 (850) 443-3300 SOPCHOPPY3/1, Covered Porch, large wooded lot, $500 Mo. + Dep. (850) 566-4124 Real Estate For Rent 3BR/2BA DWMHLarge deck, shed, remodeled kitchen, Great condition! NO Pets, (firm) $650/month $600/sec 850-926-6212 Apartments Move in special $99 Deposit $300 Swimming pool and gym Local Hero Discount $99 Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo 2BR as LOW as $700/mo 3BDR as LOW as $800/mo. Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675.per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-926-4217 Storage/ Warehouses Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,8x10 and 10x12 now available. Come by or call Wakulla Realty, (850) 926-5084 Real Estate For Sale 3BR/2BA one-story home with garage on Greiners Addition. Excellent condition. $85,000. Owner financing. 850-251-7588, 850-962-2016. SopchoppyCabin on 5 acres,600 square foot, backs up to the forest, $59,000 Revell Realty 850-962-2212 Commercial Real Estate Affordable Office Space at the Barry Building. Great atmosphere! Includes all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen use, conference room. Rates start at $250/mo. 850-210-5849 or our website at www.BarryBuilding.com Best business opportunity!!!2400 sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! Rent negotiable 850-926-2480 Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300  Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-656-6340 Restaurant Space Available Soon!! Fully equipped. Can assume full liquor license and equipment if you act quickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Lots For Sale 2-acre lot for sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Recreation Vehicles NEWMAR99, Dutchstar, Motorhome, 38tft, Deisel pusher, super slide, leather sofas, tiled kitchen and bath, 2 new flat scrn. TVs, and much more, $32,500 Call (850) 566-4124 Handyman Affordable pricing! Pressure washing, landscaping, roof cleaning,all fencing types, plumbing, wood rot repair,tree removal, painting ect. Residential & Comm. Brian 766-9304 Heating/AC HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR Sales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in CrawfordvilleDoug & Sherry Quigg, OwnersLic. Nos ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926-5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Pressure Cleaning A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed-John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Services ALL ABOUT...CONCRETEBLOCKS, BRICKS, PAVERSLANDSCAPEPLANTS, SOD, TRACTOR WORK Call JOSEPH FRANCIS 850-556-1178 OR 850-556-3761 Services Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5Br 2Ba DWMH $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $725mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $750mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker 3BR/2BA in Mysterious Waters. $695 rent, same deposit. No Pets. Call Jim at 566-5165 Move-in special $99 Deposit $300 Special on 2BR ONLY 1/2 OFF 2nd month rent Local Hero Discount $99Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BR as LOW as $630/mo 2BR as LOW as $730/mo 3BR as LOW as $830/mo Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week Please Call877676-1403 Homes For Rent

PAGE 22

Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1150 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets59 Chickat 3BR/2BA House $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets455 Old Bethel Road 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre. $950 mo. No Smoking or PetsAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 5063-1215 PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, December 19, 2011 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 December 15, 2011 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5057-1215 PUBLIC NOTICE MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON DECEMBER 5, 2011 The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. All Board Members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the agenda. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve ratification of the Master Teacher Contract for 2011-2012. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the Administrative/Supervisory and Non-Instructional Salary Schedules for 2011-2012. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. December 15, 2011 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5056-1222 Vs. Evans, Ashley 2011-CA-000189 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000189 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SCHILLING, and JAMES FOX, DEFENDANTS. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JAMES M. FOX 513 East Ivan Road Crawfordville, FL 32347 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots 32, 33, and 34 of the West Side of the Town of Sopchoppy, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida has been filed against you, Ashley Ciara Evans, a/k/a Ashley Ciara Schilling, a/k/a Ashley Ciara Fox, and John Robert Schilling in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any to: RONALD A. MOWREY, MOWREY LAW FIRM, P.A. at 515 North Adams Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 on or before January 16, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32347, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on November 21, 2011 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court (seal) By /s/Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk December 15 & 22, 2011 5058-1222 Vs. Jordan, Gary 09-CA-443 Re-Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 09-CA-443 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF JANUARY 1,2006 MORGAN STANLEY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-1, Plaintiff, vs. GARY JORDAN, ANGEL JORDAN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC.(MIN# 100176105081070966), SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION INC. UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2 and ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named Defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming, by through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 24, 2010, and entered in Case No. 09-CA-443 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF JANUARY 1,2006 MORGAN STANLEY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1 MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-1 is Plaintiff and GARY JORDAN, ANGEL JORDAN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC.(MIN# 100176105081070966), SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION INC. UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2 and ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named Defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming, by through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendants, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL at 11:00 oclock A.M. on the 5th day of January, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 3, Block K. of Songbird, Phase II, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat 3, Pages 113 through 116, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida Located : 18 Swift Pass, Crawfordville, FL 32327 and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida, this 1st day of December 2011. Brent Thurmond, Clerk of said Circuit Court /s/By: Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk Clarfiel & Okond,P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Ave., Suite 730, West Palm Beach, Fl 33401 (561) 713-1400 December 15 & 22, 2011 5060-1222 Vs. Beam, Nancy Revell Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-153-CA JAMES L. THOMPSON, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY REVELL BEAM; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF NANCY REVELL BEAM; and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styledcause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Commence at the intersection of the Easterly right-of-way boundary of State Road No. S-365 with the South boundary of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 15, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 15 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 223.80 feet, thence run North 74 degrees 41 minutes 24 seconds East 350.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run North 15 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds West 125.00 feet, thence run North 74 degrees 41 minutes 41 minutes 27 seconds East 175.00 feet, thence run South 15 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds East 125.00 feet, thence run South 74 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West 175.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. at public sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on February 2, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the property owner, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court (SEAL) /s/ By Desiree D Willis, as Deputy Clerk December 15 & 22, 2011 5061-1222 Vs. Shriver, Kathleen M. 652008CA000010FC Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 652008CA000010FC DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR FRIEDMAN, BILLINGS, RAMSEY GROUP, INC. (FBR) SECURITIZATION NAME-FBRSI 2005-5, Plaintiff, vs. KATHLEEN M. SHRIVER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 1, 2011 and entered in Case No. 652008CA000010FC of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR FRIEDMAN, BILLINGS, RAMSEY GROUP, INC. (FBR) SECURITIZATION NAME-FBRSI 2005-5, is the Plaintiff and KATHLEEN M. SHRIVER; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS, INC., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO AAMES FUNDING CORPORATION; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 5th day of January, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, BLOCK 28, OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT THREE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 135 SARSI DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on December 2, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 15 & 22, 2011 5055-1222 12/31 Sale-Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON DECEMBER 31,2011 A T 10:00A.M AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: MARY LOUISE SLOAN SCOTT STANLEY MELINDA ZUHL BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF DECEMBER 31, 2011 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. December 15 & 22, 2011 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5053-1222 Vs. Despirito, Emil T., 65-2011-CA-000115 Notice of Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDADIVISION: CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000115 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC ., Plaintiff, vs EMIL T. DESPIRITO A/K/A EMIL T. DESPIRITO, JR et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October 27, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000115 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and EMIL T. DESPIRITO A/K/A EMIL T. DESPIRITO, JR; DEBRA U. DESPIRITO; DISCOVERY MARKETING; SPRINGWOOD II ROADOWNERS MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 5th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: L OT 8 BLOCK H SPRINGWOOD PHASE II A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGES 14 THROUGH 17 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A CERTAIN 1996 NOBILITY MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: VIN# N87271A AND N87271B. A/K/A 196 RIDGEWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 22, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) BY /s-/DESIREE D. WILLIS, AS DEPUTY CLERK Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. December 15 & 22, 2011 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5059-1222 Brinkley, Bernice D.11-64-PR PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.:11-64-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF BERNICE C. BRINKLEY, DECEASED. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Bernice D. Brinkley, deceased, whose date of death was July 8, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is December 15, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Phyllis F. Hurst Post Office Box 414, Woodville, FL 32362 Attorneys for Personal Representative LAW OFFICES OF STUART E. GOLDBERG, P.L./s/ Stuart E. Goldberg Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850)222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 5063-1215 12/27 Sale-Wakulla Realty PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Wakulla Realty will hold a sale by sealed bid on Tuesday, December 27 at 10:00 a.m. at 2655B U.S. Highway 319 of the contents of Mini-warehouse containing personal property of: Wilburn McCalvin Dan Sheppard Sara McGowan Deanne Kirkland Sandcastle Painting, LLC Before the sale date of December 27, 2011, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 535, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 or by paying in person at 2655 U.S. Highway 319, Crawfordville, Florida. December 15, 22, 2011 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Wakulla County, Florida (the “County”) hereby provides notice, pursuant to section 197.3632(3) (a), Florida Statutes, of its intent to use the uniform method of collecting non-ad valorem special assessments throughout the unincorporated area of the County and within the incorporated areas of the cities of Sopchoppy and St. Marks, for the cost of providing re, emergency medical services, solid waste, stormwater, road maintenance and improvements, clean energy and wind resistance improvements, and other neighborhood improvements, facilities, and associated services commencing for the Fiscal Year beginning on October 1, 2012 and continuing until discontinued by the County. The County will consider the adoption of a resolution electing to use the uniform method of collecting such assessments authorized by section 197.3632, Florida Statutes, at a public hearing to be held at 5:00 p.m. on January 10, 2012 in the Wakulla County Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida. Such resolution will state the need for the levy andNOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESMENTSwill contain a legal description of the boundaries of the real property subject to the levy. Copies of the proposed form of resolution, which contains the legal description of the real property subject to the levy, are on le at the County Administrator’s Ofce, 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida. All interested persons are invited to attend. In the event any person decides to appeal any decision by the County with respect to any matter relating to the consideration of the resolution at the above-referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and in such an event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the public hearing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding should contact the County at (850)926-0919, at least one day prior to the date of the hearing.DECEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2011 JANUARY 5, 2012 Advertisement Detail WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REHWINKEL ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS Invitation to Bid No. ITB2012-05 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: December l5, 2011 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed responses for Roadway Improvements to Rehwinkel Road addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Of ce, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 will be received until January 13, 2012, at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Any responses received after the time and date speci ed will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Virginia Dekle Phone: 850.926.9500, FAX: 850.926.0940 e-mail: vdekle@mywakulla.com Plans and Speci cations Packages may be purchased at the Wakulla County Purchasing Of ce at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for a fee of $100.00 begining December 15, 2011. Checks or money orders only please made payable to: Preble-Rish, Inc. No pre-bid meeting will be held for this project. All Bidders are encouraged to visit the site to become familiar with the project area. Any person with a quali ed disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this of ce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Virginia Dekle, Of ce of Management and Budget

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 – Page 7BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 26 31 36 40 46 50 56 60 63 2 27 47 3 28 48 4 29 43 5 23 41 21 37 57 61 64 6 15 18 38 58 7 30 32 51 8 24 44 49 9 25 45 19 22 42 59 62 65 10 16 39 52 11 33 53 12 34 54 13 35 55 A CROSS1.Itmayhangon yourconscience 6.Gamewithahole card 10.Jock'sinventory item 14.Palmer,tohis "army" 15.Tryatlminga scene 16."Nope" 17. Glovematerial 18.Animalwarfare? 20.You're"ingood hands"withthem 22.Hall's"Maneater" partner 23.Cornorformleadin 24.Fromtheheart 26.Animalwarfare? 31.Windowstypeface 32.Voidcompanion 33.Mushyfood 36.Fisherman's"the onethatgotaway" 37.Fliersinaskein 39. Oompahband need 40.Machiavellian 41.Saltychee se 42.Screwup 43.Animalwarfare? 46.Depressedfeeling 49.Claiborneof fashion 50.Something squirreledaway 51.Arpandhisilk 56.Animalwarfare? 59.NewYork's__ FisherHall 60.Sawbucks 61.Shoppesignword 62.Silentsstar Novarro 63. OnetimeSinclair rival 64.Hippie'sillicit purchase 65.SarcasticDOWN1.Inauguralball,e.g. 2. Orsk'sriver 3.ILGWUpart:Abbr. 4.Bunchesofbull 5.Pertainingtoa manuscript 6.Backtalk,slangily 7.Sprintterminus 8.TinyTim's instrument 9 .__Plaines,Illinois 10.HistorianWillor Ariel 11."Oh,How__ to Get UpintheMorning" 12.Crowd-scene actors,inthelingo 13.Communityor hopefollower 19.Snorkeler's milieu 21.Formicary inhabitant 24.Birds thatprovide red meat 25.Uptothejob 26.Thoroughfares 27.Likesome confessions 28.Mucky 29.Nucleartreaty result 30.Either"Paper Moon"costar 33.Giveup thepigskin 34.Onetimelabor chiefI.W. 35.Scaledown 37.Comprehends 38.Kinof-ule 39.Rugrat 41.Reacttoaskunk, incartoons 42.Somecharity events 43.L anzarole 44.Walkingonair 45.eBayoer 46.Notglossy 47.Fieldunits 48.Nutjobs 51.Weekend rancher 52. "FathersandSons" novelistTurgenev 53.Jackkningvictim? 54.Walkedover 55.Endofa1/1song 57.Fiddlestick 58.Corridacheer American Prole Hometown Content 11/20/2011 E a ch puzz le i s d i v i d e d in to nine s e ct i o n s, an d ea ch s e ct i o n h a s nine b lan k squ are s. F ill in all 81 squ are s o n th e puzz le w i th n u m b er s 1 to 9. You ma y n ot re p ea t an y n u m b er s in an y o ne o f th e nine s e ct i o n s th a t you’ve alrea dy us e d el s e wh ere in th a t s e ct i o n Al so, you c an us e ea ch n u m b er 1-9 o nl y o n c e in ea ch ho ri zo n t al line o f nine squ are s, an d in ea ch v er t i c al co l u mn o f nine squ are s. Th e puzz le i s co m p le t e d wh en you co rre ct ly ll e v er y squ are .S o l ut i o n s 200 9 HtCtt 1 2345 461 748 3 267 51 4983 6 53 296 58374 200 9 HtCtt 186 2734 9 5 245698713 397145286 831 924657 672531849 459786132 964 852371 723419568 518367924 G A L A W A Y S M A T T U R A L O R A L A C R E I N T L M I R Y L O O N L I E S B A N C A R U S T E X T U A L F A I N T A N T G E T S B O S T A T I C E T T E O L T A P E O N E A L D U D U K E E M U S E L A T E D E S A B L E B I D C O R A L B A Z A A R D U R A N T T O T I V A I H A T E P U N T S E M S U P E S A B E L T R O C H E S T P A R E S Y N Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE … Dec. 9 … Even as the main events for the 2011 legislative session got started in earnest this week, sideshows seemed intent to steal center stage. Gov. Rick Scotts annual budget speech … at the Capitol this year … was crashed by a correspondent for a satirical news show. The of“ cial Christmas tree made its appearance. Even one of the states political “ gures got an entertainment deal of sorts, when Republican U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio signed a contract to write a memoir scheduled to be released next fall. But the central events of the week continued to focus on the three issues that will dominate the legislative session: A state budget with an almost $2 billion shortfall and a governor pushing for a $1 billion in new state education funding; a slate of redistricting maps that would recast the states political boundaries; and a bill to introduce several large casinos in Florida. BUDGET: FROM HOSPITALS TO SCHOOLS The headline-grabber from Scotts budget proposal was a move to slash Medicaid payment rates and use the money to help bankroll $1 billion in new education spending, though that would be offset by several factors. About $444 million would replace onetime state funding for the loss of local tax income, and another $190 million would pay for enrollment growth. The per-student increase would be about $142, or 2.3 percent. Scott also didnt replace hundreds of millions of dollars in federal education funding meant to “ ll some shortfalls. I will not sign a budget from the Legislature that does not signi“ cantly increase state funding for education,Ž Scott vowed. But the fulcrumŽ of that plan already seemed to be headed into trouble by the end of the week, with a bipartisan group of lawmakers saying they were at least mildly concerned with Scotts efforts to come up with some of the money by ” attening the Medicaid payment structure for similar types of hospitals. Scotts administration says a system that pays similar hospitals far different rates isnt logical or fair. Personally, I think that it is going to destroy the health-care continuum in our state, said Senate Minority Leader Nan Rich, D-Weston. And while some Republicans were cautious about the proposal, others supported the idea. I applaud the governor for what he has done in this budget, said Senate Education PreK-12 Appropriations Chairman David Simmons, R-Maitland. Scotts plan would also eliminate 4,500 positions in state government, close some prisons and cut business taxes. LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION Meanwhile, lawmakers were playing an autobiographical form of Wheres WaldoŽ this week, as the Senate Reapportionment Committee voted to submit its redistricting proposals as a committee and House panels got their “ rst look at a dozen possibilities for House and congressional maps. Both chambers have to carve up the state to create legislative districts and make room for two new members of Congress. The House and Senate have largely agreed to trade each others maps for their respective chambers, meaning only the congressional map to be negotiated. That didnt prevent “ reworks from going off in the Senate meetings, where Rich suggested that partisan politics were still ruling the day, despite the approval last year of the anti-gerrymandering Fair DistrictsŽ amendments. I think that the voters tell us they wanted a clean slate, not a map-making adjustment to gerrymandered maps that were adopted 10 years ago,Ž she said. Republicans bristled at the suggestion. Theres been no evidence that our process has been tainted in any way by political consideration,Ž said Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart. The House meetings were relatively calmer, though that might have had as much to do with the deluge of maps than anything else. Subcommittees are considering five House maps and seven congressional plans, a dizzying total of 789 districts to consider before the panels select their top three choices for each map next month. SHOWING THE CARDS Meanwhile, the groups already engaged in the high-stakes lobbying showdown on major resort casinos upped the ante on their battle during the week, with three Cabinet of“ cials taking sides while business lobbies faced each other and one in” uential lawmaker. Associated Industries of Florida joined with construction groups to push for the destination resortŽ legislation that would lead to casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties. We want to take control of our future and advance policies that we know will result in job creation, Brewster Bevis, an AIF vice president, said during a news conference at the Capitol. But political opposition was already building. Senate Rules Committee Chairman John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, took some of AIFs comments at a committee meeting on the measure as criticism of the Legislature and lit into a representative for the group. For you all to suggest the Florida Legislature hasnt done its job, and we ought to be embarrassed, Im embarrassed by that comment, he said. Meanwhile, Attorney General Pam Bondi and Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam held a press conference to blast the idea of destination resorts. The very character of our state is at stake in this debate, Putnam said. The third member of the Cabinet, Chief Financial Of“ cer Jeff Atwater, said later through a spokeswoman that he also didnt like the idea. Supporters were already trying to calculate their odds. Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, said she would talk with other senators and offer a revised proposal, likely as a strike-all amendment, before such a vote. Obviously, why do the strike-all if I dont have the votes? she said after the committee meeting. ŽIts a Rubiks Cube. But that and other questions about the proposal left state economists without much to go on as they try to “ gure out the states share of the jackpot. They eventually rolled the dice, guessing that it could rake in $455.7 million over the next four years. But the economists said the tax impact of the controversial casino plan is indeterminateŽ because of the need to make key assumptions. I think theres just too many assumptions that may be good assumptions, but theres just too many of them, Senate economist Jose Diez-Arguelles said. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott unveils a budget proposal with $1 billion in new state funding for education and cuts in Medicaid reimbursement rates for hospitals. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Governor, youve bene“ ted from hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars over the year, so would you be willing to pee into this cup to prove to Floridas taxpayers that youre not on drugs, youre not using any illegal drugs?Ž … The Daily Show correspondent Aasif Mandvi, to Gov. Rick Scott during a press conference to unveil Scotts budget proposal.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Spotlight falls on main eventsBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 12 … Combatants in a battle over a new north Florida barrel racing venture brought their respective cases to the 1st District Court of Appeal on Monday with track owners saying they  ve gotten the state  s blessing and their opponent crying foul. At issue is whether the appellate court should issue a stay that would at least temporarily halt gambling at a new facility in Gretna while the issue of whether it is legal winds through the courts. The Gretna track, which received its permit in September, began holding barrel races on Dec 1. Owners of the Gretna horse track say they should be allowed to continue offering pari-mutuel wagering on barrel racing and operate a card room while the case moves forward. Members of the Florida Q uarter Horse Racing Association, on the other hand, urged the court to order a halt to the track  s activities until a decision is made on whether or not the gambling is legal. At issue is whether barrel racing is a bona “ de parimutuel activity. The issue is critical because Florida law allows card rooms only at pari-mutuel facilities. Critics say barrel racing, which traditionally does not involve pari-mutuel wagering, is merely a ruse to allow track owners to conduct the more lucrative card room activities. Gretna, other track owners and the North Florida Horsemen  s Association say Florida law is largely mute on what constitutes a horse race, an open interpretation that allows for a number of horse racing venues, including barrel racing. During arguments at the appeals court on Monday, Judge William Van Nortwick pressed opponents of the facility to say what harm will be done if racing is allowed to continue until the underlying case is resolved.  Even if we deny the stay, it seems to me if you ultimately prevail you will be able to stop the barrel racing and stop the gambling, Ž Van Nortwick said. Citing a pending application from another track in Hamilton County, Stephen Menton, an attorney representing the quarter horse racing association, said once the racing genie is out of the bottle it will be nex t to impossible to put in it back in.  Because of the precedent that has been set ( with Gretna ) there are going to be permit holders, such as Hamilton Downs, who are going to come in and seek approval to begin pari-mutuel wagering in multiple other locations, Ž said Menton.Marc Dunbar, attorney representing the race track, said investors have already pumped $ 20 million into the Gretna track and employed 170 workers. Granting a stay would mean a loss of income for many area families and investors of the facility.  I question what the irreparable harm will be, Ž Dunbar said. There is no possible way they can say they are harmed by continuing the races. Ž Gretna is in Gadsden County, just west of Tallahassee.Barrel racing issue before appeals court

PAGE 24

Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PrismTM TV Pure Broadband … 10 MBPS a month for 6 months* CenturyLinkTM PrismTM. TV TV.NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE. Call 866.484.7057Americas fastest growing broadband company now brings you a better choice in television. Its not cable. Its not satellite. Its Prism. Its interactive TV that you control from the moment you click the remote. Its so advanced, it even updates automatically. Simply put, its the best way to watch all your favorite shows, teams … you name it. So turn off cable and satellite, and turn on TV worth switching for.*Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offer and stated rates are available to new, “rst-time CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV residential customers in select areas only. The $65.95 monthly rate applies to up to 10 Mbps Pure Broadband and Prism’ TV package for six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. A $6.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with Prism’ TV package. Promotional offer cannot be c ombined with any other Prism offers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees, an d surcharges will apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the three-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges, or the standard mo nthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to speci“c locations. General … Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them b y service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restric tions apply. Terms and Conditions … All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at http://about.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges … Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply, including a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time High -Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharge s. Monthly Rate for All Service Bundles … The monthly rate for all bundled services will apply while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more s ervices are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband … Early termination results in customer being responsible for payment of the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of netwo rk control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data traf“c transmissi on/connection and cannot be used for voice traf“c transmission, except for 911 services. CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV … All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top bo x (STB), one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided STBs are re quired to view TV. If a term agreement applies to the offer, an early termination fee in the amount of discounts received applies if customer terminates services before the end of the appl icable term agreement. Local channel availability varies by market. Caller ID service must be purchased separately to enable th e on-screen Caller ID feature; Caller ID feature is not available in all areas. High De“nition (HD) available on all TV plans f or an additional $11.99/month, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of STBs in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard de“nition. Subscription to service precludes customers from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional progr amming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for Prism’ Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purcha ses, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Customer may dial 67 (touch-tone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to oper ate correctly customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Vacation Program … Offer available to residential customers only. Only certain CenturyLink services are eligible for the Vacation Program; third p arty services received through CenturyLink are not eligible. Offer may include a reduced monthly recurring charge for a predetermined number of months each year, retention of equipment and suspension of service, programming and agreement during Vacation Program activa tion. A zero balance for each applicable service is required for eligibility. If customer does not contact CenturyLink to resum e full activation of applicable services before the end of six (6) consecutive month period, all applicable monthly charges, fees, surcharges, contr actual obligations, etc., will resume automatically. Vacation Pr ogram services will have restrictions and limitations that will vary for each applicable service. Contact CenturyLink for details. Equipment … Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equip ment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamage d condition, or customer is charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism’ TV Plan … Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. Green Lantern: 2011 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. PUTYOUR PRISMTM TV ON VACATION WHEN YOU HEAD BACK NORTH Bundle BRILLIANT TV with Pure Speed for an even BETTER experience.



PAGE 1

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles are in the title game. They defeated the Pasco Pirates in the state semi- nals in triple overtime on Friday, Dec. 9, by a score of 41-38, in front of a packed J.D. Jones Stadium. The War Eagles will play Miami Norland in the Citrus Bowl this Friday for the state 5A championship. Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees had said before the Pasco game that the two teams matched up pretty evenly. Both, he said, were fast and game planned to get their athletes out in space to make plays. After the game, Klees praised both teams, saying they were also alike in that neither had any quit in them. The main difference was that, where Wakulla focuses on a ground-and-pound attack, Pasco relied on short seam passes. While Pasco scored rst on their opening drive, Wakulla was leading at halftime by a score of 21-7. But Pasco battled back with a touchdown in the third and another in the fourth to tie it up. Both teams scored touchdowns in the first and second overtimes. In the third overtime, Wakullas defense came up with a big stop and Pasco kicked a eld goal to go up 38-35. On Wakullas next possession, the War Eagles faked a speed sweep to Marshane Godbolt and handed the ball to Deonte Hutchinson. The Pirates had overloaded to the left, keying on Godbolt -who had scored four touchdowns in the game, twice on passes, and twice on the ground -and Hutchinson went into the end zone untouched. The home crowd erupted in cheers after the score -some players embraced, some fell to their knees. Klees said of Godbolts performance: He dominated the game. He was just incredible. He caught two touchdowns and ran two. He just had a great football game. Wakullas all-time rushing leader, Will Thomas, was knocked out of the game late in the fourth quarter with a deep thigh bruise and did not play in overtime. Klees said he expected Thomas to play in the championship game. Defensive player Nic Walker suffered a shoulder stinger, but is also expected back. Some other players were dinged up, and Klees attributed that to a physical, physical game. Continued on Page 11A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 50th Issue Thursday, December 15, 2011 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsThe Wakullanews Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read DailyINDEXPublic Notices ...........................................Page 3A Comment & Opinion .................................Page 4A Church.......................................................Page 6A Community ...............................................Page 7A Holiday Guide ...........................................Page 8A Sports .....................................................Page 12A Outdoors ................................................Page 13A Water Ways .............................................Page 14A Sheriffs Report .......................................Page 15A Arts & Entertainment .................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ........................................Page 2B Classi eds ..................................................Page 5B Legal Notices .............................................Page 6B OBITUARIESBrenda Joyce Baggett Madelyn Joyce Crowson Joan E. Harrison Katie Whetstone WAR EAGLES WIN IN TRIPLE OVERTIMEHeaded to state championship in Citrus Bowl KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMarshane Godbolt leaps up to make the catch over the Pasco defender. Godbolt scored a touchdown on the play one of four touchdowns he scored in the game for Wakulla, including two in overtime. Dump truck plunges over Sopchoppy River bridgeStaff ReportA 73-year-old Crawfordville man was seriously injured in a one vehicle accident Saturday, Dec. 10 as his dump truck plunged over the side of Sopchoppy River Bridge at 11:44 a.m., according to Interim Sheriff Donnie Crum. Freeman Pigott was taken by medical helicopter to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital where he was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit with multiple broken bones and lacerations. About six hours later, a large crane was used to lift the truck off the bank of the Sopchoppy River. WCSO investigators determined that Pigott was northbound on Highway 375 when his right front tire struck the bridge curb and crashed through the bridge guardrail into the river. The victim was hauling dirt at the time of the accident and dropped approximately 20 feet nose rst into the bank of the river. Rescue workers took several minutes to free Pigott from the truck. The Tallahassee Fire Department Haz-Mat Unit was called to the scene to put up booms and collected less than 40 gallons of diesel fuel that leaked into the river. The river clean-up continued into Monday, Dec. 12. The bridge was damaged and has been closed inde nitely by the county public works department, ESG. A detour has been set up while the bridge is closed. Motorists can access West Sopchoppy and all addresses north of the bridge by utilizing Rose Street (County Road 22). They should take CR 22 to Curtis Mills Road and then take a right back to 375. Addresses 8201 to 8415 along Smith Creek Highway, as well as all addresses along Cherokee Drive, Trebor Lane, Seminole Lane and Blackhawk Drive will be south (left) from the intersection of Curtis Mill and 375. Continued on Page 2A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netLawmakers representing Wakulla County held their annual meeting last week to hear issues of local concern before the start of the legislative session. Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, and Reps. Marti Coley, R-Marianna, and Leonard Bembry, D-Greenville, heard a lot of the same concerns as in the past: educators worried about more cuts, local governments looking for help and fishermen angry about the unfairness of how they are treated. The session begins on Jan. 10 this year earlier than usual because the legislature must approve redistricting. But there were fewer citizens and fewer elected of cials at this years delegation meeting, which prompted Sen. Montford to joke that people must not have any complaints. Superintendent of Schools David Miller warned lawmakers that, the district cannot take anymore cuts. Were on the precipce of cutting programs that help kids, Miller said. Weve cut to the bone. Theres nothing else to cut. Wakullas school budget, which relies heavily on state dollars, has been reduced more than 15 percent since 2007, Miller said. More than $5.6 million cut since 2007s budget of $38 million to this years $32 million. He also warned of eroding morale amongst school personnel. Our employees have taken a pretty good hit over the past several years, Miller said. Except for a one-time bonus, employees havent had a step increase in pay for four years. He urged the lawmakers to look for new sources of revenue, suggesting they go after internet sales tax saying Thats not a tax increase, its a tax due. He also suggested a tax on bottled water, suggesting it was justified because the current taxes on bottled drinks is unfair. Continued on Page 5ALegislative delegation visits WakullaWILLIAM SNOWDENPlayers embrace and react to the overtime win that sends the War Eagles to the state title game for the rst time since the 1981 team won the championship.UP NEXT: The Division 5A state championship game will be played at the Citrus Bowl in Orlando on Friday, Dec. 16 beginning at 1 p.m. Visiting Pasco locker rooms burglarized during game. See Page 15A. Former Sheriff David Harveys retirement party results in $25,000 contribution to scholarship fund for Wakulla athletes. See Page 11A. The dump truck driven by 73-year-old Freeman Pigott after it went over the Sopchoppy River Bridge. Pigott was LifeFlighted to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. (Photo by WCSO) Kitsune Books created by Anne Petty See Page 1B GO, WAKULLA WAR EAGLES!Show your support for the Wakulla War Eagles at the Citrus Bowl with the War Eagle Banner on Page 10A

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsMore than 300 people jammed into Azalea Park Friday, Dec. 9 for the annual Christmas in the Park celebration featuring Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus and their elves. Santa and entourage arrived at the park escorted by Public Service Officer Nancy Watts as they arrived in a horse-drawn carriage. Many visitors to the park were festively dressed and children were excited for an opportunity to tell Santa Claus their Christmas wishes. The event is sponsored by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, WCSO Volunteers, Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department and Centennial Bank and features a kiddie train, games, food, prizes, and Christmas decorations. This year the event had an outstanding turnout despite direct competition from the Wakulla War Eagle football playoff game. Dozens of children and their parents lined up in cool and dry weather to create a long line to visit with Santa Claus. WCSO Captain Larry Massa has organized the event for several years as a way for the sheriffs of ce to give back to the community. McGruff the Crime Dog visited with children and there were decorations all over the park to indicate that Christmas was just two weeks away. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHundreds turn out for Christmas in the ParkSanta and Mrs. Claus arrive at Azalea Park in a horse-drawn carriage.Dump truck plunges over bridgeContinued from Page 1A In addition to the WCSO and Wakulla EMS, Tallahassee Fire, Wakulla re ghters, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, ESG and Jackson Cook Crane Company assisted at the scene. The bridge will be closed for a while, if not forever, according to County Administrator David Edwards. Edwards gave a report to the Sopchoppy City Commission at its Dec. 12 meeting and told them an engineer had been out to inspect the bridge and to see what could be done. However, the bridge is 70 years old and might not be able to be replaced. Edwards said they plan to explore all their options, but it was good their was another bridge next to it.Boardwalk project may resumeBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter being delayed for several years, city commissioners in St. Marks are hopeful that construction of a boardwalk promised to the city by the state could start in the middle of February. City Manager Zoe Mans- eld gave the commissioners an update on the project at its Dec. 8 commission meeting. Mans eld said the state bid out for the project on Nov. 30 and it should be awarded within three weeks. She said she was also told construction could begin the second week in February 2012. Of ce of Greenways and Trails committed to building a boardwalk in St. Marks three years ago. The boardwalk will be funded by the Florida Department of Transportation. The city constructed its portion of the boardwalk already and has been waiting on its connector. The city was also told an observation tower would be constructed along with the boardwalk, but was recently told the tower did not get funded. In other news: The city also discussed the design for the streetscape that is being drafted by the engineering rm, HydroEngineering. Mans eld said the design includes sidewalks, lighting and benches. The sidewalk will also connect to the recently repaved bike trail. The city received a Community Development Block Grant for the improvements. Mans eld said once the design is nished, she would set up a workshop for the commissioners to go over the plan. Two tenants have already rented space at the old re nery site, now known as St. Marks Innovation Park, and Mans eld said several other companies have also shown some interest. The companies are interested in renting of ce space in the larger building, but Mansfield said there are repairs needing to be made before that can happen. The electric in the buildings needs to be replaced and Mans eld said an electrician quoted $2,100 to x it. She added that she also needs to make the restroom handicap accessible, get a back door for the building and x the windows. I cant rent it until I x it, Mans eld said. Mayor Chuck Shields said if the city had the money to go ahead and do the repairs necessary to start making some money off the rental space. Money received for rent can be earmarked and paid back, he added. The commission agreed and said the larger building could also be split up to allow for more businesses to utilize the space. The city also plans to repair the dock on the site so it can be used as well. The commission voted four to zero, Commissioner Keith Ward was absent, to increase the burial fees charged to out-of-town residents from $1,000 to $2.500 and also require them to be in a certain location in the cemetery. To qualify for the resident fee of $500, one must have been a resident for a minimum of three months. The commission also voted in favor of increasing its one-day occupational fee from $10 to $25. The next meeting is Jan. 12 at 7 p.m. at city hall. CITY OF ST. MARKS Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 2012 7 PMNEWS-JOURNAL CENTER DAVIDSON THEATER DAYTONA STATE COLLEGETHURSDAY, APRIL 5, 2012 7 pmTAMPA THEATRE Call: 1-800-745-3000 or www.tampatheatre.org Call: 1-800-595-4849 or http://redgreen.tix.comMakes A Great Christmas Gift Makes A Great Chri stmas Gift Makes A Great Christmas Gift

PAGE 3

By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter discovering the plan for the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council was not in the possession of the Wakulla County Commission or the Clerk of Courts back in September, the commission was urged to adopt a plan immediately. On Dec. 5, that plan was adopted unanimously by the commission. State law requires the county to adopt an ordinance which includes the plan which lays out how the revenues obtained from the bed tax will be used. According to a memo sent out by Finance Director Greg James in September, he said it was clear there was a plan in place throughout the years, but he did not know who was in possession of it. In the ordinance, the plan includes an anticipated revenue of $150,000 for the next year. Included in the use of revenue is 75 percent to promote tourism through partnerships, events and advertising. Twenty percent will be used to create promotional programs and materials that will create awareness and attract visitors to Wakulla County. Three percent will be used to educate the citizens about the potential financial impact of nature and heritage based tourism. The remaining 2 percent will be used to develop short term and long range strategic plans for tourist development. Several people have commented that the plan is too general. Resident Hugh Taylor said the plan is loose and there arent any speci c line items. If this was a private plan, I dont believe it would y, Taylor said. Commissioner Lynn Artz said she has heard concerns that the plan has a lack of detail and spoke with TDC Director Pam Portwood about it. Portwood told her the TDC plan also includes an annual action plan which lists the speci c ways the revenue will be used. Artz added that if those people with concerns looked at the TDC plan and annual action plan together, they would no longer be concerned. Also on the table at the commission meeting was to adopt an ordinance creating the Wakulla County Airport Committee which would administer the development and operation of the airport. Previously there had been some discussion of turning the airport back over to the Tarpine community, however, it was decided the airport remain county owned so it could still be eligible for state and governmental grants. Due to lack of resources and staff to operate the airport, the commission decided to create this committee made up of volunteers to run the airport. The committee will have seven members: one selected by the commission with management experience, one selected by the TDC, one selected by the commission who has nancial experience, one by the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership, two selected by the Tarpine Homeowners Association who have at least a sports pilot certificate and one by the commission who may be a county employee. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he didnt want to see the county spending money on the airport or being required to provide matching funds for a grant obtained by the committee. The commission voted unanimously to create the committee. Relating to the airport, the committee also approved the joint participation agreement with the Florida Department of Transportation for runway lighting. This is a $75,000 grant that does not require any matching funds from the county. The county originally requested $1 million for engineering design and construction of the runway, but FDOT only allocated the $75,000. The current lighting is old and needs to be upgraded, according to county staff. In other matters: The commission approved the hiring of Michael Morgan, of Dade City, as the new re chief. Morgan started on Dec. 12 and replaced Interim Chief Louis Lamarche. Morgan will receive a starting salary of $55,000. Morgan started as a volunteer re- ghter and then became a career re ghter. He has also been a chief of cer and instructor. The commission approved the award of the Ochlockonee Bay Bicycle Trail Phase I to Peavy and Son Construction Co. who were determined to be the most quali ed and lowest bidder at $450,853. The project is for a 11.63 mile multi-use trail on County Road 372. Another bid that was awarded was for the consulting services for the Big Bend Scenic Byway Wayshowing and Interpretation Plan. It was awarded to Applied Sustainability Enterprises LLC in the amount of $28,000 which will be paid for from the Local Agency Program Agreement funds provided for Phase 1 of the project. The next county commission meeting is Jan. 10 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper.Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.com By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Historical Society is hoping a revision to a land use plan for a proposed subdivision off Zion Church Road will be accepted by the state. If accepted, the society will have a home for its dream of creating the Heritage Village. The village would be a community of about 12 historic buildings, including two community schools, that have been donated by Wakulla County families. The homes were built in the late 1800s and the society is trying to save them from being destroyed and have a living museum of Wakullas history. The society was trying to nd a location for the homes, but had been unsuccessful, until they were approached by developer Ben Boynton. Boynton agreed to donate 40 acres of his property off Zion Church Road, which will be the home of the subdivision Bloxham Plantation. However, Boynton said he would only donate the property if it was also bene cial to him. He wanted to get approval to have larger lot sizes, going from one unit per 1 acre to one unit per 2 acres. Boynton said he was looking for sellability. If I cant make money, I wont do it, Boynton said. In doing this, the amount of natural state area surrounding the properties would be reduced from 45 to 20 percent. The natural state requirement is 45 percent. So there was a need for a text amendment to change this policy. Also what would need to be changed is the policy that allows 60 units when water and sewer is not available to now allow 33 units if infrastructure is not available. This text amendment would have to be sent to the state for review and if accepted, would come back before the County Commission. At the Dec. 5 County Commission meeting, the decision was made to proceed with sending the text amendment to the state, under the stipulation that Boyton enter into a written agreement with the historical society prior to coming back before the commission. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he would like to see an easement placed on the natural area so there are some form of restrictions and the county is the ultimate authority. County Attorney Heather Encinosa suggested the commission put the easement with the homeowners association so the maintenance responsibility would fall to them. Moore agreed with adding the natural state easement and said he liked that there was one on Hwy. 98. Moore said Boynton brought forth the idea about donating the land to the society and without the donation, Boynton could have gotten this amendment done faster. This is like a half a million dollar gift, Moore said. He added that this wasnt the only reason for him agreeing with the text plan amendment. Commissioner Lynn Artz said, Thats the only reason Im doing it. Artz had wanted the commission to wait until a new planning director was hired before sending the amendment to the state. However, the other commissioners did not agreed. Boynton urged the commission to move forward. Time is of the essence, Boynton said. He added that there was no reason to delay since it will come back before the commission anyway. The commission agreed to send the amendment to the state. Chairman of the Heritage Village, Murray McLaughlin, said the society would like the opportunity to develop the village. We believe we can create something that will be a tremendous bene t, McLaughlin said. It will attract people to the area. The conceptual plan for the park includes an educational center, signs and kiosks, interpretive exhibits, amphitheater and hiking trails.Heritage Village moves a step closerCOUNTY COMMISSIONBoard adopts TDC plan for spending bed tax monies Developer Ben Boynton offers to donate 40 acres to the county, in exchange for larger lot sizes for homes The Tourist Development Council lays out its plan for promoting visitors to Wakulla County If this was a private plan, I dont believe it would y, says one critic about he lack of detail in the TDC plan.BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REGULAR BOARD MEETING MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2011Board of County Commissioners in and for Wakulla County, Florida met for a regular scheduled Board Meeting on Monday, November 21, 2011 with Chairman Mike Stewart presiding. Present were Commissioners Brock, Artz, Merritt, and Moore. Also, present were County Administrator David Edwards, County Attorney Heather Encinosa and Deputy Clerk Evelyn Evans. Invocation and Pledge of Allegiance led by Commissioner Stewart Swearing-In Ceremony of Chairman and Vice Chairman for 2011/2012 Judge Jill Walker Judge Walker administered the Oath of Ofce as Vice Chairman to Commissioner Merritt and administered the Oath of Ofce as Chairman to Commissioner Brock. Seating arrangements were changed at this time with Chairman Brock and Vice Chairman Merritt taking their perspective places on the Dias. Chairman Brock presided over the meeting from this point APPROVAL OF AGENDA (CD5:12) Commissioner Merritt moved to approve the Agenda with the following changes/modications: Commissioner Stewart requests to add under Awards and Presentations a brief comment regarding a Volunteer County Attorney Table item (7) on the Consent Agenda for a future meeting, under Awards and Presentations Our Town presentation tabled to the next meeting Commissioner Artz requests to add an Announcement and pull item (11) on the Consent Agenda for discussion Under Awards and Presentations, add Operation Santa Second by Commissioner Stewart and the motion carried unanimously, 5/0. PUBLIC HEARING (CD5:13) 1. Request Board Approval to Conduct the Public Hearing and Consider Adopting the Proposed Ordinance Amending the Commissioner Districts of Wakulla County Commissioner Merritt moved to approve to conduct the Public Hearing and adopt the proposed Ordinance adjusting the Boundary Lines for the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners. Second by Commissioner Artz and the motion carried unanimously, 5/0. DISTRICT 1 The boundary lines of District One are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Wakulla Springs Road and the northerly county line of Wakulla County; thence easterly along the county line to its intersection with the Tallahassee-St. Marks Bike Trail (old Tallahassee to St. Marks railroad); thence southerly along the county line and the Tallahassee-St. Marks Bike Trail to a point at which the county line runs easterly; thence leaving the Tallahassee-St. Marks Bike Trail run easterly along the county line to a point at which the county line runs southerly; thence southerly along the county line to its intersection with Coastal Highway; thence westerly along Coastal Highway to its intersection with the northeastern most point of Census Block 3019 within Tract 0102.02; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3019 to its intersection with River Plantation Road; thence northerly along River Plantation Road to its intersection with Hunters Trace; thence northerly along Hunters Trace to its intersection with the eastern boundary of Census Block 3012 within Tract 0102.02; thence run Northerly along the Eastern boundary of said Census Block 3012 to the Northeast corner of said Census Block 3012; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3012 to its intersection with River Plantation Road; thence northerly along River Plantation Road to the intersection with Shadeville Road; thence westerly along Shadeville Road to its intersection with Casseaux Road, thence northerly along Casseaux Road to its intersection with Wakulla Arran Road; thence easterly along Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with the western point of Census Block 1071 within Tract 0102.03; thence northerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 1071 to its intersection with Wakulla Springs Road; thence northwesterly along Wakulla Springs Road to its intersection with Bloxham Cutoff Road; thence northwesterly along Bloxham Cutoff Road to its intersection with old Shell Point Road; thence northeasterly along said Old Shell Point Road to its intersection with Wakulla Springs Road; thence northerly along said Wakulla Springs Road to the intersection with the county line and the place of Beginning. DISTRICT 2 The boundary lines of District Two are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Wakulla Springs Road and the northerly county line of Wakulla County; thence southerly along Wakulla Springs Road to its intersection with Old Shell Point Road; thence southwesterly along Old Shell Point Road to its intersection with Bloxham Cutoff Road; thence southeasterly along Bloxham Cutoff Road to its intersection with Wakulla Springs Road; thence southeasterly along Wakulla Springs Road to its intersection with the northern boundary of Census Block 1071 within Tract 0102.03; thence southerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 1071 to its intersection with Wakulla Arran Road; thence westerly along Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with Casseaux Road; thence southerly along Casseaux Road to its intersection with Shadeville Road; thence westerly along Shadeville Road to its intersection with Cajer Posey Road; thence northerly along Cajer Posey Road to its intersection with Wakulla Arran Road; thence westerly along Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with Birch Court and also being the westerly boundary of Census Block 3078 within Tract 0102.03; thence northwesterly along the west boundary of said Census Block 3078 to its intersection with the southeasterly corner of Census Block 3076 within Tract 0102.03; thence westerly along the southern boundary of said Census Block 3076 to the most western boundary of said Census Block 3076; thence northeasterly along said Census Block 3076 to the southeastern corner of Census Block 3061 within Tract 0102.03; thence northerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 3061 to its intersection with the northern boundary of said Census Block 3061; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3061 and the northern boundary of Census Block 3067 within Tract 0102.03 to its intersection with Government Road; thence northeasterly along said Government Road to its intersection with Forest Road 313; thence northerly, westerly and easterly along Forest Road 313 to its intersection with Bloxham Cutoff Road; thence northwesterly along Bloxham Cutoff Road to its intersection with the northerly county line of Wakulla County; thence easterly along the county line to its intersection with Wakulla Springs Road and the place of Beginning. DISTRICT 3 The boundary lines of District Three are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Crawfordville Highway and Wakulla Arran Road; thence easterly along Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with Cajer Posey Road; thence southerly along Cajer Posey Road to its intersection with Shadeville Road; thence easterly along Shadeville Road to its intersection with Hickorywood Drive; thence southerly along Hickorywood Drive to its intersection with Maplewood Drive; thence easterly along Maplewood Drive to its intersection with Beechwood Drive; thence southerly and easterly along Beechwood Drive to its intersection with Spring Creek Highway; thence southerly along Spring Creek Highway to its intersection with Coastal Highway; thence westerly and southerly along Coastal Highway to its intersection with Casora Drive; thence westerly along Casora Drive to its intersection with Evalee Road; thence northerly along Evalee Road to its intersection with Glover Daddy Road; thence westerly along Glover Daddy Road to its intersection with Casora Drive; thence northerly and westerly along Casora Drive to its intersection with Crawfordville Highway; thence northerly along Crawfordville Highway to place of Beginning. DISTRICT 4 The boundary lines of District Four are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Coastal Highway with the easterly County line of Wakulla County; thence southerly along the County line to the boundary line of the State of Florida in the Gulf of Mexico; thence westerly to a point directly north of the easternmost point of St. James Island (Bald Point); thence westerly to the center point of the U.S. 98 Bridge across Ochlockonee Bay; thence westerly along the County line to the southernmost point of Census Block 3034 within in Tract 0101.00, thence northerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3034 and along Surf Road to the intersection with the western boundary of Census Block 3035 within Tract 0101.00; thence northerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 3035 and along the right of way of Surf Road; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3035 to its intersection with the western boundary of Section 34 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence northerly along the western boundary of said Section 34 to the northwest corner of said Section 34; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Section 34 to the northeast corner of said Section 34, also being the southwest corner of Section 26 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence northerly along the western boundaries of Sections 26, 23 and 14 of Township 5 South Range 2 West to the northwest corner of said Section 14; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Section 14 and also Section 13 in Township 5 South Range 2 West to the northeast corner of said Section 13 and also being the southeast corner of Section 12 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence northerly along the eastern boundary of said Section 12 to the southwest corner of Hartseld Survey Lot 111; thence easterly along the southern boundary of said Lot 111 to its intersection with the eastern boundary of Census Block 3085 within Tract 0101.00; thence northerly along the meanders of said Census Block 3085 and along a portion of Purify Bay Road to its intersection with the southern boundary of Census Block 2057 within Tract 0102.00; thence easterly, southeasterly and easterly along the southern boundary of said Census Block 2057 to the western boundary of Hartseld Survey Lot 114; thence northerly along the westerly boundary of Hartseld Survey Lots 114, 104 and 94 to the intersection with Jack Crum Road; thence easterly and southeasterly along Jack Crum Road to its intersection with Spring Creek Highway; thence northerly along Spring Creek Highway to its intersection with Beechwood Drive; thence westerly and northerly along said Beechwood Drive to its intersection with Maplewood Drive; thence westerly along Maplewood Drive to its intersection with Hickorywood Drive; thence northerly along Hickorywood Drive to its intersection with Shadeville Road; thence easterly along Shadeville Road to its intersection with River Plantation Road; thence southerly along River Plantation Road to the northern boundary of Census Block 3012 within Tract 0102.02; thence easterly along the northern boundary and southerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3012 to its intersection with Hunters Trace; thence southerly along Hunters Trace to its intersection with River Plantation Road; thence southerly along River Plantation Road to its intersection with the northern boundary of Census Block 3019 within Tract 0102.02; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3019 to its intersection with Coastal Highway; thence easterly along Coastal Highway to the Point of Beginning. DISTRICT 5 The boundary lines of District Five are as follows: Beginning at the intersection of Bloxham Cutoff Road and the northerly boundary of the county line of Wakulla County; thence southeasterly along said Bloxham Cutoff Road to its intersection with Forest Road 313; thence southerly, easterly and westerly along said Forest Road 313 to its intersection with Government Road; thence southwesterly along Government Road to its intersection with the northern boundary of Census Block 3067 within Tract 0102.03; thence easterly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3067 and also along the northern boundary of Census Block 3061 within Tract 0102.03 to the intersection with the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3061; thence southerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3061 to the intersection with the northernmost point of Census Block 3076 within Tract 0102.03; thence southwesterly and easterly along the boundary of said Census Block 3076 to the intersection of the western boundary of Census Block 3078 within Tract 0102.03; thence southerly along the western boundary of said Census Block 3078 to its intersection with Birch Court and Wakulla Arran Road; thence northeasterly along said Wakulla Arran Road to its intersection with Crawfordville Highway; thence southerly along Crawfordville Highway to its intersection with Casora Drive; thence easterly along Casora Drive to its intersection with Glover Daddy Road; thence northeasterly along Glover Daddy Road to its intersection with Evalee Road; thence southeasterly along Evalee Road to its intersection with Casora Drive; thence southeasterly along Casora Drive to its intersection with Coastal Highway; thence northeasterly along Coastal Highway to its intersection with Spring Creek Highway; thence southerly along Spring Creek Highway to its intersection with Jack Crum Road; thence westerly and northwesterly along Jack Crum Road to its intersection with the northwest corner of Hartseld Survey Lot 94; thence southeasterly along the western boundary of said Lot 94 and the western boundaries of Hartseld Survey Lots 104 and 114 to its intersection with Census Block 2057 within Tract 0102.00; thence westerly, northerly and westerly along the southerly boundary of said Census Block 2057 to its intersection with Purify Bay Road and the eastern boundary of Census Block 3085 within Tract 0101.00; thence southerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3085 to a point where it intersects with the southerly boundary of Hartseld Survey Lot 111; thence westerly along the southern boundary of said Lot 111 to a point on the eastern boundary of Section 12 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence southerly along the eastern boundary of said Section 12 to the southeast corner of said Section 12, and also being the northeast corner of Section 13 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence westerly along the northern boundaries of Sections 13 and 14 in Township 5 South Range 2 West to the northwest corner of said Section 14; thence southerly along the western boundaries of Sections 14, 23 and 26 in Township 5 South Range 2 West to the southwest corner of said Section 26, also being the northeast corner of Section 34 in Township 5 South Range 2 West; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Section 34 to the northwesterly corner of said Section 34; thence southerly along the western boundary of said Section 34 to its intersection with the northern boundary of Census Block 3035 within Tract 0101.00; thence westerly along the northern boundary of said Census Block 3035 to its intersection with Census Block 3034 within Tract 0101.00 and with the right of way of Surf Road; thence southerly along the eastern boundary of said Census Block 3034 to the most southerly point of said Census Block 3034; thence westerly and northerly along the county line and the meanders of Ochlockonee River to a point at which the county line runs easterly; thence easterly along the county line to its intersection with Bloxham Cutoff Road and the place of Beginning. AWARDS AND PRESENTATIONS Update Regarding Our Town Committee John Shuff This item was tabled to a future date (CD5:17) Announcement of Wakulla County Swine Show Todd Carlton The Swine Show is February 25, 2012 and support is requested from the BOCC and citizens (CD5:21) Commissioner Stewart Mr. George Crump was not present, but Commissioner Stewart wanted to thank him publicly for volunteering his time in raking, mowing and picking up pine straw at Azalea Park (CD5:22) Operation Santa Bruce Ashley Requesting Community support with November 25, 2011 as the last day to sign a family up for Adoption, please call 926-3526. Donations may be made at the Library, Wakulla County Sheriffs Department on Oak Street or the Sheriffs Ofce annex on Shadeville Highway Commissioner Artz announced Tuesday, November 22, 2011 is the Community Thanksgiving at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens from 4:00 7:00 p.m. These minutes approved by the Board on December 5, 2011, as presented by Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk.DECEMBER 15, 22, 2011

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: War Eagles win in triple overtime Dump truck plunges over Sopchoppy River bridge School board keeps salaries at $25,416 RMS students collected food for holiday Thank you for helping with fundraiser Coast Guard Auxiliary for Dec. 15 Wakulla UMC to hold annual Christmas Bazaar thewakullanews.com Follow us onBy SHERIFF DONNIE CRUM Many residents of Wakulla County may not be aware that for the last 20 years the Wakulla County Jail has been producing revenue for the countys General Fund. The General Fund is the county commissions bank account that provides funding for the board to operate the county. Former Sheriff David Harvey determined that the only way the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office could fund a new jail that was being mandated in the late 1980s was to rent jail bed space to federal agencies. The jail-bed rental revenue has allowed the sheriffs of- ce to operate the jail and corrections budget but also provide money back to the county commission. The jail-bed rental concept was important years ago when Harvey suggested the funding option, but it has become even more critical as Florida and Wakulla County have been hit by hard economic times. After reviewing the Fiscal Year 2011-2012 budget gures it was determined that revenue from rented jail-bed space amounts to more than 13 percent of the total General Revenue account. Additional statistics show the Wakulla County Jail supporting more than 56 percent of the WCSOs total budget. It has never been an easy task to house approximately 115 Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detainees and U.S. Marshals Of ce inmates. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Corrections Division must meet additional standards as well as supplying inmates with special medical attention, providing for special dietary needs and even television privileges. The federal jail-bed contract helps our local economy because the funding supports jobs at the WCSO and within the community where local physicians and vendors all bene t. Wakulla County has also come out ahead nancially as a result of these efforts. ICE officials recently inspected the Wakulla County Jail over a three-day visit and were pleased to continue the contract. During the late summer months, Wakulla County Commissioners were faced with a budget shortfall and revenue from the Jail-Bed Rental or Rainy Day Fund helped rescue the county from a state of financial emergency. A transfer of $750,000 from the fund in August 2011 helped the county and the General Fund meet current obligations. The Wakulla County JailBed Revenue has played a large role over the 20 years the contact has been in place. The Jail-Bed Revenue brought in $544,856 more than anticipated for Fiscal Year 2010-11 and allowed for the $750,000 to be transferred from the Jail-Bed Rainy Day Fund to the county this year which funded the Fiscal Year 20092010 de cit. It is important to also note that the county auditor stated that the existence of $1,375,795 in the Rainy Day Fund prevented the county from falling into a state of nancial emergency status in the most recent audit. Harveys original insight saved the county from a more dire nancial condition. Hopefully, Florida and Wakulla Countys economy will begin to strengthen. Wakulla has lost one-third of what the millage rate brought in during the boom year of 2005. Fortunately, the federal jail bed revenue has been a relatively consistent source of revenue and an economic boost. Donnie W. Crum is sheriff of Wakulla County.Jail-bed contract helps economy Editor, The News: At the last BOCC meeting, I addressed one issue, the condition of the Tourist Development Councils Visit Wakulla website. However, after thinking it over, I have concluded it is an indication of a major problem with our board. Two commissioners, Mr. Stewart and Mr. Brock, have exhibited in the past and again now, their willingness to accept what they are told by staff without checking for themselves. My initial attempt two weeks earlier was to just call attention to the TDC web page. I was totally unprepared for the reaction and lack of decorum that erupted in that workshop. These two commissioners, the director of TDC and audience were permitted to inject their lack of respect to the podium. At the following BoCC meeting, Dec. 5th, I came prepared with a CD and printed documentation for each commissioner of what is on the TDC web page. Note: The last date a change is made on a page, is automatically entered by Joomla, the public domain platform on which this website is developed. Reviewing the site seven days later, after the debacle, I printed examples of what potential visitors will nd by looking at this site and found nothing had been changed since the meeting. It is lled with errors, omissions, inaccuracies, incomplete statements and nepotisms. Going to various links reveal many dont work, there is lack of information and the coupons I viewed were out of date. Calling several of the listed phone numbers indicated that they had been changed or disconnected! A picture of the largest athead cat sh caught in Milton, or an advertisement for Alligator Point does not stimulate interest in this county. There is no link for all the other businesses or the Chamber of Commerce or FWC. I found no mention of hosting the Whooping Cranes in winter, a world class birding event. Nor did I nd Sopchoppy Opry and the Worm Gruntin Festival mentioned, both events rapidly becoming a national interest. Commissioners Stewart and Brock, you have had your chance; it is time to leave before you infect other commissioners with your inability to accept the truth. It is not professional for Ms. Portwood to report to the BOCC that the tourist information for our county is current and complete when it is not. Wakulla County Citizen, Charles Hickman CrawfordvilleTDCs website doesnt promote WakullaREADERS WRITE:Who approved sheri s o ce sign?Editor, The News: I saw the photo, New sign at sheriffs of ce in last weeks paper. I remembered the meeting and agenda item and was under the impression that the Board of County Commissioners voted for a plaque on the sheriffs of ce administration building not some big old ugly wall decoration. I wanted to make sure and I watched the tape of the meeting. It is on YouTube. The commission did vote for a plaque, just like the one on the BOCC administration building. I went to the meeting video online and there it was after much discussion it was decided to put a plaque on the building that did not cost much. Instead of a plaque, though, was this wall lettering at the entrance to the complex. I asked my husband to nd out if he could get the cost of doing the wall. Imagine my surprise when I found out it cost $1,447.26 and that was just for the lettering, not counting labor taking off the old and putting on the new. I thought the commission made the right decision at the time, but their vote was ignored. If the sheriffs department wanted the wall, why didnt they say so at the meeting? The tape shows them saying a plaque was OK. And heres the item from the minutes with the vote: COMMISSIONER AGENDA ITEMS 12. COMMISSIONER MOORE (CD6:36) a. Request Board Approval to Name the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Building as the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Center Commissioner Moore moved to approve to name the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Building as the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Center. The name to be on a plaque and mounted on the Building. Second by Commissioner Brock with Commissioners Stewart, Brock, Merritt and Moore in favor, Commissioner Artz opposed, and the motion carried, 4/1. (The plaque to be similar to the one on the County Commission Complex honoring Anita Townsend) Why were the wishes of the commission ignored? Because its better to ask for forgiveness than permission? The commission voted because it was a public building, so who ignored them and gave the go ahead? More importantly, why was their vote ignored? I did my homework and have documented everything. I guess the bigger question is the law. Is it against the law to ignore a vote of the county commission? And, if it is, who broke it, the person ordering the letters or someone higher up? And why? Mary Cortese CrawfordvilleA Christmas present we didnt wantEditor, The News: This was going to be about Christmas. In a way it is, because we almost received a present we really wouldnt want. It was the hold my beer and watch this moment for Commissioner Alan Brock and the Chamber of Commerce on Dec. 5th, when they tried to get alcohol permitted in public buildings and parks. Many believe it was just a way to get drinking allowed at the old courthouse, which is a county building, but that would never y. So for one action, disguised as a special events ordinance, they wasted a lot of the attorneys time and our money. For leading this effort, Chairman Brock, given the season, should be spanked and coal put in his stocking! And the other commissioners should be thanked for stopping the half-baked proposal that was offered. At this meeting Commissioner Brock, in concert with the chamber, tried to slip this thing through. This whole thing subverted normal processes and was hidden from the public. And while special events was the topic, the real aim was drinking at the old courthouse, with special exemptions, appeals and co-sponsorships, which means if youre connected, you dont have to pay. Taxpayers pay and were liable. No one but those in favor of this proposal was solicited. The churches were ignored. Teachers were ignored. Citizens concerned with taxpayer liability were ignored. Heck, the sheriffs department was ignored! All the stakeholders contacted were only those in favor. Make no mistake, there was no concern for the public stake. Over time, this thing, besides changing the whole culture of Wakulla County, would come back to haunt us. Just as barrel racing in Gretna is not about barrels or racing, but about casino gambling, the special events item pushed on this agenda was about alcohol, the word used more than 100 times in the proposal. More simply, it was about the use of alcohol in our publicly-owned old courthouse which the chamber rents for $1 per year, making the liability doubly dangerous. Something happens, we pay. Dr. Martin Luther King said the arc of history always bends towards justice but I guess he never made it to Wakulla County, where history has bent towards inequity and special privilege, and where selective enforcement has been the rule. And why are Chairman Brock and the chamber pushing this anyway? This policy puts them in direct competition with businesses they are supposed to be supporting all those private businesses that could use a good wedding reception or party to help their business. So the next time youre thinking wheres the jobs? think Chairman Brock. Wanna drink? Drink at home, all you want. Not on public property where taxpayers have to pick up the tab if anything happens. The chamber wangled the old courthouse for $1 a year that the taxpayers already subsidize and now are trying to present the falsehood that beer and wine are somehow different from that demon, hard likker and privatize their gains and subsidize their losses with taxpayer money. So the next time you hear about the War on Christmas remember this moment in time and this Christmas season, when Commissioner Brock and the chamber the folks who are bringing you higher taxes disguised as fees, tried to bring you, once again, a Christmas gift of expanded and unfunded liability, special treatment and selective entitlement and enforcement. I dont want to accuse them of the total and systematic destruction of Wakulla culture and life here, just the good parts. Their Christmas gift to us will be the never-ending attempt at drinking in public buildings and parks. So make your list. And check it often. This naughtiness will never end. Hugh Taylor Crawfordville Family appreciates prayers after lossEditor, The News: The Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee hosted the 2011 WDEC Gala at Wakulla Springs Lodge on Saturday, Dec. 10. Much time, effort and planning helped us to create an inspirational evening. Our program featured Democratic leaders from near and far who alternately brought us to tears, made us laugh, left us inspired and prepared to elect Democrats in 2012. Thank you to our featured program speakers including Tallahassee City Commissioner Andrew Gillum, Representative Scott Randolph and Susannah Randolph, and Wisconsin State Senator Jessica King. The support of our business community and elected of cials contributed to the success of this event. Special thanks are expressed to Commissioner Alan Brock, Commissioner Randy Merritt, Superintendent David Miller, Mayor Colleen Skipper, Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman, Clerk of Court Brent Thurmond, Representative Leonard Bembry and Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells. Numerous silent auction donors gave generously to support the Gala. Thank you to Robbie Baker, Alan Brock, Verna Brock, Glen Campbell, Audrey Franklin, Joan Hendrix, Ken Hendrix, Dan Hinchee, Jane Jones, Tony Livingston, Clay Lovell, Jo Ann Palmer, Jane Parker, Al Pasini, Stefan Pedlar, Rachel Pienta, Beverly Roberts, David Roddenberry, Jack Rudloe and Diane Wilson. The next meeting of the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee is at 7 p.m. on Jan. 12, at the Wakulla County Public Library. We invite you to join us we will be making plans for 2012 and each meeting, on second Thursdays in 2012, will feature elected of cials and candidates. Come at 6:30 p.m. to enjoy cookies and fellowship with other Wakulla Democrats. For more information, please visit us on Facebook or visit our website at www. wakullademocrats.org. Thank you. The 2011 WDEC Gala Committee Editor, The News: Thank you to everyone for the encouraging words, prayers, food and owers during our recent bereavement. We will always miss our mother, but your kindnesses helped ease the pain of her passing. A special thanks to Spirit Life Church and the Southern Baptist Church in Sopchoppy. Family of Madelyn J. Crowson anks for support of Democratic Gala

PAGE 5

Continued from Page 1A Miller asked for support for his usual requests: sparsity funding for schools and support for regional education consortia, as well as support for district transportation programs. He also urged the legislature to reauthorize allowing school boards to levy local option taxes. The .25-mill levy that the Wakulla School Board passed, and local voters approved, sunsets this year and cannot be levied again. Formerly, school boards could pass a local-option tax levy of up to 2 mills, but the legislature has whittled away at that. The bulk of the millage approved by the Wakulla School Board now is required local effort taxes, required to be passed to get state education dollars, and some to pay off outstanding bond debt. Miller noted that nearly 80 percent of the money to operate Wakullas schools comes from the state, not local taxes. Legislators appeared sympathetic to Millers comments. Before being elected senator, Montford retired as Leon Countys Superintendent of Schools and was a principal for years. Rep. Coley still lists her occupation on her state website as a teacher, and is employed by Chipola Junior College in Marianna. COMMISSIONER ALAN BROCK County Commission Chairman Alan Brock noted that the countys government also relies on state funds to operate, and asked that there be no cuts in that money. This years budget includes $4.5 million in state funding in the countys general fund. In Wakulla County, where 1 mill equals $1 million, it would mean commissioners would have to levy more than 4.37 mills to try to replace that money which they couldnt do, he said, because it would put them above the 10 mill cap. Brock urged the local delegation to support state workers, noting that a large number of Wakulla residents are employed by the state and that the local economy depends on them. He also asked for continued support for state programs for roads and other infrastructure. Brock introduced the countys new administrator David Edwards, and said that staff members including Tim Barden and Jessica Welch will be working closely with legislators this year. Other commissioners who attended the meeting were Mike Stewart and Jerry Moore. They did not speak. Besides Brock and Miller, the only other elected official who spoke at the meeting was Sopchoppys vice-mayor, Richard Harden, who told of the citys goal of making Sochoppy a destination, and asked for any assistance identifying grants that could be used for improving the small community. FISHERMEN As he has for years, commercial sherman Richard Van Munster urged legislators to do something to help shermen get a legal net. Since the constitutional amendment that limited net shing the so-called net ban passed in 1994, local shermen have been ghting for a legal mullet net. Much of the battle has been fought in the courts and has focused on what constitutes a gill net. As it now stands, the state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has rules that limit seine nets to a maximum net size of two inches stretched. Fishermen contend, and have a pending lawsuit in circuit court arguing, that those small-mesh nets violate the intent of the net limitation because the gear catches only juvenile mullet before they have had a chance to spawn. Van Munster asked legislators to do something to curtail the power of the FWC, which he charged is answerable to no one. He asked the lawmakers to take away the FWCs budget in order to force them to see reason. Ronald Fred Crum, the Panacea businessman who operates Crums Mini-Mall and is president of Wakulla Fishermens Association and has been the driving force behind years of the shing battles, didnt talk about net shing instead he bemoaned the impact of the state and federal closure of the gag grouper season. Its not a shing issue, Crum told lawmakers. Its an economic issue. He complained that Gulf coast communities, already strained by the downturn in the economy and then compounded by last years BP oil spill, now face the challenge of the grouper season being closed and that its keeping tourists away. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 5A PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENWakullas legislative delegation was in Crawfordville last week: Rep. Leonard Bembry, D-Greenville, Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, and Rep. Marti Coley, R-Marianna.Legislative delegation visits Wakulla Ronald Fred Crum makes a point about grouper rules. Rep. Marti Coley responds to a question.Democrats hold a gala at Wakulla SpringsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netMore than a hundred people turned out for a fundraising reception for the local Democratic Party on Saturday, Dec. 10, at Wakulla Springs Lodge. Wisconsin State Sen. Jessica King told the audience how she was elected to of ce and her vigorous opposition to the policies of Wisconsins Republican Governor Scott Walker. Gov. Walker and Wisconsin drew national attention with proposals to do away with collective bargaining rights of state employees there. King ran for the state Senate seat held by a Republican supporter of Walkers. For all the politics of the evening, Kings personal story of overcoming obstacles to reach elected of ce was heart-wrenching. At 4 years old, growing up in Oshkosh, Wis., she was told by a policeman that her father was sick and she needed to live with her mom. When she was 15, her mother also became ill and she had to live with a foster family. One week of the month, we would eat good, she said. The last week, not so sure. She would come home at age 17 to perhaps nd the electricity off. She went to work in a factory and was later accepted into the University of Wisconsin at Oshkosh. She has since been elected to the Oshkosh City Council, and is currently a lawyer. In her life, King credits those state employees who helped her at each of the transitional moments of her life: policemen, social workers, teachers. I wouldnt be where I am without them, she said. Those are precisely the people who would be affected by the Wisconsin effort to stop collective bargaining, she said. She closed her speech by saying what Wisconsin Democrats were saying to their governor: Wisconsin is open for business, but our values are not for sale. It drew a standing ovation from the crowd. Besides a dinner at the lodge, the event featured a silent auction with numerous items for sale. Commission Chairman Alan Brock acted as Master of Ceremonies for the evening. Other local elected of- cials at the gala included Superintendent of Schools David Miller, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah and Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper. Guests included Tallahassee City Commissioner Andrew Gillum and state Rep. Scott Randolph of Orlando and former Rep. Curtis Richardson. Wisconsin State Sen. Jessica King gave the keynote speech, telling her emotional story of overcoming obstacles.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENDemocratic women Verna Brock, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, Shirley Howard and Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper at the gala. Notice of Change in Policy of White Church Cemetery a/k/a Woodville CemeteryFor everyone who has Reserved plots in White Church Cemetery or who plans to be buried in White Church Cemetery, notice is provided that:1. All plots that are RESERVED must be paid for by February 29, 2012, or the reservation will become void. Plots may be nanced for a six-month period and they will stay reserved in your name during the nancing period as long as payments are made on time. 2. Reservations that people have based on oral family history will become void on March 1, 2012, unless proof is provided of some agreement or transaction with the Church or a previous cemetery manager showing that the plots were given to the family. Contact our Cemetery Manager to provide her the proof, or to show her which plots in your RESERVED section you are turning back in and which ones you want to purchase. 3. Plot price will go up on January 1, 2013. 4. People who have PAID plots are requested to provide the Cemetery Manager with the name of the person to be buried in each plot. This is for your protection so no mixups occur in large families. 5. We have contracted with a professional Cemetery Manager to manage all aspects of the cemetery operations and to assure compliance with the cemetery rules. Her name is Angela Cassidy, and her telephone number is 694-8774. E-mail: Ancestor_Lady@ yahoo.com E-mail her for a copy of the REVISED Cemetery Rules ef fective November 2011. White Church Cemetery is a private cemetery and you must be a member in good standing of the Church or have family buried in the cemetery to be eligible to be buried there. Make checks for plots or donations for cemetery maintenance to White Church Cemetery, and mail to P. O. Box 112, Woodville, FL 32362. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PA RTN ER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUNCH PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS Interior Remodeling Bathroom Kitchens Doors Floors30 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827 (850) 745 Cell (850) 570

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Brenda Joyce Baggett Madelyn Joyce Crowson Joan E. Harrison Katie WhetstoneCoastal Church NewsWakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Madelyn J. CrowsonMadelyn Joyce Crowson, 86, died on Thursday, Dec. 8, at Tallahassee Memorial Regional Medical Center. She was a lifelong resident of Sopchoppy and was a retired bookkeeper and secretary at Wakulla High School. She was a founder and member of Spirit Life Church in Sopchoppy, formerly known as Ochlockonee Christian Center. Services will be held at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist on Sunday, Dec. 11 at 2 p.m. Burial will follow at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. Viewing will be held Saturday, Dec. 10 from 3 to 5 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Survivors include two sons, Roger Dale Crowson (Nancy) and Robert Walker Crowson (Linda) both of Sopchoppy; ve daughters, Belinda Marlene McElroy (Mitch) of Sopchoppy, Marcia Ray Bishop of Florida City, and Brenda Joy Wilson, Wanda Sue Teat (Eric) and Beverly Ann Parish (Dan) all of Apalachicola; four sisters, Mildred Willis of Sopchoppy, Mahaley Ruth Smith of Panacea, Janelle Crawford of Pensacola and Donna Dees of Tampa; one brother, Bobby Sanders of Pelham, Ga.; 16 grandchildren and 28 great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Oscar W. Crowson; her parents, Nathaniel Walker and Gladys Sanders; two sisters, Marcia Inez Vause and Marjorie Gray; a brother, Nathaniel Walker Sanders Jr.; and a grandson, Justin Wilson. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333).Joan E. HarrisonJoan E. Harrison, 80, passed away Saturday, Dec. 10, in Tallahassee. She had been in this area 11 years, coming from Lakeland. She was a Catholic. She loved baking and square dancing. She was a loving wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Visitation will be Thursday, Dec. 15, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville. A mass will be held Friday, Dec. 15, at 11 a.m. at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church in Crawfordville. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis TN 38105-1942. She is survived by her husband of 45 years, Urban E. Harrison of Crawfordville; two daughters, Paulette McElroy of Havana and Terri Volsch (Donald) of Crawfordville; three grandchildren, Matthew McElroy, Daniel McElroy (Jana) and Donnie Volsch; and great-grandchild, Kaylee McElroy. She was predeceased by two sisters and one brother. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) is in charge of arrangements. Brenda J. BaggettBrenda Joyce Baggett, 64, of Crawfordville, died Dec. 8, at Shands University of Florida Hospital in Gainesville. Survivors include two sons, Kevin Baggett of Graceville and Chris Baggett of Crawfordville; a daughter, Deanna Revell of Crawfordville; brothers, Bobby Moran of Marianna and Jim Moran of Tallahassee; sisters, Sherry Forehand (Don) of Tallahassee and Mary Ann Ham of Niceville; and eight grandchildren. Funeral services will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 17, at Maddox Chapel in Gainesville. Interment will follow at Riverside Cemetery with James and Sikes Funeral Home Maddox Chapel directing. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service. Expressions of sympathy may be made online at www. jamesandsikesfuneralhome.com. Katie WhetstoneKatie Whetstone, 84, passed away Tuesday, Dec. 13. She was born in Racepond, Ga., to Fred Tucker and Nancy (Grif n) Tucker but they moved to Florida shortly afterwards. After her mom passed away at the age of 9 she moved to Panacea with her sister Bessie who raised her with her daughters, Dorothy, Joy, Shirl and Nancy. After having a heart attack she stayed with her daughter in Port Charlotte but her beloved Panacea was always home and she returned as often as she could. In her early years, she was a nurses aide at W.T. Edwards Tuberculosis Hospital and Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Then she ran three restaurants in Panacea at different times in her life: the Blue Willow Lodge, Katies Coastal Restaurant and the B&K that she and her sisters Bessie and Bertha operated together. She was a longtime member of the First Baptist Church of Panacea and also a member of the Visually Impaired Persons in Port Charlotte. She will be greatly missed by her son Danny (Darleen) Whetstone; her daughter, Kathy (Wayne) Richardson; her ve grandchildren who were the joy of her life, Danny (Marilyn) Whetstone, Andy (Kim) Richardson, Daynna (Bobby) Mitchell, Danae (Steven) Ollila and David Whetstone; 18 greatgrandchildren; her sisters, Dorothy Stephens, Shirley Brown and Nancy Barwick; and many beloved nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband of 43 years, Woodrow Whetstone. She uniquely loved each of her sisters and brothers, Bessie Revell, Bertha Reynolds, Rosa Lee Crum, Grace Hall, Joy Carraway, Theodore Tucker, Jack Tucker, Cicero Tucker, Joe King and Melton Tucker. She was predeceased by nephews, Buddy Hall, Glenwood Crum and Derrick Barwick; and by her great niece, Debbie Armstrong. She loved life, loved people and always wanted to help those in need. She would always say when a person is in need try to help them. Youll never go wrong caring and sharing. Visitation will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Friday, Dec. 16 at Panacea First Baptist Church. A memorial service to celebrate her life will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 17 also at Panacea First Baptist Church. Her son, Danny Whetstone, Pastor David Carraway and grandson, David Whetstone will of ciate. Burial will follow at Panacea Cemetery. Bevis Funeral Home/Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of the arrangements. Christmas is supposed to be a joyous time, but each year some people the grieving, the lonely, the hopeless dread the approach of the holiday season. They have no heart for the cheer and the bustle, the anticipation and the excitement. Crawfordville United Methodist Church will offer a time of remembrance and recognition of those struggles as well as a message of comfort and hope for the future during a Service of Hope for the Holidays on Friday, Dec. 16 at 7 pm. The service is open to anyone in the community who knows this Christmas will be a hard one because of a death in the family, a broken relationship, nancial struggles or other life challenges. A time for refreshments and fellowship will follow the service. If you or someone you know is not feeling the joy of this season, we encourage you to join us. Contact the church at 926-7209 for more informa-tion.Service offers hope for the holidays Panacea Full Gospel Assembly 12 Taylor Street, Panacea ParkCOME CELEBRATEWITH U STHEBIRTHOF JESUS GOSPEL SIN GSATURDAY, DEC 17 7 P.M. Special Singing by Lewis & L ewis L ocal singing and fellowship EVERYONEISI NVITED

PAGE 7

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 7AhappeningsCommunity Tree of Remembrance 2011 Big Bend Hospice2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.org Please visit the Wakulla County Trees located in Crawfordville: Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial BankDedicate a bell, bow, or angel in honor or memory of someone you love!Barrett graduates from FlaglerOn Dec. 11, Allison Barrett graduated magna cum laude from Flagler College with a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting. She has been an employee with Wakulla Bank, now Centennial Bank, for the past six years and recently supervisor at the branch in St. Marks. Husband, Derrick, works for General Dynamics at St. Marks Powder and daughter, Taylor, is in third grade. She nished her Associates degree at Tallahassee Community College two years ago at night school and then transferred to Flagler. She is the daughter of Ralph and Debby Brooks of Crawfordville, and George Fasthoff and Lisa Vince of Panacea and Tallahassee. The Barrett familyWakulla County is well represented at fairBy SHERRI KRAEFTWakulla County 4-H AgentFor those of us at the Extension Of ce lucky enough to be involved in the planning and production side of the North Florida Fair, this year was particularly exciting. Each year, we are responsible for installing two booths at the fair that highlight our county and feature our Farm Bureau Farm Family of the Year. Our theme this year was centered on honeybees and we were proud to represent this thriving industry here in Wakulla County. This year, the 4-H booth displayed items that represent us from Seas to Bees and included representations from our community clubs, as well as our educational outreach in honeybee education through a grant with Florida Ag in the Classroom. We had 105 items entered into the fair from 4-H participants including those from ve different clubs. There were a total of 24 blue ribbons, 39 red ribbons, 6 white ribbons and 36 Cloverbuds participating this year. For the Wakulla County booth, we displayed a hydroponics unit, a video on education and what it means in Wakulla County, as well as items and pictures related to the beekeeping industry on loan from our Farm Family of the Year and others. Each year, both booths are designed and constructed in a collaboration between agents, staff and volunteers and this year, the Extension Of ce would like to acknowledge the help that we received from Marc Bowerman and his TV Production students and Susan Solburg and her stagecraft students at Wakulla High School. Jo Ann Palmer, Woody Palmer, Allison Green, Palmetto Expeditions, as well as the Tourist Development Council contributed to the booth as well. Our thanks goes out to all of these volunteers for their time and help putting this years booth together. For further information about any Wakulla County Extension program or activity, please contact the of ce at 926-3931 or Sherri Kraeft atsjkraeft@u .edu. Wakulla County 4-H booth at the North Florida Fair represented Seas to Bees.Christmas recital is scheduled for Dec. 16 and 17The students of Michelle Snow School of Music will perform their Christmas recital on Friday, Dec. 16 and Saturday, Dec. 17 at Christ Church Anglican on Coastal Highway 98 in Medart. The Friday performance is at 7 p.m. and on Saturday at 11 a.m. The students will be playing a variety of musical styles and instruments. The recital will feature performances by Danyelle Dias, Morgan Terry, Shannon Egler, Joey Rickards, Summer Padgett, Landon Turner, Jason Paris, Steven Kinsey, Zoie Hill, Makenzie Thompson, Yese Reyes, Jacob Rardin, Jonah and Marina Harvey, Oliver Robinson, Emily May, Erin Petrucelli, Jack and Maxwell Mispel, Desmond Maxwell, Ryan Crawford, Allison Gordon, Rebecca and Riley Blankenship, Loranda Hutton, Wesley Kyle, Hunter Myers, Tanner Pafford, Joy Li, Jason Westmark, Precision Rudd, Randi Revell, Derisha Joney, Sydney Colvin, Chloe Choquette and Abbott Gauger. The recital is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the performance. For more information, call 926-7627.Wilton Booth is attending West Hill CollegeWilton Booth Jr. started this past semester at West Hill College in California. He is majoring in business. He plays forward for the basketball team. He is a 2009 graduate of Wakulla High School. He is the son of Victoria and Wilton Booth of Sopchoppy. dress storecustom jewelry alterations upholstery furniture renishing850-926-78372698 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. (across from ACE)come see our new holiday arrivals The Thread Tree The Thread Tree The Thread Tree 850745-85452615 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite 101 WINN-DIXIE PLAZA PIG ROASTFriday, Dec. 16, 5-9PM.Come enjoy a delicious roast with sides and bread included$800for just per personWe have something for every appetite. Come try our large variety of Latin and American cuisine, large portions, low prices. PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) Holiday fun at WinterFEST!Jacksonvilles annual Winter on the Water celebration is back. New for this year, you wont want to miss WinterFEST at Adventure Landing with ice-skating, alpine slides and nightly snowfalls! For all of the details, a complete list of holiday events and for special vacation packages, visit winteronthewater.com! Find exclusive vacation package deals here. Scan with your QR reader LAST CHANC E TOSA V EIN 2011!9 MONTHS$20.11with your friends and neighbors about local news & events!is your source for Local News, Sports, Local Events, Government News, Community News, School News, Church News and moreTalk TurkeyFOR Talk Turkey! 877-401-6408 $ 20.11 rr s TM in cou nty new s ubscriptions on ly

PAGE 8

For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, autographed books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, and ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking Stuffers Too! Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium222 Clark Dr. Panacea Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm Sat. 10am 4pm Sun. 12pm 4pm(850) 984-5297www.gulfspecimen.org Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Over 3000 rods & reels in stock *Rec eive 10% back on every purchase of $10 or m ore added to a Crums Gi ft Card *exc lud es purc has es of shi ng l icen se, lot tery gas di esel, bee r and toba cco products. WITHTHE CRUMS GIFT CARDYOUCANCONTINUE TOADDYOURDISCOUNTSTOITANDUSEITWHENEVERYOUWANT... ONWHATEVERYOUWANT!NOEXPIRATIONDATEONTHECARD.WEWILLGIVETHEDISCOUNTBEGINNING11-25-11 TIL 12-25-11. Mens CALCUTTA Neoprene Stocking Foot/Chest Waders Dra wings f or Prizesto be held weekl y sto p i n and r egis ter.(NO PURCHASE NECESS ARY) GIFT CARD GIFT CARD850-984-55011321 Coas tal Hwy Panac ea, F lorida 850-984-5501 1321 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, Florida full line of & $7995Sale Reg. 89.99 Gift Ideas Reminiscent of WAKULLA SPRINGS

PAGE 9

(850)926-9100theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com635WakullaArranRoad Crawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live PS3 | Wii | Wi-fi facebook.com/GamerZParadise WESELLGAMESFOR LESSNEW& USED P etStop Pet Stopr all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOPP e t Pet Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf. CommunityFINANCE, LLCWide Selection of Puppies Special Orders AvailableA A F Stocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 9A Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce SALESTHROUGHWEBSITEand atUPCOMINGLOCAL FESTIVALS:Crawfordville Womans Club Dec. 9 & 10 Mission San Luis Winter Festival Dec. 17850926-6115 ( 850 ) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6:30 P.M.8056 WAKULLA SPRING SROADASHLEYFEEDSTORE Practical Chr istmas g ift idea s i n s tor e. Gift Ce rti ca tes !We thank our loyal customers for their business, wish you all a Merry Christmas and look forward to continuing to serve you in 2012. New&NO CONTRACT CELLULAR SERVICEAS LOW AS$35MO.Starting at $12999ANDROID PHONES-850212-03925113 Capital Circle SW Unit 4 In between Crawfordville Hwy. and Woodville Hwy. G OLD B UYERS OF CRAWFORDVILLE2106CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. NEAR WAL-MART850-566-7348 850-566-7344*Not valid with any other offers or prior purchases. Expires: Dec. 31, 2011Receive an additionalGold and Silver Jewelry! with this coupon*for your Hair By Doreen850933-67463278 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Now at EVOLU T ION DaySpa 20%discounton all services provided by Doreen.Call for an appointment LIGHTHOUSELADYCLEANINGSERVICESINC.COMPREHENSIVE JANITORIAL SERVICESDeedee Pritchard OWNER 30 Year Experience 509-0623 Trained-Screened Employees LICENSED-INSURED WORKERS COMP BONDEDOFFrst time cleaning $20 Its A POSH Christmas at Large Variety of Gift Ideas for you and your loved ones!Open 10AM-5PM... or call for a later appointment.December 16 and 17!926-333810 Vendors Featuring Antiques, Uniques, Collectibles, Jewelry, and Custom Made Items.Mon.Fri. 10-6 Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B 850 926-6241 TreatYOURSELF! www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service TheWakulla news GIVE THE GIFT THAT LASTS ALL YEAR IN PRINT AND ONLINE OR ONLINE ONLY877-401-6408 A History of the St. Marks Lighthouse and the Gresham Family, by Myrna Roberts KanekkebergThe author, a member of the Gresham family, relates their lifes history as well as the history of the lighthouse and surrounding areas. The book is available at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge gift shop, The Wakulla County Historical Society, Posh Gifts and Organics, Bo Lynns Store and Shell Island Fish Camp. For more information on how to obtain this book, call (850) 556-2362. Call me & let me give your TradeWindsRemodeling and Decorative Services Stage Homes For Quick Sale Increase Your Rental Income No Jobs Too Small Work Within Your Budget Great Gift For Anniversary, Christmas, Birthdays or Man Caves Individual Rooms or Entire Homes Simple to Complex Beach Homes, Rentals Fishing Camps, Mobile Homes WeCanDoAnything! Wha t a Gr eat Christm as Pre sent !Complete Consultation With OwnerPamela Cannon404.387.7288hopes & dreamslife!

PAGE 10

GO EAGLES!Were Proud of You!my100bank.com 850-926-7111A Home Bank Shares CompanyMember FDIC Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comCONSTITUTIONAL OFFICERS OF WAKULLA COUNTY Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.850-926-8245 LETS ROLL WAR EAGLES 850-926-8777CONGRATULATIONS! WE ARE BEHIND YOU ALL THE WAY! 850-926-3300 www.3youtdoorequipment.com850-544-0238 www.3yranch.comGOOD LUCK WAR EAGLES!Skip, Trey, Brian, & Trip Young GOOD LUCK BOYS!The Dazzles Staff850-926-6772Clerk of Courts BRENT THURMOND County Judge JILL WALKER Supervisor of Elections BUDDY WELLS Sheriff DONNIE CRUM Superintendent of Schools DAVID MILLER Property Appraiser DONNIE SPARKMAN Tax Collector CHERYLL OLAHWERE PROUD OF YOU !GO, WAKULLA WAR EAGLES!1 Dillon Norman, 2 Sheldon Johnson, 3 Garrett Wheeler, 4 Quanzee Davis, 5 Deonte Hutchinson, 6 Luke Taylor, 7 Tamarick Holmes, 8 Dalton Norman, 9 Caleb Stephens, 10 Evan Mccoy, 11 Demetrius Lindsey, 12 Brandon Nichols, 13 Conner Smith, 14 James Douin, 15 Dequon Simmons, 17 Jacob Walker, 18 Damonta Morris, 20 Mikal Cromartie, 21 Marshane Godbolt, 22 Ryan Henderson, 23 Kevin James, 24 Clarence Morrison, 25 Lyntonio Bowdry, 26 Joshua Hawkins, 28 Willie Thomas, 34 Fredrick Cummings, 42 Jordan Asbell, 44 John Brown, 50 Brandon Busby, 52 Robert Dulgar, 53 Cole Woofter, 55 David Buckridge, 57 John Cole, 58 Nicholas Walker, 59 Michael Sarvis,61 Caleb Brown, 66 Calvin Roberts, 69 Tyrell Garmon, 70 Jonathan Chunn, 72 Christopher Grif n, 75 Justin Fisher, 76 Zachery Harrell, 77 Russell Carter-Shields Wakulla Inn & SuitesGO WAR EAGLES!850926-3737www.WakullaInnHotel.com

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 11A sports news and team viewsSportsContinued from Page 1A He also praised his defense. After giving up a score on Pascos opening drive, they settled down and, he said, They played very, very well in the rst half. They played well in the second half as well, he said. Klees said he had heard some questions about the decision to continue the bend, dont break-style of defense rather than trying to pressure Pasco when they were deep in their own territory. His concern, he said, was not wanting to give up the big play. He didnt expect, he said, Pasco to mount a long drive by dinkin and dunkin with short passes to move up the eld. There were some mishaps in scoring with the War Eagles as well: kicker Conner Smith, who had been so reliable coming in to the game, missed two extra points. But he certainly redeemed himself with a 43-yard long eld goal that just went over the crossbar and inside the right upright. He also had some great punts, including one that rolled out of bounds at the Pasco 2 to pin them deep in their own territory in the fourth quarter. He also made the two extra points in overtime. It was a weird night for him, Klees said of his kicker. It was just emotionally rough. Cause he had some great plays too. The War Eagles also went for a two-point conversion after their second touchdown, but referees ruled the pass was caught by Antonio Bowdrie out-of-bounds. GAME RECAP Pascos rst score came on their opening drive when a Pirate receiver got behind Wakullas defensive backs and went in for a score to go up 7-0. Wakulla couldnt move the ball on their next series and punted, but the Pirate punt receiver fumbled and the War Eagles recovered near mid eld. After a 20yard Godbolt run, the War Eagles scored on the next play when Evan McCoy tore off a 21-yard scamper to the end zone. The extra point was no good, and the score was 7-6 with 1:21 remaining in the rst period. In the second quarter, War Eagle quarterback Caleb Stephens threw a long bomb down the right sideline and Godbolt lept up and caught the ball over the Pirate defender and raced in for the score. The two-point try was no good, but the War Eagles were leading 12-7. Later in the second half, the War Eagles pushed the ball close enough to try a 48-yard long field goal. Smiths kick fell short, but the Pirates were called on a roughing the kicker penalty and the ball moved five yards closer. On the next try, the ball fell just inside the crossbar for the War Eagles to go up 15-7 with 1:45 remaining in the half. On Pascos next offensive series, defensive back Antonio Bowdrie sniffed out a pass and jumped the route, intercepting it and returning it for a touchdown. The extra point was missed, but Wakulla was on top, 21-7, at halftime. In the third period, a punt was fumbled by the War Eagles Deonte Hutchinson and recovered by Pasco deep in Wakulla territory. That bullet was dodged, though, as the defense held and a eld goal attempt by the Pirates was well short. But with 1:28 left in the third, Pasco started its comeback when a seam pass over the middle turned into a 50yard touchdown run. In the fourth quarter, Smith dropped a perfect punt that rolled out of bounds at Pascos 2, seeming to pin them deep. But the Pirates showed patience, and took short passes right down the eld for a score to tie it at 21 all. In overtime, the ball is placed at the 10 yard line and the offense given four chances to score. Then the other team is given the same opportunity. In the first overtime, Pasco hit a seam pass for a quick score and got the extra point to go up 28-21. On Wakullas try, they seemed to be digging a hole, called for a holding penalty that backed them up to the 16 but Godbolt scored again. Klees decided to go for 2 at that point and the win. He said afterwards that he believed Godbolt could score on the speed sweep and had called that play but of cials whistled the play dead before the snap for a false start on Wakulla. Some Pasco players apparently didnt see the ags and stormed the field to celebrate believing they had won the game including one Pirate player who drove a cheer ag into the ground at mid eld. After the field was cleared by officials, and with Wakulla backed up ve yards for the penalty, Klees decided to kick the extra point, which tied it at 28. In the second overtime, Pasco elected to defend rst and Wakulla scored on another Godbolt run and added the extra point to go up 35-28. Pasco scored on fourth down when a ball thrown into double-coverage was attempted to be batted down by a Wakulla defender and fell into the arms of a Pirate receiver. The extra point was good to tie it at 35. Wakulla elected to defend rst in the next overtime, and Wakullas defense refused to yield. On fourth down, Pasco kicked a eld goal to go up, 38-35. It was absolutely the right coaching decision, said Klees. If Pasco hadnt made a touchdown on fourth down, he could have just lined up and kicked a eld goal to win it. Pasco keyed on Godbolt on the next series, overloading the defense to the left side but Stephens faked to Godbolt and handed the ball to Deonte Hutchinson on the counter and he bounced in, untouched, for the touchdown. UP NEXT: MIAMI NORLAND The War Eagles will face the unbeaten Norland Vikings at the Citrus Bowl on Friday afternoon for the Division 5A state title. The 14-0 Vikings are ranked No. 1 in 5A, 7th in Florida overall and 48th in the nation. Wakulla, with a record of 12-2, comes in to the game as a big underdog, ranked fourth in the division, 20th overall in the state, and 221 nationally. They are very good and very big, said Klees, who noted they have several players who are Division I college commitments. Asked about Norlands reputation as intimidators, Klees scoffed that Wakulla has seen it before. Our kids are focused, he said. Well stay within ourselves and do what we do. I think the Lord has really blessed this team, he said.War Eagles win in triple overtime Players of the WeekO enseDefense Special TeamsMARSHANE GODBOLT Four touchdowns in the game 2 pass, 2 run DALTON NORMAN Caused a fumble, 3 tackles TAMARICK HOLMES Five sacks, now has 19 sacks on the yearSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Seminole Boosters National Chairman Steve Brown and former Sheriff David Harvey presented a $25,000 check to Superintendent of Schools David Miller before the start of the Wakulla War Eagle football playoff game Friday, Dec. 9. The money was part of what the Wakulla Seminole Boosters have raised through the Houston Taff Memorial Scholarship and a gala retirement party for the retiring sheriff held at the FSU University Center in October. The contribution raised the total scholarship contributions in the bank to $167,000. Attending the presentation were Beth Taff, widow of the late Coach Houston Taff and sister of the former sheriff, and Windy Taff-Jones, daughter of the late coach and a faculty member at Wakulla High School. Also attending the presentation was Sheriff Harveys wife, Rhonda, who was homecoming queen and valedictorian at WHS in 1968. Also at the presentation was FSU linebacker and former Wakulla War Eagle Nigel Bradham. Harvey said his brother-in-law had a love for Wakulla County, WHS and Florida State University. He loved the War Eagles and the Seminoles and he had an impact on both male and female athletes, said Harvey. He helped me get my scholarship to Chipola so I could go to college. Anyone who would like to help by making a contribution to the Taff Scholarship may do so through Harvey, Steve Brown or Superintendent Miller. The next Taff Memorial Golf Tournament will be held in April 2012. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTeammates Marshane Godbolt and Will Thomas after the triple overtime win.WILLIAM SNOWDENFormer Wakulla Sheriff David Harvey, with his hand raised, prepares to present a check for $25,000 for FSU scholarships for Wakulla athletes. $25,000 for scholarships Above, Deonte Hutchinson carries the ball against the Pasco Pirates. Hutchinson would score the winning touchdown in the third overtime. Left, Defensive Player of the Week Tamarick Holmes gets one of his ve sacks of the night. ACTION PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS The home crowd cheers on the War Eagles, above. After the game, the band plays the school song on the eld. The nal score is visible in the background.WILLIAM SNOWDEN

PAGE 12

Special to The NewsEvelyn and Tom Vlasak of Ochlochonee Bay were at the Atlanta RRC held at Road Atlanta where Evelyn won her class, H Production, in her 1960 Austin Healy Sprite. Evelyn has only been racing for two years after supporting Toms racing for more than 40 years. The Vlasaks are both members of the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA) and Vintage Drivers Club of America (VDCA) and hold road racing competition licenses. In addition to racing the Sprite, Evelyn also is racing in vintage events in a 1970 Lynx Formula Vee (FV) single seat race car. The couple work on their cars in a private race preparation and vintage car restoration shop in Tallahassee. A photo of some of the Vlasaks cars was recently published in Unconquered the FSU Alumni magazine including her Sprite, the Lynx FV, a 1965 Mustang GT350 and Toms GT2 class Porsche Carrera. The Vlasaks are retired from the State of Florida. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The News After a disappointing 5-4 loss in the previous weeks championship game at the Georgia ASA State Championships in extra innings, the Next Level 14U team won the Gobbler Extravaganza in Valdosta, Ga., last weekend. The team started off very strong beating the Blue Angels 8-0 in the opening game. Continuing with strong pitching and defense, Next Level beat the Black Water Bandits 4-0. Unfortunately, the bats hit a dry spell and lost to the X-Plosion 5-3 in the third game of the day. Next Level fought its way back through the losers bracket beating the Columbia Crushers 8-2, and avenging its earlier loss by beating the X-Plosion 12-0 in ve innings. This set up the Championship game against the Georgia Bombers. Next Level started off very strong with a three-run home run by Karli Woolington in the bottom of the rst. The team never looked back, beating Georgia Bombers 9-1 to force the if game tie breaker. In the top half of the inning, Georgia Bombers had a runner on third with no outs, but the defense was able to get the next three batters out to end the inning. In the bottom half of the inning, the offense wasted little time by scoring the winning run to win its rst tournament of the new season. Amber Winkler, Gabby Ekberg and Karli Woolington led the team offensively, with Woolington amazingly hitting four home runs on the day. Both Ekberg and Woolington combined to not give up an earned run all day pitching. Next Level will be playing this weekend in Clearwater in the ASA 14U A Regional Quali er trying to win a bid to next years USA/ASA 14U A Nationals in South Dakota in August 2012. Special to The NewsWakulla High School Senior, Caleb Stevens participated in the high school rodeo, Southeastern Showdown in Perry, Ga., on Nov. 4-6. Contestants were from six states including, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. Stevens competed in the team roping and calf roping events at the Showdown. He and his partner, Beau Williams of Georgia, placed third in round two of Team Roping with a time of 8.73 seconds and fth place in the average for the weekend. He also placed eighth in round two of Calf Roping with a time of 12.41 seconds. Stevens is competing for points to qualify for State Rodeo Finals where they take the top 20 contestants and National Finals in Wyoming where they take the top four contestants from each event. Front row, Hannah Wilde, Amber Winkler, Brooklyn McGlamory, and Gabby Ekberg. Back row, Coach Staci Smith, Brielle Dozier, Karli Woolington, Adrianne Van Atta, Hannah Hilaman, Madison Williams, Caley Chappel and Head Coach Bob Van Atta. Not pictured: Coach Eddie Ekberg and Chelsey Murray.SOFTBALLNext Level 14U wins tournamentSPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCaleb Stevens dismounts his horse during calf roping.RODEOCaleb Stevens competes in Southeastern Showdown RACINGEvelyn Vlasak wins her classSPECIAL TO THE NEWSEvelyn Vlasak and her 1960 Austin Healy Sprite. JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GUNSMITHING F ASTTURNAROUND! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED Located on Main Street in St. Marks WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid for your gun! $ We do Special Orders and Layaways! Selling Guns Since 1999 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe CenterFull Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3 Values to $100.00Aussie/Western Outback/Wools$26.00 incl. tax PANACEA HATSAFACT $1395 OYSTE RS$4D O Z. ALL YOU CAN EATShrimp Oysters or ScallopsIncludes Cheese Grits & Cole Slaw1506 Scenic Coastal Hwy. 98Panacea850984-524310OZ. NEWYORKSTRIPDINN ERIncl udes 2 sid es$1195

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 13Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsMan, I cant wait until spring. I guess this cool weather wouldnt be too bad if the sun was shining but that hasnt happened for what seems like a week or so. When I was a lot younger the cold didnt bother me but now I guess the blood is thinner and it cuts right through me. We have had some extremely low tides the last week and if you were able to get out you could catch sh. I talked with Capt. David Fife who shes out of Spring Creek and he said he had to push and pole to get out of his canal last week but it was all worth it when they nally got where they wanted to be. He had a customer with his 10-year-old grandson and he said they probably caught and released at least 50 legal reds using mud minnows on the bottom. They left them biting and went and caught several trout using top water baits. Capt. Randy Peart took his son Wes and Bruce Johnson to the Econ na last week and every creek mouth they shed had sh holding at the front of them. He said they caught about 10 red and 14 trout using the Rapala Twitch and Rap. On Thursday and Friday he went back with charters and on Thursday after the front came through they caught six reds and four trout. They went back the next day and caught seven reds and 18 trout. He said all of the trout they caught those three days were nice and only a few of the reds were small. Most were between 22 and 25 inches and several were too big to keep. Randy said he heard there were lots of trout in the Aucilla and quite a few reds were also being caught there. I shed on Friday with Bob McCullough, and we caught about 10 trout and six or seven reds but only one of those was legal. We caught some sh on shrimp but they seemed to prefer the white Gulp that day. I saw Trey Wollington on the water the other day and had not seen him in probably 10 or 15 years. He was shing with his younger daughter and they caught 39 reds and she caught most of them. He said that the way it generally is when he takes his girls, they out- sh him. Sometimes theyll hook one and let him reel it in. This is the time of year when the sh you catch are gonna be in the river or creeks or at least at the mouth of the creeks way east of here. The Wakulla River, St. Marks River, East River, Carrabelle River, Aucilla, Econfina, Ocholockonee River and Spring Creek are the places to sh. Live bait is my choice of baits though I would rather catch them on arti cial. Whatever you fish you need to sh it very slow because the water is so cold. The water is also clear right now a light leader is best and I would probably use uorocarbon. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Look for some changes to come the rst of the year on trout and red sh regulations. Good luck and good shing!Its cold, the sh are in the creeks From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL This is a hard one I usually write on the many forms of wildlife in our region, and normally have little trouble coming up with a subject, be it a bat or buzzard, mink or weasel. However this article may raise some eyebrows, perhaps turn off some of my readers, or perhaps win me some too. Im sure it my possibly even offend some, but I feel obligated to get it out. So here goes. As most of you know Ive been a bird watcher (a term I nearly hate) all my life, and also have a fascination with insects like butter ies, and snakes, sh, amphibians and of course our native mammals. Ive written about them since 1972 nearly every week for various newspapers. But did you know I also HUNT. I can hear the gasps of horror: No, not him too! Hang in there it gets worse I even enjoy eating them! Actually perhaps only one in a 100 out there is a true vegetarian, never eating any esh of any kind except eggs and cheese. Fish have esh too remember, and though they dont scream or cry when caught (though some like grunts grunt, and croakers croak) most lie there silently in the boats bottom gasping for air as their gills dry out, slowly suffocating to death. Some say any sh you catch and plan on keeping and eating should be bopped in the brain area to prevent them from suffering. Can you picture a commercial sherman out at sea with a big haul in a mile long net doing this? Certainly not. So my point is even if you only eat sh, they still have to die. And as most of you know all store meat comes oating down from heaven all neatly packaged, and does not relate to the big-eyed, sweet old cow you see in the pasture. Now Im getting cynical, but I beg of you to hear me out. For any person to judge anyone prematurely, simply because they prefer to eat wild game occasionally rather than domestic animals is (to me) unfair. I can understand in this age when few folks out there have ever been raised on a farm (as I have), and been brought up butchering hogs, goats, cattle and chickens they cant relate to the idea of skinning a critter, much lees gutting it and preparing the meat into chops, back straps and sausage, etc. They couldnt stomach it. No problem. How many have ever read any book on animal factories. I have, and the conditions most meat animals are raised in make me nauseated. At least most wild game is safe to eat, and certainly healthier for one to eat, as it has less saturated fat, and more protein per ounce, not to mention all chemicals found in factory raised meats are missing. And the wild animal is just that wild and free, not crammed into a tiny area so small it cant even turn around, and forced feed unnaturally to grow exceptionally fast and put on weight quickly. Domestic animals raised for meat are stressed almost from the day they are born. And for that matter so are wild creatures too, constantly looking for danger for out there in the jungle, it is a eat or be eaten world! For eons, we have been predators. We have our eyes positioned to look forward binocular vision like predators, not monocular vision as those preyed upon have. We over the millennium have turned nearly naked, allowing us to sweat, and keep cool, literally running our prey down, as is still being done in more primitive parts of the world. There are many ways to hunt. What may seem right for one, may not appeal to another. In Indiana where I was raised, because many rural homes were fairly close to another, only shotguns with a close killing range could be used for deer. In other states that have more open range, and less homes per square mile a high powered ri e is often preferred. Here in our area, since we have miles and miles of swamps, areas that are often extremely hard to walk through, because of the dense vegetation or water, most hunters in this area tend to hunt with dogs that bring the deer to them. Hunting with deer dogs is also is a social manner of procuring meat. And that has been mans nature also for eons for man to hunt in groups, like other top predators (wolves and lions, for example). These guys are constantly on their walkie talkies or CB radios, keeping track of their radio-collared dogs through telemetry. Most of them use their trucks to sit on, so they can see a deer out over the palmettos, and nearly all hunt along forest roads, where this type of hunting is legal. I prefer to hunt by myself, and prefer to use what is called traditional archery to get game. That is an old recurve or stick bow Ive made myself. I rarely connect, but when I do, I feel Ive really pulled off a feat few could duplicate. And when Im slipping through a swamp with bow in hand as quietly as possible, I feel more in tune with nature than at any other time. Im not a spectator of nature, Im a participant! Its like it is in my veins! Like it is part of my genetic makeup, and rightfully so, for in mans existence on earth about 99 percent of his existence, he has been a predator! Keep in mind even a total vegetarian has an impact on wild creatures, for though they may not kill creatures, the acres of land used to raise vegetables, is displacing wildlife and keeping them from even breeding! Anyway you cut it, our very presence, in this country especially, has an impact on wildlife.Hunting wild game appeals to man as natural predatorWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHFrom FWC News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is offering a free hunter safety internet-completion course in Wakulla County. The course is at Otter Creek Range, 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 17. To gain admittance, students must complete the internet course before coming to class and bring a copy of the nal report from the online portion of the course. The nal report form does not have to be notarized. An adult must accompany children under 16 years of age at all times. Students should bring a pencil and paper with them to take notes. The hunter safety course is required for people born on or after June 1, 1975, to purchase a Florida hunting license. The FWC course satisfies huntersafety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces. People interested in attending this course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at MyFWC.com/HunterSafety or by calling the FWCs regional of ce in Panama City at (850) 265-3676.FWC to o er hunter safety course in Wakulla IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTING & SAFETYEQUIPMENT ORANGE BLAZE VESTS BUCKSHOT RIFLE SHELLS COVER SCENT 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 GEAR UP FOR Swallow-Tailed Kites by George WeymouthA Giclee Non-Fading, Signed & Numbered Call George Weymouth To Order Shipping Rustys Automotive Rustys Automotive 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 MOBILE REPAIR (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 BOGOSIGNUP FORYOURSELF RECIEVEONE TOGIVEAS AGIFT!

PAGE 14

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD It is cold outside again. But underwater on-shore (under Wakulla County lands) the temperature is still the same. Underground, Wakulla County temperatures remain a toasty 69 degrees year around until you reach sea water (which is warmer). A current meter I placed in Wakulla Springs several decades ago measured ow rate changes that matched local marine tides. At other cave sites closer to the coast we routinely encounter a salt water lens at between 160 feet and 250 feet below the water table. This warmer body of water intrudes northward in Wakulla based upon rain fall, water use and tides. Knowing this constant temperature 30 years ago, I built my home underground. With a plus or minus 10 degrees uctuation of the 69-degree ground temperature, I need only heat the entire house in the winter with a small wood burning stove and dry the summer air with a dehumidi er to be comfortable. But when we locals dive (spending 100 minutes underwater on the average) in our caves, most of us wear dry suits. Our Northern European and American visitors on the other hand, nd our water like a bath tub and LOVE IT! Thus, our winters are their summers. Off-shore, Wakulla County is a different matter. Off-shore we refer to surface and below the thermocline temperatures within recreational diving depths. A thermocline is a rapid change of temperature over a few feet and usually de nes a different body of water. Surface waters are dependent on seasonal surface air temperatures, which in the winter can get down around 10 degrees. Wind mixes the exposed surface waters dropping the water temperature down around 50 degrees above the thermocline. Our off-shore depths of the thermocline will vary depending upon storm intensity and ocean currents. Usually below the thermocline down to preferred recreational diving depths (around 130 feet) in the winter we nd temperatures warmer than surface temperatures. But upwelling and ocean currents can bring in very cold waters at our deeper recreational depths. Winter diving off-shore in our area is far less stable underwater than the conditions under our county. Summer off-shore underwater conditions reverse the temperature regime. Warm surface conditions, down to the thermocline, heat up to the mid to upper 80 degrees. In the Florida Keys, that temperature exceeds 90 degrees. No wet suit is required if you stay shallow off-shore. But below the thermocline temperatures are cooler even though they may be warmer than the winter months and wet suits are popular. Cave divers routinely wear dry suits year round while ocean divers have a much larger wardrobe to stay warm underwater. And they both have seasonal interests and pressures to diving in Wakulla County. Our store at Wakulla Diving Center shifts our inventory from thin wet suits in the summer, when the ocean divers dominate, to thick wet suits and dry suits in the winter, when the cave divers dominate our attention.Throughout the year, Ellena Rolland, the Publications Staff Of cer for our Division puts together our newsletter Salt Spray. This is no small feat and she has done an amazing job this year. In the nal edition of the newsletter for 2011, Division Commander Mo Davis submitted the following letter. I thought it tting to share his letter as well as Vice Commander Gordon Schmidts letter as we re ect on the past year and look forward to the year ahead. Mo wrote: On Oct. 9, 2011, the Division 1 Board elected Gordon Schmidt as Vice Division Commander and me as Division Commander for our second term. We both want to thank the Board for this vote of con dence and we especially want to thank all of the Division 1 members for working so hard to make Division 1 the elite division that it is. In addition to achieving virtually all of our Silver Oar Goals this year, Paul Shurte, Flotilla 17, earned the Commodore Charles S. Greanoff Inspirational Leadership Award, an award that only one Auxiliarist in the Nation can win. Also, Flotilla 17 was awarded the Flotilla of the Year Award for the entire Auxiliary, Beverly Whaley, Flotilla 19, awarded the Atlantic Area West Recreational Boating Safety Award and Harry Sweezey, Flotilla 19, placed rst place in the Boat U.S. Foundation Grassroots Grant for the a Water Safety Discussion and Activity Booklet for Parents and Kids. In addition, Ellena Roland and Patti Fritchie teamed up to organize and direct the best ever Joint Area Rescue Exercise (JAREX) which included members from four otillas, Station Panama City and representatives from all of the rst responders. Following the JAREX, at our November Division Conference, we were fortunate enough to have Commander Hellstern, Director of Auxiliary, address us at our Awards Banquet. I would like to share with you his four priorities: 1. Compliance with Coast Guard and Coast Guard Auxiliary policy. Virtually every situation that we may face whether as an Elected Of- cer, Appointed Of cer or general member is addressed in the Auxiliary Manual. It is our responsibility to read the manual, know it and follow the policies. 2. Standardization throughout the Auxiliary Do it the right way, the same way, the rst time and every time. Whether we are on a safety patrol in Pensacola or St. Marks on an Auxiliary facility the basic methods and procedures for that entire mission should be the same. 3. Safety Everything we do has some risk associated with it. We need to know what the risks are, keep aware of changing risks and reduce risks where we can. If the risks out way the bene ts, dont do it. 4. Education/Member Training The rst three priorities are dependent on and can only be realized with properly trained members. Again, I want to thank all Division Members for the excellent work you are doing and will continue to do in the upcoming year. Any organization is only as good as its people, thats why Division 1 continues to be one of the best, if not the best in the Eighth Coastal Region. Gordon Schmidt reflected on the significance of the uniform we are wear: Is it me or the uniform which will make the difference? We put on the United States Coast Guard uniform; but do we really know what it means? How do the active duty personnel look at us every day? Are we just a bunch of old folks wandering around knowing that since we were there and done that we can live with just being so impressed with ourselves that we really do not need to contribute or participate with the United States Coast Guard active duty? Look around you, these are the young people that are the future of America and some day they will be right where you are today. Ask yourselves, How can we contribute to help them with their future? We have many people in our Flotillas with a broad spectrum in background experience able to contribute to their futures. We have accountants, executives, retired military of cers and enlisted personnel, plus other personnel with a plethora of backgrounds and experiences which will be a great resource for these young people of today. It is my personal goal to make sure that everyone with knowledge and/or the talent shares it with the active duty (Gold side). We are their backup; let us put it to good use beginning today. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! Please be safe when out on the water. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 3.3 ft. 4:03 AM 3.0 ft. 5:00 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:54 AM 0.0 ft. 11:37 AM 0.7 ft. 12:27 AM 0.5 ft. 1:42 AM 0.1 ft. 3:01 AM -0.3 ft. 4:14 AM -0.8 ft. 5:18 AM Low 3.1 ft. 5:34 PM 3.1 ft. 6:15 PM 2.7 ft. 6:12 AM 2.5 ft. 7:44 AM 2.5 ft. 9:27 AM 2.6 ft. 10:53 AM 2.8 ft. 12:00 PM High 0.9 ft. 11:21 PM 0.4 ft. 12:28 PM 0.8 ft. 1:27 PM 1.2 ft. 2:35 PM 1.4 ft. 3:46 PM 1.5 ft. 4:52 PM Low 3.1 ft. 7:02 PM 3.1 ft. 7:56 PM 3.2 ft. 8:55 PM 3.3 ft. 9:56 PM 3.4 ft. 10:54 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 3.3 ft. 4:00 AM 3.1 ft. 4:57 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:51 AM 0.0 ft. 11:34 AM 0.8 ft. 12:24 AM 0.5 ft. 1:39 AM 0.1 ft. 2:58 AM -0.4 ft. 4:11 AM -0.8 ft. 5:15 AM Low 3.2 ft. 5:31 PM 3.1 ft. 6:12 PM 2.8 ft. 6:09 AM 2.5 ft. 7:41 AM 2.5 ft. 9:24 AM 2.7 ft. 10:50 AM 2.9 ft. 11:57 AM High 1.0 ft. 11:18 PM 0.5 ft. 12:25 PM 0.9 ft. 1:24 PM 1.3 ft. 2:32 PM 1.5 ft. 3:43 PM 1.6 ft. 4:49 PM Low 3.1 ft. 6:59 PM 3.2 ft. 7:53 PM 3.2 ft. 8:52 PM 3.4 ft. 9:53 PM 3.5 ft. 10:51 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 3.0 ft. 4:39 AM High -0.3 ft. 11:58 AM 0.8 ft. 12:25 AM 0.7 ft. 1:31 AM 0.4 ft. 2:46 AM 0.1 ft. 4:05 AM -0.3 ft. 5:18 AM -0.7 ft. 6:22 AM Low 2.9 ft. 6:10 PM 2.8 ft. 5:36 AM 2.5 ft. 6:48 AM 2.3 ft. 8:20 AM 2.3 ft. 10:03 AM 2.4 ft. 11:29 AM 2.6 ft. 12:36 PM High 0.0 ft. 12:41 PM 0.4 ft. 1:32 PM 0.8 ft. 2:31 PM 1.1 ft. 3:39 PM 1.3 ft. 4:50 PM 1.4 ft. 5:56 PM Low 2.9 ft. 6:51 PM 2.8 ft. 7:38 PM 2.9 ft. 8:32 PM 2.9 ft. 9:31 PM 3.1 ft. 10:32 PM 3.2 ft. 11:30 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 2.4 ft. 3:55 AM 2.3 ft. 4:52 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:05 AM 0.0 ft. 11:48 AM 0.5 ft. 12:38 AM 0.3 ft. 1:53 AM 0.1 ft. 3:12 AM -0.2 ft. 4:25 AM -0.6 ft. 5:29 AM Low 2.3 ft. 5:26 PM 2.3 ft. 6:07 PM 2.0 ft. 6:04 AM 1.9 ft. 7:36 AM 1.8 ft. 9:19 AM 2.0 ft. 10:45 AM 2.1 ft. 11:52 AM High 0.7 ft. 11:32 PM 0.3 ft. 12:39 PM 0.6 ft. 1:38 PM 0.9 ft. 2:46 PM 1.0 ft. 3:57 PM 1.1 ft. 5:03 PM Low 2.3 ft. 6:54 PM 2.3 ft. 7:48 PM 2.4 ft. 8:47 PM 2.5 ft. 9:48 PM 2.6 ft. 10:46 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 2.5 ft. 3:47 AM 2.3 ft. 4:44 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:33 AM 0.0 ft. 11:16 AM 0.7 ft. 12:06 AM 0.5 ft. 1:21 AM 0.1 ft. 2:40 AM -0.3 ft. 3:53 AM -0.7 ft. 4:57 AM Low 2.4 ft. 5:18 PM 2.4 ft. 5:59 PM 2.1 ft. 5:56 AM 1.9 ft. 7:28 AM 1.9 ft. 9:11 AM 2.0 ft. 10:37 AM 2.2 ft. 11:44 AM High 0.9 ft. 11:00 PM 0.4 ft. 12:07 PM 0.8 ft. 1:06 PM 1.2 ft. 2:14 PM 1.4 ft. 3:25 PM 1.5 ft. 4:31 PM Low 2.4 ft. 6:46 PM 2.4 ft. 7:40 PM 2.5 ft. 8:39 PM 2.6 ft. 9:40 PM 2.7 ft. 10:38 PM High Thu Dec 15, 11 Fri Dec 16, 11 Sat Dec 17, 11 Sun Dec 18, 11 Mon Dec 19, 11 Tue Dec 20, 11 Wed Dec 21, 11 Date 2.3 ft. 3:35 AM 2.0 ft. 4:40 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:23 AM -0.1 ft. 11:01 AM 0.8 ft. 12:11 AM 0.5 ft. 1:33 AM 0.1 ft. 2:52 AM -0.3 ft. 4:00 AM -0.6 ft. 5:00 AM Low 2.1 ft. 6:20 PM 2.1 ft. 6:45 PM 1.7 ft. 6:03 AM 1.5 ft. 7:49 AM 1.4 ft. 10:03 AM 1.7 ft. 12:22 PM 1.9 ft. 1:51 PM High 1.0 ft. 10:54 PM 0.3 ft. 11:41 AM 0.6 ft. 12:24 PM 1.0 ft. 1:15 PM 1.3 ft. 2:20 PM 1.5 ft. 3:38 PM Low 2.2 ft. 7:12 PM 2.3 ft. 7:41 PM 2.4 ft. 8:14 PM 2.5 ft. 8:52 PM 2.6 ft. 9:37 PM HighGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDec. 15 Dec. 21First Jan. 2 Full Jan. 11 Last Dec. 17 New Dec. 24Major Times 4:25 AM 6:25 AM 4:49 PM 6:49 PM Minor Times 10:57 AM 11:57 AM 10:44 PM 11:44 PM Major Times 5:13 AM 7:13 AM 5:37 PM 7:37 PM Minor Times 11:33 AM 12:33 PM 11:46 PM 12:46 AM Major Times 6:01 AM 8:01 AM 6:26 PM 8:26 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:08 PM 1:08 PM Major Times 6:50 AM 8:50 AM 7:16 PM 9:16 PM Minor Times 12:48 AM 1:48 AM 12:45 PM 1:45 PM Major Times 7:42 AM 9:42 AM 8:08 PM 10:08 PM Minor Times 1:52 AM 2:52 AM 1:24 PM 2:24 PM Major Times 8:36 AM 10:36 AM 9:04 PM 11:04 PM Minor Times 2:57 AM 3:57 AM 2:07 PM 3:07 PM Major Times 9:33 AM 11:33 AM 10:03 PM 12:03 AM Minor Times 4:05 AM 5:05 AM 2:56 PM 3:56 PM Average Average Average+ Average Average Average Average7:25 am 5:39 pm 10:45 pm 10:58 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:26 am 5:39 pm 11:46 pm 11:34 am 7:26 am 5:39 pm --:-12:09 pm 7:27 am 5:40 pm 12:49 am 12:46 pm 7:27 am 5:40 pm 1:52 am 1:25 pm 7:28 am 5:41 pm 2:58 am 2:08 pm 7:28 am 5:41 pm 4:06 am 2:57 pm69% 62% 55% 48% 41% 33% 26% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org Get 40 100mg/20mg pills for only $99.00CALL NOW AND GET 4 BONUS PILLS FREE! BUY THE BLUE PILL NOW!1-888-746-5615SATISFACTION GUARANTEED SAVE $500! VIAGRA or CIALIS?D o you take Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 15AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Dec. 1, Joey Melton of Panacea reported a grand theft. The victim planned a yard sale in Crawfordville and covered items overnight with plans to hold the sale the next day. When he arrived at the Crawfordville property in the morning, people were already shopping and leaving with items. Witnesses said a white truck loaded up with goods and returned several times for additional loads of goods. The victim stated that $5,000 worth of items was removed from the property including tools, games, clothing, household goods, bicycles and more. On Dec. 1, Deputy Nick Gray and Deputy Mike Zimba responded to a two vehicle crash at Brown Boulevard and Cajer Posey Road in Crawfordville. Myrtle Martin McKenzie, 73, of Crawfordville was driving a 2002 Toyota Corolla and made a left hand turn off Brown Boulevard onto Cajer Posey Road. Robin Leslie Ruby, 23, of Crawfordville was driving a 2006 Chevrolet truck on Cajer Posey Road. McKenzie did not see Ruby coming and Ruby crashed into the side of McKenzies vehicle. No one was injured. McKenzie was found at fault but was not cited. The Toyota was towed away from the scene while the truck was drivable. On Dec. 1, Carol Allen of Ochlockonee Bay reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $2,040 worth of jewelry and coins. On Dec. 1, David Moss of Sopchoppy reported an animal incident where his dog was attacked by two other dogs. A neighbor used a shovel to scare off one of the dogs and separate the second. The Animal Control Unit was called to the scene and contacted the victim and witness. On Dec. 2, Sara Wilkinson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from her home. The mountain bike is valued at $50. On Dec. 3, a Crawfordville woman reported an animal incident involving her 7-year-old son. The child was jumped by a neighbors dog and suffered abrasions. EMS treated the victim at the scene. Animal Control Of cer Ivanhoe Carroll responded to investigate and quarantine the dog. Her investigation continues. On Dec. 3, Deborah Revell of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft at a Crawfordville rental property. A water well tank and pump was stolen. The stolen property is valued at $1,500 and a suspect has been identi ed. On Dec. 3, Deputy Ward Kromer investigated a suspicious person at County Line Road. Deputy Kromer identi ed the male subject as someone reported missing from Leon County. The man was considered missing and endangered due to lack of medications and was turned over to a relative. On Dec. 2, a Crawfordville man reported a residential burglary and battery as a suspect forced himself into the residence. Two victims sustained minor injuries when they subdued the suspect inside the home. Tyson Lynn Scott, 22, of Crawfordville was charged with burglary with assault and battery. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Scott thought he was locked out of his own home. On Dec. 2, Dishawn Scott of Sopchoppy reported a structure re on Dinosaur Lane. Scott and two other individuals, including a juvenile, escaped the re. The re appeared to start in a bedroom electrical outlet. Damage to the mobile home and furnishings are estimated at $35,000. The home is owned by Kevin James of Sopchoppy. On Dec. 4, Andrew Edmonds of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victims vehicle was left unlocked overnight and a CD player, valued at $179, was stolen. Three other vehicle burglaries were reported within a mile of each other during the same timeframe. On Dec. 4, Christopher Deason of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone entered the victims unlocked vehicle and removed $1,320 worth of property including a shotgun, GPS and gun case. On Dec. 4, Cori Revell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone entered her unlocked vehicle and removed $148 worth of items including a GPS, satellite radio and electronic chargers. On Dec. 3, Valencia Statam of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of livestock. Two baby pigs were reported stolen. The pigs were taken from a pen and are valued at $60. On Dec. 4, a female Sopchoppy victim reported a battery and criminal mischief. A juvenile became angry with the victim and hit her vehicle with an axe. She also struck the woman. The juvenile was arrested for battery and felony criminal mischief and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Damage to the vehicle was estimated at $1,500. The juvenile was released to the custody of her mother. On Dec. 4, Deputy Jeremy Johnston stopped Skylar Dylan Heller, 20, of Tallahassee for speeding at Bob Miller Road and Old Woodville Highway. The driver was traveling 47 miles per hour in a 35 mile per hour zone. The driver could not produce his license because it was suspended for failure to pay court nes. He was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge and was given a warning for excessive speed. On Dec. 4, Evester Britt of Panama City reported a grand theft at Burneys Temple First Born Church in Crawfordville. Part of an air conditioning unit and copper were reported missing. The copper tubing was removed from a propane tank and was approximately 30 feet long. The missing property was valued at $4,100. On Dec. 5, Shara Harvey of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a cellular telephone. The victim was paying for gas at Murphy Oil when she put her telephone down on a counter. She returned a short time later and the phone was missing. The phone is valued at $100. On Dec. 5, Melissa Hudson of Crawfordville reported a structure fire to a neighboring property owned by Louis Andrew Sutton of Crawfordville. Sutton and Wakulla Fire- ghters were ghting the fire when Deputy Vicki Mitchell arrived on the scene. The victim was burning off fuel from a boat motor when he left the burning fuel unattended. He returned to find the northeast side of the mobile home on re. The home was used for storage. On Dec. 5, an 11-yearold female juvenile was arrested and charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill after she threatened family members with kitchen knives. A family relative subdued the juvenile. With knives in both hands, the juvenile threatened two relatives. The juvenile was transported to the juvenile detention facility. On Dec. 1, Cobb H. Adams of Crawfordville reported a vehicle crash at Highway 61 and Rosa Shingles Road. There were no injuries to the driver after a deer ran into his path. Deputy Ben Steinle investigated. On Dec. 6, WCSO inmate Paul Mitchell Porretto, 54, of Tallahassee was arrested for battery for getting into an altercation in the Wakulla County Jail bathroom area. Porretto and a 61-year-old victim got into an altercation in front of a restroom sink and Porretto struck the victim several times with a closed hand. On Dec. 7, Ashley Rogers of Crawfordville contacted the WCSO about a traffic crash at Wal-Mart. The victim reported damage to her vehicle which was parked in the parking lot at the time it was struck. Damage to the victims truck was estimated at $450. On Dec. 7, Dustin Raker of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The vehicle was recovered in Altha and a suspect has been identi- ed. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 770 calls for service during the past week.Special to The NewsTwo Crawfordville teenagers were arrested for the burglary of the Pasco County High School football locker room after the Pasco-Wakulla football playoff game on Friday night. The two teens, Travis Anthony McCullough, 18, and Christian Robert Payne, 18, were each charged with 10 counts of grand theft, one count of burglary and 22 counts of petit theft in the incident. Deputies discovered that dozens of items were taken including watches, clothing, electronics, shoes, wallets, sunglasses, telephones and cash, according to Undersheriff Maurice Langston. In all, 32 victims were identi ed and $7,587 worth of stolen property was reported missing. Investigators established McCullough and Payne as suspects through video evidence collected at the scene. A road patrol deputy located the suspects about ve miles away at a Crawfordville fast food restaurant. McCullough gave deputies consent to search his vehicle and many of the stolen items were recovered. Investigators determined that the two teenagers entered the school at 9:10 p.m. and left about 15 minutes later. It is unfortunate that on a night when Wakulla High School earned a berth in the Class 5A State Championship game that the thrill of a triple overtime victory was partially negated by having something like this happen to the visiting team, said Undersheriff Langston. Two arrested for thefts at football game Travis A. McCullough Christian Robert Payne Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Office (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Office (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Office (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New auto rates as low as 2.75% for qualified applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and floor rate of 2.75%No payments for the first 90 days! Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL Mini-Warehouses Boats RVs519-5128 508-51772 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSEYARD SALEDEC. 16 & 178AM 2PMNO EARLY BIRDSFRI. & SAT. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.-----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 926-3281

PAGE 16

Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com CASH IN FOR THE HOLIDAYSBUYING: GOLD SILVERJEWELRYCOINS PAID ADVERTISEMENT PAYING CASH FOR ALL TYPES OF GOLD, SILVER, DIAMONDS AND MORE! WE ALSO PURCHASE SILVERWARE SETS POCKET WATCHES ANDWRIST WATCHESSILVER SCRAP GOLD POCKET & WRIST WATCHES .999 FINE SILVER SCRAP SILVER *This amount depends upon rarity, condition and what collectors are willing to pa yINDIAN CENT UP TO $500* MERCURY DIME UP TO $3,600* 3 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,500* MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR UP TO $100,000* LIBERTY V NICKEL UP TO $2,800* BARBER DIME UP TO $2,800* JEFFERSON WAR NICKEL UP TO $2,000* WHEAT BACK CENT UP TO $1,500* STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER UP TO $4,400* SHIELD NICKEL UP TO $4,000* WALKING LIBERTY HALF DOLLAR UP TO $4,700* CAPPED BUST HALF DIME UP TO $10,000* BARBER QUARTER UP TO $3,200* 2 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,000* PEACE DOLLAR UP TO $3,000* BUFFALO NICKEL UP TO $1,800* BRAIDED HAIR LARGE CENT UP TO $3,800* SEATED LIBERTY DIME UP TO $6,500* BARBER HALF DOLLAR UP TO $6,750* KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR MANY TIMES FACE VALUE* PAYING CASH FOR PRE-1970 COINS & CURRENCY Other Items of InterestCOSTUME & GOLD JEWELRY PAPER CURRENCY GOLD COINS Bring this pass and beat the lines Dont miss your chance of cashing in at these Record High Gold & Silver Prices Express Pass GOLDIS TRADING AT ALL TIME HIGHS NOW IS THE TIME TO CASH IN! Express PassGOLD & SILVEREXPRESS PASSNO WAITING IN LINE ALL JEWELRY ACCEPTED DIAMONDS CHECK IT OUT!WHOINTERNATIONAL GOLD, SILVER & DIAMOND BUYERSWHATOPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO SELL THEIR GOLD, SILVER, DIAMONDS & TREASURESWHEREPERRY HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 601 EVERETT WAY DIRECTIONS: 850.584.3200TALLAHASSEE STAYBRIDGE SUITES TALLAHASSEE I-10 E 1600 SUMMIT LAKE DR. (HWY 90 EAST) DIRECTIONS: 850.219.7000CRAWFORDVILLE BEST WESTERN PLUS WAKULLA INN & SUITES 3292 COASTAL HWY 98 DIRECTIONS: 850.926.3737WHENDECEMBER 12TH 17TH MONFRI 9AMPM SATURDAY 9AMPMINFORMATION 217.787.7767* That old class ring could buy the Flat Screen TV youve been wanting. Odd gold earrings & broken jewelry could pay for a new PlayStation or Xbox! CASH INON YOUR SCRAP GOLD & JEWELRY

PAGE 17

& Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Dance pros from New York teach local classesPage 3B Spotlight falls on main eventsWeekly Roundup, Page 4B Kitsune Books was created by Anne Petty By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter getting several of her own books and short stories published, Crawfordville resident Anne Petty decided she wanted to help other writers who were being overlooked by mainstream publishers. The big publishing companies are extremely hard to break into, even if the book is wonderful, Petty says. So in 2006 she created Kitsune Books, a publishing venue for books of high quality that are not mainstream or found on a best-seller list. She publishes poetry collections, literary ction, novels, short story collections, literary memoirs and non- ction literary commentary from rst time authors, as well as published authors. The name Kitsune comes from Japanese culture and means fox. Petty says it is based on the fox spirit character from folklore which is a shapeshifter who can transform into a woman and is considered a trickster. Petty says the whole idea of the fox spirit is about playfulness, creativity, cleverness and unpredictability, which she felt represented her company well. Petty has enjoyed writing ever since she was little when she created books out of cardboard. She has also written three horror/dark fantasy novels, three books on literary criticism and many essays. She is currently working on her fourth novel. She also has a PhD in English and has taught at the high school and college level. Ive been a wordsmith all my life, Petty says. She left teaching after being recruited by a private industry publication to become its editorial director. And Ive been doing that ever since, Petty says. In the rst year of Kitsune Books, she published three books. It then increased to four a year and then seven a year and now she publishes around 10 a year. She does not accept hard copies of manuscripts because it slows the entire process down. She only accepts them via email. Writers also must follow all the guidelines for submitting their work. If not, Petty says she screens those books out because those writers cant follow directions, or dont care to and will probably be dif cult to work with. Petty says in the beginning, she received about a dozen submissions a week. That number has increased drastically and is up to about 100 a week. Its a ood, Petty says. When it gets to be too much, Petty says she stops taking submissions. Currently, she isnt taking manuscripts until June 2012. That way I can turn the spigot off, Petty says. When she receives a submission, Petty says she does a quick screen and determines if the books falls into one of the categories she publishes and also if it is something she is looking for. After that, she reads only the rst three pages. I can guarantee within three pages, if its something I can use, Petty says. She reads those three pages and waits for the book to grab her. I listen for the authors voice and then for the author to disappear, Petty says. A books has to be well written and also not require lots of editing, she says. It needs to come to me ready to go, Petty says. She says she will work with a rst-time author and help them if they are extremely talented. If the book doesnt grab her in the rst three pages, sometimes she will look at the ending and the synopsis to see if she missed something. Continued on Page 3B PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENAnne Petty, founder of Kitsune Books, in her Wakulla of ce. e Wakulla-based publisher puts out about 10 books a year, ranging from poetry and novels to literary commentaryA fox mask Kitsune means fox in Japanese along with some of the award-winning books the small company has published. e name Kitsune comes from Japanese culture and means fox. Petty says it is based on the fox spirit character from folklore which is a shapeshifter who can transform into a woman and is considered a trickster. TravelingJarforChange! Give To Sponsored by Donate Your Change atNew Location EVERY Week! Tallahassees Most Preferred HospitalFor the7thYear in a RowOnce each year, the National Research Corporation polls the toughest critics in the health care industry the public. And for the 7th year in a row, consumers in the Tallahassee Metropolitan Statistical Area have named Tallahassee Memorial as the most-preferred hospital in the region. Tallahassee Memorial HeathCares vision is to provide recognized world class health care. It is a vision we keep rmly in sight each and every day. And, the biggest winners of all are our patients. Our Vision: RECOGNIZEDWORLDCLASSHEALTHCARE TMH.org

PAGE 18

Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, December 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla office, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, December 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, December 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 2242321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Vendors wanting to participate, call Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or 528-5838, or email posh_faery@ yahoo.com. ORDER OF CONFEDERATE ROSE Mary C. Gwaltney chapter will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405. SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS Wakulla Guards Camp will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405. Sunday, December 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, December 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, December 20 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at noon at the Historic Wakulla County Courthouse on High Drive in Crawfordville. Wednesday, December 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create y our masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, December 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY will meet at 6 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. Friday, December 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 5451853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 5451853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsThursday, December 15 WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will have its Christmas Dinner at Wakulla Springs Lodge at 6 p.m. Survivors, spouses, caregivers, friends, all are invited to share this time with them. For details, call Marge Kinder at 926-6050. Saturday, December 17 A CELTIC CHRISTMAS will be held at Posh Java featuring Aisha Ives on violin, Katie Geringer on violin and Aaron O Rourke on guitar. Reservations requested. Call (850) 962-1010 for tickets or more information. Friday, December 23 BLOODMOBILE WILL BE AT WALMART from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A $10 gift card will be given to all donors. For questions, call 877-7181. By JO ANN PALMERKWCB DirectorKeep Wakulla County Beautiful has received a $1,000 cash award from Keep America Beautiful (KAB). This was part of a nationwide effort sponsored by Nestl Waters North America to encourage local PET (plastic bottle) recycling during the 2011 Great American Cleanup. This event is the nations largest community improvement program and takes place annually from March 1 through May 31. Nestl Pure Life Puri- ed Water, the of cial national bottled water sponsor of the Great American Cleanup, worked with KAB to further energize PET recycling activities. A new Great American Cleanup record for PET recycling was set a grand total of 290 million bottles were recycled. KWCB contributed more than 2,400 pounds to the overall effort, thereby receiving a Nestl Pure Life PET Recycling Award as one of the top PET recyclers during the 2011 campaign. Keep America Beautiful congratulates Keep Wakulla County Beautiful for its plastic bottle recycling accomplishments during the 2011 Great American Cleanup, said Gail Cunningham, senior vice president of Keep America Beautiful, and managing director of the Great American Cleanup. Through your PET recycling efforts and the efforts of other organizations in communities across America, a record-breaking number of bottles were recycled a record that KWCB should be proud of. Nestl Pure Life PET Recycling Awards were awarded to 25 KAB af- liates that collected the most pounds of PET for recycling based on population served. Eight awards were given in three population categories: small (under 50,000), medium (50,000 250,000) and large (more than 250,000), and one award was given in the State KAB affiliate category. I am excited that KWCB was the winner in the less than 50,000 population. There were only two winners from the state of Florida. Nestl Waters also partners with KAB on community recycling programs, and serves as a National Sponsor for Keep America Beautiful Great American Cleanup and America Recycles Day. Keep America Beautiful, Inc., established in 1953, is the nations largest volunteer-based community action and education organization. To join the Great American Cleanup and let green start with you, visit www. kab.org. If you would like to get involved with KWCB, email helpkwcb@gmail.com or call (850) 745-7111. Remember, reuse when possible, reduce your personal trash and recycle, its good for everyone. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comKeep Wakulla County Beautiful... Cancer Support Group Christmas Dinner at the Lodge at 6 p.m. Tip a Cop fundraiser at Poseys Steam Room 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Celtic Christmas at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Wakulla Economic Development Council at noon at the old courthouse. ThursdayFridaySaturdayTuesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingThursday, December 15 WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the county administration conference room. WAKULLA COUNTY RECYCLE TASK FORCE will meet from 4 to 6 p.m. at the library. By MARJ LAW Last week, Joe and I met our friend Barry at the WCSO range in Sopchoppy. Joe was going to show Barry how to hit those orange disks they call birdies out of the air, and I was going to try out a beautiful antique 16-gauge shotgun. Joe pops the 16-gauge open, slips in a shot, and calls pull. The orange bird ies into the air, maybe 20 yards away. Joe pulls the trigger and the birdie disintegrates into bits. The guys kindly allow me to try it out next. I take the shotgun, ip the lever to open it and nothing. I try to pull the stock and barrel towards each other, but am not strong enough to open it. Darn. Joe takes it back and pops it open. Maybe its a little stiff, he says. O-Kay. I call pull and shoot. The birdie sails in a graceful arc and oats to the ground. In one piece. I ip the lever again, and again cant open it to eject the shell. I consider whapping it in my leg and yanking both ends to get the darn thing opened, but gure thats probably not good range etiquette. So Joe takes the gun, ejects the shell, and loads it again. I call pull and watch the birdie sail again unharmed. Now Barry has never shot skeet or trap before. Joe shows him how to load his new gun, gives a couple words of advice and steps back. Barry calls pull. I watch the birdie y into a million pieces. Humph. Beginners luck, I think dejectedly. Barry loads again, a bit slowly and thoughtfully. Pull! he calls again, and again the birdie dies. And again. And again. Im going over to the ri e range, I tell the guys, and collect my trusty 10/22 which is like a small ri e with a scope. Its easy to use and will soothe my disgruntled feelings. And OK, OK, Im happy for Barry. The WCSO range has lots of places to shoot. You can also shoot at metal targets. They are fun, because you can hear the ping when you hit them, and then they have the grace to fall over, so you really know you whomped them. Then theres a pistol range for handguns, a practice range for law enforcement, the ri e range and more. Theres a young man at the ri e range. I slide into the seat on his far side. He gives a 2 finger wave and smiles. I wave slightly and load the 22s magazine. Then I plop down a sandbag which is a place to rest the barrel so your shooting is more accurate. After my dismal display at the clays, I needed that accuracy. I aim, and shoot 5 rounds. At 50 yards, I cant see the target, so I break out my binoculars. Yep. A couple holes mark the center of the target and 3 more are close by. Im feeling better. Joe and Barry come over. 8 out of 20! Barry says with satisfaction. Im still abbergastered. His rst time. Hes a natural. The boy waves at Joe and Barry. Joe looks at me strangely. Why didnt you shoot next to Danny? Joe asks me. Danny? My youngest son who lives in Tallahassee? That young man is Danny? I look at him. He smiles again. Well, glory be. I go over and hug him. You didnt recognize me, did you? he asked. Your own son and you didnt recognize me? What can I say? I hug him harder. Despite some guilty maternal feelings, the day is turning out really well. Being with Joe, a good friend and my son? Im happy. We spend the afternoon going from the ri e range, to the metal targets and then to the pistol range. Theres nothing more relaxing than aiming for targets with your family on a nice sunny day. Christmas is coming. If my son werent already a member, Id have bought him a membership if only to spend companionable time with him. And hed have liked it a lot more than sweaters and socks.Home on the Range... Its a family thing

PAGE 19

Continued from Page 1B She says she also looks at the writers credentials, but that doesnt typically sway her either way. I dont care if you are the cousin of Dolly Parton, Petty says. She adds that name dropping happens quite often. Sometimes after reading a book she becomes frustrated because it is extremely well written, but she published something similar within the past year. When that happens, she emails the writer back and praises them and sends them names of other publishers who might be interested. Petty says there is a great network of small press publishers who hand off manuscripts to each other. We keep things in circulation, Petty says. If she likes a submission, she sends it off to her assistant editor, Lynn Holschuh, who will do the rst read through and then give her feedback. Holschuh and Petty went to school together and Petty says they have a long wordsmithing history. If the book fits into an opening they have, they contact the author and enter into a contract. It then takes about a year for the book to be published. Were small, Petty says. And when we take somebodys book, we may have two other balls in the air. You have to get in the queue. Once Petty takes the book, they also must decide on a cover. Sometimes the author has a specific picture they want to use or has a basic idea and sometimes they arent sure what to use for the cover and Petty helps them decide and may contract with an artist to design the cover. One books cover was done by a local artist, another was done by a tattoo artist. Occasionally we get lucky, Petty says. You never know what will happen with a cover. For the book, Florida Gothic Stories by Vicki Hendricks, Petty says they got extremely lucky and had a photograph by well-known photographer Clyde Butcher featured on the cover. Petty says Hendricks wanted to use one of Butchers photographs, but Petty didnt think she would be able to afford them. Hendricks had a friend who knew Butchers sister and his sister agreed to ask him. Petty says Butcher let them use the photograph for free and all he wanted was credit for it. Prior to the book being published, she also enlists her husband Bill to do some fact checking. Bill Petty is a local mycologist, as well as a scientist and mathematician. Petty has him check references in the books that relate to science, technology and astronomy, such as if its possible for a certain ower to be blooming in a certain environment during a speci c season. I really rely on him to catch stuff like that, Petty says. Once the books are published, they can be ordered on Amazon and through Kistune Books website. About half of them are also available as e-books. A book she is currently working on is called Blood Red Dawn and is a collection of poetry written by a solider who did tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. The soldier was told he should get therapy for his post-traumatic stress disorder, but decided instead to write. He then obtained a degree in English and submitted his manuscript to Petty. I read it with jaw dropped, Petty says. Petty says she was blown away by his writing. Most large publishers wouldnt publish a collection like this one because it is somewhat controversial, and it is poetry by a solider, Petty says. But she says it was well written, edgy and had a very unique voice. The cover of the book is a photograph one of the soldiers friends took while they were on tour. Recently, ve of the books she has published won gold and silver medals from the Florida Publishers Association 2011 Book Awards in the poetry, memoir, adult ction and middle grades fiction categories. The high quality has been recognized, Petty says. For more information, visit www.kitsunebooks.com or email anne@kitsunebooks. com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 3BDance pros from New York teach at local studio Kitsune Books was created by Anne PettySpecial to The NewsIt was a dream come true for local dance students at Crawfordvilles Studio 88 Dance Productions when they hosted performers-choreographers Ashle Dawson, Jim Cooney and Jessica Seavor. Studio 88 is led by Lauren Manning and Denise Jefferson. Ashle Dawson captivated America as a Top Four nalist on Foxs smash So You Think You Can Dance. With 10 years of teaching experience under her belt, after her appearance on the TV show, she continued on traveling the world as an internationally acclaimed and respected performer, choreographer and instructor while being based in Los Angeles. This past fall season, Dawson appeared on MTVs Made As the Latin Dance Coach. Jim Cooney has taught jazz, tap and musical theater across the world and has established himself as one of the most popular theater dance faculty members at Broadway Dance Center in New York City. He is the faculty advisor of BDCs elite Professional Semester training program and the Summer Intern Program. He also has been the dance captain for eight productions including the rst national tour of Tony Award winner Susan Stromans Broadway revival of The Music Man and the original company of Nights on Broadway, directed and choreographed by Tony Award winner Andy Blankenbuehler and starring former Miss America Kate Shindle. How did they end up in a little town called Crawfordville? Jessica Seavor was an instructor at the Crawfordville dance studio when it was formerly known as Dancing With Miss Denise, and taught for two years. While with Miss Denise, Seavor had applied for a scholarship program with The Pulse and Broadway Dance Center. She was awarded both and has been training in New York City since September 2010. Seavor quickly made a name for herself at BDC. While taking more than 12 classes a week, multiple teachers took note of her hard work and talent. In late November, Seavor was featured in Of ce Max: Elf Yourself campaign, directed and choreographed by Cooney, was promoted as their spokesperson and asked to travel to Chicago for multiple promotions. In February, Dawson took Jessica to Washington, D.C., to perform for an Audi Event along with two fellow dancers. Chio Yamada, a Jazz Funk teacher at BDC and the Pulse, also took Jessica and her other assistant to Pennsylvania, where they both assisted at the Motion Dance Convention, as well as performed along side Yamada at their Gala. In March, Seavor made her way back down to Tampa where she assisted Cooney. Along with assisting, she has performed with dancers from all over the world, back-up danced for Aisha, Japanese pop star, and with Run-DMC, among others. Seavor recently auditioned for a role in the Broadway production Nine to Five and found out just before she arrived in Crawfordville that she made the cast. This news came of no surprise to Miss Denise or Miss Lauren and the rest of their dance family. Seavor and Lauren have remained great friends and talk often about the plans for our new Studio 88. Lauren will be traveling with a few of the Studio 88 dancers to complete an internship program in New York City at the BDC in summer 2012. Lauren is artistic director at Studio 88 and Miss Denise is now the business director. Studio 88 dancers will be traveling to Atlanta in March to compete against the best studios at Access Broadway and will be performing in different events in the spring.Jessica Seavor returns to her home dance studio after much success in New York, and brings two well-known instructors with herSPECIAL TO THE NEWSVisiting artists Ashle Dawson and Jim Cooney with local dance students at Studio 88. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringCarolyn HarveyNovember 2011 Winner Her name was drawn fromis was the rst time entering my name for this contest and I won just a few days later. ank You! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! St. MarksRIVER CANTINA We Have The Best Hamburgers AroundPrize for Best Dressed Golf Kart Dress Up Your Golf Kart & Join The Parade Call for FREE registration925-9908 5th Annual Golf Kart Christmas ParadeFriday, Dec. 16 @ 6:30 p.m. St. Marks Toy DriveBring an unwrapped giftgifts will be distributed by St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department Join the Cantina for Thanksgiving Dinner on Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish If you cant Join us Anyway! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 We accept most major insurance plans. Transfer today!Your Publix Pharmacy accepts the State of Florida Employees program, TRICARE,Express Scripts, Blue Cross/Blue Shield, and many more.publix.com/pharmacyTransfers are easy! Just bring in your prescription bottle or new prescription. Well take care of the rest.TRICARE is a registered trademark of the TRICARE Management Activity. All rights reserved.

PAGE 20

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com List 10 words that rhyme with bear. 1. ______________ 2. ______________ 3. _____________ 4. ______________ 5. ______________ 6. _____________ 7. ______________ 8. ______________ 9. _____________ 10. _____________What Rhymes withSome answers: care, chair, dare, fare, glare, hair, pair, rare, scare, tear Almost every household with young kids has a box of crayons. The first crayons, however, were a lot different than those of today. Made of charcoal and oil, they broke easily and were hard to use. They were also toxic! In the early 1900s, cousins Edwin Binney and C. Harold Smith created their own version of crayons. Made of wax and pigments, the crayons were stronger and safer. Binneys wife, Alice, named the crayons crayolas, and the first box of eight was sold for a nickel in 1903. Binney and Smiths crayons were a hit, and today, over five billion in 120 colors are made every year. Thats a lot of crayons for a lot of coloring.Color Kids Happy Many companies all over the world make toys. How familiar are you with toymakers? Fill in the blanks to name that toymaker.Answers: 1) Mattel, 2) Hasbro, 3) Playmobil, 4) Lego, 5) Bandai, 6) LeapFrog, 7) Radio Flyer1) M A __ __ E L2) H A __ __ __ O3) __ L A __ __ O B __ L4) L __ G __5) B A __ D __ I6) __ E A __ __ R O __7) R __ D I __ F __ Y E __ Name That Toymaker Name That Toymaker COLORING PICTURE 1) Gramma Nut and King Kandy are from Chutes and Ladders. Fact or Fiction? 2) Butterflies and spare ribs can be found in Operation. Fact or Fiction? 3) The object of Connect Four is to get four pieces of the same color in a row first. Fact or Fiction? 4) Players must twist their bodies all around in Battleship. Fact or Fiction? 5) Hungry Hungry Hippos has five hippos. Fact or Fiction? 6) Simon has four buttons. Fact or Fiction? 7) Players roll dice to move around the board in Sorry. Fact or Fiction? 8) The object of Monopoly is to gain property while keeping cash reserves low. Fact or Fiction? 9) Mr. Mouth is a frog. Fact or Fiction? 10) Colonel Mustard and Miss Scarlet are from Boggle. Fact or Fiction?FACT OR FICTION?Board Game ChallengeMany a kid has spent hours playing board games. How much do you know about board games? Take this quiz and find out.Answers: 1) Fiction, the characters are from Candy Land, 2) Fact, 3) Fact, 4) Fiction, they must twist all around in Twister, 5) Fiction, there are only four, 6) Fact, 7) Fiction, they draw cards to move, 8) Fiction, the object is to gain property and money, 9) Fact, 10) Fiction, the characters are from Clue Q: Why did the doll act so silly on Christmas?A: She was wound up. Q: Whats red and white and gives toys to good little fish?A: Sandy Claus.Jokes and Riddles This page sponsored in part by:

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 5B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 24 HOUR EMERGENCYRESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALSERVICEALLMAKESANDMODELSMAINTANCECONTRACTSSTOCKALLSIZE FILTERSANDMEDIA 850-926-4676North Pointe Center 1606-B Crawfordville Highwaylic# CAC1816154 WWW.TALLYSENERGYSTAR.COM Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Cornerstone CookingWant a SMOKED TURKEY or HAM for your holiday get-together? Maybe you dont want to cook at all. Let Cornerstone Cooking take some of the hassle out of the holidays for you.We also o er FULL CATERING SERVICES! Morris Pigo at (850) 661-1117 with Dolly MoodyYoga Gain exibility, strength, energy. Call for class schedule and rates.YogaFORSENIORSFocusyoga@yahoo.com or call 228-380-0140Focus on a healthier you.BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com DouglasMOBILEMARINE Outboard Repair & Service Electronics Installation Fiberglass RepairFactory trained: Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki and Tohatsu850-228-0889 LICENSED & INSURED 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building. Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com.FOXTROT FARM Learn: horse care, equipment, safety with some riding time. for private lessons on our new school ponies. English lessons on your horse; will come to your place. Call -LAURIE WESTBROOK 850-926-2004 TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Do leaves have you bogged down this fall then call Pat Greens Lawn ServiceCall today for a free quote! They have all the modern equipment to rid you of all those falling leaves.(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUYSELLTRADEREPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @comcast.net Denises ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net wakulla realty Free Offers CATS, KITTENS & PUPPIES ( Mal-chi) NEED good HOMES (850) 210-2841 Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Lost Lost Dog-Red Peek-a-poo on 11/22 between 10AM-3PM near Hwy 98, We miss our dog! Companion for senior, please call (850) 926-4075 Announcements SAVE $$$ on Advertising! Run your classified ad in over 100 Florida newspapers reaching over 4 MILLION readers for $475-that is less that $4 per newspaper. Call this newspaper or (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida -classifieds.com Professional CJIS GROUP Inc.,a Market Research firm, has a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting /training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUP benefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgr oup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills DRIVER NEEDEDFull time with benefits available, CDL with Hazmat certification, Inquire at Wakulla Gas Company or call 850-926-7670 Driver-Dry & Refrigerated. Single source dispatch. No tractor older than 3 years. Daily Pay! Various hometime options! CDL-A, 3 months currentOTR experience 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers: Run GA, AL, MS, & TN & FL HOME WEEKENDS, earn Up to 39 cents a mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp. Call: SUNBELT TRANSPORT,LLC (800)572-5489 EXT 227 HOME WEEKLY 100% O(/Op Company O/Ops CDL A Drivers/ Reefer $1,000 sign on bonus! Call 800-237-8288 or visit www.suncocarriers.com Trades/ Skills RV & MOTORIZED DELIVERY DRIVERS Needed NOW! See the Country side! Deliver Motorhomes, boats, and other trailers to the 49 states & Canada. Detailswww.horizontransport.com Career Opportunities A Better CareerWith Melton Great Equipment & Benefits 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www. meltontruck.com Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877) 359-1690 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. Call Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction ALLIED HEALTHCareer training -Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.Centura Online.com EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINEOnline from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Schools/ Instruction EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINEOnline from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Miscellaneous Financial $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!! $$$As seen on TV. Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++ within 48/hours? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com General Commercial Bakery equipment for sale,2-3 years old, excellent cond, 2 gas confection ovens,Globe mixer,2 prep tables, pans ect. $7000 for all 850-364-4545 or 850-320-5323 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWSFORDVILLE32 Merwing Dr 2 BR 2 BA. Nice, well kept, near lake & great schools, nice area $550 (850) 443-3300 SOPCHOPPY3/1, Covered Porch, large wooded lot, $500 Mo. + Dep. (850) 566-4124 Real Estate For Rent 3BR/2BA DWMHLarge deck, shed, remodeled kitchen, Great condition! NO Pets, (firm) $650/month $600/sec 850-926-6212 Apartments Move in special $99 Deposit $300 Swimming pool and gym Local Hero Discount $99 Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo 2BR as LOW as $700/mo 3BDR as LOW as $800/mo. Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675.per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-926-4217 Storage/ Warehouses Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease,8x10 and 10x12 now available. Come by or call Wakulla Realty, (850) 926-5084 Real Estate For Sale 3BR/2BA one-story home with garage on Greiners Addition. Excellent condition. $85,000. Owner financing. 850-251-7588, 850-962-2016. SopchoppyCabin on 5 acres,600 square foot, backs up to the forest, $59,000 Revell Realty 850-962-2212 Commercial Real Estate Affordable Office Space at the Barry Building. Great atmosphere! Includes all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen use, conference room. Rates start at $250/mo. 850-210-5849 or our website at www.BarryBuilding.com Best business opportunity!!!2400 sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! Rent negotiable 850-926-2480 Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300 Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-656-6340 Restaurant Space Available Soon!! Fully equipped. Can assume full liquor license and equipment if you act quickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space -1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Lots For Sale 2-acre lot for sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Recreation Vehicles NEWMAR, Dutchstar, Motorhome, 38tft, Deisel pusher, super slide, leather sofas, tiled kitchen and bath, 2 new flat scrn. TVs, and much more, $32,500 Call (850) 566-4124 Handyman Affordable pricing! Pressure washing, landscaping, roof cleaning,all fencing types, plumbing, wood rot repair,tree removal, painting ect. Residential & Comm. Brian 766-9304 Heating/AC HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR Sales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in CrawfordvilleDoug & Sherry Quigg, OwnersLic. Nos ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926-5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Pressure Cleaning A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed-John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Services ALL ABOUT...CONCRETEBLOCKS, BRICKS, PAVERSLANDSCAPEPLANTS, SOD, TRACTOR WORK Call JOSEPH FRANCIS 850-556-1178 OR 850-556-3761 Services Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5Br 2Ba DWMH $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $775mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $725mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $750mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker 3BR/2BA in Mysterious Waters. $695 rent, same deposit. No Pets. Call Jim at 566-5165 Move-in special $99 Deposit $300 Special on 2BR ONLY 1/2 OFF 2nd month rent Local Hero Discount $99Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BR as LOW as $630/mo 2BR as LOW as $730/mo 3BR as LOW as $830/mo Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week Please Call877676-1403 Homes For Rent

PAGE 22

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1150 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets59 Chickat 3BR/2BA House $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets455 Old Bethel Road 3BR/2BA House on 1 acre. $950 mo. No Smoking or PetsAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 5063-1215 PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE : Monday, December 19, 2011 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 December 15, 2011 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5057-1215 PUBLIC NOTICE MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON DECEMBER 5, 2011 The meeting was called to order by the Chairman. The Pledge of Allegiance was recited with a prayer given by Mr. Evans. All Board Members and Superintendent Miller were in attendance. Moved by Mr. Gray, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the agenda. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Gray to approve ratification of the Master Teacher Contract for 2011-2012. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. Moved by Mr. Thomas, seconded by Mr. Evans to approve the Administrative/Supervisory and Non-Instructional Salary Schedules for 2011-2012. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas Moved by Mrs. Cook, seconded by Mr. Evans to adjourn. Voting for the motion: Mrs. Cook, Mr. Evans, Mr. Gray, Mr. Scott and Mr. Thomas. December 15, 2011 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5056-1222 Vs. Evans, Ashley 2011-CA-000189 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.:2011-CA-000189 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, v. ASHLEY CIARA EVANS, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA SCHILLING, a/k/a ASHLEY CIARA FOX, JOHN ROBERT SCHILLING, and JAMES FOX, DEFENDANTS. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JAMES M. FOX 513 East Ivan Road Crawfordville, FL 32347 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots 32, 33, and 34 of the West Side of the Town of Sopchoppy, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida has been filed against you, Ashley Ciara Evans, a/k/a Ashley Ciara Schilling, a/k/a Ashley Ciara Fox, and John Robert Schilling in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses to it, if any to: RONALD A. MOWREY, MOWREY LAW FIRM, P.A. at 515 North Adams Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 on or before January 16, 2012, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32347, either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and Seal of this Court on November 21, 2011 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court (seal) By /s/Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk December 15 & 22, 2011 5058-1222 Vs. Jordan, Gary 09-CA-443 Re-Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 09-CA-443 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF JANUARY 1,2006 MORGAN STANLEY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-1, Plaintiff, vs. GARY JORDAN, ANGEL JORDAN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC.(MIN# 100176105081070966), SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION INC. UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2 and ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named Defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming, by through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendants, RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 24, 2010, and entered in Case No. 09-CA-443 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF JANUARY 1,2006 MORGAN STANLEY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2006-1 MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-1 is Plaintiff and GARY JORDAN, ANGEL JORDAN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC.(MIN# 100176105081070966), SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION INC. UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2 and ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named Defendant is deceased, the personal representatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other parties claiming, by through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, persons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claiming under any of the above named or described Defendants, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the lobby at the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL at 11:00 oclock A.M. on the 5th day of January, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 3, Block K. of Songbird, Phase II, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat 3, Pages 113 through 116, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida Located : 18 Swift Pass, Crawfordville, FL 32327 and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included as security in Plaintiffs mortgage. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida, this 1st day of December 2011. Brent Thurmond, Clerk of said Circuit Court /s/By: Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk Clarfiel & Okond,P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 500 S. Australian Ave., Suite 730, West Palm Beach, Fl 33401 (561) 713-1400 December 15 & 22, 2011 5060-1222 Vs. Beam, Nancy Revell Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-153-CA JAMES L. THOMPSON, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY REVELL BEAM; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF NANCY REVELL BEAM; and UNKNOWN TENANTS, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styledcause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Commence at the intersection of the Easterly right-of-way boundary of State Road No. S-365 with the South boundary of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 15, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 15 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 223.80 feet, thence run North 74 degrees 41 minutes 24 seconds East 350.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run North 15 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds West 125.00 feet, thence run North 74 degrees 41 minutes 41 minutes 27 seconds East 175.00 feet, thence run South 15 degrees 18 minutes 33 seconds East 125.00 feet, thence run South 74 degrees 41 minutes 27 seconds West 175.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. at public sale, to the highest bidder, for cash, at the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m., on February 2, 2012. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, other than the property owner, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court (SEAL) /s/ By Desiree D Willis, as Deputy Clerk December 15 & 22, 2011 5061-1222 Vs. Shriver, Kathleen M. 652008CA000010FC Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 652008CA000010FC DIVISION DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR FRIEDMAN, BILLINGS, RAMSEY GROUP, INC. (FBR) SECURITIZATION NAME-FBRSI 2005-5, Plaintiff, vs. KATHLEEN M. SHRIVER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 1, 2011 and entered in Case No. 652008CA000010FC of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR FRIEDMAN, BILLINGS, RAMSEY GROUP, INC. (FBR) SECURITIZATION NAME-FBRSI 2005-5, is the Plaintiff and KATHLEEN M. SHRIVER; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS, INC., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO AAMES FUNDING CORPORATION; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 5th day of January, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1, BLOCK 28, OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT THREE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 135 SARSI DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on December 2, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 15 & 22, 2011 5055-1222 12/31 Sale-Seminole Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLORIDA SELF STORAGE FACILITY ACT, FLORIDA STATUES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY SEALED BID ON DECEMBER 31,2011 A T 10:00A.M AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF: MARY LOUISE SLOAN SCOTT STANLEY MELINDA ZUHL BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF DECEMBER 31, 2011 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROPERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION. December 15 & 22, 2011 Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5053-1222 Vs. Despirito, Emil T., 65-2011-CA-000115 Notice of Foreclosure IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDADIVISION: CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000115 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. EMIL T. DESPIRITO A/K/A EMIL T. DESPIRITO, JR et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated October 27, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000115 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and EMIL T. DESPIRITO A/K/A EMIL T. DESPIRITO, JR; DEBRA U. DESPIRITO; DISCOVERY MARKETING; SPRINGWOOD II ROADOWNERS MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 5th day of January, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 8 BLOCK H SPRINGWOOD PHASE II A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGES 14 THROUGH 17 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A CERTAIN 1996 NOBILITY MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: VIN# N87271A AND N87271B. A/K/A 196 RIDGEWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 22, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) BY /s-/DESIREE D. WILLIS, AS DEPUTY CLERK Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. December 15 & 22, 2011 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices 5059-1222 Brinkley, Bernice D.11-64-PR PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO.:11-64-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF BERNICE C. BRINKLEY, DECEASED. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Bernice D. Brinkley, deceased, whose date of death was July 8, 2011, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The first date of publication of this Notice is December 15, 2011. Personal Representative: /s/ Phyllis F. Hurst Post Office Box 414, Woodville, FL 32362 Attorneys for Personal Representative LAW OFFICES OF STUART E. GOLDBERG, P.L./s/ Stuart E. Goldberg Fla. Bar No. 0365971, Amy Mason Collins, Post Office Box 12458, Tallahassee, Florida 32317 Telephone (850)222-4000 Facsimile (850) 942-6400 5063-1215 12/27 Sale-Wakulla Realty PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Wakulla Realty will hold a sale by sealed bid on Tuesday, December 27 at 10:00 a.m. at 2655B U.S. Highway 319 of the contents of Mini-warehouse containing personal property of: Wilburn McCalvin Dan Sheppard Sara McGowan Deanne Kirkland Sandcastle Painting, LLC Before the sale date of December 27, 2011, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 535, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 or by paying in person at 2655 U.S. Highway 319, Crawfordville, Florida. December 15, 22, 2011 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. NoticesWakulla County, Florida (the County) hereby provides notice, pursuant to section 197.3632(3) (a), Florida Statutes, of its intent to use the uniform method of collecting non-ad valorem special assessments throughout the unincorporated area of the County and within the incorporated areas of the cities of Sopchoppy and St. Marks, for the cost of providing re, emergency medical services, solid waste, stormwater, road maintenance and improvements, clean energy and wind resistance improvements, and other neighborhood improvements, facilities, and associated services commencing for the Fiscal Year beginning on October 1, 2012 and continuing until discontinued by the County. The County will consider the adoption of a resolution electing to use the uniform method of collecting such assessments authorized by section 197.3632, Florida Statutes, at a public hearing to be held at 5:00 p.m. on January 10, 2012 in the Wakulla County Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida. Such resolution will state the need for the levy andNOTICE OF INTENT TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESMENTSwill contain a legal description of the boundaries of the real property subject to the levy. Copies of the proposed form of resolution, which contains the legal description of the real property subject to the levy, are on le at the County Administrators Ofce, 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida. All interested persons are invited to attend. In the event any person decides to appeal any decision by the County with respect to any matter relating to the consideration of the resolution at the above-referenced public hearing, a record of the proceeding may be needed and in such an event, such person may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the public hearing is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence on which the appeal is to be based. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation or an interpreter to participate in this proceeding should contact the County at (850)926-0919, at least one day prior to the date of the hearing.DECEMBER 15, 22, 29, 2011 JANUARY 5, 2012 Advertisement Detail WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REHWINKEL ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS Invitation to Bid No. ITB2012-05 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: December l5, 2011 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed responses for Roadway Improvements to Rehwinkel Road addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Of ce, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 will be received until January 13, 2012, at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Any responses received after the time and date speci ed will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Virginia Dekle Phone: 850.926.9500, FAX: 850.926.0940 e-mail: vdekle@mywakulla.com Plans and Speci cations Packages may be purchased at the Wakulla County Purchasing Of ce at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for a fee of $100.00 begining December 15, 2011. Checks or money orders only please made payable to: Preble-Rish, Inc. No pre-bid meeting will be held for this project. All Bidders are encouraged to visit the site to become familiar with the project area. Any person with a quali ed disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this of ce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Alan Brock, Chairman Virginia Dekle, Of ce of Management and Budget

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 Page 7BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 26 31 36 40 46 50 56 60 63 2 27 47 3 28 48 4 29 43 5 23 41 21 37 57 61 64 6 15 18 38 58 7 30 32 51 8 24 44 49 9 25 45 19 22 42 59 62 65 10 16 39 52 11 33 53 12 34 54 13 35 55 A CROSS1.Itmayhangon yourconscience 6.Gamewithahole card 10.Jock'sinventory item 14.Palmer,tohis "army" 15.Tryatlminga scene 16."Nope" 17. Glovematerial 18.Animalwarfare? 20.You're"ingood hands"withthem 22.Hall's"Maneater" partner 23.Cornorformleadin 24.Fromtheheart 26.Animalwarfare? 31.Windowstypeface 32.Voidcompanion 33.Mushyfood 36.Fisherman's"the onethatgotaway" 37.Fliersinaskein 39. Oompahband need 40.Machiavellian 41.Saltychee se 42.Screwup 43.Animalwarfare? 46.Depressedfeeling 49.Claiborneof fashion 50.Something squirreledaway 51.Arpandhisilk 56.Animalwarfare? 59.NewYork's__ FisherHall 60.Sawbucks 61.Shoppesignword 62.Silentsstar Novarro 63. OnetimeSinclair rival 64.Hippie'sillicit purchase 65.SarcasticDOWN1.Inauguralball,e.g. 2. Orsk'sriver 3.ILGWUpart:Abbr. 4.Bunchesofbull 5.Pertainingtoa manuscript 6.Backtalk,slangily 7.Sprintterminus 8.TinyTim's instrument 9 .__Plaines,Illinois 10.HistorianWillor Ariel 11."Oh,How__ to Get UpintheMorning" 12.Crowd-scene actors,inthelingo 13.Communityor hopefollower 19.Snorkeler's milieu 21.Formicary inhabitant 24.Birds thatprovide red meat 25.Uptothejob 26.Thoroughfares 27.Likesome confessions 28.Mucky 29.Nucleartreaty result 30.Either"Paper Moon"costar 33.Giveup thepigskin 34.Onetimelabor chiefI.W. 35.Scaledown 37.Comprehends 38.Kinof-ule 39.Rugrat 41.Reacttoaskunk, incartoons 42.Somecharity events 43.L anzarole 44.Walkingonair 45.eBayoer 46.Notglossy 47.Fieldunits 48.Nutjobs 51.Weekend rancher 52. "FathersandSons" novelistTurgenev 53.Jackkningvictim? 54.Walkedover 55.Endofa1/1song 57.Fiddlestick 58.CorridacheerAmerican Prole Hometown Content 11/20/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sect ions, and each s ection has nine b lank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with n umber s 1 to 9. You ma y not repeat an y n umber s in an y one of the nine sections that youv e already used else where in that section. Also, you can use each n umber 1-9 onl y once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each v er tical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctl y ll e ver y square .Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 2345 461 748 3 267 51 4983 6 53 296 58374 00 9 HtCtt 186 2734 9 5 245698713 397145286 831 924657 672531849 459786132 964 852371 723419568 518367924 G A L A W A Y S M A T T U R A L O R A L A C R E I N T L M I R Y L O O N L I E S B A N C A R U S T E X T U A L F A I N T A N T G E T S B O S T A T I C E T T E O L T A P E O N E A L D U D U K E E M U S E L A T E D E S A B L E B I D C O R A L B A Z A A R D U R A N T T O T I V A I H A T E P U N T S E M S U P E S A B E L T R O C H E S T P A R E S Y N Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE Dec. 9 Even as the main events for the 2011 legislative session got started in earnest this week, sideshows seemed intent to steal center stage. Gov. Rick Scotts annual budget speech at the Capitol this year was crashed by a correspondent for a satirical news show. The of cial Christmas tree made its appearance. Even one of the states political gures got an entertainment deal of sorts, when Republican U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio signed a contract to write a memoir scheduled to be released next fall. But the central events of the week continued to focus on the three issues that will dominate the legislative session: A state budget with an almost $2 billion shortfall and a governor pushing for a $1 billion in new state education funding; a slate of redistricting maps that would recast the states political boundaries; and a bill to introduce several large casinos in Florida. BUDGET: FROM HOSPITALS TO SCHOOLS The headline-grabber from Scotts budget proposal was a move to slash Medicaid payment rates and use the money to help bankroll $1 billion in new education spending, though that would be offset by several factors. About $444 million would replace onetime state funding for the loss of local tax income, and another $190 million would pay for enrollment growth. The per-student increase would be about $142, or 2.3 percent. Scott also didnt replace hundreds of millions of dollars in federal education funding meant to ll some shortfalls. I will not sign a budget from the Legislature that does not signi cantly increase state funding for education, Scott vowed. But the fulcrum of that plan already seemed to be headed into trouble by the end of the week, with a bipartisan group of lawmakers saying they were at least mildly concerned with Scotts efforts to come up with some of the money by attening the Medicaid payment structure for similar types of hospitals. Scotts administration says a system that pays similar hospitals far different rates isnt logical or fair. Personally, I think that it is going to destroy the health-care continuum in our state, said Senate Minority Leader Nan Rich, D-Weston. And while some Republicans were cautious about the proposal, others supported the idea. I applaud the governor for what he has done in this budget, said Senate Education PreK-12 Appropriations Chairman David Simmons, R-Maitland. Scotts plan would also eliminate 4,500 positions in state government, close some prisons and cut business taxes. LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION Meanwhile, lawmakers were playing an autobiographical form of Wheres Waldo this week, as the Senate Reapportionment Committee voted to submit its redistricting proposals as a committee and House panels got their rst look at a dozen possibilities for House and congressional maps. Both chambers have to carve up the state to create legislative districts and make room for two new members of Congress. The House and Senate have largely agreed to trade each others maps for their respective chambers, meaning only the congressional map to be negotiated. That didnt prevent reworks from going off in the Senate meetings, where Rich suggested that partisan politics were still ruling the day, despite the approval last year of the anti-gerrymandering Fair Districts amendments. I think that the voters tell us they wanted a clean slate, not a map-making adjustment to gerrymandered maps that were adopted 10 years ago, she said. Republicans bristled at the suggestion. Theres been no evidence that our process has been tainted in any way by political consideration, said Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart. The House meetings were relatively calmer, though that might have had as much to do with the deluge of maps than anything else. Subcommittees are considering five House maps and seven congressional plans, a dizzying total of 789 districts to consider before the panels select their top three choices for each map next month. SHOWING THE CARDS Meanwhile, the groups already engaged in the high-stakes lobbying showdown on major resort casinos upped the ante on their battle during the week, with three Cabinet of cials taking sides while business lobbies faced each other and one in uential lawmaker. Associated Industries of Florida joined with construction groups to push for the destination resort legislation that would lead to casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties. We want to take control of our future and advance policies that we know will result in job creation, Brewster Bevis, an AIF vice president, said during a news conference at the Capitol. But political opposition was already building. Senate Rules Committee Chairman John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, took some of AIFs comments at a committee meeting on the measure as criticism of the Legislature and lit into a representative for the group. For you all to suggest the Florida Legislature hasnt done its job, and we ought to be embarrassed, Im embarrassed by that comment, he said. Meanwhile, Attorney General Pam Bondi and Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam held a press conference to blast the idea of destination resorts. The very character of our state is at stake in this debate, Putnam said. The third member of the Cabinet, Chief Financial Of cer Jeff Atwater, said later through a spokeswoman that he also didnt like the idea. Supporters were already trying to calculate their odds. Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, said she would talk with other senators and offer a revised proposal, likely as a strike-all amendment, before such a vote. Obviously, why do the strike-all if I dont have the votes? she said after the committee meeting. Its a Rubiks Cube. But that and other questions about the proposal left state economists without much to go on as they try to gure out the states share of the jackpot. They eventually rolled the dice, guessing that it could rake in $455.7 million over the next four years. But the economists said the tax impact of the controversial casino plan is indeterminate because of the need to make key assumptions. I think theres just too many assumptions that may be good assumptions, but theres just too many of them, Senate economist Jose Diez-Arguelles said. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott unveils a budget proposal with $1 billion in ne w state funding for education and cuts in Medicaid reimbursement rates for hospitals. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Governor, youve bene ted from hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars over the year, so would you be willing to pee into this cup to prove to Floridas taxpayers that youre not on drugs, youre not using any illegal drugs? The Daily Show correspondent Aasif Mandvi, to Gov. Rick Scott during a press conference to unveil Scotts budget proposal.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Spotlight falls on main eventsBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 12 Combatants in a battle over a new north Florida barrel racing venture brought their respective cases to the 1st District Court of Appeal on Monday with track owners saying they ve gotten the state s blessing and their opponent crying foul. At issue is whether the appellate court should issue a sta y that would at least temporarily halt gambling at a new facility in Gretna while the issue of whether it is legal winds through the courts. The Gretna track, which received its permit in September, began holding barrel races on Dec 1. Owners of the Gretna horse track say they should be allowed to continue offering pari-mutuel wagering on barrel racing and operate a card room while the case moves forward. Members of the Florida Q uarter Horse Racing Association, on the other hand, urged the court to order a halt to the track s activities until a decision is made on whether or not the gamb ling is legal. At issue is whether barrel racing is a bona de parimutuel activity. The issue is critical because Florida law allows card rooms only at pari-mutuel facilities. Critics say barrel racing, which traditionally does not involve pari-mutuel wagering, is merely a ruse to allow track owners to conduct the more lucrative card room activities. Gretna, other track owners and the North Florida Horsemen s Association say Florida law is largely mute on what constitutes a horse race, an open interpretation that allows for a number of horse racing venues, including barrel racing. Dur ing arguments at the appeals court on Monday, Judge William Van Nortwick pressed opponents of the facility to say what harm will be done if racing is allowed to continue until the underlying case is resolved. Even if we deny the stay, it seems to me if you ultimately prevail you will be able to stop the barrel racing and stop the gambling, Van Nortwick said. Citing a pending application from another track in Hamilton County, Stephen Menton, an attorney representing the quarter horse racing association, said once the racing genie is out of the bottle it will be ne xt to impossib le to put in it back in. Because of the precedent that has been set ( with Gretna) there are going to be permit holders, such as Hamilton Downs, who are going to come in and seek approval to begin pari-mutuel wagering in multiple other locations, said Menton. Marc Dunbar attorney representing the race track, said investors have already pumped $ 20 million into the Gretna track and employed 170 workers. Granting a stay would mean a loss of income for many area families and investors of the facility. I question what the irreparable harm will be, Dunbar said. There is no possib le way they can say they are harmed by continuing the races. Gretna is in Gadsden County, just west of Tallahassee.Barrel racing issue before appeals court

PAGE 24

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 15, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PrismTM TV Pure Broadband 10 MBPS a month for 6 months* CenturyLinkTM PrismTM. TV TV.NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE.Call 866.484.7057Americas fastest growing broadband company now brings you a better choice in television. Its not cable. Its not satellite. Its Prism.Its interactive TV that you control from the moment you click the remote. Its so advanced, it even updates automatically. Simply put, its the best way to watch all your favorite shows, teams you name it. So turn off cable and satellite, and turn on TV worth switching for.*Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offer and stated rates are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers in select areas only. The $65.95 monthly rate applies to up to 10 Mbps Pure Broadband and Prism TV package for six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. A $6.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with Prism TV package. Promotional offer cannot be combined with any other Prism offers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees, an d surcharges will apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the three-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges, or the standard mo nthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specic locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them b y service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restric tions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at http://about.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply, including a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time High -Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharge s. Monthly Rate for All Service Bundles The monthly rate for all bundled services will apply while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband Early termination results in customer being responsible for payment of the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of netwo rk control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data trafc transmissi on/connection and cannot be used for voice trafc transmission, except for 911 services. CenturyLink Prism TV All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box (STB), one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided STBs are required to view TV. If a term agreement applies to the offer, an early termination fee in the amount of discounts received applies if customer terminates services before the end of the appl icable term agreement. Local channel availability varies by market. Caller ID service must be purchased separately to enable th e on-screen Caller ID feature; Caller ID feature is not available in all areas. High Denition (HD) available on all TV plans f or an additional $11.99/month, and up to two (2) of the up to four (4) video streams can be in HD. Customers location determines both HD availability and the maximum number of HD video streams (between 0 and 2 HD streams) a customer can view and record at any one time per residence, regardless of the number of STBs in the household. All non-HD video streams are provided in standard denition. Subscription to service precludes customers from purchasing high-speed Internet services from any third party. Additional charges will apply for additional programming packages, movie channel subscriptions (except for Prism Premium plan), Pay Per View movies and events, On Demand purcha ses, and premium services/subscriptions for all plans. Some subscription services, events, and broadcast network service may be blacked out in customers area. Customer may dial 67 (touch-tone) or 1167 (rotary) prior to placing a call to block their calling information. In order for media sharing to oper ate correctly customer must have Windows XP or VISTA and Windows Media Player 11. Vacation Program Offer available to residential customers only. Only certain CenturyLink services are eligible for the Vacation Program; third p arty services received through CenturyLink are not eligible. Offer may include a reduced monthly recurring charge for a predetermined number of months each year, retention of equipment and suspension of service, programming and agreement during Vacation Program activa tion. A zero balance for each applicable service is required for eligibility. If customer does not contact CenturyLink to resum e full activation of applicable services before the end of six (6) consecutive month period, all applicable monthly charges, fees, surcharges, contr actual obligations, etc., will resume automatically. Vacation Pr ogram services will have restrictions and limitations that will vary for each applicable service. Contact CenturyLink for details. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equip ment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamage d condition, or customer is charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism TV Plan Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. Green Lantern: 2011 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. PUTYOUR PRISMTM TV ON VACATION WHEN YOU HEAD BACK NORTH Bundle BRILLIANT TV with Pure Speed for an even BETTER experience.