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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00384
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 11-23-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00384
 Related Items
Preceded by: Wakulla County news

Full Text

This issue is being

delivered to every

household in

Wakulla County


Published Weekly,
Read Daily


Two Sections

75 Cents


Our 116th Year, 47th Issue
Serving Wakulia County


Wednesday, November 23, 2011
For More Than A Century


War Eagles pound


Gulf Breeze, 33-14


Wakulla has too many
offensive weapons for
the Dolphins, and de-
fense continues to be
aggressive
By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor~~thewakullanews.net

The Wakulla War Eagles
won the first round of the
playoffs at home, trouncing
the Gulf Breeze Dolphins

The War Eagles, who im-
proved to 9-2, had too many
weapons for the Dolphins
on Friday night, Nov. 18.
In past games this sea-
son, it seemed like one
or two Wakulla players
- different ones every week
- stepped to the forefront
to carry the team to vic-
tory. Against Gulf Breeze,
the stars of the Wakulla
football team all had their
moment.
"Our offense is playing
at a real high level right
now," said Head Coach Scott
Klees. He praised the play of
quarterback Caleb Stephens,
who was named Offensive
Player of the Week, for how
he managed the game.
Workhorse running back
Will Thomas gained 111
yards on 14 carries and
scored a touchdown.
Mar shane Godbolt
scored two touchdowns
- one in the air and one on
the ground,
And Antonio Bowdrie
caught a 46-yard TD pass.


UP NEXT: Rematch
against district rival
Godby Cougars on
Friday, Nov. 25, at
J.D. Jones Stadium
at 7:30 p.m.

Other offensive players
- Deonte Hutchinson and
Demetrius Lindsey also
had good performances in
the game.
Klees praised his offen-
sive players, noting that
every week it's been some-
body different stepping up
as the opponent's defense
tries to key on one or two
players,
The Defensive Player of
the Week was De'quon Sim-
mons, who had 11 tackles
and broke up three pass
plays.
Other defensive play-
ers of note were Mikal
Cromartie and Ryan Hender-
son, both of whom had big
interceptions in the game.
The special teams player
of the week was Luke Tay-
lor, who had three tackles,
The only real drama was
in the fourth quarter when
officials were throwing flags
on numerous penalties and
it took more than 30 min-
utes to get through two
minutes of playing time
of the game clock. Fans
on both sides of the field
were booing the referees
as it seemed that every play
drew multiple flags.
Continued on Page 13A


PHOTOS BY JENNIERBJENSEN
Aidan Stevens, 5, plays with 2-year-old twins Ella and Aidan Choquette at a meeting of the Train Club.

TIhe club draws on autistic children's fascination


with trains: it has movement, the wheels are all
connected and moves in a circular motion creat-
ing a constant
By JENNIFER JENSEN
jjensen~thewakullanews.net

When Carrie Stevens' son Aidan would get upset or
have a tantrum, he would pick up the heaviest thing he
could find and throw it making holes in the wall or
he would kick, hit or spit.
"We couldn't figure out why," Stevens says.
Stevens says at first it was labeled as behavioral
problems and her husband said Aidan was just slower
at picking things up. But after research and mother's
intuition, she knew it was more than that. It turned out,
Aidan had autism.
"A mother knows their child," Stevens says.
She learned that the reason for his outbursts was be-
cause he couldn't communicate what he was feeling.
Stevens started Aidan in speech therapy, as well as
Occupational therapy, to help with his social and com-
munication skills.
"Speech therapy has been the biggest blessing," Ste-


Ella Choquette peeks over the club's sign.


vens says.
Aidan has continued to improve and is doing very
well. He is currently in kindergarten at a regular elemen-
tary school and Stevens says she feels being in a regular
classroom has also helped her son.
Aidan gets therapy at school and has an Individual
Education Plan at school where goals are set for him to
accomplish. Stevens also takes him to Speech Therapist
April Schreiber once a month.
"April's my followup," Stevens says.
Schreiber says Aidan has done well and is very intel-
ligent. Aidan is described as high-functioning autistic.
"He's very social, but sometimes he doesn't understand
social cues," Schreiber says.
Steven is hoping a new club she created will help her
son even more, as well as other children with autism. The
Train Club for Spectrum Children was created so children
of all ages and all levels of autism could interact with each
other and to help improve their social skills.
Aidan is on one end of the spectrum. There are differ-
ent levels of autism, like a rainbow that has many colors
and ones in between, Schreiber says.
"Every kid is unique," she says.
The other end is low functioning autism where the
child doesn't notice when a parent or sibling enter a room,
because they are so focused on what they are doing.
Aidan's older brother Ethan says, "He would just ignore
me."
Continued on Page 5A


Head Coach Scott Klees strategies with quarterback Caleb
Stephens against the Gulf Breeze Dolphins.


Aidan Stevens gets his eye-level down to the wheels.



Inside Bob the

This Wee~ck


dog is reunited
taken to Bonnie Brinson,
owner of Cauzican Rescue.
Bob suffered an injury to
his back leg, as well as two
broken ribs and has had
numerous surgeries, per-
formed by Dr. Norm Griggs
of Shepherd Spring Animal
Hospital. Bob has been in
Brinson's care ever since.
"It was meant for him to
be here," Brinson says.
After he was found, his
microchip was scanned and
it turned out Bob belonged
to Guzardo. Guzardo says
she reported Bob missing
and looked for him for
weeks, never thinking she
would ever see her child-
hood pet again.
Once it was determined
Bob in fact had an owner,
the problem then was that
Guzardo didn't live any-
where close to Florida. Bob the dog back in the arm
In fact, she now lived left, of Alaska, after meeting C
frhe thn fTexaos. wev- right, in New Orleans.


family
missing, Guzardo and her
family moved to Alaska.
No one knows how Bob
got to Florida, but it can
only be assumed he was
stolen,
Once Brinson found
Bob's owner, it was a matter
of getting Bob to her.
Guzardo planned to visit
her family in Texas and
show them her new baby.
Guzardo was actually in
labor at the time Bob was
found. When 24-hour Pet
Watch called the number
linked to the microchip, the
number had been discon-
nected so they called the
emergency number that
Guzardo listed. They got in
touch with the emergency
contact letting them know
where Bob was, at the same
time Guzardo was having
her first child.

Continued on Page 2A


After being hit by a car,
Bob the do 's micro-
chip shows he belongs
to woman inTexas and
has been missing for a
year and a half, but the
owner has since moved
to Alaska

By JENNIFER JENSEN
jjensen@thewakullanews.net

After missing for 18
months, only to be found
after suffering a terrible ac-
cident, a daschund named
Bob has finally been re-
united with his family*
Bob went missing from
Killeen, Texas, in Feburary
2010 from Dana Guzardo's
backyard. Then, somehow in
August 2011, he was found
here in Wakulla County

almost kIe him man t


Public Notices ..............Page 3A
Comment & Opinion....Page 4A
Church..........................Page6bA
Community..................Page 8A
School.........................Page 1OA
Spots ........................Page 12A
Outdoors ...................Page 17A
Weekly Roundup.........Page 20A
Water Ways...............Page 18A
Sheriff's Report..........Page 23A
Senior Citizens ............. Page 1B
Week in Wakulla .......... Page 2B
Classifieds .................... Page 7B
Legal Notices ............... Page 8B







68 45 7 8 O2 15


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Is of his owner Dana Guzardo,
:rawfordville's Bonnie Brinson,


for children


Train Club oteuim
spectrum


with his





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for Virtual Education

Wakulla County Students... you now have an option!
Earn your high school diploma in only 18 credits instead of 24.
Students attend school every day to earn middle and high school credits.
Relaxed environment with an experienced and certified teacher there tohep
Scholarships are not based on grades and available for those who qualify.
We promote dual enrollment in college and technical programs.
NO FCAT! Annual testing is administered in order to determine progress,
not promotion.
Limited space available for grades 7-12.
A Private school locally owned and operated by Wakulla County resident,
Donna Savary.

If you are contemplating a change in schools now or at the end of the semester
and think your child may qualify for ANY scholarship, CALL us as soon as possible
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Deadline for McKay Scholarship is Dec. 1st
(If your child has an IEP or 504 Plan, they probably qualify!)


850-926-9977 www.savaryacademy.com

Locally owned/operated by Donna Savary ~









WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC PARTY GALA

Saturday, Dec. 10


The Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee
and
The Wakulla Democratic Women's Club
cordially in vite you to join as Saturday,
December 10th~, 2011 for an evening with~
Democrats at Wakulla Springs Lodge.


Help us keep our local elected Democrats
working for us and be inspired by Senator
Kings efors i Wiconsn! t wll e aKeynote Speaker
Kings efors i Wiconsn! t wll e aWisconsin Senator Jessica King
night you don't want to miss. And featuring our local
Gala Tickets: $50 Wakulla Elected Democrats
VIP Tickets $75 ndm hrge u Fleia.
HeP tikets include reserved seating.
For more information and to purchase tickets online: Fo add toal informto rt
littp://www~r.uubr~ll~~ ilademnatslmg purchase tickets, please call 933-0294.
Political advertisement paid for and approved by The Wakulla Democratic Women's Club inclepenclently of any canclicate.


ive Crinstmas


CO3C9456







Spnsrd y ochpyPesevtion at11 AM. 4
andr~~F Imroeen Ascitin Ic..
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Fo nfraio al u H T IN (80 92418- atie


Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011
CITY OF ST. MARKS


Grant sought to clean up site


www.thewakullanews.com
CITY OF SOPC;HOPPY


Water deposits are increased


the city actually gives people
about 60 days.
Public Works Director
Leonard Tartt said people
who are being cut off are usu-
ally two and three months
behind,
And Lawhon added that
it was consistently the same
customers,
Cox also suggested the
city charge a different depos-
it fee to an owner as opposed
to a tenant or renter,
He said if a tenant doesn't
pay his water bill and moves
and the charges are greater
than the deposit, the city
would have to write the ad-
ditional amount off.
If the account is in the
owner's name, however, it
would stay with the prop-
erty. He suggested charging
a $100 fee to owners and a
$150 fee to tenants,
Tartt said putting the ac-


count in the tenant's name
would ultimately benefit the
owner,
Commissioner Anginita
Rosier said she felt the rec-
ommended fee increase was
steep. She also said she
would like to see more op-
tions to pay water bills. Cur-
rently, customers can not pay
with a credit card.
Mayor Colleen Skipper
said this has been brought
up in the past, but nothing
was implemented,
Lawhon said the city has
looked mnto provided credit
card payment, but the fee the
company charges is high. The
city would need to charge a
fee to customers to use their
credit card, she said.
A representative from a
company Centennial Bank
uses is supposed to contact
the city about its services this
week, Lawhon said.


By JENNIFER JENSEN
jjensen~thewakullanews.net

During the Sopchoppy
City Commission on Nov. 14,
a decision was made to in-
crease the rates for the city's
turn-off fees and deposit fees
for water,
City Clerk Jackie Lawhon
said the current charges
aren't enough to cover the
administrative costs,
.The deposit fee would be
raised from $80 to $150 and
the initial turn-on fee and
reconnect fee would be $50
instead of $20.
City Attorney Dan Cox
said, "It's supposed to re-
cover your costs.
With the increase, the city
may make a little extra, but
not much, Cox said.
Customers are supposed
to be cut off if they are 30
days late, but Lawhon said


A 1 ying fo r a a6 t
$700,000federalgrant he e:
to go towards remedi- June
atin the old St. Marks Re
R finr city
they
By JENNIFER JENSEN anat,
jjen sen~thewakullanews.net a,
m1ore
The City of St. Marks is tions
hoping its application for asse!
an Environmental Protec- awar(
tion Agency grant will be Re
awarded so it can continue told t
cleaning up St. Marks Inno- majo
vation Padrk also known as towal
the old St. Marks Refinery It
site. city v
The grant would be used ee, t
on two different parcels ing p
on the site, 8 acres on the site's
watedrfrnt side and 45 acres city al
which extends from the fields
easement to the highway. prop
Both parcels are limited to grant
$200,000. Th
However, the city has ply fe
also requested hardship becai
assistance up to $150,000. gant
This would waive the 20- in 20(
percent match required. envir
The city also asked for ad- ment
ditional funding because Cil
of the complexity of the field
site, said Roger Register that
of Cardno TBE, the city's If
brownfields consultant. The the I
total amount would then be the s
$700,000. accor
The grant is due Nov. 28 feder
and the city held a public Th
workshop on Nov. 17 to get oil re
input before submitting the jet f,
application, crude
Register said there is barg~



S850

"QSTTIB ALY


:o 8 month cycle, so
rpects it would be re-
ed between May and
2012.
Igister said he feels the
las a good chance, but
are also competing on
ional level,
.st year, there were
Than 600 applica-
and 13 percent of
ssment grants were
ded,
Igister said he was also
:hat, like last year, the
rity of funds will go
rds cleanup grants.
isn't a guarantee the
will be awarded, how-
there are several sell-
,oints, including the
potential for reuse, the
already getting a brown-
Sassessment grant and
erly administering that
thus far.
le city was able to ap-
or the cleanup grant,
use the assessment
was already awarded
09, which provided an
onmental site assess-
Sof the refinery site.
ty Manager Zoe Mans-
said, "I feel confident
we're going to get it."
awarded, Register said
money would allow
ite to be managed in
dance with state and
al regulations,
le site was home to an
finery that produced
uel and diesel. The
Soil was delivered by
e and products were


shipped out by truck. It was
shut down in 2001, leaving
a mess for the city,
The Florida Department
of Environmental Protec-
tion took over the land in
2003 and spent $20 million
to remove the processing
equipment, excavating and
cleaning up the site. DOE
then constructed a dike
around the process area, cre-
ating a pond, to capture any
residual contaminants. The
property was then donated
to the city through the Fed-
eral Bankruptcy Court.
The city is currently in
the process of using the
remainder of grant money
previously awarded to take
down the rest of the large
tanks. There were 11 tanks
on the site and just two
remain.
Mansfield said the prod-
uct inside the tanks that sit
closest to the road needs
to be removed before the
tanks come down. A com-
pany will come in after the
Thanksgiving holiday to be-
gin work. The content in the
tanks will be heated and
the asphalt will be removed,
Then another company will
come in and remove the re-
maining tanks, she said.
"It's a slow process, but
a good process," Mansfield
said.
Commissioner Gail Gil-
man said, "We'll be proud
of the end results...


the sweet, loving Bob, and
says she will miss him.
When they all got togeth-
er in Louisiana, Guzardo
called out his name and Bob
started dancing, prancing
and whining, Brinson says.
"When he saw her, I
knew he belonged to her,"
Brinson says.
Bob ran to Guzardo and
started licking her entire
face. Bob even recognized
Guzardo's mother and gave
her some affection also.
"It was a real good feel-
ing," Brinson says.
And in her 20 years of
rescue, Brinson says she has
never had a story like this
one. Bob who went through
so much and is finally back
with his family.
"Everything was reward-
ing," Brinson says.
Now, Bob is home in
Alaska with his family and
doing very well, Guzardo
says. The cold weather is
a little hard on Bob's back


leg that was injured, but
Guzardo fixed that problem
by getting him a sweater
and booties,
Guzardo says it feels
right to have Bob home
with her again,
"Like time never passed
really," Guzardo says. "He
follows me everywhere and
is always in my lap or at
my feet."
Guzardo was very thank-
ful to Brinson, as well as
Dr. Griggs, for taking care
of her Bob.
"They are amazing peo-
ple who deserve so much
recognition for their acts of
kindness," Guzardo says.
And Brinson stressed the
importance of microchip-
ping pets, because without
that, Bob and Guzardo prob-
ably would have never been
reunited,
"He's home," Brinson
says. "That's the important
thing."


Continued from Page 1A

Guzardo could only come
to Texas in October when
flights were the cheapest.
"We had to make it hap-
pen," Brinson says.
Brinson and Guzardo
agreed to meet in New Or-
leans, La., on Oct. 16.
Thanks to the generosity
of Joeann Vesecky and Bob
and Janet Crane, Brinson
had enough funds to make
her trip to Louisiana.
Guzardo says she was ex-
tremely excited and anxious
to see Bob, the dog she has
had since she was 14 and is
now 22.
She brought along her
mother and son to greet
Bob.
Brinson says she wanted
to make sure Guzardo was
in fact Bob's owner, espe-
cially after caring for him
for six weeks and paying to
repair his leg and ribs. Plus,
she had become attached to


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www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 3A



FLORIDAL

PUBLIC NOTICES




SIGN UP TO RECEIVE E-MAIL NOTI-
FICATION OF NEWI
PUBLIC NOTICES AT


F LORI DAPUBL IC NOT IC E S.COM


NOT IC EOF



The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold
a Pubhic Hearing on December 5, 2011 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission
Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CREATING THE WAKULLA COUNTY AIR-
PORT COMMITTEE; ESTABLISHING THE PURPOSE OF THE WAKULLA
COUNTY AIRPORT COMMITTEE; SETTING FORTH THE DUTIES AND
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY AIRPORT COMMITTEE;
PROVIDING FOR THE MEMBERSHIP AND MEETINGS OF THE AIRPORT
COMMITTEE; PROVIDING VOTING REQUIREMENTS; REQUIRING COM-
PLIANCE WITH APPLICABLE LAWS; PROVIDING FOR CODIFICATION
IN THE CODE OF ORDINANCES; PROVIDING FOR SEVERABILITY; AND
PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawtordville
Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or
submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides
to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter
considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and
that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceed-
ings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is
to be based.
Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person
needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commis-
sioners' Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. Nvme2,21




NOT IC EOF

E5: PUBLIC HEARING

The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners
W111 hold
a Public Hearing on December 5, 2011 at 5:00p.m.
in the Commission Chambers,
29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327
to Consider:

AN ORDINANCE OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AMENDING SEC-
TION 29.050 OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY CODE RELATING TO THE EX-
PENDITURE OF TOURIST DEVELOPMENT TAX FUNDS; ADOPTING AN
UPDATED TOURIST DEVELOPMENT PLAN; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY,
FOR CODIFICATION, AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE.

A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawtordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public
Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commis-
sion with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will
need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to
ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the
testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based.

Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speak-
ing person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of
County Commissioners' Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.




NOTICE OF

E: PUBLIC HEARING

The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners
will hold a Public Hearing on December 5, 2011 at 5:00p.m.
in the Commission Chambers,
29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327
to Consider:

A RESOLUTION OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ELECTING TO USE THE
UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS
LEVIED WITHIN THE UNINCORPORATED AREA AND OF WAKULLA COUNTY
AND WITHIN THE INCORPORATED AREA AND OF WAKULLA COUNTY AND


WITHIN THE INCORPORATED AREAS OF THE CITIES OF SOPCHOPPY AND
ST. MARKS, FLORIDA; STATING A NEED FOR SUCH LEVY; PROVIDING FOR
THE MAILING OF THIS RESOLUTION; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE
DATE.

A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville
Highway, Crawtordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or
submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person de-
cides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any
matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceed-
ings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the
proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the
appeal is to be based.
Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person
needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commis-
SiOneTS' Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926- 1201.
NOVEMBER 23, 211


), NOTICE OF
t:: PUBLIC HEARING

The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners
will hold a Public Hearing on December 5, 2011 at 5:00p.m.
in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327
to Consider:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORI DA REGARD NG SPECIAL EVENTS AN D AL-
COHOL PERMITTING; REPEALING IN ITS ENTIRETY AND REPLACING
SECTION 5.001 OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY CODE OF ORDINANCES
REGARDING COMPLIANCE WITH STATE LAWS AND RULES RELATING
TO ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES; AMENDING SECTIONS 5.002, 5.003,
5.004, OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY CODE REGARDING STATE LAWS
AND RULES RELATING TO ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES; REPEALING IN
ITS ENTIRETY AND REPLACING SECTION 5.007 OF THE WAKULLA
COUNTY CODE, RELATING TO ALCOHOL ON COUNTY PROPERTY;
REPEALING SECTIONS 22.031 THROUGH 22.037 OF THE WAKULLA
COUNTY CODE RELATED TO MUSIC OR ENTERTAINMENT FESTIVALS;
AMENDING SECTION 23.003 OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY CODE,
PROVIDING DEFINITIONS RELATED TO PARKS AND RECREATION;
REPEALING SECTION 23.006 OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY CODE RE-
LATED TO ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES IN COUNTY PARKS; AMEND-
ING SECTION 23.007 OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY CODE RELATED TO
OUTDOOR PUBLIC ASSEMBLIES AND SPECIAL EVENTS; CREATING
TWO NEW SECTIONS OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY CODE TO ADDRESS
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES ON COUNTY PROPERTY AND AT SPECIAL
EVENTS; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EF-
FECTIVE DATE.

A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawford-
ville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing
or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person
decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to
any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the pro-
ceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record
of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which
the appeal is to be based.
Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking per-
son needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Com-
missioners' Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.
NOVEMBER 23, 2011


--_ :


L - NOTICE OF

won PUBLIC HEARINGS
onn
The Wakulla County Planning Commission proposes to con-
sider the following applications. A Public Hearing is sched-
uled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Plan-
ning Commission on Monday, December 12, 2011, beginning
at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners
on Monday, January 10, 2012, beginning at 5:00 PM, unless
otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings
are held at the County Commission Chambers located west
of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and
present testimony.

















1. Application for Short Form Final Plat: SFO9-02
Applicant: Capital City Bank
Proposal: 13 lot residential subdivision
Tax ID Number: 00-00-037-000-09728-000
Existing FLU Map: Rural 3 (FLUE Policy 1.2.12)
Existing Zoning: AG (Section 5-25, LDC)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0250-B
Parcel Size: 156.79+/- acres.
Location: nrthas ofkt I ineajco ofdeil od
Hearings Required: Board of County Commissioners:
Monday, January 10, 2012@ 5:00 PM
2. Application for Site Plan: SP11-13
Applicant: Ivan Assembly of God
Proposal: construct addition
Tax ID Number: 19-3s-01w-000-04533-001
Exitin ""Uap Ub ne LE5P-o iyL1. .5)
FEMA Flood Info: "C" zone on Panel 0225-B
Parcel Size: 3.5+/- acres
Location: 202 Ivan Church Road
Hearings Required: Planning Commission:
Monday, December 12, 2011 @ 7:00 PM
Board of County Commissioners:
Monday, January 10, 2012@ 5:00 PM
Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record files
may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 3095 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone
(850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County
Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony
and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access
considerations should call the Board Office at least 48 hours before the
date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted at (850)
926-0919 or TDD 926-7962, NOVEMBER 23, 2011





SUBMITTED BY JIMMIE SMITH


SUBMITTED BY JEFF TRUE

A couple of editorial cartoons submitted by readers.


READERS WRITE:


ThanEk you, fre~fgh3ters and community


HAWC Introduc-
tion will be held on
Friday, Dec. 2 at The
Works Co-Working
Cafe from 5:30 p.m.
to 8 p~m.
For more infor_
mation, call (850)
926-3526 or (718)
682-3870. Or visit
the website at www.
healingartswakulla.
org or on Facebook
at Healing Arts of
Wakulla County.

ing artists and providers
of health programs and
services in Wakulla.
Funding for the poram
will be used to help local
artists become the conduit
by which health-related
messages are delivered to
the public with a stronger
impact that leads to wider
cha ge
It 1so has the potential
for the development of
an arts alliance that offers
support and grant opportu-
nities to the varied artists
within the area.
The community recep-
tio is schedule Id froms'j 0

to come share in the de-
tails of this innovative new
program.

Herb Donaldson is local
playwright and director of
Palaver Tree Theatre-



MOSt pOp Ul?



e PlayOffs: War Eagles
defeat Gulf Breeze, 33-
14

* Documentary on Joe
Hutto will air on PBS
Nov. 16

* Sopchoppy woman
dies in car wreck; pas-
senger arrested

* Fire at Promise Land
Ministries

* Sheriff's Report for
Nov. 17, 2011

* Letter: Show concern
at school board meeting

thewahullanews.com


L J(ZNATIONAL
I, (z:NEWSPAPER

wsPyyptp MEMBER


The Wakulla News (USPS hh64-6-0 is published weekly at
3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News,
P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
General Manager: Tammie Barfield........................tbarfield@thwklaesnt
Editor: William Snowden..................... .................editor@thewakullanews.net
Staff W riter/Reporter: Jennifer .i.. 1 .n 11., 1.".n'.1 I. 1,11,,.1. 11.
.1 ,1, n i,. . ,i ll i **I il ** II * 11--. 11 1- 11. 11 .
( I I. i... 1...1 Denise Folh........................... classifieds@thewakullanews.net
... 1..~ i. 11..,, ,1..... S h e rry 11..l..... I 1...........In c1. II... 111l s... 11..1
Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................ estanton@thewakullanews.net

Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one
year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $31l/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County C1 .. $24/6 mo.
Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.


Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com



readers speak out


COmment & Opinion


ChL ~ ti






lr A)tt~ T\o hit


of local news as complete
as what you have in your
hands,
From the local politics
of the county commis-
sion and the city govern-
ments of St. Marks and
Sopchoppy, to feature sto-
ries on your neighbors and
friends,
We have local sports:
from the Wakulla High
School War Eagles football
team beating Gulf Breeze
in the playoffs last week
and preparing for the re-
gional semi-final against
the Godby Cougars, to
the excellent year had by
the Wakulla cross-country
team with runner Stanley
Linton finishing in eighth
place in the state.
From fishing with Capt.
Jody Campbell and his
From the Dock column,
to what's happening on
the water with the Coast
Guard Auxiliary Report by
Carolyn Brown Treadon.
Other popular features
include the Sheriff's Re-
port, with some of the


interesting law enforce-
ment activity of the past
week, and News Service of
Florida's Weekly Roundup,
which reports on happen-
ings in state government,
Every week of the
month, the B-section of-
fers a different focus: in
this edition, it's Senior
Citizen news. Other sec-
tions include the Chamber
of Commerce on the first
of the month, followed by
Green Scene with environ-
mental news, and an Arts
&r Entertainment section
on the third week.
On those months when
there's a fifth week, we
have the News Extral -
which focuses on special
news and reports,
Are we missing some-
thing you'd like to see in
the paper? Let me know.
You can call me at 926-
7102 or email at editor@
thewakullanews.net,

Willian2 Snowden is
the editor of The Wakulla
News.


Z2_
------


rC-C


William Snowden
wsnowden~thewakullanews .net

If you're not a regular
subscriber to The Wakulla
News, you may be wonder-
ing why you got this in
the mail.
This is the issue we do
every year that's delivered
to every address in Wakul-
la County.
If you're not a subscrib-
er, we hope this issue
convinces you of why you
should be.
The main reason is that
there is no other source


The program serves loca-
tions that have even greater
ethnic diversity and experi-
ence significantly higher
rtsbiotypovnerty, tlness'
than Florida's urban and
suburban communities,
These populations are
also highly underserved
when it comes to the vari-
ous forms and uses of art.
The program, in partner-
ship with the Florida Divi-
sion of Cultural Affairs, has
been extended to eight loca-
tions in Florida, and now
Wakulla County has been
chosen to take part,
The new Healing Arts of
Wakulla County (HAWC),
through the leadership of
the UF/Shands project, will
have its first introduction
to the public on Dec. 2, at
the Works Co-Working Caf6.
The community project will
rely strongly on the buy-in
and support of those in the
county,
A "Taste of Talent" fol-
low-up event is scheduled
for Jan. 21 at the Community
Center for those wishing to
become active in the imple-
mentation of the program.
Through Wakulla County
Coalition for Youth, along
with the Health Care Task
Force, the Wakulla Chapter
of the INational Alliadnceaonn

the Palaver Tree Theater,
group leaders from Shands
and University of Florida's
AIM program will begin a
dialogue on the potential
for HAWC to improve com-
munity wellness by engag-


Editor, The News:

Thank youl
Promise Land Ministries Lighthouse
would like to send out a letter of apprecia-
tion to the community,
As many of you know, on Sunday, Nov.
13, we experienced a fire that destroyed
parts of our facilities. If it were not for
Our well-trained firemen and emergency
response teams the loss would have been
devastating to our community work.
Everyone who came to help did a great
job. I was extremely impressed with the care
and concern that the firefighters showed
not only for the men here and the build-
ings but they even took the time to save
whatever personal items they could for the
residents of Promise Land,
For the great job, fast response and
genuine concern for the ministry and the
men, all of us at Promise Land Ministries
say thank you to the emergency personnel
that serve our community so well. May God
bless everyone of youl
To our community, we thank you as well,
you heard our plea for help and you have
come through.
On Sunday afternoon, Nov. 13, we had
no personal items to give to those who
entered the ministry. Now, just one week


later, because of your love and support, we
are no longer without. For your love and
concern we thank youl We pray that the
Lord will bless you.
The rebuilding process has begun and
we are counting on your continued prayers
and support as we move forward.
We are still in need of additional
personal toiletries, towels, pillows, twin
size sheets, and tools circular Skil saws,
Sawzall reciprocating saws, screw drivers,
hammers, drills, drill bits, socket sets,
wrenches, etc.
We need a general contractor who can
volunteer to head up the demolition and
rebuilding projects as well as skilled labor
volunteers to assist.
If you would like to volunteer or donate
items please contact Pastor Glenn Hamel
at (850) 926-3281 or (850) 251-4302 through
email at pastor@promiselandministries,
org or 20 Church Road, Crawfordville FL
32327.
Again, thank you to our community, the
firemen, EMS and citizens that have done
so much for us,
May God bless you and your families,

Pastor Glenn M. Hamel
Promise Land Ministries


By HERB DONALDSON

In early October, local
artists and individuals af.
filiated with health-based
organizations in Wakulla
County met with Jill Sonke,
University of Florida's Direc-
tor of the Center for Arts
in Healthcare Research and
Education,
The discussion focused
on the Arts in Healthcare
for Rural Communities Pro-
gram, and how community
wellness could be achieved
through the arts,
In the late 1980s a group
of healthcare professionals
at the University of Flori.
da began to explore how
art affected the well-being
of patients and staff in a
healthcare environment.
What began as an inves-
tigation of how art might
help reduce the stress of
nosp tah Haon has ofrowrn
founded on the belief that
art is anintegralcomponent
to healing,
Arts in Healthcare for
Rural Communities, a major
initiative, was launched two
years ago.


Editor, The News:


from our shores.
In the Big Bend, we fish
for gags from April through
mid-June and again from
late October through De-
cember, because the gags
come into our shallow,
near shore waters in 20 to
40 feet.
During the spring and fall
months, we don't have to
face the daily dangers of get-
ting caught well offshore in
summer afternoon storms.
I will not take youngsters
on a 100-mile round trip to
bring them back in light-
ning and rough seas.
There are few grouper
fishers left in the Big Bend.
The hundreds of folks from
south Georgia who, only a
few years ago, came down
for weekly gag grouper trips
have stopped coming, sold
their boats, beach houses
and fish camps. The Big
Bend Grouper waters are
barren of fishermen. I have
taken kids out to prime ter-
ritory, on weather perfect
days, where I had histori-
cally seen 15 to 20 boats and
not seen a single grouper
fishing boat all day.
It's not because the gag
grouper aren't there We
have more gags now than
we have ever had, especially
in the spring.
These gags migrate to
deep water in the summer,
and they are only acces-
sible to long range charters,


Overnight head boats and
commercials,
There are no head boats
and fewer than a handful of
grouper charters or commer-
cial grouper fishers out of
Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson
and Taylor counties,
If you accept this summer
time gag grouper season,
your actions will sound the
final death knell for what
remains of the recreational
gag grouper fishers who
once enjoyed Apalachee Bay
and its magnificent shallow
water gag grouper fishery.
The only answer is for
FWC to Regionally Manage
Gag Grouper, just like you
already do for Trout and
Red Drum.
I have given up on NOAH
Fisheries, as I'm convinced
that their mission is to
eliminate recreational fish-
ers. I still have hope for
and faith in my FWC Com-
missioners and believe that
your wisdom and passion
for Florida's abundant, re-
newable natural resources
will prevail.
Respectfully submitted,

Major Alan Lamarche
Shell Point

Editor's Note: The FWC
voted at their meeting last
week to make their rules
consistent with federal regu-
lations. See the story on
Page 17A.


An open letter to the
FWC:
Dear Commissioners,
My name is Alan La-
marche, and I am a retired
deputy director of law en-
forcement for the old Flori-
da GFC. I addressed you at
last year's meeting at the Pat
Thomas Law Enforcement
Academy, concerning the
abundant Gag Grouper and
Red Drum populations in
the North Eastern Gulf.
I have more than 40 years
of first-hand knowledge
and experience with both
species in this part of the
world. In my later years, I
have devoted much of my
life to introducing young-
sters to the wonders of
salt water sport fishing,
especially to gag grouper as
our local populations are so
accessible in the spring and
fall months. I support the
Beau Turner Youth Conser-
vation Center and volunteer
there.
Needless to say, I am dis-
tressed to learn that NOAH
Fisheries is proposing a
permanent gag grouper rec-
reational season from July 1
through Oct. 30.
These hot summer, thun-
derstorm months are the
worst fishing time for us be-
cause gag grouper are living
in the deep. cool waters that
are 50 plus nautical miles


Take a look at The News:


Content you can't get anywhere else


gno ~C ( R~ bvt 1


Healing Ar ts of Wakulla


Cout OUs ISCOm18g


F WC, consider im fact ofgrcouper rules


















































































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www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 5A


Continued from Page 1A

Schreiber says that is
one of the red flags for au-
tism. Some other flags are
repetitive behavior, poor
eye contact, lack of verbal
communication or repeat-
ing what someone else says
instead of saying two-word
phrases on their own.
Autistic children may
also have sensory issues
or be hypersensitive to
certain sights and sounds,
she says*
This is one of the many
reasons Stevens, with the
help of Schreiber, developed
the Train Club.
Stevens got the idea after
reading an article in the
New York Times about chil-
dren with autism who were
fascinated with trains. Her
son also loves trains and
anything with wheels. She
wondered why no one ever
started a club in Wakulla
County. There are a few op-
portunities in Tallahassee,
but nothing locally,
After seeking advice from
several people, including
those at The Center for
Autism and Related Dis-
abilities at Florida State
University, she approached
Schreiber to see if she would
like to help.
"I was so excited," Sch-
reiber says. "They're all so
precious,
The whole goal of the
club is tohelp them interact
with children, as well as
their parents. Schreiber says
sometimes it's hard to get a
child with autism to engage



say.

"It gives all children who
participate a little therapy
without knowing it because
they are having so much
fun," Stevens says.
Stevens and Schreiber


and seemed to enjoy them-
selves. Ella even asked
politely for more grapes
during snack time, which
caused her mother's eyes
to light up with joy.
Stevens says a day
doesn't go back when her
son doesn't ask about train
club.
Stevens hopes the club
will continue to grow and
also become a way for the
parents to mingle with each
other and offer support*
She says some parents
get discouraged, but they
shouldn't because each
child has its own niche.
"It's finding it and un-
locking it," Steven says.
Stevens eventually wants
to break the club into two
age groups, one for younger
kids like Ella, Aidan and
Aidan, and another for older
kids. She says several 17 and
18-year-olds have expressed
an interest, but she current-
ly doesn't have anything
for them,
"They don't want to play
with Thomas the Train,"
Steven says.
She is looking for a lo-
comotive train and says it
would be great if someone
would like to donate one
they aren't using to the
club.
She also wants to eventu-
ally take the club on field
trips to see locomotive
trains, but says she needs
to get the club more es-
tablished before that hap-
pens,


PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWEN
Rotarians Michelle Snow and Sharol Brown hand out dic-
tionaries at Riversink Elementary on Monday, Nov. 21.



Giving out



It's been a longtime project of the Wakulla Rotary
Club to give out dictionaries to every third grade student
in county schools. This year's project got underwray last
week and continues this week with distributions in
third grade classrooms.


I -m I
JENNIE~R JENSEN
Aidan and Ella Choquette playing with trains,


develop activities for the
children that have a social
aspect, engage them and
require them to follow direc-
tion and take turns,
"We try to make a pur-
pose to each activity," Sch-
reiber says.
And each activity has
some sort of visual stimu-
lation, since spectrum chil-
dren respond better that
way, she says.
"If they can't see it, some-
times it flies out the win-
dow," Schreiber says.
The reason for the trains
is because most spectrum
children like the movement
of a train and the fact that
the wheels are all connected
and create a cirle, which is




a train. Stevens says after
seeing Aidan do this, she
decided to do it herself.
Aidan was seeing flash-
es of light as the wheels
moved, creating somewhat
of a kaleidoscope effect,
she says.
"He was making that


effect for himself," Stevens
says. "They do things that
you don't think about."
Schreiber adds that they
simply see the world in a
different way. .
Stevens says interactmng
with Aidan and getting on
his level is important,
Sonia Choquette brought
her 2-year-old twins Ella and
Aidan, both of whom have
autism, to the last playdate,
and was excited about the
new club.
Choquette says her chil-
dren also enjoy trains. They
have an outdoor train set.
The twins played with the
trains alongside Aidan Ste-
vens, colored, sang songs


Rotarian Jo Ann Palmer leads students in games played
with their new dictionaries.



Tallahasseeecom Dc
Nort Eflorida fairgro~unds
Don't miss the region's most
treasured holiday shopping tradition.
Event features everything from fine arts
to charming stocking stuffers.
Be~ft the
I abla see
~ useum Ticket information: marketdays.0rg or850-575-8684


Preventative Maintenance.
check on your unit to keep it operating etriciently.


Complete


* Residential
* Commercial


Trenching
Water Heater Repair
Solar Power Systems
Generator Sales
And Installation
*Sign Maintenance And Repair
me Jacuzzi Pool Wiring
5 Service Upgrades -
Code Corrections
Trouble Shooting
Phone TV Outlets
Readlers. *i New Outlets Circuits


Industrial
*New Construction
*Remodeling And Additions
Mobile Home Services
Landscape Lighting -
Security Lighting
Recess lighting Ballasts
*Ceiling Fans
*Dock Power Boat Lifts
*Underground Cable Locating


Train Club for children with autism


Choice n.~ FI Choice n. 7 Choice nI. Choice n. 2
W~ahulla Walullla Waleuilla Waktilla
2008 pa~ 2009 p 2010 2011


Readers Readers Rea s





BIG YARD SALE .
Christmas Bazaar and Bake Salk O
Friday, Nov. 25 and Saturday, Nov. 26
7AM-until... Rain or Shine!
Christmas decorations, games, toys, books, small
kitchen appliances, household items, dishes, ney~ --
&used, clothes, and so much more! OdlC
First Baptist Church of Wakulla Station
945 Woodville Highway




P~ X

Look Us Up? online
for Classified ads fr~om


www.thewakullanews.com -1 ~
Also check out your
,~Community Calendar


CratofordvrilleArea I


Crawf~ordville United
Methodist Church
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7 209
Ochlockonee & Arran Road "Come Grow With Us"www.crawfordville-umc.org


]Sopchoppry


M~edart Area



Trinty ( Anglican
TrntLutheran r Ch6*< Sunday
Churh o~akua~onty8:30am Service
Churh ofWakula Cunty9:30am Sunday School for
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Adults & Children
Web site: 10:30am Worship Service
Lutheransonline.corn/trinityofwakullaNusravibl
Bibl Clss 900 ~m. Thursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study
Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and
Worship 10:00 a.m. Children, Youth and Adult Bible Classes
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
The Rev. John Spicer, Rector
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock 807581
Church 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557
3383 Coastal Highway

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church
Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797
Sunday Mass 9:00 am
Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm
Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs
1st Saturday of every month:
Confessions 10:30 -11:30 and 3:00 -4:00
Adoration Mass 10:00 am




Hwy 319 Medart,
ke EllOffice 926-5265
~ IE~e ~Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
D Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
~hlirhAWANA 5:00 p.m.
YouthZoneTime 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
Operating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengtheningF our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org


~ I ~~ I I I r~


Wak ulla
Station

Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday moemporar Sence 8:0am

Sunday Worship 11 a.m
Wednesday Service 7 p.m
1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor }aisit Hesty Rinsba t


YOH'Ve Got Bible Questions?
We 've Got Bible Antswers
Find the Peace and Hope and
Answers in these Troubling Times.

If~c~Let thre Bible Speak
1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327
"the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16
www. OysterBayChurchofCh rist.org


IVan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road

Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
"Come & Worship aMth Urs
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School........................ 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship ...................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship....................... 6 p.m.
Wednesday Service.................. 7 p.m.
& Youth Service........................ 7 p.m.
Royal Rangers........................... 7 p.m.
Missionettes .............................. 7 p.m.


Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com


religious views and events


Aletha M. McDonald
Robert 'Bob' Weitzel


Aletha M. McDonald
Aletha M. McDonald, 76,
of Crawfordville, formerly
of Alma, Ga., died on Friday,
Nov. 11, in Panama City after
an extended illness,
No services are planned
at this time. Memorialization
will be by cremation,
Survivors include a son,
John "Larry" McDonald
(Sherri); three grandchil-
dren, Jason Daniel McDonald
(Meagan), Cameron Michael
McDonald and McKenzi
Leigh Dawson; two great-
grandchildren, Jason Daniel
McDonald Jr. and Bethany
Grace McDonald; several
brothers and sisters, nieces
and nephews; and special
friend Mark Nichols.
She was preceded in death
by her husband, R.L. McDon-
ald; son, R. Lowell (Holly)
McDonald; and parents, John
J. and Reatha Moore,
Arrangements are un-
der the direction of Marlon
Peavy at Peavy Funeral Home
in Blountstown.


Robert 'Bob' Weitzel
Robert "Bob" Weitzel
passed away on Monday,
Nov. 14, from complications
from a recent motorcycle
accident.
He resided in Pinellas
County for 40 years before
moving to Crawfordville in
2005. Since his retirement
he enjoyed riding his Harley,
antique shopping and play-
ing with his dog.
Survivors include his lov-
ing wife of 43 years, Charlotte
"Charlie;" his sister, Mary
Daike (Roger) of Indiana;
sister-in-law, Diane Hamilton
of Crawfordville; and several
nieces and nephews.
A memorial service was
held Saturday Nov. 19, at
3 p.m. at 56 Jasmine Drive
in Crawfordville. In lieu of
flowers, please donate to the
local CHAT (Citizens for Hu-
mane Animal Treatment) at
P.O. Box 1195, Crawfordville
FL 32326 (850-926-0890).
Bevis Funeral Home, Har-
vey-Young Chapel, Crawford.
ville, Florida (850-926-3333)
was in charge of the arrange-
ments.


f' )hse has a combined cast of more than
f M e siah set 60 vocalists and instrumentalists,
Admission is free and a reception in
p.m. at Sopchoppy United Method- the church fellowship hall will follow
ist Church. The 11th presentation the concert.
under the direction of Reba Mason


Wakulla Community Chorus will
perform George Frederic Handel's
"Messiah" on Sunday, Dec. 11, at 3


Upcommng

CVCntS at





A Christmas Bazaar
will be held at Wakulla
United Methodist Church
on Dec. 3, from 9 a.m. to t'
2 p.m., featuring crafts
and baked goods by the
Busy Bee OQuilters and
CtZp~.rafters with a quilt raffle S1
Wakulla UMC is locat-
ed at 1584 Old Woodville
Road. and can ber~eached
at (850) 421-5741.
SLiving Nativity will The
be held at the church on Saturd
Dec 9 nd10.f~m 6p~. i Sp
Dec 9 and. ,rno 6)p theme O~eob
parsonage driveway at 918 girs to
Woodville Highway. son th
Re freshments and Operat
Christmas music will fol- The
low at the Fellowship area ch
Hall, arriving


around 11 a.m.
Sharon McClendon and her husband,
Don, the organizers of the biker run, want
to thank all the bikers who went on the
run and all the people who graciously
supplied the gift filled shoeboxes to be
given to poor and needy children.
"These shoeboxes will be given to chil-
d etn wrho iave never been given a
said.


In total, there
given by the folks
Church for this
poor children.


rere~9 boxes
at Spirit Life
ministry to


coastal


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...0:30 a.m.
Worship ...................10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship .............5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
062-2213

Spirit Life Church
NES LO IN!
131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL
962 9000
Schedule of Services
Sunday School 9:45am
Refreshments 10:30~am
Worship 11:00am
Prayer 5:00pm
Wednesday Supper 6:00pm
Wed Pioneer Club 6:30plm
Wed Adult Group Studies 6:30plm

Spirit 'I .....1 '


Pastor 11i)ls 1)issining1
(From Rhema Bible Training Center)
www ochec.org


C hurch


O bituarie s


Chur ch News


Performance o


hoebox Biker


ILun iS Ielu
Shoebox Biker Run was held last
ay morning at Spirit Life Church

ocx stffe wth i fts f by n
,be distributed this Christmas sea-
rough Samaritan's Purse and their
:ion Shoebox ministry.
biker group, representing different
lurches, left Spirit Life at 8:30 a.m.,
g in Lake City at the drop-off point


w~











































sPECIAL. TO THE NEWS
Amanda Davis in front of the most famous cave, Cave 4, where several important scrolls were found along with thou-
sands of fragments,


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Being situated in Haifa
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 7A


Editor's Note: Amanda
M. Davis, author of this ar-
ticle, is the daughter ofEarl
and Teresa Davis and niece
ofCora Greene of Crawford-
ville, and the granddaughter
ofPaul and Dorothy Smith
of Tallahassee. Davis is a
student at Emory Univer-
sity in Atlanta working on
a Master's of Theological
Studies,

By AMANDA DAVIS
special to The News

This summer I traveled
t soiverael t udu a h
my Master's studies in Re-
ligion. I spent eight weeks
studying modern Hebrew as
part of a Hebrew language
ulpan,
The program was di-
vided into two four-week
sessions with a week-long
break in between. In addi-
tion to studying Hebrew,
the program included many
sight-seeing trips around
Israel.
During the first session, I
visited downtown Haifa, the
Ghetto Fighters Museum,

"::: ":hev cieD inJrsl
Tel Aviv, Elijah's cave, Akko
and Rosh HaNikra with the
University.
Visiting the Ghetto Fight-
er's Museum was pretty
interesting because it was
the world's first Holocaust
museum. It has the only
model of the Treblinka
death camp made from an
eyewitness account, as well
as the testimony of hun-
dreds of survivors,
Perhaps the most in-
spiring thing about this
museum is that it doesn't
end with the terrible events
of the Holocaust, but high-
lights how the victims were
able to move to Israel and


start a new life on the Beit
Lohamei Kibbutz.
In the second session, I
visited the Bahai Gardens in
Haifa, Caesarea, the Burnt
house and City of David
in Jerusalem, Jaffa, the Sea
of Galilee, Megiddo, Bet
She'an and the Jordan River,
Visiting the Sea of Galilee
was one of the best parts
of my trip. I went to the
tombs of famous rabbis in
Tiberias, biked around the
Sea of Galilee and spent
time in the ancient ruins of
Capernaum. It is amazing to
walkein a pa orwithdsuch
things as they stood nearly
2,000 years agol
During the break be-
tween the two Hebrew
sessions I spent the week
in Jerusalem. I was able to
visit the city's holy sites, the
Hebrew University ofJerusa-
lem, the Israel Museum, and
the Rockefeller Museum.
One night while eating
dinner gelato on Ben Ye-
huda Street I was able to
sit back and watch as the
protesters over the rise in
the housing market walked
sy ha in and ewo i
few countries where, in
the wake of the economic
downfall, the housing mar-
ket is still rising. It was
also during this time that
I was able to take travel to
Masada, O~umran, the Dead
Sea and Jericho,
Since my major scho.
plastic interests are in the
history and reception of the
Dead Sea Scrolls this was
the most exciting part of
my trip. I was able to walk
around the ruins of Qumran
- the community near the
caves where, beginning in
1948, the Dead Sea Scrolls
were discovered see the
caves, and visit the museum


shoreline several times,
I also attended two
games of the Maccabbi
Haifa Soccer team who,
after winning the Israeli
Championship, were play-
ing in the UEFA Champions
qualifiers.
Additionally, the univer-


sity is situated on the very
top of Mount Carmel the
famous site of the prophet
Elijah and I was able to
take hiking trips into the
Carmel Forest.
As a result of this trip,
I am able to apply the He-
brew skills I acquired to my


research as well as to have a
better understanding of the
historical and religious sites
of my studies since I now
have first-hand experience
of them,
The memories and
friends I made along the
way will last a lifetime.


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guished Service Award.

special to The News

The Wakulla County Ex-
tension Office is home to
two national award winners
this year.
Family and Consumer
Sciences Agent Shelley
Swenson and 4-H Agent
Sherri Kraeft have both
been recently honored at
their respective national
professional associations
for excellence in program-
ming and professional de-
velopment,
Swenson is a member of
National Extension Asso-
ciation of Family and Con-
sumer Sciences Agents and
received the Distinguished
Service Award representing
Florida. She received the
award for her extension ca-
reer in Kansas and Florida.
She was chosen by her
peers as an agent with a
program representing both
the goals and mission of
UF/IFAS and the profes-
sional organization with
which she affiliates.
She serves on numerous
Florida-EAFCS committees
and is Arrangements Com-
mittee Chairman for the
2012 National Meeting.
Kraeft is a member of
the National Association
of Extension 4-H Agents
and recently shared a team
a ward for Ex cellence in
Natural Resources and En-



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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com


special to The News

A mandatory meeting for
exhibitors in the 2012 Wakulla
Youth Swine Show will be
held Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. at the
Wakulla Extension Office,
"Participants for the 2012
Wakulla Youth Swine Show
(WYSS) are signing up at a rate
more than double last year's
show," said PJ Piland, WYSS
board president.
The organizational meeting
will cover the rules of compe-
tition, awards and acceptable
conduct. Participants and


their parents will be provided
a copy of the rules. 4-H live-
stock project participation will
also be reviewed.
Those showing for the first
time will get to see the arena
and the pens where the swine
will be exhibited and housed
during the competition.
"It can be a bit intimidation
for children doing this tefrt
time, so we want to make it as
fun as possible," said Piland.
The judging process will
also be explained,
"Everyone wants to go
home with ribbons and tro-


phies, and we want them all
to have an equal chance," said
Piland.
The next big date will be
Dec. 4.
"All the entrants must be
registered and have their hogs
ear tagged," said Piland.
"Even if you don't have
your pig by the Nov. 29 meet-
ing, but plan to compete,
please come to the meeting,"
said Piland.
For more information check
the Wakulla Swine Show Face-
book page or call P.J. Piland at
509-3263.


hfht.1AL TU THE; DIEVV
Family and Consumer Sciences Agent Shelley Swenson, center, receives her Distin-


Umited Daughters of Confederacy givoes out

tfwo militar-y service awards to residents


vironmental Education.
The team included Natural
Resources Agent Will Shef-
tall from Leon County and
former Wakulla County
Extension Director and Sea
Grant Agent Scott Jackson,
Through partnerships
with the Wakulla County
School System, Riversprings
Middle School and the
Florida Department of En-
vironmental Protection's
Office of Environmental
Education, they were able
to coordinate and facilitate
field laboratory experiences
for all sixth, seventh and
eighth grade students at
Riversprings Middle School
twice each year.
The primary focus is
teaching students about the
Wakulla Springs watershed
which supports the area's
drinking water, recreation
and tourism.


Each of these awards is
entered through the state
affiliate of each organiza.
tion and is judged by a com.
mittee of peer members,
Once their decision is made
by choosing a state-level
winner, the entries then
continue to the regional
and national levels.
Swenson and Kraeft said
they are proud and hon.
ored to have received these
awards and been given the
opportunity to represent
Wakulla County on a na-
tional level in both of our
respective associations.
For more information
on either of our awards or
programs, please contact
Sherri Kraeft at sjkraeft@
ufl.edu or Shelley Swenson
at sswenson@ufl.edu at the
Wakulla Extension Office in
Crawfordville.They can also
be reached at 926-3931.


The R. Don McLeod Chap-
ter 2469 of the United Daugh-
ters of the Confederacy is
thankful to all veterans and
their families for their service
and to show their apprecia-
tion. two awards werer~ecent-
ly given to two residents,
The chapter awarded the
World War I Military Service
Award to Finley Lamar Mc-


Millan on behalf of his father
Finley McMillan, and World
War I Military Service Award
to Thelma Walker Watts on
behalf of her father, Joseph
Herbert Walker.
The United Daughters of
the Confederacy's Cross of
Military Service is awarded
to veterans who are direct
descendants of a faithful


Confederate veteran,
The UDC Military Service
Awards were an outgrowth of
the Cross of Honor bestowed
upon Confederate veterans.
For more information,
visit the chapter website
at rdonmcleod.wordpress.
comn. or email Michelle Kirby
at gomichellekir-by@gmail.
comn.


Pzlt. Hunt graduates fromz Army basic training


Army Pvt. Joel E. Hunt has
graduated from basic combat
training at Fort Jackson, Co-
lumbia, S.C.
During the nine weeks of
training, he studied the Army
mission, history, tradition and


core values, physical fitness
and received instruction and
practice in basic combat skills,
military weapons, chemical
warfare and bayonet training,
marching, rifle marksman-
ship, field tactics and numer-


ous other areas.
Hunt is the son of Richard
Hunt of Panacea.
He graduated in 2006 from
Wakulla High School.


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ILites
mig


COMMZnlffl t


happenings


Swenson and Kraeft receive awards Mlandatory meeting uoill be Novr. 29


I i/ ~for exhibitorsF in youth swoine show,

















J


AARP Tax-Aide, the na-
tion's largest fevolunteer-
run tax preparation and
assistance service, is seek-
ing volunteers in Wakulla
County to help taxpayers
who ar e seeking als sttahne

2011 tax returns,
Volunteers do not need
to be an AARP member or
retiree to participate,
AARP Tax-Aide volunteers
receive free tax training and
arer~eimbursed on limited
basis for qualified program-
related expenses. They help



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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 9A


special to The News
In these times when
children are being identified
with early onset of diabetes
and many suffer from obe-
sity. healthy lifestyle choices
education becomes even
more important.
The University of Florida
and the Wakulla County Ex-
tension Service will provide
a program assistant to the
district's schools through
the Expanded Food and Nu-
trition Education Program
(EFNEP).


The position will be filled
by Stacy Harvey, a graduate
from Wakulla County High
School.
She is in her fourth year
as a 4-H Sea Searchers Ma-
rine Science Club Leade
and currently works as the
Wakulla County Program
Coordinator for Big Brothers
Big Sisters.
"We are thrilled to be
able to obtain grant funding
to continue this important
Extension education pro-
gram," said Shelley Swen-


son, Wakulla County FCS
agent. "Reaching children
with healthy lifestyle edu-
cation, including nutrition
at an early age allows them
to realize how foods eaten
impact their entire life. It is
our goal that through educa-
tion we can enable them to
make wiser choices."
The EFNEP program is
coordinated through the
Wakulla County School Dis-
trict in schools that qualify
for programming,
A six-week, one hour a


week course is offered dur-
ing class time and summer
day camps and related activ-
ities are offered to continue
the learning process.
Harvey said, "Encourag-
ing children to bethebest
they can be in life ensures
a healthy and productive
future for Wakulla County."
Contact the UF/IFAS
Wakulla County Extension
Office, 926-3931 or through
their website at wakulla.
ifas.ufl.edu, for more infor-
mation.


Bronson Ryan Sweatt
II celebrated his first birth,
day on Nov. 4.
He is the son of Bronson
and Lauren Sweatt of Craw.
fordville.
He has a sister, Isabelle
Miller, who is 6 years old.
His maternal grandpar.
ents are Bill Webster of
Tallahassee and Tom and
Lucile Graham of Ochlock.
onee Bay,
His maternal great-grand.
parents are Jean Webster of
Tallahassee and Jim Page of
Concord, N.C.
His paternal grandparents
anedPamnB srd 0f Sp opdp
Sweatt of East Point.
His paternal great-grand-


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taxpayers at sites around
the state, learning new skills
while giving back to count-
less communities.
AARP Tax-Aide provides
free tax preparation for low-
andumode ate-income indi-
tion to those 60 and older.
AARP Tax-Aide provides
free tax preparation for low-
and moderate-income indi-
viduals, with special atten-
tion to those 60 and older.
Last year; more than 2,500
AARP Tax-Aide volunteers
helped more than 236,000


taxpayers across the state.
For more information on
how you can join the AARP
Foundation Tax-Aide team,
visit our Web site at www.
aarp.org/tavolunteers or
call Carol McAliley at 745-


8091. Deadline for applica-
tion is Dec. 15.
Tax-Aide is a program
of the AARP Foundation,
offered in conjunction with
the IRS.


The Wakulla County Co-
alition for Youth will again
provide a happier Christmas
for dozens of families in
Wakulla through Operation
Santa.
Last year; the effort helped
48 families,
Families in need must
complete an application by
Nov. 25. Families will be noti-
fied of acceptance by Dec 1.
Presents will be delivered
on Dec. 16 and 17.
To help: Identify families
who have a need and help
them with a confidential As-
sistance Application. Adopt
a family, ask a business or
friends to adopt a family. Do-
nate and ask for donations
- cash will be used to shop
for needed items. Sign up to
"staff" the Operation Santa


Store the first two weeks
in December to assemble
Christmas boxes, shop for
families and various other
volunteer duties*
Families in need will be
helped on an appointment
basis*
Items to Donate: Gently
worn or new clothes that are
clean, folded and in a box,
labeled with sizes, Clean,
and in good repair, toys,
electronics, games, bikes,
books, puzzles. Household
items, kitchen ware, tools,
workshop items
The Wakulla County Li-
brary is a collection point
and is now open to receive
donations.
Call 926-3526 for more
information.


Rep. Steve Southerland voill
be in St. Marks ont No~v. 28
Congressman Ste ve He will attend a town
Southerland will be in St. meeting at the St. Marks
Marks on Monday, Nov. Volunteer Fire Department
28. from 2:30 to 4 p.m.


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COMMuriffy


happenings


Happy first birthday


Stacy Harvey has joined the extension office


AARP Tax-Aide seeks volunteers for tax assistance


Operation Santa seeks

donations to help families


dress store


Pu RP LE 1~4RT IN


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Medart Elementary Annual Winter Holiday Festival i
Friday Dec. 2 4 p.m. 8 p.m. For more information, call 962-4881.
All funds raised at the Games Prizes Bingo Cake Walk Inflatable Obstacle Course and Giant Slides --
event will go towards Go-cart Racing Face Painting Delicious food
needed items for Medart /
Elementary School. Even a visit with Santa himself, or decorate Christmas cookies with Mrs. Claus. 2558 CoastarlHighway.


Preschoolers from Sopchoppy Pre-K participate in a scav-
enger food hunt at Sopchoppy IGA.

special to The News
Backwoods Bistro and the Sopchoppy IGA welcomed
children from Sopchoppy PreK as part of their studies on
food and the farm for the month of November.
The preschoolers participated in a scavenger food hunt
at the IGA where they located items from the various
food groups, and then were treated to apples by store
owners Beth and Dwayne.
Chef Jesse Rice from Backwoods Bistro served up some
"round" orders of pizza pies to the excited children who
said this was the best pizza ever.


Medart Holiday FestivalEDec. 2
Medart Elementary School will be holding their Holi-
day Festival Friday, Dec. 2 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the
school. This will be Medart's fifth holiday festival.
The event will feature jousting, blow up slides, an
obstacle course, sno cones, cotton candy, hamburgers,
hot dogs, sausage dogs, French fries, paint ball, bingo,
a cake walk, children's games, Christmas lights and
decorations,
Santa Claus will be visiting from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. to
see what the children want for the holidays. Parents are
reminded to bring their cameras to snap a shot of St.
Nick and the children.



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68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.)
(850) 926-2700 Fax: (850) 926-2741
E-M ail: deirdre @farrington.co mcastbiz.net


Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com


~cho /


Preschoolers visit grocery

store and bistro on Jield triP


AVID Executive Vice President Granger Ward, back row center, along with Wakulla administrators, AVID teachers and
AVID student panel.


Special to The News
Wakulla County school system was
fortunate to be visited by Granger
Ward, the executive vice president of
AVID worldwide on Nov. 15.
AVID, Advancement Via Individual
Determination, is a college preparation
program that began in the 1980s with
One teacher who saw college potential
in students who were capable but not
well prepared for college, or who were
not encouraged to take college prep
classes. Many AVID students will be
the first generation in their family to
graduate from college.
Ward oversees all AVID divisions
worldwide. The AVID system is in place
in more than 4,500 middle and high
schools throughout the United States
and Department of Defense schools
worldwide.
This is the third year that Wakulla
has implemented the AVID program,
thanks to Superintendent of Schools
David Miller advocating for Wakulla
County to be the first rural district
chosen for The Florida Partnership
with the College Board grant,
Ward met with some AVID students
from Wakulla High School and the
middle schools, at Wakulla Middle


School.
He shared his own background as a
first generation college graduate from
the Bronx in New York. One teacher
made all the difference in his life
when she would not accept any less
than his best.
He graduated from high school in
New York and received his Bachelor of
Science degree from the State Univer-
sity of New York in Syracuse.
He earned his Masters degree from
Syracuse University and his administra-
tive credential is from the State Univer-
sity of New York at Oswego.
After working as a teacher and then
a principal, Ward became superinten-
dent of the Manhattan High Schools in
the city of New York. and later superin-
tendent of the Grossmont Union High
School District in San Diego, Calif.
He also was a good role model for
Wakulla students to not neglect their
personal dreams as he told them
about becoming a licensed pilot, a
father of grown twin daughters and a
grandfather.
One of his daughters is a doctor
and the other is a lawyer, showing the
impact teachers had in his life, which
affected his children.
Superintendent Miller said, "AVID


has proved to be one of the most suc-
cessful programs I have seen in my
career. It gives students the confidence
to succeed not only in academics, but
also to believe that they can take on
leadership roles in their schools, and
ultimately in our society...
Ward's responsibilities also include
the expansion of AVID Elementary,
AVID's Postsecondar program, AVID
Demonstration Schools and AVID
Center partnerships with philanthropic
organizations.
Additionally he supports AVID Sum-
mer Institutes, and contributes to the
development of AVID Center's national
legislative relations,
It was an honor to have Ward make
a special trip to Wakulla as he was
visiting Tallahassee from California to
meet with state officials.
This program serves students in
eighth grade at Wakulla Middle School
with teacher Katherine Spivey and
at Riversprings Middle School with
teacher Donna Sullivan,
At Wakulla High School, teacher
Nancy Floyd Richardson has 10th and
11th grade students and Melinda House
teaches ninth grade students. Twelfth
grade will be added for 2012-13.


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education news from local schools


AVID's Granger Ward visits Wakulla County











www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 11A


Staff Report

An endowment fund
for the Wakulla Springs
State Park has been es-
tablished in order to con-
tinue to conserve, protect
and enhance the natural,
historical, cultural and
recreational resources of
the park for present and
future generations.
The Friends of Wakulla
Springs, a non-profit orga-
nization dedicated to sup-
porting the stewardship
of the park's resources, set
up the fund through the
Community Foundation
of North Florida.
"Wakulla Springs and
the park are a priceless
treasure to this region
and, indeed, to all of Flor-
ida," said Ron Piasecki,
president of the Friends
organization. "Our inten-
tion in establishing this
fund is to provide resourc-
es far into the future to
protect and enhance the
park's assets."
The goal is to get the
park set up for the future
and have a steady form of
funding, especially during
difficult economic times,
Piasecki said,
Piasecki said the group
put in $5,000 to get the
fund started. They will
match funds contributed,
dollar for dollar, up to
$5,000 until Dec. 31.
"This is a great time
of the year to look at
pear-nditdonat on oto
like the Friends," Piasecki

saith cash and non-cash
contributions including
a transfer of stock, real
estate or other assets may
be made to the Friends
of Wakulla Springs State
Park endowment fund.
Deferred gifts, such as
bequests named in a will
or trust, life insurance
proceeds or retirement
benefits which accrue af-


ter death are also accepted
as contributions to the
endowment.
Piasecki said contribu-
tions will be made directly
to the Community Foun-
dation. But the Friends
plan to check in periodi-
cally to see how the fund
is developing,
The Friends' goal is to
not draw down any of
the money for the next
10 years, in hopes that
the balance will be around
$100,000 by then. After
that, the plan is to only
draw down an estimated 4
percent per year, Piasecki
said.
The Friends of Wakulla
Springs State Park most
recently is responsible for
refurbishing the historic
river cruise boats, add-
ing electric motors and
solar panels for a quieter,
more environmentally
friendly visitor experi-
ence. Past projects include
restoration of the lodge's
decorative ceiling, replace-
ment of the lodge roof,
installment of a pedes-
trian bridge on the trail,
renovation of the boat
ticket area and the addi-
tion of an archaeological
exhibit,
The Friends organiza-
tion is also very active
and visible as advocates
for protection of the water


quality and quantity of
Wakulla Springs.
The Community Foun-
dation and the Friends of
Wakulla Springs State Park
are non-profit organiza-
tions and all contributions
are fully tax deductible,
The Community Foun-
dation is a public charity
whose mission is to build
permanent charitable as-
sets for the benefit of
nonprofit organizations
in North Florida. The
Foundation has extensive
experience in managing
endowments and invest-
ing for the long-term.
Established in 1997, the
Foundation has received
more than $19 million in
contributions for more
than 150 charitable funds.
These funds have generat-
ed more than $6 million in
grants to nonprofit organi-
zations in the region,
More information about
the Friends is available
through their website,
www.wakullasprings.org.
The mailing address is
465 Wakulla Springs Dr.,
Wakulla Springs, FL 32327.
The Community Foun-
dation of North Florida
may be contacted through
their website, www.cfnf.
org, by phone at (850) 222-
2899, or by mail at 1621
Metropolitan Blvd., Suite
A, Tallahassee, FL 32308.


e
g


g


*,

s


Friends ofWakulla Springs


establishes endowment


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Health."
Join NAMI Wakulla for holiday treats and an opportunity
to exchange one wish for mental health with community
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Crawfordville Woman's Club, 64 Ochlockonee St. (right
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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com


sports news and team views


CROSS COUNTRY


Linton makes podium at


state meet; girls run well


By PAUL HOOVER
WHS Track Coach

The Wakulla High School qualifiers
for the state cross country meet, Stanley
Linton and the girls team, traveled to the
Little Everglades Ranch outside Dade City
last weekend for their first appearance at
this prestigious meet,
The race is run on a 1.25-mile equestrian
steeplechase course with a thick grass sur-
face and rolling hills, not quite what the
team had expected,
On race morning, the sunny skies were
welcomed, but the unseasonably warm
weather was not. The 2A girls teams ran at
10:10 a.m. and the boys 2A race didn't start
until 10:50 a.m. By then, the temperature
had risen to 80 degrees and presented an
additional challenge.
Going into the meet, the WHS girls were
ranked 19th in the Florida Athletic Coaches
Association poll and Linton was picked to
finish eighth in the boys race,
The girls race started promptly with 176
girls thundering down the home stretch
of the race course for the first time. The
number of girls made the early going ex-
tremely congested, with everyone fighting
for position and trying to get to the inside
of the race course,
It took almost three quarters of a mile
for the congestion to thin out enough for
the runners to settle into position and start
racing unimpeded,
As has been the case all season, the
WHS girls were paced by the duo of senior
Cora Atkinson and sophomore Marty
Wiedeman. Close behind, was the pack
of the rest of the local girls, led by junior
Raychel Gray and senior Emily McCullers
with senior Kristie Hodges and freshman
Lydia Wiedeman and Lilli Broadway in
tow. These two groups stayed basically
intact until the last quarter-mile and the
final push up the hill, known as the "Green
Monster," to the finish.
The finish saw Wiedeman open a slight
gap on Atkinson and finish in 50th place
in 21:00, with Atkinson only three place
back in 53rd (21:03). Lydia Wiedeman made
it 2 out of 3 for the Wiedeman family and


led the second group in, finishing 121st in
22:52. McCullers, who fought back from an
early season injury, was the next WHS fin-
isher in 123rd in 22:55, with Gray coming in
as the final scorer in 125th in 23:01. Hodges
finished one spot back in 126th (23:03) and
Broadway in 137th in 23:30.
As a team, the local girls finished exactly
as ranked, in 19th place. Wiedeman's finish
was the best by a WHS girl since 2005 when
Sydney Nutting placed 30th in 20:43.
The boys race shaped up to be a real
duel, with local standout Linton projected
to be right in the thick of things and that
is exactly how the race unfolded,
After a blistering first 600 meters, Linton
had positioned himself in the lead pack of
about 15 runners and was determined to
remain with the leaders.
By two miles, two runners had opened
a 2-3 second lead on the chase pack and
Linton was in 9th place in that group. At
about this point, he had to fight through
a side stitch, but was able to maintain his
position. By the 2.75-mile mark the two
leaders had been caught by the pack and
the 10 front runners were tightly bunched
with a lead on the rest of the field.
From that point on to the finish, it was
basically on all-out sprint and a battle of
wills down the last downhill section and up
the "Green Monster"' to the finish line.
Linton stormed across the line in eighth
place out of 187 runners and secured his
spot on the podium. He finished in the
excellent time of 16:34. Linton's finishing
place and time earned him a spot on the
"All State Team" and the Milesplit U.S.
Second Team.
His finish is the best by a WHS runner
since 2006 when Tyler Price finished in
seventh in 16:50.
While the cross country season is over
for most of the local runners, Linton and
Atkinson will be traveling this weekend to
Charlotte, N.C., to compete in the Footlocker
South Race, which is a regional qualifier for
the Footlocker National Meet.
"It was really special for our kids to
qualify for State this year and they all raced
about as well as we could have asked for,"
said Coach Paul Hoover.


PHOTO BY JANICE EAKIN
Mike Eakin of Purple Frog Racing at the Road Atlanta's Road Race of Champions,

RACING



Purp e Frog Racme

Wins at Road Atlanta


Special to The News
On May 23, Mike Eakin
won the Sports Car Club
of America national race at
Road Atlanta.
Road Atlanta is a chal-
lenging 2.7 mile, 12-turn,
very hilly, road race course
just outside Braselton, Ga.
Eakin was driving a F2000
formula race car entered by
Purple Frog Racing which is
based in Crawfordville.
This was the team's first
race of the year after hav-
ing to extensively rebuild
the car after it was crashed
heavily last October at the
Southeastern Invitational


Championships.
Eakin, during a break
in his duties as the techni-
cal director of the F2000
Championship Series, took
the opportunity to run this
national level event. He
commented after the race
on just how many qual-
ity technical services were
available in the Wakulla
County area to support the
needs of highly technical
modern race cars,
The successful rebuild
was due much in part to
services provided by many
businesses local to Wakulla
County.
Kevin Roberts at Kevin's


Machine manufactured
many new precision parts
that were needed,
Dallas Beckett at Moon-
light Welding repaired the
chassis and did much of
the new painting, after
repairing the damaged
bodywork. Dave Boudreau
at S&rD Machine machined
many custom replacement
chassis parts.
Kelly Sheet Metal sup-
plied and formed the spe-
cial alloy aluminum sheet
needed. Richard Fogleman
donated many hours of
his time to help with the
reconstruction of the Rey-
nard race car.


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Continued from Page 1A

At the same time as
Wakulla was beating Gulf
Breeze, the Godby Cougars
defeated West Florida Tech
34-17 in Pensacola. The win
sets up a showdown in the
regional semifinals next
week against Godby on
Friday, Nov. 25 at J.D. Jones
Stadium.

GAME RECAP

In the first quarter against
Gulf Breeze, Wakulla got on
the scoreboard first with
a 46-yard touchdown pass
from quarterback Caleb Ste-
phens to Antonio Bowd-
rie that came on a fourth
down and nine. It was a
perfect pass from Stephens
to a double-covered Bowdrie,
who caught it in full stride
in the back of the end zone.
Kicker Conner Smith added
the extra point and Wakulla
was up 7-o*
The Dolphins fought
back, mounting a drive of
their own that ended with
a quick slant pass over the
middle for a 10-yard touch-
down. The PAT made it 7-7.
In the second quarter, Ste-
phens connected on a quick
seam pass to Marshane God-
bolt, who outran the defense
to the goal line. Smith's extra
point made it 14-7.
Later in the second pe-
riod, the Dolphins set up
to attempt a field goal at
the 26, but were called for


111 ~-r ~SL~ II


www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 13A


a false start. Backed up five
yards, Gulf Breeze went for
it on fourth down, but Mi-
kal Cromartie intercepted
the pass and returned it
to the 16 yard line of the
Dolphins. A couple of plays
later, Deonte Hutchinson ran
the ball up the middle and
reached across the goal line
for the score. Smith's kick
made it 21-7.
In the third quarter, Ryan
Henderson jumped a receiv-
er's route and intercepted a
Dolphin pass and returned
it for a 40-yard touchdown.
Wakulla Head Coach Scott
Klees decided to go for
a 2-point conversion it
looked like a quick screen
to a receiver was the called
play, but the Dolphin blitz
got to quarterback Stephens
and the conversion was no


good.
Towards the end of the
third quarter, running back
Will Thomas busted a long
run to put the ball inside
the Dolphin 5. A couple of
plays later, and after chang-
ing ends of the field for
the fourth quarter, Thom-
as punched the ball in on
fourth and goal from a yard
away. The extra point was no
good one of the few that
Smith has missed all year
- and the War Eagles were
up at ~337.
Klees started substituting
his reserve and junior varsity
players for the remainder of
the game,
Then came an excruciat-
ing portion of the game in
which the officials' yellow
handkerchiefs were seem-
ingly always on the field.


Time passed slowly, and
seemed to stop completely
as far as the time clock was
concerned.

LOOKING TO GODBY

"They're gonna come
in here fired up and with
a chip on their shoulder,"
said Coach Klees. "That's all
right, we're gonna be fired
up too."
"I've been preaching to
our kids just to stay focused
and keep our wits about us,"
he said,
The defense needs to
keep playing like it has, he
said, being aggressive and
hitting hard.
"On offense," Klees said,
"we need to take care of the
ball and keep hitting on all
cylinders."


wILLuaMsNoWDEN
on the first score, above, receiver Antonio Bowdrie catches
a 46-yard touchdown pass in full stride from quarterback
Caleb Stephens. Workhorse running back Will Thomas,
below, runs straight ahead and through tacklers on his
way to another 100-plus yard night.


DEFENSE


SP ECIAL TEAMS


OFFENSE


KEN FIELDS


LUKE TAYLOR
3 tackles


I I II
DE'OUON SIMMONS
11 tackles, 3 passes defended


Gyl1a Pak.Aet That's tudcey talk for "Dig in."
Tallahassee, fl 32305
There's no better time to
Bus: 850222-620
gayle.parks.hrl4@statelrm~com thank you for your continued
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Like good neighbor,
State Farm is there. O


WRESTLING

Wakulla finishes second at Lincoln Duals


Wakulla High School
made the short trip up to
Lincoln on Saturday, Nov. 19,
to wrestle in their first tourna-
ment of the season.
Coach Pafford was able to
get his young team to focus
early and start strong beating
Florida High 66-18. Next up
was Fort Walton Beach, which
Wakulla handled 61-16.
Wakulla was ahead of


Chiles with two matches
left to go but was unable to
hold on and lost 39-42 to the
eventual champions.
Coach Pafford regrouped
his young men to face rival
Lincoln, as Wakulla pulled
out the close victory 42-37.
The last match of the
day was against Lowndes
County, Ga., and Wakulla's
young wrestlers felt the lift


of confidence from the earlier
matches to come away with
a 55-23 win.
There were four varsity
wrestlers who went unde-
feated in the duals, Zach
Malik, Bill Morgan, Travis
Hinsey and Keith Godden.
Dyjuan Carney also went
undefeated during wrestling
in the JV division.
One special milestone was


Travis Hinsey's 100th varsity
win, a mark only a handful
of Wakulla wrestlers have
achieved in the past.
Wakulla would like to
invite everyone to their only
home meet of the season on
Saturday, Dec. 3, as they host
a 10-team dual tournament,

submitted by/oh~n Hinsey


Christmas Shopping- All Day Enjoynay The Folloin
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Pose 's Steam Room

Posey s Doc si de

Coyote Mullet Shuffle
Steven's Seafood
&e Chicken Restaurant

Coastal Corner
La Cantina Grille


Funky Filddler
Rose s Botanicals

Wiakulla Discount Li uor
Mike's Marine Su 1 y
East Coast Connections

at Angelo's

My-W~ay Seafood
Mineral Springs Seafood

Big Top Supermarket
Dollar General
The Hat Man
Sea-Tow
Two Blondes
Yasmania

Sheer Expressions Hair Salon

Tropical Trader Seafood
Brooks Concrete

Rock Landing: Marina


mylO0bank.com
A Home BancShares Company
SMember FDIC


War Eagles found GulfBreeze, 33-14


PlayerS Of the Week


CALEB STEPHENS
82 yards passing, 2 TDs


~StateF~rPrr


Visit the t"~ii-ask iu, Paniacea,

Marketplace 11a~m- 5pm
NEXT To BIG TOP SUPERMARKET


0Bar Ou, Twai P~uawk

Parade be mns at 6:30 p.m.
(Starts at Post Office

Tree Lighting After Parady~e Bouy's By the Bay Restaurant
Caroling around the Tree with
B.B. Bawick an Frien Come Early and Visit the

Refrshmets ,Following Attractions:
Refrehmensk ~Gullf Specimen Marine Lab,
Tour of Lights Featuringt~jL Paul ~loeCne
Local Business-sn o es in aae

Maritime Center


~4~R"e~e~f" S;aaneo~ced ecl
I,


1


For more information Call 528-1527


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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 15A


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:11m1


Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com


By JILL COOPER
Livingonadime.com

Thanksgiving can be a
great opportunity to en-
joy time with family and
friends, but it's easy to
get overwhelmed at the
thought of everything that
you need to do.
Here are a few tips to
help you make this Thanks-
giving more fun and less
stressful.
*Larger turkeys are usu-
ally less expensive, so buy
the largest one you can. If
you have a small family, ask
the butcher to cut your tur-
key in half and wrap each
half separately. Then you
can freeze half and save it
for later so you won't have
weeks of Thanksgiving
leftovers.
Half a turkey is also much
easier to handle and pre-
pare for roasting. Just wrap
the other half and freeze it
to use for Christmas,
I've often made ham for
Christmas just because by
Christmas we are so sick of
turkey that we don't want to
think of preparing another
one ever,
If there are fewer left-
overs after Thanksgiving,
your family might not mind
having turkey again. Then
you would have one less
thing to buy for Christmas
dinner,
If you still don't want to


have turkey at Christmas,
save it for some cold day
in January. If you have a
large enough crockpot, cook
the turkey in the crockpot.
If not, cook it on very low
in the oven so that it slow
cooks all day. It is amazingly
delightful to come home to
the yummy smell of slow
cooked turkey.
*Save money by making
your own pies instead of
buying the expensive pre-
made ones. If the thought
of making pie crust is too
daunting, just buy a ready
made crust. They are usu-
ally on sale for very little
around Thanksgiving,
It really isn't that difficult
to make the filling for most
pies. Pies are often easier to
make than cakes or cookies,
If you like the traditional
pumpkin pie, most cans of
pumpkin have the recipe on
the back.
If your family and friends
aren't fussy about having
the traditional pumpkin
pie, you can make banana
cream, chocolate or butter-
scotch pie. Just mix a box of
banana pudding and pour it
into a baked pie crust. Cover
it with sliced bananas and
whipped topping.
For the chocolate pie,
use chocolate pudding with
chocolate chips in it and
cover it with whipped top-
ping.
For the butterscotch,


use butterscotch pudding
and whipped topping and
sprinkle with butterscotch
chips.
You don't have to make
so many pies that you could
open a bakery. I have found
that most kids are just as
happy with a platter of
cookies. If you have time,
make the cookies in the
shapes of pumpkins and
turkeys.
*Save on your relish
dish. Buying ingredients
for a relish dish can get
expensive. especially where
we live. Only use three or
four vegetables on the rel-
ish dish instead of 10 and
cut out the more expensive
vegetables.
On this occasion, the
turkey is the star and most
people won't even notice
that you cut back on the
relish dish.
*Don't make so many
side dishes. Like I said, the
turkey, gravy and mashed
potatoes are more impor-
tant than everything else.
By the time everyone stuffs
themselves on those, they
only eat a token amount of
the side dishes.


Jill Cooper and Tawra
Kellam publish the web-
site wwwLivingOnA~iime
com and are authors of the
"Dining On A Dime Cook-
book,"


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www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 17A



outdoor sports and fishing reports


I don't know what it is
about Fridays and Satur-
days, but they sure do at-
tract the wind.
I told the folks I fished
with on Friday the wind
was gonna blow and we
should probably cancel.
One of the people had
already taken the day off
and wanted to go despite
the winds. They have fished
with me many timeshaa
been in the wind.
On Friday when they
got on the boat one of
them commented this was
the windiest we had ever
fished and it probably was,
It finally laid by a little bit
in the afternoon but it made
anchoring tough all day. We
ended the day with four
flounder, two whiting and
eight trout. We lost several
nice trout and a sheeps-
head that probably weighed
about 6 or 7 pounds. They
were happy so I was happy
and glad when the day was
over,
Capt. David Fife also
fished out there on Friday
in the wind and he caught
some big trout around the
bars using live minnows.
We caught everything on
shrimp and the Gulp. David
had a charter the day it was
so foggy and they caught 15
nice trout using top water
plugs. He said it was so
foggy you could hardly see


times while in flight and
almost disappear.
We have quite a few bald
eagles around here and
I don't know how many
times I have seen them
around Oyster Bay and
Spring Creek. Mark Prance
and I were in Spring Creek
last year when an eagle
swooped down and picked
a redfish out of the water.

catch i agus 1l s p anu
land on a channel mark-
er and pluck them like a
chicken,
We were out in early
October and had a manatee
come right up to the boat
as if to see what we were
doing. I don't know how
many spotted Eagle Rays I
have seen jump out of the
water,
Twice I have seen a dol-
phin being born. I've seen
king and Spanish Mackerel
jump out of the water like a
rocket feeding on baitfish.
The reason I mention all
of this is that if you don't
look around while out on
the water and if you just
have tunnel vision you're
gonna miss a lot.
If you go this weekend
I hope you are successful.
Don't forget to leave that
float plan and be careful out
there. We hope you have a
happy Thanksgiving,
Good luck and good fish-
ingl

*Avoid wearing white,
red, black or blue since
these are the colors of a
gobbler's head and body.
*Select a spot that is
in open timber rather than
thick brush. Eliminating
movement and camouflage
is more critical to success


The Florida
commission's goal is
to achieve consistentcy
with feder al
protections
From Fwc News

The Florida Fish and

Cmisesionnsoer tlaos
week to change how gag
and red grouper are man-
aged in Gulf of Mexico
state waters,
The decision came on
Nov. 16, day one of the
two-day November Com-
mission meeting in Key
Lare
Te c anges, w ic
include additional pro-
tections for gag grouper
while increasing the bag
limit for red grouper, will
make state protections
consistent with gag and
red grouper federal rules
in the Gulf of Mexico.
"We are listening and
are very concerned about
the economy, jobs and
managing resources for
longevity as well," Com-
missioner Ron Bergeron
said following stakeholder
conversation,
Changes for red grouper
will take effect Dec. 23 in
Gulf of Mexico state waters
(excluding Monroe County)


than heavy cover.
*Sit against a large
stump, blow-down, tree
trunk or rock that is wider
than your shoulders and
higher than your head when
calling wild turkeys.
*If you imitate the
sound of a gobbling tur-


and will include increasing
the recreational bag limit
from two to four fish.
Commissioners also
voted to continue the cur-
rent gag grouper closure in
Gulf of Mexico state waters
(excluding Monroe County)
into 2012. The closure was
2e 1. expire at the end
This measure will help
the state achieve consis-
tency with gag grouper
management efforts affect-
ing federal Gulf waters,
The FWC believes apply-
ing the same recreational
open and closed harvest
seasons for gag grouper
in Gulf state waters as in
federal offshore waters
would maximize fishing
opportunities for anglers
and charter boat operators
along Florida's Gulf coast,
Federal managers are
currently working on a
plan to further protect gag
grouper, which is over-
fished and undergoing
overfishing in the Gulf.
The FWC will revisit state
gag grouper management
efforts in February 2012,
once federal rules are so-
lidified,
To learn more, visit My-
FWC.com/Commission
and click on "Commission
Meetings" and "Agenda."


key, you could call in other
hunters. You should always
be cautious, but especially
when hunting public land.
*Leave the area if you
suspect there's another
hunter already working the
same bird.


your plug as you were work-
inI abkaedktto tRhaet t Aucil-
la and he said over the
weekend the fish moved
into the river but right after
it warmed up they moved
back out to the flats. He said
there are plenty of trout on
the flats and he wouldn't
fish more than threc or four
feet of water. Live shrimp
and the Gulp will both
work. JR said about all he
uses is the Glow/Gulp Jedrk
Shad. The mouth of all the
creeks are holding fish and
plenty of trout and reds up
in the creeks. He also said
the Aucilla River is full of
mullet and plenty of people
are down there snatching
them,
Mark and Louise Prance
and I went over to Panacea
on Sunday afternoon and
caught about 40 white trout
and quite a few whiting us-
ing the white Gulp on the
bottom. About 10 of the
white trout were 15 to 16
inches and the others were
small.
While we were out there


we could look over towards
Mashes Sandsoadd It~h

As we watched them, one
jumped out of the water sev-
eral times and did a flip.
I tell people when we
are heading out of the canal
fishing to always pay atten-
tion to the water and look
around because there isn't
any telling what you will
see out there.
We were out in about 14
feet of water several years
back when we kept hearing
what I thought was a dol-
phin coming up and blow-
ing but turned out to be a
small whale about 20 feet
long. Fortunately a boat out
of Panacea grouper fishing
also saw it so people didn't
think I was crazy.
On Friday when we were
fishing we saw four flocks
of white pelicans at one
time and there must have
been more than 200 birds.
If you have never seen them
in flight they are absolutely
beautiful. They have black
On the tips of their wings
and they will turn some-


this fall:
*Know your state's
hunting regulations and
follow them,
*Keep your firearm
pointed in a safe direction,


and leave the safety on until
you are ready to shoot.
*Positively identify your
target, and know what is
beyond your target before
you shoot.


From the NWTF

Here are some tips from
the National Wild Turkey
Federation to consider
when you're in the woods


hBulMiows
SCikts


Bait Shop
(850) 926-1162


Outdoors


FWC changes gag,


red TrOR CT ful S


Fishing in the wind makes it tough


Some tips for safe turkey hunting


lr~ine 1


Supply i)b

















I


Coast Guard Auxiliary Reports -` --

By Carolyn Brown Treadon l


By Kurt Mondlak

Yesterday, at a North Florida spring, I watched a group
of new diving students conduct their first dives under the
watchful eyes of their instructors,
As I observed them conduct the various drills required
for their Basic Open Water certification, I realized that they
would all likely soon be qualified to conduct basic scuba
dives at any recreational open water dive site in the world
after only completing four dives under supervision in a
very controlled environment,
While statistics show that most newly certified divers
will either not dive regularly ever again or will only dive
with all-inclusive resorts or dive centers that provide them
with supervision similar to that provided by their instruc-
tors during these training dives, some will continue their
diving careers in more complex environments either in
our fresh water springs, the Gulf or the ocean.
For this minority of divers, are they truly ready, mentally
and physically, to conduct these dives?
I think the answer to this lies in the difference between
training and mentoring,
Training is conducted against a set of minimum stan-
dards. Mentoring consists of everything that is provided
to the student beyond those standards,
In diving, this training consists of both academics and
underwater skills,
Satisfactory demonstration of the required minimum
standards in each of these areas by the student, while cer-
tifying them on paper to dive in a variety of more challeng-
mng environments, in reality provides them with something
akin to a learner's permit, allowing them to gradually build
experience over a lifetime spent in this sport.
Unfortunately, many newly qualified divers often find
themselves in situations for which they are ill-prepared
during their first five to 10 open water dives.
Although there are few reported accidents involving
these new divers, these initial unpleasant experiences
during which they realize they may not be fully prepared
to accept the challenges of a rough ocean or cold water
may be partly to blame for the low number of open water
diving graduates that remain with the sport,
In the absence of an increase in the training require-
ments which have existed for decades, the only way to
produce new divers that are well-equipped to meet the
challenges of the various dive sites they may visit is through
mentorship.
This requires the instructor to take additional time to
teach the many subtleties of the sport that not only make
it safer but also more enjoyable,
This requires training beyond the required minimums,
involves a combination of forming habits for pre-dive
preparation, providing hints for equipment configuration of
maintenance and providing guidance for in-water activities,
and requires the instructor to make him or herself avail-
able after certification to continue the mentoring process
throughout the early, formative stages of a diver's career,
All of this additional knowledge is the result of the
instructor's vastly superior in-water experience and might
not otherwise ever be developed in the student.
While I have related this situation to new open water
divers, this problem exists at all levels of diving instruction,
although the ratio of mentoring to instructing increases
with more advanced certifications,
In reality, all instructors train,
Only the best truly mentor their students,


DO Bating Emergencies
;uard Station
City ....................... .. .... ............ (850)
;uard Station
town ...................... ... .... ............. (352)
;uard Auxiliary
ks (Flotilla 12) .......................................... (850)
......._ ........... ........... ........... .....(850)


~-1111

lli

1


Q HICKS HEATING IRLL





Jon Hicks

926-1909 o 509-8554


The 5p a M5H r Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open

Cra Aod vil 1rneh Ire S1 Credit Union 224-4960


ThurdalFor tides at the following points add to Thulrsdayr
s............... G ulf C oast W eekly A lm anac Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide wrms Mo~e
7:09 am 6:26 am Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. 149AM-1249 515AM-615AM
5:3 p 511pm First Full Last New OV 24-N v 30Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. 1119PM-119AM 417PM-5 17PM
8%Dec. 1 Dec. 10 Dec. 17 Nov. 24 -... Cat Point 1 Hr.,13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Better
FIW\ Tde hatsbyLower Anchorage 1Hr. 36Min. 2 Hrs, 3 Min.Fd~
rida Tid cart b West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Fiu
Sunrise/set Moonrise/set -- ----1PP'"'i.: M iua otwrL C4 rTunes M~orTunes
7:10 am 7:34 am St. Marks River Entrance City of St. Marks Shell Point, Spring Creek ------- 62MI-72AM
5:37 pm 6:09 pm 1150AM-150PM 510PM-610PM
Brgtns--0 ate Hh Low Hh Low Date Hih Lw Hg ow Dae Hh Low Hh Low Bs
Thu 3.8 ft. -1.1 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.4 ft. T u 3.6 f. -1.0 f. 3.3 f. 1.3 f. T u 3.9 f. -1.2 f. 3.6 f. 1.6ft
Satudu.1Nov 24, 11 12:07 AM 7:12 AM 1:48 PM 6:58 PM Nov 24, 11 12:43 AM 8:16 AM 2:24 PM 8:02 PM Nov 24, 11 12:04 AM 7:09 AM 1:45 PM 6:55 PM S~lurday
sunriseiset Moonriseiset Fi 3.9 f. -1.2 f. 3.4 f. 1.5 f. Fri 3.7 ft. -1.1 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.3 ft. Fri 4.0 ft. -1.3 ft. 3.5 ft. 1.6 ft.
7:11 am 8:38 am Nov 25, 11 12:49 AM 8:01 AM 2:35 PM 7:40 PM Nov 25, 11 1:25 AM 9:05 AM 3:11 PM 8:44 PM Nov 25, 11 12:46 AM 17:58 AM 2:32 PM 17:37 PM 122AorT22elsAM 734r sAM
5:37 pm 7:12 pm S t 4.0 f. -1.1 f. 3.3 f. 1.5 f. Sat 3.7 ft. -1.0 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.3 ft. S t4.0 f. -1.2 f. 3.4 f. 1.6 ft.,~,, 125PM253M 08P -78P
Nov 26, 11 1:31 AM 8:48 AM 3:19 PM 8:20 PM Nov 26, 11 2:07 AM 9:52 AM 3:55 PM 9:24 PM Nov 26, 11 1:28 AM 8:45 AM 3:16 PM 8:17 PM
Brightness- 8% Sun 3.9 f. -0.9 f. 3.1 f. 1.4 ft un 3.6 f. -0.8 f. 2.9 f. 1.3 f. Sun 4.0 ft. -0.9 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.5 ft. SEASONSBEST
Suindus Nov 27, 11 2:13 AM 9:33 AM 4:01 PM 9:02 PM Nov 27, 11 2:49 AM 10:37 AM 14:37 PM 10:06 PM Nov 27, 11 2:10 AM 9:30 AM 3:58 PM 18:59 PM Sundal
Mon 3.7 ft. -0.5 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.4 ft. Mon 3.4 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.3 ft. Mon 3.8 ft. -0.6 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.5 ft.
sunisist oorieiet Nov 28, 11 2:56 AM 10:18 AM 4:42 PM 9:46 PM Nov 28, 11 3:32 AM 11:22 AM 15:18 PM 10:50 PM Nov 28, 11 2:53 AM 10:15 AM 4:39 PM 9:43 PM MaorTnnes Mm~orTnnes
7:2a 935am Tue 3.4 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.4 ft. Tue 3.2 f. -0.1 f. 2.6 f. 1.3 ft ue 3.5 f. -0.1 f. 2.9 f. 1.5ft12M -4A 83 I97M
5:37 pm 8:16 pm Nov 29, 11 13:40 AM 11:01 AM 5:23 PM 10:35 PM Nov 29, 11 14:16 AM 12:05 PM 5:59 PM 11:39 PM Nov 29, 11 3:37 AM 10:58 AM 15:20 PM 10:32 PM 155PM-355PM 7n1PM-8H1PM
Brightness- 15% Wed 3.1 ft. 0.3 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.4 ft. Wed 2.9 ft. 0.3 ft. 2.5 ft. Wed 3.1 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.5 ft. FishmgImage
lIinndaz Nov 30, 11 14:28 AM 11:45 AM 6:05 PM 11:36 PM Nov 30, 11 5:04 AM 12:49 PM 6:41 PM Nov 30, 11 4:25 AM 11:42 AM 6:02 PM 11:33 PM hllnnda\
sunris/set Moonrisi/set Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Dog Island W7est End Maormnes aMuormnes
7:13 am 10:24 am 225AM-425AM 34AM-1034A
5:37 pm 9:20 pm ate H~h Lw Hgo w w ate Hih Lw Hg ow Date Hih Low Hig Low Hi 254PM-454P 815PM-915PM
Thu -0.8 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.1 ft. T u -1.0 f. 2.7 f. 1.4 f. T u -0.6 f. 2.5 f. 1.7 f. 3.0ft
2 Nov 24, 11 7:23 AM 1:40 PM 7:09 PM Nov 24, 11 6:51 AM 1:32 PM 6:37 PM Nov 24, 11 6:43 AM 3:04 PM 6:08 PM 11:41 PM Good
Tuesd arFr 3.0 f. -0.8 f. 2.6 f. 1.1 f. Fi3.1 f. -1.1 f. 2.7 f. 1.4 f. Fi-0.7 f. 2.5 f. 1.8 f.Tuesdal
Nov 25, 11 12:41 AM 8:12 AM 2:27 PM 7:51 PM Nov 25, 11 12:33 AM 7:40 AM 2:19 PM 7:19 PM Nov 2,11 7:31 AM 3:56 PM 16:50 PM
sun isist oo rieiet Sat 3.0 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.1 ft. Sat 3.1 ft. -1.1 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.4 ft. Sat 3.0 ft. -0.7 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.7 ft. MaorTunes Mm~orTunes
7:13 am 11:06 am Nov 26, 11 1:23 AM 8:59 AM 3:11 PM 8:31 PM Nov 26, 11 1:15 AM 8:27 AM 3:03 PM 7:59 PM Nov 26, 11 112:25 AM 18:19 AM 4:42 PM 17:33 PM 323AM-523AM 023AM-1123A
5:6p 1 :2 p S n 2.9 f. -0.6 f. 2.4 f. 1.0 f. Sun 3.0 ft. -0.8 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.4 f. S n 3.0 f. -0.6 f. 2.3 f. 1.6ft35P 0M 19 -09M
Brgtes-30% Nov 27, 11 2:05 AM 9:44 AM 3:53 PM 9:13 PM Nov 27, 11 1:57 AM 9:12 AM 3:45 PM 8:41 PM Nov 27, 11 1:12 AM 9:05 AM 5:21 PM 8:20 PM Aerage
Henedal Mon 2.8 ft. -0.4 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.0 ft. Mon 2.9 f. -0.5 f. 2.3 f. 1.4 f. Mon 2.9 ft. -0.5 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.5 ft.li n da
Nov 28, 11 2:48 AM 10:29 AM 4:34 PM 9:57 PM Nov 28, 11 2:40 AM 9:57 AM 4:26 PM 9:25 PM Nov 2,11 2:02 AM 9:50 AM 5:56 PM 9:14 PM
sunriseiset Moonriseiset Tue 2.6 ft 01f. 2.1 f. 1.0 f. Tue 2.7 ft. -0.1 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.4 ft. Tue 2.7 f. -0.2 f. 2.2 f. 1.4 ft. orTunes Mm~orTunes
7:14am 11:44 am Nov 29, 11 13:32 AM 11:12 AM 5:15 PM 10:46 PM Nov 29, 11 3:24 AM 10:40 AM 5:07 PM 10:14 PM Nov29, 11 12:56 AM 10:34 AM 6:27 PM 10:19 PM 416AM-616AM 106AM-120P
5:36 pm 11:18 pm Wed 2.3 ft. 0.2 ft. 2.0 ft. 1.0 ft. Wed 2.4 ft. 0.3 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.3 ft. Wd 2.4 f. 0.0 f. 2.2 f. 1.2 f.441PM-641PM 019PM-1119P
Nov 30, 11 4:20 AM 11:56 AM 5:57 PM 11:47 PM Nov 30, 11 4:12 AM 11:24 AM 5:49 PM 11:15 PM Nov30 11 3:55 AM 11:16 AM 16:56 PM 11:36 PM
Brightness- 36% Averge



:1111:


Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com


As they say, good things
come to those who wait.
This year, Tim Ash-
ley has been planning Cos
the FSU flyover from justCosG
about when we finished IPanama
last year. While that may Coast G
be a slight exaggeration,
each year we look at what Yankeet
worked and what can be Coast G
done better the following St a
year.StMa
The past four years, we or ...
have had the privilege of
hosting MH-60 Jayhawk,
HH 65 Dolphin and HC
140 Casa fixed wing from
Air Training Center Mobile --
(ATC), Safe Boat and crew
from Station Panama City
and the Marine Safety
Response Team (STRIKE).
Add in the Auxiliary and
we are ready to go.
This year seemed to be
a little more challenging
as we did not know what
time the game would be
until several days before
the event. While two air- Coast G
craft were scheduled, the
night game prevented the
HU-25 Guardian (Falcon)
from joining the Casa.
Standard practice only
allows one fixed wing air-
craft during night hours.
For spectators, the fly-
over lasts only a short
while, but in reality for
those involved it has a lot
more pre-planning. The
crew from ATC arrived
Friday for pre-planning,
practice and staging. Sat-
urday the day was spent Coast G
setting up our static dis-
plays along with the crew
from Station Panama City,
This year we had a prime
location right by the stat- ..
ue of Chief Osceola and :
Renegade on the stadium
green,
Crews met early to start
prepping for the Home-
coming crowd and the
game at 7 p.m. Tim Ashley,
Duane Treadon, Tiffanie -
Bourassa, Raye Crews, Rob
Purvis and Alex Gulde all Pilots m
worked throughout the
day to assist and support
the ATC and Station Panama City
as well as provide information
about the Auxiliary and safe boat-
ing to visitors. It is a lot of fun for


tion Crew. Gratitude to
Dr. Morris is indeed
Sdue for his dedication
) to providing a recipro-
cal relationship for our
234-4228 teams as we provide a
service to his.
Also owed thanks is
---r00the Leon County Sher.
iff's Office for storing
the Safe Boat so that
9--50the crew form Station
284-1166 Panama City and the
ATC could enjoy the
game.
All in all, it was a
1 gg long day that began
early and ended very
late. But it was a suc.
cess and we will be back
again for next year.
Sunday Tim Ashley
was Coxswain aboard
My Gail with crew
Chuck Hickman, Terry
Hoxworth and Rob Pur-
vis. The crew headed
SOut to the center chan-
TO THENEWS nel marker to do a vi.
adium. sual inspection of the
buoys to make sure all
were in good order.
Out near the center
channel marker they ran
into the Seahawk from
.. Carrabelle. The crew
was over doing boat
inspections while on a
safety patrol. Coxswain
Tim Ashley said the wa.
ter was smooth as glass
and the day was perfect
to be out.
By the time you all
are reading this, I hope
you are surrounded by
your family and friends
ready to remember what
it is we all give thanks
for,
This year, please re.
member to give thanks
to those who sacrifice to
allow us the freedoms
we often forget are not
free.
There are many fami-
lies who will not be able
to hug their loved ones
and see them at the
table over Thanksgiv.
ing. Please keep them
in your thoughts and
prayers not only this week, but
always.
As Sherrie reminds us, safe boat-
ing is no accidents


PHOTOS SPECIAL
;uard presence outside Doak Campbell St


;uard pilots for the pre-game flyover.


neet the Seminole cheerleaders,

all involved,
Saturday Dr. Charles (Chuck)
Morris, assistant director of Athlet-
ics, provided a tour of the stadium
and facilities to the ATC and Sta-


a peek into life on and under the water














MAR ELLEN DAVIS


(850) 926-6003


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 19A


"If you hear yourself criticiz-
ing, judging or complaining,
you're part of the problem,
Happy, self-respecting peo-
ple don't find it necessary
to dump on others to make
themselves feel good.
"If someone else is the
problem, simply don't give
them the ammunition they
need," she says. Instead try
these tactics:
Do not say anything
negative. Period. And no
one-downingl One-downing
is the opposite of one-up-
ping. It's the art of coming
up with something worse
when someone else talks
about their problem.
Dodge, distract and
detour. Turn things around
with a question a positive
one. If you need to, make
a "happy list" of questions
before you go, so you'll have
some at the ready. And res-
member, there's no law that
says you have to answer a
question just because some-
One asked it,


Do not talk about your-
self. The only reason nega-
tive people care about what
you're up to is because they
want something to ridicule,
brag or gossip about to
make themselves look or
feel good. Don't go there.
Do not share your
woes. Even if you're in a
tough place and could really
use a shoulder to cry on,
don't start laying your woes
on a Negative Nell. Even in a
weak moment, when you've
had a terrible day, talking
about it with a negative
person is a bad idea.
Do your homework and
become like Teflon. Think
of the times people said
things that made you feel
bad or made you feel the
need to defend or explain
yourself. If you want to
avoid going down that trail
again, start hacking away
at the jungle of your own
emotions. Get over need-
ing anyone's approval or
blessing.


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For those of us from
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one direction a mood can go
during holiday get-togethers
and that's down.
Sure, the running nega-
tive commentary, bubble-
bursting barbs and rampant
self-pity were funny com-
ing from comedian Rachel
Dratch on "Saturday Night
Live's" Debbie Downer
sketches. But few of us can
foresee our own Negative
Nancys giving us a good
belly laugh.
There are tricks you can
use to keep the table talk
from getting lethal, says
Paula Renaye, a professional
life coach and author of The
Hardline Self Help Hand-
book, (www.hardlineself-
help.com).
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Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011

WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)



Let's get to work on the session


www.thewakullanews.com


By BRANDON LARRABEE
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE, Nov. 18
- The occasional chill in
the air what passes for a
chill in Tallahassee sent
signals that 2011 was draw-
ing to an end.
But with an early ses-
sion slated for 2012 to
deal with redistricting,
lawmakers were beginning
to lay the groundwork for
the major proposals of the
coming year,
Except, it seemed, for
the redistricting debate
that prompted the early
starting gun.
While the Senate Reap-
portionment Committee
put the finishing touches
on its instructions for draw-
ing up a proposed commit-
tee bill, the House panel
tasked with the once-a-de-
cade redrawing of Florida's
political boundaries hit the
pause button. A committee
meeting and three sub-com-
mittee get-togethers were
all canceled, prompting
yelps from Democrats that
they weren't getting the full
story on the delays.
But even without a slate
of redistricting meetings,
there were plenty of po-
litical hot potatoes to deal
with, from destination re-
sorts to insurance reform
to a pair of contentious
claims bills.

GAMBLING BOOM
OR BUST?

The lobbying war over
the future of gambling in
Florida heated up during
the week, with some parts
of the business commu-
nity going all-in to support
bringing massive luxury
casinos to South Florida.
Associated Industries
of Florida put its cards on
the table, saying it would
make the approval of a
destination resorts bill its
highest priority in the 2012
session.
Among the other groups
pushing lawmakers to
adopt the proposal were
the Latin Builders Associa-
tion and the Florida United
Business Association, with
all of the supporters say-
ing that the state could
hit a jackpot worth tens of
thousands of jobs.
Others business groups
say the bill was nothing
but bad luck. The Florida
Chamber of Commerce
has lined up with Disney
and the Florida Retail Fed-
eration to say the proposal
isn't worth it.
But even after the first
committee meeting on the
proposal, it wasn't clear
where the chips might fall.
The meeting of the Senate
Regulated Industries Com-
mittee featured a lobbyist
saying "bulls**t" and a
panoply of concerns from
all sides.
The bill could lead to
expansions of gambling in
the rest of the state, some
opponents noted, though
gambling interests said
no other part of the state
would support the $2 bil-
lion minimum investments
required by the bill.
"There would be oppor-
tunity for this across the
state of Florida if the bill
was structured differently,"
said Alan Feldman, senior
vice president of MGM Re-
sorts. "At $2 billion, this is
a South Florida bill."
But even some gam-
bling lobbyists were skit-
tish about having too many
players at the table. Andy
Abboud, vice president
of government relations
for Las Vegas Sands, told
lawmakers to be careful
about "market saturation."
And pari-mutuel racetracks
were worried about the
competition.
The only thing guar-
anteed was a roll of the


dice. Senate President Mike
Haridopolos told reporters
Wednesday "we willohav sa

tination resorts bill on the
floor up or down."


An assault on fraud that
Gov. Rick Scott and others
say is costing motorists
almost $1 billion a year
in higher car-insurance
premiums.
Scott kicked off the drive
to change things, holding a
press conference with Cabi-
net members, law enforce-
ment officers and indus-
try lobbyists and blaming
staged crashes, bogus clin-
ics and unnecessary medi-
cal procedures for raising
the cost of personal injury
protection insurance,
"It's a $900-million tax
on consumers," Scott told
reporters and lobbyists
representing physicians,
hospitals, plaintiff's attor-
neys, providers and insur-
ance companies. "Crashes
are down but costs are up.
That makes absolutely no
sense."
The next day, House and
Senate members began
gauging proposals that
would make a number of
changes to rules surround-
ing the $10,000 benefit
created in the 1970s to en-
courage injured motorists
to seek medical attention
and stay out of court.
A House proposal would
limit rates and the number
of chiropractic or massage
treatments within a 12-
month period for accident
victims, cap attorneys fees
for legal cases and ban
benefits to recipients who
submit fraudulent or exag-
gerated claims. Insurance


companies would also face
new regulations.
The Senate also began
looking at efforts to craft
a solution at a midweek
hearing. Likely areas would
include placing restrictions
or bans on attorney referral
services, a move supported
by Chief Financial Officer
Jeff Atwater,
Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stu-
art, hinted other likely
areas to be addressed in-
clude requiring clinics to
be headed by physicians,
and some limitations on
the number of procedures
allowed during the course
of treatment.
But supporters of the
crackdown saw a potential
speed bump in the fierce
debate ahead.
"It's going to be a war,"
said House Insurance and
Banking Subcommittee
Chairman Bryan Nelson,
R-Apopka. "It's not a bill
that everybody is going
to say yes, yes, yes.... the
chiropractors won't like it,
the docs maybe won't like
it, the trial attorneys won't
like it."

CLAIMING VICTORIES?

Two claims bills that are
priorities of Senate Presi-
dent Mike Haridopolos also
got started along the legis-
lative path, but one of them
still threatened to turn into
a lobbyist food-fight.
The Senate Rules Com-
mittee voted 9-1 to move


forward with SB 4, which
calls for the Broward
County Sheriff's Office to
pay $15.575 million to Eric
Brody, who suffered debili-
tating injuries in a 1998 car
accident with a sheriff's
deputy.
A lobbyist for the sher-
iff's office insurer said the
bill is part of "scheme" by
Brody's attorneys to bring
what is known as a bad-
faith lawsuit against his
client despite the insurer's
willingness to pay $8.5
million to Brody to settle
the dispute but has been
rebuffed,
But Lance Block, an at-
torney for Brody, said $8.5
million would not cover the
costs to care for the Broward
County man, who suffered
brain damage and was in a
coma for six months after
the accident,
Rules Chairman John
Thrasher, R-St. Augustine,
implored the two sides to
try to reach an agreement
to end the dispute,
"This case cries out to
be resolved," Thrasher said.
"Eric Brody needs to be
helped."
Haridopolos has made a
priority of passing claims
bills to provide money to
Brody and William Dillon,
who spent 27 years in pris-
on after being wrongfully
convicted in a 1981 murder
in Brevard County. The bills
could pass the Senate dur-
ing the first week of the
2012 legislative session,


LEAVING THE
TAJ MAHAL

But at least one Capitol
saga seemed to be inching
toward a conclusion. Em-
battled First District Court
of Appeal Judge and noted
vinegar-lover Paul Hawkes
said he would resign Jan. 4,
ending one chapter of the
embarrassing saga over the
court's lavish new head-
quarters and short-circuit-
ing an inquiry into Hawkes'
role in the controversy.
Hawkes' resignation let-
ter to Scott never men-
tioned the looming Judicial
Qualifications Commission
hearing set to begin Jan,
30, but the case has drawn
attention for the sharply
critical legal briefings filed
by both sides, which had
included quotes from for-
mer Gov. Jeb Bush, Alice
in Wonderland and Shake-
speare to highlight their
points.
The crux of the dispute,
though, was Hawkes' role
in the construction of his
court's lavish new build-
ing on the outskirts of
Tallahassee and what Spe-
cial Counsel Wallace Pope
characterized as Hawkes'
browbeating and demean-
ing style of leadership.
But there were also fears
that shutting down the JC
hearings could keep Flo-
ridians in the dark about
how the proposal for a
new home for the court
morphed into the palatial


"Taj Mahal" courthouse.
"The taxpayers, the citi-
zens of Florida, will never
get many questions an-
swered, unfortunately,"
said Sen. Mike Fasano, a
New Port Richey Republican
who was one of Hawkes'
most vocal critics.
Along those lines, House
Democratic Leader Ron
Saunders called for an in-
vestigation into how Flor-
ida lawmakers funded the
$50 million structure,
"I am concerned that as
we enter a legislative ses-
sion where budget cuts will
be considered that could
cause great harm to needy
infants and senior citizens,
it remains unclear how this
lavish facility got approved
for funding," Saunders, D-
Key West, said,

STORY OF THE WEEK:
The debate over a contro-
versial proposal to bring
luxury casinos to Florida
begins in earnest.

OUOTE OF THE WEEK:
"I had three points I was go-
ing to make and I thought,
'Oh boy. I hope I remember
the three."' Gov. Rick
Scott, to The Palm Beach
Post, talking about his
interview with the paper's
editorial board. Scott was
referring to a gaffe by Texas
Gov. Rick Perry, Scott's po-
litical hero, during a recent
presidential debate.


E~n


PIP SOUAWKING


Also debuting this week:





www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 21A


reports


tivation of cannabis and,
as part of a plea deal with
the state, was ordered to
serve eight months in the
Wakulla County Jail with
credit for 87 days served
as a condition of two years
of felony drug offender
probation,
According to the police
report in the court file,
on May 26, deputies were
called out to her her home
in response to a domestic
disturbance. Deputies al-
legedly saw 49 marijuana
plants in her garden.
*Melissa Jo Oquincey,
31, pleaded no contest to
felony battery and, in an-
other case, to possession
of contraband in jail and
was ordered to six months
in Wakulla County Jail fol-
lowed by two years of drug


offender probation,
Oquincey was charged on
May 28 with forcing her way
into a home and fighting
with aman,
on Sept. 18, Q~uincey
was stopped by a deputy
after her car appeared to be
driving erractically. There
were cold beers in the car,
and she appeared intoxi-
cated. When she got out of
the car for DUI exercises,
the deputy allegedly saw
her stick something in her
shorts,
A search of her car found
some Xanax not in a pre-
scription bottle, and she
was charged with posses-
sion of a controlled sub-
stance and reckless driv-
ing. (As part of the plea
deal, the possession of the
Xanax was dropped by the


state.) At the jail, marijuana
was allegedly found inside
Oquincey earning her a
felony charge of contraband
in jail.
If was less than 20 grams
and was allegedly what the
deputy saw sticking in her
pants when she got out of
the car. Had it been discov-
ered then, it would have
only been a misdemeanor
charge.
*A 31-year-old Crawford-
ville man, John Cox, pleaded
to 35 counts of possession
of child pornography and
was sentenced to five years
in state prison followed by
five yeas of sex offender
probation,
*Steven Donoho, 48,
was sentenced to three
years in prison for pos-
session of a firearm by a


convicted felon.
According to the arrest
report, deputies were re-
sponding to a disturbance
call at Wal-Mart and stopped
a car in the parking lot be-
ing driven by Donoho. In
the backseat of the Lincoln
was a 12-gauge shotgun.
*Paul Porretto, 54, was
set for trial in December
on charges of trafficking
in methamphetamine and
aggravated battery with a
firearm.
According to the arrest
report, Porretto was report-
edly selling meth in the
area and got into an argu-
ment with a man riding
in his van and took a shot
at him.
The two different cases
with have two different
trials.


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor~thewakullanews.net

A 20-year-old woman
placed on probation in July
for trying to smuggle con-
traband to male inmates in
the Wakulla County Jail was
back in court last week for
violating her probation after
she was arrested in Louisi-
ana with a pound of pot.
Randi Rae Ministerio's
probation was modified in
court on Nov. 9 to include
an additional 70 days in
jail.
On Aug. 25, Ministerio
was a passenger in a car on
I-10 stopped for following
too closely. According to the
arrest report in court file,


the driver and Ministerio
both claimed they had no
identification but they
acted so nervous that the
officer became suspicious.
A search of the trunk of
the rental car turned up a
pound of marijuana as
well as IDs. The driver was
only 16, which earned Min-
isterio an additional charge
in Louisiana of contribute.
ing to the delinquency of
a minor.
She was charged with vi.
olating her state probation
for picking up a new law
violation and for leaving the
area without permission,
In other court activity:
*Cynthia White, 48,
pleaded no contest to cul-


Law Enforcemnent and Courts


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 23A


On Nov. 13, Skip Young
of Crawfordville reported
an attempted business bur-
glary at Three Y Outdoor
Equipment in Crawfordville.
A lock on a fence was bro-
ken. Evidence was collected
at the scene. No access to
the business was obtained,
Deputy Nick Gray, Deputy
Ben Steinle and Deputy
Vicki Mitchell investigated,
In other activity reported
by the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office this week:
*On Nov. 13, Amber Jean
Nowling, 18, of Sopchoppy
was charged with DUI fol-
lowing traffic crash on U.S.
Highway 98 and Floyd Gray
Road in Medart. Deputy
Billy Metcalf and Deputy
Mike Zimba discovered
Nowling inside a crashed
vehicle along the tree line.
EMS responded and deter-
mined that Nowling did not
require transportation to a
hospital. DUI exercises were
conducted and she was
transported to the Wakulla
County Jail. Breathalyzer
tests were also conducted
by Deputy Vicki Mitchell,
*On Nov. 13, Linda Hol-
lis of Panacea reported a
vehicle theft from her yard.
A suspect has been identi-
fied and the vehicle was
entered into the NCIC/FCIC
computer,
After finishing the theft
paperwork, WCSO Commu-
nications contacted Road
Patrol deputies that Kailey
Charlene Griffin, 21, of Pana-
cea was in the WCSO lobby
and the stolen vehicle was
in the parking lot. Lt. C.L.
Morrison returned the ve-
hicle to the victim. PSO Wes
Coleman and Deputy Vicki
Mitchell also investigated,
*On Nov. 13, Brenda Lee
Davis, 45, of Crawfordville


was injured in a single
vehicle accident on Reh-
winkel Road near Old Still
Road. Davis was being as-
sisted by another motorist
who stopped to help when
Deputy Mike Zimba arrived
at the scene. He determined
that Davis was northbound
on Rehwinkel Road when
she ran off the roadway as
she was coming around a
curve. Davis overcorrected
which caused her vehicle
to cross the road and flip
in the ditch on the south-
bound side of the road.
Da vis was thro w n
through the open vehicle
window. The vehicle was
a total loss and EMS staff
transported Davis to Talla-
hassee Memorial Hospital.
No charges were filed. PSO
Nancy Watts and Deputy
lan Dohme assisted at the
scene.
*On Nov. 11, Eddie
Hartsfield of Crawfordville
reported a residential bur-
glary. Two window air con-
ditioning units were stolen
along with a shotgun. The
stolen property is valued at
$200. Deputy Ben Steinle
investigated.
*On Nov. 12, Charles
Smith of Tallahassee report-
ed a residential burglary in
Sopchoppy. A forced entry
was discovered. It appeared
that someone was living
in the house. Two skillets,
valued at $100, were stolen
and $15 worth of damage
to the home was also ob-
served. Deputy Mike Zimba
investigated,
*On Nov. 12, Phoebe
Fillis of Crawfordville re-
ported a vehicle burglary,
The victim reported that
her vehicle battery, valued
at $50, was stolen. Deputy
Nick Gray investigated,


*On Nov. 10, James
Weaver of Tallahassee re-
ported a credit card fraud
at his Crawfordville bank.
Three charges were found
on the card that had not
been authorized. The charg-
es totaled $327 in San Juan,
Puerto Rico. Deputy Randy
Phillips investigated.
*On Nov. 10, Emily
Gould of Fortis Environ-
mental Group reported the
theft of tires from a trailer
which was parked at a loca-
tion on Crawfordville High-
way. The trailer is a portable
wastewater treatment plant
owned by the Florida De-
partment of Environmental
Protection. The four tires
were valued at $200. Lt. Brad
Taylor investigated,
*On Nov. 13, Charles Mc-
Murry of St. Marks reported
a residential burglary. Three
firearms and currency were
stolen from the residence. A
forced entry was discovered
at the home and damage
was estimated at $100. The
stolen property is valued at
$1,700. Deputy Clint Beam
investigated,
*On Nov. 13, Kristopher
Slater of Crawfordville re-
ported a criminal mischief.
Two holes were observed in
the victim's bedroom win-
dow. The damage was cre-
ated by a BB gun. Damage
is estimated at $150. Deputy
Nick Gray investigated,
*On Nov. 13, Tamara
Hornbaker of Crawfordville
reported a trespass at her
home. The victim observed
an overhead light go on in
her vehicle. The victim hit
the vehicle alarm and the
suspect fled on foot. Deputy
Clint Beam investigated,
*On Nov. 14, a 17-year-
old male juvenile was bitten
by a dog on Barber Road


as he walked on the road.
The victim suffered a bite
wound to his leg and torn
clothing.
EMS responded and
treated the victim. Wakulla
County Animal Control
seized the dog. Deputy Ra-
chel Oliver investigated,
*On Nov. 14, Charles
Randall Allen, 30, of Craw-
fordville was arrested for
battery in connection with
an altercation at the Kanga-
roo station in Wakulla Sta-
tion. Witnesses stated that
Allen struck a 60-year-old
Midway man in the face at
the store.
The victim said Allen
blew an air horn at him
while they were traveling
on the highway. The alter-
cation took place near the
gas pumps. Allen was taken
to the Wakulla County Jail
without incident. Sgt. Mike
Helms investigated,
*On Nov. 14, Robert
W. Tully of Crawfordville
reported the theft of tools
and a speaker box from
a residential property he
was working on. The tools
are valued at $380. Deputy
Rachel Oliver interviewed
two suspects in the case
and issued them trespass
warnings for the victim's
property.
Deputy Randy Phillips
recovered a stolen chain
saw submerged in the water
under the Lost Creek Bridge.
The case has been turned
over to the Criminal Inves-
tigations Division.
*On Nov. 14, Merritt
Taylor of Panacea reported
a residential burglary to a
family home. A forced en-
try was discovered at the
home and $2,290 worth of
fishing equipment, elec-
tronics, camping equip-


ment, ammunition and
tools were reported stolen,
Deputy Randy Phillips in-
vestigated.
*On Nov. 15, Judy Parker
of Crawfordville reported a
fraud as her Social Security
check did not automatically
deposit into her bank ac-
count. The victim contacted
Social Security and was
told the check was sent
to another account. The
case was turned over to
the Criminal Investigations
Division. Deputy Rachel
Oliver investigated,
*On Nov. 15, Earl Car-
penter of Crawfordville
reported a grand theft. A
chain saw, valued at $400,
was stolen from the victim's
porch. Deputy Ward Kromer
investigated.
*On Nov. 16, Danny Ellis
of Crawfordville reported
a grand theft. A chain saw
was stolen out of the vic-
tim's vehicle. The tool is
valued at $700 and suspect
has been identified. Deputy
Mike Zimba investigated,
*On Nov. 15, Cheryl Mc.
Call of Sopchoppy reported
a felony criminal mischief
as someone damaged her
vehicle while it was parked
at Wakulla High School,
Damage to a door and mir.
ror was estimated at $900.
Surveillance evidence was
collected by Deputy Scott
Rojas,
*On Nov. 16, Kim Miller
of Crawfordville reported
a credit card offense. The
victim had two unauthor.
ized charges on her bank
account which totaled $139.
The charges were accrued
through Amazon. Lt. C.L.
Morrison investigated.
*On Nov. 16, Belinda
Ross of Crawfordville re.
ported a credit card offense.


TOA8 BAH


I





I

I

I

I

I


Must Present Coupon O~ffer expires December 31, 2011.

Monday Friday 9a.m. -6p.m. Saturday 9a.m. 3p.m.

850-926-8467
2543 C Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville


Sheriff's Report


Three unauthorized charges
were observed on her ac-
count. The charges totaled
$97. Deputy Scott Rojas
investigated.

The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office received
745 calls for service during
the past week including 21
residential and business
alarms; 13 disturbances;
41 investigations; 10 loud
music/noise complaints;
51 medical emergencies; 0
suspicious people; 11 sus-
picious vehicles: 36 traffic
stops; 10 disabled vehicles;
and 155 watch orders.


Christmas

in the Park

Set Dec. 9
Special to The News

The Wakulla County Sher-
iff's office, Wakulla County
Parks and Recreation and
Centennial Bank will host
the annual Christmas in the
Park for children on Friday,
Dec. 9 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
at Azalea Park in Crawford-
ville,
The event will give chil-
dren a chance to meet with
Santa Claus while getting
into the Christmas spirit.
Santa will arrive at the park
at 6 p.m. and parents are
invited to bring their cam-
eras. Four bicycles will be
given away along with bike
helmets and toys and door
prizes,
In addition, there will be
Spin Art, train rides around
the padrk food and beverages
and entertainment.
Everyone is invited.


li~


III:1EB B~I


Gifis & Accessories































+Sheh W~orks a*
Let usI eku~eku wakulla's coworking caf4

Syour~dy ~~850-253-7253
~aaeeiv B Omplimentary eo~ ~

when you order a
Pastry and C~offe Aiprecial!"










Order te spcial














FRESH MADE TO ORDER
HOT OR COLD
SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS
SEASONAL SOUP & CHILI PARTY PLATTERS
926-3500 rax orders 926-350 1
500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawforvle


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Dickerson Bal

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LUNCH SPEClALS
11la.m. 3p.m. All Under $10.

THURSDAYS
$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS
ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95
BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 ITHURS DAYS

713*0014 DOMESTI
99 ROCK LAN\DINGI ROAD BEER
~$1.50
111, SUMMER HOURS:
OPEN THURSDAY. SUNDAY. j WELLS
&T MONDAY II A.M. 9 P~M.
IP5s FRIDAY & SATURDAY (
Flrinda II AM. 10 P.M.


Page 24A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com


By KEITH BLACKMAR
Wakulla Sheriff's Office

An average work day
in December 2010 almost
turned tragic for Sgt. Ronald
"Boonie" Mitchell and his
K-9 partner Gunny.
The pair was taking part
in a vehicle pursuit and
Gunny got thrown around
the vehicle and injured his
spine.
There was a happy end-
ing thanks to two surger-


ies by Dr. Norm Griggs of
Shepherd Spring Animal
Hospital in Crawfordville.
After several months of
recuperative time, Gunny
and Sgt. Mitchell have been
able to return to a normal
law enforcement relation-
ship.
Right after the injury,
Mitchell took Gunny to see
Dr. Faith Hughes and the
dog experienced paralysis
in his rear end. There was
talk of retiring the dog


and a canine expert recom-
mended taking Gunny to
Gainesville for treatment
from an orthopedic sur-
geon,
As luck would have it,
Wakulla County had an
orthopedic vet practicing
right down the highway.
Dr. Griggs, a canine
orthopedic surgeon, told
Mitchell that he thought he
could save the animal.
"At that point, Boonie
wasn't concerned about
Gunny continuing his po-
lice work, he just wanted
to save the dog's life," said
Griggs. "I felt like Gunny
could recover."
The first surgery on Gun-
ny's spine was in December
2010 and the dog began to
make some progress toward
recovery.
"Dr. Griggs found more
damage to the spine and
nerve damage due to the
injury," said Mitchell.
The second surgery was
conducted in January 2011
and Mitchell went through
months of rehabilitative
work to get Gunny back in
sh pe to continue police
All of the hard work
done by Mitchell at home
was conducted while the
sergeant was reassigned to
the road patrol unit. Boonie
and his wife Vicki are both
employed by the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office and
both understood what it
took to care for Gunny.
"The way I saw it, it was
another officer who was
wounded," said Mitchell. "It
was a 24-hour-a-day thing
for me and my wife.
The Mitchells celebrated
milestones of the dog's
Afee e four months of
recuperating from the two
surgeries.nMitckh I an
Gnny wen back troug
drug interdiction training
sn Juyma A gust and, in
Septebr Gny bcm
100 percent certified in


Happy Thanksgiving!
elWe will be closed Wed. Nov. 23 and reopen Mon. Nov. 28




S PE CIALS!i

F)ettet Dinners

$7.99o

Grouper Burgers C;E

.$6.99
Fried, Blackened or Grilled

We have Soft Shell Grabs

Huttons Seafood

& More 570-1004


Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7*
Sat. 10-s Closed Sun. & Wed.


Sgt. Boonie Mitchell with K-9 Gunny and Dr. Norm Griggs and his staff.


narcotics detection by the
International Forensic Re-
search Institute.
Mitchell continued to
work with Gunny on track-
ing and he showed his skill
by quickly locating a miss-
ing 4-year-old child.
..The dog was always
good at tracking," he said.
After finding the child,
Gunny got to play with his
pull toy, a favorite activity.
Gunny has also helped
locate a female Alzheimer's
patient,
Mitchell's wife Vicki
handled Dante, a retired
WCSO law enforcement
dog. Dante is now 14 and
is blind. He is a Belgian
Malinois.
."K-9 handlers are a fam-
ily worldwide," said Mitch-
ell. "We all understand,
We have all been through
the same training. There
is a mutual respect there.
We're all kind of linked
together."
The 25 year law enforce-


ment veteran feels Gunny
will be good for another
year, but he isn't sure what
the future will bring.
For Griggs and his staff
of wife Melody and as-
sistants Alison Collier and
Maria Steurer, it has be-
come a special event when
Gunny rumbles through the
animal hospital.
"I had experience work-
ing with law dogs when
I was in Memphis," said
Griggs. "The ruptured disc
was unusual for this breed.
He blew out two different
discs. Boonie and his dedi-
cation to this dog was just
amazing. He wanted to save
the dog's life. It was really,
really thrilling to me."
"He is a very, very lucky
dog," said Griggs. "He is
also a very headstrong dog
and that probably helped
him during the recovery."
Recently, Mitchell and
Gunny were called out to
a wooded area of Wakulla
Beach Road to locate a


young child who had wan-
dered away from his home.
Gunny caught the scent and
pulled Mitchell through
some thick brush. Eventu-
ally, Mitchell could see the
boy running and hollered
out to him to come back,
to come meet and visit with
his dog.
The child changed di-
rections and came toward
Mitchell, and the sergeant
carried the young boy out
of the woods like a back-
pack while Gunny led the
way, backtracking his own
scent,
"This county should be
very, very proud of these
two," said Griggs. "The dog
can find a child, he can
find drugs and he can drag
down a felon. He is a very
special dog."
"The county has invested
a lot of money in Gunny,"
Mitchell concluded. "But
how can you put a price on
finding a missing child. It
was priceless."


rC


We will be closed Thanksgiving Da

Re-Openmng the dy after

from 10 ~m. until

2` 8 Localy owned & _Operate~d


Dr. Norm Griggs' surgery helped save K-9 officer Gunny































www.thewakullanews.c.om Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century

~ell m(ill .)lu
'g..
Odc~r bkd~


Pick and choose the items on tlis list that add up to your target calorie range.


~Corner of Rose St. and Wintlump Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy 926-10101


-


BREJ

Coastal Restaurant
OOOO



LOo ok fo~ r Yo urt Col mp l i me nItar y

( ff~e W ~ith 31W 6111 Br~ea~fast Orldelr

Hungry Man Break~Fuits $52
Breg~astPhattr $24
$1 9Br cSast Special

Kids Eat AU8-2: 3 ~CE
on ed Chickien Tues.
*n &'~d Th urs.
S 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea 1


The Lrabby CGreet


(Alfredo, crabmeat, feta and mozzarella cheese)

Toni's Pitta

sm $9.95 Med $10.95 Lg $23.95
(Feta and mozzarella cheese, bacon, mushrooms,
pepperoni, alfredo and marinara sauce)


Our choose ylour own topping... add .50 each
Mushrooms Bacon Tomatoes Anchovies Pepperoni Onions Feta Hamburger Mozzarella Lheese Marinara Alfredo LGartic.



Come visit 0-We-G~o 1.oun e


1/> OFF Appetizers & Drinks,


1402. T- Bone or 14o2. Nlew Y/orK Strip STEA(C $16.% 1
and choice of P9otato

....-s--. 984-5168

Open Wednesday Sunday
Wed. & Thur. 4:30-10 Fri. & Sat. 4:30 -11 Sun. 12-10
CALL FOR HOLIDAY HOURS


www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 25A


2,000 calories a day, and
most women need about
1,soo calories a day to main-
tain a healthy weight.
"Your Thanksgiving meal
should make up about one-
third of your daily calories
if you plan on eating three
meals for the day," Herndon
said.
To stay in that target calo-
rie range, Herndon recom-
mends using the following
infographic.
"Remember, if you do
indulge a little on Thanks-
givmng Day, make sure you
return to eating balanced,
healthy meals the next day,"
Herndon sai fraio n

making healthy choices dur-
ing the holidays, visit www.
mdanderson. org/focus ed.


Medical experts offer
advice on controlling
Thanksgiving portions
Special to The News
HOUSTON Adults can
avoid holiday weight gain
by learning how to choose
healthier food portions with
the new Thanksgiving serv-
ing size infographic, created
by experts at The University
of Texas MD Anderson Can-
cer Center.
"Overeating can lead to
unhealthy weight gain that,
in the long-run, may make it
harder for your body to fight
off disas llikee cncor -

MPH, RD, wellness dietitian
at MD Anderson,
Most men need about


The Albert Einstein
Medical Center offers five
recommendations to pro-
tect your heart health this
winter's heart attack sea-
son,
1. Beware of fatty foods
and large portions Make
sure your holiday dinner
table consists of lots of
veggies, fruits, lean protein
and whole grains.
2. Exercise Try 30 min-
utes of light exercise per
day to help strengthen
the heart.


3. Stop smoking Re-
place your smoking routine
with a 30-minute exercise
session, which will help
get your mind off smok-
ing,
4. Avoid those obvi-
ous holiday heart attack
triggers Excess physical
exertion, overeating, lack
of sleep, emotional stress,
cold temperatures, illegal
drugs and alcohol.
5. Talk to your doctor
- And stay regular with
your medications,


Q""
c- UII ...T ~rr,


Our Seafood Mar~et has moved... ONLY I BlocK
NOW Across from Lentena Bat K



pical Trader





a r




SHRIMP- F ~SSH OFF THE~ BOAT
plEPA\LED FOD D
Premade for Easy1 use
Bacon Wrapped Stuffed Shrimp
Stuffed Shrimp
Deviled Lrab
Shrimp Salad
Lrab Meat Salad
Marinated Shrimp
Smoked Fish Dip

Seasoned Salmon Fillet
Seafood stuffd potato
Escargot
Blue Lheese stubfd shrimp
Blue Lheese stubfd grouper



Used in our dishes at Angelo's Pestaurant
Prices vary with sites
GreeK Htouse Dressini
Blue Lheese Dressing
A variety of Lrab Boils


Marinated ~reeK Olives & Feta

Tsdel ore ~ing u~Sauce
GreeK Butter


Lhar- Broi\ Seasoning
Pib & Smoued Fish Pub
singer Sesame Dylster Sauce
BBq Sauce
Lreole Sauce

984-HSH
( 3 47 4)
open Wed. & Thur. 11-8
Fri. & Sat. 9-9 Sun. 11-8


good and drink
and receive a
complimentary copy of


se~e an~ura n4etaBwhile quantities last.


Make fruits,
vegetables, beans
*: whl:grin


By DAVID WHITE
Turkey Day is notorious-
ly terrifying for the at-home
sommelier.
Just stick to this handful
of guideposts. It's actually
ault eras tow i~aea memo-
everyone will enjoy.
For starters, remember
that Thanksgiving is an
American holiday.
So when you head to the
store, embrace your patrio-
tism and pick up domestic
wine. And don't hesitate
to buy local. All 50 states
now produce wine, and the
Drink Local Wine move-
ment is taking off.
Second, as San Francisco
wine writer Jon Bonne has
advised, "devise a roster
of one sparkling wine, one
white and one red."
Anything beyond three
wines creates needless con-
fusion.
A simple Pinot Grigio,
for example, isn't a power-


ful wine so won't stand
up to mashed potatoes and
gravy. Equally important,
an in-your-face Cabernet
Sauvignon lacks finesse,
so will smother your food.
Look for refreshing wines
wiFhortdh sparkler, this
means avoiding bottles that
are too sweet look for
"brut" or "extra brut" on the
label. Old standbys like Do-
maine Chandon and Korbel
are better than ever before,
and if you're in the mood
to splurge, America's top
sparkling wines easily rival
French Champagne look
for Roederer or Argyle*
Every gathering should
begin with a toast, of course,
but sparkling wine goes
with just about everything
- so keep the sparkler on
your table all evening*
For the white wine, re-
member to look for body*
Bold Chardonnays work
well with turkey and can
cut through just about every


bec.
po naortc eis the n s
giving, but it's very difficult
to find good Pinot for less
than $15. That's why Syrah
- ideally from a cool-climate
region like Washington or
California's coastal regions
- is a better bet. There are
literally hundreds of choices
for less than $15.
Finally, and most impor-
tantly, have lots of wine on
hand. The more wine on the
table, the more your family
will enjoy the meal.
David White, a wine
writer, is the founder and
editor of Terroiristtcom,
His columns are housed
at Wines~com, the fastest
growing wineportal on the
Internet,


P


Special ty

Pizzas

Dine in or take out
Medium Cheese ................. $1 2.95
SLarge Cheese ................... .. $17.95
Small Pepperoni ................... $8.95
Medium Pepperoni. .............$13.95
Large Pepperoni ................ $18.95


How to carve up TIhanksgiving calories


5 tips for avoiding

'Heart Attack Season'


Organics de @95f~c


?is T~hanksgiving

d nk easy


WWW.m(idBFleSOLORglf0CIISE

component of your meal
- fromnsweethflavors likesci

green vegetables. California
is still on top, but look for
wines with specific Viticul-
tural Areas on the label, like
Carneros, Monterey County,
Russian River Valley, and
others.
Riesling either dry or
slightly sweet is also a
wonderful wine for Thanks-
giving. In Washington,
Hogue Cellars and Pacific
Rim are making some stun-
ning wines, and just about
everything from New York's
Finger Lakes would please
your guests,
With reds, think refresh-
ment. This means avoiding
wines with lots of tannin,
so steer clear of Cabernet
Sauvignon, Merlot and Mal-


COme try our NEW

Made fkomr Scratch


She\fish Lovers Pitta Sm $11.95 Med $19.99 Lg $26.95
(Clams, shrimp r,- scallops in olive oil and garlic)


Alas~can Pitta


(Smo~ed salmon, cream cheese and sPinach)

The Weiner

sm $6.95 Med $155.95 Lg $10.95
(Chili cheese dog pizza)


4:30


- 6:00



























Fair Trade and Locally Handcrafted Gifts
Holiday and Special Occasion Cards & Gifts
Local and World CD 's
Health & Beauty hand milled soap, lotions,
essential oil, makeup, and more.

Fine Art & Art Prints, Bumper stickers
and buttons with a message
Tee shirts and limited clothing items
Puppets & children 's toys

Natural Food Grocery Store
Featuring Organic, gluten free, supplements,
& specialty items
Cafe/Coffee Shop/akery/Homemade organic
bakery, lunches, cappucinos, smoothies, etc.

Organic Growers Market every Saturday:
11 a.m. 3 p.m.
Live music concerts and special events:
for updates, email poshjava @gmail. com
or phone (850) 962-1010.
Americana, Roots, Country, Folk, Jazz,
Classical, Celtic, Old Time, Soft Rock'
Blues Influences, and more...
ALL ORIGINAL singer songwriters!
Downtown Sopchoppy


2669 Crawfordville Hwy
Ope~ D~s Downtown Crawfordlville


r~l~===~~ralocautrim. FRI 1 1-6 PM




MON. -THUS .1 93
248F1R RAS 11LLE OW
IN BA SPRING LAZAM-F Dine in only 11-3
ELJalisco5@live.com


Page 26A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www.thewakullanews.com


Who among us can eat five

pounds offood in one hour?


d~c~dczice &


~;c~i


#1 Donny Bennett 27:16, #2 Austin Hill 29:57,
#3 Henry Abarca 59:43, #4 Chris Dolan 59:45.
There are 75 other names on the Wall of Shame.
Who among us can eat five pounds of food in one
hour? Perhaps the question should be why would anyone
want to?
Answer: Glory and fame. Nearly 80 challengers have
attempted Myra Jean's Behemoth Cheeseburger Challenge,
Most fell short and landed on the Wall of Shame. After all,
three pounds of beef, 10 slices of cheese, the enormous bun
and a pound of fries is enough food to stuff four hungry
grown men. It takes a lot of gut to eat your way to glory.
Last January Austin Hill became the first to eat it all
in under 30 minutes. The deal is, if you eat it in less than
an hour, you are a champion and your name and picture
goes on the Wall of Fame, but if you eat it in under 30
minutes, we refund the $19.95 entry fee so you get it all for
FREE as well. Austin ate everything in 29:57.
Honestly, we at MJ's doubted anyone would ever beat
that record. Wrong
On Oct. 24, 2011 Donny Bennett came with a crowd of
supporters to Myra Jean's. He ordered and paid for our chal-
lenge burger. He was seated and The Behemoth was placed
before him and 27 minutes, 16 seconds later, Myra Jean's
was refunding his money and taking his picture. Austin
Hill's record was broken and Donny Bennett had become
Myra Jean's all time Behemoth Cheeseburger Champion.
We at Myra Jean's are confident that this new record
will never be beaten. Come bask in the glow of the new
champion, see his picture, and the pictures of our three
other victorious contestants on the wall of fame located
in Myra Jean's main dining room.


We are very pleased with the wonderful response our
community has given us since our grand opening in May.
We have enjoyed meeting you and your family and truly
appreciate all the positive feedback we have received
during your frequent visits to the restaurant.
We also appreciate your compliments on our freshly
made, great tasting variety of plates, and your gratitude
on our "low prices-large portions" commitment that we
will continue to offer, as well as the free kid's meal with
an adult's purchase anytime, any day!
Your special requests for certain items is on top of our
priority list. Very soon we will start baking fresh Cuban
pastries daily for those of you from down South who
keep craving for such delicious treats and we promise
that the locals will love them as well,
Breakfast will be available from 8AM dine-in or take
out on your way to work. Keep checking your local pub-
lications for discount coupons, specials and new items
on our menu.
Our event catering service was also very well received
in our community with extraordinary results. Holiday
party orders are arriving early, so don't wait 'til the last
minute. Call us now at 850-745-8545 and we will take care
of catering your holiday party
Again, we appreciate all the support and wish to invite
you to continue to patronize this locally owned and oper-
ated business which adds such variety to the choices you
have for dining out. Our friendly staff is ready to serve
you and your family. Black Bean Cuban Cuisine is located
at 2615 Crawfordville Hwy. at the Winn-Dixie Plaza in
Crawfordville and can also be reached at 850-745-8545.
-- Black Bean Management and Staff


7r


Readers'Cocn "' I

2 011"~3
Bes~t Dionnr
PCRl~OPPY OR:.
Bes~t Atmosp~here Historic Downtown Sopchoppy
W~akulla Chamber of Commerce
2011 Business of the Year
Our Distinctive Menu includes:
Specialty Pizzas, Unique Appetizers, Crearny Alfredos, Fresh
Seafood, Meat and Veggie Lasagnas, Hearty Sandwiches,
Signature Salads, Exquisite Desserts and Weekend Specials
O~ceorU~,U~c~~ Fu ll Menu on TheBackwoodsBistro.com
Faceook~om/ackwodsWe Serve Beer and Wine


Coastal
Restau~ran~lt
I,.......,r ,..
\. .I,... I.. ,./.,,
KIds Eat 9
FreeonWednesday



lues~. & Ilme1.4
MOBILE CATERING

981-2933' "' ".


Black Bean pleased with

response since Grand Opening


~12~;~i~~it.t~~o~3~,~iL~7~T~i~~i23~1~~


Win One Mveal from Every Restaurant!


Winner receives one meal from the following:

Coastal Restaurant fiYCE Chicken or Pork< Chop D~inner

El ]alisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or Girilled

Myra ]eans Grilled Chicken Pita with side

Hlamaknockers Hlamma Pizza

Backwoods Bistro 11sro for one EntreeS (dine in only)

Talk o' The Town Dei Choice of Sandwich 5 Drink

Black Bean Cuban Caisine Lanch Special of your choice (dine in only)


15/OOF

on ANY p~urchase of $20O or more.

at1 WinDii cbacc~~1~ 857584
























I)


THE WAK~ULL~1 NEWS. Wednesday, November 23, 2011





corarry senior




R.H. Carter

We recognize how fast
each year passes at this
time each year,
It seems that each year
passes faster than the year
before.
Employees, volunteers
and other seniors in the Se-
nior Center are always look-
ing back at pictures taken
years and even months
before and are reminded
that life is temporary,
It motivates all of us to
strive to enjoy our life and
our friends and neighbors
on a daily basis,
We learn that we have
only one opportunity to
enjoy each day.
We can't go back be-
cause there are no re-runs.
If we fail to enjoy a day,
the opportunity is lost
forever,
We must avoid negative
thoughts and enjoy the
many please afforded
by te gif o ie.
It is the best time of
the year to give thanks for
all that we enjoy and give
prise for the blessing of

Remembering that giv-
ing and receiving conver-
sation, gifts and all other


interactions create friend-
ship, companionship and
communities in which

We continually meet
new clients as they come
to the Senior Center.
The numbers are grow-
ing and the needs are be-
coming more diverse just
as the diversity of their
background and culture.
The thing that has not
increased is the funding
provided by grants that we
receive. This creates a chal-
lenge for our community
to meet these increasing
needs.
I am amazed at how
many people recognize this
and give to help.
Recently, the Fundrais-
ing Committee invited me
to meet with them and
discuss fundraising proj-
ects and events to increase
community awareness.
There are many mem-
bers on this committee.
I didn't select them, they
contacted Kathie Brown
and volunteered to help
her raise funds for senior
citizens.
On this date the com-
mittee members present
were Kathie Brown, Virgin-
ia Moore, Lynn Henderson,
Becky Black, Maria Lintz
and Donna Card. I over-
heard one of them thank-
ing Kathie for letting her
serve on this committee.
Continued on Page 3B


By DIANE LATER
and TAMARA BYRNES
of the Senior Center


Thanks also to Frank and Donna
Newman, Dave Hove, Chef Mary Har-
rison, Peggy Bump, Katie Barrett, Mary
Hampton, Eileen Debish, Edna Adkins
and all of the other volunteers for all
of their hard work, sorting, folding
clothes and pricing items. Giving up
their Saturday morning to put it all
together and enduring to the end.
These are just few of our many vol-
unteers who help to keep the Senior
Center moving forward.
Seniors vs. Crime, a special project
of the Florida Attorney General's of-
fice, was presented to the seniors. The
program educates seniors about con-


summer frauds, con games, scams and
other acts and assists senior victims
through volunteer mediation services,
mentoring or referral to another help
or enforcement agency.
The speakers are called Senior
Sleuths (a detective) because they are
the eyes and ears for the Attorney
General of Florida. The Senior Sleuth
acts as a case worker, interviewer,
presenter or mediator. For more in-
formation on this program call (850)
891-4044 on any Wednesday between
10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
Continued on Page 3B


October was another busy month
at the Senior Center. Big Bend Hospice
presented a program on music ther-
apy that is available to their clients,
One of their many talented musicians
played the guitar to allow us the op-
portunity to relax and experience the
healing powers of music.
Thanks to everyone who came to
Our Whale of a Garage Sale. We had
lots of fun and sold almost everything
that was donated,


Tips to guard against
identity theft

Savvy Senior, Page 3 B


Seniors celebrate Halloween, hold a Whale


of a G arage S ale,hear fr~om Big B end H hospice


and Senior Sleuths and enjoy a fish fry
IC ~ ~ ~ mmLs .@ JP I-...-I


Give thanks for


the gift of life





City and County Meeting


Monday, December 5
*COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular
meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.



Clubs. Groups. Regular Meetings

Thursday, November 24
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the
Panacea Women's Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For
more information call 524-9103.
*BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from
6 p.m. to 9p.m.
*COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey's
Steam Room in Panacea.
*FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6
p.m. at the NAM I Wakulla office.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
WAKU LLA COU NTY H HISTORICAL SOC IETY MUSE U M
will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located
at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.
*BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille
in Panacea to benefit Florida Wild Mammal Association.
*NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet
at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla office, 2140-C Crawfordville
Highway. This group is for family members and friends of peo-
ple diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.

Friday, November 25
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8
p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850)
545-1853 for more information.
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at
noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850)
545-1853 for more information.
FR IDAY AFTE RNOON BOO K C LU B meets at the publ ic
library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
*GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St.Teresa's Epis-
copal Church in Medart from 7 p.m.to 8:30 p.m.
*PICKIN"'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
*WAKU LLA COU NTY H HISTORICAL SOC IETY MUSE U M
will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located
at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.

Saturday, November 26
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at
5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in
Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.
*NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Craw-
fordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call
224-2321.
*SOPCHOPPY GROWER'S MARKET is held every Sat-
urday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy.
The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables,
homemade fresh bread, live music and varying demonstra-
tions, events, vendors and activities. Vendors wanting to par-
ticipate, call Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.
register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at
962-1010 or 528-5838, or email posh faery@yahoo.com.

Sunday, November 27
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at
6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more
information call (850) 545-1853.

Monday, November 28
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at
St. Marks First Baptist Church.
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the
Panacea Women's Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets
each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Craw-
fordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.
*LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30
.m
*RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer's Project
of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared
for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is
located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for
more information at (850) 984-5277.
*YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 1 0:30 a.m.
at the Senior Citizens Center.This is a gentle restorative class
focusing on the breath to build flexibility, restore balance with
a mind/body approach.

Tuesday, November 29
*ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawford-
ville at noon
*BOOK BUNCH meets in the children's room at the public
library at 10:30 a.m
*NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
at the NAM I Wakulla off ice. This group is for people diagnosed
with a mental illness
*VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the
VFW Post on Ar ran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
*CRAWFORDVILLE LION'S CLUB will meet at Beef
O'Brady's at 6 p.m.

Wednesday, November 30
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee
Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon
*BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will
be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.
*BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center
at 10:30 a.m
*KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.
*LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2
.m
*NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m.
at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more
information.
*BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45
p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and
stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5
fee for the materials.
*KN ITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library.
Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to
attend


Thursday, December 1
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the
Panacea Women's Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For


Jud 8
NOOk

Judy
iih On in


I need to find out where you can
get a fake ID.
I never needed one growing up
since I am not a drinker, nor a fan
of R-rated movies. I was what was
known then as a 'good' girl. This, of
course, was when I had more control
over that mischievous alter ego of
mine, Nurse Judy.
I know you are wondering why I
suddenly need such an ID this late in
life. No I am not turning into an alco.
holic or hiding out at the adult-only
movies. Besides, no one believes I am
not old enough to be allowed access
to any activity. What I need is a fake
ID that shows that I am younger than
what my birth certificate indicates.
Now, that I read this, I realize how
ludicrous it sounds. My presentlD al.
lows me all kinds of discounts much
to the dismay of Nurse Judy, who
thinks it is demeaning to be viewed
as a senior citizen. She actually hides
the AARP magazine when it comes
for fear someone will think she is the
o word (old). I, on the other hand,
like to read about the achievements
of older people. It gives me hope.
Besides an AARP card gives me ad.
ditional discounts.
Then why do I need a fake ID that
would show me as younger? Let me
explain.
Two of Nurse Judy's greatest fears
are of being the "O" word and of
being fat.


Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www. thewakullanews.com


Bloodmobile at
Eden Springs
from 8 a.m. to 1
p.m.


Wednesday


Sopchoppy
Grower's Market
from 11 a.m. to
3 p.m. in front of
Posh Java.


Chamber netwrork-
ing luncheon from
noon until l:15 p.m.
at Mike's Seafood
Gril le.


more information call 524-9103.
*BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
*COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey's
Steam Room in Panacea.
*FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6
p.m.at the NAMI Wakulla office.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille
in Panacea to benefit Florida Wild Mammal Association.
*WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MU-
SEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is
located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.
*WRITERS OR WAKULLA will meet from 6 p.m. to 7
p.m. in the conference room at the library. New members
are always welcome.
*WAKULLA GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30
p.m. in the main meeting room of the library. All are invited
to attend.

Friday, December 2
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8
p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850)
545-1853 for more information.
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at
noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850)
545-1853 for more information.
*FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the
public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
*GAM BLE RS A NO NYMO US m eets at St. Teresa's E pis-
copal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
*PICKIN"'N'GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the
senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
*WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MU-
SEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is
located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.

Special EventS

Wednesday, November 23
*14TH ANNUAL FARM CITY BREAKFAST will be held
at 7 a.m. at the Livestock Pavilion by the North Florida Fair
Association, Wakulla County Farm Bureau and University of
Florida/IFAS/Wakulla County Cooperative Extension Service
to recognize Jeff Lawhon and his family as the new North
Florida Fair Association's 201 1 Outstanding Farm Fam ily for
Wakulla County. R.S.V.Pby Nov. 22 at wakulla@ifafsfufledu
or call 926-3931 if you will be attending the breakfast. We
want to thank you for your support of agriculture in Wakulla
County, and we hope you can be with us at our breakfast.
*BLOODMOBILE will be at Eden Springs Nursing Home
from 8 a.m.to l p.m. No appointment necessary. Donors will
receive a free FSU vs. UF T-shirt. For more information call
(850) 491-4444.

Wednesday, November 30
*CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held
at Mike's Seafood Grille, 2302 Crawfordville Highway, from
noon until 1:15 p.m. Please RSVP to the Wakulla Chamber
office at 926-1848. Cost is $12 per person.

Friday, December 2
*COMMUNITY RECEPTION to launch Healing Arts of
WakulIla Cou nty, which willI i involve the arts i n comm u nity well-
ness, will be held from 5:30 to 8 p.m.at The Works Co-Work-
ing Cafe in Crawfordville. Artists, healthcare professionals,
instructors and the public are invited to attend. Refreshments
and drinks will be available. RSVP to 926-3526.
*AN NUAL W INTE R HOLIDAY FESTIVAL will be held at
Medart Elementary School from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. All funds
raised at the event will go towards needed items for Medart
Elementary School. There will be games, prizes, bingo,
cake walk, inflatable obstacle course and giant slides, go-


cart racing, face painting, delicious food and even a visit
with Santa himself, or decorate Christmas cookies with Mrs.
Claus. Medart Elementary School is located at 2558 Coastal
Highway. For more information, call 962-4881.
*2011 BIG BEND HOSPICE SERVICE OF REMEM-
BRANCE will be held at 6:30 p.m. at the Hudson Park
pavilion in Crawfordville. A reception will follow the service.
Join and remember loved ones who have died.This time of
remembrance and healing is open to anyone regardless of
whether they used hospice services. Come light a candle
and honor a memory. The locations for the Wakulla County
Trees of Remembrance are Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank
and Centennial Bank of Crawfordville. Call Pam Albritton at
(850) 926-9308 for more information.

Saturday, December 3
*WAKULLA FRIENDS OF SCOUTING FUN SHOOT
will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office Shooting
Range from 9 a.m.to 4 p.m..There is a $5 entry fee per per-
son to be able to shoot rifles and pistols.There will be hourly
prizes for the best shots. There will be a competitive plate
shooting event, shooting demonstrations, gun safety instruc-
tion, and a chance drawing for a special prize.This event is
open to all ages who can shoot safely, as determined by the
range safety officer. Firearms will be provided.All proceeds
will benefit the Boy Scouts of America.The WCSO Shooting
Range is located at: 65 Qualify Lane, Crawfordville.
*CHRISTMAS PET PHOTOS with Santa Claus will take
place at Azalea Park from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. A professional
photographer will be on hand to take the photos. Pictures
are $10 each for a 5x7 print. Finished pictures will be avail-
able the day of the event and mounted in a CHAT (Citizens
for Humane Animal Treatment) Christmas card. Look for
us at the Gazebo decorated in an old fashioned Christmas
theme.All profits benefit CHAT of Wakulla County. For more
information, please call Lewis McCartha at 926-0890.
*SEVENTH ANNUAL PANACEA CHRISTMAS will be
held in Panacea with the Boat on Trailer Parade at 6:30 p.m.
and lighting of the Christmas tree. Join in the parade fun by
decorating a boat, golf cart, float or horse. A $50 cash prize
will be awarded for the Best "Boat," the "Best Float or Pon-
toon Boat," the Best "Golf Cart," and the Best "Walking Unit."
Winners will be announced at the Tree Lighting Ceremony
in front of Shops by the Bay following the Boat Parade. For
more information contact Sherrie Miller at 528-1527. There
will also be local merchants at the Christmas in Panacea
Marketplace from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit www.visitpanacea.
com for more information.
*BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA BOOK GIVEAWAY will be
held from 9 a.m.to noon at the library. There will be thousands
of books, video and audio available. While donations are
never required, any funds raised go directly to the Friends of
the Library to fund children's programs, a large of our book
and materials budget and many other items. The library is
located at 4330 Crawfordville Highway. Call (850) 926-7415
for more information.
Friday, December 9
*HOLIDAY CRAFT BAZAAR PREVIEW PARTY will be
held at the Crawfordville Women's Club, 64 Ocklochonee
Street, at 6 p.m. The bazaar will feature numerous local
and regional crafters and craft vendors. There will be hors
d'oeuvres and a wine-tasting event. The bazaar will be held
on Saturday. For details, or to request a booth at the festival,
call 294-6482.
*CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK will be held from 5 to 8
p.m. at Azalea Park by the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office,
Wakulla County Parks and Recreation and Centennial Bank.
The event will give children a chance to meet with Santa
Claus. Santa will arrive at the park at 6 p.m. Four bicycles will
be given away along with helmets and toys and door prizes.
There will be Spin Art, trai n rides, food and beverages, other
vendors and entertainment. Everyone is invited to attend.


She is on me all the time about my
weight. I usually ignore her, but when
my clothes began getting too tight, I
decided to do something about it.
I called a weight program and
decided to sign up. I had just had
a physical and submitted my papers
showing what great health I was in.
Everything was going along well.
Nurse Judy was ecstatic and looking
forward to benefiting from a new
slimmer me,
Then, I got a phone call from the
receptionist at the center. "I'm sorry
to have to tell you, but you are not
eligible for the program," she said.
I was upset and Nurse Judy was
devastated. "Why not?" I blurted out,
wondering if they had found some-
thing in my perfect physical that I
hadn't seen.
"It's your age," she said. "You're
Over the limit.
I was dumbfounded. "Too old to
lose weight?" I queried.
"Oh no," she said. "You can join
other programs but the doctor here
has a cutoff age.
I began to plead. "I'm very fit. I'm
sure I'm young for my age. Please
check again,
She agreed hesitantly, but in a very
short time I received another call.
"I'm sorry," she began again but the
cut-off age is the cut-off age. You can
diet on your own and come in and
get weighed if you'd like."
I hung up. I was a reject. I can't
remember being rejected before. I
don't know how to handle this. I
am a hard worker. I am competitive.
This is a situation I don't know how
to cope with.
"I'm a loser," I lament to Nurse
Judy.
"Stop whining," she says. "Re-
member we want to be losers-weight
losers. Pick yourself up and show


some spunk."
For once this silly alter ego of mine
was making some sense. I decided to
follow her advice. I began to exercise
more and eat less.
Now she was the one beginning to
whine. I threw out all of her stashes
of candy. There were no cakes or
cookies in our pantry. She was getting
really surly.
Food portions became smaller
and smaller. She became sarcastic
and held a magnifying glass over our
dinner plate.
She tried to cheat a few times
with jello and whipped cream, but
I had only the diet kind, which she
was unaware of. The sly self-satisfied
grin on her face as she hid the empty
containers tickled me.
One week later I had my weight
checked. I had lost 4.5 pounds. Guess
I was winner who was closer. Guess
I don't need that fake ID after all.
Now, I'm the one wearing a self-
satisfied grin. That is, I am wearing it
until Nurse Judy pipes up, "You have
me to thank, Missy. You'll still be fat
and whining if it wasn't for me. It was
my idea, you know." She twirls away
in new skinnier jeans with embroi-
dery on the legs. I guess she's right.
I don't mention that there is lot of her
hanging over the waistband of those
jeans. I don't mention it because l am
a kinder gentler person than she is. I
also don't mention it because the fat
hanging over herjeans is called amuf-
fin top, and the thought of a muffin
top makes me very very hungry.
More later,
Judy


Judy Conlin is anursewho works
in Wakulla and Gadsden counties.
Her website is wwwnursefudyinfo,
con2,


Happy
Thanksgivi ng!


Thursday


Saturday Wednesday


HYrSCd Hs 1S 18e HCC( Of ak IRC























































Continued from Page 1B

We ended the month
with our Fall Festival and
Halloween Dance that eve-
ning. There were many ley-
er and original costumes to
be seen. Witches are always
first on the list and Floria
Mathis won the prize for the
best costume. We think she
is too pretty to be a witch,
but her costume was very
original,
There were Indians, cow-
boys, the scarecrow from


program, please call 926-
7145.
If you have not visited
our center, come by any
time for a tour and take
time to look at our Pergola
with all of the fall flowers
and the winter garden that
the seniors planted with
the help of the Iris Garden
Club.

At right, employees of the
property appraiser's office
frying fish for seniors,


_ __


Dressed up for Halloween at the Senior Center,


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g #----- Continued fr~om Page IB
1 7_ 1The discussion iniluded l
business nilletis. iianbl~tiv



nlizationl s and~ ent\'ltS In1 the

selling the Itnianning cook-
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 3B


are some things you can do to
minimize your risks.
Guard your SSN: Treat you
SSN like your most prized pos-
session. Never carry your Social
Security card around in your wal-
let or purse, don't write your SSN
on checks (except those you send
to the IRS), and never give your
SSN, credit card number, checking
or savings account numbers to
strangers who call, visit, text or
send email messages to you even
if they seem legitimate.
And don't carry around your
Medicare card either unless you're
going to the doctor. Your Medi-
care card contains your SSN.
Be wary of emails: If you use
the internet, don't trust emails
that claim to be from the Social
Security Administration, the IRS
or other government agencies.
Also be leery of emails that
look like they're from your bank,
telephone company or credit card
company.
Remember that only phony
emails will ask for your credit
card number or SSN. For more
internet fraud tips including a
list of common online scams see


onguardonline.gov.
Secure your mail: Empty your
mailbox quickly, or consider get-
ting a P.O. Box or buy a locked
mailbox to deter thieves. Also,
don't leave outgoing mail in your
mailbox.
To put a stop to prescreened
credit-card offers that thieves look
to intercept, use the consumer
credit reporting industry opt-out
service at optoutprescreen.com or
call 888-567-8688 they will ask
for your SSN and date of birth.
Destroy your trash: Buy a
cross-cut paper shredder and
shred all records, receipts, state-
ments, pre-approved credit offers,
mail solicitations or other papers
you throw out that has your finan-
cial or personal information,
Monitor your accounts: Re-
view your monthly bank and
credit card statements carefully,
and see if your bank or credit-card
issuer offers free alerts that will
warn you of suspicious activity as
soon as it's detected. If they do,
sign up for them.
Watch your credit: Check your
credit report at annualcreditre-
port.com or call 877-322-8228.


You can receive one free report
a year from each of the three
major credit bureaus (Equifax,
Experian and TransUnion), so
consider staggering your request
so you can get one free copy every
four months.
set up security freezes: You
can help protect yourself by
setting up a security freeze on
your credit reports at all three
credit bureaus Equifax (equi-
fax.com, 800-685-1111), Experian
(experian.com, 888-397-3742) and
TransUnion (transunion.com, 877-
322-8228).
With a freeze in place, no one,
including you, can open new lines
of credit in your name. This typi-
cally costs $5 to $10 per person
per credit bureau each time you
freeze or thaw your credit report.
Some states offer free freezes for
ID-theft victims,
Take action: If you ever think
your identity's been stolen, imme-
diately contact your creditors and
financial institutions to report
unauthorized charges or debts,
and close any compromised ac-
counts.
Then place fraud alerts and


security freezes with the three
credit reporting agencies, and file
a report with your local police
and with the Federal Trade Com-
mis sion at ftecomplainta assistant.
gov or 877-438-4338.
Savvy tips: For more tips on
preventing identity theft visit
idtheftinfo.org and idthefteenter.
org. You can also hire an identity
theft protection service like Pro-
tectMylD, LifeLock or TrustedlD
to keep tabs on your identity for
you.
These companies typically
charge around $10 to $20 per
month, but the services they
provide are typically no better
than what you can do yourself
by following the previously listed
tips.

Send your senior questions
to Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443,
Norman OK 73070, or visit Say-
vySenior.org.


Jim Miller is a contributo rto
the NBC Today show and author
of "The SavvySenior" book.


Sal'1'y
Seniior


Dear Savvy Senior,
What tips and resources can
you recommend to help seniors
guard against identity theft?
My next door neighbor, who's
79, recently had her identity
stolen and I want to make sure
it doesn't happen to me.
Cautious Connie

Dear Connie,
Identity theft continues to be
a big problem in the U.S., affect-
ing around nine million people
every year many of whom are
seniors.
Identity theft occurs when
someone gets access to your So-
cial Security number (SSN), bank
or credit card account number or
other identifying information and
uses it to steal from you.
While there's no ironclad
protection against ID theft, here


"The Wizard of Oz" and
many other eye-catchers.
Lunch on that day was
the treat we always look
forward to. The gentlemen
from the property apprais-
er's office and their helpers
provided a delicious mullet
meal. We thank them for
all of their hard work and
making the day even more
special,
Again, we say thank you
to all of our volunteers. If
you would like to know
more about our volunteer


the setnionis that atte~nd the
Se~nioi Centei andt home.
boundl se~nlcks that neceitve t





nias. 19 niolre about thIS SeasnSI In
oui nexst nat~ile. After that
\ite \xt Il be~ \ltsing about a
nex !t yal andi looking for
nioite \11ndedullu things to
happ~n.
If yogu un.Sh to hale .t
Chllstnias g its del ~le edi~


to setnlolss iall Ann Ros~s at

Alctenzie at 920~--'li est.
291.



u~'ondedlull nienloner s 1071 all
to e~nloy.
Av\oltd all those negatl\ve
commernts that you he~ai on
trte\levsoln andl Itea. We!t say
that they ciicte~ "Stinkin'
Thinkin:"
It's oui wish that you
~nloy; blfe.


lislliM


\fiar~E~.


Ce-b~T


* Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial)
* Estate Planning-- Wills, Power ofAttomey, Living Wills, Trusts
* Business Planning and Incorporations
* Title Insurance
* Probate and Heir Land Resolution
* General Practice


!


Crawfordville Office
3042 Crawfordville Highway
Crawfordville, FL 32327


Tallahassee Office
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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011



Honor Rolls for first nine weeks


www. thewakullanews.com


COAST
CHARTER SCHOOL

A HONOR ROLL
First grade
BUTLER ORLA
FOUNTAIN ROSALIE

Third grade
HILBERT ETHAN
SKALAK-YOUNG CHRISTIA
SMITH GLEN
WARREN TAYLOR

Fifth grade
SMITH SARAH

Sixth grade
HIGBEE MEGAN

Seventh grade
VARGAS CHRISTIAN

Eighth grade
LLOYD LYDIA

A/B HONOR ROLL
First grade
BUTLER KIARRA
DEPROSPERO JOHNATHAN
LOGAN ADEN
MACKIE JACOB
SANDOW MICAH
THORNTON NANCY
WELCH DANIEL

Second grade
CLEWIS GABRIEL

Third gade
BENTLEY SAMANTHA
DEPROSPERO THOMAS
GLASS JEREMIAH
HUPP JUSTIN
ODOM ERICA
WILLIS VERONICA

Fourth grade
FOUNTAIN MADISON
LEVINGSTON KACI
SCARBOROUGH CAITLIN
TURNER ZACHARIAH

Fifth grade
COOK HARLEY
EVANS DAWN
GILSON ARIANNA
AFFORD TAYLOR
VARGAS KATARINA
WOODS JORDAN

Sixth grade
LEVINGSTON ERIC
WELCH BRANDON

Seventh grade
ABRAHAM LILIANA
ALLEN CHADRICK
HILL KENDRA

Eighth grade
HUDSON LOGAN
LLOYD ANNA

MEDART
ELEMENTARY

A HONOR ROLL
Kindergarten
BOYD MANDALYN
CARRAWAY RILEY
CRUM RYLEE
DYKES EMMA
GODBOLT ALYCIA
JONES KOLBIE
LASHLEY GLENN


LE NEVAN
LEWIS LILIANA
MCMILLAN BENJAMIN
MCMILLAN LILY
MOWERY AUDREIAUNAH
SANDERS KAYLEE
SHAW JESSE
TILLMANJORDYN
TUCKER KANE
VANMUNSTER THERESA

First grade
ABRAHAM SCARLETT
ALLEN ZACHARIAH
BARKSDALE TAYLOR
BARNES BREANA
BLAKE XAVIER
BRATCHER PAXTON
CMEHIL STEVEN
DUDASH SYDNEY
DUNEGAN AUDREY
DUNEGAN KIMBERLY
GAVIN SHAMYHIA
HAMEL MATTHEW
HARRELL CHASSIDY
HODGES MEMPHIS
JONES LOGAN
LAWHON AVA
LOPEZ JODI
MANNING KANIA
MATLOCK ANNIKA
MORRISON COLT
NEGRIN-MURRAY ERIC
NICHOLS BRITTON
OWENS LANDON
PUT-PORTER HELEN
RARDIN KAYLEE
RYE ADA
SPLITT TEONA
WOOD CHASE

Second grade
ALGER ELIANA
BENNETT MEAGAN
BRETT GAGE
BUCHLEITNER ANDREW
BUCKLAND TABOR
CHANCY ANNABELL
DUDASH JACOB
GOODE WYATT
JACOBS GABRIELLA
LE DOLAN
NICHOLS CAMERON
NICHOLS LILY
PARRISH STEVEN
PATTON LUKE
PAUL TRISTAN
POOL COURTNEY
POWELL CHARITY
ROBERTS ELLA
RODDENBERRY BROOKE
RUSSELL SANDRA
SMITH KYLIE
SORRELL WILLIAM
TOTH KATIA
TUCKER KANOA
VALENTINE GAIA
WILLIAMS DALTON

Third grade
BARWICK ELIZABETH
BURDETTE MICHAEL
DAVIS GALEN
DAVIS JONATHAN
GALLOWAY DARA
GLOVER HANNAH
GRA PEYTON
HERO ANTONIO
HOBBY SADIE
JONES MOLLY
LARISCY BLAZE
LAWHON GRACIE
NEAL FRANK
NORDIN DYLAN
STRICKLAND BAILEY
WALLACE MICHAEL
WOOD CHANCE

Fourth grade
ALLEN GRACE
ANDERSON OLIVIA
BORCHARDT BRANDON
BRATCHER FARRAH


BUDA BRYCE
CORRIGAN MIKAYLA
FEWELL PAYTON
HODGE BRODY
INGRAM ZACHARY
LEWIS MICHAL
MATLOCK ERIK
MELTON KAITLYN
NICHOLS COLTON
PARKER JACK
RARDIN JACOB
RODDENBERRY TAYLOR
RUDD MAEGAN
SANDERS ALYSSA
SARVIS MADISON
SAVARY MADELINE
TEATE ALVIANNA
VEARIL BRAYDEN
WALKER LOGAN

Fifth grade
CLARK JENNA
CLARK ZACHARY
COLLINS MELANIE
DAVIS CASSIDY
HARRINGTON SHEA
HICKS JAZONTE'
HUGHES ELIZABETH
LARISCY AMANDA
LAWHON HUNTER
LAWHON TRENTON
LEWIS ZEB
MATHIS MOLLY
NELSON ANDREW
ROWAN TAYLOR
TIMMONS NICOLAS
WESTMARK JASON

A/B HONOR ROLL
Kindergarten
AYOTTE MATTHEW
BARNIDGE JUSTIN
BRADLEY KAYLEA
BURGESS OUINLAN
CARR ADEN
COETZEE JACK
CORE GRACIE
RIPE ALANAH
DAVIS EMILY
EDDINS ANGELINA
FORT ABIGAIL
FRANK DESTINY
GAVIN ROBERT
GIDDENS JACKSON
GLOVER JEREMIAH
GREEN HAYDEN
HARDEN WILLIAM
HARRIS EDWARD
HENDERSON TIMOTHY
HURLEY RACHEL
HUTTON CALEB
JAMES KELWIN
LANGFORD JACOB
LANGSTON JACOB
LAUGHTER JAYMYE
LAWHON PARKE
LOVEL MARY
MILLER MIKAELA
NAGY SCOTT
PEEBLES BRADEN
PORTER ALEX
PRITCHARD WYAT
RADABAUGH KAILYN
REED ZHANIYA
RICKS III TERRY
RUSSELL BABYRUTH
SHIVER MATTHEW
SMITH SHELDON
STOKES WILLIAM
STUBBS MAVERICK
TAYLOR MERRITT
TOTH COLLIN
WALKER TERRICA
WARD JALYNN
WILSON BRADY
WINSTON DESTINY
WIREMAN MARIAH

First grade
ANTILL TYSON
BARTON JAMIE
BARWICK JESSICA
BURLISON HANNAH
CARTER AMELIA
CHOOUETTE IAN


CLARK ETHAN
CRABTREE AVID
FOOTE JESSILYN
GREEN KEON
HAMILTON MICHAELA
HAMILTON PAYTON
HARRELL LAYLA
JACOB KATHLEEN
KINCAID-REEVES CHLOE
LANGSTON AMELIA
LOVE ABRIEL
LYDA ETHAN
MARTIN MADISON
MCKAYE RONALD
NICHOLS ALEXANDER
NICHOLS JUSTIN
PATEL ANUJ
PORTER ALIJAH
ROBINSON JORDAN
ROBINSON TAJ-ALI
RODDENBERRY JAKE
SANDERS SAM
SMITH JAYDE
TAFF HAYLEE
THORNTON MARISSA
WAINSCOTT TREVOR

Second grade
BEELER ALEXIS
BRANTLEY TAYLOR
BURNS JALYNN
CHAFIN LILA
CLEMONS-BROWN CARSON
CORE DALTON
CROW SEBASTIAN
DEAN NAVI
FOWLER DAKOTA
GLOVER ISAIAH
GODWIN ANTHONY
GOODMAN JACOB
HARVEY JULIAN
HOBBY KYRA
HOGAN ABIGAIL
JACKSON JASON
JALBERT XANDER
LAWHON BRAYDEN
MALONI MASON
MILLS ALLANA
NICHOLS CAITLIN
PAIANO BRYNNA
PARKER BRENDAN
PETRANDIS SAVANNAH
PITMAN KYLEE
POPE DYLAN
POOL MORGAN
ROBERTS BLAKE
SADLER JENNIFER
SAPP BENJ~TAMIN
SHEPHERD MACKENZIE
WARD ETHAN
WILSON ISAIAH
WILSON JENNA

Third grade
BOWELL SAGE
BREWER ETHAN
BROWN JEREMIAH
BUTLER TREASURE
CAPPS MIRANDA
CARR-MCFADDEN TOBY
CUMBIE LEE
DUTROW OLIVIA
FAIRCHILD CHARLES
FUSSELL DESTINY
GODINES ENRIQUE
GREENE DESMOND
HARDEN VALERIE
HARRIS OLIVIA
HARRISON DRAKE
HAWKINS ASHLEA
HUGHES ADRIANNA
KEVER DUSTIN
MCCULLEY TREVOR
MCMILLAN FINLEY
MCMULLEN BILLY
MORRISON SARAH
NELSON ELLIE
PARRAMORE ASHLEY
POSEY HUNTER
SANDERS DEE
SANDERS HALEY
THOMAS JACKSON
VEARIL KALEB
WARBURTON DANA


Fourth grade
ALLEN HANNAH
ASHLEY AYDEN
BRANTLEY DAVID
CARRAWAY CHRISTIAN
CARRAWAY MORGAN
CARTER ANDREW
DEHART TABITHA
GREENE DESTINY
GRUBBS DEREK
HENDERSON KATELYN
JACOB EDWIN
JALBERT PHOENIX
JOHNSON FREDRICK
KEITH MYKEL
LENTNER CIERRA
METCALF LUKUS
MILLENDER JORDYN
NICKEL PRESTON
OAKS LYRIC
PARRA MELISSA
PIGOTT KORI
POWELL ANGELINA
THOMAS MALAYSIA
TOMAINI AMADEO
TUCKER BRANDON
VALENTINE DRAKE
WATSON GARRET
WILES JACK
WILLIAMS JACOB
WILSON NOAH

Fifth grade
ABRAHAM ZACHARY
ALLEN NICOLE
BARWICK TRISTAN
BROWN JAMES
CLOUD DANIEL
DELVALLE DANIEL
GREEN SALLY
KEITH GABRIEL
KELLY ADAM
KOENIG JAMIE
LANGSTON ALYSSA
LAWHON JONAH
MATTHEWS JOANN
MELTON NOAH
NIX ARIEL
NIX ZOE
PAUL WHITNEY
PORTER BOBBY
REED MADISON
ROBERTS KASH
RODDENBERRY JARED
SANDERS DYLAN
SMITH TAYLOR
TALLMAN ANGEL
TUCKER DRAVEN
WALLACE SETH
WHITE CHLOE
WHITEHEAD MATTHEW
WILLIAMS ASHTON
WILSON LUCAS

RIVER SPRINGS
MIDDLE

A HONOR ROLL
Sixth grade
ANDREWS KAYLEIGH
BALL STEPHANIE
BLANKENSHIP CHYANNE
BRANCH LOGAN
BROWN JAVARI
CACCIATORE ALYSSA
COLVIN SYDNEY
EIMILLER KAITLYN
GARNER AUGUST
GAY MA'ASA
HAIRE AMANDA
HOOKER SYLVIA
HOSKINS MIRIAM
HUGHES OLIVIA
LONG-WILDE MICHAEL
MCGLAMRY KATHRYN
MUSGROVE SKYLER
AFFORD MICAH
POTTER IAN
RICHARDSON ALEXANDER
ROSSETTI KAYLA
RUDD MADISEN
RUSSELL ANNEMARIE
SCOTT CHEYENNE
SMITH KAYLEE
STRICKLAND ABIGAIL


STRICKLAND HANNAH
TEW BRYLEE
TURNER LANDON
WEBER JARED
WHITING DANIELLE
WIEDEMAN CALEB

Seventh grade
BEARD KELSEY
BREEDEN NOAH
METCALF MASON
MEYERS KAYLEE
PARIS JASON
SAMLAL KAVITA
STEVENS BRANDI
STRINGER DORI

Eighth grade
AHRENDT JOHN
BOLTON BLAKELEIGH
CASON COURTNEY
COX EBECCA
GUNNARSSON MATTIAS
HART HANNAH
KENT ISAAC
LENK SHELBY
MOHRFELD GABBRIELLE
FARMER MARIA
PEARSON KYLE
SAMLAL NICHOLAS
SUTTON ELIZABETH
WEBER JOHN

A/B HONOR ROLL
Sixth grade
BODDYE ASHTON
BRAND KALLI
BROWN ETHAN
BURROUGHS CAILYNNE
BYRUM BLAKE
COLVIN ASHLEY
COX CARAH
CROMARTIE LESSIE
DEW KRISTEN
FAGAN BAILEY
FIELDS JAZMINE
FOUNTAIN SUSANNAH
FREEMAN MELISSA
GREEN DESTINY
HOWARD BRANDON
HUGHES LYNDAMARIE
HUMES TARIOUE
JEFFERSON JAYDA
JOHNSON TERESA
LANIER MICAH
LAWHON EASTON
MARSHALL TAYLOR
MCCARL MAX
MCMULLEN WALTER
MCREYNOLDS JAMES
MORALES KYLE
MORAN VICTORIA
PERRY MARY
REYES ROSARIO
RoATH HALEY
ROTH CONNOR
RUSSELL JACKSON
SCOTT CONNOR
SPELL TAYLOR
STALVEY MORGAN
SYKES MADISEN
SYMONS RYAN
TREADWAY STELLA
WEBB MAKAYLA
WILLIAMS J'KAYLA
WISE AUSTIN

Seventh grade
BEATTY ALEXANDER
BENNETT PEYTON
BOWYER MATTHEW
BREEDEN NORA
BRIGGS LUCAS
BRIGHAM CHASON EMMA
COOK MATTHEW
CURTIS DEVIN
CUTCHEN CHLOE
ESPY CHRISTOPHER
GUNNARSSON NATASHA
HARPER KAYSHA
HICKS MACLELLAN

Continued on
next page


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Hoo R 10 O?0S


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 5B


GODBOLT KYLASIA
GOWDY GABRIEL
HERNANDEZ DAYANA
HEARING HAYDEN
HOXWORTH MAKAYLA
HUDSON KELSEY
JACOBS KARLIE
KIMBERL DONALD
MITCHELL GUNNAR
NEAL ETHAN
NEWBERN JACOB
RATHER RUBY
PUT CARSON
RHINEHART BRENT
SAGALA ANN MAREE
SAMMONS KIMBERLY
SCHAWALL DEVEN
SCREWS TAYLOR
SPEARS KYLIE
STROUP AIDEN
THOMAS JA'SHAWN
TOOLE SIERRA
VAUTIER GABRIELLE
VICE CHRISTIAN
WRIGHT DEAN

Second grade
BASS KINSLEY
BLANKENSHIP SHELBI
BRAMBLETT LOGAN
BRANNAN EMOREE
CALLAGHAN MARK
CARMICHAEL SPENCER
CHAVEZ DAVID
DULL TREVOR
EDENFIELD TYLER
GAYNOR MARGARET
GEORGE JACQUELINE
HARRIS KARSON
HARRISON TAYLOR
HARVEY SAMUEL
HINDLE KASEY
INDIHAR AUSTIN
JONES JUSTUS
KIRKLAND HAYLEE
MOORE SAGE
MOTES CHANCE
MULLINAX CAROLINE
NUTTING ALLIE
PELL WILLIAM
ROBERTS JARRE~TT
ROMAN TYSON
STRICKLAND ETHAN
THURMAN MIA
VICE ISSABELLA
WINGERT NOVALEE


Bh d de ALEXANDER
BOYKIN DOMINICK
BROOKS TRISTIN
CARTER BETHANY
CARTER CHASE
CONCEPCION DIEGO
CROSS IAN
DICKEY JORDAN
DIETRICH GILLIAN
EDENFIELD MADISON
EVANS MADISON
GRIMES CHRISTIAN
HOPSON LUKE
JERNIGAN SYDNEY
KELLY JASE
LAWHON FISHER
MCCLINTOCK ADEN
MCKENZIE KAYLA
ODOM MASON
PELL JOHN
PETERSON HAYES
PULLAM MACKENZIE
SHIPLEY ANTONIO
SILAS JACINTA
SMITH JORDAN
SMITH TYLER
SPENCE DAMEN
STEWART ASPEN
THOMPSON ASHLYNNE
TUCKER ASHLEY
UNDERWOOD HAILEY
VAUGHN EMMA
WEAVER JACE
WEST JAMES

Fourth grade
BLANKENSHIP REBECCA
BRANNAN BAILEY
BROOME LUKE
FAIRCLOTH KATIE
FREEMAN RYLEIGH
FUNDERBURKE ALEXANDER
GROSS KYAN
GURR MICHAELA
HALL MADISON
HANEY CONNIE
HARTSFIELD DAVID
HOOVER JORDAN
JACKSON JORDAN
JONES DERISHA
JONES SILER
KRAUSE COURTNEY
MCKEITHEN LORA
MERRITT DENYM
NEWSOME JAMES


AFFORD SAVANNAH
PARKER AALIYAH
RAY TRISTAN
REED BAILEE
ROBERTS KYLA
ROBERTS VICTORIA
RODDENBERRY JARED
RODDENBERRY ROBERT
RUSHINAL TANAR
SCHULTZ EMILY
SIMPSON TANNER
SMIROLDO BRANDON
STARLING HUNTER
STRICKLAND HAYDEN
SUDERMAN JACOB
SYMONS REID
WEST LOUIS
WILLIAMS KAMRYN

Fifth grade
ANDERSON THOMAS
ANNAND ANDREW
AVERA ABIGAIL
BARTLOW MAURA
BOWYER KATELYN
DAMRON JULIAN
DESHERLIA TREVOR
EVERHEART JESSICA
FRANCK DYLAN
FRANKLIN DAVID
GIBBS THOMAS
GREEN ASHLYN
GRIFFITH VICTORIA
HILL DAKODA
HOBBS EMILY
HOWARD NKRUMAH
HUTTER SETH
KINSEY STEVEN
LEHRMANN DEVIN
LEONARD ANGEL
NEWBERRY SYDNEY
NG MARK
AFFORD TANNER
RAYBOUN FAITH
ROBERTS BRITNEY
RODD ELIZABETH
ROSIER ALEXAH
SMITH ALYSSA
THOMAS MANDALYN
WILLIAMS REKENYA


SECOND CHANCE
SCHOOL

A/B HONOR ROLL

DLGhAR D VID


11th grade
CLARK MARCUS

CRAWFORDVI LLE
ELEMENTARY

A HONOR ROLL
Kindergarten
ALFORD NOAH
BARKSDALE OWEN
BLOUNT SAMUEL
BROXTON GARRET
CHESTER MADISON


CHRISTIAN ANDON
DIEHL WYAT
DODSON TESSA
ELMORE SHA'KAIYAH
ESTES STEPHEN
GEHRKE GWENDELYN
GUMPHREY GEORGIA
HARPER DEVON
HARVEY CARLEE
HOOVER ABBI
JACKSON TUCKER
JESSUP ROBERT
KELLY MARIE
KENNEDY DAVID
KOLLING-BARNETT ZOEY
MODZELEWSKI ROWAN
NAZWORTH JESSE
OLDS EJAVIA
POLLARD KARIS
SMITH LAYLA
TAFF ISABELLA
TIDWELL KAYLA
VELTKAMP GABRIELLE
VENTRY DAVID
WHITE RACHEL
WICKHAM IAN

First grade
ANDREWS SYDNEY
ANZALONE JOSEPH
BARWICK TRISTA
BICKFORD EMILY
BUTLER DANIEL
CARVER HUNTER
CORBET PENELOPE
DAVIS JALEESAH
DAVIS RILEY
BRIGHT DELL
ELKINS RAVEN
GILLIAM HARLEIGH
GRAHAM BRYSON
HARDEN LUCAS
HARRELL KYLA
HENDERSON EMMA
HENING COLEMAN
HUNTSBERGER ANDREW
HURST NATALIE
JEDZINIAK LILY
KENERSON D'ANDRE
LARSON NOLAN
MARINI COLBY
MASSEYALILYAEINA

MCKAY ALLEN
MILLER ISABELLE
MOCK TRISTA

AONZRI OE NAN IS

PICHARD EMILY
PICHARD HANNAH
SAULTER ANNA
SCHISSLER MAKENNA
SELLNER MARYLIN
SORENSEN SEQUOYAH
STEPHENS COLLIER
TILLMAN CORY
VENTURI EMMA
WELLMAN ALEXIS

Second grade
ALFORD CLARA
BERRYMAN ALYSA
CARDOZA JACOB


CLARK MACKENZIE
COPELAND MADISON
CORE NAILAH
CROSBY SELINA
DAUGHTRY JOHN
DODSON ANGEL
BRIGHT BENJ~TAMIN
GUNNARSSON ANNIKA
KANITZ ETHAN
MCNAIR CIERRA
NEAL AALIYAH
PARSONS JADYN
ROBISON KAYLEE
SHERMAN SAMANTHA
SMITH FREDRICK
STOLK LILY
TEUTON TREY
VARNES MACIE
WHALEY NATALIE
WILLIS AUBREY

Third grade
BARKSDALE ADEN
CRUM AMBER
CUSHARD KEIRA
ELKINS VICTORIA
FREEMAN RACHEL
GANEY MELODY
HARVEY MARINA
HOOKER DAWSON
JORDAN WESLEY
OSTEEN JACKSON
SAULTER TYLER
SIMS ANYYSA
TILLMAN CALEB
TUCKER AIDAN
WALKER KRISTEN
WHITE MELODY
WILLIAMSON DYLAN
YORK JOSEPH

Fourth grade
BRUCE GRACIE
BRUCE WILSON
BRYAN HANNAH
GUNNARSSON KATARINA
HARDEN ALEXANDRA
HARVEY GARRETT
HAY ALYSSA
KAUFMANN GAVIN
MANN ZACHARY
SIMONS LILLY
SMITH BRYAN
THOMAS EMILY
WILKINSON PARKER

Fifth rde
ANDR WS GRACE

DARNELL ELEANOR
DIEHL ELIAS
EVERHART WALTER
FIELDER MIKAELA
HERRON COURTNEY
HOOKER HALEY
HUTTO KATIE
JEFFERSON JAQUESHA
JOINER FAITH
LASSITER JADA
OSTEEN VANCE
PICARD ADAM
PRESTIA ANNALISA
TAYLOR KENDALL
Continued on next page


Continued from
previous page

HUGHES EMMA
JENSEN MATHILDA
KELLY ELAINE
KELLY EMILY
KING MICHAEL
MERCER SHALEIGH
MITCHELL ADRIANNA
MORRIS ADRIAN
MULLENS ELIJAH
NG MARLON
PEARSON PAIGE
PICHARD BRIANNA
RICHARDSON KELSEY
ROBERTS DEVIN
RUDD PRECISION
STARLING TAYLOR
STEVENS SARAH
SULLIVAN SKYLER
TABB ABIGAIL
THIGPEN SARAH
THOMAS SHENIKA
WHITWORTH TYLER
WINKLER SHELBY


Eighth grade
BARR K ITLYNN
CRAWFORD GARRETT
DOUIN KURSTIN
ECK KATHRYN
EDMONDS HALEIGH
EMERSON NICHOLAS
FRANCK JENNA
FREEMAN KAYLA
GAY KARENA
GONZALEZ NAYSHA
GRIMES KAITLYN
HAMMOND CHANDLER
HARRIS KRISTEN
HATCH LAUREN
ISMAN NOAH
KENT JORDAN
LANGSTON CHRISTOPHER
LENTZ NICHOLAS
RET NY R.EBECCA
MCHONE BRITANY
PANZARINO KAITLYN
RALEY TYLER


SCABO ERH B EANNA
SEBER TAYLOR
STATEN SENTWALI
STRICKLAND JOSHUA
WAITES STEVEN
WARD CHRISTOPHER
WEDDLE ABIGALE
WILLIAMS KATELYNN
YU JUVEN
ZDRAZIL MATTHEW

RIVER SINK
ELEMENTARY

A HONOR ROLL
Kindergarten
GRIMES ROBERT
HARRIS HELEN
JACKSON CALEB
JEFFERSON MILAN
JONES PRESLEY
LLOYD SARA
MALPHURS LANDON
MCCLINTOCK HALLIE
MCMAHAN ERIC
MILLER JACKSON
OSTBERG MARY
PETERSON JOSLYN
SAMPSON PAYTON
STEWART MADALYN
STRINGER SHELLEY
TAYLOR EMILY
TEW AMELIA
WESTER MAGGIE
WOOLEY JOSEPH

First grade
ALBRITTON JASMINE
CREEL ROBERT
DODSON ADALYNN
DUNN KOLBY
HALLMAN EMILY
HARRISON MAKAYLA
KINSEY RILEY
LAWHON LAKE
MARR DAVID
MCKENZIE GARRETT
MORGAN CHASE
PASCOE KAYDEE
POLLOCK PARKER
SANDBERG HAILEY
SEALY ADAM
SMITH LAINEY


VAUGHN BENJ~TAMIN
WESTER LAINA

Second grade
BRAINARD CADENCE
CORDELL GRACE
DUrTON GABRIEL
FRANCIS HANNAH
FULGHUM BELLA
GRAY LAURAL
HENRY AMAYIA
LLOYD EMMA
ROBERTS BROOKE
RODDENBERRY LIA
ROSENBERG PENELOPE
SPRAKER HEATHER
WILLIAMS ELLIANA

Third grade
BLANKEN ANDREW
COOKSEY TANASHA
CROCKETT MACKENZIE
GAVIN JAICEE
GRUBBS LANEY
HART ETHAN
JEFFERSON MELVIN
KAMAL ZAKARIA
LEWIS JAMILYNN
NYLUND MEGAN
TYRE ROBERT
WESSINGER CARTER
WILDERMAN BREANNA

Fourth grade
BARCELO ISABELLA
GRAY ABIGAIL
GREEN OLIVER
HAMBRICK SAMANTHA
HOLLAND ANNA
MORGAN TRAVIS
PRESTON ASHIERA
RALEY BRITTNEY
RICHARDSON COLBY
RODDENBERRY MAKENNA
SAMPSON JAMES
SANDBERG RILEY
SLOAN AARON
STRINGER JACOB
THOMPSON CALYNNE

Fifth grade
ALMANZOR GISELLE ANNE
MARTIN CAITLYN
MASON JO)RDAN

SMITH SHELBY
THOMPSON ARTHUR
WALKER CELESTIAL
WARD CLAYTON

A/B HONOR ROLL
Kindergarten
AINSWORTH VIOLET
ALBRITTONJOHN
ALVAREZ ISABELLA
ARIES TANNER
ATKINS MAKINNA
AVERA DALTON
BLINK GABRIELLE
BOWYER JUSTIN
BUNCH ROBERT
CHESHIRE ELLIOTT
CONCEPCION VICTORIA
DAVIS RYLEIGH
DIXON TAVARRIOUS
DONALDSON KEIRA
GAUGER ABBOT
HARTSFIELD CONNOR
JEFFERSON ERIC
KIRKLAND KRISTEN
KLEES HADEN
LEE TRISTON
MARSHALL JAMES
MATHEWS NATALIE
NOLAND MAXWELL
PASCOE WILLIAM
PAUL BRIANNA
PETERS GAGE
PIPPIN KOHLSON
POLAND KAILEY
RAGIN ZEKIE
RHINEHART VICTORIA
SCOTT SHATARA
SMITH CAMERON
TYRE NATALIE
WESTER DONALD
WILDERMAN ABIGAIL

First grade
BARBARINO KYLE
BARRS EMILY
CALLAGHAN JESSE
CARR WILLIAM
CASH JAMES
CREEL THOMAS
DAMRON NATHAN
EADY JAMIE
GAY DONNASHIA
GILES TRACE


Attend an serninarv to learvn about

CapitalZ Heal~th Plann Advanntage Pluns (HMO) &
CapitalZ Heal~th Plann Preferred Advanntage (HMO).


Tuesday, November 22
Friday, November 25
Tuesday, November 29
Wed nesd ay, Novem ber 30


Monday, December 5
Tuesday, December 6
Friday, December 9
Friday, December 23


Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP
850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512
(TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943)
8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week
www.capital health.com/medicare


Holiday Special


20% off ~d

.e ..a- ,. e e-. -- -


Capital Health
P LAN

An Idepndet Liense o th
Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association













Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www. thewakullanews.com


RANDOLPH KYLE
REEVES HAYDEN
REI BREEANA
ROBENHORST LUKE
RODRIGUEZ IDALIA
ROGERS HEVYN
SPEIGNER ASHLYN
VARNUM WADE
WEST BLAKE
WHITAKER JAMARIN
WHITAKER KAMARI

Third grade
BARRETT TAYLOR
BRYAN TOBY
BULL BRANDON
BUTLER GABRIELLA
CAMARENA AUSTIN
CARVER CHRISTIAN
CLARK TRAVIS
DESHERLIA DOUGLAS
DUNLAP HAYLEY
FAIRCLOTH EMILY
FLETCHER TRYSTON
GAFFNEY SEBASTIAN
GOOD HAYDEN
GOODWIN CARSON
GOWDY DALTON
GRAUSE SYDNEY
HARVEY-WEBSTER DESHAWN
HAZEN JAMES
JACKSON AUDRIAUNA
JOINER JOHN
JONES AUTUMN
JONES JARRE~TT
JORDAN JADA BELLE
KELLEY BRYCEN
LEE CAMERON
MALLOW ROBERT
MELTON ASHANTI
MESSER JADA
MESSIER BENJ~TAMIN
MILLENDER CAITLIN
NAVA SALAZAR YAREYDI
NEEL ZACHARY
PEDLER ANARIE
PERDUE MICAH
QUICK HAILEY
REVELL AUSTIN
SELPH SAVANNAH
SORENSEN ISAIAH
STAPLETON CAMERON
TIMMONS TAMILL
WATERS CHRISTOPHER
WILLIS MADISON

Fourth grade
ALLEN DEVYNN
ARMSTEAD QU'NAYSIA
BAIRD JACOB
BEAULIEU DANIELLE
BUTLER SAIRA
CARTER MORGAN LEE
CASON CAITLYN
DEMONTMOLLIN BRANDY
ESTELA SAHEILY
FOGLEMAN MEGAN
GALLADAY COLBY
HALE TREY'VON
HAMILTON RYAN
HARPER GEORGE
HARRELL MICHAEL
HENDERSON KALEB
JACKSON JEFFREY


JEDZINIAK CRYSTAL
KENYON CHANDLER
KENYON LILLIAN
LINVILLE CAITLYNN
LOGAN SETH
MAHONEY MERCEDES
MEYER ANIA
PEARSON AUTUMN
REGISTER HUNTER
ROGERS JASON
RUETH TYLER
VARGAS DOMINIC
WILSON MICHAEL

Fifth grade
AHRENS SAVANNAH
ARCHIE ADAIJA
ATHERTON BRENDEN
BEAULIEU GABRIELLE
BRADFORD CHAIM
BROWN DEVIN
BROWN TALLY
CARDOZA JUSTIN
CHRISTENSEN SPENCER
CORDOBA HAYLEIGH
DYAL KYLEIGH
FOWLER TIERA
GEHRKE STEVEN
HARVEY JONAH
HARVEY ZACHARRIYA
HOANG HUNG
HOLLETT NICHOLAS
HURST AMANDA
JONES AUDREY
JONES CODY
KING JORDAN
MAYNE EMERY
NELSON MILES
NEWSOME SARAH
OWENS CHARLES
PERDUE NOAH
POSEY CODIE
PRICE JUSTIN
PROCTOR MAKAYLA
REEVES HUNTER
RENTZ BRANDON
RENTZ SYDNEY
REVELL RANDI
SMID TALIA
SPEIGNER BRIAN
SWAIN ALEXANDRA
TAYLOR EMMA
THOMAS ASIAH
TIMMONS CURTIS
TURNER SUSAN
WALKER JATYREN
WINDSOR ZACKARY

WAKULLA HIGH
SCHOOL

A HONOR ROLL
Ninth grade
ALMANZOR CHRISHNIKA
ALVAREZ HEATHER
ANDERSON STROMAN
ANDREA
ANDREWS SIERRAUNNA
ATKINSON WILLIAM
BROWN HALEY
CALLAGHAN ALIYA
CAPPS HOLLI


CUTCHEN CADE
DEROSS BRETT
EDGE BRIAN
EIMILLER KRISTEN
FIELDER REBEKAH
HUDSON MATTHEW
HUNTER ZACHARY
PANDOLFI ASHLEY
PLASAY THOMAS
ROZAR HARRISON
SCHNEIDER JOSHUA
SORRELL ALBREY
TWIST CODY
WIEDEMAN LYDIA
WORRILL MATTHEW

10th grade
BYRD ETHAN
CLARK CORY
DAMON DAVID
DUTTON ALEXANDER
GENTRY MELISSA
HANSEN MATTHEW
HARRIS MADISON
HART ARIEN
INLOW SAMMIE
KEATON KAEDRETIS
KELLEY MARLEE
METCALF ALLISON
SCHUBERT ALYSSA
TORRES ANNALISE
WESTMARK EMILY
WIEDEMAN MARGARET
WOOD SHANNAN

11th grade
ALVAREZ AMBER
BARNES JEFFERY
BONTS BLAKE
BROWN CALEB
CHUNN JONATHAN
COLE JOHN
CRUM NATALIE
HARRIS SAVANNA
HURST HALEY
KOCHER BRENT
LOWE CASEY
PHILLIPS MATTHEW
SIMPSON OLIVIA
THIGPEN KAYLYN
TIDWELL GRACE
TROMBINI JESSICA
WESTERFIELD MIKAYLA

12th grade
ABBOTT CODY
ADKISON MARY
ATKINSON CORA
BARWICK SLOAN
BURSE DANIEL
CHADWELL KENNETH
CLARK ERICA
CLIFI'ON TYLER
EDWARDS ELIZABETH
GALLAMORE KRISTINE
GIMELLO-VENTURI CARO-
LINE
HAMEL SARAH
HUMMEL ASHLEY
LINDLEY JOSHUA
MARTIN SAMANTHA
METZLER BRIAN
MILLER TREVER
PEDDIE DAVID


SHAPIRO KAIYA
STAHR JOSHUA
STAHR TIFFANY

A/B HONOR ROLL
Ninth grade
ABRAHAM KATELYN
ALSUP SHELBY
BARTON GAGE
BARTON JAMES
BEATY KEEFER
BRANCH TAYLOR
BROADWAY LILIANA
BROOKS JONATHAN
BROOKS JOSIE
CARLTON HEATHER
CARPENTER SAMANTHA
CARR ASHLEY
CARROLL ASHLEY
CASEY MARINA
CHANGE JACOB
CLARK CHLOE
COTES ALEXANDRA
COVINO JOSEPH
DAVIS JAMES
DIXON KERI
DODSON RYAN
EVANS CHRISTINA
FERGUSON KATHERINE
GALLOWAY SHANIA
GARCIA JADE
GEIGER BRANDON
GRIFFIN DEVIN
HAWKINS SHELBY
JEZIORSKI MICAHLYN
JONES JACEN
KELLY MORGAN
KILPATRICK MARTAYVIOUS
LEE KENZIE
MCIVER CAMEN
MILLER KINSEY
MIXON MARIAH
OCHAT CODY
PATTERSON TAMETRIA
PEARCE TUCKER
PEARSON ALAN
PETRANDIS MARINA
PIOTROWSKI JAMES
POST BROOKE
PRICE JACOB
ROSSETTI MARISA
ROTH MITCHELL
RUSSELL SLOAN
SAMMONS KAITLYNN
SANDERS CIARA
SEBER ROBERT
SMALL GREGORY
STANDLEY MACKENZIE
STEVENS ASHLEY
STINSON LUCAS
STRICKLAND CARSON
WEBB JAKE
WEIRBACK REBECCA
WEST BENJ~TAMIN
WHALEY BRITAN
WILLIAMS KENDRIA
WINKLER AMBER

Continued on next page


Continued from
previous page

A/B HONOR ROLL
Kindergarten
ANZALONE JOHN
BISHOP ISAIAH
BLANKENSHIP HALEY
BOWDEN ANDRE
BRAVERMAN NATHAN
BRINSON SAMRON
BRUCE GABY
BRUMBY CHASON
BUTLER SHELBY
CHRISTENSEN CARTER
COOK LAURYN
COUNCIL MASON
CREAMER TRINITY
CRUM JOSHUA
DONAWAY SAM
DUGENT FRANK
DUNLAP AYLA
ELLSWORTH JACOB
FARMER JACEY
FLANAGAN ANGEL
GALAN DESTINY
GRAY FALLON
HALE TIMOTHY
HATFIELD JORDYN
HOLT CECILLEE
HOWELL KEYONI
HUTCHINSON AUBREY
JABLOW SAMUEL
KELLY BRADLEY
KING JACKSON
LANE JOSEPH
LANIER JULIAN
LEE GAVIN
LEE REBECCA
LOGAN MARIAH
MCGHEE SEAN
MCNAIR CHRISTOPHER
MILAM BRIANNA
MILLENDER DUSTIN
MOSCATO SAVANNAH
O'OUINN AIDEN
OGLETREE AUSTIN
OWENS KATIE
PAGEL KAYLA
PIERCE BENJ~TAMIN
RAWLS JACOB
RAY ZACKARY
REVELL HUNTER

ROBI SONT IH
ROSENBERGER NICHOLAS
SORENSEN ADONYAH
SPARBY JACOB
SWAIN B HDYOE

TAFF BAYLEE
WALKER AMELIA
WICKHAM KYARA
WILLIAMSK AENIE

WINKLER ASHLEY
WINKLER KAYLEY
YORK SARAH


First grade
ATKINSON REID
BABCOCK ROBERT
BRAVERMAN ETHAN
BROWN ISAIAH
COLEMAN RILEY
DUNCAN JABRYAH
FINCH SHEYENNE
GOOD TAYLOR
HARVEY KALI
JEFFERSON BRIANNA
JOHNSON ZACHARY
JOYNER RONNIE
KILPATRICK JAYLIN
LINVILLE CHASE
MERRICK HARPER
PAUL BRAEDEN
PELT JACOB
REVELL SAMANTHA
SIMONS TUCKER
SIMPSON MICHAEL
SLAYTON STANLEY
TAFF BRAXTON
TURNER WILLIAM
VARNES KENDAL
VAUSE DYLAN
WALKER CODY
WARREN ROBIN
WRIGHT KADYN
YON JAYDEN

Second grade
ATKINS ETHAN
BABCOCK MATTHEW
BELDIN BRENDEN
BOWDEN JONVONTA
BROWN JANYA
BRUMBY KOLBY
BUTLER TAMIRA
BUTLER-MOORE BRIYAUN
CASON MATHEW
CODDINGTON MACY
COOK BRANDON
COUNCIL JUSTIN
CRUM JACOB
DAVIS JASMINE
DAVIS TYLER
EDMONDSON AUBRIANA
FARMER CAMDEN
FIELDER JOSHUA
FORBES PEYTON
HAMILTON AUSTIN
HAMPTON WYETT
HARRELL SCHELBY
HARVEY EVERETT
HATFIELD ABIGAIL
HILL ERIN
HINEMAN SPENCER
JACOBS SKYLAR
JERNIGAN ALIA
JONES AZIAH
MADISON ZOEY
MANN RILEY
MATHERS ROWAN
NEWELL KAITLYN
OSBORNE GRACIE
PALUMBO VICTOR
PETERSEN LUCAS
POLLARD ISAAC


)fl)lrUllllllt
I


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RESTORATION & CLEANING
850-926-3647


We Restore,
You Recover"




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J Full Service Reconstruction Services ER
J Tra uma Scene Cleanup
J Board-Up & Tarp-Over Service e
J Storm Damage Restoration
J IlCRC Certified ProfessionalS G
J Employee Wakulla County Residents
J Proud Supporter of Wakulla County United Fire Fighters Association


Hoo R11 Ol 0S


TH a n s WNAKU LLA! You K~eep Us GoinG!

Fon 26 veans we HaVe STRIVeD TO BRIRIG HONESTY, INTEGRITY

& QUALITY COLLISION REPAIR TO WAKULLA COUNTY.
We do all types of repairs from door handles, glass, hinges and trim.
If it is on the body of your vehicle and its broken, chances are,
we can fix it properly the first time. Its what we do!
Always check with us first before you look to Tallahassee for repairs!!
Remember..!. You havle the right to havle your insurance ..
r. i repairs done at the sho of your choice! Ij


COMPLETE DISAS-TER RESTORA-TION


INSPECTION
CLEANING
and
RESTORATION


Ca l awa y =rwodvle Fl:md


Truch


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E lectrica l Bra kest A/Cj Comp uter Dia gn ostics ATun e-Ips



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MIUElf~Your Boat's One Stop
Paint & Body Shop

MARIN WA~s 850925-5685
Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Supplies
56 Industrial Court
* Gelcoat Repairs 12-volt wiring St. Marks Industrial
* Bottom Paint Electronics Installation Park,St. Marks 32355
* Trailer Repairs Fuel Tank Removal rin
and installation ##
* Boat Detailing B~ertfY
* Total Boat Refinishing rasodek n OHIT
stringer replacement



SHE PARD AC COUN TIN G
~ AXSE TCE
LORRA L. PHILLIPS, CERTIFIED
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT
Serving the Area Since 1998

Tax Planning and Return Preparation

Bookkeeping and Payroll Services

For Individuals and Businesses


926-9802
www.shepardaccounting.com


Member
American Institute of
Certified Public Accountants
Florida Institute of
Certified Public Accountants
Wakulla County
Chamber of Commerce ,

"providing the area .
with FRIENDLY
PROFESSIONAL
and HERE TO STAY
service" i -~i "''
Jessica, Lorra, Miti

P.O. Box 1605 3038 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B






GENE LMBERT 850926-3425


Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook
to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of...


sthaEtt thh $10


Newspaper in Education Program!

The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and
are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year.

Crawfordville Elementary .......... 36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr
Medart Elementary ................... 33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr
Riversink Elementary. ............... 20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr
Shadeville Elementary .............. 40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr
C.O.A.S.T. Charter School........ 10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr
Sopchoppy Education Center.. ................... ...20newspapers ..........$320/yr

Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not
currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom,
please contact us today!


SJust $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for
an entire school year. To sponsor or partially

Suipport sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County
Newspaper ; -I school, call Tammie Barfield or Sherry
ut ..~LBalchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail
in Educat on
your contribution to The Wakulla News
Newspaper in Education Program, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida
32326.


L -All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.


www.thewakullanews.com


HOnII Rol


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 7B


PROULX SAMUEL
REGISTER JESSICA
ROBERTS CALVIN
ROZANSKI KYLE
SANDERS CHELSEA
SESSOR ANDREA
TAYLOR LUKE
THOMAS JACOB
THOMPSON CASSIDY
VISE MOLLY
WEAVER ALLISON

WAKULLA MIDDLE
SCHOOL

A HONOR ROLL
Sixth grade
ANDERSON THOMAS
BAKER BEAU
BARWICK MICHAEL
BOONE ZACHARY
BUCKLAND ALYSSA
CALDWELL SAVANNAH
CASEY JAMES
COUNCIL MADISON
CUSHARD NATHAN
DAVIS EBONE
DELBEATO TAYLOR
DIEHL RIAN
DISMUKE JACOB
ENGLISH ELIZABETH
FENNER GAGE
FLEMING RUSSELL
FOX AIDAN
GODWIN JAYLIN
GOLDIN STEPHEN
HAMEL CHRISTIAN
HARVEY JESELLA
HARVEY WYNTER
JONES MEAGAN
LLOYD SCOTT
MCFALLS SYDNEY
MODZELEWSKI ANTHONY
MOODY YULIA
PATEL RIDDHI
PFISTER TARYN
PICARD SAMUEL
PORTER DAVID
POTTER MIRACLE
RICHARDSON JILLIAN
ROSIER JA'MECIA
SELLERS KEARSTON
SELLERS KENDRICK
SHEFFIELD KAITLYN
SHIRAH JASMINE
SMID KALLIOPE
SULLIVAN JAMES
TAFF ERA
TAYLOR JOSHUA
TETTEY MIQUELA
WALKER ANDREW
WELLS LINDSEY
WILLIAMS TAYLOR

Seventh grade
ATKINS DYLAN
AVILES JASMINE
BUCKLAND VERONICA
CREECH WALKER
DARNELL AMANDA
DEAN TRENTON
EVANS KATELIN
GEHRKE MADELYN
GRAY SHAWNA
HARRIS DALLAS
HOGAN AUSTIN
HOWARD DEZZALINE
HUTTO ANDI
INGRAM CAROLYN
JOHNSTON ALLIE
JOHNSTON DIXIE
JONES CHEYENNE
LANGSTON KALEB
LAWHON JAREN
LAWHORN DALTON
METCALF MADISON
MILLERSHIP MADISEN
PARKER MITCHELL


PRESTIA JULIANA
REED JALECIA
RHODES AVA
RICHARDSON DANNA
RIGDON HARLEY
RODDENBERRY SAMUEL
SANDERS BOBBI
TERRY MORGAN
THOMAS WILLIAM
UNSELL TIA
WOODWARD KALYNN

Eighth grade
ANACAN-CARTER MARC
BARNES NICHOLE
BRADFORD LIAM
BRAYMAN DEVIN
BRYAN JACOB
CARRIER RILEY
DODSON ADAM
EDGE SCOTT
EVANSHINE JACOB
GILCHER-PETRASEK CASSIE
HALL KENNEDY
HENDERSON NATALIE
HOPE BRITTANY
HUTTO JACOB
KEITH CONNOR
KELLY MAYA
LANGSTON KACIE
LEE JOHN
PICARD NICHOLAS
ROBERTS BRIELLE
SARVIS MEGHAN

A/B HONOR ROLL
Sixth grade
BARWICK FERRELL
BARWICK GRACIE
BEAULIEU KELSIE
BISSONNETTE DESTYNE
BRADLEY MADELINE
BROOKS JESSI
BUTLER AKASIA
DAVIS ALLYSON
DAVIS SARAH
DEMPSEY THAN
DUNCAN HUNTER
FINIFROCK RAYDEN
GOKE GABRIELLE
GREENE CIERRI'YANNA
GREENE HUNTER
GREENE TYRONE
HARRELL TRINITEE
HARRIS NAYLISA
HASKETT CRYSTAL
HODGES SERA
HODGES TONIA
HOLTER GABRIEL
HOUSTON GAGE
JOLLY BRYCE
KELLEY REBECCA
KLEINPETER MACKENZIE
LAWHORN KYLE
I.ERMAD DERRICK

LOGAN CALEB
LORD BRADLEY
LOVEL MARGARET
LUCAS EMILEE
MATHIS SHAYLA
MCKNIGHT HEIDI
MCMILLAN EMILY
MCWHITE TRAVORIS


MORRISON JEANIE
NICHOLS BRIANNA
NICHOLS BROOKE
NICHOLS CHRISTOPHER
OSBURN BRANDEN
PARKER KEONI
PAYNE LAURA
PEACOCK BRIANNA
PEEBLES DYLAN
PETERSON ABRYANNA
PITMAN PAYTON
POSEY ROYCE
ROBERTS BEELER
ROGERS BROOKE
RUSS BRAYDEN
SCHMIDT BREEZE
SHEATS ELI
SMITH ALEXANDRA
SMITH REBECCA
ST. MARTIN SHAWN
STEWART CONNOR
SUMNER BAILEY
THOMAS CHRISTOPHER
TILLMAN CODY
TILLMAN OLIVIA
TIMMONS TALYSSA
WATSON DELLA
WEEKS SHELBY
WHEATCRAFI' HANNAH
WHITEHEAD COCHISE
WILLIS JOHN
YATES ELIJAH

Seventh grade
APPLEBY VIRGINIA
ARNOLD TOBIAS
BANKS ARIEL
BANKS AUSTIN
BOHELER ZATANA
BROWN CAITLYN
BURKE LAYNA
CARTER CORRINA
CASEY CHRISTOPHER
CLARK MORGAN
COLLINS MEGAN
CRUM ASHLYNN
FOGLEMAN ZACHARY
GALLADAY KELSEY
GARMON SIERRA
GOATES BREANNA
HALEY KAITLYN
HAMPTON CHRISTOPHER
HOANG NHI
HOLLINGSWORTH CIERRA
HUTTON LORANDA
LIPFORD MONTANA
MASSEY EZRA
MCCANN EMILY
MCCRELESS KODY
MCGOUGH BROOKLYN
MCKENZIE HANNAH
METCALFJOHN
METCALF RUBY
NICHOLS BRYSON
NORMAN CHRISTOPHER
OLDS EMONTE
PAUL ZHANE
POYNTER ALEXUS
QUICK JEARLD
RIDNER HOLLY
SANDERS NOAH
SANTANA AICKA
SMITH MACEY
SPARBY TERI


SPOONER HALEY
STEVENS DYLAN
STOKLEY ALYSSA
STRICKLAND KARLEE
SULLIVAN KYMBERLI
TAYLOR ALEXANDER
THOMAS ASIA
TRICE AUBREY
TUCKER TATUM
TUCKER TYLER
WARBURTON ALLEN
WILLIS MADISON
WILSON AARON
WISHART DESERA'

Eighth grade
ADDERLEY KRISTOPHER
ALLEN BROOKE
ANTILL WILLIAM
BISSONNE'ITE CHAZYA
BRITT DUNCAN
BROWN ALEXIS
BULL BETHANY
CAMACHO XAVIER
CAPPS FAITH
CLARK TAYLOR
COOLEY LINDSEY
DAVIS CHASE
DAWKINS JELISA
DODSON CASEY
DOYLE CASSIE
DUNAWAY SAMANTHA
EDWARDS SARAH
EVANS ASHLYN
GASPERI JESSICA
GLOVER CHRISTIAN
GRIFFIN LEON
GRIFFIN SHAYLA
GUARINO EVAN
HARTSFIELD CHEYENNE
HERRON ALEXANDRIA
HOUSTON RYAN
INGRAM FAITH
LARSEN ZACHARY
LAWHON TAYLOR
LEWIS CONSTANCE
MCCULLEY COLTON
MCKNIGHT HANNAH
MOODY ALISA
PAYNE MATT
PEARSON ALI
PIGOTT CHASON
RODDENBERRY ALEXA
ROMANUS ANTHONY
ROWE ASHLEY
RUDD KAYLA
RUSSELL SARAH MARIE
SANDERS JUSTIN
STEVENS CALYN
STEWART AISLINN
SULLIVAN KATHERINE
TAYLOR KAYLEE
TERRY NOLAN
TINDAL TIFFANY
TOWNSEND COURTNEY
WELLS JACOB
WHITTINGTON CHEYENNE
YATES BREANNA
YOUNG BRANDON


Continued on Page 11B


Continued from
previous page

10th grade
ALLEN CHRISTOPHER
ATKINSON AUDREY
BENNETT TYLER
BLACK MEAGAN
BOYETT AIDEN
BROWN CHRISTEN
BURSE IAN
CHESHIRE ASHLEY
CONWAY JOSHUA
CROWE SPENCER
DAVIS EMILY
DEAL RICHARD
EVANS JUSTINE
FURNISH SHANA
GOBLE ELIZABETH
GRADDY RYAN
GREEN PATRICK
GUBALA BRIANNA
GUNN THOMAS
HAMILTON SAVANAH
HARRELL SHELBY
HECKLER VICTORIA
HOLLETT MAXAMILLION
HOWARD DILLON
HUTCHINS GABRIEL
KELLEY LOGAN
KENT ALISHA
KESTEL REGINA
KYLE WESLEY
LOUDNER BRANDON
MARTINEZ JACOB
MATHERS CARY
MATHIS SARA
MAXWELL JASMINE
MCCULLERS DANIEL
MCFALLS DORAN
MOSS SHAUNA
NICHOLS BRYAN
NOLAND TIFFANY
NORDLOF ZACHARY
PARIS CHRISTOPHER
PAYNE MAKAYLA
PLAGGE ALEYDA
POITEVINT DAKOTA
POTTER ISAAC
POTTER TAMIA
RICHARDSON MARSHALL
RODDENBERRY BROOK
RUDD EDWARD
RUDD EMILY
SMALL JOSHUA
SMITH AARON
STEWART AMBER
THOMAS DIWATA
TODD JACEY
TONDEE HUNTER
VAUGHAN TAYLOR
VEGA JOSEPH
WALTMAN JESSICA
WHITE KELLI
WILLIAMS TABITHA
WILSON CHARITY
WISE JESSICA
WOOFI'ER RACHEL
YOUNG CHIONE

11th grade
ARELLANO CHELSI
ARMSTRONG VICTORIA
BATTLE JACK
BAZE PAYTON
BEAL SAVANNAH
BOATENREITER MARYANA
CARRIER TYLER
CARROLL CHELSEA
CHAMPANY MADELINE
DAY CHEYENNE
DEROSS HUNTER
DIX-KESSLER RACHEL
DUGGER GARRETT
ESTES BAILEY
GRAY RAYCHEL


GRIMMETT SHANTE'
HARRELL ERICA
HARRIS KAYLA
HARVEY WYATT
HEROLD BRITTANY
HUMMEL ELLEN
HUNTER JAKE
JENKINS SAMANTHA
KOPPENAAL NICOLE
LEWIS ALEXANDER
LINDSEY DEMETRIUs
MAULDIN COURTNEY
MCCRAY TYLER
MCIVER RAMI
MCKAYE HUNTER
MILLIGAN SHELBY
MONTGOMERY ROBERT
MOSS DAVID
PARKER LAURYL
PERKINS SHELBY
POKA TAYLOR
RAY MEGAN
REVELL CHRISTOPHER
REYNOLDS MELISSA
RODDENBERRY JORDAN
RODRIGUEZ LYNDSEY
SARVIS MICHAEL
SCOTT CALEB
SHIVER SHELBY
SIMMONS KIERSTEN
SMITH TYLER
STANLEY CARSON
STRICKLAND JULIA
WALKER JACOB
WALLACE DYLAN
WEBSTER JANAY
WESTERFIELD ASPEN
WILLIAMS SELINA

12th grade
ABSHIRE MARIAN
ANDERSON MAEGAN
BAUMEISTER JACQUELINE
BERT JESSICA
BOATENREITER DUSTIN
BONIN KANDI
BROADWAY ZACHARY
BURNS KENDALIN
BURNSED JENNIFER
CASH CODY
CLINE KEITH
CRUM MILLION
CURTIS COLIN
DAW FAITH
DAW KEVIN
DYCUS CARISSA
EATON CAMIELLE
EGLER SHANNON
EVANS ADAM
FINN SARITA
FLETCHER AUSTIN
FLOWERS BEVERLY
GASPERI RICHARD
GAVIN JAMAL
HAFFNER BRIAN
HAWKINS JOSHUA
HODGES KRISTIE
KELLY MARCUS
KEMP AMANDA

CEY CCHAEELSEA
LINTON STANLEY
LOCKWOOD BRANTLEY
LONG CHELSEA
MATHERS INA
MAUNEY HOPE
MAXWELL JAMES
MCCOY EVAN
MCCULLERS ALINA
MERCURIO VINCENT
NEWSOME COURTNEY
PANDOLFI NICOLE
PARKER COURTNEY
PARRISH SHELBY
PATTON THOMAS
PEARCE BECCA


YES!I I want to help sponsor Qe )W
|program. Enclosed is my check fo
to help support as many children a

Name

Address

ICity
Phone Email


I


,alulla 300tus NIE

s Ican.


Zip


State













































r


Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www. thewakullanews.com


EACHH
HEXBUG Nano
Holiday Ornament
60-713 Assorted colors. Age 3 and up. Reg. 9.99.


microSDH C
Cards.
44-170/183/211


~bSkullicanch;


Skullcandy Ink'd
Headphones
33-360/61/81 Reg. 19.99.


$099 ~~
6-Ft. High-S peed
HDMI Cable
15-363 Reg. 27.99.


SDHC USB Flash Drives.
Cards. 4GB Black 25-1109, Pink Checker 25-3125,
44-1681 Blue Flower 25-3126, Blue Circular 25-3128,
201/311 8GB Black 25-1110, 16GB Black 25-1111


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s 129 99
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s49 99 Syvtmran
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SAVE 50%
$ 10 99
Gyro-X RC Helicopter
Age 10 and up. Requires 4 "AA" batteries.
60-640 Reg. 39.99.


(SAV9E950%
$99
Exclusive 2011
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White 26-1562, Black 26-363
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$ e 99' vUI ... u AM
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12-662 Reg. 79.99.
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channels including NFL and Howalrd Stern. SiriusXM
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Sirius, XM anti all related marks anti logos are trademarks of Sirius XM
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SAVE $40 Nikon.
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4 ~Logitech-

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EI
Free Dog male, Carin
terrier,14 mos old,
black/gray, all shots,
neutered~needs
yard~potty trained
850-212-3252




Farm fresh vegetables
Fbas benched and frozen,
ng doe and frzn
green~~~~~ boln ent


Selling

Something?
Classified Ads

For As Little

As $10 A W~eek
L

CJIS GROUP Inc ,
a Market Research firm,

has a full time position opening.
Potential candidates must be
dependable, focused, and capable
of meeting production quotas. Good
grammar, reading and writing skills
are required. Daily job tasks include
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uments, and report writing. The
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paid holidays, monthly personal
accrual, Health, Dental and 401K.
PleaSe E-mail resume to
Cheryl@cjisgroup.com. Or send by
mail to: CJIS GROUP;
2758 Coastal Hwy US 98-
Crawfordville, FI 32327.


Polly Nichzols'
Special Touch Cleaning Service 1-73
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pray like it's up to God, Work like it's up to you" 926-3065
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Do leaves have you bogged down this fall
then call Pat Green's Lawn Service
Call today for a free quote!
A.-, i. .. i nI. ..dern equipment to rid you of all those f ll...- i .
(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 ,
Lr: jlly Ow;ned and Operated/Licensed and In~ur d





* Outheard Repair & Service Factory trained: Honda,
* Electronics Installati0H Yamaha, Suzuki and Tohatsu
* Rherglass Repair LICENSED & INSURE 850-228-0880







926-- 02 0


STOWAWAY MARINE st MORE, Inc. ~
BUY*SELL THA DE*HEPAIH
Boats, Motors, Trailers,
New/Used Marine Supplies Sold slt
4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawtordville, FL 32327 850-556-4652
www.wakulIlaboatsa les.com stowawayma ri ne@ comcast. net




|]eginner Sericj MYetY with D~oly Moody
f-lexibility, strength, inner peace
$50 series or $12 drop-in, 6-7Phi call for class schedule!
at the Barry Building (The Log Cabin) 3295 Crawfordville Hwy.* Suite C, Upstairs
e-mail Focusyoga@yahoo.com or call 228-380-0140


Home Maintenance & Repailr
--- Cliff Westbrook Services ---
FUII Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental,
yard cleanup. Flower beds, window washing, trash haulinO-
EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE 850-926-2004







Mini-Warehouses Boats RV's 51 9-51 28
2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE 508-51 77


Ad~ornerstone Cooking~~s
Want a SMOKED TURKEY or HAM for your holiday get-together?
Maybe you don't want to cook at all.
Let Cornerstone Cooking take some of the hassle out of the holidays for you.
We also offer FULL CATERING SERVICES!
Morris Pigott at (850) 661-1117



gY METRV New Construction,

Remodeling& ear


850.524.5894




--~J- 7, SEL F
""r~- ~- STORAG E
850-926-5725
5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.st wwacnter.com


BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!
I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy
them again and make copies to share.
Keep the family i,. It, *., alive with restored photographs
Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655 dougapple@gmail.com




NEW!! Horsemanship small group classes. Learn: horse care,
equipment, safety with some riding time. ALSO, A few openings for
private lessons on our new school ponies. English lessons on your
horse; will come to your place.
Call -- LAURIE WESTBROOK 809620


Gatortrax Services LLC
Professional Property Maintenance
SGeneral Landscaping/Lawn Maint.* Flower Bed Specialist

"": 850-545-6760
2011 www. atortraxservices.com


Drivers: Run GA, AL,
MS, TN &FL
HOME WEEKENDS'
earn Up to 39 cents a
mile, 1 yr OTR Flatbed
Exp. Call: SUNBELT
TRANSPORTLLC
(800)572-5489 EXT 227
Drivers-Build your own
hometime! Part-time,
Full-time, Express &
Casual lanes! Daily or
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Equpementmechani 3
Gotsreenerwth Noprth
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txeions ad Local ob
Placement Assisanice


Tinedd fo hnst onAvi-

-la Housing Avilbe. r
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Careeer wtraining
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ment asistane. -
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faied. SCEV certified.
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Junior P. Sanders
Septic Tank Services
18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types.
-Drain Repair.Washing Machine Systems.
n JOB TOOSHIALL, FAI1R PRICES,
SR01116FRIENDoLYGUAAN7EEDSERVICE! 850-210-5777

r-- -- -- -- *
I SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS :

ICabins, Brns Pla ho U ities G zeboo, Tabe Sinags Rock- 1
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I $25 credit on a new building with this ad. I
I See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care I
850-926-3441











;Affordable Office Space
.4 the Barry Bucilding. En~joy working surrowrded
by a great atmosphere with man~y amenities. Rates
start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a
tour at www.BarryBuildin~g.com.
aso-21o-ss49
or visit us at www.BarryBuilding. com


Mung'S Tree Servid~ v
Professional Work done at Affordable Rates!


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ISA certified arborist FL-6125 850-421-8104 -~ j


A New Look Painting
Specializing in residential and commercial
Re-painting pressure washing sheetrock wood rot repairs & L


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certified. Call
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cm




SAWMILLS from only
MAKE M NY& SAVE
aOY sut yur ob nk
ready to ship. FREE Info.
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com
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LAWSUIT
CASH NOW!! $$$
As seen on TV. Injury
Nee $ 00 $ 0 .++
within 48/hours? Low
rae NAEal NOW BY
Toll-Free: (800p)58 -8321




Yard Sale

S10 0AM Crod il e
Self Storage
3291H Cawfordville





CASH FOR CARS
Any Make, Model, or
uer iWe Pay OREl
Your Car or Truck
TODAY Fr e Twng!


2 Bedroom, 1 Bath
SWMH, quiet street
$400/month, $400
deposit.References re-
quired! 904-583-1177
2bed/2bath MH
North of Crawfordville
Wakulla County
water & garbage
provided, 1st, last and
security reqd. $550 mo
850-960-4230
3BR/2BA DWMH
Wakulla Gardes,




fo85a0 p0dntme~nts
727-642-6043

3m20 0W o es
$650 mo. rent to own
850-926-9540
Crawfordville
3/2 on 1/2 acre $700
mo~nt pus dlep00sit



85. n66-01




Move in special $99
Deposit $300
Swimming pool

Doa Hte 9
Civil Servant

5% ,off rent
1BDR as LOW as
$600/mo
2BR as LOW as
3BD a LmW as
$800/mo.
Appl1 a in F $35




2BR/1BA Duplex near
downtown craw-
fordvle /s6c0u mo,
Call 566-7391
Crawforcville, chan,barge 2
bedro m 2p 0u nts d b3x,


3BR/2BA in Mysterious
watersS695/rent, same
deposit, no pets.
call Jim at 566-5165
Cozy cottage,
Re d ecea. 1A
Rmodee 2R/1A
Hcirdwasotdh ooursh ceil-
W/D hook-up, opera
back deck, Close to
Gulf of Mexico
excellent fishing
$585tmont 286550/1deposi




CRAWFORDVILLE
2N/ S~moo t ,
78050 r b+5 c.

Medart studio house
on four lots, $500/per
month, plus deposit.


Revell Realty
850-962-2212


Maini-W5arehouse



Spaces for lease, 8x10
and labl~now

Coame by or a
926-5084



3BR/2BA cnestort home on
1.5bltwihi nrage ucelent
Ownerlinandng.





Choice corner lot at
juncture of
Crawfordville Highway
and pa Od NWhit00ck
Commercial zoning
gua anteed $3 coo


AffordableOfficeSpace
at the Barry Building.
Great atmosphere
Includesallutiliies~trash p/u,
fullkIdtchen use, conference
room. ibles start atS$28)/mo.
850-210-5849
orourwebsiteat
www.BarrvBuildina.com
Resta rnt Sa Available
Soon!! Fully equipped.
liceCs rn qupet if
Call850-42 M39 P


WOODVILLE RETAIL
SPACfeAV ILBLE
1000/sft riostowall

sto erot wbck
stora e
Divided offi e space-
1074sf
Le iswoo Cnter




BANK ORDERED
AUCTIONS! Nov
19th-Dec 3rd AL, FL &
MS. Multiple Properties
Live Onsite &
www.Actions inteed.com
Proxibid.com/Auctionsun
ited (800)222-5003

BANK ORDERED
AUCTIONS:
Asset -L, GA, N
TN. December 6th, 7th,
& 8th-Homes, Acreage,
Residential Lots &
Commercial Proper-
t es-(8 ?J2-8 88 or

LAND LIQUIDATION 20
$99mo OlS2900
TX, Owner financing,
NO CREDIT CHECKS
moneyR bc uruan-
chure (800)755-8953
www, sunsetranches, com

CLASSIFIED

Per We k!


2BR/IBA, $850/month
Access to boat
ramp, dock, and park
on Wakulla River
51 M steiu wat r
Rd.85e0 5-8755es
850-926-1385



2-acre lot for sale near
new rf eile School,


Owe fiacn all





HOME
COMFORT
INDUSTRIES
CENTRAL
HEATING & AIR
Sales, Installation
E R L i

Fans, Lighting,
Wiring for
Electrical,
Phones, TV,
Computer &
Sound


Qoi g, Ower~s
Lic. No s ER0010924,

(850 c 6- 790
KEITH KEY
HEATING & AIR
Commercial, residen-
tial an m bil h s.
installation. All makes
Lia. # 046 516







LIFE NE

aEN LME


BACKFO)RPYTRACTOR
SERVICE
Bushhogging,
Boxblading
Driveway
Larry carter
Owner/Operator
850-925-7931 or
850-694-7041
Licensed & Insured



A-1 PREeSS RE CLEeANING
License Joh Farrell


ALL ABOUT***
CONCRETE
BLOCKS, BRICKS, PAVERS
LANDSCAPE
PLANTS, SOD,
TRACTOR WORK
Call JOSEPH FRANCIS
850-556-1178 OR
850-556-3761

Harold Burse
Stump6Gr ending

CS2u k: 0


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page DB


Lost Jack Russell
blind in right eye, near
Lawhon Mill/Harvey Mill
rd, black spot on side,
please call. I miss my
baby 8050-5745-680755





Advertising that Works.
Put your ad in Over
100 Papers throughout
Florida for one
6OW IlE!C~a31
or visit: www.florida
-classifieds.com





A FEW PRO DRIVERS
NEEDED.
Top Pay &401k 2 Mos.
CEL Cls Dri 2 g
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Burner
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ret.Mus hav brn e~~r
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CALL JIM PORTER- '
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LCEN RDD


CL.Abil I ID ADS starting at just $10.00 a week!


















SOUTHERN HOMES PROPERTY & DEVELOPMENT, INC.,
a Florida Corporation, and
JOSEPH A. CULLEY, A/K/A JOSEPH A. CULLEY,111,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff s Final Summary Judgment For
Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in
WakuullaFlorida. described as follows. to wit:
LOT 3, BLOCK 7 WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
AND
LOT 47, BLOCK "8", WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein af-
ter. at public sale on December 8,2011, at 11:00a.m.(Eastern Standard Time), or as
soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, ot the highest bidder for cash, at the
Wakulla County Courthouse. 3056 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville. Florida 39397
If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale,
you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you
fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds.
Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court
Administrator s office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(seal)
By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk
November 17 &24,2011

5012-1124
Vs. Galiowaly, Charlies 10-000346-CA Nofice ofSale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 10-000346-CA
CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
liARLES GALLOWAY and BRENDA GALLOWAY, husband and wife,
defiend t( ereby given that, pl90TletF to tSl FOrder of Final Summary Judgement
of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida described
as..
Lot 3 of HERON POINT, a subdivision as per map of plat thereof recorded in Plat
Book 4, Page 34 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida.
at Public Sale, to the highest bidder, for cash at lobby of the Wakulla County Court-
house, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on December 1,2011
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
tpeo ertyowner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days af-

(S 1TNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 1st day of November, 2011.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court
/s/By: Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk
Steve M. Watkins, Ill
FBN 0794996
41 Commerce Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
(850) 653-1949
November 17 &24,2011


sons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claim-
ing under any of the above named or described Defendants,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated March 24, 2010, and entered in Case No. 09-CA-443 of the Circuit Court of
the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Walkulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK
NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER POOLING AND SERVICING AGREE-
MENT DATED AS OF JANUARY 1,2006 MORGAN STANLEY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST
2006-1 MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-1 is Plaintiff and GARY
JORDAN, ANGEL JORDAN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC.(MIN# 100176105081070966), SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSO-
CIATION INC. UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2 and ALL OTHER UN-
KNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named Defendant is deceased, the personal repre-
sentatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other par-
ties claiming, by through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, per-
sons or parties, natural or corporate, or whose exact legal status is unknown, claim-
ing under any of the above named or described Defendants, are Defendants, I will
sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the lobby at the Wakulla County Court-
house located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL at 11:00 o clock
A.M. on the 1st day of December, 2011, the following described property as set forth
in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit:
Lot 3, Block K. of Songbird, Phase II, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded
in Plat 3, Pages I13 through I 16, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida
Located : 18 Swift Pass, Crawfordville, FL 32327
and all fixtures and personal property located therein or thereon, which are included
as security in Plaintiff s mortgage.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than
the property owner as of the date of the lis pendns must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.
Dated at Crawfordville, Walkulla County, Florida, this 8th day of November, 2011.
Brent Thurmond, Clerk of said Circuit Court
/s/By: Desiree D Willis, As Deputy Clerk
Clarfiel & OkondP.A., Attorney for Plaintiff
500 S. Australian Ave., Suite 730, West Palm Beach, FI 33401 (561) 713-1400
November 17 &24,2011

5018-1124
Vs. Culiey, Joseph A. V 10-CA-047 Notice of Salie
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT INAND FCORI WA1LO

2 t rTA~s~ S etCASE NO.: 10-CA-047
Tallahassee, Florida 32304,
Plaintiff
SUTHERN HOMES PROPERTY & DEVELOPMENT, INC ,
a Florida Corporation, and '
JOSEPH A. CULLEY, A/K/A JOSEPH A. CULLEY,111,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff s Final Summary Judgment For
Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in
Walkulla, Florida, described as follows, to wit:
LOT 1, BLOCK B OF GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 77&78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein af-
ter, at public sale on December 8,2011, at 11:00a.m.(Eastern Standard Time), or as
soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, ot the highest bidder for cash, at the
Wakulla County Courthouse. 3056 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville. Florida 39397
If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale,
you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you

Ntc Ito Pesn Wtuh Ds bi setitledI to e ny preman git f ability who needs any
accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no
cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court
Administrator s office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(seal)
BY: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk
Novemberl17&24,2011

5017-1124
Vs. CulieyJoseph A. V 0-CA-046 Notice of Salie
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 10-CA-046
TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK
2720 West Tennessee Street
TallaP isee Florida 32304,
vs.



BIG YARD SALE :
Christmnas Bazaar and Bake Sale
Friday Nov. 25 and Saturda Nov. 26 P
7AM-until... Rain or Shine!
Christmas decorations, games, toys, books, small
kitchen appliances, household items, dishes, newu

Fir t Batic Chrch d sWamuul Sam ion C
945 Woodville Highway


5020-1124
Vs, Trimboi, Jr, Frank 65-2011-CA-000264 Nofice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000264
NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FRANK J. TRIMBOLI JR., et al,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: DARLENE M. TRIMBOLI
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 75 PURPLE MARTIN COVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA
32327 ALSO ATTEMPTED AT 5A GUINEVERE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 AND 11985
SOUTHERN BLVD #126, ROYAL PALM BEACH, FL 33411-7619. CURRENT ADDRESS UN-
KNOWN
FRANK J TRIMBOLI JR
LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 75 PURPLE MARTIN COVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327
ALSO ATTEMPTED AT 5A GUINEVERE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 AND 11985 SOUTH-
ERN BLVD #126, ROYAL PALM BEACH, FL 33411-7619.CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN

YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following
described property:
LOT 12, BLOCK H, SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PHASE II, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, 113, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is
1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 thirty (30) days after the first
publication of this Notice in the THE WAKULLA NEWS and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff s attorney or immediately thereaf-
ter, otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
If you are a person with a disability shoe needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact Danny Davis, Court Technology Office at the Of-
fice of COurt Administration, 301 S. Monroe St., Rm 225, Talllahassee, FL 32303, tele-
phone 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or im-
mediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance
is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 8th day of November, 2011.
BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(S E AL ) B s A EK

November 17 &24, 2011

5019-1124
Vs. Jordan, Gary 09-CA-443 Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No. 09-CA-443
DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE UNDER POOLING AND SERV-
ICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF JANUARY 1,2006 MORGAN STANLEY HOME EQUITY
LOANPIT US 2006-1 MORTGAGE PASS -THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-1,
vs.
GARY JORDAN, ANGEL JORDAN, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS
INC.(MIN# 100176105081070966), SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSO-
CIATION INC. UNKNOWN TENANTS) IN POSSESSION #1 and #2 and ALL OTHER UN-
KNOWN PARTIES, including, if a named Defendant is deceased, the personal repre-
sentatives, the surviving spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and all other par-
ties claiming, by through, under or against that Defendant, and all claimants, per-





*I Lionel
Da zevedo
AHWD,
RMM,
SFR
HARTUNG AND 'I
Realtor. i/
NOBLIN, INC., 85onCnts
REALTORS@ Lionel~emboamramailcom
YOUR WAKULLA COUNTY and CRAWFORDVILLE CONNECTION.


Selling Somnething?

C RSSified Ads For

As Little As $10O A ~Week


BUCK FOREST 11 ACRES &
HORSE STALLS. $265,000 3 2
~ ~~~8Cross fenced, 3 stables, sep. work-
shop. 2400sf. skylights & fireplace.
Custom maple cabinetry, stainless

RIVER PLANTATION ES applSane.
WITH GUEST APT. $239,900 2 6il un** '~c
story, 2440sf on 1.46 Acres. Full
kitchen guest apt. above Workshop!
Barn. 3 3 MB on 1st level, wood
flooring & huge kitchen. Boating _b
access.
3 ACRES OF LAND $137,500.
2BD 3BA. living room has bonus
room, eat-in kitchen breakfast bar.
Pole Barn Workshop. Fully fenced.
-.-ss, 4- Buy with one acre at $117,500.
FAMILY NEIGHBORHOOD-
$138,900. Nice floor plan, gleaming
wood flooring, 2 car gar. Pretty 3 2.
Back yard is privacy fenced TV deck
designed for entertaining. % acre lot.
Must be sold!
DESIRABLE AUDUBON FOR-

ET te- $1 d c5e t 4/r eSplideplan,

a1 th bdrm. at in kitchen has aHl ap-
yard. Above ground pool. 2 car gar.

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated
2650-1 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327
S850-284-6961Phone 850-26-41875 Fax x~w.
www. LionelD azevedo~com


Eaine ~ary aww ..e

850-509-5409 96 Friendship Church Road Ranch style

3BD/2BA home on 1.88 acres with rocking chair
ffont porch and large back deck, split plan with

appliances. $144,900. Inquire about 4BD/2BA
B1U~w tr~a~home available early January. Additional lots and
Realty GrouP floor oans avilable.


Ochfokoeeya We Offer Long-Term

Rentals in W2akulla
and Franklin Counties!


Realty 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246
obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com


Need to rent yo ur house?

Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for
25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.

Let our experience work for you!
Call 984-0001 to find out how!

1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront home- Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/
fireplace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month.

28 Endeavor Drive- Tradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club
house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month.

142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month.

1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month.

Commercial Office Building- South of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month.

415 Mashes Sands Rd.- 3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.

Ochloconee Bayfront Home- 3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch,
workshop and fireplace $1100 per month,


"CA Nzew Level of Service!!!"~


IVlanaopemtent, lea


ReentEa ate Realty Group

850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com

AVAILABLE RENTALS
* 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of office space, fenced
* 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets
* 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BAHouse on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets
* 51A& 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok
* 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Elliciency. $1,350 Mo.
No Smoking or Pets
* 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets
* 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA2,390sfHouse with fireplace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets
* 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets
* 55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets
* 36 Stephen Donaldson Road 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 1 Acre $700 No Smoking or pets RENT TO OWN!!
* 59Chickat3BR/2BAHouse $850Mo.No SmokingorPets
* 55 Janet Drive 3BR/2BA MH, Paradise Village, canal front, dock, community pool, Lawn Maint. Incl.
$800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets
* 11 Quiet Cove, Panacea 2BR/2BA $850 mo. No Smoking, Pets negotiable
* 455 Old Bethel Road 3BR/2BAHouse on acre. $950 mo. No Smoking or Pets


RENTALS NEEDED!!
Talk to us today about managing your property!
We have an experienced Property MVanagement Team
who will provide you with an excellent level of
customer ser-vice and results!


Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www. thewakullanews.com


M


E


R


5021-1124
12/3 Salie-Seminole Mini Storalge
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANT TO FLNOoRID EFL ST RAGE FACILITY ACT. FLORIDA STAT-
UES, CHAPTER 83, PART IV THAT SEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILL HOLD A SALE BY
SEALED BID ON DECEMBER 3,2011 AT 10:00A.M. AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY,
CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAIN-
ING THE PERSONAL PROPERTY OF:
AMANDAYVALE
ROBERT ROBINSON, JR
BEFORE THE SALE DATE OF DECEMBER 3,2011 THE OWNERS MAY REDEEM THEIR PROP-
ERTY BY PAYMENT OF THE OUTSTANDING BALANCE AND COST BY MAILING IT TO 2314
CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, 32327 OR PAYING IN PERSON AT
THE WAREHOUSE LOCATION.
NOVEMBER 24, 2011 AND DECEMBER 1,2011


M


GATED RIVER COMMUNITY -
$269,900 4 2.5 2 acres TV gorgeous
kitchen. Over 2500 sf., fireplace
& scrnd porch. Shows beautifully.
Community boat ramp & pool.


u


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NeW Construction


Plggot s Pond

Subdivision


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5 6 3


2 3 87 8


8 2 78


~~~~51


9 4 2


8 2 9 6


7 6 8


56 3 15 7

Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of
the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere in that
section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each
horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of
nine squares.The puzzle is completed when you correctly fill
every square.


E L & 18 86 9

8 98 6 79 L L
---------
89 L 6 9E L&88

8 9E 8 6L 99L86

8 L E8 965 9 L

L 69 LE 8L &9

L E 98 99L 9865

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3 o o13 lae i ls v o N



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www.thewakullanews.com




Hoo R 10 O?0S


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011 Page 11B


HAY TAYLOR
HENDERSON JAYLA
HUGHES JOHN
HURLEY MICHAEL
JOHNSON MARQUEZ
JOHNSON MARY
JOHNSTON JEREMY
JOINER JUSTIN
JONES EVAN
JONES RYVERS
KENDRICK LYNLEY
KIESER ELLI
KIRKLAND NOAH
LALONDE HUNTER
LAMB JACE
LAWRENCE KARLEE
LEON DEVIN
LEONARD KACYN
MATHIS DAMIAN
MCCORD ANDREW
MCCULLOUGH SCOTT
MCDONALD MAHALA
MILLENDER BROOKE
MILLER KAYDANCE
MORSE KADEN
MORSE SARAH
MORSE ZACHARY
NEAL AUSTIN
NIX REID
PATTERSON CHAD
PEACOCK HAYDEN
PEARCE LILLIAN
POLLOCK BROOKLYN
PUNAUSUIA LYLA
RAY LANDON
REYNOLDS IAN
RISOLDI HAILEY
ROBERTSON RAVEN
ROBLES BRANDON
RODGERS EVA
ROSS JAVON
SADBERRY JOSEPH
SALAS MICAH
SASSER MEGHANN
SEYMOUR JOSEPH
SHARP EMILY
SHARP WHITNEY
SIMS CALEB
SPIVEY ALEESA
STIBER LOGAN
STREATER JOURDYN
SWAIN DALLAS
THOMAS ELICIA
TIMMONS KARL
VAUSE ASHLYN
WEEKS JOSHUA
WEEKS MEREDITH
WELLS CHRISTOPHER

First grade
ALLEN KADEN
BEARD BETHANEY
BREEDEN EMMA
BROWN CONNOR
BROWN TAYLOR
CARNLINE EUGENE
CHUKES TARAN
COLE SEBASTIAN
CONLEY COLBY
COOK SADIE
COSHATT NATHAN
COX CALE
FLOYD KODY
FULLWOOD EMILY
GEIGER MASON
GRUBBS AUSTIN
GRUBBS WAYLON
GURR JACOB


HARRELL TORI
HARRIS JARED
HARRIS NATHANIEL
HARRISON CAMERON
HILL PEYTON
KEMP JAYDEN
LAWHON SHELBY
LYNCH TREVOR
MATHIS TREVOR
MERCER AVA
MONROE DE'ANDRE
MORSE JAMES
OLIVER JASON
PEARCY SHAYLEE
PEARSON EMILY
POLOUS DALE
PUCCI NICHOLAS
RILEY ANGEL
RUDD JACOB
SEYMOUR JAXON
SMITH JACOB
SMITH KAILEE
SMITH LEANA
THOMAS AUBREY
TIMMONS MAKINA
TUTEN KEIRA
WILLIAMS BRIANNA
ZACE ANGELINA
ZACHRY ROBERT

Second grade
ALBERT DE'ANA
ALLEN MARGARET
ALLEN SHARE
BISSONNETTE ZION
BROWN WILLIAM
BROWNE JAMES
CHIPPS SARA
COLEMAN DYLAN
CRAWFORD RYAN
DEAN BREANNA
DEROCHE DERRIN
FONDO JEWELL
FRANKLIN NEHEMIAH
GRIMES CAMRYN
HALL PHILIP
HARTWEIN STEPHEN
HICKS BRYCE
HUBMANN CALINGTON
JOKI AMRITHA
KEEFER KYLER
LARUE PARRIS
LAWRENCE KAYLIN
LEBLANC EMILY
MANNING VINCENT
MEYER ZAYDA
MILLER GWINDOLYN
NEEL CLAY
PAARLBERG CASEY
PASCHAL AUSTIN
PILGRIM DEVIN
POLLOCK NICHOLAS
PRETTI MADELINE
RAKER WYATT
REDFERN CONNOR
SICKLES DAKOTA
SILCOX TRISTAN
SIMS TRINITY
SPELL MADISON
STEFFEN ALLISON
TODD HANNAH
VAUGHAN CHRISTALYN
VAUSE REMIE
WARD JESSE
WILLIAMS MASON
WILLIAMS TE'ANNA
WILSON DEVON
YOUNG ANSLEY


RANSOM SHALONC'A
RICHARDSON ELIZABETH
ROGERS CAITLYN
RUDD JAMES
SALAS MADISON
SASSER SETH
SIZEMORE EMMA
STRICKLAND MADISON
THOMPSON MICHAEL
TULLY LOGAN
WALKER IAN
WEEKLY BREEANNA

Fifth grade
ALLBRITTON JACKSON
ALTMAN KATIE
BALL CHARLES
BERUBE HUNTER
BLAKE ELISHA
BLASDEL JASMINE
BOOKOUT MEGHANN
BRANTLEY MACKENZIE
BUSEN HUNTER
BUSSEY CAYLIE
CALLAGHAN MAKENNA
CARPENTER REBECCA
CAUSSEAUX HAYDEN
CLARK MELANIE
COULLIETTE JUSTIN
DAVIS CLYDE
DEAN NATHAN
DEROCHE DEVIN
DOWELL JOSHUA
FAGAN MORGAN
GLOVER CODY
GRINER CHRISTOPHER
HALL CYDNEYANNE
HARPER CALEB
HATCH VICTORIA
HILL HUNTER
HILLMON TORI
HOSTETTER ABBY
HUNTER BRANDON
HUNTER CAITLYN
JOHNSON SHACARRA
KELLOGG KAYLEIGH
KELLY ASHTON
KREGER ANNA
LEDBETTER HARLEY
LENK HAYDEN
LEWIS HUNTER
LINTON ABIGAIL
LOCKWOOD DESTINY
MAXWELL NYJA
MEEKS JOSEPH
MEYER DALLAS
MORSE KYAH
MURRAY MALIK
PILGRIM DESTANI
PULLEY CAROL
REGISTER REUBEN
REVELS MCKENZIE
ROLLINS MALIK
ROSIER CHEYANNA
ROWLS DEMARCUS
SHIRAH EMILY
SMITH LAUREN
STEPHENS NOLYN
STOFFEL MADISON
THOMAS RONNIE
THOMPSON ANGEL
TUMBLESON CHARITY
WILLIAMS DA'MYA
WILSON JUWAN


Third grade
ALBERT KIANNA
ANDERSON WILLIAM
BAGGETT AUSTIN
BILODEAU RIANNA
BISHOP WALTER
BLOODWORTH LILLIANA
BURCH HALIE
CARRAWAY GABRIELLE
CHADWELL KELLY
CHAMBERS DANIEL
COLE SIMON
DANNER JONVIAY
DAVIS KEEGAN
DUNLAP CASSANDRA
FOREST TYRAY
GAY SARAIAH
HANES ALAURA
HARRELL SARA
HERNANDEZ GEORGE
HUGHES EMILY
JOHNSON HAILEY
JONES KEIRA
KING TWINTE'
LANGSTON KOLTEN
LEE KAYLA
MERCER SHERIDAN
OAKS CONNER
PATTERSON KAYLA
PILGRIM ALEXANDER
POLOUS RAYMOND
REVELS SYDNEY
ROBINSON MI'KIYA
SANFORD KAYLA
SHARP LIAM
SICKLES JAYLA
SMART HUNTER
WALLACE SARA
WATSON KYLE
WILLIAMS TERRELL

Fourth grade
ALVAREZ SHYTIRA
AUSTIN KATELYNN
BARTON JUSTUS
BECKMAN EMMA
BLASDEL BRYANNA
BOLDEN JORDAN
BRINSON SAVANNAH
BROOKSHIRE CASSANDRA
CARNES LYNNE
CARNLINE MICHAEL
CLARK WILLIAM
COOK JOSHUA
DAVIS JAYLEE
ELLIOTT CHASE
FLOYD KYLE
GEIGER ALYSSA
GOUDE BRIANNA
GRAVES REBECCA
HARRELL LEVI
HART TREVOR
HINSEY JOHN
HOLT JOHN
HOWARD MADISON
HUNT AUSTIN
KELLY ASHELY
LAMB JAILYN
LANGLEY TRENTEN
LEBLANC ALLYSON
LORENZINI DESTINY
LOURCEY ANDREW
MALIK IRENE
MCIVER DYLAN
METCALF MARGARET
OWEN MATTHEW
PADGETT SUMMER


Continued from Page 7B

SHADEVILLE
ELEMENTARY

A HONOR ROLL
Kindergarten
CALLAGHAN SADIE
CHAMBERS SARA
DANIELS TRAVIS
DRYE CYRUS
GAVIN NEARIAH
HOSKINS ANDRISS
LI JOY
METCALF MADDEN
PERRY HALEY

First grade
BROCK LAUREN
BRUCE HALEY
BUSHEE AUBREE
CALLAGHAN JADEN
CIERPIK ZACHARY
DUBOIS AVA
DUCHARME SHELBIE
ESTES JACE
FONDO EMILY
FRUGGIERO CORTLYND
GOODWIN LILY
HERNANDEZ ALEX
KENNEDY CHASE
LAMB DESTINY
MARTIN BRADLEY
MOORE PHILIP
MOSELEY PAYTON
OAKS MACKENZIE
PERRY ISABELLA
PUCCI JACOB
REINKE BRIANA
SEXTON RUBY
SPENCE ABIAGAIL
STALLING EMILY
TAYLOR LEGION
THAXTON JAMES
VAN DER MERWE DEHAHN
VIGIL STEPHANIE
WIEDEMAN JOSEPH
YOUNG CONNOR

Second grade
BARLAR RANDAL
BENDECK BAILEE
BRATTAIN WILLIAM
DENSON ALAINA
EDDY CHRISTINA
GOWER SYMON
HAMMONDJACOB
HARPER MOLLY
HUG ALEXIA
MARLOW CHRISLYNN
NORDLOF ANNIKA
PATTERSON XAVIER
PEACOCK ANNA
PIOTROWSKI SAMANTHA
POLLOCK JOSEPH
PRETTI EMMA
RILEY MONICA
WILDEY PAUL
WOLF BLAKE

Third grade
DUBOIS COLE
MARTINDALE MAKENNA


MCDONALD SIANNA
THAXTON LORA
VOYLES KAREN

Fourth grade
ALLBRITTON WILLIAM
BISSONNETTE CHEYENNE
BRACCI ANALISE
HILL ZOIE
JENSEN CHRISTOPHER
MCCORD MASON
ROBERTS WILLIAM
SMITH DAISY
STONE TAYLOR
WIEDEMAN DANIEL

Fifth grade
CHRISTENSEN BRITT~NEY
GRAY TARA
GREENE JAKE
HICKS LOGAN
HUG AARON
HUGHES ABIGAIL
HUGHES AERIAL
JOSE GABRIAL
LOPEZ JULIANNA
NICHOLSON SHAWNTIA
FARMER MAGNOLIA
POOLE BRIANNA
REDFERN HUNTER
VAN DER MERWE ALEX
WHEELER SYDNEY
WILSON SHAYNE
ZACHRY CARMEN
ZDRAZIL DANIEL

A/B HONOR ROLL
Kindergarten
AMIN SHAMYA
AUSTRENG LOGAN
BAGGETT KATELYN
BODIE DAWSON
BOYKIN TYLER
BRALEY MICAH
BRINKLEY JANIA
BRINSON CHEYENNE
BROCK SPENCER
BROWN DESTINY
CAQUIMBO ADLEIGH
CARTER ADDISON
CHIPPS CAIDEN
CONLEY SARAHBETH
CREATH-PAPESH ALYSSA
CRUTCHER MICHAEL
DAVIS GABRIEL
DEBAUFER FREDRICK
DOUGLAS ANNA
EDDY JOSHUA
EGLTON ANTONIO
EVERSOLE JADEN
FANT GARY
FANT JUSTIN
FOWLER AIYANA
RINGER HAYDEN
GAVIN KIRSTEN
GEIGER MICHAEL
GOODSON JACOB
GRAY JULIET
HALE IONA
HALL ELLEINA
HALL PRESTON
HAMLIN HALEY
HARMON HARLEY
HATCHER MARKLON


net ic y*7 98i


85092-3 3 7


* High Speed Inter


Meeting Rooms 3292 Coastal Hwy.
www.WakullalnnHotel.com


ACROSS
1.5pringformal
5. Where (trendy

1o. ."lmeediately!" in
the OR
14. Traditional
teachings
15. Lunar valley
16. One who's next in
line
17. Black cat, to
some
18. Burger topper
19. Air France airport
20. Throwing a group
of troops?
23. Item up one's

24. "s vues
25. Stubborn sort

28.5berd downer,

31. Shangri-la
34. Winter vehicle
36. Pastoral
expanses
38. Like some
vaccines and
exams
40. Lemons' locale
41. Throwing a movie
VIP?
44. Paid to play
45. Slaw or fries
46. End in (require
overtime)
47. Inspiration for the
Frisbee
49. Diana or Betsy
51. longng, vita
brevis"
52. Pricing word
53. Feedbag morsel
55. 007 creator
Fleming
57. Throwing a
cheese?
64. Weevil's meal
66. Marsh wader
67. Omani money
68. Love-letter letters


10/30/2011


Amenican Profile Hometown Content

69. Mount the
soapbox
70. One of Salome's
seven
71. Moffo or Magnani
72. Granada
gentleman
73. European erupter

DOWN
1. Alka-Seltzer-
landing-in-water
sound
2. "Arrivederci, **
3. Metal-bearing
minerals
4. Bright bunch
5. Applied, as a
patch
6. Triangle tone
7. Unlikely, as
chances
8. For everyone to
hear
9. Present and past


10. Buck or brogan
11. Pottery clay
12.Feel out ofsorts
13. Take a shot at
21. Lipinski's milieu
22. Slight coloration
26. -faire
27. Metric units of
volume
28. Dogpatch's
creator
29. Frosh's topper,
once
30. Guide to
achieving a major
ojective
32. Joule fractions
33. Rock bottom
35. Shamu or Willy
37. Dele undoer
39. Italian beach
resort
42. Dumb cluck


43. Nixon or Agnew,
in the '70s
48. Snacks with salsa
50. Got a load of
54. "It's done!"
56. Chicken's lack
58. Chase of stage
and screen
59. Tabriz's country
60. "Just say
drugs"
61. Get lighter
62. Get heavier
63. Cinders of old
strips
64. "Be prepared
org.
65. Part of BYOB


Brought to you by...




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-- --


Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 23, 2011


www. thewakullanews.com


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