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Wakulla news
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00386
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 12-08-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00386
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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles kept rolling Friday night in the playoffs, defeating the Ponte Vedra Sharks by a score of 20-6. The win, in front of a big crowd at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Dec. 2, sets up the War Eagles to face Pasco County on Friday night, Dec. 9, to determine who gets to play for the state title. Our defense played well, our offense played well, and our special teams was the key to the game,Ž said Head Coach Scott Klees. They blocked an extra point by the Sharks, made two “ eld goals, forced a fumble on a kick-off, and punted well. Klees praised Special Teams Coach George Kilborn, saying: He did a phenomenal job.Ž The War Eagles offense kept the ball on the ground for most of the night, only attempting three passes … all of which fell incomplete on a cold night. We tried to hit our spotsŽ with the passing, Klees said. He added, though, that it was part of the game plan to run the ball more and control the games tempo. Continued on Page 9A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 49th Issue Thursday, December 8, 2011 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This WeekPublic Notices ............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ..Page 4A Church........................Page 6A Community..................Page 7A Sports ........................Page 9A School........................Page 10A Outdoors .................Page 11A Water Ways...............Page 12A Sheriffs Report ........Page 13A Green Scene ..............Page 1B Week in Wakulla ........Page 2B Classi eds ..................Page 7B Legal Notices .............Page 8B P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read Daily Christmas, Panacea-style WAR EAGLES KEEP ROLLING!Wakulla knocks off Ponte Vedra, 20-6 KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDeonte Hutchinson high-steps his way as he carries the ball against the Ponte Vedra defense. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAll-time leading rusher Will Thomas, prepares to stiff-arm a Shark defender.Commission rejects alcohol in buildingsAnother year without a payraise for teachers WILLIAM SNOWDENCheerleaders, players and band members celebrate.UP NEXT: The state semi-final playoff against Pasco County at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Dec. 9, at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $8. SPECIAL: Cheer on the War Eagles Friday night with a special banner. See Page 8A.By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA proposed ordinance to allow the sale and consumption of alcohol in certain county buildings and parks for special events or private parties failed for a lack of a second at the Dec. 5 Wakulla County Commission meeting. Commissioner Randy Merritt made the initial motion to allow alcohol at certain county buildings, but did not want to include county parks. Merritt seemed to have the support of Commissioners Alan Brock, Jerry Moore and Lynn Artz, but after hearing from numerous citizens who opposed the idea, along with Commissioner Mike Stewart, he withdrew his motion. Brock then made another motion in favor of the ordinance, but he did not receive a second from another commissioner in support and the motion died. Brock initiated the ordinance and the board had directed County Attorney Heather Encinosa to revise the countys existing code regulating the use of alcohol within the county, and develop new provisions for alcohol permitting for special events held in the county. Brock said the intention was so that organizations could hold events and serve alcohol, such as a wine and cheese at an art exhibit at the Wakulla County Welcome Center in Panacea. There were also some who wanted to be able to serve beer at “ shing tournaments. The ordinance would have allowed alcoholic beverages to be served at events in the Wakulla County Community Center, Chamber of Commerce, old jail, Wakulla County Welcome Center, extension of“ ce and Panacea Womens Center. In order to serve alcohol at a private event in a county facility, the person would be required to hire a caterer who has a license, pay a damage deposit, obtain liability insurance and hold the county harmless against liability resulting from the serving of alcohol. There was also a section which would have allowed alcohol to be served at public events held in county parks. Brock said an example would be a music festival. People could hold the event in Wakulla County instead of having to go to Tallahassee. It would bene“ t us economically,Ž he said. Encinosa said there were signi“ cant regulations in order to do this. The applicant must obtain a temporary permit from the State Division of Alcoholic Beverages for nonpro“ t and civic organizations, list all alcoholic beverages that may be served, describe where and how alcoholic beverages may be served, provide the times alcoholic beverages may be served, draft a plan outlining the means for ensuring the responsible consumption of alcoholic beverages, pay a damage deposit of $1,000 and obtain liquor liability insurance of $1 million. Merritt, Moore and Artz were not in favor of allowing alcohol at county parks, but supported the allowance at certain county buildings. Moore said he didnt want festivals where drinking was allowed and children could be exposed to it. Merritt agreed and said he didnt see the need. I dont see the upside,Ž Merritt said. Stewart was completely against the ordinance. I dont want Wakulla County to be known as a place to come have a drunken brawl,Ž Stewart said. Continued on Page 3AA proposal that would have allowed alcohol in some buildings for special events … such as weddings at the old courthouse … fails after numerous citizens speak against it Alan Brock, the new chairman of the county commission, is the youngest person to ever hold that post. He discusses his priorities. See Page 3A. I dont want Wakulla County to be known as a place to come have a drunken brawl, says one commissioner who opposed the measure. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County School Board approved a new teacher contract at a special meeting this week that again does not include a regular payraise. It is the fourth year that district employees … teachers and all other employees … have been without a regular step increase in pay. As a small consolation, the school board did approve a one-time bonus of $250 for all employees in their next pay check. But this year, all district employees faced being required to make a 3 percent contribution to their retirement, which meant a reduction in take-home pay. The school board approved the contract at a special meeting on Monday, Dec. 5, and praised teachers and their union representative for realizing the budget problems that the district faces. School board member Becky Cook noted that, while the board had been unable to give pay increases in the past several years, they had sought to at least soften that by holding employees harmless on increases in insurance. The district will make a slight increase in its contribution to employee health insurance … about $50 more for single, and slightly less than $150 for employees with a family plan. That represents a slight decrease in the increase in health insuranceŽ that teachers faced this year, said Superintendent of Schools David Miller. It was a lengthy process and both sides worked hard,Ž said Missy Atkinson, who represented teachers in the negotiations. We protected our teachers and did whats best for the district.Ž Miller said he believes teachers and other employees understand the kind of budget constraints the district is facing … and he had heard some express appreciation for the effort the district has made. Still, the outlook going forward for school budgets is bleak … as School board member Greg Thomas noted: Next year may be even worse.Ž The one-time $250 payment for all employees is the result of an increase in the number of students in the districts schools. Last year, employees also got a bonus … $500 for instructional personnel and $250 for non-instructional. There was a $200 increase across the board last year, but thats less than any step increase in pay. This years budget had anticipated a loss of 100 students, but the board is actually up 68 students. Since the state contributes money to the local education budget based on the number of students, that meant a little bump in revenues. The board felt that the best use of those funds was for a one-time payment to employees,Ž Miller said. A starting teacher in Wakulla with a bachelors degree is paid $33,700, or $35,900 with a Masters. The salary schedule tops out at $54,900. It will be the last year the district will offer a $1,000 unreimbursed medical payment that can be used for expenses such as co-pays, glasses or other costs. David MillerFacing a fourth year without a payraise, the school board approves giving a one-time bonus of $250 to all employees HOLIDAY GUIDE See Page 14A See Page 2A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comIt’s Christmas, Panacea-style The seventh annual A Panacea ChristmasŽ was held in downtown Panacea on Dec. 3 by the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership. It began with a downtown marketplace, followed by the holiday boat on trailer parade and the lighting of the Christmas tree. Boats were adorned with Christmas lights and other decorations and ” oated down U.S. Highway 98, along with decorated golf carts, cars and motorcycles, waving to spectators and throwing out treats to children. The winner of the boat division in the parade went to Interim Sheriff Donnie Crum. The Wakulla County Moose Lodge came in second, Crums Mini Mall in third and Big Top Supermarket in fourth. The Merry Mermaids took “ rst place in the golf cart division followed by Jamie Crum in second and Travis Crum in third. The best walking unit went to Santas Elves. Second place went to the Wakulla County Moose Lodge. First place in the pontoon boat and ” oat division went to Miss Wakulla County. Following the parade, the crowd was entertained by Christmas music, including A Panacea ChristmasŽ and children were able to visit with Santa Claus. There was also the lighting of the Christmas tree. The winners of the Celebration of Lights Contest were Michele Baggett for the best decorated home, Centennial Bank for best decorated business and Panacea Volunteer Fire Department for best decorated non-pro“ t. One of Santas elves works on a lollipop.Merry Mermaids from the briny deep of Dickerson Bay … some wearing Panacea Nikes.Sheriff Donnie Crums ” oat won “ rst place and featured Santa trolling for a big “ sh.A golf-cart sleigh pulled by a lighted reindeer. The Panacea community Christmas tree.Winners announcedPhotos by JENNIFER JENSENMore photos at thewakullanews.com WAKULLA COMMUNITY THEATRE PresentsWAKULLA COMMUNITY CHORUSInHandel’sMESSIAHDirected By Reba Mason Featuring a Cast of 60 Singers and InstrumentalistsSUNDAY, DECEMBER 113:00 PMSopchoppy United Methodist Church10 Faith Ave.-Free AdmissionReception In Fellowship Hall Immediately Following Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011 our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL850.224.4960www.fsucu.org ASHLEY FEEDSTORE8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROADfor more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY& RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other servicesHorseshoeing demo by Farrier, Dude Suttergren

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Continued from Page 1A He added that if they allow one thing, the commission would be opening Pandoras box. And if anybody drove away drunk from an event held at a county facility and was killed, the board would be responsible, Stewart said. I would feel responsible,Ž Stewart said. Several citizens spoke out against the ordinance at the meeting, many expressing their shame and frustration that the commission would condone drinking. There will be at some point a very negative outcome at one of these events,Ž Resident Steve Fults said. For our government, I am ashamed.Ž Rev. Bill Jenkins felt the same way and said, That is a door you will never be able to shut again.Ž Many residents asked the commission to think about all the accidents and fatalities involving alcohol and drunk driving and expressed their concern that this ordinance could cause even more. This is going to cause people to act irresponsibly who otherwise would have acted responsibly,Ž said resident Jonathan Clark. Those in support of the ordinance said it would allow residents to hold special events, such as weddings, at county buildings, and have a champagne toast. They dont want a drunken brawl, but they want the opportunity to have a reception,Ž said resident Pam Shields. Shields added that many families cant afford to have a reception at the lodge or other places around the county and this would give them an affordable option. The county could also require the event holder to have law enforcement on the premises during the event for safety, she said. Chamber President John Shuff said they receive numerous calls from couples wanting to rent the courthouse for weddings, but when they are told they cannot serve alcohol, the couple chooses another venue. Shuff said this would allow the chamber to generate revenue to help them maintain the old courthouse. He added, You are trying to legislate for 1 or 2 percent of the population.Ž Stewart said the commission is supposed to lead by example and if people want to party, they can hold their event elsewhere. Were setting a dangerous precedent,Ž Stewart said. This is not for this county.Ž After Merritt withdrew his motion, Brock attempted to persuade the other commissioners to at least hold a workshop on the item, but none were in favor of that idea. The commission will, however, look at section 10 of the countys current code which deals with special permits. There was a need to clarify and update the ordinance and get rid of some redundancy. The ordinance will be brought back at a future meeting without the alcohol components. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOn Nov. 21, Commissioner Alan Brock became the youngest chairman selected in modern times. Brock, 31, is serving his fourth year as a Wakulla County commissioner. He was voted unanimously by his fellow commissioners to take the place at the head of the dais. “I’m really excited to be chairman,” Brock said. “I hope I can bring a young perspective and help our county move forward.” Brock said he hopes he can help the commission move faster on items it has agreed are priorities, such as the Crawfordville Town Plan and economic development. One way is through a workshop that involves several agencies, all who have the common goal of economic development. “I want to make the most of our resources and reduce redundancy,” Brock said. Brock is youngest board chairmanAlan Brock www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.com Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Democratic Party will co-host the 2011 Democratic Gala with the Wakulla Democratic Womens Club on Saturday, Dec. 10 at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. The event will begin at 5:30 p.m. with a VIP Reception in the Edward Ball Room overlooking the grounds of the Lodge and continue at 6 p.m. with a silent auction and Candidate Meet and GreetŽ in the historic downstairs lobby. The main dinner event will begin at 7 pm. The Democrats will hear from Wisconsin State Senator Jessica King. Wakulla DEC Chair Rachel Pienta noted Sen. King was newly elected during the special postrecall elections in Wisconsin and is coming to share a “ rst-hand account of the states struggles. Wakulla Democratic Womens Club PresidentElect Verna Brock compared the political climate between the two states: Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, like our Florida Gov. Rick Scott, has taken an anti-worker, anti-education, and anti-government approach to “ xing the states economy. Wisconsin citizens were the “ rst in the country to step forward and start “ ghting back, inspiring our own Awake the State and Pink Slip Rick movements here, and helping to provide the impetus for the Occupy movement sweeping our nation.Ž Additionally, the event will feature local elected Democrats, including Master of Ceremonies Wakulla County Commissioner Alan Brock, Tallahassee City Commissioner Andrew Gillum, Representative Scott Randolph and many Democratic leaders from around Florida. The priority for the funds raised at this event will support of“ ce space for the DEC during the 2012 election cycle and help the group to support local and regional Wakulla County candidates. To purchase tickets, for sponsorship opportunities, or to advertise in the program, visit the website, www.wakullademocrats. org or call 321-3582. Ticket prices are as follows: VIP tickets (including reserved seating during the dinner program and pre-event meet and greet reception with honored guests) $75; Gala tickets (including welcome candidate reception and dinner program) $50. Tickets are limited, call today.Wakulla Democrats to hold Dec. 10 gala County commission rejects alcohol in buildings Lynn Artz: Opposed to allowing alcohol in county parks.Commissioners on the alcohol issue :Alan Brock: Made a motion to allow alcohol, but died for lack of second. Randy Merritt: Withdrew his original motion after opposition was raised. Jerry Moore: Opposed to festivals where kids might see adults drink. Mike Stewart : Outright opposed. Holiday fun at WinterFEST!Jacksonvilles annual Winter on the Water celebration is back. New for this year, you wont want to miss WinterFEST at Adventure Landing with ice-skating, alpine slides and nightly snowfalls! For all of the details, a complete list of holiday events and for special vacation packages, visit winteronthewater.com! Find exclusive vacation package deals here. Scan with your QR reader Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) www.florida-classifieds.com ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA Y Y o u r a d v e r t i s i n g b u d g e t i s T O O B I G Statewide adver sing—refreshing rates (866)742 1373 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDeltaNOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on December 14, 2011, at 5:30pm DECEMBER 8, 2011 LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak outComment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• War Eagles knock off Ponte Vedra to continue in playoffs •Operation Santa is in full swing • Sheriff’s Report for Dec. 1 • District lines redrawn, but current board within boundaries •Southerland holds town hall meeting in St. Marks •Wakulla UMC to hold annual Christmas Bazaar • Give thanks for the gift of life thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Occupy Sopchoppy fails to take holdBy PABLO ANDREU SOPCHOPPY … Inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York and similar demonstrations across the country, Occupy Sopchoppy made a pretty half-hearted attempt to take over Sopchoppys “ nancial district. The ragged group of listless protesters disbanded only a few hours after forming. The movement, comprised of residents Bill, Edna and Mike, ” oundered when occupiers remembered that Sopchoppy doesnt have a “ nancial district, inside sources Bill, Edna and Mike revealed. Changing tack, the demonstrators marched over to Sopchoppy City Hall on Municipal Avenue. Well, they came complaining about how poor they were and how it was our fault because we were rich,Ž said Mayor Colleen Q. Skipper. I reminded them that were all poor and that pretty much was that.Ž Afterwards, Occupy Sopchoppy members walked over to Backwoods Bistro and ordered a few burgers. Id say we accomplished about as much as Occupy Wall Street has,Ž said Occupy Sopchoppy spokesperson Edna.Originally featured in the Daily Pygmy. Follow Pablo Andreu on Twitter: www. twitter.com/DailyPygmy. SATIRE Editors Note: Several readers saw this piece after it appeared online at Huf“ ngton Post. The author agreed to allow it to be reprinted in The Wakulla News.Author is asked, Why Sopchoppy?After the Occupy Sopchoppy article appeared on Huffington Post, we contacted Pablo Andreu to ask about running it in The News. He emailed back: First of all, Im flattered. I think its great that its actually reaching people from the Sopchoppy area. Youre the second person from down there thats reached out to me.Ž He expressed concern, though, about making up a quote for Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper and whether she might be offended by it and seeing it appear in the local paper. We called Skipper and she said she thought the article was hilarious. Plus, she said, its a good advertisement for Sopchoppy and Backwoods Bistro. Asked why he chose Sopchoppy … how had he heard of it? did he just like the sound of it? has he ever visited? … Andreu wrote back: As far as Sopchoppy goes, I just wanted to poke fun at the Occupy movement and how chapters seemed to be sprouting everywhere. I looked for a town name that sounded small-town and folksy. I did some Googling and came across Sopchoppy, which was perfect. I really dont know anything about Sopchoppy except from the little internet research Ive done.Ž Editor, The News: This is a big THANK YOU to the following businesses who helped us make Jeanine Aber-Poseys bene“ t a success on Saturday, Nov. 12. We couldnt have done it without you! Sopchoppy Grocery, Revels Meat & Grocery, Macks Country Meats, Poseys Steam Room, Riverside Cafe, Moon Walkers Inc., Wakulla Appraisal, Wakulla Sign Co., Myra Jeans Restaurant, Wildwood Country Club, Coastal Restaurant, Savannahs Country Buffet, Wild“ re BBQ Grill, Lindys, Beef OBradys, Wakulla Mini-Warehouse, Wakulla County Parks and Recreation, Promise Land Ministry, Passion Parties by Shelli Payne, Porters Automotive, Jewels by Park Lane, Photo Book by Mrs. Purple Frog aka Janice Eakin, Libby McFalls Photograph, Coon Bottom Creek Band, Super Lube, Goin Under Dive Services, Wakulla County Chaper of National Wild Turkey Federation, wakulla.com, AMS Marine Supply, Centennial Bank and Leigh Key … Face Painting from the Barry Building. We are blessed to be in a community that pulls together in a time of need. And we are grateful not only to the businesses, but the community who supported Jeanine and Jeff! Sincerely, Family and friends of Jeanine and Jeff Posey Editor, The News: On Friday, Nov. 18, Wakulla County committed a theft by taking.Ž Thats when Chad Carraway, a junk collector, was on Dickson Bay Road to dig up and remove a tin hornŽ (driveway ditch pipe). A few years ago, when the woods were full of water, Bunkin Taylor tried to get the county to open up the ditches to drain the standing water from the lots behind the old Taylor residence. As usual, the county refused to help and told him to do it himself. Taylor got the tin hornŽ and put it in the ditch to drain the mosquito-infested water from the property. Now the weather is dry and the pipe was partially exposed. Carraway said that MorresseŽ from the county called him and gave the pipe to him for junk. The sheriffs department was called, and a deputy responded, but no explanation was given to the caller by the deputy. I really dont have a problem with Carraway or any other junk man getting rid of eyesores on county roads. But to dig up the drain pipe is a little ridiculous because it is going to be wet weather again. We really do have an eyesore in Panacea, on Highway 98 between the Post Of“ ce and the Dollar Store. The abandoned, broken-down trailer has been there for more than “ ve years and nobody has done anything about getting it moved. Oh yes, the county has sent letters to many individuals and raised Cain with them about stuff in yards, they have even threatened them about their junk and its not even near Highway 98. Maybe MorreeseŽ could take it upon himself to call Carraway AGAIN and give him the broken down trailer for junk... WHY NOT? The broken down trailer IS an eyesore to everyone who drives on Highway 98, and each and every parade in Panacea is blurred by the trailer. Vivian Johnson Panacea anks for support of Aber-Posey bene“ t Drain pipe in Panacea is no eyesoreLast year I made a New Years resolution to give back and be more involved in my community. I am sorry to say that nearly a year later I have not ful“ lled my resolution. At least not to the extent that I envisioned. I have taken the initial steps of researching volunteer opportunities and “ lling out applications, but not following through. I did reaf“ rm my desire to become a Big Sister with Big Brothers Big Sisters. However, the wait list is two years or longer and I still have a year to go. The problem is that the organization has more boys than girls who need mentors and not enough male volunteers. If you are interested in getting involved in this great organization and helping to inspire, encourage and support a young person, contact the Wakulla County director at wakulla@bbbsbigbend. org or 366-3865. This past year, I have let planning a wedding, my job and other responsibilities consume my life. Now, with Christmas right around the corner, I have decided to take some of those steps. Christmas is a time of giving. A time to put aside sel“ sh feelings and try and help others who are less fortunate. We all should do as much as we can this holiday season. When most of us say we are struggling, we have no idea what real struggling is. Those who are truly struggling to make ends meet dont have the luxuries many of us have and consider necessities. Such as a cell phone, cable, internet, going out to eat, etc. Those of us who can afford these luxuries should help those who cannot. Charities make it so easy to get involved around Christmas. There is no more room for excuses. Its as easy as saying yes to the cashier at the grocery store checkout line when they ask if you would like to donate a certain dollar amount to a charity. Just say yes. What is $1, $5 or $10 added to your $100 grocery bill? Not a lot when it could help feed a family this Christmas. In Wakulla County there are numerous ways to get involved. One of those ways is through Operation Santa, which is an effort of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth in partnership with several other organizations and churches. This operation helps families in need with clothes, food, toys, household items and toiletries and tries to ful“ ll a wish of each member of the family. Currently, there are 105 families asking for help this year. Executive Director Gail Campbell says about half have been adopted by individuals, businesses, organizations and churches. There has been such an outpouring from the community,Ž Campbell says. Campbell says it is amazing to see all these groups and churches come together for the same cause. This is truly a community-wide effort. Numerous groups and individuals have donated their time and expenses for the cause. On Tuesday, students in the AVID program at Wakulla Middle School were at the community center helping to sort through donations and shopped for items on several families lists. You can help by donating new or gently used clothing or toys until Dec. 12. Items can be dropped off at the Wakulla County Community Center, located at 318 Shadeville Road, Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Donations can also be taken to Amazing Mail Solutions next to Myra Jeans restaurant in Crawfordville. There is a great need for food and gas. So money, gifts or gas cards would be appreciated. After Monday, only monetary donations will be accepted. Campbell says they will use the money to purchase Christmas dinners for the families and try and purchase any of the wish list items that werent ful“ lled. My husband and I plan to go through our closets and storage room and give them anything we can. The staff here at The Wakulla News has also adopted a family. Everyone can do a little bit to help and if each person gives a little of their time or money or items they dont use anymore, the coalition can reach its goal and make this holiday season a little brighter for these families. Children who otherwise may not have had a present to open on Christmas will now have one. What a great feeling it would be to be a part of the joy that these children will feel on Christmas morning. You could help create the smile on these childrens faces or put the food on these families tables for Christmas dinner. There are plenty of opportunities to start giving, and not being from Wakulla County, people always tell me how this community comes together in times of need. Well, Wakulla County, there is a large need this holiday season. Like Lt. Bruce Ashley, president of the coalition, said at a recent county commission meeting, The outpouring is great and the need is great.Ž Lets continue to give and do all we can to help these families. For more information, call 926-3526.Jennifer Jensen is a reporter for The Wakulla News. e season for giving Jennifer Jensenjjensen@thewakullanews.netEditor, The News: Would you have any room to announce the Santa mailbox located in front of the courthouse in Wakulla? The letters are read and children who leave a phone number on their letter will receive a phone call from Santa who we know is very busy but takes the time to try and call everyone. Santas HelperSantas Mailbox is open for lettersEditor, The News: I wanted to let you know that the David F. Harvey Retirement Party will present a check to the FSU Seminole Boosters National Chairman at Friday nights football game in the amount of $25,000. This money will go directly to a Wakulla County athlete through the Houston Taff Memorial Scholarship endowment. As you know, all the proceeds from the Retirement Party and the silent auction at the Retirement Party were designated for this purpose. Judy LangstonCheck for $25,000 to be presented at gameDomestic & Sexual Violence Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111 JENNIFER JENSENWakulla Middle School AVID kids help out with Operation Santa donations.

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By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsEveryone is invited to the Wakulla Historical Societys Third Annual Open House on Tuesday, Dec. 13, to see the exhibits, or purchase the latest holiday tree ornament. Those who can are asked to bring something for the giving box donation to Promise Land Ministries. Christmas is known as the time to celebrate the birth of the Christ child, but during the fall and winter of 15391540, Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto and his men, marked our area as being the home of the “ rst Christmas celebration in the United States. So much of our participation in the Christmas of today is the result of varied cultural celebrations. Many of them far from holy. Eventually, people began to make the holiday their own. And this includes Wakulla. The tales … and incidents … of the county are plentiful. One story, told by Clarence Morrison, took place on the morning of Dec. 26, 1947, the day after Christmas, when Crawfordville was awakened by screams, gunshots and automobile horns, alerting the community of an emergency. In this instance, the town post of“ ce was on fire and there was no chance of saving it. All efforts were put toward protecting the buildings that stood on either side of it. One was a grocery store operated by Archie Cooper. The other, a barber and beauty shop, owned by Albert and Mary Love Moore, who also lived in the rear of the building. Morrison wrote that it had been extremely cold that morning, but became one of the hottest times hed ever recalled. Retired Air Force Lt. Colonel, Burton T. Poole, whose home was on Ocklockonee Bay, was once a Red Cross “ eld director. One Christmas Day he got word that a soldiers entire family had been killed in a car accident. He was able to round up a Protestant chaplain, a Catholic priest and medical doctor. Poole relayed the terrible news to the soldier and arranged the young mans entire trip home, making sure a Red Cross member was there to greet him at every single stop. Beulah Primitive Baptist Church, founded in 1874, held a Christmas program every year. All received a small brown paper bag, filled with an apple, orange, pecans, candy, and, sometimes, grapes. The bag was twisted closed at the top with care by church deacon, Bennie Phillips, who drove to Thomasville every year to select the best fruits for the bags he prepared one by one. Beulah is said to be the Mother of all Primitive Baptist churches in Wakulla, even AfricanAmerican. African-American church celebrations often consisted of the children dressing up as certain characters (wise men, etc.) and reciting a Christmas speech, or participating in plays depicting the birth of Jesus. Afterwards, the menfolk arrived in the guise of Santa, bearing gifts. The Baptist Church in Panacea also held a Christmas play. Those too small to read or recite would hold up the letters to spell out a word, or the different meanings of Christmas. In St. Marks, young ones waited at the docks for boats, like the Osprey, or the Hermosa, to come in. Santa Claus was sure to arrive on one of them, his pockets bulging with candy. On Christmas Day, neighbors were expected to knock on the door, with small gifts and best wishes for the season. And, as in olden times, there was much frolic and revelry. Elizabeth F. Smith writes in a 1964 issue of the Magnolia Monthly about a Christmas dance held at the Crawfordville Womens Club. However, before the event, the ” oor was accidentally polished with ” y spray instead of wax. But in spite of this,Ž she writes, people agreed that the dance smelled perfectly “ ne.Ž John Mills threw Christmas dances at the Buckhorn Caf. A jar “ lled with dollar bills was the grand prize to the best dancer. People often took their routines outside and into the parking lot, where they would shimmy to the piccolos music from the tops of cars. One highly ambitious performer even broke her leg. Bar-hopping during the season … ” itting from one drinking establishment to the other (often a neighbors home) … was quite common. In drier times, instead of a beer run to Franklin County, one simply made a trip to Carraways, just up the street. The true spirit of Christmas may be found in how one chooses to enjoy natures gift of life with others. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 5AWakulla County Historical Society’s Third Annual Open House will be held Tuesday, Dec. 13, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Museum (Old Jail). For more information, call (850) 926-1110. Or visit the Wakulla County Historical Society on Facebook.Historical Society set for its annual open house LOCAL HOLIDAY TALES By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOn Dec. 2, just after dusk, about 25 people gathered under the pavilion at Hudson Park to honor and remember the loved ones they have lost. The Service of Remembrance was held by Big Bend Hospice and was led by Chaplain Ed Lyon. Lyon told the audience that one never gets over the loss of a loved one, but can “ nd ways to get through it and “ nd joy in their lives again. He recited this years theme, I have seen too many stars to let the darkness overwhelm me,Ž which is a quote by Sister Macrina Wiederkehr. Lyon told them there is hope after losing someone. The night will soon go away,Ž Lyon said. Team Manager Regina Compton said hospice has been putting on this service since 1994 and it kicks off the Christmas season. Its a good time to come together,Ž Compton said. Those in attendance heard from Etta Jo Oliver who recently lost her mother. Her mother was a patient at Big Bend Hospice and she spoke of her appreciation for all who cared for her mother and helped her family in their dif“ cult time. She also shared some memories of her mother. Following these stories, members of the Big Bend Hospice Advisory Council and team lit the Christmas tree, as well as the candles of grief and hope. A candle was lit and the ” ame was passed around so others in attendance could light their candles. People were then given the chance to speak of the ones they lost. Its a ceremony of hope and remembering,Ž said Pam Allbritton, community relations for Big Bend Hospice. It is a time to honor and remember loved ones.Ž Trees of Remembrance have also been placed at all the banks in Crawfordville. People can buy an ornament and write a message to their loved one. The ornaments are $10, $25 and $50. Those who purchase an ornament will also receive an ornament to take with them and put on their own tree. Money raised stays in the county and goes towards services for patients, Allbritton said. Its a way to give back to Big Bend Hospice and honor their loved one,Ž Allbritton said. JENNIFER JENSENParticipants at the Service of Remembrance held Friday, Dec. 2, at Hudson Park. Service of Remembrance held Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there. CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 C apital C ircle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Holiday Special 10% OFF purchase and installation of a new Gate Operator Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY Saturday, Dec. 109A.M. until 4 P.M. “Relaxed Shopping from Arts, Crafts and Food Vendors, and our Local Merchants.” Sponsored by Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association, Inc. For information call our HOTLINE (850) 962-4138 Daytimeat 11 A.M Live Christmas & Celtic Music Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Marvin Roy Barton Mark Andrew Clanton Yvonne Council Mary Kathryn Gibson William Robert Newberry Jr. John E. Probert Florence K. SaulsCoastalChurch NewsWakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213Marvin R. BartonMarvin Roy Barton, 55, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 29, in Sopchoppy. He was a lifelong resident of this area. He was an auto mechanic. He was a member of Ochlockonee Christian Center. He was a loving and devoted father and grandfather. Visitation was held Dec. 1 at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Friday, Dec. 2, at West Sopchoppy Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to American Cancer Society, 241 John Knox Road, Suite 100, Tallahassee FL 32303 (800-342-2383). Survivors include his parents, Roy Lamar Barton and Hazel Fulford Barton; his former wife, Diane Hart Barton; two sons, Zachariah Roy Barton and Jonathan Lee Barton; brothers, Marvins Bud, his twin, Melvin Lamar Barton (wife Penny), Tommy Kenneth Barton (wife Ann) and Billy Keith Barton (wife Betty); his sister, Louellen Barton Harvey Deibler (husband Gary); grandchildren, Jamie Warren Barton, Hunter Roy Barton, Justin Lee Barton; and a devoted friend and prayer partner, Fanchon Roddenberry. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville, FL (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) was in charge of arrangements. Mark A. ClantonMark Andrew Clanton, 56, died Saturday, Dec. 3, in Tallahassee. Born Oct. 8, 1955, in Moultrie, Ga., he was a son of Joyce Thompson and Jack Melvin Clanton. He was a mechanic, served in the U.S. Army. Survivors include his wife, Jeanne Clanton; father and stepmother, Jack and Sheila Clanton; siblings, Lyle Clanton Sr., Karen Webb, Steven Clanton and James Clanton; a stepdaughter, Melissa Ferguson; two step-grandchildren; one step-great-grandchild; an aunt, Doris Giddens; and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. The funeral was held Tuesday, Dec. 6, at Abbey Funeral Home in Tallahassee, with burial at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.Yvonne CouncilYvonne Council passed away peacefully on Nov. 26, in Spring Creek. She was born in Cordele, Ga. She and her late husband, Hal Council, worked side-by-side in several successful business ventures, moving to Spring Creek in 1995. They opened Affordable Properties and operated it until his death on Aug. 28, 2011. A memorial service for Hal and Yvonne Council will be held at the Council Cemetery in Crawfordville, on Saturday, Dec. 10, at 2 p.m. for family and friends. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include her daughters, Susan Council and Lori Council Farkas; and her two grandsons; Samuel Farkas and Coy White.Mary K. GibsonMary Kathryn Gibson, 88, of St. George Island, died Sunday, Dec. 4, at Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee. A native of Hamden, Conn., she traveled the world with her late husband, before making her home on St. George Island for the past several years. A memorial service on the island is being planned for a later date. Memorial donations may be made to Apalachicola Riverkeeper (850/653-8936), Post Of“ ce Box 8, Apalachicola FL 32320. Survivors include her son, Drexel W. Gibson (Sarah) of Victor, Idaho; her daughter, Kathryn Gibson (James Hennessey) of Spring Creek; her granddaughter, Aura Castro of Tallahassee; and two step-granddaughters, Halle Hennessey of Portland, Ore., and Eron Hennessey of Seattle, Wash. Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee (850/385-2193 or www.bevisfh.com) assisted the Gibson family.William R. NewberryWilliam Robert Newberry Jr., 78, of Sopchoppy died Tuesday, Nov. 29 in Tallahassee. He was born in Barth, and had been in this area for 28 years coming from Madeira Beach. He graduated from Florida State University and was an avid Seminole Football fan. He was an of“ cer in the U.S. Army. He retired as a captain with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. Private family memorial services will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to the Florida Sheriffs Boys Youth Ranch, P.O. Box 2000, Boys Ranch FL 32064 or Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include three daughters, Patti Athanson of New Port Richey, Beverly Storozuk (Michael) of Minneapolis, Minn., and Kathleen Rodriguez (Robert) of Woodstock, Ga.; and seven grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Kathleen Newberry; and a grandchild, Sidney Summerlin. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements.John E. ProbertJohn E. Probert, 84, died on Friday, Dec. 2, in Tallahassee. He was born in Sioux City, Iowa, and had been in this area 21 years. He was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church. He served in both the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy. Memorial services were held Monday, Dec. 5, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Memorial contributions may be made to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 7077 Bonneval Road, Suite 610, Jacksonville FL 32216. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Dolores Probert of Panacea; two daughters, Anne Stuckey (Phillip) of Mequon, Wis., and Debra Schweitzer (Gary) of Johnsburg, Ill.; two sons, John Probert Jr. of Wheeling, Ill., and David Probert of DeFuniak Springs; and nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) was in charge of arrangements. Why do people think that they have to borrow or be in debt? Why is money one of the biggest causes of divorce? Are we a slave to money? First Baptist Church of Crawfordville is hosting Dave Ramseys Financial Peace University Class. Everyone can bene“ t from this 13-week class. Personal “ nance is 80 percent behavior and 20 percent head knowledge. This class will transform you. Throw off the chains of debt and “ nd peace through “ nancial freedom. Classes begin on Tuesday nights starting Jan. 10 at 6:30 p.m. Childcare will be provided. If you are interested in taking the class go to www. crawfordvillefbc.com/fpuclass.html or contact the church of“ ce for more information at 926-7896. A preview class is being offered on Tuesday, Dec. 13 or Jan. 3 at 6:30 p.m. in the church sanctuary. Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station will hold a Living Nativity on Friday, Dec. 9, and Saturday, Dec. 10, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The event will be a family drive-thru viewing of a live nativity scene. Enter between the Kast Net and Savannahs at 918 Woodville Highway. After driving through, everyone is invited for refreshments in the Fellowship Hall of Wakulla United Methodist Church at 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Please call 421-5741 for more information.Financial Peace University o ered at First Baptist Living Nativity will be held at Wakulla UMCHave you ever wondered what you would have felt had you been in Bethlehem the night Jesus was born? During the chaos of a massive census, the Prince of Peace came into the world as a gentle baby. Ivan Assembly of God invites you and your family to come and witness the Christmas Story through a special, outdoor experience, A Walk Through Bethlehem.Ž The event will be held Dec. 16 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and on Dec. 17 and 18 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God is located at 202 Ivan Church Road in Crawfordville. The phone number is 926-4826.Ivan Assembly presents Walk rough BethlehemFlorence K. SaulsFlorence K. Sauls, 85, of Crawfordville, died Sunday, Dec. 4, in Tallahassee. She was of the Baptist faith. She loved “ shing, cooking and crocheting. Graveside services were held on Wednesday, Dec. 7, at 2 p.m. at Oakland Cemetery in Tallahassee. Survivors include two daughters, Kathy and Betty; “ ve sisters, Grace, Mildred, Mary Helen, Stella, and Donna; a brother, Bill; 12 grandchildren, 17 great grandchildren and 14 great-great grandchildren. Tree of Remembrance 2011 Big Bend Hospice2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.org Please visit the Wakulla County Trees located in Crawfordville: Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial BankDedicate a bell, bow, or angel in honor or memory of someone you love!

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Buddy and Linda Harvey are proud to announce their daughter, Rachel Harveys graduation from Flagler College. She will receive a Bachelor of Art Degree in accounting. She will work at Strategic Wealth Alliance in Crawfordville. She is the granddaughter of Allen and Monica Harvey of Crawfordville. She graduated from Wakulla High School in 2007. There will be a reception on Sunday, Dec. 11 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womens Club in Crawfordville. Friends and family are invited to attend. Nadia Shirya Gupta, of Snellville, Ga., will celebrate her “ rst birthday on Dec. 16. She is the little sister to Aaryan Gupta who is 6 years old and is a very proud big brother. Her parents are Abhishek Gupta and Brianna GrassGupta of Snellville, Ga. Her maternal grandparents are Norman and Judy Grass of Crawfordville. Paternal grandparents are Satyaprakash and Shuba Gupta of Mumbai, India. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunityCarey and Miller will wed Dawn Marie Carey, of Crawfordville, and Nathan John Miller, of Reading, Pa., announce their engagement. Carey is the daughter of Jackie Carey of Crawfordville and Charles Carey of Buffalo, N.Y. Miller is the son of Linda Miller and Craig Miller of Reading, Pa. The bride-elect graduated from Florida State University with a bachelors degree in computer science and currently is the vice president of the Federal Division at FedTech Services Inc. The groom-elect graduated from West Chester University with a bachelors degree in kinesiology. He is the owner of a personal “ tness and training company and is also a “ fth grade teacher. The couple lives in Tampa. They will wed on March 10, 2012. Dawn M. Carey and Nathan J. Miller Nadia S. GuptaMcKenzie wins Lions Club peace poster contestSpecial to The NewsHannah McKenzie, a seventh grade student at Wakulla Middle School, was recently selected as the grand prize winner of the Lions Club Peace Poster Contest sponsored by the Sopchoppy Lions Club. There should be peace, laughter and happiness and serenity,Ž McKenzie said. Her poster was selected by the Sopchoppy Lions Club members for best portrayal of the theme Children Know PeaceŽ and originality and artistic merit. Club President Franklin Roberts said he was impressed by the expression of creativity of the students. It is obvious that these young people have strong ideas about what peace means to them,Ž Roberts said. McKenzie took home “ rst prize for her poster and $50. Karlee Strickland was awarded second place and $35. Laura Carlson came in third and received $25 and Keely Mathers came in fourth and received $15. The Wakulla Middle School students were recognized for their participation during school morning announcements on Nov. 8. McKenzies poster will move on to the district competition and then possibly the multiple district and then international rounds. Principal Mike Barwick, Keely Mathers, Laura Carlson, art teacher Carol Belancsik, Karlee Strickland and Hannah McKenzie.Happy “ rst birthday, Nadia Rachel Harvey graduates from Flagler Rachel Harvey Values to $100.00Aussie/Western Outback/Wools$26.00 incl. tax PANACEA HATSAFACT St. MarksRIVER CANTINA “We Have The Best Hamburgers Around”Prize for Best Dressed Golf Kart Dress Up Your Golf Kart & Join The Parade Call for FREE registration925-9908 5th Annual Golf Kart Christmas ParadeFriday, Dec. 16 @ 6:30 p.m. St. Marks Toy DriveBring an unwrapped giftgifts will be distributed by St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department Join the Cantina for Thanksgiving Dinner on Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish… If you can’t… Join us Anyway! Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.-----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 926-3281 George E. BlockburgerAugust 26, 1948 Nov. 10, 2011If you were a friend of George a/k/a “Gorgeous George”, a/k/a “Jersey George”, please join us to celebrate his life with his family and friends! Saturday, December 10, 2011 1PM-3PM at The River of Life Church445 Donaldson Williams Rd., Crawfordville, FLDRESSCOMFORTABLEANDCASUAL850-508-3131 Gift Ideas Reminiscent of WAKULLA SPRINGS

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICERS OF WAKULLA COUNTY F r a n c e s C a s e y L o w e P A Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.850-926-8245 – LETS ROLL WAR EAGLES – 850-926-8777 CONGRATULATIONS! WE ARE BEHIND YOU ALL THE WAY! 850-926-3300 € www.3youtdoorequipment.com850-544-0238 € www.3yranch.com GOOD LUCK WAR EAGLES! Skip, Trey, Brian, & Trip Young GOOD LUCK BOYS! The Dazzles Staff850-926-6772 Go, Wakulla War Eagles! CENTENNIALBANK GO EAGLES! Were Proud of You!my100bank.com € 850-926-7111A Home Bank Shares CompanyMember FDICClerk of Courts BRENT THURMOND County Judge JILL WALKER Supervisor of Elections BUDDY WELLS Sheriff DONNIE CRUM Superintendent of Schools DAVID MILLER Property Appraiser DONNIE SPARKMAN Tax Collector CHERYLL OLAH WE’RE PROUD OF YOU

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach WHS senior cross country runners Cora Atkinson and Stanley Linton got one more chance last weekend to run in a high school cross country meet when they were invited to run in the Florida Athletic Coaches Association (FACA) Senior All-Star Meet. The meet, sponsored by the FACA and hosted by FSU, was held at the Apalachee Regional Cross Country park in Tallahassee, and was invitation only. It involved 32 of the top senior runners of each gender from all over Florida. The 32 seniors were divided into four teams; north, south, east and west, which then raced against each other. The invited runners were treated to a banquet on Friday night and were presented with commemorative singlets and meet medals. Linton ran for the south team and placed 12th overall in 16:35 and was second among his team members. Atkinson, running for the west girls, ran 21:01 and was the sixth runner on her allstar team. It was pretty special for Cora and Stanley to earn an invitation to this prestigious meet,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. LINTON WINS JINGLE BELL RUN What does a senior cross country runner do for an encore after participating in his “ nal high school cross country meet? If you are WHS senior Stanley Linton, who on Saturday morning ran in the prestigious FACA Senior All-Star Invitational, you turn around and run in the Tallahassee Winter Festival Jingle Bell Run and win it! Only eight hours after running in the FACA Meet, Linton lined up on Monroe Street in Tallahassee with an estimated 7,000 other people for the annual Jingle Bell 3K run. Less than 10 minutes later he crossed the finish line as the “ rst overall runner. Linton is the third WHS runner to win the Jingle Bell Run over the years … runners Sydney Nutting and Tyler Price are also past winners. Continued from Page 1A I thought we had a good chance of winning if we didnt turn the ball over,Ž he said. Ponte Vedra got a steady diet of running back Will Thomas, who gained 112 yards on 18 carries, and added to his total as Wakullas all-time leading rusher. There was also more of quarterback Caleb Stephens running the ball. Klees said the Sharks kept busting through and keying on Thomas, which gave Stephens an opportunity to scramble for a couple of big runs. Center Caleb Brown was named offensive player of the week, scoring out at 92 percent on his blocking. Nic Walker was named defensive player of the week and had 11 tackles in the game. On special teams, kicker Conner Smith was player of the week with two “ eld goals, two extra points and his punting duties. GAME RECAP Wakulla took the opening kickoff and marched down the “ eld on a long, sustained drive that took up almost half the first quarter and culminated in a Marshane Godbolt 2-yard scamper for a touchdown. The extra point was good, and Wakulla was up 7-0. On the ensuing kickoff, the Sharks fumbled deep in their own territory and Wakulla recovered. Unable to move the ball, the War Eagles kicked a “ eld goal to go up 10-0 with less than four minutes remaining in the “ rst period. The Sharks responded with their own drive, which ended with a 17-yard touchdown pass. The extra point was blocked by Wakulla to make the score 10-6. That would be the score at halftime, and the third quarter was a defensive battle. In the fourth quarter, Godbolt busted a long run down to the Ponte Vedra 20 yard line. The War Eagles got down inside the 10 but couldnt get into the end zone, and Smith kicked his second field goal of the night to make the score 13-6 with more than 8:30 remaining in the game. With time running out, the Sharks made a desperate play to score with a ” ea” icker pass thrown deep down“ eld that was intercepted by Wakulla defensive back Mikal Cromartie and returned to mid“ eld. Facing a second down and 20, Thomas broke a big run to move the ball to the Ponte Vedra 15 yard line. A couple of runs by speedy Deonte Hutchinson got the ball down to the 1, and quarterback Caleb Stephens took the ball in from there. Smiths extra point made it 20-6 with three minutes remaining. UP NEXT: PASCO Theyre a lot like us,Ž Klees said of the War Eagles next opponent, Pasco County. Theyre fast.Ž In addition to that speed, Klees said Pasco throws the ball more and likes to mix the pass and run. Theyve got four kids who are very, very good,Ž Klees said. Like Wakulla, he said, the two teams will be trying to get their athletes out in space where they can make something happen. Were gonna have to play a great game,Ž he said. The team with the fewest mistakes is going to win this game.ŽCONNER SMITH Kicker 2 “ eld goals, 2 PATs Players of the WeekO enseDefenseSpecial TeamsCALEB BROWN Center 92 percent blocking NIC WALKER Lineman 11 tacklesWakulla knocks o Ponte Vedra, 20-6 Game photos online at thewakullanews.com • Follow us on Twitter for updates during the game Linton, Atkinson earn invitations to all-star meetCROSS COUNTRY PHOTO BY ROBERT & KATHI DOUINLongtime Wakulla wrestling coach Buddy Tomaini was honored at Saturdays wrestling tournament with having the schools wrestling room named after him. Tomaini is credited with starting the program at the high school. Athletic Director Mike Smith, left, says a few words about Coach Tomaini, right, during the ceremony. 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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolSpecial to The NewsNovember Teachers of the Month were Riversprings Middle Schools Jeff Dutrow and Crawfordville Elementary Schools Heather Hat“ eld and Employee of Month was Transportation Departments Ronald Pumphrey. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the experience and expertise these employees bring to the district, as well as the positive attitude they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Dutrow has dedicated more than 14 years to teaching, either in a public school or at FSU. Dutrow said, To learn students must negotiate the meaning of concepts by participating in authentic and engaging opportunities relevant to their lives.Ž He not only teaches science to students, he teaches science to teachers, he facilitates the school science fair and has been the program coordinator for the FSU Marine Lab for 12 years. Dutrow grew up in Washington, D.C., but graduated from Gulf Coast Community College and later from FSU with a masters degree in science education. While in Florida in applied for a teaching position in Wakulla County and was hired in 2006. RMS Principal Dod Walker said, Mr. Dutrow is an outstanding science teacher. His passion is his greatest asset along with his desire to be the best and to have his students be their best. He has served as the leader of the eighth grade, as well as mentor to many new teachers over the years. His energy and leadership with the LIFE Program has created an invaluable partnership with Wakulla Springs and several state environmental agencies. He is respected by his students, his peers and his principal.Ž The other teacher of the month is fourth grade teacher Hatfield. Prior to teaching at Crawfordville Elementary School she taught third grade in Leon County. Hat“ eld became a part of the Wakulla School System in 1987 as a student. She grew up in Havana, and later moved to Wakulla County and attended school at Sopchoppy Elementary, Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School. She is a graduate of TCC and Flagler College. Hat“ eld said, What I “ nd most enjoyable about teaching is working with the children and seeing their expressions when they “ nally get a concept that has caused them to struggle. It is the sparkle in their eyes and the grin on their face that says, I get it, that is so rewarding. Each time I see the light bulb brighten, my day gets 10 times better.Ž Crawfordville Principal Angie Walker said, Mrs. Hatfield is a soft spoken, kind hearted, enthusiastic and devoted teacher. When I walk into Mrs. Hatfields classroom, I see 22 students move from center to center with a purpose, listening for Mrs. Hat“ elds quiet words to direct them to the next activity and eagerly attack their assignments with the same enthusiasm that she exhibits while instructing. She inspires as others with her constant approach: Let the students know you love them. Let them know that you care. Let them know that school is important. Let them know that learning can be fun. Her communication skills are excellent. Mrs. Hat“ eld is also on our on-site technology rep.Ž The November Employee of the Month is Pumphrey. He began his education in Tampa and moved to North Florida, graduating from Carrabelle High School. It did not take long for the district to learn the value of Pumphrey as a bus attendant. He has been with the district since 2007. Pumphrey said, Working in this school system is like being part of a big family and the students always come “ rst. Our school system is really concerned about each childs education and their safety.Ž Transportation Coordinator Pat Jones adds, To know Mr. Pumphrey is to like Mr. Pumphrey. He is such a delightful person with an attitude of I will do whatever you need me to do when it comes to our students and their needs. He always wears a smile and has a kind word to say to all those he encounters. His work ethics are superb. Mr. Pumphrey does a wonderful job keeping his van clean and believes that his students deserve a nice clean van.ŽTeachers and employee of the month for are recognized Jeff Dutrow Ronald Pumphrey Heather Hat“ eldSpecial to The NewsCrawfordville Elementary School recently hosted Bingo for Books Family Night in the cafeteria. This was the third year and the greatest participation by students and parents thus far. Participants snacked on popcorn, hotdogs and drinks between rounds of bingo. There were 114 parents, 144 students and 37 staff members in attendance, however, based on the noise level, few vacant seats and the consumption of 320 hotdogs, there is evidence to support that there was quite a few more participants than had signed in. Tickets were given to each student who then redeemed the ticket for a book of their choice upon winning. Students who did not win during the game also cashed in their ticket in exchange for a book. All students left with a book. Parents were also given the opportunity to browse through a collection of gently used adult paperback books. Parent surveys revealed that the best part of Family Night Bingo was spending time with their children, socializing with others, winning free books and the snacks. Bingo for Books is held twice each year in conjunction with the Scholastic Book Fair. The next Bingo for Books Family Night will be held second semester. We look forward to another huge crowd of hungry avid readers. Bingo for Books was a success Student and parents participate in Bingo for Books held recently at Crawfordville Elementary School. WHS talent show is ursday, Dec. 8The Wakulla High School Winter Talent Show will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 8 in the auditorium This years show will be “ lled with vocal talent, musicians, dancers, twirlers and the ever popular Santas ElvesŽ will also be part of the holiday fun. The cost for students is $4 and $6 for adults. Proceeds help drama students go to their District Competition in January at the Northwest Florida State University in Niceville, Florida. San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Wed. 10-5 Closed Sat. & Sun.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!We will be closed Dec. 21 Jan. 4 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327Open 7:30a.m. 8:00p.m.During Holiday Break12/21/11 1/4/12 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: WINTER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!Special Rates applyWe will be closed: Christmas Eve & Day • New Years Eve & Day For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, autographed books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, and ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking Stuffers Too! Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium222 Clark Dr. Panacea Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm Sat. 10am 4pm Sun. 12pm 4pm(850) 984-5297www.gulfspecimen.org

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsThe creeks are full of reds, and plenty of trout mixed in The weather was absolutely beautiful this past weekend and there were quite a few folks on the water and lots of “ sh were caught. I talked with Capt. Randy Peart and he said there were a lot of folks spending the holiday at St. George and he “ shed “ ve days over there. He said about the only thing behind St. George right now are reds but there are plenty of them. He suggests using the Rapala Twitch & Rap. There are still some ” ounder and sheepshead around and I have heard lots of white trout around the old bridge. He said he “ shed one day at Whiskey George Creek and they caught quite a few trout and some ” ounder but the trout were small. He said we need some cold weather to push the larger “ sh up there but this week may do just that. I talked with Bucky over at Shell Island and he said “ shing has been pretty good. Most people are “ shing around the oyster bars at the mouth of the river and in East River. He said trout and reds are also being caught up in the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers. He said he went out about a week ago and caught a 24inch trout in one of his favorite spots and then caught a 27-inch red in another spot. I had heard some very big reds were being caught up in the Wakulla River right now. Jimmy said he and a friend took his airboat out on one of the extremely low tides last week and probably released more than 50 legal reds. They used a white/pink jerk bait made by Gulp. Todd Hellams of Shell Point had his son Ryan down from Atlanta over the Thanksgiving holiday and Ryan wanted to catch a nice red. They went out for a couple of hours with live shrimp and came back with a 25-inch red that Ryan caught. Mark and Louise Prance from Shell Point had their boys down from Georgia and spent quite a few hours on the water. They caught lots of reds, ” ounder, white trout and black sea bass. Ivor Groves said they “ shed about three days during the Thanksgiving week and caught and released more than 150 reds and out of that only two were legal. He said all the oyster bars they “ shed around Shell Point had reds on them and they used live bait, Gulp and gold spoons. I wasnt able to get in touch with JR but was told he had a good day “ shing for reds on Saturday. The creeks are full of reds and there are also plenty of trout mixed in with them. He “ shes the low tides when there arent many places for the “ sh to be. With that airboat he can get in and out no matter how much water. Capt. Luke at AMS and Scott Harper went down to the Aucilla last Wednesday and caught their limit of large trout and also had two nice reds. They “ shed the Gulp and live shrimp under a Cajun Thunder in about eight feet of water. If you plan on going down there give JR a call and hell tell you where they are. I “ shed on the Saturday before last with Lloyd Bell, his son, brother and dad. On Tuesday the weather forecast was nice. Of course on Friday they were on their way down from Atlanta and now the forecast had changed to 15 to 20 knots out of the east. Fortunately, as has been the case so many times, the weather forecast was wrong. It blew very little during the morning and early afternoon and by 3:30 p.m. it was about as ” at as it could be. We ended up catching 15 nice speckled trout and some reds. Half of the trout were caught way back in the bay around the oyster bars but at the end of the day the water temperature was up to 64 degrees and I decided to try the ” ats. We caught seven nice trout in less than an hour and missed quite a few. We caught everything on live shrimp under a Cajun Thunder. On Sunday I “ shed with Dr. Julian Hurt from Atlanta and we caught a few trout, kept our two reds and threw back 49 reds. All were caught on live shrimp though Julian did catch one very nice red on his ” yrod. There are some big changes coming to the red “ sh and trout regulations and I hope to know more in the coming weeks. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL A day spent birdwatching along the Lighthouse dikesObjective: To spend the entire day along Lighthouse Drive, and its adjacent dikes, and do some serious wildlife viewing, plus write about my observations in this article. I planned on using my binoculars and spotting scope, and hoped to see possibly bobcat, otter, bear etc., but knew mostly what Id see is, of course, birds. So at 6:15 a.m., I was loaded up in my van, and soon arrived by the parking lot at Picnic Pond in the refuge at 7:15 just before the sun broke over the eastern horizon. As daylight pushed the nights darkness into the shadows, Id passed a few patches of frost on the shoulders of Highway 98, so I knew for the “ rst couple of hours, Id have to dress for the cold. But all in all expected a near perfect day, with a light breeze from the east, and no clouds predicted. Sure enough, by 2 p.m. I was down to a T-shirt. If it is a cloudy day then the lighting is poor when looking through optics. If it is windy, your body is buffeted around by the wind, and again viewing through optics, especially a scope is much harder! And if the breeze is from the south or offshore, in the winter months, there is a good chance of pulling up to our coast and “ nding yourself enveloped in sea fog … a real bummer! I knew a frosty morning would provide me with the best overall day for smelling the rosesŽ so to speak. A day off, just enjoying nature. A day minus mosquitoes too. Ive been hooked on birds since childhood, and for about a half a century have really gotten to know them. Im proud of my identifying skills, and wished to work on them the whole day, so I kept the sun mostly to my back for best visibility, and walked the dikes to avoid the sounds of traf“ c on the road leading to the lighthouse. Also, Ive found the best way to really see the critters is by foot. Even biking has its limits, because when biking on the dikes, through grass, and often soft sand, it requires effort enough that when you stop to check out something with your binoculars, your heart rate is so high, you cant hold the optics steady! When I use my binoculars Ill press them against my face “ rmly, and recently found that by taking my left pinky and also clamping down on my caps bill, Im able to stabilize my binoculars even better, if there is a disturbing breeze. So at dawn I “ rst checked out Picnic Pond hoping to see some American Avocets, which have been there off and on for a few weeks. Sure enough, there were nine, a real treat! Then I checked out Tower Pond … nothing. Next Headquarters Pond, which by then it was welllit by the rising sun. Glossy Ibis, coot and Green-winged Teal dominated the scene. When doing any activity along the coast, one should be aware of the tides, and when observing wildlife like birds, tides can really be important. From experience I know that at high tide birds are ” ushed/forced off the mud ” ats where they normally feed, and will, in the refuge, often ” y to Lighthouse Pool to roost. Since high tide was about 9 a.m., thats where I went next and recorded eight Marbled Godwits, and a gob of shorebird species. Out from the lighthouse in the Gulf were three Common Loons and two Horned Grebes, along with the usual stuff like American Oystercatchers, Brown Pelicans and a ton of Double-crested Cormorants, etc. I returned later in the day when the tide was going out and sure enough, the shorebirds had all left Lighthouse Pool to return to the mud ” ats, but I did see more than 200 White Pelicans with their nine-foot wing span soaring out over the bay areas, ” ying along in their spectacular black and white plumage … what a show! By the end of the day Id seen only one doe Whitetail, and after walking more than seven miles of dikes ( to Mounds Pool and back as one example) Id still not seen or heard by dusk any crows, Carolina Wrens, rails, Herring Gulls, Accepitor hawks, owls, Tree swallows or Common Grackles to name a few. Yet I recorded right at 80 species. The waterfowl are de“ nitely in! Unfortunately, the water level is low in the refuge and so many of the ducks are way out from the banks, and hard to identify … even with a good spotting scope. Still I saw these species: Mallard, N. Pintail, Blue-winged, and Greenwinged Teal, N. Shoveler, Gadwall, Amer. Wigeon, Canvasback, Redhead, Ringnecked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Hooded Merganser and Red-breasted Merganser. The highlight of the day for me was hearing a Sandhill crane, and then spotting it working a thermal over Stony Bayou Pool No. 2. In checking my email this morning, I was informed that the Apalachee Audubon Society had recorded one over Lake Henrietta in Tallahassee the same day. Perhaps theyre on the move?Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH Preventative Maintenance.Complete check on your unit to keep it operating ef“ciently. 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Last week I shared with you a loss in our Auxiliary family. Once again, we have lost another member. When Flotilla 15 disbanded out of St. George Island, John Probert transferred into Flotilla 12. On Friday, Dec. 2, John passed away in Tallahassee. While many of us did not get much time to get to know John, he was an active member for the Coast Guard Auxiliary for more than 20 years. I had the pleasure of knowing John through his role as the Flotilla Commander at St. George Island. His winning smile, kind words and diligent efforts to get me his reports on time always made the Division meeting a bit more fun. If my memory serves me right, John was not a fan of the computer, but he always had an extra copy of his report to hand me at every meeting. I wish I had a picture to share with all of you, but I have not been able to locate one in my “ les thus far. John came to the Auxiliary after serving his county in the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy. He also served in the Wisconsin Civil Air Patrol and worked with FEMA. John was an educator and we often shared stories about students and classroom adventures at our Division Meetings. He is survived by his wife of 62 years Dolores, four children, nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. We have all lost not only a good Auxiliarist, but a friend and mentor. Fair winds and following seas, John! With the loss of two members in the last month, during the Annual ” otilla holiday party, we held a moment of remembrance for both Harry and John. A great big thank you goes out to Bill and Wanda Wannall for opening their home to us so that we could all come together and join in one of our four cornerstones, fellowship. This is something that we often lose sight of during the more hectic times of active boating season. But as our annual party reminds us, without fellowship, it can be very hard to keep doing what we do. It is a time when family and friends come together and set businessŽ aside. This is what led many of us to come together for the Annual Change of Watch at St. Andrews Bay Yacht Club in Panama City. Sunday morning Tim Ashley joined the Treadon clan and we headed over. Every December the elected and appointed staff of“ cers from the Division come together for fellowship and to take the oath of of“ ce. This year we were honored to have with us CWO James Todd from DIRAUX and Larry King, District Captain East. Division Commander Mo Davis and Vice Commander Gordon Schmidt along with all the newly elected Flotilla Commanders took their oath, followed by all the incoming staff officers. Outgoing staff of“ cers received a certi“ cate of appreciation for their work in the division and incoming officer were presented a certificate of appointment. We are looking forward to making Division One the best it can be for the coming year. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! As the cooler weather comes, be sure to be prepared for the unexpected. Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Elected of“ cers taking the oath.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Thank you, DEP. This journey began several years led by a band of local people with a vision that equal access to our underwater trails would bring greater opportunity to our Wakulla community. They “ rst organized as a club open to everyone. Their membership soon swelled to 100, many from outside Wakulla County. Some members channeled their energy into locating and working with land owners of dive sites who were willing to share their sinkholes with others. Access was made safer with erosion reduction steps, large safety gold line mapping the underwater passages, and gate keeper policies. Others organized site clean-up events when they discovered these dive sites were repeatedly inundated by folks dumping trash to avoid paying land“ ll fees. Two years ago a small group of club members began to analyze the local economic impact possible should Wakulla County become an equal access diving destination. Recently, the Wakulla Springs State Park downsized their staff and turned management of their Lodge over to a private concession because of a number of economic challenges. Discussions with their new Lodge manager revealed his interest to make the Park into an international destination to boost growth. Current restrictions on diving limit his options. This group found Jackson and Lafayette counties applied equal diving access policies resulting in millions of dollars infused into their economy. Dr. William Huth documented their success and published papers in peer-reviewed papers. As a result of this success, people who dive have made these counties diving destinations. When they lined the two counties up on a map, they realized Wakulla County was right in the middle and that if you include High Springs in Alachua County and Eagles Nest in Hernando County, a Cave Divers Trail with hundreds of dive site opportunities became obvious, all but Wakulla County, with equal access gate keeper policies. Armed with these revelations, presentations were made to the Wakulla Tourist Development Council, Economic Development Board, Optimists Club and this week the Rotary Club to alert Wakulla citizens of the economic losses currently going elsewhere because of dive restrictions at Wakulla Springs State Park. An assessment of the caves under the control of Wakulla Springs State Park was conducted this past summer by the state Department of Environmental Protection in an effort to understand why their caves were closed to equal access diving policies. Leaders from the diving community participated on this review committee and made numerous recommendations. All agreed that an equal access gatekeeper diving policy similar to that maintained at Peacock Springs State Park was applicable to Wakulla Springs State Park. Careful monitoring of the Gem of Cave Diving, the main vent under the diving tower, was also recommended. I began this column by thanking DEP for their willingness to host a public hearing to permit everyones input into this very important opportunity. I have been assured that a date in mid-January will be announced this week, the site as yet undetermined. I know you will have more information as soon as it is released right here in The Wakulla News. I hope to see you there! Appointed of“ cers taking the oath. Future Auxiliarist Marshall with Phyllis, Duane and Bill. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Dec 8, 11 Fr i Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 3.2 ft. 12:13 AM 3.3 ft. 12:46 AM 3.4 ft. 1:20 AM 3.5 ft. 1:55 AM 3.5 ft. 2:33 AM 3.4 ft. 3:15 AM H i gh -0.4 ft. 6:55 AM -0.5 ft. 7:30 AM -0.6 ft. 8:03 AM -0.6 ft. 8:36 AM -0.7 ft. 9:07 AM -0.6 ft. 9:40 AM -0.5 ft. 10:15 AM Low 3.0 ft. 1:28 PM 3.1 ft. 2:02 PM 3.1 ft. 2:36 PM 3.2 ft. 3:11 PM 3.2 ft. 3:45 PM 3.2 ft. 4:20 PM 3.1 ft. 4:56 PM H i gh 1.5 ft. 6:28 PM 1.4 ft. 7:05 PM 1.3 ft. 7:41 PM 1.2 ft. 8:18 PM 1.2 ft. 8:57 PM 1.1 ft. 9:39 PM 1.0 ft. 10:26 PM Low Thu Dec 8, 11 Fr i Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 3.3 ft. 12:10 AM 3.4 ft. 12:43 AM 3.5 ft. 1:17 AM 3.5 ft. 1:52 AM 3.6 ft. 2:30 AM 3.5 ft. 3:12 AM H i gh -0.4 ft. 6:52 AM -0.5 ft. 7:27 AM -0.6 ft. 8:00 AM -0.7 ft. 8:33 AM -0.7 ft. 9:04 AM -0.7 ft. 9:37 AM -0.6 ft. 10:12 AM Low 3.0 ft. 1:25 PM 3.1 ft. 1:59 PM 3.2 ft. 2:33 PM 3.2 ft. 3:08 PM 3.2 ft. 3:42 PM 3.2 ft. 4:17 PM 3.2 ft. 4:53 PM H i gh 1.6 ft. 6:25 PM 1.5 ft. 7:02 PM 1.4 ft. 7:38 PM 1.3 ft. 8:15 PM 1.3 ft. 8:54 PM 1.2 ft. 9:36 PM 1.1 ft. 10:23 PM Low Thu Dec 8, 11 Fr i Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 2.9 ft. 12:14 AM 3.0 ft. 12:49 AM 3.1 ft. 1:22 AM 3.2 ft. 1:56 AM 3.2 ft. 2:31 AM 3.2 ft. 3:09 AM 3.2 ft. 3:51 AM H i gh -0.3 ft. 7:59 AM -0.4 ft. 8:34 AM -0.5 ft. 9:07 AM -0.6 ft. 9:40 AM -0.6 ft. 10:11 AM -0.6 ft. 10:44 AM -0.5 ft. 11:19 AM Low 2.8 ft. 2:04 PM 2.8 ft. 2:38 PM 2.9 ft. 3:12 PM 2.9 ft. 3:47 PM 2.9 ft. 4:21 PM 2.9 ft. 4:56 PM 2.9 ft. 5:32 PM H i gh 1.3 ft. 7:32 PM 1.3 ft. 8:09 PM 1.2 ft. 8:45 PM 1.1 ft. 9:22 PM 1.1 ft. 10:01 PM 1.0 ft. 10:43 PM 0.9 ft. 11:30 PM Low Thu Dec 8, 11 Fr i Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 2.4 ft. 12:05 AM 2.5 ft. 12:38 AM 2.6 ft. 1:12 AM 2.6 ft. 1:47 AM 2.6 ft. 2:25 AM 2.6 ft. 3:07 AM H i gh -0.3 ft. 7:06 AM -0.4 ft. 7:41 AM -0.4 ft. 8:14 AM -0.5 ft. 8:47 AM -0.5 ft. 9:18 AM -0.5 ft. 9:51 AM -0.4 ft. 10:26 AM Low 2.2 ft. 1:20 PM 2.3 ft. 1:54 PM 2.3 ft. 2:28 PM 2.4 ft. 3:03 PM 2.4 ft. 3:37 PM 2.4 ft. 4:12 PM 2.4 ft. 4:48 PM H i gh 1.1 ft. 6:39 PM 1.0 ft. 7:16 PM 1.0 ft. 7:52 PM 0.9 ft. 8:29 PM 0.9 ft. 9:08 PM 0.8 ft. 9:50 PM 0.7 ft. 10:37 PM Low Thu Dec 8, 11 Fr i Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 2.6 ft. 12:30 AM 2.7 ft. 1:04 AM 2.7 ft. 1:39 AM 2.7 ft. 2:17 AM 2.7 ft. 2:59 AM H i gh -0.3 ft. 6:34 AM -0.5 ft. 7:09 AM -0.6 ft. 7:42 AM -0.6 ft. 8:15 AM -0.7 ft. 8:46 AM -0.6 ft. 9:19 AM -0.5 ft. 9:54 AM Low 2.3 ft. 1:12 PM 2.4 ft. 1:46 PM 2.4 ft. 2:20 PM 2.5 ft. 2:55 PM 2.5 ft. 3:29 PM 2.5 ft. 4:04 PM 2.4 ft. 4:40 PM H i gh 1.4 ft. 6:07 PM 1.4 ft. 6:44 PM 1.3 ft. 7:20 PM 1.2 ft. 7:57 PM 1.1 ft. 8:36 PM 1.1 ft. 9:18 PM 1.0 ft. 10:05 PM Low 2.5 ft. 11:57 PM H i gh Thu Dec 8, 11 Fr i Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 2.7 ft. 12:19 AM 2.7 ft. 1:03 AM 2.6 ft. 1:49 AM 2.5 ft. 2:39 AM H i gh -0.6 ft. 6:28 AM -0.7 ft. 7:06 AM -0.7 ft. 7:40 AM -0.7 ft. 8:13 AM -0.7 ft. 8:44 AM -0.6 ft. 9:15 AM -0.5 ft. 9:48 AM Low 2.2 ft. 3:03 PM 2.2 ft. 3:37 PM 2.2 ft. 4:08 PM 2.2 ft. 4:37 PM 2.2 ft. 5:04 PM 2.2 ft. 5:30 PM 2.1 ft. 5:55 PM H i gh 1.6 ft. 5:33 PM 1.6 ft. 6:15 PM 1.6 ft. 6:53 PM 1.6 ft. 7:30 PM 1.5 ft. 8:10 PM 1.4 ft. 8:55 PM 1.2 ft. 9:49 PM Low 2.6 ft. 10:58 PM 2.6 ft. 11:37 PM H i gh Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDec. 8 Dec. 14First Jan. 2 Full Dec. 10 Last Dec. 17 New Dec. 24Major Times 10:56 AM 12:56 PM 11:20 PM 1:20 AM Minor Times 5:34 AM 6:34 AM 4:14 PM 5:14 PM Major Times --:---:-11:45 AM 1:45 PM Minor Times 6:27 AM 7:27 AM 5:01 PM 6:01 PM Major Times 12:11 AM 2:11 AM 12:37 PM 2:37 PM Minor Times 7:20 AM 8:20 AM 5:52 PM 6:52 PM Major Times 1:02 AM 3:02 AM 1:28 PM 3:28 PM Minor Times 8:10 AM 9:10 AM 6:46 PM 7:46 PM Major Times 1:54 AM 3:54 AM 2:20 PM 4:20 PM Minor Times 8:57 AM 9:57 AM 7:44 PM 8:44 PM Major Times 2:46 AM 4:46 AM 3:11 PM 5:11 PM Minor Times 9:40 AM 10:40 AM 8:43 PM 9:43 PM Major Times 3:36 AM 5:36 AM 4:00 PM 6:00 PM Minor Times 10:20 AM 11:20 AM 9:44 PM 10:44 PM Better Best Best Better++ Better Good Average7:20 am 5:37 pm 4:15 pm 5:34 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:21 am 5:37 pm 5:01 pm 6:28 am 7:22 am 5:37 pm 5:52 pm 7:21 am 7:22 am 5:37 pm 6:47 pm 8:11 am 7:23 am 5:38 pm 7:45 pm 8:58 am 7:24 am 5:38 pm 8:44 pm 9:41 am 7:24 am 5:38 pm 9:45 pm 10:21 am86% 92% 98% 96% 89% 83% 76% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Nov. 24, Steven Fults of Panacea reported a criminal mischief on Tarpine Drive. A subdivision gate was damaged and four wheeler tracks were observed on the Wakulla County Airports grass runway. Damage to the gate is estimated at $250. € On Nov. 24, Kimberly Pittman of Crawfordville reported an animal incident and cruelty to animals. The victim reported that a suspect, who has been identi“ ed, shot her dog. The dog is valued at $500. € On Nov. 23, Faith Barnett of Crawfordville reported a vehicle “ re on the 1900 block of Highway 267. Wakulla “ re“ ghters arrived on the scene and put out the “ re after Deputy Jeremy Johnston was unable to extinguish the blaze with his department issued “ re extinguisher. The “ re originated inside the vehicle and the state Fire Marshal was called in to investigate. € On Nov. 24, a concerned citizen from Crawfordville reported observing a 6-year-old boy wandering the street in his underwear. Contact was made with the mother and Deputy Rachel Oliver observed the home in disarray with trash and insects. She contacted the Department of Children and Families for additional investigation. € On Nov. 25, Curtis R. Mixon, 68, of Crawfordville was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill. Deputy Clint Beam responded to a disturbance. Mixon allegedly pointed a “ rearm at and threatened to shoot a 42-year-old male victim. There were no injuries. € On Nov. 26, Ronette Cruse of Sopchoppy reported a vehicle crash on Jack Crum Road in Crawfordville. The victim was passing Purify Bay Road when a deer ran out in front of her vehicle and she swerved off the road and crashed into the tree line. No injuries were reported. € On Nov. 26, Howard Hall of Wal-Mart reported a shoplifting. Robert Keith Krueger, 44, of Crawfordville was charged with retail theft after attempting to remove $294 worth of merchandise from the store without paying. The items included “ shing equipment, camera equipment, oil, and antifreeze. € On Nov. 27, Robert Keith Krueger, 44, of Crawfordville was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction as Deputies Vicki Mitchell and Billy Metcalf investigated a vehicle crash in Panacea. The vehicle crashed after an altercation between other individuals inside the truck. Krueger admitted his license was suspended for previous DUIs. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. € On Nov. 26, Deputy Mike Zimba conducted a traf“ c stop of a suspicious vehicle on the Woodville Highway. One of the passengers in the vehicle, Austin Luke Beck, 18, of Crawfordville, was determined to have an active warrant out of Leon County. While searching the subject, Deputy Zimba allegedly discovered marijuana and pills in his pocket. Beck was transported to the Leon County Jail by the Florida Highway Patrol and was also charged with possession of marijuana less than 20 grams and possession of a controlled substance. € On Nov. 27, Richard Hockett of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone ” attened two of his vehicle tires. Damage is estimated at $200. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € On Nov. 27, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after a black male reportedly left the store at 4:30 a.m. without paying for a 32inch ” at screen television. The suspect jumped into a waiting vehicle and left the scene heading north on U.S. Highway 319. The television is valued at $278. €On Nov. 28, Cary Watts of Wakulla County Public Works ESG reported a felony criminal mischief. A tractor used to mow roadside grass was vandalized in Sopchoppy. Two tires were damaged and must be replaced. The tires are valued at $2,200. € On Nov. 28, Edwin Day of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim was shopping for an automobile on an internet listing site. An automobile was found and a price was agreed to by the victim and the seller.Ž The victim sent $2,809 via Western Union and the seller advised that the vehicle would be shipped. When the victim did not receive his vehicle, he discovered the contact e-mail address and telephone number were invalid. € On Nov. 29, Deputy Randy Phillips was on patrol when he smelled an excessive amount of diesel odor from a vehicle in front of him. The deputy discovered that the license plate was tagged to be seized. Robert M. Paiano, 44, of Crawfordville was stopped and given a citation for driving with a suspended driver license without knowledge. The license plate was seized and Paiano was given a January court date. € On Nov. 29, Fredrick Hyatt of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and $220 worth of damage was done to the residence. Stolen property included “ rearms, jewelry and cellular telephones valued at $3,750. € On Nov. 29, Diana Nichols of Crawfordville reported recovering a vehicle license plate on U.S. Highway 98 near Spring Creek Highway. The owner was a Tallahassee business. € On Nov. 30, Shellen D. Scott of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash on Arran Road and Forest Highway 13. The victims rear tire blew out causing her to veer off the highway and scrape the side of a bridge guardrail. EMS responded to the scene, but the driver was taken to a Tallahassee hospital in a private vehicle. Damage to the vehicle was listed at $400. € On Nov. 30, Deputy Ben Steinle investigated an abandoned vehicle on Mohave Road. As the deputy was investigating, the vehicles teenage owner returned with gasoline. Deputy Steinle allegedly detected the smell of burned marijuana inside the vehicle. The owner reportedly turned over drug paraphernalia to the deputy to be turned in to the evidence division for destruction. The teenager was not charged due to a lack of marijuana in the vehicle. The sheriffs office received 804 calls for service during the week. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce will partner with the Wakulla County Special Olympics and Poseys Steam Room to host a Tip A CopŽ fundraiser for the Wakulla Special Olympians. The date has been changed from Dec. 9 to avoid a con” ict with the Wakulla War Eagle football game. The event is now Friday, Dec. 16, at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea, 1506 Coastal Highway, (850) 984-5243. The Special Olympians rely on funding from outside the school district to compete at events in different locations in Florida. There will be two sessions where sheriffs of“ ce personnel will assist with table service in exchange for tips to be set aside for the Wakulla Special Olympics. The lunch session will be held from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. and the dinner session will be held from 5:30 p.m. until 9:30 p.m. Tip A Cop is also a Wakulla County Law Enforcement Torch Run Kickoff event. If you would like to participate in the Torch Run in 2012, please contact Lt. Brent Sanders at bsanders@wcso.org. For more information about Tip A Cop or Special Olympics, please call Patricia Bodiford or Sharon Scherbarth at Wakulla High School, 926-7125, extension 271.Date for Tip a Cop fundraiser is movedStaff ReportThe sign was completed last week for naming the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Complex.Ž Sheriff Harvey served as Wakullas sheriff from 1976 to 2011 and become the dean of Florida Sheriffs. He left of“ ce as the longest serving sheriff in Florida. He stepped down on Sept. 30 to take a post as executive director of the Florida Sheriffs Self-Insurance Fund. Gov. Rick Scott appointed Donnie Crum to serve out the remainder of Harveys term as sheriff.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNew sign at sheri s o ce O ver 3000 rods & reels in st oc k *Receive 10% back on every purchase of $10 or m ore added t o a Crum’ s Gift Card *exc lud es purcha ses of shi ng li cens e, lott er y ga s, diesel be er and toba cco products. WITHTHE CRUMS GIFT CARDYOUCANCONTINUE TOADDYOURDISCOUNTSTOITANDUSEITWHENEVERYOUWANT... ONWHATEVERYOUWANT!NOEXPIRATIONDATEONTHECARD.WEWILLGIVETHEDISCOUNTBEGINNING11-25-11TIL 12-25-11. Mens CALCUTTA Neoprene Stocking Foot/Chest Waders Dr a win gsf or P r izest o b e heldw eeklyƒs t op in and r egi s t er .(N O PU RCHASE NECE S S A R Y) GIFT CARD GIF T CARD850-984-55 0113 2 1 Coas t al Hwy. P anacea, Florida 850-984-5501 1321 Coastal Hwy.Panacea, Florida full line of & $7995Sale Reg. 89.99

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce SALESTHROUGHWEBSITE and atUPCOMINGLOCAL FESTIVALS:Crawfordville Womans Club Dec. 9 & 10 Mission San Luis Winter Festival Dec. 17850926-6115 ( 850 ) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAY SAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6:30 P.M.8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROADASHLEYFEEDSTORE Practical Christmas gift ideas in store. Gift Certi cates !We thank our loyal customers for their business, wish you all a Merry Christmas and look forward to continuing to serve you in 2012. New& NO CONTRACT CELLULAR SERVICE AS LOW AS $35 MO.Starting at $12999ANDROID PHONES 352835-6150 5113 Capital Circle SW Unit 4 In between Crawfordville Hwy. and Woodville Hwy. G OLD B UYERS OF CRAWFORDVILLE2106CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. NEAR WAL-MART850-566-7348 850-566-7344*Not valid with any other offers or prior purchases. Expires: Dec. 31, 2011Receive an additionalGold and Silver Jewelry! with this coupon*for your Hair By Doreen 850933-67463278 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Now at EVOLU T ION DaySpa 20%discounton all services provided by Doreen.Call for an appointment LIGHTHOUSELADYCLEANINGSERVICESINC.COMPREHENSIVE JANITORIAL SERVICESDeedee Pr i tchard OWNER 30 Year Experience 509-0623 Trained-Screened Employees LICENSED-INSURED WORKERS COMP BONDEDOFF“rst time cleaning $20 P etStop Pet Stopr all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pet Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC L P A ALL Y P N. CommunityFINANCE, LLC Wide Selection of Puppies Special Orders AvailableA A F Stocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates It’s A POSH Christmas at Large Variety of Gift Ideas for you and your loved ones! Open 10AM-5PM... or call for a later appointment. December 16 and 17!926-3338 10 Vendors Featuringƒ Antiques, Uniques, Collectibles, Jewelry, and Custom Made Items. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTING & SAFETYEQUIPMENT ORANGE BLAZE VESTS • BUCKSHOT • RIFLE SHELLS • COVER SCENT 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 GEAR UP FOR Mon.Fri. 10-6 • Sat. 10-5 • 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B 850 926-6241 TreatYOURSELF! www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service TheWakulla news GIVE THE GIFT THAT LASTS ALL YEAR IN PRINT AND ONLINE OR ONLINE ONLY877-401-6408

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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 I cant think of many issues that have been more controversial in our county this year than county-wide trash and recycling. I certainly dont have many answers but I wanted to take this opportunity to write some thoughts on what I am seeing, hearing and experiencing as I travel the county and when I attend meetings. I dont intend to try to defend all of the decisions that were made; I just want to focus on the household practice of trash disposal. I am an educator with a goal of trying to in” uence people in a direction that seems realistic and good for the majority. I dont know how to argue against recycling! I am disappointed at the number of household recycling bins that are still sitting by the side of the road unused. Whether you are in favor of the countywide program or not, the recycling bin is yours to utilize. Are you familiar with the things that can be recycled? Are the recycling bins just too heavy when “ lled to get them back to the roadside for pick up? Are you familiar with the codes on the bottom of plastics which assist you with determining which can be recycled? Do you know why the symbols are there? Are you aware of why so many people are encouraging you to recycle? I believe that everyone can make a small change in working their trashŽ that can have a great impact on our county. Wouldnt it be wonderful if in a year from now, household recycling would be in full operation in the majority of the homes in the county? Wouldnt it be nice if people would feel even more Wakulla County pride and appreciation for our many beautiful, natural settings because the view is not marred by trash along the roadside, hanging from trees and on the highways? Lets discuss some ideas to further encourage you to re-think your disposal of residential trash. THINGS THAT CAN BE RECYCLED Look in your trash container before it goes curbside. Every aluminum, tin and steel can and glass jar can be recycled. Many plastic containers are also able to be recycled. Look for the chasing arrow triangle with any number between 1 and 7 on the bottom of plastic containers because they have a place in your recycling bin. The chasing arrow triangle is there to make the plastics more easily sorted. This even includes the containers that look like Styrofoam. If they have the logo and the correct numbers, put the container in the recycling, not the trash. The bin that gets full “ rst at my house is the paper one. Flattened cardboard, newspapers, phone books, cereal boxes, magazines, catalogues, junk mail and even paperback books can be recycled. HOW TO PREPARE THE ITEMS FOR RECYCLING Why not spend a little extra time to make the system work. Flatten your cardboard, cereal and other boxes. This does not mean crushing them. Dismantle them by cutting through the glued area to make them perfectly ” at. When you empty your soup can or almost empty ketchup container, rinse them. Any contaminated items need to be sorted out somewhere along the streamŽ and all of that takes time. Each of us doing our small part will make a huge difference. Recycling bins are too heavy when “ lled to get to the road: Do you feel committed to make the effort to adopt some new recycling habits in 2012 but the bin is just too heavy? Why not add a small wheeled cart to your Christmas wish list? I have one that was purchased years ago to pull my luggage before wheeled luggage made its way to the market. It works great. Plastic or paper bags versus reusable shopping bags: If you are a person who always accepts store shopping bags, I would challenge you in 2012 to consider using reusable shopping bags at least every other time you shop. That would cut the number of plastic bags used in half. Continued on Page 4BRecycling – it’s the right thing to do By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Thorium for generating nuclear energy?EarthTalk, Page 3B It’s cold outside – dress for it... Get FitFocus on the exhale to release stress... Yoga For Life Health & Fitness, Page 4B By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOne of the goals of the Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committee is to help the county establish maintenance policies and procedures. In determining ways to help save money and energy, the committee has found that buildings under the purview of the county commission do not have a routine maintenance schedule and it is also not understood who is responsible for the maintenance of equipment in these buildings. The committee invited several of the constitutional of“ cers or representatives from their of“ ces to its Nov. 18 meeting to “ gure it out. Brad Harvey from the property appraisers of“ ce said if his of“ ce was responsible for maintenance of equipment they have never been told that. However, he said his of“ ce has paid for repairs to AC units before because the county did not have the funds to do so. He added that they also perform some routine maintenance on the building. Harvey said the department of facilities and maintenance was created but there wasnt any money put in their budget for them to do their job and perform preventative maintenance. He added that currently there isnt a line item in the property appraisers budget for equipment maintenance either. We can do that, but there will need to be a line item in the budget available,Ž Harvey said. The committee was also trying to determine if each constitutional of“ cer pays for its electric bill from its budget. Harvey said his of“ ce only pays for the phone line. Supervisor of Elections Henry BuddyŽ Wells said it is the same for his of“ ce. The clerk pays all the bills,Ž Harvey said. He added that his of“ ce does not receive a power or water bill. Those bills are sent to the county administration. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the committee needs to emphasize the need for a countywide budget for maintenance and policies. Continued on Page 3BEnergy Committee hears from o cials Tallahassees Most Preferred HospitalFor the7thYear in a RowOnce each year, the National Research Corporation polls the toughest critics in the health care industry … the public. And for the 7th year in a row, consumers in the Tallahassee Metropolitan Statistical Area have named Tallahassee Memorial as the most-preferred hospital in the region. Tallahassee Memorial HeathCares vision is to provide recognized world class health care. It is a vision we keep “rmly in sight each and every day. And, the biggest winners of all are our patients. Our Vision: RECOGNIZEDWORLDCLASSHEALTHCARE TMH.org Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKF AST PA RTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. Law Oce Est. 1998F orec l osures Creditor /D ebtor B usiness L aw1 7 High D rive, Suite C Courthouse S q uare Crawfordvi ll e, Fl orida

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, December 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, December 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, December 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Vendors wanting to participate, call Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, December 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, December 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Tuesday, December 13  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, December 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will meet at noon at the TCC Wakulla Center in Crawfordville. Lunch is provided. Call (850) 926-9005 for more information. Thursday, December 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, December 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsFriday, December 9  HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR PREVIEW PARTY will be held at the Crawfordville Women’s Club, 64 Ocklochonee Street, at 6 p.m. The bazaar will feature numerous local and regional crafters and craft vendors. There will be hors d’oeuvres and a wine-tasting event. The bazaar will be held on Saturday. For details, or to request a booth at the festival, call 294-6482.  CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. at Azalea Park by the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Ofce, Wakulla County Parks and Recreation and Centennial Bank. The event will give children a chance to meet with Santa Claus. Santa will arrive at the park at 6 p.m. Four bicycles will be given away along with bike helmets and toys and door prizes. In addition, there will be Spin Art, train rides around the park, food and beverages for sale by vendor Stump Harts eld, other vendors and entertainment. Everyone is invited to attend. Saturday, December 10  HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held at the Crawfordville Women’s Club from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is free to the public and will feature local and regional craft vendors. Part of the proceeds from the holiday bazaar will go towards the club’s high school scholarship fund, and to help with other of the club’s civic projects. For details, or to request a booth at the festival, call 294-6482.  ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sopchoppy. Santa will be there at 11 a.m. Live musical performances featuring Christmas music, food, and arts and crafts galore. For more vendor information contact billlowrie@embarqmail. com.  DEMOCRATIC GALA will be held at 5:30 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge with a VIP reception. A candidate meet and greet and silent auction will begin at 6 p.m. It is hosted by the Wakulla Democratic Party and the Wakulla Democratic Women’s Club. The main dinner event will begin at 7 p.m. The keynote speaker is Wisconsin State Senator Jessica King, who will speak about the people of Wisconsin’s efforts to stand up for good government. Additionally, local elected Democrats Commissioner Andrew Gillum, Representative Scott Randolph and many more Democratic leaders from around Florida will be present. The priority for the funds raised at this event will support of ce space for the DEC during the 2012 election cycle and help to support local and regional Wakulla County candidates. To purchase tickets, see www.wakullademocrats.org/ or contact us at 850-321-3582. Ticket prices for VIP tickets are $75; Gala tickets (including candidate reception and dinner program) are $50.  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will be held from 10 to noon at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. The club is open to children of all ages and all levels of autism. Children are asked to bring their favorite train, as well as a snack and drink. Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times. RSVP to Carrie Stevens at 274-9474 or carriejstevens@comcast.net.  FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL HOLIDAY PARTY will be held for volunteers and supporters at 6 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea. There will be games, raf es and a White Elephant gift exchange for those who wish to participate (gifts under $10, please). For those who’d like to have dinner while there, La Cantina Grille has graciously offered to provide ve choices of menu items at a cost of only $5 a person. To RSVP, contact Chris Beatty at choppaotta@aol.com.  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB’S CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION will be held at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812, Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol.com. Bring buttons to the meeting for free appraisals. Monday, December 12  BLOODMOBILE will be at TMH Family Practice Ofce, 15 Council Moore Road, from 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, December 13  THIRD ANNUAL CHRISTMAS HERITAGE OPEN HOUSE will be held by the Wakulla County Historical Society at the museum from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The museum is located behind the Crawfordville Courthouse on High Drive in Crawfordville. Come celebrate and view the latest exhibits while enjoying complimentary holiday refreshments. Members of the Wakulla County Historical society will be dressed in 1800s period clothing. Saturday, December 17  A CELTIC CHRISTMAS will be held at Posh Java featuring Aisha Ives on violin, Katie Geringer on violin and Aaron O’ Rourke on guitar. Reservations requested. Call (850) 962-1010 for tickets or more information. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorBook Extravaganza Once Again a Success Our Book Extravaganza fundraiser was once again a great success last Saturday. With your help, we raised close to $600 for the Friends of the Library! Wed also like to thank the Iris Garden Club for coming out and giving us a generous donation as well. Remember that all funds raised by the Friends of the Library go directly to help us with our book budget, childrens programs and our new public computers, which will be operational shortly. The Friends have saved Wakulla taxpayers more than $50,000 the past 2 years as a result of their hard work and generosity, so please join this great group today. Call us at 926-7415 or stop by for more information. Operation Santa Drop Off The library this year is happy to work with the Wakulla Coalition for Youth in the Operation Santa campaign. Please help out the needy in our county this year by dropping off clean, gently worn clothes (with sizes clearly marked, folded in boxes), toys, electronics, games, bikes, books, puzzles, etc. in good repair, and household items such as kitchenware, tools and workshop items. The Coalition for Youth will make sure that these items will go to those in need. You can drop off the items at the front desk during business hours. Thank you in advance for your generosity. Call 926-3526 for more information. Friday Night Movie Our last Friday Night Movie of the year is one that many of our patrons have been waiting for since it came out in theatres six months ago. Based on the best selling phenomenon The HelpŽ by Kathryn Stockett, (we still cant keep our copies on the shelves, it checks out so often) this PG-13 rated drama tells the story of Skeeter Phelan, who in 1960s Jackson, Miss., begins work on a book which details the lives of the AfricanAmerican maids in the city and the households they work in. While names have been changed in the book, when it comes out, the novel creates a scandal in the town and causes many to rethink their feelings on race and fairness. Starring Emma Stone, Bryce Dallas Howard and Viola Davis, this “ lm was one of the best reviewed and highest grossing of the year so come out and enjoy this poignant, inspirational “ lm. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comLibrary News... Christmas in the Park at Azalea Park from 5 to 8 p.m. Annual Christmas in Sopchoppy from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bloodmobile at TMH Family Practice Of ce from 3 to 5 p.m. Christmas Heritage Open House at the Historical Society Museum from 6 to 8 p.m. FridaySaturdayMondayTuesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingThursday, December 8  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall.  WAKULLA LEGISLATIVE DELEGATION will meet at 7 p.m. in the Wakulla County Commission Chambers. The meeting will be chaired by Sen. Bill Montford and includes other delegation members Rep. Marti Coley and Rep. Leonard Bembry. The delegation meeting is held to allow the citizens and public of cials an opportunity to voice their issues of local concerns prior to the start of the legislative session. Monday, December 12  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, December 13  WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC RECORDS COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. The purpose of the meeting is to propose ways to improve the ef ciency of Wakulla County’s public records policies and procedures.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 3BFrom the Editors of E/The Environmental MagazineDear EarthTalk: Thorium is a naturally occurring element that is supposedly more available, more ef“ cient and safer to use than uranium for generating nuclear energy. Is this true and, if so, why havent we made the switch? … Jane Westermann Austin, Texas Thorium, a naturally occurring radioactive element found in abundance in the Earths crust all around the world, might well be a better fuel source than uranium for nuclear power generation for a variety of reasons. First and foremost, just one ton of the silvery metal can produce as much energy as 200 tons of uranium or 3.5 millions tons of coal, according to Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia of the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Another advantage is that it comes out of the ground as a 100 percent pure, usable isotope. Unlike uranium, which contains only 0.7 percent “ ssionable material, thorium doesnt require enrichment to be used in nuclear reactors. Also, the spent-fuel waste from thorium “ ssion cannot be re-formulated for nuclear weapons like plutonium, the waste product of uranium-based “ ssion. Also, proponents say that thorium doesnt require the high temperatures and mitigation equipment of uranium-based reactors. The plants would be much smaller and less expensive,Ž Kirk Sorensen, a former NASA rocket engineer and now chief nuclear technologist at Teledyne Brown Engineering, told the UKs Telegraph last year. You wouldnt need those huge containment domes because theres no pressurized water in the reactor.Ž With no high temperatures, thorium reactors cant melt downŽ and release radiation. Once you start looking more closely, it blows your mind away,Ž adds Sorensen. You can run civilization on thorium for hundreds of thousands of years, and its essentially free.Ž The advocacy-oriented Thorium Energy Alliance reports that there is enough thorium in the U.S. alone to power the country at its current energy level for over 1,000 years.Ž Nuclear researchers in the U.S. “ rst contemplated using thorium as a nuclear energy feedstock back in the 1940s, but its lack of feasibility in making nuclear weapons put it on the back burner, where it has sat for the last six decades despite various attempts to revive the technology for practical use. In Russia, China and India, thorium reactors represent the next generation of nuclear power. India possesses about a quarter of the worlds thorium reserves. The country is working to develop a network of large thorium-based reactors, and plans to meet 30 percent of its electricity needs with thorium by 2050. Many nuclear advocates and environmentalists alike dont see thorium as the savior its supporters make it out to be. For one, uranium is still relatively easy to come by and inexpensive, and the nuclear industry is set up to run on it. Changing over to thorium would be expensive, and who knows what unforeseen problems may arise with full-scale deployment. Perhaps most important, some analysts worry that putting more eggs into humanitys nuclear basket will surely further delay the transition to a truly green economy that runs on clean renewable energy from the sun, wind and other socalled alternative sources. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Why havent we switched to thorium for generating nuclear energy? iStock Collection/Thinkstock Advocates of thorium to power nuclear plants say that the element is safer than uranium, and that its waste cannot … like the plutonium waste of uranium “ ssion … be re-formulated for nuclear weapons. Thorium plants, they say, also wouldnt need containment domes like those pictured here because the reactors cant melt down and release radiation.The Thorium Energy Alliance reports that there is enough thorium in the U.S. alone to power the country at its current energy level for over 1,000 years.Continued from Page 1B Harvey said once those policies are in place, the committee can really start making an impact. Dan Ard with Talquin Electric Cooperative said he couldnt believe the county didnt have maintenance policies, procedures and accountability. He added that buildings of Talquin are checked monthly. If you dont “ x step A, youre never going to get to Z,Ž Ard said. The county is probably spending money on repairs when the equipment just needs to be replaced, he said. The cheap stuff now may cost more later,Ž Ard said. The committee also discussed the issues with the roof on the property appraisers office building. Harvey said there was a small leak and then construction began, which caused the building to ” ood, and a new roof was installed. The roof was supposed to make the building more energy ef“ cient, but it wasnt installed properly. The roof was completely sealed in, not allowing for any ventilation, Harvey said. Since that time, his of“ ce has tried to “ x that problem by installing insulation in the attic and put in fans for ventilation. Ard said he would go examine the roof and determine what is needed to “ x the problem. He added that along with this, the committee also needs to compile a priority list of the buildings that are consuming the most energy so that he can perform an audit and determine what can be done to reduce consumption. Well eat the elephant one leg at a time,Ž Ard said. The committee agreed to create a priority list of the highest consuming county buildings on Talquin Electric and email it to Ard so he could get started. The next committee meeting is Dec. 15 at 10 a.m. in the county administration conference room.Energy Conservation Committee hears from county o cials Commissioner Lynn ArtzWell eat the elephant one leg at a time, says a committee advisor on trying to cut down on the countys energy use $15995FS45 TRIMMEREasy-to-use, well-balanced trimmer for homeowner use $17995MS 170CHAIN SAWDesigned for occasional wood-cutting tasks around thehome $15995BG55 HANDHELD BLOWERProven handheld blower at an affordable price Bar lengths may vary by region. GET GEARED UPwith protective apparel and accessories. STIHLusa.com THIS HOLIDAY GIVE SOMETHINGDEPENDABLEAvailable at participating dealers while supplies last. 2011 STIHL At 3Y You Get MOW For Your Money!

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Office (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Office (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Office (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New auto rates as low as 2.75% for qualified applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and floor rate of 2.75%No payments for the first 90 days! Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 HEALTH & FITNESSIn the yogic practice of breath control (or pranayama), the exhale has a special function. While the inhale is stimulating, the exhale is relaxing. While the inhale is about bringing energy into the body, the exhale is about releasing stress, toxins and pain. Because of this, you can use conscious breathing as a break in your day. By focusing on your exhale, you can let go of the past and come into the present with a renewed commitment. Heres how: Sit up in your chair with your feet on the ” oor and a long spine. Close your eyes and focus on your breath. Inhale through the nose, feeling your spine get longer and taller. Then exhale through your mouth with a deep sigh. As you exhale, visualize the moments of your day moving away from you. Try this for a few minutes anytime you need to let go of something. It can have a profound effect on your emotional and physical health. In good health, Dolly.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140.Whether you are working, exercising or even playing outside, we must protect ourselves from the elements. Just because it is not beach weather, it doesnt mean you have to stop your exercise routine. With simple tips you will be able to stay “ t and warm when the weather turns chilly. First and foremost, always check with your physician if you have any medical condition, such as asthma, heart problems, etc., as there are certain things that your doctor may want to discuss before you work out in the cold. LAYER … When you are getting ready to work out remember to always dress in layers, such as a thin layer of polypropylene synthetic material such as Under Armor shirts. This material keeps sweat away from your body, unlike cotton which will stay wet next to your skin. Add another layer of ” eece or wool for insulation and a waterproof, breathable outer layer to keep you dry. Layering your clothes helps keep you from overheating. A heavy jacket or vest could cause you to overheat, especially if youre exercising hard. COVER THOSE EARS, TOES & FINGERS … When its cold, the blood ” ow is concentrated on your bodys core, which means that your hands, feet and ears are vulnerable to frostbite. So dont forget to keep these areas covered in the cold. Try wearing a thin pair of gloves under a pair of heavier gloves or mittens lined with wool or ” eece and make sure that you put them on before your hands become cold and remove once your hands begin to sweat. If you wear thermal socks, try to make sure your shoes are a half-size or one size larger than usual to allow for thick thermal socks or an extra pair of regular socks. Last but not least, dont forget a hat or headband to protect your ears, which also are vulnerable to frostbite and/or loss of heat, as we all know 30 to 40 percent of body heat is lost through the head. RUNNERS DONT WEAR BLACK! … It is so important with the change in time and it getting darker earlier, try to avoid dark colors so that cars can see you on the side of the road. A MUST-MUST would be to wear re” ective clothing and/or shoes, bright enough for people to see that you are there. Also, choose shoes that have more tread to avoid slips and falls on ice patches. SUNSCREEN IS GOOD IN THE WINTER! … Florida sun can burn you in the winter as well as the summer, so it is important to always don the sunscreen! HEAD IN TO THE WIND … To keep you from getting a chill it is better to run towards the wind at the beginning of your route, so that you can return with the wind to your back, to keep the chill off, especially if you have sweat. HYDRATE … Remember to drink water before, during and after your workout, even if youre not really thirsty. It is just as easy to become dehydrated in cold weather as in the heat from sweating and breathing, but more dif“ cult for you to notice during cold weather. COLD & RAIN … Hypothermia increases in cold, rainy weather, especially in older adults. Signs include intense shivering, slurred speech, loss of coordination and fatigue.Pamela Chichester, CFT, is manager of Body-Tek 24 Hours Fitness. For information about the gym and classes, call (850) 926-2348 or visit Body-Teks Facebook page.Baby, it’s cold outside – prepare for it GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERFocus on the exhale to release stress YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Continued from Page 1B I often hear the comment that even if your reusable bags “ nd their way back to your car, they are forgotten when you enter the store. When I started using them, I often found this to be true. You know what cured me? I asked a checker to park my shopping cart in the check-out area so I could go to my car to get them. I never had a checker object and after a few times of returning to my car to get the reusable bags, the habit was “ rmly planted. I used to feel like such a good person when I would go to a store and take bags out of their recycling bin to take home to use for my garbage instead of buying garbage bags. Then someone explained to me that my doing so was defeating the purpose of recycling. That plastic bag was still making its way to the land“ ll. I now look for other alternatives that can be used for my household waste. If you do come home with plastic or paper bags, and “ nd over time, many have accumulated, make the effort to get them to a collection point. In addition, using a paper sack or the plastic bag multiple times before it enters the waste stream is another choice you can make. What happens to the recycled item? According to UF/IFAS Specialist, Dr. Michael Gutter, Aluminum is 100 percent recyclable. A pound of recycled aluminum will yield a pound of newŽ aluminum. Recycled plastic cannot be used for packaging food. Plastic food containers are made of new plastics because the Food and Drug Administration has not approved recycled plastic for use in food containers. Glass is easily recyclable and save up to 25 percent of the energy compared to making glass from new materials. However, glass is rarely made from 100 percent recycled glass, so that energy savings is usually less that 25 percent. Recycled cardboard and paper are used to make cereal boxes and other cartons. The aluminum beverage cans were most likely cans before. They are typically recycled back into beverage cans. In a six week time period a recycled can will be back on the shelf again. The process can continue for as long as 20 years. Want to know more on recycling? Visit www.edis. ufl.edu and request the bulletin No. FCS3158 or contact me and I will get you a copy. A year from now we will have data on how effective the recycling effort in Wakulla County has been. Until then, I would like to share some national data available through the United States Environmental Protection Agency that may assist you in seeing the big recycling picture. In 2008, the U.S. generated about 13 million tons of plastics. An aluminum can that is thrown away will still be a can 500 years from now! Learning new habits can be dif“ cult. But the effort is towards greater recycling and it is worth it. Gradually these new habits will be easier and easier. You and I have a role to play in reducing our countys solid waste. Every individuals participation is important and does make a difference. Recycling … its the right thing to do

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 5B Answers: 1) Fact, 2) Fiction, geese honk; ducks quack, 3) Fiction, you won’t find tigers at campgrounds, but you may find bears and they like to get into campers’ food, 4) Fiction, rattlesnakes are the only snakes with a rattle on their tails, 5) Fact, 6) Fiction, owls mostly sleep during the day, 7) Fact, 8) Fiction, hawks like to dine on squirrels, 9) Fiction, crickets chirp; hawks squawk, 10) Fact Fact or Fiction? WILDLIFE CHALLENGEIf you have ever been camping, you have probably seen, if not heard, some wildlife. How much do you know about wildlife? Take this quiz and find out. 1) Deer are quiet creatures that drivers fear running into. Fact or Fiction? 2) Geese quack. Fact or Fiction? 3) Tigers growl and often go after campers’ food. Fact or Fiction? 4) Copperheads rattle their tails to let campers know they are near or about to strike. Fact or Fiction? 5) Beavers build lodges to live in. Fact or Fiction? 6) Owls do most of their hooting during the day. Fact or Fiction? 7) Bullfrogs croak so loud they can often be heard miles away. Fact or Fiction? 8) Squirrels like to dine on hawks. Fact or Fiction? 9) Crickets squawk. Fact or Fiction? 10) Fish rarely make any noise, other than an occasional splash when they jump up out of the water. Fact or Fiction? List 10 words that rhyme with “tent.” 1. ______________ 2. ______________ 3. ______________ 4. ______________ 5. ______________ 6. ______________ 7. ______________ 8. ______________ 9. ______________ 10. _____________ What Rhymes with Tent Some answers: bent, cent, dent, lent, meant, rent, scent, sent, spent, went 1) __ ’ M O __ E __2) H __ T D __ G S3) S __ E __4) M __ R S __ M __ L L __ W __5) __ A M __ U R __ E __ S6) F __ S __7) C __ I __ I Name That ——Food——For some people, the best part about camping is the food. There are many camp food favorites. Do you know what they are? Fill in the blanks to name that food. Answers: 1) S’mores, 2) Hot dogs, 3) Stew, 4) Marshmallows, 5) Hamburgers, 6) Fish, 7) Chili COLORING PICTURE COLORING PICTURE Old FaithfulHave you ever been to Yellowstone National Park? If so, you may have seen Old Faithful. It is a coneshaped geyser that erupts about every 91 minutes, shooting 3,700 to 8,400 gallons of boiling water into the air. A group of explorers discovered Old Faithful in 1870. They were surprised to see it, and after watching it for a while, they named it Old Faithful because of its regular eruptions. Today, Old Faithful continues to delight park visitors. It is not the biggest or the most consistent geyser, but it is a sight to behold nonetheless. Jokes and Riddles Q: What should you do when you find a fork in the road on a hike? A: Stop and have lunch. A: Make sure one is a matchstick.Q: How can you start a fire with two pieces of wood? This page sponsored in part by:

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com CASH IN FOR THE HOLIDAYSBUYING: GOLD SILVERJEWELRYCOINS By David Morgan STAFF WRITERPerry, Tallahassee & Crawfordville -area residents are in for a rare treat when the International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers (IGSDB) host an event here, from December 12th 17th The company has identified this region as prime territory for purchasing your precious metals„especially gold and silver. The IGSDB estimates that local residents have millions of dollars worth of valuables that they no longer need or want. That is where the IGSDB comes in„they specialize in buying those items from local sellers in the U.S., Canada and Europe. Items like gold coins, scrap gold, sterling silver and tea sets also diamond rings are in high demand right now, and IGSDB is purchasing massive quantities of them on behalf of their global network of collectors, dealers and refineries. Currently on an international tour, IGSDB has included Perry, Tallahassee & Crawfordville on its list of stops for next week. Residents are urged to mark their calendar for this special opportunity to meet one-on-one with gold, silver and diamond specialists. Because of IGSDBs low overhead, extensive resources and massive volume, the company is often able to pay out more than other dealers and retailers. Many customers are surprised at how much they are offered for seemingly small amounts. I had two bent herringbone necklaces, a class ring, and some outdated earrings that I brought to a show. I walked out with $425 in less than 15 minutes,Ž said a satisfied guest. Providing an economic boost to each region it visits, the IGSDB projects to pay out $350,000 at each event„a testament to the high volume of items they purchase and the prime prices being paid. Offers are made based on rarity, numismatic value, condition and market value. Company spokesman Matthew Enright says, We just paid $4,700 for a loose 1.25„carat diamond. Our mission is to pay local residents on the spot for sterling silverware, fine jewelry, coins and precious metals„especially silver and gold.Ž The company has seen a huge influx of gold lately. Customers have been scrambling to cash into the record-high value of gold,Ž adds Enright. For those who are unsure if their items are genuine gold or silver, or simply costume, company will test it for free. The best strategy is to bring all items to the show for a free evaluation from our specialists. It always amazes me how a small handful of gold and silver can turn into hundreds of dollars in just a few moments. We test, weigh, and buy items right on the spot,Ž Enright says. At a recent show, a small„town dentist had a nice pay day. I have been collecting dental gold for years from patients who didnt want their extracted teeth. It really added up„my check is for over $31,000!Ž While most people dont have buckets of dental gold at their fingertips, they do have $750 worth of scrap gold scattered throughout their homes or mismatched earrings. In addition to scrap gold, fine jewelry and diamonds, coins are a big hit. Offers will be made on all coins dated 1965 and earlier„gold coins, silver, silver dollars, half dollars, quarters, nickels and dimes. Enright explains, U.S. coins made before 1970 are worth more than their legal tender amount because they contain 90% silver. Rare dates and mint marks can make them even more valuable. We recently paid $78,000 for an amazing coin collection. One couple brought in a rusty coffee can filled with silver coins, sawdust, and a dead spider. The can had been in the basement for years. We were happy to send them home with a check for more than $700!Ž Perry, Tallahassee & Crawfordville -area residents should start collecting their valuables now to bring to the free event, which runs next Monday Saturday Deals will be made and money will be paid on the spot. Attendance is expected to be high, but no appointment is needed. Enright encourages everyone to take advantage of this special opportunity to meet directly with specialists from the International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers. He concludes, Its a great chance for people to cash in their old diamonds, jewelry, coins and scrap gold. This is a sellers market, so dont miss out!Ž PAID ADVERTISEMENTInternational Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers paying on the spot for valuables next week in Perry, Tallahassee & Crawfordville! Other Items of Interest SILVER GOLD COINS COSTUME AND GOLD JEWELRY WRIST & POCKET WATCHES GOLD & SILVEREXPRESS PASSŽNO WAITING IN LINE ALL JEWELRY ACCEPTED Bring this pass and beat the lines Dont miss your chance of cashing in at these Record High Gold & Silver Prices Express Pass GOLDIS TRADING AT ALL TIME HIGHS NOW IS THE TIME TO CASH IN! Express Pass What We Buy: CHECK IT OUT!WHOINTERNATIONAL GOLD, SILVER & DIAMOND BUYERSWHATOPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO SELL THEIR GOLD, SILVER, DIAMONDS & TREASURESWHEREPERRY HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 601 EVERETT WAY DIRECTIONS: 850.584.3200TALLAHASSEE STAYBRIDGE SUITES TALLAHASSEE I-10 E 1600 SUMMIT LAKE DR. (HWY 90 EAST) DIRECTIONS: 850.219.7000CRAWFORDVILLE BEST WESTERN PLUS WAKULLA INN & SUITES 3292 COASTAL HWY 98 DIRECTIONS: 850.926.3737WHENDECEMBER 12TH 17TH MON…FRI 9AM…6PM SATURDAY 9AM…4PMINFORMATION 217.787.7767 CASH IN ON YOUR SCRAP GOLD & JEWELRY That old class ring could buy the Flat Screen TV youve been wanting. Odd gold earrings & broken jewelry could pay for a new PlayStation or Xbox!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars  Real Estate  Rentals  Employment  Services  Yard Sales  Announcements 877-676-1403 A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting € pressure washing € sheetrock € wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 24 HOUR EMERGENCYRESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALSERVICEALLMAKESANDMODELSMAINTANCECONTRACTSSTOCKALLSIZE FILTERSANDMEDIA 850-926-4676North Pointe Center • 1606-B Crawfordville Highwaylic# CAC1816154 WWW.TALLYSENERGYSTAR.COM Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Cornerstone CookingWant a SMOKED TURKEY or HAM for your holiday get-together? Maybe you don’t want to cook at all. Let Cornerstone Cooking take some of the hassle out of the holidays for you.We also o er FULL CATERING SERVICES! Morris Pigo at (850) 661-1117 BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Douglas MOBILEMARINE• Outboard Repair & Service • Electronics Installation • Fiberglass RepairFactory trained: Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki and Tohatsu850-228-0889 LICENSED & INSURED FOXTROT FARM Learn: horse care, equipment, safety with some riding time. for private lessons on our new school ponies. English lessons on your horse; will come to your place. Call -LAURIE WESTBROOK 850-926-2004 TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Do leaves have you bogged down this fall then call Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceCall today for a free quote! They have all the modern equipment to rid you of all those falling leaves.(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSUREDWill help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to “t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUY€SELL€TRADE€REPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @ comcast.net Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. Free Offers CATS, KITTENS & PUPPIES ( Mal-chi) NEED good HOMES (850) 210-2841 Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 FLORIDA CITRUS: FREE S&H 20LB. Gift Pack-Only $34.95. Navel Oranges or Ruby Reds. Order NOW for Christmas! www.box o fruit.com Lost LOST Boston Terrier, Male, black & white In Walkers Crossing (850) 926-1906 Lost Dog-Red Peek-a-poo on 11/22 between 10AM-3PM near Hwy 98, We miss our dog! Companion for senior, please call (850) 926-4075 Announcements SAVE $$$ on Advertising! Run your classified ad in over 100 Florida newspapers reaching over 4 MILLION readers for $475-that is less that $4 per newspaper. Call this newspaper or (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida -classifieds.com Professional CJIS GROUP Inc.,a Market Research firm, has a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting /training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUP benefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgr oup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills Apply Now,12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com DRIVER NEEDEDFull time with benefits available, CDL with Hazmat certification, Inquire at Wakulla Gas Company or call 850-927-7670 Driver-Dry & Refrigerated. Single source dispatch. No tractor older than 3 years. Daily Pay! Various hometime options! CDL-A, 3 months currentOTR experience 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers: Run GA, AL, MS, & TN & FL HOME WEEKENDS, earn Up to 39 cents a mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp. Call: SUNBELT TRANSPORT,LLC (800)572-5489 EXT 227 Trades/ Skills HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANICExperienced Heavy Equipment mechanic needed. Must have a clean driving record Contact Jason Greener with North Florida Reforestation 850-509-8861, 850-926-2730 Career Opportunities Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)359-1690 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. Call Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction ALLIED HEALTHCareer training -Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.Centura Online.com EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINEOnline from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Miscellaneous Financial $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!! $$$As seen on TV. Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++ within 48/hours? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com Garage/ Yard Sales CrawfordvilleFri Sat & Sun Furniture, toys, clothes, housewares, metal bunk bed, lots of everything! Must not miss! 159 Trice Lane CRAWFORDVILLEHarvest Thrift Store BIG SALE On Summer Clothes Dec. 1-10 Tee Shirts 4 for $1.00 Shorts .50 cents. Short sleeve Shirts .50 cents North Point Center CRAWFORDVILLESaturday 10th 8a-1p MULTI FAMILY SALE Furniture, clothes, baby items & more 66 Duncan Drive CRAWFORDVILLESaturday Dec. 10 8am-4pm Christmas, household, Books, lots of Nice things! 15 Belmont Ct. (The Farm) Be sure you dont miss it. Wanted to Buy CASH FOR CARS! All Cars/Trucks Wanted! Top Dollar Paid! We come to you! Any make/model.Call for Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3807 CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant Offer: 888-420-3807 Mobile Homes For Rent SOPCHOPPY3/1, Covered Porch, large wooded lot, $550 Mo. + Dep. (850) 566-4124 Mobile Homes For Rent 3BR/2BA SWMHon five acres. $500/mo.$500/sec. One mile South of Wakulla Station. Avilable now! 850-745-8526 CRAWFORDVILLE4BR/2BA DW MH in Great Neighborhood, close to great schools, 2 Acres, very nice and well kept. $850 mo. 144 Leslie Circle 850-443-3300 CRAWSFORDVILLE2Br 1Ba. SCR .PORCH, Large fenced front yard.Very clean, Near Hwy 98 $450/m + sec 850-562-5226 Apartments Move in special $99 Deposit $300 Swimming pool and gym Local Hero Discount $99 Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo 2BR as LOW as $700/mo 3BDR as LOW as $800/mo. Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675.per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-926-4217 Storage/ Warehouses Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease, 8x10 and 10x12 now available. Come by or call Wakulla Realty, 926-5084 Real Estate For Sale 3BR/2BA one-story home with garage on Greiners Addition. Excellent condition. $85,000. Owner financing. 850-251-7588, 850-962-2016. SopchoppyCabin on 5 acres,600 square foot, backs up to the forest, $59,000 Revell Realty 850-962-2212 Commercial Real Estate Affordable Office Space at the Barry Building. Great atmos phere! Includes all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen use, conference room. Rates start at $250/mo. 850-210-5849 or our website at www.BarryBuilding.com Best business opportunity!!!2400 sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! Rent negotiable 850-926-2480 Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300  Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-656-6340 Restaurant Space Available Soon!! Fully equipped. Can assume full liquor license and equipment if you act quickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space 1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Condos For Sale BANK FORECLOSURE! BRAND NEW FLORIDA WAT ERFRONT CONDOS! Only $199,900.( Similar units sold for $399,900) Upscale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1675 sf condo. Luxury amenities, prime location on the water! Call now for special holiday incentives (877)888-7571 x 86 Vacant Property LAND FOR SALE ROAD FRONT PROPERTY IN QUINCY; COUNTRY LIVING 6 MILES FROM SHOPS AND STORES ON POST PLANT ROAD; APPROX ACRE; INCLUDE: SEPTIC TANK W/EXTENDED DRAIN FILL LINE; TALQUIN WATER LINE; NATURAL GAS LINE; 2 SECURITY LIGHT POLES; METAL CHAIN LINK FENCING; $8,000. CALL OR TEXT ME (850) 694-1732. Lots For Sale 2-acre lot for sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Recreation Vehicles NEWMAR99, Dutchstar, Motorhome, 38tft, Deisel pusher, super slide, leather soafs, tiled kitchen and bath, 2 new flat scrn. TVs, and much more, $32,500 Call (850) 566-4124 Handyman Affordable pricing! Pressure washing, landscaping, roof cleaning,all fencing types, plumbing, wood rot repair,tree removal, painting ect. Residential & Comm. Brian 766-9304 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Heating/AC HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR Sales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in CrawfordvilleDoug & Sherry Quigg, OwnersLic. Nos ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926-5790 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Pressure Cleaning A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed-John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 Services ALL ABOUT...CONCRETEBLOCKS, BRICKS, PAVERSLANDSCAPEPLANTS, SOD, TRACTOR WORK Call JOSEPH FRANCIS 850-556-1178 OR 850-556-3761 Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5052-1208 PUBLIC NOTICE NWFTCA Meeting Notification -Notice is hereby given The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a meeting on December 13, 2011. The meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. CST at the Destin City Hall … Annex, 4100 Indian Bayou Trail, Destin, FL. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Amy Paulk at (850) 415-1040 or by email apaulk@gc-inc.com. December 8, 2011 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Fictitious Name Notices 5054-1208 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865-09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN t hat the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: MCHENRYS ENTERTAINMENT located at 77 Liberty Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in the county of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Fl. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida this 2nd day of December, 2011. /s/Vince McHenry Owner December 8, 2011 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 CLASSIFIEDS $10 Per Week! 877-676-1403

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1150 per month.Selling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 926-7102 Attention Comcast Customers -Important Information about your services: While we continue to make investments, we periodically need to adjust prices due to increases in programming and other business costs. Starting January 1, 2012, new prices will apply to certain video, Internet services and installation fees as indicated in this notice. Current New Field Collection Fee $20.00 $25.00 Convenience Fee $5.00 $5.99 Self Install Kit (Single-Product) $15.00 $10.00 Self Install Kit (Multi-Product) $30.00 $10.00 Self Install Kit Shipping and Handling (Single and Multi Product) $10.00 $9.95 Self Install Kit Shipping and Handling (Priority Shipping) $30.00 $29.95 Home Networking Installation* $149.99 $119.99 Performance Internet (Only) $59.95 $62.95 Blast! (Only) $69.95 $72.95 Directory assistance charges $1.50 $1.99 Extreme 105 Installation* $249.00 $219.00 *A Technician Visit Charge of $30.00 will be added to any installation activity that requires a home visit. XF TRIPLE PLAY PACKAGES** Starter XF Triple Play Bundle $129.99 $139.95 Preferred XF Triple Play Bundle $139.99 $149.95 HD Preferred XF Triple Play Bundle $149.99 $159.95 HD Preferred Plus XF Triple Play Bundle $169.99 $179.95 HD Premier XF Triple Play Bundle $199.99 $209.95 HD Complete XF Triple Play Bundle $N/A $239.95 ** Effective February 1, 2012 December 8 & 15, 2011 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5029-1208 Vs. Branch, Earnest 65-2010-CA-000068 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000068 DIVISION US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CSFB HEAT 2006-3, Plaintiff, vs. ERNEST BRANCH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000068 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CSFB HEAT 2006-3 is the Plaintiff and ERNEST BRANCK; DEBRA J. BRANCH; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: TRACT NUMBER 94 AND ALL OF TRACT NUMBER 93, EXCEPT THE SOUTH 50 FEET OF TRACT NO. 93 OF GOLDEN GATE FOREST, AS PER PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED ON PAGE 3 OF PLAT BOOK 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 46 PEARL AVENUE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F09121197 5030-1208 V Morhfeld, Fred R. 65-2009-CA-000050 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000050 DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. FRED R. MORHFELD, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000050 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and FRED R. MORHFELD; THU H. MOHRFELD A/K/A THU MOHRFELD; CITIBANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CITIBANK, FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK; BUCK FOREST PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3, BUCK FOREST, UNIT TWO, (UNRECORDED): Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F09013730 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5023-1208 Vs. Barry, Jr., Joseph C., 2010-CA-000399 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY Case #: 2010-CA-000399 Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, N.A. Plaintiff, -vs.Joseph C. Barry, Jr. a/k/a Joseph C. Barry a/k/a Joseph Barry; Betty G. Barry; David M. Sapp; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000399 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, N.A., Plaintiff and Joseph C. Barry, Jr. a/k/a Joseph Barry are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, at 11:00 AM on DECEMBER 22, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 11, MEADOW ACRES, AS MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 1998, MAKE; HICKORY FLEETWOOD, TRIPLEWIDE, VIN # GAFLV35A13413HH21 AND VIN # GAFLV35B13413HH21 AND VIN # GAFLV35C13413HH21, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS, AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE A FIXTURE AND A PART OF THE REAL ESTATE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 December 1 & 8, 2011 10-180830 FC01 5025-1208 Vs. Velazquez, Luz 65-2011-CA-000042 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000042 DIVISION HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOMURA ASSET ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, SERIES 2006-WF1, Plaintiff, vs. LUZ VELAZQUEZ A/K/A LUZ M. PEREZ, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000042 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOMURA ASSET ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, SERIES 2006-WF1, is the Plaintiff and LUZ VELAZQUEZ A/K/A LUZ M. PEREZ; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LUZ VELAZQUEZ A/K/A LUZ M. PEREZ N/K/A PEDRO VELAZQUEZ; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 40, BLOCK 7, WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 71 KLOWA CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F11003467 5027-1208 Vs. Serai,Kanwaljit Singh. 2009-250 CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2009-250CA HERITAGE COMMUNITY BANK d/b/a AMERIS BANK Plaintiff vs. KANWALJIT SINGH SERAI a/k/a K.S. SERAI, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment For Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North along the East boundary of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25a distance of 667.78 feet to a concrete monument (marker #4261) marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25, thence run North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 315.00 feet to a concrete monument(marked#4262) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 547.05 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 999.46 feet to a concrete monument(marked #4261), thence run South 88 degrees 33 minutes 08 seconds East 116.83 feet to a concrete monument marked #4261), thence run North 00 degrees 32 minutes 13 seconds East 28.57 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 88 degrees 37 minutes 25 seconds East 419.88 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 11 minutes 14 seconds East 1023.81 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 12.68 acres, more or less. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on December 22,2011, at 11:00a.m.(Eastern Standard Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 7, at the W akulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy., Crawfor dville, Florida 32327 If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 18, 2011 December 1 and 8, 2011 5031-1208 V Routa, Robert A.. 65-2011-CA-000152 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000152 DIVISION REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT A. ROUTA, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000152 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE, is the Plaintiff and ROBERT A. ROUTA; ZOYA SHYNKEVICH; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: PARCEL NO. 1: BEGIN AT THE POINT WHERE THE NORTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO JOHN HOARD BY W.R. TAFF, ET UX, BY DEED DATED JULY 20.1948 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 336 OF DEED BOOK 35 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, INTERSECTS THE EASTERLY BANK OF THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER AND THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE OLD W.C. ROUSE LAND, SAID POINT BEING MARKED BY A CONCRETE MONUMENT. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 08 DEGREES 40 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE HIGH WATER LINE OF SAID RIVER 53.5 FEET, THEN RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 45 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID HIGH WATER LINE 336.5 FEET, THEN RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 35 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID HIGH WATER LINE 120 FEET, THEN RUN SOUTH 47 DEGREES 05 MINUTES EAST 400 FEET TO THE NORTHERN RIGHT OF WAY LIMITS OF A PUBLIC ROAD, THEN RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 08 MINUTES WEST 190 FEET TO THE DIVISION LINE BETWEEN THE LAND OF JOHN HOARD AND THE OLD ROUSE PROPERTY, THEN RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID DIVISION LINE 83.3 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING AND BEING IN THE SOUTH HALF OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED AUGUST 12, 2003, JOB NUMBER 03-516AC.1.48: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 2919) WHERE THE NORTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO JOHN HOARD BY W.R. TAFF ET UX, BY DEED DATED JULY 20, 1948 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 336 OF DEED BOOK 35 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, INTERSECTS THE EASTERLY BANK OF THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER AND THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE OLD W.C. ROUSE LAND (POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 57, BLOCK A OF THE ADDENDUM TO SOPCHOPPY RIVER ESTATES AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 8, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTHEASTERLY AND NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIVERS EDGE THE FOLLOWING 9 COURSES: NORTH 07 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 38.27 FEET, NORTH 24 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST 48.24 FEET, NORTH 48 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 82.04 FEET, NORTH 34 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 87.79 FEET, NORTH 39 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 116.99 FEET, NORTH 20 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 23.34 FEET, NORTH 66 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 14.42 FEET, NORTH 78 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 48.95 FEET NORTH 86 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 72 93 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVERS EDGE, RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 399.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 2919) LYING ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF MOUNT BEASOR ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 189.95 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 41 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 82.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL BEING THAT SAME PARCEL AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 16, PAGE 390 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 2: LOTS 56 AND 57 OF ADDENDUM TO SOPCHOPPY RIVER ESTATES; AS PER PLAT OF SAID ADDENDUM RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 2, PAGE 8 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 3: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, RUN, THEN NORTH 89 DEGREES, 46 MINUTES EAST 1,127.62 FEET, THEN RUN SOUTH 734.97 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY BANK OF THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER. THEN RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES EAST 133.66 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF A COUNTY ROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE SOUTH 40 DEGREES 36 MINUTES EAST 287.49 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE. THEN RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES WEST 542.4 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE. THEN RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 806.16 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE. THEN RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 48 MINUTES EAST 192.4 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY ROAD. THEN RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES, 54 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD 217.03 FEET. THEN RUN NORTH 62 DEGREES 42 MINUTES EAST ALONG SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD 541.88 FEET. THEN RUN NORTH 11 DEGREES 42 MINUTES EAST ALONG SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD 202.96 FEET. THEN RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 40 MINUTES EAST ALONG SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD 13.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LAND IN THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEINGMORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED AUGUST 12, 2003, JOB NUMBER 03-5 16AC.7.25: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 1127.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 734.97 FEET, THENCERUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 133.66 FEET TO AN IRON AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices BOUNDARY OF MOUNT BEASOR ROAD MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, CONTINUE SOUTH 40 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 282.69 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 542.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED R 4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 805.76 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160), THENCE RUN, NORTH 18 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 192.20 FEEL TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF MOUNT BEASOR ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY AND NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY THE FOLLOWING 4 COURSES: SOUTH 85 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 219.04 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160), NORTH 62 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 23 SECONDSEAST 540.61 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, NORTH 11 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 157.79 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160), NORTH 24 DEGREES 27MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 53.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL BEING THAT SAME PARCEL AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 61, PAGES 862 AND 863 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 274 MOUNT BEASOR ROAD, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F11017105 Lynn Cole-Eddinger lynncole5228@msn.comDavid Hoover dhoover2@hotmail.com OPEN HOUSESUNDAY, DECEMBER 11 1 4PMCHRISTMAS SPECIAL!457 HUNTERS TRACE, CRAWFORDVILLEUltimate home in one of the county’s most desirable locations. Custom brick home on 20 acres in gated community. 3,222 sq. ft. 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths. Interior features include soaring 12’ ceilings, hardwood oors in formal living and formal dining room, spacious family room, gorgeous kitchen w/new stainless appliances and eat in area with lots of windows. Master bedroom has sitting area and super master bath. Large inside utility room w/washer, dryer, and plenty of cabinets. Three car garage. Property lies close to Wakulla River, coast, and short ride to Tallahassee. Short sale.Hosted by Lynn Cole`Eddinger,850-5458284 Dir: From downtown Crawfordville, take Shadeville Highway to Hunters Glen Plantation on right, go through gate, home on left. (look for signs) COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. (850) 926…8038 ~ (850) 926…2390 fax 520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 – Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 22 34 40 44 47 57 64 67 70 2 35 58 3 36 59 4 41 60 18 23 27 37 48 51 5 15 24 49 6 25 45 52 68 71 7 21 28 50 61 8 26 38 53 65 19 29 42 66 9 16 43 62 10 30 39 63 69 72 11 31 46 54 12 32 55 13 33 56 A CROSS1.Toucheddown 5.Makeoneself hoarse,perhaps 9.Chichesterchap 14.ComicalCarvey 15.Truantfromthe troops 16.AncientGreek colony 17.Blooperremovals? 20. Getgussiedup 21. Glitterati 22.LaBreagunk 23.Understood 26.Pendulum'spath 27.Israel'sOlmert 29.Deceive 34.Badstart? 37.They'respentby 25-Down 39.Wordsbeforepot orseed 40.Searchersfor opinions? 44.LondonMagazine essayist 45.Tryforanace, perhaps 46.Unidentied Richard 47.Spaghettiwestern directorLeone 50.Ragou torburgoo 51.Belightatthe pokertable 53.Dadaismpioneer Jean 54.Protrude 57.Troopers'quarries 62. O. Henrydevice 64.Summarizesome baseballplays? 67.Johnwhoplayed Gomez 68."It'sImpossible" singer 69.Adman'saward 70.Newmoon,e.g. 71."Terrible"time 72.SharpasatackDOWN1.Expandthefamily, inaway 2.DesignerAshley 3.ICBMpart 4.Britishgallery founderSirHenry 5.Chewthe rag 6.Merino mama 7.Abundle 8.Alpacakin 9.SatiristAmbrose 10.Rioter's take 11.Crossto bear 12.Toyonastring 13.Divisioninboth majorleagues 18."Measurefor Measure"villain 19.AutopioneerBenz 24.PartofB&O 25.Folksoneither sideof the Bosporus 28.Valleys 30.In thepast 31.Ill-humored 32.Gridirongreat Graham 33.Pinocchio's protuberance 34.Executes 35.Timeforeggnog 36.Theslammer 38.Rather,informally 41.Trail thepack 42.Eggsorder 43.Carnivaldoll 48.Itsdeciency causesgoiter 49. "TheVirginian" authorWister 52.Notonallfours 54.Tenmillionergs 55.Setfree 56.Youngest heavyweight champion 57.Itcomesinca kes 58.Propel,asapram 59.BluesyJames 60.Bush41and43,as collegians 61.Unlikelytosteal bases 63.Alcatraz,with "the" 65.Cyber-shorthand for"editorially speaking" 66.Turndowns American Prole Hometown Content 11/13/2011 Each p uzz l e is d i v i ded i nt o n i ne s ect io n s and each s ect io n ha s n i ne b l ank s quare s Fill i n a ll 81 s quare s o n the p uzz l e w i th number s 1 t o 9. Y o u may n o t re p eat any number s i n any o ne o f the n i ne s ect io n s that y o u’ve a l ready u s ed e ls ewhere i n that s ect io n. Also y ou can u s e each number 1 9 o n l y o nce i n each h o r i z o nta l li ne o f n i ne s quare s and i n each vert i ca l c ol umn o f n i ne s quare s The p uzz l e is c o m pl eted when y o u c o rrect l y ll every s quare.Sol ut io n s 200 9 HtCtt 1 2 3 4 451 6748 3 216 59 8275 8659 532 5498 200 9 HtCtt 915 6728 3 4 438519627 627438951 394 285176 751364298 862197345 273 846519 189753462 546921783 A D O P T D O E S S O A L A U R A Y U L E P U S I N T E R S T I R E T T T A T E L A G E L I A N G E L O I O D I N Y A K O H I O O W E N E W E T U R K S E R E C L O T S D A L E S S L O L L A M A S O R T A I M K A R L O V E R N O B I E R C E K E W P I E L O O T A G O R O C O N U S D O U R J O U L K I T E O T T O U N T I E A S T N O S E T Y S O Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5024-1208 Vs. Bradford, Charles C., 2010-CA-000388 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY Case #: 2010-CA-000388 5032-1208 V Routa, Robert A. 65-2011-CA-000163 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000162 DIVISION REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT A. ROUTA A/K/A ROBERT ANDREW, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000163 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE, is the Plaintiff and ROBERT A. ROUTA A/K/A ROBERT ANDREW ROUTA; ZOYA SHYNKEVICH; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 11 AND 12, BLOCK D OF SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 24 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TOGETHER WITH A 0.12 ACRES TRACT MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK B OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT NO.1 AND RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 1 A DISTANCE OF 122.50 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-367, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1150.0 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 3, BLOCK D OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT N0.1, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOTS 3 AND 12, BLOCK D AND THE PROJECTION THEREOF OF LOTS 3 AND 12, BLOCK D, A DISTANCE OF 380.87 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160) LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CANAL STREET SAID POINT ALSO MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 102.82 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 52.57 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE CENTER OF A CANAL, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTER OF SAID CANAL A DISTANCE OF 102.84 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 52.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNINGA/K/A 327 CANAL STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F09013730 5026-1208 Vs. Rowland, Rebecca A.., 2011-CA-000088 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY Case #: 2011-CA-000088 Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage Loan, N.A. Plaintiff, -vs.Rebecca A. Rowland a/k/a Rebecca Rowland; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000088 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage Loan, Plaintiff and Rebecca A. Rowland a/k/a Rebecca Rowland are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, at 11:00 AM on DECEMBER 22, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 34, BLOCK 4Ž, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOF 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. 5028-1208 Vs. Hahn, Eric. 65-2009-CA-000129 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000129 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. ERIC HAHN, et ux., et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment Scheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on November 16, 2011 in this case now pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 11:00 a.m. on the 22 day of Dec., 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4,OF SHELL POINT HARBOR, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 24, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A: ROYSTER DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ENTERED AT WAKULLA County, Florida, this 16th day of November, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Courts, As Clerk, Circuit Court WAKULLA, Florida By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk December 1 and 8, 2011. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5045-1208 12/15 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida StatuesŽ, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday, December 15, 2011 at 11:00 am at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Myhria Hall Before the sale date of December 15, 2011, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 December 1 & 8, 2011. Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Fannie Mae (Federal National Mortgage AssociationŽ). Plaintiff, -vs.Charles C. Bradford and Jennifer L. Bradford, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000388 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Fannie Mae (Federal National Mortgage AssociationŽ), Plaintiff and Charles C. Bradford and Jennifer L. Bradford are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, at 11:00 AM on DECEMBER 22, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 16, OF OLD ARRAN TRACE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 December 1 & 8, 2011 10-191796 FC01 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 December 1 & 8, 2011 10-212548 fc01 The Wakull a Newswww.thewaku ll anew s .c o m F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PrismTM TV Pure Broadband … 10 MBPS a month for 6 months* CenturyLinkTM PrismTM. TV TV.NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE. Call 866.484.7057Americas fastest growing broadband company now brings you a better choice in television. Its not cable. Its not satellite. Its Prism. Its interactive TV that you control from the moment you click the remote. Its so advanced, it even updates automatically. Simply put, its the best way to watch all your favorite shows, teams … you name it. So turn off cable and satellite, and turn on TV worth switching for.*Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offer and stated rates are available to new, “rst-time CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV residential customers in select areas only. The $65.95 monthly rate applies to up to 10 Mbps Pure Broadband and Prism’ TV package for six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. 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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles kept rolling Friday night in the playoffs, defeating the Ponte Vedra Sharks by a score of 20-6. The win, in front of a big crowd at home at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Dec. 2, sets up the War Eagles to face Pasco County on Friday night, Dec. 9, to determine who gets to play for the state title. Our defense played well, our offense played well, and our special teams was the key to the game, said Head Coach Scott Klees. They blocked an extra point by the Sharks, made two eld goals, forced a fumble on a kick-off, and punted well. Klees praised Special Teams Coach George Kilborn, saying: He did a phenomenal job. The War Eagles offense kept the ball on the ground for most of the night, only attempting three passes all of which fell incomplete on a cold night. We tried to hit our spots with the passing, Klees said. He added, though, that it was part of the game plan to run the ball more and control the games tempo. Continued on Page 9A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 49th Issue Thursday, December 8, 2011 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This WeekPublic Notices ............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ..Page 4A Church........................Page 6A Community..................Page 7A Sports ........................Page 9A School........................Page 10A Outdoors .................Page 11A Water Ways...............Page 12A Sheriffs Report ........Page 13A Green Scene ..............Page 1B Week in Wakulla ........Page 2B Classi eds ..................Page 7B Legal Notices .............Page 8B Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read DailyChristmas, Panacea-styleWAR EAGLES KEEP ROLLING!Wakulla knocks off Ponte Vedra, 20-6 KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDeonte Hutchinson high-steps his way as he carries the ball against the Ponte Vedra defense. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAll-time leading rusher Will Thomas, prepares to stiff-arm a Shark defender.Commission rejects alcohol in buildingsAnother year without a payraise for teachers WILLIAM SNOWDENCheerleaders, players and band members celebrate.UP NEXT: The state semi-final playoff against Pasco County at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Dec. 9, at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $8. SPECIAL: Cheer on the War Eagles Friday night with a special banner. See Page 8A.By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA proposed ordinance to allow the sale and consumption of alcohol in certain county buildings and parks for special events or private parties failed for a lack of a second at the Dec. 5 Wakulla County Commission meeting. Commissioner Randy Merritt made the initial motion to allow alcohol at certain county buildings, but did not want to include county parks. Merritt seemed to have the support of Commissioners Alan Brock, Jerry Moore and Lynn Artz, but after hearing from numerous citizens who opposed the idea, along with Commissioner Mike Stewart, he withdrew his motion. Brock then made another motion in favor of the ordinance, but he did not receive a second from another commissioner in support and the motion died. Brock initiated the ordinance and the board had directed County Attorney Heather Encinosa to revise the countys existing code regulating the use of alcohol within the county, and develop new provisions for alcohol permitting for special events held in the county. Brock said the intention was so that organizations could hold events and serve alcohol, such as a wine and cheese at an art exhibit at the Wakulla County Welcome Center in Panacea. There were also some who wanted to be able to serve beer at shing tournaments. The ordinance would have allowed alcoholic beverages to be served at events in the Wakulla County Community Center, Chamber of Commerce, old jail, Wakulla County Welcome Center, extension of ce and Panacea Womens Center. In order to serve alcohol at a private event in a county facility, the person would be required to hire a caterer who has a license, pay a damage deposit, obtain liability insurance and hold the county harmless against liability resulting from the serving of alcohol. There was also a section which would have allowed alcohol to be served at public events held in county parks. Brock said an example would be a music festival. People could hold the event in Wakulla County instead of having to go to Tallahassee. It would bene t us economically, he said. Encinosa said there were signi cant regulations in order to do this. The applicant must obtain a temporary permit from the State Division of Alcoholic Beverages for nonpro t and civic organizations, list all alcoholic beverages that may be served, describe where and how alcoholic beverages may be served, provide the times alcoholic beverages may be served, draft a plan outlining the means for ensuring the responsible consumption of alcoholic beverages, pay a damage deposit of $1,000 and obtain liquor liability insurance of $1 million. Merritt, Moore and Artz were not in favor of allowing alcohol at county parks, but supported the allowance at certain county buildings. Moore said he didnt want festivals where drinking was allowed and children could be exposed to it. Merritt agreed and said he didnt see the need. I dont see the upside, Merritt said. Stewart was completely against the ordinance. I dont want Wakulla County to be known as a place to come have a drunken brawl, Stewart said. Continued on Page 3AA proposal that would have allowed alcohol in some buildings for special events such as weddings at the old courthouse fails after numerous citizens speak against it Alan Brock, the new chairman of the county commission, is the youngest person to ever hold that post. He discusses his priorities. See Page 3A. I dont want Wakulla County to be known as a place to come have a drunken brawl, says one commissioner who opposed the measure. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County School Board approved a new teacher contract at a special meeting this week that again does not include a regular payraise. It is the fourth year that district employees teachers and all other employees have been without a regular step increase in pay. As a small consolation, the school board did approve a one-time bonus of $250 for all employees in their next pay check. But this year, all district employees faced being required to make a 3 percent contribution to their retirement, which meant a reduction in take-home pay. The school board approved the contract at a special meeting on Monday, Dec. 5, and praised teachers and their union representative for realizing the budget problems that the district faces. School board member Becky Cook noted that, while the board had been unable to give pay increases in the past several years, they had sought to at least soften that by holding employees harmless on increases in insurance. The district will make a slight increase in its contribution to employee health insurance about $50 more for single, and slightly less than $150 for employees with a family plan. That represents a slight decrease in the increase in health insurance that teachers faced this year, said Superintendent of Schools David Miller. It was a lengthy process and both sides worked hard, said Missy Atkinson, who represented teachers in the negotiations. We protected our teachers and did whats best for the district. Miller said he believes teachers and other employees understand the kind of budget constraints the district is facing and he had heard some express appreciation for the effort the district has made. Still, the outlook going forward for school budgets is bleak as School board member Greg Thomas noted: Next year may be even worse. The one-time $250 payment for all employees is the result of an increase in the number of students in the districts schools. Last year, employees also got a bonus $500 for instructional personnel and $250 for non-instructional. There was a $200 increase across the board last year, but thats less than any step increase in pay. This years budget had anticipated a loss of 100 students, but the board is actually up 68 students. Since the state contributes money to the local education budget based on the number of students, that meant a little bump in revenues. The board felt that the best use of those funds was for a one-time payment to employees, Miller said. A starting teacher in Wakulla with a bachelors degree is paid $33,700, or $35,900 with a Masters. The salary schedule tops out at $54,900. It will be the last year the district will offer a $1,000 unreimbursed medical payment that can be used for expenses such as co-pays, glasses or other costs. David MillerFacing a fourth year without a payraise, the school board approves giving a one-time bonus of $250 to all employees HOLIDAY GUIDE See Page 14ASee Page 2A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comIts Christmas, Panacea-style The seventh annual A Panacea Christmas was held in downtown Panacea on Dec. 3 by the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership. It began with a downtown marketplace, followed by the holiday boat on trailer parade and the lighting of the Christmas tree. Boats were adorned with Christmas lights and other decorations and oated down U.S. Highway 98, along with decorated golf carts, cars and motorcycles, waving to spectators and throwing out treats to children. The winner of the boat division in the parade went to Interim Sheriff Donnie Crum. The Wakulla County Moose Lodge came in second, Crums Mini Mall in third and Big Top Supermarket in fourth. The Merry Mermaids took rst place in the golf cart division followed by Jamie Crum in second and Travis Crum in third. The best walking unit went to Santas Elves. Second place went to the Wakulla County Moose Lodge. First place in the pontoon boat and oat division went to Miss Wakulla County. Following the parade, the crowd was entertained by Christmas music, including A Panacea Christmas and children were able to visit with Santa Claus. There was also the lighting of the Christmas tree. The winners of the Celebration of Lights Contest were Michele Baggett for the best decorated home, Centennial Bank for best decorated business and Panacea Volunteer Fire Department for best decorated non-pro t. One of Santas elves works on a lollipop.Merry Mermaids from the briny deep of Dickerson Bay some wearing Panacea Nikes.Sheriff Donnie Crums oat won rst place and featured Santa trolling for a big sh.A golf-cart sleigh pulled by a lighted reindeer. The Panacea community Christmas tree.Winners announcedPhotos by JENNIFER JENSENMore photos at thewakullanews.com WAKULLA COMMUNITY THEATRE PresentsWAKULLA COMMUNITY CHORUSInHandelsMESSIAHDirected By Reba Mason Featuring a Cast of 60 Singers and InstrumentalistsSUNDAY, DECEMBER 113:00 PMSopchoppy United Methodist Church10 Faith Ave.-Free AdmissionReception In Fellowship Hall Immediately Following Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL850.224.4960www.fsucu.org ASHLEY FEEDSTORE8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROADfor more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYSAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY& RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other servicesHorseshoeing demo by Farrier, Dude Suttergren

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Continued from Page 1A He added that if they allow one thing, the commission would be opening Pandoras box. And if anybody drove away drunk from an event held at a county facility and was killed, the board would be responsible, Stewart said. I would feel responsible, Stewart said. Several citizens spoke out against the ordinance at the meeting, many expressing their shame and frustration that the commission would condone drinking. There will be at some point a very negative outcome at one of these events, Resident Steve Fults said. For our government, I am ashamed. Rev. Bill Jenkins felt the same way and said, That is a door you will never be able to shut again. Many residents asked the commission to think about all the accidents and fatalities involving alcohol and drunk driving and expressed their concern that this ordinance could cause even more. This is going to cause people to act irresponsibly who otherwise would have acted responsibly, said resident Jonathan Clark. Those in support of the ordinance said it would allow residents to hold special events, such as weddings, at county buildings, and have a champagne toast. They dont want a drunken brawl, but they want the opportunity to have a reception, said resident Pam Shields. Shields added that many families cant afford to have a reception at the lodge or other places around the county and this would give them an affordable option. The county could also require the event holder to have law enforcement on the premises during the event for safety, she said. Chamber President John Shuff said they receive numerous calls from couples wanting to rent the courthouse for weddings, but when they are told they cannot serve alcohol, the couple chooses another venue. Shuff said this would allow the chamber to generate revenue to help them maintain the old courthouse. He added, You are trying to legislate for 1 or 2 percent of the population. Stewart said the commission is supposed to lead by example and if people want to party, they can hold their event elsewhere. Were setting a dangerous precedent, Stewart said. This is not for this county. After Merritt withdrew his motion, Brock attempted to persuade the other commissioners to at least hold a workshop on the item, but none were in favor of that idea. The commission will, however, look at section 10 of the countys current code which deals with special permits. There was a need to clarify and update the ordinance and get rid of some redundancy. The ordinance will be brought back at a future meeting without the alcohol components. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOn Nov. 21, Commissioner Alan Brock became the youngest chairman selected in modern times. Brock, 31, is serving his fourth year as a Wakulla County commissioner. He was voted unanimously by his fellow commissioners to take the place at the head of the dais. Im really excited to be chairman, Brock said. I hope I can bring a young perspective and help our county move forward. Brock said he hopes he can help the commission move faster on items it has agreed are priorities, such as the Crawfordville Town Plan and economic development. One way is through a workshop that involves several agencies, all who have the common goal of economic development. I want to make the most of our resources and reduce redundancy, Brock said. Brock is youngest board chairmanAlan Brock www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper.Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.com Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Democratic Party will co-host the 2011 Democratic Gala with the Wakulla Democratic Womens Club on Saturday, Dec. 10 at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. The event will begin at 5:30 p.m. with a VIP Reception in the Edward Ball Room overlooking the grounds of the Lodge and continue at 6 p.m. with a silent auction and Candidate Meet and Greet in the historic downstairs lobby. The main dinner event will begin at 7 pm. The Democrats will hear from Wisconsin State Senator Jessica King. Wakulla DEC Chair Rachel Pienta noted Sen. King was newly elected during the special postrecall elections in Wisconsin and is coming to share a rst-hand account of the states struggles. Wakulla Democratic Womens Club PresidentElect Verna Brock compared the political climate between the two states: Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, like our Florida Gov. Rick Scott, has taken an anti-worker, anti-education, and anti-government approach to xing the states economy. Wisconsin citizens were the rst in the country to step forward and start ghting back, inspiring our own Awake the State and Pink Slip Rick movements here, and helping to provide the impetus for the Occupy movement sweeping our nation. Additionally, the event will feature local elected Democrats, including Master of Ceremonies Wakulla County Commissioner Alan Brock, Tallahassee City Commissioner Andrew Gillum, Representative Scott Randolph and many Democratic leaders from around Florida. The priority for the funds raised at this event will support of ce space for the DEC during the 2012 election cycle and help the group to support local and regional Wakulla County candidates. To purchase tickets, for sponsorship opportunities, or to advertise in the program, visit the website, www.wakullademocrats. org or call 321-3582. Ticket prices are as follows: VIP tickets (including reserved seating during the dinner program and pre-event meet and greet reception with honored guests) $75; Gala tickets (including welcome candidate reception and dinner program) $50. Tickets are limited, call today.Wakulla Democrats to hold Dec. 10 gala County commission rejects alcohol in buildings Lynn Artz: Opposed to allowing alcohol in county parks.Commissioners on the alcohol issue:Alan Brock: Made a motion to allow alcohol, but died for lack of second. Randy Merritt: Withdrew his original motion after opposition was raised. Jerry Moore: Opposed to festivals where kids might see adults drink. Mike Stewart: Outright opposed. Holiday fun at WinterFEST!Jacksonvilles annual Winter on the Water celebration is back. New for this year, you wont want to miss WinterFEST at Adventure Landing with ice-skating, alpine slides and nightly snowfalls! For all of the details, a complete list of holiday events and for special vacation packages, visit winteronthewater.com! Find exclusive vacation package deals here. Scan with your QR reader Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction ALL WOODDOVE TAIL JOINTSSELF CLOSINGDRAWERS REMODELING? CABINETSBY Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) www.florida-classifieds.com ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA Y Y our advertising budget is TOO BIG Statewide adver singrefreshing rates (866)742 1373 ~ Haircuts ~ Tea Tree Shampoo ~ Scalp Massage ~ Tea Tree Conditioner ~ Steam Towel ~ Neck Massage ~ Neck Shave (optional) Gentlemen Endulge Yourself Tea Tree 3 Experience926-40803334 Crawfordville Hwy. ~ Styles ~ Cuts ~ Color ~ Low Lites ~ WaxingDeltaNOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on December 14, 2011, at 5:30pm DECEMBER 8, 2011 LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLDSPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak outComment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: War Eagles knock off Ponte Vedra to continue in playoffs Operation Santa is in full swing Sheriffs Report for Dec. 1 District lines redrawn, but current board within boundaries Southerland holds town hall meeting in St. Marks Wakulla UMC to hold annual Christmas Bazaar Give thanks for the gift of life thewakullanews.com Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Occupy Sopchoppy fails to take holdBy PABLO ANDREU SOPCHOPPY Inspired by the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York and similar demonstrations across the country, Occupy Sopchoppy made a pretty half-hearted attempt to take over Sopchoppys nancial district. The ragged group of listless protesters disbanded only a few hours after forming. The movement, comprised of residents Bill, Edna and Mike, oundered when occupiers remembered that Sopchoppy doesnt have a nancial district, inside sources Bill, Edna and Mike revealed. Changing tack, the demonstrators marched over to Sopchoppy City Hall on Municipal Avenue. Well, they came complaining about how poor they were and how it was our fault because we were rich, said Mayor Colleen Q. Skipper. I reminded them that were all poor and that pretty much was that. Afterwards, Occupy Sopchoppy members walked over to Backwoods Bistro and ordered a few burgers. Id say we accomplished about as much as Occupy Wall Street has, said Occupy Sopchoppy spokesperson Edna.Originally featured in the Daily Pygmy. Follow Pablo Andreu on Twitter: www. twitter.com/DailyPygmy. SATIREEditors Note: Several readers saw this piece after it appeared online at Huf ngton Post. The author agreed to allow it to be reprinted in The Wakulla News.Author is asked, Why Sopchoppy?After the Occupy Sopchoppy article appeared on Huffington Post, we contacted Pablo Andreu to ask about running it in The News. He emailed back: First of all, Im flattered. I think its great that its actually reaching people from the Sopchoppy area. Youre the second person from down there thats reached out to me. He expressed concern, though, about making up a quote for Sopchoppy Mayor Colleen Skipper and whether she might be offended by it and seeing it appear in the local paper. We called Skipper and she said she thought the article was hilarious. Plus, she said, its a good advertisement for Sopchoppy and Backwoods Bistro. Asked why he chose Sopchoppy how had he heard of it? did he just like the sound of it? has he ever visited? Andreu wrote back: As far as Sopchoppy goes, I just wanted to poke fun at the Occupy movement and how chapters seemed to be sprouting everywhere. I looked for a town name that sounded small-town and folksy. I did some Googling and came across Sopchoppy, which was perfect. I really dont know anything about Sopchoppy except from the little internet research Ive done. Editor, The News: This is a big THANK YOU to the following businesses who helped us make Jeanine Aber-Poseys bene t a success on Saturday, Nov. 12. We couldnt have done it without you! Sopchoppy Grocery, Revels Meat & Grocery, Macks Country Meats, Poseys Steam Room, Riverside Cafe, Moon Walkers Inc., Wakulla Appraisal, Wakulla Sign Co., Myra Jeans Restaurant, Wildwood Country Club, Coastal Restaurant, Savannahs Country Buffet, Wild re BBQ Grill, Lindys, Beef OBradys, Wakulla Mini-Warehouse, Wakulla County Parks and Recreation, Promise Land Ministry, Passion Parties by Shelli Payne, Porters Automotive, Jewels by Park Lane, Photo Book by Mrs. Purple Frog aka Janice Eakin, Libby McFalls Photograph, Coon Bottom Creek Band, Super Lube, Goin Under Dive Services, Wakulla County Chaper of National Wild Turkey Federation, wakulla.com, AMS Marine Supply, Centennial Bank and Leigh Key Face Painting from the Barry Building. We are blessed to be in a community that pulls together in a time of need. And we are grateful not only to the businesses, but the community who supported Jeanine and Jeff! Sincerely, Family and friends of Jeanine and Jeff Posey Editor, The News: On Friday, Nov. 18, Wakulla County committed a theft by taking. Thats when Chad Carraway, a junk collector, was on Dickson Bay Road to dig up and remove a tin horn (driveway ditch pipe). A few years ago, when the woods were full of water, Bunkin Taylor tried to get the county to open up the ditches to drain the standing water from the lots behind the old Taylor residence. As usual, the county refused to help and told him to do it himself. Taylor got the tin horn and put it in the ditch to drain the mosquito-infested water from the property. Now the weather is dry and the pipe was partially exposed. Carraway said that Morresse from the county called him and gave the pipe to him for junk. The sheriffs department was called, and a deputy responded, but no explanation was given to the caller by the deputy. I really dont have a problem with Carraway or any other junk man getting rid of eyesores on county roads. But to dig up the drain pipe is a little ridiculous because it is going to be wet weather again. We really do have an eyesore in Panacea, on Highway 98 between the Post Of ce and the Dollar Store. The abandoned, broken-down trailer has been there for more than ve years and nobody has done anything about getting it moved. Oh yes, the county has sent letters to many individuals and raised Cain with them about stuff in yards, they have even threatened them about their junk and its not even near Highway 98. Maybe Morreese could take it upon himself to call Carraway AGAIN and give him the broken down trailer for junk... WHY NOT? The broken down trailer IS an eyesore to everyone who drives on Highway 98, and each and every parade in Panacea is blurred by the trailer. Vivian Johnson Panacea anks for support of Aber-Posey bene t Drain pipe in Panacea is no eyesoreLast year I made a New Years resolution to give back and be more involved in my community. I am sorry to say that nearly a year later I have not ful lled my resolution. At least not to the extent that I envisioned. I have taken the initial steps of researching volunteer opportunities and lling out applications, but not following through. I did reaf rm my desire to become a Big Sister with Big Brothers Big Sisters. However, the wait list is two years or longer and I still have a year to go. The problem is that the organization has more boys than girls who need mentors and not enough male volunteers. If you are interested in getting involved in this great organization and helping to inspire, encourage and support a young person, contact the Wakulla County director at wakulla@bbbsbigbend. org or 366-3865. This past year, I have let planning a wedding, my job and other responsibilities consume my life. Now, with Christmas right around the corner, I have decided to take some of those steps. Christmas is a time of giving. A time to put aside sel sh feelings and try and help others who are less fortunate. We all should do as much as we can this holiday season. When most of us say we are struggling, we have no idea what real struggling is. Those who are truly struggling to make ends meet dont have the luxuries many of us have and consider necessities. Such as a cell phone, cable, internet, going out to eat, etc. Those of us who can afford these luxuries should help those who cannot. Charities make it so easy to get involved around Christmas. There is no more room for excuses. Its as easy as saying yes to the cashier at the grocery store checkout line when they ask if you would like to donate a certain dollar amount to a charity. Just say yes. What is $1, $5 or $10 added to your $100 grocery bill? Not a lot when it could help feed a family this Christmas. In Wakulla County there are numerous ways to get involved. One of those ways is through Operation Santa, which is an effort of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth in partnership with several other organizations and churches. This operation helps families in need with clothes, food, toys, household items and toiletries and tries to ful ll a wish of each member of the family. Currently, there are 105 families asking for help this year. Executive Director Gail Campbell says about half have been adopted by individuals, businesses, organizations and churches. There has been such an outpouring from the community, Campbell says. Campbell says it is amazing to see all these groups and churches come together for the same cause. This is truly a community-wide effort. Numerous groups and individuals have donated their time and expenses for the cause. On Tuesday, students in the AVID program at Wakulla Middle School were at the community center helping to sort through donations and shopped for items on several families lists. You can help by donating new or gently used clothing or toys until Dec. 12. Items can be dropped off at the Wakulla County Community Center, located at 318 Shadeville Road, Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Donations can also be taken to Amazing Mail Solutions next to Myra Jeans restaurant in Crawfordville. There is a great need for food and gas. So money, gifts or gas cards would be appreciated. After Monday, only monetary donations will be accepted. Campbell says they will use the money to purchase Christmas dinners for the families and try and purchase any of the wish list items that werent ful lled. My husband and I plan to go through our closets and storage room and give them anything we can. The staff here at The Wakulla News has also adopted a family. Everyone can do a little bit to help and if each person gives a little of their time or money or items they dont use anymore, the coalition can reach its goal and make this holiday season a little brighter for these families. Children who otherwise may not have had a present to open on Christmas will now have one. What a great feeling it would be to be a part of the joy that these children will feel on Christmas morning. You could help create the smile on these childrens faces or put the food on these families tables for Christmas dinner. There are plenty of opportunities to start giving, and not being from Wakulla County, people always tell me how this community comes together in times of need. Well, Wakulla County, there is a large need this holiday season. Like Lt. Bruce Ashley, president of the coalition, said at a recent county commission meeting, The outpouring is great and the need is great. Lets continue to give and do all we can to help these families. For more information, call 926-3526.Jennifer Jensen is a reporter for The Wakulla News. e season for giving Jennifer Jensenjjensen@thewakullanews.netEditor, The News: Would you have any room to announce the Santa mailbox located in front of the courthouse in Wakulla? The letters are read and children who leave a phone number on their letter will receive a phone call from Santa who we know is very busy but takes the time to try and call everyone. Santas HelperSantas Mailbox is open for lettersEditor, The News: I wanted to let you know that the David F. Harvey Retirement Party will present a check to the FSU Seminole Boosters National Chairman at Friday nights football game in the amount of $25,000. This money will go directly to a Wakulla County athlete through the Houston Taff Memorial Scholarship endowment. As you know, all the proceeds from the Retirement Party and the silent auction at the Retirement Party were designated for this purpose. Judy LangstonCheck for $25,000 to be presented at gameDomestic & Sexual Violence Call Refuge House: 926-9005 24 hour hotline: 681-2111 JENNIFER JENSENWakulla Middle School AVID kids help out with Operation Santa donations.

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By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsEveryone is invited to the Wakulla Historical Societys Third Annual Open House on Tuesday, Dec. 13, to see the exhibits, or purchase the latest holiday tree ornament. Those who can are asked to bring something for the giving box donation to Promise Land Ministries. Christmas is known as the time to celebrate the birth of the Christ child, but during the fall and winter of 15391540, Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto and his men, marked our area as being the home of the rst Christmas celebration in the United States. So much of our participation in the Christmas of today is the result of varied cultural celebrations. Many of them far from holy. Eventually, people began to make the holiday their own. And this includes Wakulla. The tales and incidents of the county are plentiful. One story, told by Clarence Morrison, took place on the morning of Dec. 26, 1947, the day after Christmas, when Crawfordville was awakened by screams, gunshots and automobile horns, alerting the community of an emergency. In this instance, the town post of ce was on fire and there was no chance of saving it. All efforts were put toward protecting the buildings that stood on either side of it. One was a grocery store operated by Archie Cooper. The other, a barber and beauty shop, owned by Albert and Mary Love Moore, who also lived in the rear of the building. Morrison wrote that it had been extremely cold that morning, but became one of the hottest times hed ever recalled. Retired Air Force Lt. Colonel, Burton T. Poole, whose home was on Ocklockonee Bay, was once a Red Cross eld director. One Christmas Day he got word that a soldiers entire family had been killed in a car accident. He was able to round up a Protestant chaplain, a Catholic priest and medical doctor. Poole relayed the terrible news to the soldier and arranged the young mans entire trip home, making sure a Red Cross member was there to greet him at every single stop. Beulah Primitive Baptist Church, founded in 1874, held a Christmas program every year. All received a small brown paper bag, filled with an apple, orange, pecans, candy, and, sometimes, grapes. The bag was twisted closed at the top with care by church deacon, Bennie Phillips, who drove to Thomasville every year to select the best fruits for the bags he prepared one by one. Beulah is said to be the Mother of all Primitive Baptist churches in Wakulla, even AfricanAmerican. African-American church celebrations often consisted of the children dressing up as certain characters (wise men, etc.) and reciting a Christmas speech, or participating in plays depicting the birth of Jesus. Afterwards, the menfolk arrived in the guise of Santa, bearing gifts. The Baptist Church in Panacea also held a Christmas play. Those too small to read or recite would hold up the letters to spell out a word, or the different meanings of Christmas. In St. Marks, young ones waited at the docks for boats, like the Osprey, or the Hermosa, to come in. Santa Claus was sure to arrive on one of them, his pockets bulging with candy. On Christmas Day, neighbors were expected to knock on the door, with small gifts and best wishes for the season. And, as in olden times, there was much frolic and revelry. Elizabeth F. Smith writes in a 1964 issue of the Magnolia Monthly about a Christmas dance held at the Crawfordville Womens Club. However, before the event, the oor was accidentally polished with y spray instead of wax. But in spite of this, she writes, people agreed that the dance smelled perfectly ne. John Mills threw Christmas dances at the Buckhorn Caf. A jar lled with dollar bills was the grand prize to the best dancer. People often took their routines outside and into the parking lot, where they would shimmy to the piccolos music from the tops of cars. One highly ambitious performer even broke her leg. Bar-hopping during the season itting from one drinking establishment to the other (often a neighbors home) was quite common. In drier times, instead of a beer run to Franklin County, one simply made a trip to Carraways, just up the street. The true spirit of Christmas may be found in how one chooses to enjoy natures gift of life with others. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 5AWakulla County Historical Societys Third Annual Open House will be held Tuesday, Dec. 13, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Museum (Old Jail). For more information, call (850) 926-1110. Or visit the Wakulla County Historical Society on Facebook.Historical Society set for its annual open houseLOCAL HOLIDAY TALESBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOn Dec. 2, just after dusk, about 25 people gathered under the pavilion at Hudson Park to honor and remember the loved ones they have lost. The Service of Remembrance was held by Big Bend Hospice and was led by Chaplain Ed Lyon. Lyon told the audience that one never gets over the loss of a loved one, but can nd ways to get through it and nd joy in their lives again. He recited this years theme, I have seen too many stars to let the darkness overwhelm me, which is a quote by Sister Macrina Wiederkehr. Lyon told them there is hope after losing someone. The night will soon go away, Lyon said. Team Manager Regina Compton said hospice has been putting on this service since 1994 and it kicks off the Christmas season. Its a good time to come together, Compton said. Those in attendance heard from Etta Jo Oliver who recently lost her mother. Her mother was a patient at Big Bend Hospice and she spoke of her appreciation for all who cared for her mother and helped her family in their dif cult time. She also shared some memories of her mother. Following these stories, members of the Big Bend Hospice Advisory Council and team lit the Christmas tree, as well as the candles of grief and hope. A candle was lit and the ame was passed around so others in attendance could light their candles. People were then given the chance to speak of the ones they lost. Its a ceremony of hope and remembering, said Pam Allbritton, community relations for Big Bend Hospice. It is a time to honor and remember loved ones. Trees of Remembrance have also been placed at all the banks in Crawfordville. People can buy an ornament and write a message to their loved one. The ornaments are $10, $25 and $50. Those who purchase an ornament will also receive an ornament to take with them and put on their own tree. Money raised stays in the county and goes towards services for patients, Allbritton said. Its a way to give back to Big Bend Hospice and honor their loved one, Allbritton said. JENNIFER JENSENParticipants at the Service of Remembrance held Friday, Dec. 2, at Hudson Park. Service of Remembrance held Im your agent for that.1001177.1 State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Company State Farm Indemnity Company Bloomington, ILHaving me as your agent means having a real person there to help you when you need it. So when accidents happen, you have someone who can get the job done right, and right away. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL FOR A QUOTE 24/7. Cause you never know what you might run into. Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 Capital Circle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Holiday Special 10% OFFpurchase and installation of a new Gate Operator Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY Saturday, Dec. 109A.M. until 4 P.M. Relaxed Shopping from Arts, Crafts and Food Vendors, and our Local Merchants. Sponsored by Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association, Inc. For information call our HOTLINE (850) 962-4138 Daytimeat 11 A.M Live Christmas & Celtic Music Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Marvin Roy Barton Mark Andrew Clanton Yvonne Council Mary Kathryn Gibson William Robert Newberry Jr. John E. Probert Florence K. SaulsCoastalChurch NewsWakulla Station Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Marvin R. BartonMarvin Roy Barton, 55, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 29, in Sopchoppy. He was a lifelong resident of this area. He was an auto mechanic. He was a member of Ochlockonee Christian Center. He was a loving and devoted father and grandfather. Visitation was held Dec. 1 at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Friday, Dec. 2, at West Sopchoppy Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to American Cancer Society, 241 John Knox Road, Suite 100, Tallahassee FL 32303 (800-342-2383). Survivors include his parents, Roy Lamar Barton and Hazel Fulford Barton; his former wife, Diane Hart Barton; two sons, Zachariah Roy Barton and Jonathan Lee Barton; brothers, Marvins Bud, his twin, Melvin Lamar Barton (wife Penny), Tommy Kenneth Barton (wife Ann) and Billy Keith Barton (wife Betty); his sister, Louellen Barton Harvey Deibler (husband Gary); grandchildren, Jamie Warren Barton, Hunter Roy Barton, Justin Lee Barton; and a devoted friend and prayer partner, Fanchon Roddenberry. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville, FL (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) was in charge of arrangements. Mark A. ClantonMark Andrew Clanton, 56, died Saturday, Dec. 3, in Tallahassee. Born Oct. 8, 1955, in Moultrie, Ga., he was a son of Joyce Thompson and Jack Melvin Clanton. He was a mechanic, served in the U.S. Army. Survivors include his wife, Jeanne Clanton; father and stepmother, Jack and Sheila Clanton; siblings, Lyle Clanton Sr., Karen Webb, Steven Clanton and James Clanton; a stepdaughter, Melissa Ferguson; two step-grandchildren; one step-great-grandchild; an aunt, Doris Giddens; and numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. The funeral was held Tuesday, Dec. 6, at Abbey Funeral Home in Tallahassee, with burial at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.Yvonne CouncilYvonne Council passed away peacefully on Nov. 26, in Spring Creek. She was born in Cordele, Ga. She and her late husband, Hal Council, worked side-by-side in several successful business ventures, moving to Spring Creek in 1995. They opened Affordable Properties and operated it until his death on Aug. 28, 2011. A memorial service for Hal and Yvonne Council will be held at the Council Cemetery in Crawfordville, on Saturday, Dec. 10, at 2 p.m. for family and friends. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include her daughters, Susan Council and Lori Council Farkas; and her two grandsons; Samuel Farkas and Coy White.Mary K. GibsonMary Kathryn Gibson, 88, of St. George Island, died Sunday, Dec. 4, at Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee. A native of Hamden, Conn., she traveled the world with her late husband, before making her home on St. George Island for the past several years. A memorial service on the island is being planned for a later date. Memorial donations may be made to Apalachicola Riverkeeper (850/653-8936), Post Of- ce Box 8, Apalachicola FL 32320. Survivors include her son, Drexel W. Gibson (Sarah) of Victor, Idaho; her daughter, Kathryn Gibson (James Hennessey) of Spring Creek; her granddaughter, Aura Castro of Tallahassee; and two step-granddaughters, Halle Hennessey of Portland, Ore., and Eron Hennessey of Seattle, Wash. Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee (850/385-2193 or www.bevisfh.com) assisted the Gibson family.William R. NewberryWilliam Robert Newberry Jr., 78, of Sopchoppy died Tuesday, Nov. 29 in Tallahassee. He was born in Barth, and had been in this area for 28 years coming from Madeira Beach. He graduated from Florida State University and was an avid Seminole Football fan. He was an of cer in the U.S. Army. He retired as a captain with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. Private family memorial services will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to the Florida Sheriffs Boys Youth Ranch, P.O. Box 2000, Boys Ranch FL 32064 or Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include three daughters, Patti Athanson of New Port Richey, Beverly Storozuk (Michael) of Minneapolis, Minn., and Kathleen Rodriguez (Robert) of Woodstock, Ga.; and seven grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Kathleen Newberry; and a grandchild, Sidney Summerlin. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements.John E. ProbertJohn E. Probert, 84, died on Friday, Dec. 2, in Tallahassee. He was born in Sioux City, Iowa, and had been in this area 21 years. He was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church. He served in both the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy. Memorial services were held Monday, Dec. 5, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Memorial contributions may be made to the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, 7077 Bonneval Road, Suite 610, Jacksonville FL 32216. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Dolores Probert of Panacea; two daughters, Anne Stuckey (Phillip) of Mequon, Wis., and Debra Schweitzer (Gary) of Johnsburg, Ill.; two sons, John Probert Jr. of Wheeling, Ill., and David Probert of DeFuniak Springs; and nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) was in charge of arrangements. Why do people think that they have to borrow or be in debt? Why is money one of the biggest causes of divorce? Are we a slave to money? First Baptist Church of Crawfordville is hosting Dave Ramseys Financial Peace University Class. Everyone can bene t from this 13-week class. Personal nance is 80 percent behavior and 20 percent head knowledge. This class will transform you. Throw off the chains of debt and nd peace through nancial freedom. Classes begin on Tuesday nights starting Jan. 10 at 6:30 p.m. Childcare will be provided. If you are interested in taking the class go to www. crawfordvillefbc.com/fpuclass.html or contact the church of ce for more information at 926-7896. A preview class is being offered on Tuesday, Dec. 13 or Jan. 3 at 6:30 p.m. in the church sanctuary. Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station will hold a Living Nativity on Friday, Dec. 9, and Saturday, Dec. 10, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The event will be a family drive-thru viewing of a live nativity scene. Enter between the Kast Net and Savannahs at 918 Woodville Highway. After driving through, everyone is invited for refreshments in the Fellowship Hall of Wakulla United Methodist Church at 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Please call 421-5741 for more information.Financial Peace University o ered at First Baptist Living Nativity will be held at Wakulla UMCHave you ever wondered what you would have felt had you been in Bethlehem the night Jesus was born? During the chaos of a massive census, the Prince of Peace came into the world as a gentle baby. Ivan Assembly of God invites you and your family to come and witness the Christmas Story through a special, outdoor experience, A Walk Through Bethlehem. The event will be held Dec. 16 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and on Dec. 17 and 18 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God is located at 202 Ivan Church Road in Crawfordville. The phone number is 926-4826.Ivan Assembly presents Walk rough BethlehemFlorence K. SaulsFlorence K. Sauls, 85, of Crawfordville, died Sunday, Dec. 4, in Tallahassee. She was of the Baptist faith. She loved shing, cooking and crocheting. Graveside services were held on Wednesday, Dec. 7, at 2 p.m. at Oakland Cemetery in Tallahassee. Survivors include two daughters, Kathy and Betty; ve sisters, Grace, Mildred, Mary Helen, Stella, and Donna; a brother, Bill; 12 grandchildren, 17 great grandchildren and 14 great-great grandchildren. Tree of Remembrance 2011 Big Bend Hospice2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.org Please visit the Wakulla County Trees located in Crawfordville: Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial BankDedicate a bell, bow, or angel in honor or memory of someone you love!

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Buddy and Linda Harvey are proud to announce their daughter, Rachel Harveys graduation from Flagler College. She will receive a Bachelor of Art Degree in accounting. She will work at Strategic Wealth Alliance in Crawfordville. She is the granddaughter of Allen and Monica Harvey of Crawfordville. She graduated from Wakulla High School in 2007. There will be a reception on Sunday, Dec. 11 from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womens Club in Crawfordville. Friends and family are invited to attend. Nadia Shirya Gupta, of Snellville, Ga., will celebrate her rst birthday on Dec. 16. She is the little sister to Aaryan Gupta who is 6 years old and is a very proud big brother. Her parents are Abhishek Gupta and Brianna GrassGupta of Snellville, Ga. Her maternal grandparents are Norman and Judy Grass of Crawfordville. Paternal grandparents are Satyaprakash and Shuba Gupta of Mumbai, India. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 7AhappeningsCommunityCarey and Miller will wed Dawn Marie Carey, of Crawfordville, and Nathan John Miller, of Reading, Pa., announce their engagement. Carey is the daughter of Jackie Carey of Crawfordville and Charles Carey of Buffalo, N.Y. Miller is the son of Linda Miller and Craig Miller of Reading, Pa. The bride-elect graduated from Florida State University with a bachelors degree in computer science and currently is the vice president of the Federal Division at FedTech Services Inc. The groom-elect graduated from West Chester University with a bachelors degree in kinesiology. He is the owner of a personal tness and training company and is also a fth grade teacher. The couple lives in Tampa. They will wed on March 10, 2012. Dawn M. Carey and Nathan J. Miller Nadia S. GuptaMcKenzie wins Lions Club peace poster contestSpecial to The NewsHannah McKenzie, a seventh grade student at Wakulla Middle School, was recently selected as the grand prize winner of the Lions Club Peace Poster Contest sponsored by the Sopchoppy Lions Club. There should be peace, laughter and happiness and serenity, McKenzie said. Her poster was selected by the Sopchoppy Lions Club members for best portrayal of the theme Children Know Peace and originality and artistic merit. Club President Franklin Roberts said he was impressed by the expression of creativity of the students. It is obvious that these young people have strong ideas about what peace means to them, Roberts said. McKenzie took home rst prize for her poster and $50. Karlee Strickland was awarded second place and $35. Laura Carlson came in third and received $25 and Keely Mathers came in fourth and received $15. The Wakulla Middle School students were recognized for their participation during school morning announcements on Nov. 8. McKenzies poster will move on to the district competition and then possibly the multiple district and then international rounds. Principal Mike Barwick, Keely Mathers, Laura Carlson, art teacher Carol Belancsik, Karlee Strickland and Hannah McKenzie.Happy rst birthday, Nadia Rachel Harvey graduates from Flagler Rachel Harvey Values to $100.00Aussie/Western Outback/Wools$26.00 incl. tax PANACEA HATSAFACT St. MarksRIVER CANTINA We Have The Best Hamburgers AroundPrize for Best Dressed Golf Kart Dress Up Your Golf Kart & Join The Parade Call for FREE registration925-9908 5th Annual Golf Kart Christmas ParadeFriday, Dec. 16 @ 6:30 p.m. St. Marks Toy DriveBring an unwrapped giftgifts will be distributed by St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department Join the Cantina for Thanksgiving Dinner on Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish If you cant Join us Anyway! Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.-----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 926-3281 George E. BlockburgerAugust 26, 1948 Nov. 10, 2011If you were a friend of George a/k/a Gorgeous George, a/k/a Jersey George, please join us to celebrate his life with his family and friends! Saturday, December 10, 2011 1PM-3PM at The River of Life Church445 Donaldson Williams Rd., Crawfordville, FLDRESSCOMFORTABLEANDCASUAL850-508-3131 Gift Ideas Reminiscent of WAKULLA SPRINGS

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comCONSTITUTIONAL OFFICERS OF WAKULLA COUNTY Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.850-926-8245 LETS ROLL WAR EAGLES 850-926-8777CONGRATULATIONS! WE ARE BEHIND YOU ALL THE WAY! 850-926-3300 www.3youtdoorequipment.com850-544-0238 www.3yranch.comGOOD LUCK WAR EAGLES!Skip, Trey, Brian, & Trip YoungGOOD LUCK BOYS!The Dazzles Staff850-926-6772Go, Wakulla War Eagles! CENTENNIALBANK GO EAGLES!Were Proud of You!my100bank.com 850-926-7111A Home Bank Shares CompanyMember FDICClerk of Courts BRENT THURMOND County Judge JILL WALKER Supervisor of Elections BUDDY WELLS Sheriff DONNIE CRUM Superintendent of Schools DAVID MILLER Property Appraiser DONNIE SPARKMAN Tax Collector CHERYLL OLAHWERE PROUD OF YOU

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach WHS senior cross country runners Cora Atkinson and Stanley Linton got one more chance last weekend to run in a high school cross country meet when they were invited to run in the Florida Athletic Coaches Association (FACA) Senior All-Star Meet. The meet, sponsored by the FACA and hosted by FSU, was held at the Apalachee Regional Cross Country park in Tallahassee, and was invitation only. It involved 32 of the top senior runners of each gender from all over Florida. The 32 seniors were divided into four teams; north, south, east and west, which then raced against each other. The invited runners were treated to a banquet on Friday night and were presented with commemorative singlets and meet medals. Linton ran for the south team and placed 12th overall in 16:35 and was second among his team members. Atkinson, running for the west girls, ran 21:01 and was the sixth runner on her allstar team. It was pretty special for Cora and Stanley to earn an invitation to this prestigious meet, said Coach Paul Hoover. LINTON WINS JINGLE BELL RUN What does a senior cross country runner do for an encore after participating in his nal high school cross country meet? If you are WHS senior Stanley Linton, who on Saturday morning ran in the prestigious FACA Senior All-Star Invitational, you turn around and run in the Tallahassee Winter Festival Jingle Bell Run and win it! Only eight hours after running in the FACA Meet, Linton lined up on Monroe Street in Tallahassee with an estimated 7,000 other people for the annual Jingle Bell 3K run. Less than 10 minutes later he crossed the finish line as the rst overall runner. Linton is the third WHS runner to win the Jingle Bell Run over the years runners Sydney Nutting and Tyler Price are also past winners. Continued from Page 1A I thought we had a good chance of winning if we didnt turn the ball over, he said. Ponte Vedra got a steady diet of running back Will Thomas, who gained 112 yards on 18 carries, and added to his total as Wakullas all-time leading rusher. There was also more of quarterback Caleb Stephens running the ball. Klees said the Sharks kept busting through and keying on Thomas, which gave Stephens an opportunity to scramble for a couple of big runs. Center Caleb Brown was named offensive player of the week, scoring out at 92 percent on his blocking. Nic Walker was named defensive player of the week and had 11 tackles in the game. On special teams, kicker Conner Smith was player of the week with two eld goals, two extra points and his punting duties. GAME RECAP Wakulla took the opening kickoff and marched down the eld on a long, sustained drive that took up almost half the first quarter and culminated in a Marshane Godbolt 2-yard scamper for a touchdown. The extra point was good, and Wakulla was up 7-0. On the ensuing kickoff, the Sharks fumbled deep in their own territory and Wakulla recovered. Unable to move the ball, the War Eagles kicked a eld goal to go up 10-0 with less than four minutes remaining in the rst period. The Sharks responded with their own drive, which ended with a 17-yard touchdown pass. The extra point was blocked by Wakulla to make the score 10-6. That would be the score at halftime, and the third quarter was a defensive battle. In the fourth quarter, Godbolt busted a long run down to the Ponte Vedra 20 yard line. The War Eagles got down inside the 10 but couldnt get into the end zone, and Smith kicked his second field goal of the night to make the score 13-6 with more than 8:30 remaining in the game. With time running out, the Sharks made a desperate play to score with a ea- icker pass thrown deep down eld that was intercepted by Wakulla defensive back Mikal Cromartie and returned to mid eld. Facing a second down and 20, Thomas broke a big run to move the ball to the Ponte Vedra 15 yard line. A couple of runs by speedy Deonte Hutchinson got the ball down to the 1, and quarterback Caleb Stephens took the ball in from there. Smiths extra point made it 20-6 with three minutes remaining. UP NEXT: PASCO Theyre a lot like us, Klees said of the War Eagles next opponent, Pasco County. Theyre fast. In addition to that speed, Klees said Pasco throws the ball more and likes to mix the pass and run. Theyve got four kids who are very, very good, Klees said. Like Wakulla, he said, the two teams will be trying to get their athletes out in space where they can make something happen. Were gonna have to play a great game, he said. The team with the fewest mistakes is going to win this game.CONNER SMITH Kicker 2 eld goals, 2 PATs Players of the WeekO enseDefenseSpecial TeamsCALEB BROWN Center 92 percent blocking NIC WALKER Lineman 11 tacklesWakulla knocks o Ponte Vedra, 20-6Game photos online at thewakullanews.com Follow us on Twitter for updates during the gameLinton, Atkinson earn invitations to all-star meetCROSS COUNTRY PHOTO BY ROBERT & KATHI DOUINLongtime Wakulla wrestling coach Buddy Tomaini was honored at Saturdays wrestling tournament with having the schools wrestling room named after him. Tomaini is credited with starting the program at the high school. Athletic Director Mike Smith, left, says a few words about Coach Tomaini, right, during the ceremony. 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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolSpecial to The NewsNovember Teachers of the Month were Riversprings Middle Schools Jeff Dutrow and Crawfordville Elementary Schools Heather Hat eld and Employee of Month was Transportation Departments Ronald Pumphrey. Superintendent David Miller and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the experience and expertise these employees bring to the district, as well as the positive attitude they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Dutrow has dedicated more than 14 years to teaching, either in a public school or at FSU. Dutrow said, To learn students must negotiate the meaning of concepts by participating in authentic and engaging opportunities relevant to their lives. He not only teaches science to students, he teaches science to teachers, he facilitates the school science fair and has been the program coordinator for the FSU Marine Lab for 12 years. Dutrow grew up in Washington, D.C., but graduated from Gulf Coast Community College and later from FSU with a masters degree in science education. While in Florida in applied for a teaching position in Wakulla County and was hired in 2006. RMS Principal Dod Walker said, Mr. Dutrow is an outstanding science teacher. His passion is his greatest asset along with his desire to be the best and to have his students be their best. He has served as the leader of the eighth grade, as well as mentor to many new teachers over the years. His energy and leadership with the LIFE Program has created an invaluable partnership with Wakulla Springs and several state environmental agencies. He is respected by his students, his peers and his principal. The other teacher of the month is fourth grade teacher Hatfield. Prior to teaching at Crawfordville Elementary School she taught third grade in Leon County. Hat eld became a part of the Wakulla School System in 1987 as a student. She grew up in Havana, and later moved to Wakulla County and attended school at Sopchoppy Elementary, Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School. She is a graduate of TCC and Flagler College. Hat eld said, What I nd most enjoyable about teaching is working with the children and seeing their expressions when they nally get a concept that has caused them to struggle. It is the sparkle in their eyes and the grin on their face that says, I get it, that is so rewarding. Each time I see the light bulb brighten, my day gets 10 times better. Crawfordville Principal Angie Walker said, Mrs. Hatfield is a soft spoken, kind hearted, enthusiastic and devoted teacher. When I walk into Mrs. Hatfields classroom, I see 22 students move from center to center with a purpose, listening for Mrs. Hat elds quiet words to direct them to the next activity and eagerly attack their assignments with the same enthusiasm that she exhibits while instructing. She inspires as others with her constant approach: Let the students know you love them. Let them know that you care. Let them know that school is important. Let them know that learning can be fun. Her communication skills are excellent. Mrs. Hat eld is also on our on-site technology rep. The November Employee of the Month is Pumphrey. He began his education in Tampa and moved to North Florida, graduating from Carrabelle High School. It did not take long for the district to learn the value of Pumphrey as a bus attendant. He has been with the district since 2007. Pumphrey said, Working in this school system is like being part of a big family and the students always come rst. Our school system is really concerned about each childs education and their safety. Transportation Coordinator Pat Jones adds, To know Mr. Pumphrey is to like Mr. Pumphrey. He is such a delightful person with an attitude of I will do whatever you need me to do when it comes to our students and their needs. He always wears a smile and has a kind word to say to all those he encounters. His work ethics are superb. Mr. Pumphrey does a wonderful job keeping his van clean and believes that his students deserve a nice clean van.Teachers and employee of the month for are recognized Jeff Dutrow Ronald Pumphrey Heather Hat eldSpecial to The NewsCrawfordville Elementary School recently hosted Bingo for Books Family Night in the cafeteria. This was the third year and the greatest participation by students and parents thus far. Participants snacked on popcorn, hotdogs and drinks between rounds of bingo. There were 114 parents, 144 students and 37 staff members in attendance, however, based on the noise level, few vacant seats and the consumption of 320 hotdogs, there is evidence to support that there was quite a few more participants than had signed in. Tickets were given to each student who then redeemed the ticket for a book of their choice upon winning. Students who did not win during the game also cashed in their ticket in exchange for a book. All students left with a book. Parents were also given the opportunity to browse through a collection of gently used adult paperback books. Parent surveys revealed that the best part of Family Night Bingo was spending time with their children, socializing with others, winning free books and the snacks. Bingo for Books is held twice each year in conjunction with the Scholastic Book Fair. The next Bingo for Books Family Night will be held second semester. We look forward to another huge crowd of hungry avid readers. Bingo for Books was a success Student and parents participate in Bingo for Books held recently at Crawfordville Elementary School. WHS talent show is ursday, Dec. 8The Wakulla High School Winter Talent Show will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 8 in the auditorium This years show will be lled with vocal talent, musicians, dancers, twirlers and the ever popular Santas Elves will also be part of the holiday fun. The cost for students is $4 and $6 for adults. Proceeds help drama students go to their District Competition in January at the Northwest Florida State University in Niceville, Florida. San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Wed. 10-5 Closed Sat. & Sun.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!We will be closed Dec. 21 Jan. 4 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 facebook.com/GamerZParadise(850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327Open 7:30a.m. 8:00p.m.During Holiday Break12/21/11 1/4/12 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: WINTER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!Special Rates applyWe will be closed: Christmas Eve & Day New Years Eve & Day For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, autographed books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, and ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking Stuffers Too! Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium222 Clark Dr. Panacea Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm Sat. 10am 4pm Sun. 12pm 4pm(850) 984-5297www.gulfspecimen.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsThe creeks are full of reds, and plenty of trout mixed in The weather was absolutely beautiful this past weekend and there were quite a few folks on the water and lots of sh were caught. I talked with Capt. Randy Peart and he said there were a lot of folks spending the holiday at St. George and he shed ve days over there. He said about the only thing behind St. George right now are reds but there are plenty of them. He suggests using the Rapala Twitch & Rap. There are still some ounder and sheepshead around and I have heard lots of white trout around the old bridge. He said he shed one day at Whiskey George Creek and they caught quite a few trout and some ounder but the trout were small. He said we need some cold weather to push the larger sh up there but this week may do just that. I talked with Bucky over at Shell Island and he said shing has been pretty good. Most people are shing around the oyster bars at the mouth of the river and in East River. He said trout and reds are also being caught up in the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers. He said he went out about a week ago and caught a 24inch trout in one of his favorite spots and then caught a 27-inch red in another spot. I had heard some very big reds were being caught up in the Wakulla River right now. Jimmy said he and a friend took his airboat out on one of the extremely low tides last week and probably released more than 50 legal reds. They used a white/pink jerk bait made by Gulp. Todd Hellams of Shell Point had his son Ryan down from Atlanta over the Thanksgiving holiday and Ryan wanted to catch a nice red. They went out for a couple of hours with live shrimp and came back with a 25-inch red that Ryan caught. Mark and Louise Prance from Shell Point had their boys down from Georgia and spent quite a few hours on the water. They caught lots of reds, ounder, white trout and black sea bass. Ivor Groves said they shed about three days during the Thanksgiving week and caught and released more than 150 reds and out of that only two were legal. He said all the oyster bars they shed around Shell Point had reds on them and they used live bait, Gulp and gold spoons. I wasnt able to get in touch with JR but was told he had a good day shing for reds on Saturday. The creeks are full of reds and there are also plenty of trout mixed in with them. He shes the low tides when there arent many places for the sh to be. With that airboat he can get in and out no matter how much water. Capt. Luke at AMS and Scott Harper went down to the Aucilla last Wednesday and caught their limit of large trout and also had two nice reds. They shed the Gulp and live shrimp under a Cajun Thunder in about eight feet of water. If you plan on going down there give JR a call and hell tell you where they are. I shed on the Saturday before last with Lloyd Bell, his son, brother and dad. On Tuesday the weather forecast was nice. Of course on Friday they were on their way down from Atlanta and now the forecast had changed to 15 to 20 knots out of the east. Fortunately, as has been the case so many times, the weather forecast was wrong. It blew very little during the morning and early afternoon and by 3:30 p.m. it was about as at as it could be. We ended up catching 15 nice speckled trout and some reds. Half of the trout were caught way back in the bay around the oyster bars but at the end of the day the water temperature was up to 64 degrees and I decided to try the ats. We caught seven nice trout in less than an hour and missed quite a few. We caught everything on live shrimp under a Cajun Thunder. On Sunday I shed with Dr. Julian Hurt from Atlanta and we caught a few trout, kept our two reds and threw back 49 reds. All were caught on live shrimp though Julian did catch one very nice red on his yrod. There are some big changes coming to the red sh and trout regulations and I hope to know more in the coming weeks. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL A day spent birdwatching along the Lighthouse dikesObjective: To spend the entire day along Lighthouse Drive, and its adjacent dikes, and do some serious wildlife viewing, plus write about my observations in this article. I planned on using my binoculars and spotting scope, and hoped to see possibly bobcat, otter, bear etc., but knew mostly what Id see is, of course, birds. So at 6:15 a.m., I was loaded up in my van, and soon arrived by the parking lot at Picnic Pond in the refuge at 7:15 just before the sun broke over the eastern horizon. As daylight pushed the nights darkness into the shadows, Id passed a few patches of frost on the shoulders of Highway 98, so I knew for the rst couple of hours, Id have to dress for the cold. But all in all expected a near perfect day, with a light breeze from the east, and no clouds predicted. Sure enough, by 2 p.m. I was down to a T-shirt. If it is a cloudy day then the lighting is poor when looking through optics. If it is windy, your body is buffeted around by the wind, and again viewing through optics, especially a scope is much harder! And if the breeze is from the south or offshore, in the winter months, there is a good chance of pulling up to our coast and nding yourself enveloped in sea fog a real bummer! I knew a frosty morning would provide me with the best overall day for smelling the roses so to speak. A day off, just enjoying nature. A day minus mosquitoes too. Ive been hooked on birds since childhood, and for about a half a century have really gotten to know them. Im proud of my identifying skills, and wished to work on them the whole day, so I kept the sun mostly to my back for best visibility, and walked the dikes to avoid the sounds of traf c on the road leading to the lighthouse. Also, Ive found the best way to really see the critters is by foot. Even biking has its limits, because when biking on the dikes, through grass, and often soft sand, it requires effort enough that when you stop to check out something with your binoculars, your heart rate is so high, you cant hold the optics steady! When I use my binoculars Ill press them against my face rmly, and recently found that by taking my left pinky and also clamping down on my caps bill, Im able to stabilize my binoculars even better, if there is a disturbing breeze. So at dawn I rst checked out Picnic Pond hoping to see some American Avocets, which have been there off and on for a few weeks. Sure enough, there were nine, a real treat! Then I checked out Tower Pond nothing. Next Headquarters Pond, which by then it was welllit by the rising sun. Glossy Ibis, coot and Green-winged Teal dominated the scene. When doing any activity along the coast, one should be aware of the tides, and when observing wildlife like birds, tides can really be important. From experience I know that at high tide birds are ushed/forced off the mud ats where they normally feed, and will, in the refuge, often y to Lighthouse Pool to roost. Since high tide was about 9 a.m., thats where I went next and recorded eight Marbled Godwits, and a gob of shorebird species. Out from the lighthouse in the Gulf were three Common Loons and two Horned Grebes, along with the usual stuff like American Oystercatchers, Brown Pelicans and a ton of Double-crested Cormorants, etc. I returned later in the day when the tide was going out and sure enough, the shorebirds had all left Lighthouse Pool to return to the mud ats, but I did see more than 200 White Pelicans with their nine-foot wing span soaring out over the bay areas, ying along in their spectacular black and white plumage what a show! By the end of the day Id seen only one doe Whitetail, and after walking more than seven miles of dikes ( to Mounds Pool and back as one example) Id still not seen or heard by dusk any crows, Carolina Wrens, rails, Herring Gulls, Accepitor hawks, owls, Tree swallows or Common Grackles to name a few. Yet I recorded right at 80 species. The waterfowl are de nitely in! Unfortunately, the water level is low in the refuge and so many of the ducks are way out from the banks, and hard to identify even with a good spotting scope. Still I saw these species: Mallard, N. Pintail, Blue-winged, and Greenwinged Teal, N. Shoveler, Gadwall, Amer. Wigeon, Canvasback, Redhead, Ringnecked Duck, Lesser Scaup, Bufflehead, Hooded Merganser and Red-breasted Merganser. The highlight of the day for me was hearing a Sandhill crane, and then spotting it working a thermal over Stony Bayou Pool No. 2. In checking my email this morning, I was informed that the Apalachee Audubon Society had recorded one over Lake Henrietta in Tallahassee the same day. Perhaps theyre on the move?Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH Preventative Maintenance.Complete check on your unit to keep it operating efciently. 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Last week I shared with you a loss in our Auxiliary family. Once again, we have lost another member. When Flotilla 15 disbanded out of St. George Island, John Probert transferred into Flotilla 12. On Friday, Dec. 2, John passed away in Tallahassee. While many of us did not get much time to get to know John, he was an active member for the Coast Guard Auxiliary for more than 20 years. I had the pleasure of knowing John through his role as the Flotilla Commander at St. George Island. His winning smile, kind words and diligent efforts to get me his reports on time always made the Division meeting a bit more fun. If my memory serves me right, John was not a fan of the computer, but he always had an extra copy of his report to hand me at every meeting. I wish I had a picture to share with all of you, but I have not been able to locate one in my les thus far. John came to the Auxiliary after serving his county in the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy. He also served in the Wisconsin Civil Air Patrol and worked with FEMA. John was an educator and we often shared stories about students and classroom adventures at our Division Meetings. He is survived by his wife of 62 years Dolores, four children, nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. We have all lost not only a good Auxiliarist, but a friend and mentor. Fair winds and following seas, John! With the loss of two members in the last month, during the Annual otilla holiday party, we held a moment of remembrance for both Harry and John. A great big thank you goes out to Bill and Wanda Wannall for opening their home to us so that we could all come together and join in one of our four cornerstones, fellowship. This is something that we often lose sight of during the more hectic times of active boating season. But as our annual party reminds us, without fellowship, it can be very hard to keep doing what we do. It is a time when family and friends come together and set business aside. This is what led many of us to come together for the Annual Change of Watch at St. Andrews Bay Yacht Club in Panama City. Sunday morning Tim Ashley joined the Treadon clan and we headed over. Every December the elected and appointed staff of cers from the Division come together for fellowship and to take the oath of of ce. This year we were honored to have with us CWO James Todd from DIRAUX and Larry King, District Captain East. Division Commander Mo Davis and Vice Commander Gordon Schmidt along with all the newly elected Flotilla Commanders took their oath, followed by all the incoming staff officers. Outgoing staff of cers received a certi cate of appreciation for their work in the division and incoming officer were presented a certificate of appointment. We are looking forward to making Division One the best it can be for the coming year. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! As the cooler weather comes, be sure to be prepared for the unexpected. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Elected of cers taking the oath.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Thank you, DEP. This journey began several years led by a band of local people with a vision that equal access to our underwater trails would bring greater opportunity to our Wakulla community. They rst organized as a club open to everyone. Their membership soon swelled to 100, many from outside Wakulla County. Some members channeled their energy into locating and working with land owners of dive sites who were willing to share their sinkholes with others. Access was made safer with erosion reduction steps, large safety gold line mapping the underwater passages, and gate keeper policies. Others organized site clean-up events when they discovered these dive sites were repeatedly inundated by folks dumping trash to avoid paying land ll fees. Two years ago a small group of club members began to analyze the local economic impact possible should Wakulla County become an equal access diving destination. Recently, the Wakulla Springs State Park downsized their staff and turned management of their Lodge over to a private concession because of a number of economic challenges. Discussions with their new Lodge manager revealed his interest to make the Park into an international destination to boost growth. Current restrictions on diving limit his options. This group found Jackson and Lafayette counties applied equal diving access policies resulting in millions of dollars infused into their economy. Dr. William Huth documented their success and published papers in peer-reviewed papers. As a result of this success, people who dive have made these counties diving destinations. When they lined the two counties up on a map, they realized Wakulla County was right in the middle and that if you include High Springs in Alachua County and Eagles Nest in Hernando County, a Cave Divers Trail with hundreds of dive site opportunities became obvious, all but Wakulla County, with equal access gate keeper policies. Armed with these revelations, presentations were made to the Wakulla Tourist Development Council, Economic Development Board, Optimists Club and this week the Rotary Club to alert Wakulla citizens of the economic losses currently going elsewhere because of dive restrictions at Wakulla Springs State Park. An assessment of the caves under the control of Wakulla Springs State Park was conducted this past summer by the state Department of Environmental Protection in an effort to understand why their caves were closed to equal access diving policies. Leaders from the diving community participated on this review committee and made numerous recommendations. All agreed that an equal access gatekeeper diving policy similar to that maintained at Peacock Springs State Park was applicable to Wakulla Springs State Park. Careful monitoring of the Gem of Cave Diving, the main vent under the diving tower, was also recommended. I began this column by thanking DEP for their willingness to host a public hearing to permit everyones input into this very important opportunity. I have been assured that a date in mid-January will be announced this week, the site as yet undetermined. I know you will have more information as soon as it is released right here in The Wakulla News. I hope to see you there! Appointed of cers taking the oath. Future Auxiliarist Marshall with Phyllis, Duane and Bill. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Dec 8, 11 Fri Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 3.2 ft. 12:13 AM 3.3 ft. 12:46 AM 3.4 ft. 1:20 AM 3.5 ft. 1:55 AM 3.5 ft. 2:33 AM 3.4 ft. 3:15 AM H i gh -0.4 ft. 6:55 AM -0.5 ft. 7:30 AM -0.6 ft. 8:03 AM -0.6 ft. 8:36 AM -0.7 ft. 9:07 AM -0.6 ft. 9:40 AM -0.5 ft. 10:15 AM Low 3.0 ft. 1:28 PM 3.1 ft. 2:02 PM 3.1 ft. 2:36 PM 3.2 ft. 3:11 PM 3.2 ft. 3:45 PM 3.2 ft. 4:20 PM 3.1 ft. 4:56 PM H i gh 1.5 ft. 6:28 PM 1.4 ft. 7:05 PM 1.3 ft. 7:41 PM 1.2 ft. 8:18 PM 1.2 ft. 8:57 PM 1.1 ft. 9:39 PM 1.0 ft. 10:26 PM Low Thu Dec 8, 11 Fri Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 3.3 ft. 12:10 AM 3.4 ft. 12:43 AM 3.5 ft. 1:17 AM 3.5 ft. 1:52 AM 3.6 ft. 2:30 AM 3.5 ft. 3:12 AM H i gh -0.4 ft. 6:52 AM -0.5 ft. 7:27 AM -0.6 ft. 8:00 AM -0.7 ft. 8:33 AM -0.7 ft. 9:04 AM -0.7 ft. 9:37 AM -0.6 ft. 10:12 AM Low 3.0 ft. 1:25 PM 3.1 ft. 1:59 PM 3.2 ft. 2:33 PM 3.2 ft. 3:08 PM 3.2 ft. 3:42 PM 3.2 ft. 4:17 PM 3.2 ft. 4:53 PM H i gh 1.6 ft. 6:25 PM 1.5 ft. 7:02 PM 1.4 ft. 7:38 PM 1.3 ft. 8:15 PM 1.3 ft. 8:54 PM 1.2 ft. 9:36 PM 1.1 ft. 10:23 PM Low Thu Dec 8, 11 Fri Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 2.9 ft. 12:14 AM 3.0 ft. 12:49 AM 3.1 ft. 1:22 AM 3.2 ft. 1:56 AM 3.2 ft. 2:31 AM 3.2 ft. 3:09 AM 3.2 ft. 3:51 AM H i gh -0.3 ft. 7:59 AM -0.4 ft. 8:34 AM -0.5 ft. 9:07 AM -0.6 ft. 9:40 AM -0.6 ft. 10:11 AM -0.6 ft. 10:44 AM -0.5 ft. 11:19 AM Low 2.8 ft. 2:04 PM 2.8 ft. 2:38 PM 2.9 ft. 3:12 PM 2.9 ft. 3:47 PM 2.9 ft. 4:21 PM 2.9 ft. 4:56 PM 2.9 ft. 5:32 PM H i gh 1.3 ft. 7:32 PM 1.3 ft. 8:09 PM 1.2 ft. 8:45 PM 1.1 ft. 9:22 PM 1.1 ft. 10:01 PM 1.0 ft. 10:43 PM 0.9 ft. 11:30 PM Low Thu Dec 8, 11 Fri Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 2.4 ft. 12:05 AM 2.5 ft. 12:38 AM 2.6 ft. 1:12 AM 2.6 ft. 1:47 AM 2.6 ft. 2:25 AM 2.6 ft. 3:07 AM H i gh -0.3 ft. 7:06 AM -0.4 ft. 7:41 AM -0.4 ft. 8:14 AM -0.5 ft. 8:47 AM -0.5 ft. 9:18 AM -0.5 ft. 9:51 AM -0.4 ft. 10:26 AM Low 2.2 ft. 1:20 PM 2.3 ft. 1:54 PM 2.3 ft. 2:28 PM 2.4 ft. 3:03 PM 2.4 ft. 3:37 PM 2.4 ft. 4:12 PM 2.4 ft. 4:48 PM H i gh 1.1 ft. 6:39 PM 1.0 ft. 7:16 PM 1.0 ft. 7:52 PM 0.9 ft. 8:29 PM 0.9 ft. 9:08 PM 0.8 ft. 9:50 PM 0.7 ft. 10:37 PM Low Thu Dec 8, 11 Fri Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 2.6 ft. 12:30 AM 2.7 ft. 1:04 AM 2.7 ft. 1:39 AM 2.7 ft. 2:17 AM 2.7 ft. 2:59 AM H i gh -0.3 ft. 6:34 AM -0.5 ft. 7:09 AM -0.6 ft. 7:42 AM -0.6 ft. 8:15 AM -0.7 ft. 8:46 AM -0.6 ft. 9:19 AM -0.5 ft. 9:54 AM Low 2.3 ft. 1:12 PM 2.4 ft. 1:46 PM 2.4 ft. 2:20 PM 2.5 ft. 2:55 PM 2.5 ft. 3:29 PM 2.5 ft. 4:04 PM 2.4 ft. 4:40 PM H i gh 1.4 ft. 6:07 PM 1.4 ft. 6:44 PM 1.3 ft. 7:20 PM 1.2 ft. 7:57 PM 1.1 ft. 8:36 PM 1.1 ft. 9:18 PM 1.0 ft. 10:05 PM Low 2.5 ft. 11:57 PM H i gh Thu Dec 8, 11 Fri Dec 9, 11 S a t Dec 10, 11 Sun Dec 11, 11 Mon Dec 12, 11 Tue Dec 13, 11 Wed Dec 14, 11 D a te 2.7 ft. 12:19 AM 2.7 ft. 1:03 AM 2.6 ft. 1:49 AM 2.5 ft. 2:39 AM H i gh -0.6 ft. 6:28 AM -0.7 ft. 7:06 AM -0.7 ft. 7:40 AM -0.7 ft. 8:13 AM -0.7 ft. 8:44 AM -0.6 ft. 9:15 AM -0.5 ft. 9:48 AM Low 2.2 ft. 3:03 PM 2.2 ft. 3:37 PM 2.2 ft. 4:08 PM 2.2 ft. 4:37 PM 2.2 ft. 5:04 PM 2.2 ft. 5:30 PM 2.1 ft. 5:55 PM H i gh 1.6 ft. 5:33 PM 1.6 ft. 6:15 PM 1.6 ft. 6:53 PM 1.6 ft. 7:30 PM 1.5 ft. 8:10 PM 1.4 ft. 8:55 PM 1.2 ft. 9:49 PM Low 2.6 ft. 10:58 PM 2.6 ft. 11:37 PM H i ghGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDec. 8 Dec. 14First Jan. 2 Full Dec. 10 Last Dec. 17 New Dec. 24Major Times 10:56 AM 12:56 PM 11:20 PM 1:20 AM Minor Times 5:34 AM 6:34 AM 4:14 PM 5:14 PM Major Times --:---:-11:45 AM 1:45 PM Minor Times 6:27 AM 7:27 AM 5:01 PM 6:01 PM Major Times 12:11 AM 2:11 AM 12:37 PM 2:37 PM Minor Times 7:20 AM 8:20 AM 5:52 PM 6:52 PM Major Times 1:02 AM 3:02 AM 1:28 PM 3:28 PM Minor Times 8:10 AM 9:10 AM 6:46 PM 7:46 PM Major Times 1:54 AM 3:54 AM 2:20 PM 4:20 PM Minor Times 8:57 AM 9:57 AM 7:44 PM 8:44 PM Major Times 2:46 AM 4:46 AM 3:11 PM 5:11 PM Minor Times 9:40 AM 10:40 AM 8:43 PM 9:43 PM Major Times 3:36 AM 5:36 AM 4:00 PM 6:00 PM Minor Times 10:20 AM 11:20 AM 9:44 PM 10:44 PM Better Best Best Better++ Better Good Average7:20 am 5:37 pm 4:15 pm 5:34 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:21 am 5:37 pm 5:01 pm 6:28 am 7:22 am 5:37 pm 5:52 pm 7:21 am 7:22 am 5:37 pm 6:47 pm 8:11 am 7:23 am 5:38 pm 7:45 pm 8:58 am 7:24 am 5:38 pm 8:44 pm 9:41 am 7:24 am 5:38 pm 9:45 pm 10:21 am86% 92% 98% 96% 89% 83% 76% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Nov. 24, Steven Fults of Panacea reported a criminal mischief on Tarpine Drive. A subdivision gate was damaged and four wheeler tracks were observed on the Wakulla County Airports grass runway. Damage to the gate is estimated at $250. On Nov. 24, Kimberly Pittman of Crawfordville reported an animal incident and cruelty to animals. The victim reported that a suspect, who has been identi- ed, shot her dog. The dog is valued at $500. On Nov. 23, Faith Barnett of Crawfordville reported a vehicle re on the 1900 block of Highway 267. Wakulla re ghters arrived on the scene and put out the re after Deputy Jeremy Johnston was unable to extinguish the blaze with his department issued re extinguisher. The re originated inside the vehicle and the state Fire Marshal was called in to investigate. On Nov. 24, a concerned citizen from Crawfordville reported observing a 6-year-old boy wandering the street in his underwear. Contact was made with the mother and Deputy Rachel Oliver observed the home in disarray with trash and insects. She contacted the Department of Children and Families for additional investigation. On Nov. 25, Curtis R. Mixon, 68, of Crawfordville was charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill. Deputy Clint Beam responded to a disturbance. Mixon allegedly pointed a rearm at and threatened to shoot a 42-year-old male victim. There were no injuries. On Nov. 26, Ronette Cruse of Sopchoppy reported a vehicle crash on Jack Crum Road in Crawfordville. The victim was passing Purify Bay Road when a deer ran out in front of her vehicle and she swerved off the road and crashed into the tree line. No injuries were reported. On Nov. 26, Howard Hall of Wal-Mart reported a shoplifting. Robert Keith Krueger, 44, of Crawfordville was charged with retail theft after attempting to remove $294 worth of merchandise from the store without paying. The items included shing equipment, camera equipment, oil, and antifreeze. On Nov. 27, Robert Keith Krueger, 44, of Crawfordville was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction as Deputies Vicki Mitchell and Billy Metcalf investigated a vehicle crash in Panacea. The vehicle crashed after an altercation between other individuals inside the truck. Krueger admitted his license was suspended for previous DUIs. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. On Nov. 26, Deputy Mike Zimba conducted a traf c stop of a suspicious vehicle on the Woodville Highway. One of the passengers in the vehicle, Austin Luke Beck, 18, of Crawfordville, was determined to have an active warrant out of Leon County. While searching the subject, Deputy Zimba allegedly discovered marijuana and pills in his pocket. Beck was transported to the Leon County Jail by the Florida Highway Patrol and was also charged with possession of marijuana less than 20 grams and possession of a controlled substance. On Nov. 27, Richard Hockett of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone attened two of his vehicle tires. Damage is estimated at $200. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On Nov. 27, a retail theft was reported at WalMart after a black male reportedly left the store at 4:30 a.m. without paying for a 32inch at screen television. The suspect jumped into a waiting vehicle and left the scene heading north on U.S. Highway 319. The television is valued at $278. On Nov. 28, Cary Watts of Wakulla County Public Works ESG reported a felony criminal mischief. A tractor used to mow roadside grass was vandalized in Sopchoppy. Two tires were damaged and must be replaced. The tires are valued at $2,200. On Nov. 28, Edwin Day of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim was shopping for an automobile on an internet listing site. An automobile was found and a price was agreed to by the victim and the seller. The victim sent $2,809 via Western Union and the seller advised that the vehicle would be shipped. When the victim did not receive his vehicle, he discovered the contact e-mail address and telephone number were invalid. On Nov. 29, Deputy Randy Phillips was on patrol when he smelled an excessive amount of diesel odor from a vehicle in front of him. The deputy discovered that the license plate was tagged to be seized. Robert M. Paiano, 44, of Crawfordville was stopped and given a citation for driving with a suspended driver license without knowledge. The license plate was seized and Paiano was given a January court date. On Nov. 29, Fredrick Hyatt of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and $220 worth of damage was done to the residence. Stolen property included rearms, jewelry and cellular telephones valued at $3,750. On Nov. 29, Diana Nichols of Crawfordville reported recovering a vehicle license plate on U.S. Highway 98 near Spring Creek Highway. The owner was a Tallahassee business. On Nov. 30, Shellen D. Scott of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash on Arran Road and Forest Highway 13. The victims rear tire blew out causing her to veer off the highway and scrape the side of a bridge guardrail. EMS responded to the scene, but the driver was taken to a Tallahassee hospital in a private vehicle. Damage to the vehicle was listed at $400. On Nov. 30, Deputy Ben Steinle investigated an abandoned vehicle on Mohave Road. As the deputy was investigating, the vehicles teenage owner returned with gasoline. Deputy Steinle allegedly detected the smell of burned marijuana inside the vehicle. The owner reportedly turned over drug paraphernalia to the deputy to be turned in to the evidence division for destruction. The teenager was not charged due to a lack of marijuana in the vehicle. The sheriffs office received 804 calls for service during the week. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will partner with the Wakulla County Special Olympics and Poseys Steam Room to host a Tip A Cop fundraiser for the Wakulla Special Olympians. The date has been changed from Dec. 9 to avoid a con ict with the Wakulla War Eagle football game. The event is now Friday, Dec. 16, at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea, 1506 Coastal Highway, (850) 984-5243. The Special Olympians rely on funding from outside the school district to compete at events in different locations in Florida. There will be two sessions where sheriffs of ce personnel will assist with table service in exchange for tips to be set aside for the Wakulla Special Olympics. The lunch session will be held from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. and the dinner session will be held from 5:30 p.m. until 9:30 p.m. Tip A Cop is also a Wakulla County Law Enforcement Torch Run Kickoff event. If you would like to participate in the Torch Run in 2012, please contact Lt. Brent Sanders at bsanders@wcso.org. For more information about Tip A Cop or Special Olympics, please call Patricia Bodiford or Sharon Scherbarth at Wakulla High School, 926-7125, extension 271.Date for Tip a Cop fundraiser is movedStaff ReportThe sign was completed last week for naming the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Complex. Sheriff Harvey served as Wakullas sheriff from 1976 to 2011 and become the dean of Florida Sheriffs. He left of ce as the longest serving sheriff in Florida. He stepped down on Sept. 30 to take a post as executive director of the Florida Sheriffs Self-Insurance Fund. Gov. Rick Scott appointed Donnie Crum to serve out the remainder of Harveys term as sheriff.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNew sign at sheri s o ce O ver 3000 rods & reels in st oc k *Receive 10% back on every purchase of $10 or m ore added t o a Crums Gift Card *exc lud es purcha ses of shi ng li cens e, lott er y ga s, diesel be er and toba cco products. WITHTHE CRUMS GIFT CARDYOUCANCONTINUE TOADDYOURDISCOUNTSTOITANDUSEITWHENEVERYOUWANT... ONWHATEVERYOUWANT!NOEXPIRATIONDATEONTHECARD.WEWILLGIVETHEDISCOUNTBEGINNING11-25-11TIL 12-25-11. Mens CALCUTTA Neoprene Stocking Foot/Chest Waders Dr a win gsf or P r izest o b e heldw eeklys t op in and r egi s t er .(N O PU RCHASE NECE S S A R Y) GIFT CARD GIF T CARD850-984-55 0113 2 1 Coas t al Hwy. P anacea, Florida 850-984-5501 1321 Coastal Hwy.Panacea, Florida full line of & $7995Sale Reg. 89.99

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce SALESTHROUGHWEBSITEand atUPCOMINGLOCAL FESTIVALS:Crawfordville Womans Club Dec. 9 & 10 Mission San Luis Winter Festival Dec. 17850926-6115 ( 850 ) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAY SAWEEKFROM 9 A.M. 6:30 P.M.8056 WAKULLA SPRINGSROADASHLEYFEEDSTORE Practical Christmas gift ideas in store. Gift Certi cates !We thank our loyal customers for their business, wish you all a Merry Christmas and look forward to continuing to serve you in 2012. New&NO CONTRACT CELLULAR SERVICEAS LOW AS$35MO.Starting at $12999ANDROID PHONES-352835-61505113 Capital Circle SW Unit 4 In between Crawfordville Hwy. and Woodville Hwy. G OLD B UYERS OF CRAWFORDVILLE2106CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. NEAR WAL-MART850-566-7348 850-566-7344*Not valid with any other offers or prior purchases. Expires: Dec. 31, 2011Receive an additionalGold and Silver Jewelry! with this coupon*for your Hair By Doreen850933-67463278 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Now at EVOLU T ION DaySpa 20%discounton all services provided by Doreen.Call for an appointment LIGHTHOUSELADYCLEANINGSERVICESINC.COMPREHENSIVE JANITORIAL SERVICESDeedee Pritchard OWNER 30 Year Experience 509-0623 Trained-Screened Employees LICENSED-INSURED WORKERS COMP BONDEDOFFrst time cleaning $20 P etStop Pet Stopr all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOPP e t Pet Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf. CommunityFINANCE, LLCWide Selection of Puppies Special Orders AvailableA A F Stocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates Its A POSH Christmas at Large Variety of Gift Ideas for you and your loved ones!Open 10AM-5PM... or call for a later appointment.December 16 and 17!926-333810 Vendors Featuring Antiques, Uniques, Collectibles, Jewelry, and Custom Made Items. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTING & SAFETYEQUIPMENT ORANGE BLAZE VESTS BUCKSHOT RIFLE SHELLS COVER SCENT 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 GEAR UP FORMon.Fri. 10-6 Sat. 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B 850 926-6241 TreatYOURSELF! www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service TheWakulla news GIVE THE GIFT THAT LASTS ALL YEAR IN PRINT AND ONLINE OR ONLINE ONLY877-401-6408

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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 I cant think of many issues that have been more controversial in our county this year than county-wide trash and recycling. I certainly dont have many answers but I wanted to take this opportunity to write some thoughts on what I am seeing, hearing and experiencing as I travel the county and when I attend meetings. I dont intend to try to defend all of the decisions that were made; I just want to focus on the household practice of trash disposal. I am an educator with a goal of trying to in uence people in a direction that seems realistic and good for the majority. I dont know how to argue against recycling! I am disappointed at the number of household recycling bins that are still sitting by the side of the road unused. Whether you are in favor of the countywide program or not, the recycling bin is yours to utilize. Are you familiar with the things that can be recycled? Are the recycling bins just too heavy when lled to get them back to the roadside for pick up? Are you familiar with the codes on the bottom of plastics which assist you with determining which can be recycled? Do you know why the symbols are there? Are you aware of why so many people are encouraging you to recycle? I believe that everyone can make a small change in working their trash that can have a great impact on our county. Wouldnt it be wonderful if in a year from now, household recycling would be in full operation in the majority of the homes in the county? Wouldnt it be nice if people would feel even more Wakulla County pride and appreciation for our many beautiful, natural settings because the view is not marred by trash along the roadside, hanging from trees and on the highways? Lets discuss some ideas to further encourage you to re-think your disposal of residential trash. THINGS THAT CAN BE RECYCLED Look in your trash container before it goes curbside. Every aluminum, tin and steel can and glass jar can be recycled. Many plastic containers are also able to be recycled. Look for the chasing arrow triangle with any number between 1 and 7 on the bottom of plastic containers because they have a place in your recycling bin. The chasing arrow triangle is there to make the plastics more easily sorted. This even includes the containers that look like Styrofoam. If they have the logo and the correct numbers, put the container in the recycling, not the trash. The bin that gets full rst at my house is the paper one. Flattened cardboard, newspapers, phone books, cereal boxes, magazines, catalogues, junk mail and even paperback books can be recycled. HOW TO PREPARE THE ITEMS FOR RECYCLING Why not spend a little extra time to make the system work. Flatten your cardboard, cereal and other boxes. This does not mean crushing them. Dismantle them by cutting through the glued area to make them perfectly at. When you empty your soup can or almost empty ketchup container, rinse them. Any contaminated items need to be sorted out somewhere along the stream and all of that takes time. Each of us doing our small part will make a huge difference. Recycling bins are too heavy when lled to get to the road: Do you feel committed to make the effort to adopt some new recycling habits in 2012 but the bin is just too heavy? Why not add a small wheeled cart to your Christmas wish list? I have one that was purchased years ago to pull my luggage before wheeled luggage made its way to the market. It works great. Plastic or paper bags versus reusable shopping bags: If you are a person who always accepts store shopping bags, I would challenge you in 2012 to consider using reusable shopping bags at least every other time you shop. That would cut the number of plastic bags used in half. Continued on Page 4BRecycling its the right thing to do By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Thorium for generating nuclear energy?EarthTalk, Page 3B Its cold outside dress for it... Get FitFocus on the exhale to release stress... Yoga For Life Health & Fitness, Page 4BBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netOne of the goals of the Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committee is to help the county establish maintenance policies and procedures. In determining ways to help save money and energy, the committee has found that buildings under the purview of the county commission do not have a routine maintenance schedule and it is also not understood who is responsible for the maintenance of equipment in these buildings. The committee invited several of the constitutional of cers or representatives from their of ces to its Nov. 18 meeting to gure it out. Brad Harvey from the property appraisers of- ce said if his of ce was responsible for maintenance of equipment they have never been told that. However, he said his of ce has paid for repairs to AC units before because the county did not have the funds to do so. He added that they also perform some routine maintenance on the building. Harvey said the department of facilities and maintenance was created but there wasnt any money put in their budget for them to do their job and perform preventative maintenance. He added that currently there isnt a line item in the property appraisers budget for equipment maintenance either. We can do that, but there will need to be a line item in the budget available, Harvey said. The committee was also trying to determine if each constitutional of cer pays for its electric bill from its budget. Harvey said his of ce only pays for the phone line. Supervisor of Elections Henry Buddy Wells said it is the same for his of ce. The clerk pays all the bills, Harvey said. He added that his of ce does not receive a power or water bill. Those bills are sent to the county administration. Commissioner Lynn Artz said the committee needs to emphasize the need for a countywide budget for maintenance and policies. Continued on Page 3BEnergy Committee hears from o cials Tallahassees Most Preferred HospitalFor the7thYear in a RowOnce each year, the National Research Corporation polls the toughest critics in the health care industry the public. And for the 7th year in a row, consumers in the Tallahassee Metropolitan Statistical Area have named Tallahassee Memorial as the most-preferred hospital in the region. Tallahassee Memorial HeathCares vision is to provide recognized world class health care. It is a vision we keep rmly in sight each and every day. And, the biggest winners of all are our patients. Our Vision: RECOGNIZEDWORLDCLASSHEALTHCARE TMH.org Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKF AST PA RTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. Law Oce Est. 1998F oreclosures Creditor /D ebtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse S quare Crawfordville, Fl orida

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, December 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, December 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, December 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Vendors wanting to participate, call Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, December 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, December 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Tuesday, December 13 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, December 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC VIOLENCE TASK FORCE will meet at noon at the TCC Wakulla Center in Cr awfordville. Lunch is provided. Call (850) 926-9005 for more information. Thursday, December 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, December 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsFriday, December 9 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR PREVIEW PARTY will be held at the Crawfordville Womens Club, 64 Ocklochonee Street, at 6 p.m. The bazaar will feature numerous local and regional crafters and craft vendors. There will be hors doeuvres and a wine-tasting event. The bazaar will be held on Saturday. For details, or to request a booth at the festival, call 294-6482. CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. at Azalea Park by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce, Wakulla County Parks and Recreation and Centennial Bank. The event will give children a chance to meet with Santa Claus. Santa will arrive at the park at 6 p.m. Four bicycles will be given away along with bike helmets and toys and door prizes. In addition, there will be Spin Art, train rides around the park, food and beverages for sale by vendor Stump Harts eld, other vendors and entertainment. Everyone is invited to attend. Saturday, December 10 HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR will be held at the Crawfordville Womens Club from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. It is free to the public and will feature local and regional craft vendors. Part of the proceeds from the holiday bazaar will go towards the clubs high school scholarship fund, and to help with other of the clubs civic projects. For details, or to request a booth at the festival, call 294-6482. ANNUAL CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Sopchoppy. Santa will be there at 11 a.m. Live musical performances featuring Christmas music, food, and arts and crafts galore. For more vendor information contact billlowrie@embarqmail. com. DEMOCRATIC GALA will be held at 5:30 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge with a VIP reception. A candidate meet and greet and silent auction will begin at 6 p.m. It is hosted by the Wakulla Democratic Party and the Wakulla Democratic Womens Club. The main dinner event will begin at 7 p.m. The keynote speaker is Wisconsin State Senator Jessica King, who will speak about the people of Wisconsins efforts to stand up for good government. Additionally, local elected Democrats Commissioner Andrew Gillum, Representative Scott Randolph and many more Democratic leaders from around Florida will be present. The priority for the funds raised at this event will support of ce space for the DEC during the 2012 election cycle and help to support local and regional Wakulla County candidates. To purchase tickets, see www.wakullademocrats.org/ or contact us at 850-321-3582. Ticket prices for VIP tickets are $75; Gala tickets (including candidate reception and dinner program) are $50. TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will be held from 10 to noon at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway. The club is open to children of all ages and all levels of autism. Children are asked to bring their favorite train, as well as a snack and drink. Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times. RSVP to Carrie Stevens at 274-9474 or carriejstevens@comcast.net. FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL HOLIDAY PARTY will be held for volunteers and supporters at 6 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea. There will be games, raf es and a White Elephant gift exchange for those who wish to participate (gifts under $10, please). For those whod like to have dinner while there, La Cantina Grille has graciously offered to provide ve choices of menu items at a cost of only $5 a person. To RSVP, contact Chris Beatty at choppaotta@aol.com. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUBS CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION will be held at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812, Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol.com. Bring buttons to the meeting for free appraisals. Monday, December 12 BLOODMOBILE will be at TMH Family Practice Ofce, 15 Council Moore Road, from 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, December 13 THIRD ANNUAL CHRISTMAS HERITAGE OPEN HOUSE will be held by the Wakulla County Historical Society at the museum from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The museum is located behind the Crawfordville Courthouse on High Drive in Crawfordville. Come celebrate and view the latest exhibits while enjoying complimentary holiday refreshments. Members of the Wakulla County Historical society will be dressed in 1800s period clothing. Saturday, December 17 A CELTIC CHRISTMAS will be held at Posh Java featuring Aisha Ives on violin, Katie Geringer on violin and Aaron O Rourke on guitar. Reservations requested. Call (850) 962-1010 for tickets or more information. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorBook Extravaganza Once Again a Success Our Book Extravaganza fundraiser was once again a great success last Saturday. With your help, we raised close to $600 for the Friends of the Library! Wed also like to thank the Iris Garden Club for coming out and giving us a generous donation as well. Remember that all funds raised by the Friends of the Library go directly to help us with our book budget, childrens programs and our new public computers, which will be operational shortly. The Friends have saved Wakulla taxpayers more than $50,000 the past 2 years as a result of their hard work and generosity, so please join this great group today. Call us at 926-7415 or stop by for more information. Operation Santa Drop Off The library this year is happy to work with the Wakulla Coalition for Youth in the Operation Santa campaign. Please help out the needy in our county this year by dropping off clean, gently worn clothes (with sizes clearly marked, folded in boxes), toys, electronics, games, bikes, books, puzzles, etc. in good repair, and household items such as kitchenware, tools and workshop items. The Coalition for Youth will make sure that these items will go to those in need. You can drop off the items at the front desk during business hours. Thank you in advance for your generosity. Call 926-3526 for more information. Friday Night Movie Our last Friday Night Movie of the year is one that many of our patrons have been waiting for since it came out in theatres six months ago. Based on the best selling phenomenon The Help by Kathryn Stockett, (we still cant keep our copies on the shelves, it checks out so often) this PG-13 rated drama tells the story of Skeeter Phelan, who in 1960s Jackson, Miss., begins work on a book which details the lives of the AfricanAmerican maids in the city and the households they work in. While names have been changed in the book, when it comes out, the novel creates a scandal in the town and causes many to rethink their feelings on race and fairness. Starring Emma Stone, Bryce Dallas Howard and Viola Davis, this lm was one of the best reviewed and highest grossing of the year so come out and enjoy this poignant, inspirational lm. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comLibrary News... Christmas in the Park at Azalea Park from 5 to 8 p.m. Annual Christmas in Sopchoppy from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Bloodmobile at TMH Family Practice Of ce from 3 to 5 p.m. Christmas Heritage Open House at the Historical Society Museum from 6 to 8 p.m. FridaySaturdayMondayTuesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingThursday, December 8 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. WAKULLA LEGISLATIVE DELEGATION will meet at 7 p.m. in the Wakulla County Commission Chambers. The meeting will be chaired by Sen. Bill Montford and includes other delegation members Rep. Marti Coley and Rep. Leonard Bembry. The delegation meeting is held to allow the citizens and public of cials an opportunity to voice their issues of local concerns prior to the start of the legislative session. Monday, December 12 SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will meet at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, December 13 WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC RECORDS COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. The purpose of the meeting is to propose ways to improve the ef ciency of Wakulla Countys public records policies and procedures.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 3BFrom the Editors of E/The Environmental MagazineDear EarthTalk: Thorium is a naturally occurring element that is supposedly more available, more ef cient and safer to use than uranium for generating nuclear energy. Is this true and, if so, why havent we made the switch? Jane Westermann Austin, Texas Thorium, a naturally occurring radioactive element found in abundance in the Earths crust all around the world, might well be a better fuel source than uranium for nuclear power generation for a variety of reasons. First and foremost, just one ton of the silvery metal can produce as much energy as 200 tons of uranium or 3.5 millions tons of coal, according to Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia of the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Another advantage is that it comes out of the ground as a 100 percent pure, usable isotope. Unlike uranium, which contains only 0.7 percent ssionable material, thorium doesnt require enrichment to be used in nuclear reactors. Also, the spent-fuel waste from thorium ssion cannot be re-formulated for nuclear weapons like plutonium, the waste product of uranium-based ssion. Also, proponents say that thorium doesnt require the high temperatures and mitigation equipment of uranium-based reactors. The plants would be much smaller and less expensive, Kirk Sorensen, a former NASA rocket engineer and now chief nuclear technologist at Teledyne Brown Engineering, told the UKs Telegraph last year. You wouldnt need those huge containment domes because theres no pressurized water in the reactor. With no high temperatures, thorium reactors cant melt down and release radiation. Once you start looking more closely, it blows your mind away, adds Sorensen. You can run civilization on thorium for hundreds of thousands of years, and its essentially free. The advocacy-oriented Thorium Energy Alliance reports that there is enough thorium in the U.S. alone to power the country at its current energy level for over 1,000 years. Nuclear researchers in the U.S. rst contemplated using thorium as a nuclear energy feedstock back in the 1940s, but its lack of feasibility in making nuclear weapons put it on the back burner, where it has sat for the last six decades despite various attempts to revive the technology for practical use. In Russia, China and India, thorium reactors represent the next generation of nuclear power. India possesses about a quarter of the worlds thorium reserves. The country is working to develop a network of large thorium-based reactors, and plans to meet 30 percent of its electricity needs with thorium by 2050. Many nuclear advocates and environmentalists alike dont see thorium as the savior its supporters make it out to be. For one, uranium is still relatively easy to come by and inexpensive, and the nuclear industry is set up to run on it. Changing over to thorium would be expensive, and who knows what unforeseen problems may arise with full-scale deployment. Perhaps most important, some analysts worry that putting more eggs into humanitys nuclear basket will surely further delay the transition to a truly green economy that runs on clean renewable energy from the sun, wind and other socalled alternative sources. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Why havent we switched to thorium for generating nuclear energy? iStock Collection/Thinkstock Advocates of thorium to power nuclear plants say that the element is safer than uranium, and that its waste cannot like the plutonium waste of uranium ssion be re-formulated for nuclear weapons. Thorium plants, they say, also wouldnt need containment domes like those pictured here because the reactors cant melt down and release radiation.The Thorium Energy Alliance reports that there is enough thorium in the U.S. alone to power the country at its current energy level for over 1,000 years.Continued from Page 1B Harvey said once those policies are in place, the committee can really start making an impact. Dan Ard with Talquin Electric Cooperative said he couldnt believe the county didnt have maintenance policies, procedures and accountability. He added that buildings of Talquin are checked monthly. If you dont x step A, youre never going to get to Z, Ard said. The county is probably spending money on repairs when the equipment just needs to be replaced, he said. The cheap stuff now may cost more later, Ard said. The committee also discussed the issues with the roof on the property appraisers office building. Harvey said there was a small leak and then construction began, which caused the building to ood, and a new roof was installed. The roof was supposed to make the building more energy ef cient, but it wasnt installed properly. The roof was completely sealed in, not allowing for any ventilation, Harvey said. Since that time, his of ce has tried to x that problem by installing insulation in the attic and put in fans for ventilation. Ard said he would go examine the roof and determine what is needed to x the problem. He added that along with this, the committee also needs to compile a priority list of the buildings that are consuming the most energy so that he can perform an audit and determine what can be done to reduce consumption. Well eat the elephant one leg at a time, Ard said. The committee agreed to create a priority list of the highest consuming county buildings on Talquin Electric and email it to Ard so he could get started. The next committee meeting is Dec. 15 at 10 a.m. in the county administration conference room.Energy Conservation Committee hears from county o cials Commissioner Lynn ArtzWell eat the elephant one leg at a time, says a committee advisor on trying to cut down on the countys energy use $15995FS45 TRIMMEREasy-to-use, well-balanced trimmer for homeowner use $17995MS 170CHAIN SAWDesigned for occasional wood-cutting tasks around thehome $15995BG55 HANDHELD BLOWERProven handheld blower at an affordable price Bar lengths may vary by region.GET GEARED UPwith protective apparel and accessories. STIHLusa.com THIS HOLIDAY GIVE SOMETHINGDEPENDABLEAvailable at participating dealers while supplies last. 2011 STIHL At 3Y You Get MOW For Your Money!

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Office (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Office (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Office (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New auto rates as low as 2.75% for qualified applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and floor rate of 2.75%No payments for the first 90 days! Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 HEALTH & FITNESSIn the yogic practice of breath control (or pranayama), the exhale has a special function. While the inhale is stimulating, the exhale is relaxing. While the inhale is about bringing energy into the body, the exhale is about releasing stress, toxins and pain. Because of this, you can use conscious breathing as a break in your day. By focusing on your exhale, you can let go of the past and come into the present with a renewed commitment. Heres how: Sit up in your chair with your feet on the oor and a long spine. Close your eyes and focus on your breath. Inhale through the nose, feeling your spine get longer and taller. Then exhale through your mouth with a deep sigh. As you exhale, visualize the moments of your day moving away from you. Try this for a few minutes anytime you need to let go of something. It can have a profound effect on your emotional and physical health. In good health, Dolly.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140.Whether you are working, exercising or even playing outside, we must protect ourselves from the elements. Just because it is not beach weather, it doesnt mean you have to stop your exercise routine. With simple tips you will be able to stay t and warm when the weather turns chilly. First and foremost, always check with your physician if you have any medical condition, such as asthma, heart problems, etc., as there are certain things that your doctor may want to discuss before you work out in the cold. LAYER When you are getting ready to work out remember to always dress in layers, such as a thin layer of polypropylene synthetic material such as Under Armor shirts. This material keeps sweat away from your body, unlike cotton which will stay wet next to your skin. Add another layer of eece or wool for insulation and a waterproof, breathable outer layer to keep you dry. Layering your clothes helps keep you from overheating. A heavy jacket or vest could cause you to overheat, especially if youre exercising hard. COVER THOSE EARS, TOES & FINGERS When its cold, the blood ow is concentrated on your bodys core, which means that your hands, feet and ears are vulnerable to frostbite. So dont forget to keep these areas covered in the cold. Try wearing a thin pair of gloves under a pair of heavier gloves or mittens lined with wool or eece and make sure that you put them on before your hands become cold and remove once your hands begin to sweat. If you wear thermal socks, try to make sure your shoes are a half-size or one size larger than usual to allow for thick thermal socks or an extra pair of regular socks. Last but not least, dont forget a hat or headband to protect your ears, which also are vulnerable to frostbite and/or loss of heat, as we all know 30 to 40 percent of body heat is lost through the head. RUNNERS DONT WEAR BLACK! It is so important with the change in time and it getting darker earlier, try to avoid dark colors so that cars can see you on the side of the road. A MUST-MUST would be to wear re- ective clothing and/or shoes, bright enough for people to see that you are there. Also, choose shoes that have more tread to avoid slips and falls on ice patches. SUNSCREEN IS GOOD IN THE WINTER! Florida sun can burn you in the winter as well as the summer, so it is important to always don the sunscreen! HEAD IN TO THE WIND To keep you from getting a chill it is better to run towards the wind at the beginning of your route, so that you can return with the wind to your back, to keep the chill off, especially if you have sweat. HYDRATE Remember to drink water before, during and after your workout, even if youre not really thirsty. It is just as easy to become dehydrated in cold weather as in the heat from sweating and breathing, but more dif cult for you to notice during cold weather. COLD & RAIN Hypothermia increases in cold, rainy weather, especially in older adults. Signs include intense shivering, slurred speech, loss of coordination and fatigue.Pamela Chichester, CFT, is manager of Body-Tek 24 Hours Fitness. For information about the gym and classes, call (850) 926-2348 or visit Body-Teks Facebook page.Baby, its cold outside prepare for it GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERFocus on the exhale to release stress YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Continued from Page 1B I often hear the comment that even if your reusable bags nd their way back to your car, they are forgotten when you enter the store. When I started using them, I often found this to be true. You know what cured me? I asked a checker to park my shopping cart in the check-out area so I could go to my car to get them. I never had a checker object and after a few times of returning to my car to get the reusable bags, the habit was rmly planted. I used to feel like such a good person when I would go to a store and take bags out of their recycling bin to take home to use for my garbage instead of buying garbage bags. Then someone explained to me that my doing so was defeating the purpose of recycling. That plastic bag was still making its way to the land ll. I now look for other alternatives that can be used for my household waste. If you do come home with plastic or paper bags, and nd over time, many have accumulated, make the effort to get them to a collection point. In addition, using a paper sack or the plastic bag multiple times before it enters the waste stream is another choice you can make. What happens to the recycled item? According to UF/IFAS Specialist, Dr. Michael Gutter, Aluminum is 100 percent recyclable. A pound of recycled aluminum will yield a pound of new aluminum. Recycled plastic cannot be used for packaging food. Plastic food containers are made of new plastics because the Food and Drug Administration has not approved recycled plastic for use in food containers. Glass is easily recyclable and save up to 25 percent of the energy compared to making glass from new materials. However, glass is rarely made from 100 percent recycled glass, so that energy savings is usually less that 25 percent. Recycled cardboard and paper are used to make cereal boxes and other cartons. The aluminum beverage cans were most likely cans before. They are typically recycled back into beverage cans. In a six week time period a recycled can will be back on the shelf again. The process can continue for as long as 20 years. Want to know more on recycling? Visit www.edis. ufl.edu and request the bulletin No. FCS3158 or contact me and I will get you a copy. A year from now we will have data on how effective the recycling effort in Wakulla County has been. Until then, I would like to share some national data available through the United States Environmental Protection Agency that may assist you in seeing the big recycling picture. In 2008, the U.S. generated about 13 million tons of plastics. An aluminum can that is thrown away will still be a can 500 years from now! Learning new habits can be dif cult. But the effort is towards greater recycling and it is worth it. Gradually these new habits will be easier and easier. You and I have a role to play in reducing our countys solid waste. Every individuals participation is important and does make a difference. Recycling its the right thing to do

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 5B Answers: 1) Fact, 2) Fiction, geese honk; ducks quack, 3) Fiction, you wont find tigers at campgrounds, but you may find bears and they like to get into campers food, 4) Fiction, rattlesnakes are the only snakes with a rattle on their tails, 5) Fact, 6) Fiction, owls mostly sleep during the day, 7) Fact, 8) Fiction, hawks like to dine on squirrels, 9) Fiction, crickets chirp; hawks squawk, 10) FactFact or Fiction?WILDLIFE CHALLENGEIf you have ever been camping, you have probably seen, if not heard, some wildlife. How much do you know about wildlife? Take this quiz and find out. 1) Deer are quiet creatures that drivers fear running into. Fact or Fiction? 2) Geese quack. Fact or Fiction? 3) Tigers growl and often go after campers food. Fact or Fiction? 4) Copperheads rattle their tails to let campers know they are near or about to strike. Fact or Fiction? 5) Beavers build lodges to live in. Fact or Fiction? 6) Owls do most of their hooting during the day. Fact or Fiction? 7) Bullfrogs croak so loud they can often be heard miles away. Fact or Fiction? 8) Squirrels like to dine on hawks. Fact or Fiction? 9) Crickets squawk. Fact or Fiction? 10) Fish rarely make any noise, other than an occasional splash when they jump up out of the water. Fact or Fiction? List 10 words that rhyme with tent. 1. ______________ 2. ______________ 3. ______________ 4. ______________ 5. ______________ 6. ______________ 7. ______________ 8. ______________ 9. ______________ 10. _____________What Rhymes with TentSome answers: bent, cent, dent, lent, meant, rent, scent, sent, spent, went 1) __ M O __ E __2) H __ T D __ G S3) S __ E __4) M __ R S __ M __ L L __ W __5) __ A M __ U R __ E __ S6) F __ S __7) C __ I __ IName That FoodFor some people, the best part about camping is the food. There are many camp food favorites. Do you know what they are? Fill in the blanks to name that food. Answers: 1) Smores, 2) Hot dogs, 3) Stew, 4) Marshmallows, 5) Hamburgers, 6) Fish, 7) Chili COLORING PICTURE COLORING PICTURE Old FaithfulHave you ever been to Yellowstone National Park? If so, you may have seen Old Faithful. It is a coneshaped geyser that erupts about every 91 minutes, shooting 3,700 to 8,400 gallons of boiling water into the air. A group of explorers discovered Old Faithful in 1870. They were surprised to see it, and after watching it for a while, they named it Old Faithful because of its regular eruptions. Today, Old Faithful continues to delight park visitors. It is not the biggest or the most consistent geyser, but it is a sight to behold nonetheless. Jokes and Riddles Q: What should you do when you find a fork in the road on a hike?A: Stop and have lunch. A: Make sure one is a matchstick.Q: How can you start a fire with two pieces of wood? This page sponsored in part by:

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com CASH IN FOR THE HOLIDAYSBUYING: GOLD SILVERJEWELRYCOINS By David Morgan STAFF WRITERPerry, Tallahassee & Crawfordville -area residents are in for a rare treat when the International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers (IGSDB) host an event here, from December 12th 17th. The company has identified this region as prime territory for purchasing your precious metalsespecially gold and silver. The IGSDB estimates that local residents have millions of dollars worth of valuables that they no longer need or want. That is where the IGSDB comes inthey specialize in buying those items from local sellers in the U.S., Canada and Europe. Items like gold coins, scrap gold, sterling silver and tea sets also diamond rings are in high demand right now, and IGSDB is purchasing massive quantities of them on behalf of their global network of collectors, dealers and refineries. Currently on an international tour, IGSDB has included Perry, Tallahassee & Crawfordville on its list of stops for next week. Residents are urged to mark their calendar for this special opportunity to meet one-on-one with gold, silver and diamond specialists. Because of IGSDBs low overhead, extensive resources and massive volume, the company is often able to pay out more than other dealers and retailers. Many customers are surprised at how much they are offered for seemingly small amounts. I had two bent herringbone necklaces, a class ring, and some outdated earrings that I brought to a show. I walked out with $425 in less than 15 minutes, said a satisfied guest. Providing an economic boost to each region it visits, the IGSDB projects to pay out $350,000 at each eventa testament to the high volume of items they purchase and the prime prices being paid. Offers are made based on rarity, numismatic value, condition and market value. Company spokesman Matthew Enright says, We just paid $4,700 for a loose 1.25carat diamond. Our mission is to pay local residents on the spot for sterling silverware, fine jewelry, coins and precious metalsespecially silver and gold. The company has seen a huge influx of gold lately. Customers have been scrambling to cash into the record-high value of gold, adds Enright. For those who are unsure if their items are genuine gold or silver, or simply costume, company will test it for free. The best strategy is to bring all items to the show for a free evaluation from our specialists. It always amazes me how a small handful of gold and silver can turn into hundreds of dollars in just a few moments. We test, weigh, and buy items right on the spot, Enright says. At a recent show, a smalltown dentist had a nice pay day. I have been collecting dental gold for years from patients who didnt want their extracted teeth. It really added upmy check is for over $31,000! While most people dont have buckets of dental gold at their fingertips, they do have $750 worth of scrap gold scattered throughout their homes or mismatched earrings. In addition to scrap gold, fine jewelry and diamonds, coins are a big hit. Offers will be made on all coins dated 1965 and earliergold coins, silver, silver dollars, half dollars, quarters, nickels and dimes. Enright explains, U.S. coins made before 1970 are worth more than their legal tender amount because they contain 90% silver. Rare dates and mint marks can make them even more valuable. We recently paid $78,000 for an amazing coin collection. One couple brought in a rusty coffee can filled with silver coins, sawdust, and a dead spider. The can had been in the basement for years. We were happy to send them home with a check for more than $700! Perry, Tallahassee & Crawfordville -area residents should start collecting their valuables now to bring to the free event, which runs next Monday Saturday. Deals will be made and money will be paid on the spot. Attendance is expected to be high, but no appointment is needed. Enright encourages everyone to take advantage of this special opportunity to meet directly with specialists from the International Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers. He concludes, Its a great chance for people to cash in their old diamonds, jewelry, coins and scrap gold. This is a sellers market, so dont miss out! PAID ADVERTISEMENTInternational Gold, Silver and Diamond Buyers paying on the spot for valuables next week in Perry, Tallahassee & Crawfordville! Other Items of Interest SILVER GOLD COINS COSTUME AND GOLD JEWELRY WRIST & POCKET WATCHES GOLD & SILVEREXPRESS PASSNO WAITING IN LINE ALL JEWELRY ACCEPTED Bring this pass and beat the lines Don t miss your chance of cashing in at these Record High Gold & Silver Prices Express Pass GOLDIS TRADING AT ALL TIME HIGHS NOW IS THE TIME TO CASH IN! Express Pass What We Buy: CHECK IT OUT!WHOINTERNATIONAL GOLD, SILVER & DIAMOND BUYERSWHATOPEN TO THE PUBLIC TO SELL THEIR GOLD, SILVER, DIAMONDS & TREASURESWHEREPERRY HOLIDAY INN EXPRESS 601 EVERETT WAY DIRECTIONS: 850.584.3200TALLAHASSEE STAYBRIDGE SUITES TALLAHASSEE I-10 E 1600 SUMMIT LAKE DR. (HWY 90 EAST) DIRECTIONS: 850.219.7000CRAWFORDVILLE BEST WESTERN PLUS WAKULLA INN & SUITES 3292 COASTAL HWY 98 DIRECTIONS: 850.926.3737WHENDECEMBER 12TH 17TH MONFRI 9AMPM SATURDAY 9AMPMINFORMATION 217.787.7767 CASH IN ON YOUR SCRAP GOLD & JEWELRY* That old class ring could buy the Flat Screen TV youve been wanting. Odd gold earrings & broken jewelry could pay for a new PlayStation or Xbox!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting pressure washing sheetrock wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 24 HOUR EMERGENCYRESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALSERVICEALLMAKESANDMODELSMAINTANCECONTRACTSSTOCKALLSIZE FILTERSANDMEDIA 850-926-4676North Pointe Center 1606-B Crawfordville Highwaylic# CAC1816154 WWW.TALLYSENERGYSTAR.COM Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Cornerstone CookingWant a SMOKED TURKEY or HAM for your holiday get-together? Maybe you dont want to cook at all. Let Cornerstone Cooking take some of the hassle out of the holidays for you.We also o er FULL CATERING SERVICES! Morris Pigo at (850) 661-1117BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com DouglasMOBILEMARINE Outboard Repair & Service Electronics Installation Fiberglass RepairFactory trained: Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki and Tohatsu850-228-0889 LICENSED & INSUREDFOXTROT FARM Learn: horse care, equipment, safety with some riding time. for private lessons on our new school ponies. English lessons on your horse; will come to your place. Call -LAURIE WESTBROOK 850-926-2004 TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Do leaves have you bogged down this fall then call Pat Greens Lawn ServiceCall today for a free quote! They have all the modern equipment to rid you of all those falling leaves.(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSUREDWill help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUYSELLTRADEREPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @comcast.net Denises ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building. Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. Free Offers CATS, KITTENS & PUPPIES ( Mal-chi) NEED good HOMES (850) 210-2841 Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 FLORIDA CITRUS: FREE S&H 20LB. Gift Pack-Only $34.95. Navel Oranges or Ruby Reds. Order NOW for Christmas! www.box o fruit.com Lost LOST Boston Terrier, Male, black & white In Walkers Crossing (850) 926-1906 Lost Dog-Red Peek-a-poo on 11/22 between 10AM-3PM near Hwy 98, We miss our dog! Companion for senior, please call (850) 926-4075 Announcements SAVE $$$ on Advertising! Run your classified ad in over 100 Florida newspapers reaching over 4 MILLION readers for $475-that is less that $4 per newspaper. Call this newspaper or (866)742-1373 or visit: www.florida -classifieds.com Professional CJIS GROUP Inc.,a Market Research firm, has a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government documents, and report writing. The starting /training salary ranges from $20k to $24k based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUP benefits include 10 paid holidays, monthly personal accrual, Health, Dental and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgr oup.com. Or send by mail to CJIS GROUP; 2758 Coastal Hwy US 98; Crawfordville, FL 32327 Trades/ Skills Apply Now,12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay 2 Mos. CDL Class A Driving Exp (877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com DRIVER NEEDEDFull time with benefits available, CDL with Hazmat certification, Inquire at Wakulla Gas Company or call 850-927-7670 Driver-Dry & Refrigerated. Single source dispatch. No tractor older than 3 years. Daily Pay! Various hometime options! CDL-A, 3 months currentOTR experience 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com Drivers: Run GA, AL, MS, & TN & FL HOME WEEKENDS, earn Up to 39 cents a mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed Exp. Call: SUNBELT TRANSPORT,LLC (800)572-5489 EXT 227 Trades/ Skills HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANICExperienced Heavy Equipment mechanic needed. Must have a clean driving record Contact Jason Greener with North Florida Reforestation 850-509-8861, 850-926-2730 Career Opportunities Heat & Air JOBS Ready to work? 3 week accelerated program. Hands on environment. Nationwide certifications and Local Job Placement Assistance! (877)359-1690 Employment Info AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing Available. Call Aviation Institute Of Maintenance. (866)314-3769 Schools/ Instruction ALLIED HEALTHCareer training -Attend college 100% online. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call (800)481-9409 www.Centura Online.com EARN COLLEGE DEGREE ONLINEOnline from Home *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 877-206-5165 www.CenturaOnline .com Miscellaneous Financial $$$ ACCESS LAWSUIT CASH NOW!! $$$As seen on TV. Injury Lawsuit Dragging? Need $500-$500,000++ within 48/hours? Low rates APPLY NOW BY PHONE! Call Today! Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com Garage/ Yard Sales CrawfordvilleFri Sat & Sun Furniture, toys, clothes, housewares, metal bunk bed, lots of everything! Must not miss! 159 Trice Lane CRAWFORDVILLEHarvest Thrift Store BIG SALE On Summer Clothes Dec. 1-10 Tee Shirts 4 for $1.00 Shorts .50 cents. Short sleeve Shirts .50 cents North Point Center CRAWFORDVILLESaturday 10th 8a-1p MULTI FAMILY SALE Furniture, clothes, baby items & more 66 Duncan Drive CRAWFORDVILLESaturday Dec. 10 8am-4pm Christmas, household, Books, lots of Nice things! 15 Belmont Ct. (The Farm) Be sure you dont miss it. Wanted to Buy CASH FOR CARS! All Cars/Trucks Wanted! Top Dollar Paid! We come to you! Any make/model.Call for Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3807 CASH FOR CARS! Any Make, Model, or Year. We Pay MORE! Running or Not. Sell Your Car or Truck TODAY. Free Towing! Instant Offer: 888-420-3807 Mobile Homes For Rent SOPCHOPPY3/1, Covered Porch, large wooded lot, $550 Mo. + Dep. (850) 566-4124 Mobile Homes For Rent 3BR/2BA SWMHon five acres. $500/mo.$500/sec. One mile South of Wakulla Station. Avilable now! 850-745-8526 CRAWFORDVILLE4BR/2BA DW MH in Great Neighborhood, close to great schools, 2 Acres, very nice and well kept. $850 mo. 144 Leslie Circle 850-443-3300 CRAWSFORDVILLE2Br 1Ba. SCR .PORCH, Large fenced front yard.Very clean, Near Hwy 98 $450/m + sec 850-562-5226 Apartments Move in special $99 Deposit $300 Swimming pool and gym Local Hero Discount $99 Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo 2BR as LOW as $700/mo 3BDR as LOW as $800/mo. Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLEClean Large 2 Bdrm 2 BA $675.per mo Call Linda 850 926-0283 Rental Houses Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposi t. 850-926-4217 Storage/ Warehouses Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease, 8x10 and 10x12 now available. Come by or call Wakulla Realty, 926-5084 Real Estate For Sale 3BR/2BA one-story home with garage on Greiners Addition. Excellent condition. $85,000. Owner financing. 850-251-7588, 850-962-2016. SopchoppyCabin on 5 acres,600 square foot, backs up to the forest, $59,000 Revell Realty 850-962-2212 Commercial Real Estate Affordable Office Space at the Barry Building. Great atmosphere! Includes all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen use, conference room. Rates start at $250/mo. 850-210-5849 or our website at www.BarryBuilding.com Best business opportunity!!!2400 sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! Rent negotiable 850-926-2480 Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300 Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-656-6340 Restaurant Space Available Soon!! Fully equipped. Can assume full liquor license and equipment if you act quickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLEFitness Studio 1000/sf, wall to wall mat &mirrors Retail -1250/sf storefront w/ back storage Divided of fice space 1074sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Condos For Sale BANK FORECLOSURE! BRAND NEW FLORIDA WAT ERFRONT CONDOS! Only $199,900.( Similar units sold for $399,900) Upscale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1675 sf condo. Luxury amenities, prime location on the water! Call now for special holiday incentives (877)888-7571 x 86 Vacant Property LAND FOR SALE ROAD FRONT PROPERTY IN QUINCY; COUNTRY LIVING 6 MILES FROM SHOPS AND STORES ON POST PLANT ROAD; APPROX ACRE; INCLUDE: SEPTIC TANK W/EXTENDED DRAIN FILL LINE; TALQUIN WATER LINE; NATURAL GAS LINE; 2 SECURITY LIGHT POLES; METAL CHAIN LINK FENCING; $8,000. CALL OR TEXT ME (850) 694-1732. Lots For Sale 2-acre lot for sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 Recreation Vehicles NEWMAR, Dutchstar, Motorhome, 38tft, Deisel pusher, super slide, leather soafs, tiled kitchen and bath, 2 new flat scrn. TVs, and much more, $32,500 Call (850) 566-4124 Handyman Affordable pricing! Pressure washing, landscaping, roof cleaning,all fencing types, plumbing, wood rot repair,tree removal, painting ect. Residential & Comm. Brian 766-9304 Heating/AC KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Heating/AC HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR Sales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in CrawfordvilleDoug & Sherry Quigg, OwnersLic. Nos ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926-5790 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Pressure Cleaning A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed-John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 Services ALL ABOUT...CONCRETEBLOCKS, BRICKS, PAVERSLANDSCAPEPLANTS, SOD, TRACTOR WORK Call JOSEPH FRANCIS 850-556-1178 OR 850-556-3761 Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5052-1208 PUBLIC NOTICE NWFTCA Meeting Notification -Notice is hereby given The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a meeting on December 13, 2011. The meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. CST at the Destin City Hall Annex, 4100 Indian Bayou Trail, Destin, FL. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Amy Paulk at (850) 415-1040 or by email apaulk@gc-inc.com. December 8, 2011 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Fictitious Name Notices 5054-1208 PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865-09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: MCHENRYS ENTERTAINMENT located at 77 Liberty Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in the county of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Fl. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida this 2nd day of December, 2011. /s/Vince McHenry Owner December 8, 2011 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 CLASSIFIEDS $10 Per Week! 877-676-1403

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Call 984-0001 to nd out how!50 Spokan Rd.Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA house $750 per month. 1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1150 per month.Selling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 926-7102 Attention Comcast Customers -Important Information about your services: While we continue to make investments, we periodically need to adjust prices due to increases in programming and other business costs. Starting January 1, 2012, new prices will apply to certain video, Internet services and installation fees as indicated in this notice. Current New Field Collection Fee $20.00 $25.00 Convenience Fee $5.00 $5.99 Self Install Kit (Single-Product) $15.00 $10.00 Self Install Kit (Multi-Product) $30.00 $10.00 Self Install Kit Shipping and Handling (Single and Multi Product) $10.00 $9.95 Self Install Kit Shipping and Handling (Priority Shipping) $30.00 $29.95 Home Networking Installation* $149.99 $119.99 Performance Internet (Only) $59.95 $62.95 Blast! (Only) $69.95 $72.95 Directory assistance charges $1.50 $1.99 Extreme 105 Installation* $249.00 $219.00 *A Technician Visit Charge of $30.00 will be added to any installation activity that requires a home visit. XF TRIPLE PLAY PACKAGES** Starter XF Triple Play Bundle $129.99 $139.95 Preferred XF Triple Play Bundle $139.99 $149.95 HD Preferred XF Triple Play Bundle $149.99 $159.95 HD Preferred Plus XF Triple Play Bundle $169.99 $179.95 HD Premier XF Triple Play Bundle $199.99 $209.95 HD Complete XF Triple Play Bundle $N/A $239.95 ** Effective February 1, 2012 December 8 & 15, 2011 Misc. Notices Misc. Notices Misc. Notices 5029-1208 Vs. Branch, Earnest 65-2010-CA-000068 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000068 DIVISION US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CSFB HEAT 2006-3, Plaintiff, vs. ERNEST BRANCH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000068 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CSFB HEAT 2006-3 is the Plaintiff and ERNEST BRANCK; DEBRA J. BRANCH; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: TRACT NUMBER 94 AND ALL OF TRACT NUMBER 93, EXCEPT THE SOUTH 50 FEET OF TRACT NO. 93 OF GOLDEN GATE FOREST, AS PER PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED ON PAGE 3 OF PLAT BOOK 2 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 46 PEARL AVENUE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F09121197 5030-1208 V Morhfeld, Fred R. 65-2009-CA-000050 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000050 DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. FRED R. MORHFELD, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000050 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and FRED R. MORHFELD; THU H. MOHRFELD A/K/A THU MOHRFELD; CITIBANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CITIBANK, FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK; BUCK FOREST PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 3, BUCK FOREST, UNIT TWO, (UNRECORDED): Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F09013730 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5023-1208 Vs. Barry, Jr., Joseph C., 2010-CA-000399 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY Case #: 2010-CA-000399 Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, N.A. Plaintiff, -vs.Joseph C. Barry, Jr. a/k/a Joseph C. Barry a/k/a Joseph Barry; Betty G. Barry; David M. Sapp; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1; Unknown Tenants in Possession #2; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000399 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Successor by Merger to Union Planters Bank, N.A., Plaintiff and Joseph C. Barry, Jr. a/k/a Joseph Barry are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, at 11:00 AM on DECEMBER 22, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 11, MEADOW ACRES, AS MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 12, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN YEAR: 1998, MAKE; HICKORY FLEETWOOD, TRIPLEWIDE, VIN # GAFLV35A13413HH21 AND VIN # GAFLV35B13413HH21 AND VIN # GAFLV35C13413HH21, MANUFACTURED HOME, WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LANDS, AS SUCH IT IS DEEMED TO BE A FIXTURE AND A PART OF THE REAL ESTATE. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 December 1 & 8, 2011 10-180830 FC01 5025-1208 Vs. Velazquez, Luz 65-2011-CA-000042 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000042 DIVISION HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOMURA ASSET ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, SERIES 2006-WF1, Plaintiff, vs. LUZ VELAZQUEZ A/K/A LUZ M. PEREZ, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000042 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR NOMURA ASSET ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, SERIES 2006-WF1, is the Plaintiff and LUZ VELAZQUEZ A/K/A LUZ M. PEREZ; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LUZ VELAZQUEZ A/K/A LUZ M. PEREZ N/K/A PEDRO VELAZQUEZ; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 40, BLOCK 7, WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 71 KLOWA CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F11003467 5027-1208 Vs. Serai,Kanwaljit Singh. 2009-250 CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 2009-250CA HERITAGE COMMUNITY BANK d/b/a AMERIS BANK Plaintiff vs. KANWALJIT SINGH SERAI a/k/a K.S. SERAI, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment For Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North along the East boundary of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25a distance of 667.78 feet to a concrete monument (marker #4261) marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Southwest quarter of said Section 25, thence run North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 315.00 feet to a concrete monument(marked#4262) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 89 degrees 04 minutes 30 seconds West 547.05 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 00 degrees 23 minutes 26 seconds East 999.46 feet to a concrete monument(marked #4261), thence run South 88 degrees 33 minutes 08 seconds East 116.83 feet to a concrete monument marked #4261), thence run North 00 degrees 32 minutes 13 seconds East 28.57 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 88 degrees 37 minutes 25 seconds East 419.88 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 11 minutes 14 seconds East 1023.81 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 12.68 acres, more or less. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on December 22,2011, at 11:00a.m.(Eastern Standard Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 7, at the W akulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfor dville Hwy., Crawfor dville, Florida 32327 If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk November 18, 2011 December 1 and 8, 2011 5031-1208 V Routa, Robert A.. 65-2011-CA-000152 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000152 DIVISION REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT A. ROUTA, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000152 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE, is the Plaintiff and ROBERT A. ROUTA; ZOYA SHYNKEVICH; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: PARCEL NO. 1: BEGIN AT THE POINT WHERE THE NORTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO JOHN HOARD BY W.R. TAFF, ET UX, BY DEED DATED JULY 20.1948 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 336 OF DEED BOOK 35 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, INTERSECTS THE EASTERLY BANK OF THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER AND THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE OLD W.C. ROUSE LAND, SAID POINT BEING MARKED BY A CONCRETE MONUMENT. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, RUN NORTH 08 DEGREES 40 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE HIGH WATER LINE OF SAID RIVER 53.5 FEET, THEN RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 45 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID HIGH WATER LINE 336.5 FEET, THEN RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 35 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID HIGH WATER LINE 120 FEET, THEN RUN SOUTH 47 DEGREES 05 MINUTES EAST 400 FEET TO THE NORTHERN RIGHT OF WAY LIMITS OF A PUBLIC ROAD, THEN RUN SOUTH 52 DEGREES 08 MINUTES WEST 190 FEET TO THE DIVISION LINE BETWEEN THE LAND OF JOHN HOARD AND THE OLD ROUSE PROPERTY, THEN RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID DIVISION LINE 83.3 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LYING AND BEING IN THE SOUTH HALF OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED AUGUST 12, 2003, JOB NUMBER 03-516AC.1.48: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 2919) WHERE THE NORTHWESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO JOHN HOARD BY W.R. TAFF ET UX, BY DEED DATED JULY 20, 1948 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 336 OF DEED BOOK 35 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, INTERSECTS THE EASTERLY BANK OF THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER AND THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE OLD W.C. ROUSE LAND (POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 57, BLOCK A OF THE ADDENDUM TO SOPCHOPPY RIVER ESTATES AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 8, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTHEASTERLY AND NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIVERS EDGE THE FOLLOWING 9 COURSES: NORTH 07 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 38.27 FEET, NORTH 24 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST 48.24 FEET, NORTH 48 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 82.04 FEET, NORTH 34 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 29 SECONDS WEST 87.79 FEET, NORTH 39 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 116.99 FEET, NORTH 20 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 23.34 FEET, NORTH 66 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 14.42 FEET, NORTH 78 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 48.95 FEET NORTH 86 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 72 93 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIVERS EDGE, RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 399.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 2919) LYING ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF MOUNT BEASOR ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 189.95 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 41 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 82.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL BEING THAT SAME PARCEL AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 16, PAGE 390 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 2: LOTS 56 AND 57 OF ADDENDUM TO SOPCHOPPY RIVER ESTATES; AS PER PLAT OF SAID ADDENDUM RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK NO. 2, PAGE 8 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PARCEL NO. 3: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, RUN, THEN NORTH 89 DEGREES, 46 MINUTES EAST 1,127.62 FEET, THEN RUN SOUTH 734.97 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTHERLY BANK OF THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER. THEN RUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES, 36 MINUTES EAST 133.66 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF A COUNTY ROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE SOUTH 40 DEGREES 36 MINUTES EAST 287.49 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE. THEN RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 41 MINUTES WEST 542.4 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE. THEN RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 806.16 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE. THEN RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 48 MINUTES EAST 192.4 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AT THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY ROAD. THEN RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES, 54 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF COUNTY ROAD 217.03 FEET. THEN RUN NORTH 62 DEGREES 42 MINUTES EAST ALONG SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD 541.88 FEET. THEN RUN NORTH 11 DEGREES 42 MINUTES EAST ALONG SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD 202.96 FEET. THEN RUN NORTH 58 DEGREES 40 MINUTES EAST ALONG SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID COUNTY ROAD 13.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID LAND IN THE SOUTHWEST 1/4 OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. BEINGMORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED BY RECENT SURVEY BY THURMAN RODDENBERRY AND ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED AUGUST 12, 2003, JOB NUMBER 03-5 16AC.7.25: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 1127.62 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 734.97 FEET, THENCERUN SOUTH 40 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 133.66 FEET TO AN IRON AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160) LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices BOUNDARY OF MOUNT BEASOR ROAD MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, CONTINUE SOUTH 40 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 282.69 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 542.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED R 4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 82 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 805.76 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160), THENCE RUN, NORTH 18 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 192.20 FEEL TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF MOUNT BEASOR ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY AND NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY THE FOLLOWING 4 COURSES: SOUTH 85 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 219.04 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160), NORTH 62 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 23 SECONDSEAST 540.61 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, NORTH 11 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 157.79 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160), NORTH 24 DEGREES 27MINUTES 08 SECONDS EAST 53.02 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PARCEL BEING THAT SAME PARCEL AS DESCRIBED IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 61, PAGES 862 AND 863 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 274 MOUNT BEASOR ROAD, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F11017105 Lynn Cole-Eddinger lynncole5228@msn.comDavid Hoover dhoover2@hotmail.com OPEN HOUSESUNDAY, DECEMBER 11 1 4PMCHRISTMAS SPECIAL!457 HUNTERS TRACE, CRAWFORDVILLEUltimate home in one of the countys most desirable locations. Custom brick home on 20 acres in gated community. 3,222 sq. ft. 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths. Interior features include soaring 12 ceilings, hardwood oors in formal living and formal dining room, spacious family room, gorgeous kitchen w/new stainless appliances and eat in area with lots of windows. Master bedroom has sitting area and super master bath. Large inside utility room w/washer, dryer, and plenty of cabinets. Three car garage. Property lies close to Wakulla River, coast, and short ride to Tallahassee. Short sale.Hosted by Lynn Cole`Eddinger,850-5458284 Dir: From downtown Crawfordville, take Shadeville Highway to Hunters Glen Plantation on right, go through gate, home on left. (look for signs) COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. (850) 926 ~ (850) 926 fax 520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 8, 2011 Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 22 34 40 44 47 57 64 67 70 2 35 58 3 36 59 4 41 60 18 23 27 37 48 51 5 15 24 49 6 25 45 52 68 71 7 21 28 50 61 8 26 38 53 65 19 29 42 66 9 16 43 62 10 30 39 63 69 72 11 31 46 54 12 32 55 13 33 56 A CROSS1.Toucheddown 5.Makeoneself hoarse,perhaps 9.Chichesterchap 14.ComicalCarvey 15.Truantfromthe troops 16.AncientGreek colony 17.Blooperremovals? 20. Getgussiedup 21. Glitterati 22.LaBreagunk 23.Understood 26.Pendulum'spath 27.Israel'sOlmert 29.Deceive 34.Badstart? 37.They'respentby 25-Down 39.Wordsbeforepot orseed 40.Searchersfor opinions? 44.LondonMagazine essayist 45.Tryforanace, perhaps 46.Unidentied Richard 47.Spaghettiwestern directorLeone 50.Ragou torburgoo 51.Belightatthe pokertable 53.Dadaismpioneer Jean 54.Protrude 57.Troopers'quarries 62. O. 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"TheVirginian" authorWister 52.Notonallfours 54.Tenmillionergs 55.Setfree 56.Youngest heavyweight champion 57.Itcomesinca kes 58.Propel,asapram 59.BluesyJames 60.Bush41and43,as collegians 61.Unlikelytosteal bases 63.Alcatraz,with "the" 65.Cyber-shorthand for"editorially speaking" 66.TurndownsAmerican Prole Hometown Content 11/13/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine b lank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with number s 1 to 9. Y ou may not repeat any number s in any one of the nine sections that y ouve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, y o u can use eac h number 1-9 onl y once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when y ou correctl y ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 2 3 4 451 6748 3 216 59 8275 8659 532 5498 00 9 HtCtt 915 6728 3 4 438519627 627438951 394 285176 751364298 862197345 273 846519 189753462 546921783 A D O P T D O E S S O A L A U R A Y U L E P U S I N T E R S T I R E T T T A T E L A G E L I A N G E L O I O D I N Y A K O H I O O W E N E W E T U R K S E R E C L O T S D A L E S S L O L L A M A S O R T A I M K A R L O V E R N O B I E R C E K E W P I E L O O T A G O R O C O N U S D O U R J O U L K I T E O T T O U N T I E A S T N O S E T Y S O Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5024-1208 Vs. Bradford, Charles C., 2010-CA-000388 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY Case #: 2010-CA-000388 5032-1208 V Routa, Robert A. 65-2011-CA-000163 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000162 DIVISION REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT A. ROUTA A/K/A ROBERT ANDREW, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000163 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein REGIONS BANK DBA REGIONS MORTGAGE, is the Plaintiff and ROBERT A. ROUTA A/K/A ROBERT ANDREW ROUTA; ZOYA SHYNKEVICH; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the22 day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 11 AND 12, BLOCK D OF SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 24 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TOGETHER WITH A 0.12 ACRES TRACT MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK B OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT NO.1 AND RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 1 A DISTANCE OF 122.50 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-367, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1150.0 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 3, BLOCK D OF SAID SHELL POINT BEACH, UNIT N0.1, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOTS 3 AND 12, BLOCK D AND THE PROJECTION THEREOF OF LOTS 3 AND 12, BLOCK D, A DISTANCE OF 380.87 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160) LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CANAL STREET SAID POINT ALSO MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 102.82 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED NO. 7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 52.57 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE CENTER OF A CANAL, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTER OF SAID CANAL A DISTANCE OF 102.84 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 85 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 52.49 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNINGA/K/A 327 CANAL STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on November 16, 2011. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any person with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call the Clerk of Court at (850) 926-0905. December 1 and 8, 2011. F09013730 5026-1208 Vs. Rowland, Rebecca A.., 2011-CA-000088 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY Case #: 2011-CA-000088 Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage Loan, N.A. Plaintiff, -vs.Rebecca A. Rowland a/k/a Rebecca Rowland; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000088 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage Loan, Plaintiff and Rebecca A. Rowland a/k/a Rebecca Rowland are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, at 11:00 AM on DECEMBER 22, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 34, BLOCK WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOF 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. 5028-1208 Vs. Hahn, Eric. 65-2009-CA-000129 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000129 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY, Plaintiff, vs. ERIC HAHN, et ux., et al., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment Scheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on November 16, 2011 in this case now pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 11:00 a.m. on the 22 day of Dec., 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4,OF SHELL POINT HARBOR, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 24, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A: ROYSTER DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ENTERED AT WAKULLA County, Florida, this 16th day of November, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Courts, As Clerk, Circuit Court WAKULLA, Florida By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk December 1 and 8, 2011. Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5045-1208 12/15 Sale-Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statues, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Thursday, December 15, 2011 at 11:00 am at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Myhria Hall Before the sale date of December 15, 2011, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 December 1 & 8, 2011. Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Self Storage Notices Fannie Mae (Federal National Mortgage Association). Plaintiff, -vs.Charles C. Bradford and Jennifer L. Bradford, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 16, 2011, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000388 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Fannie Mae (Federal National Mortgage Association), Plaintiff and Charles C. Bradford and Jennifer L. Bradford are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, at 11:00 AM on DECEMBER 22, 2011, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 16, OF OLD ARRAN TRACE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 December 1 & 8, 2011 10-191796 FC01 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing impaired, call 711. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614 (813) 880-8888 (813) 880-8800 December 1 & 8, 2011 10-212548 fc01 The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com For local For local news news and and photos photos visit us visit us online online www.TheWakullaNews.com www.TheWakullaNews.com

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