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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00383
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 11-17-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00383
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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 46th Issue Thursday, November 17, 2011 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 2A Comment & Opinion ....Page 3A Church..........................Page 4A Community....................Page 5A School...........................Page 6A Sports ..........................Page 7A In The Huddle ..............Page 8A Outdoors .....................Page 9A Water Ways...............Page 10A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 11A Arts & Entertainment ...Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read Daily SPORTS 7A Cross country girls, Linton qualify for state meet Wakullas Robby Coles, at Chipola, signs with FSUSpecial to The NewsMore than 260 people turned out for the “ sh fry in Panacea last week to benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters. The fish fry, held on Tuesday, Nov. 8, featured a Poseys shrimp dinner paired with the musical offerings of Brandon Stricklands new band, The Possums,Ž all in the name of helping more Wakulla County youth achieve success in life. Presented by Waste Pro USA and supported by numerous generous sponsors and individual donors, the dinner event raised more than $6,000 to support Big Brothers Big Sisters expanding efforts. We are encouraged by the renewed and growing support of Wakulla County residents,Ž said Stacy Harvey, Wakulla County program coordinator. With so many folks in attendance, it is clear Wakulla County residents want us here and care about helping youth facing adversity reach their full potential.Ž The outpouring of support has been phenomenal,Ž said agency CEO Louis Garcia. The BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry had almost twice the attendance it had last year. I am positive this has to do with the hard work of Commissioner Alan Brock, Stacy Harvey, Sherrie Posey Miller and the various news outlets for helping us to get the word out.Ž It also has to do with momentum, explained Garcia. We are gaining traction in Wakulla County and we are making more new matches each month. This is just the beginning. While it is important for us to secure sustainable funding each year for continued service and growth, it is just as important for us to recruit more dedicated volunteers. Moving forward, we need to put together a Wakulla County advisory committee and to recruit and enroll many more volunteer mentors.Ž Big Brothers Big Sisters is currently seeking safe adult mentors willing to spend time with a child two to four times monthly for a minimum of 12 months. Being a Big Brother or a Big Sister is both enjoyable and ful“ lling. Volunteers have the opportunity to help shape a childs future for the better by empowering them to achieve. Volunteering just a few hours a month can change the course of a childs life for the better, forever. By simply changing their perspective on what the world can offer, volunteers can literally change lives. Sometimes, it is as simple as playing basketball, making crafts, reading or “ shing. For information about how to become a mentor, contact Stacy Harvey at wakulla@bbbsbigbend.org or 850.366.3865 or visit www.bigbendmentoring. org/wakulla. Big Brothers Big Sisters raises $6,000 at “ sh fryBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen someone first meets Crawfordville resident Jerry Kinder, they learn quickly that he is quite the jokester with a vibrant sense of humor. What they dont know is that he learned from the best. In conversations with Kinder, the names Bob Hope, Dick Martin, Dan Rowan and Bob Newhart, roll off his tongue. He shares stories about these famous comedians from a different time he encountered over the years. Kinder says their humor ended up rubbing off on him. He met many celebrities, developing lasting friendships with some, through his job as a professional fundraising consultant for 22 years. He traveled all over the U.S. and conducted 75 major fundraising campaigns for churches, Easter Seals, hospitals, the YMCA, Boy Scouts, Goodwill and more. He organized golf tournaments, comedy shows and other events to raised money for these organizations. Although he wasnt a comedian back then, Kinder now performs standup comedy at charity events. He says he learned standup from the entertainers he hired as a fundraising consultant. I just watched them work,Ž he says. As a consultant, he organized the entire fundraiser from the ground up. I organized the whole thing,Ž Kinder says. From A to Z.Ž He organized golf tournaments, shows and bene“ ts, which is how he met celebrities, by getting them to be the guest speaker at his event. This was done either through networking and contacts he had already made or the same route as everyone else, through an agent. They all have an agent,Ž Kinder says. After that, the trick is knowing what you are doing, he says. One has to know their audience and demographics of the city where the event is held to have a successful fundraiser. Kinder says a lot of people end up paying too much for the rental of the facility and the entertainer, which in turn makes them charge more for tickets and the event bombs.Continued on Page 12AHe’s a funny fundraiser Fire burns Promise Land MinistriesJENNIFER JENSENJerry KinderJerry Kinders sense of humor aided him throughout his career as a fundraising consultant. He does standup comedy for charities … and he doesnt just bear a faint resemblance to Bob Newhart, his delivery sounds like him too.He traveled the world as a fundraising consultant and met a lot of celebrities, hanging out with the likes of Bob Hope and Dan Rowan Staff ReportA structure “ re reported at 11:46 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 13, resulted in the loss of one building and damage to a second at Promise Land Ministries in Crawfordville. A utility building caught fire near living quarters which was beginning to catch fire as well when law enforcement of“ cials arrived. A resident of the facility attempted to put out the blaze with a “ re extinguisher but was unsuccessful. Wakulla County “ re“ ghters arrived on scene and gained control of the blaze. The utility building was a total loss. The living quarters sustained damage to one side of the structure, estimated at $6,000. Damage to the utility building was estimated at $30,000. The building was “ lled with miscellaneous donations and appliances. The cause of the “ re is still to be determined, but it was not suspicious in nature. One man was treated and cleared by EMS staff for smoke inhalation at the scene. He was transported to a Tallahassee hospital by a private vehicle. Promise Land is in need of: € A house trailer. Several of the men are sleeping in the church until new living arrangements can be found. € Extra large storage shed. This is perhaps the most important as they have no place to store donated items and they primarily support themselves by doing handy work and yard work. The building would be used to store their equipment. The building that held their clothes, bathroom supplies, washers and dryers and linens was also lost. € They also need washers, dryers, bath towels, shaving cream, razors, deodorant, shampoo, soap, socks, water pump and a freezer. Please contact Joe Brown at (850) 284-1264 for more information or mail donations to Promise Land Ministries, 20 Church Road, Crawfordville FL 32327. COURTESY OF JERRY KINDERJerry Kinder, right, in the 1970s sharing a private plane with comedian Bob Hope.Sopchoppy woman dies in car wreck; passenger arrestedSpecial to The NewsA 25-year-old Sopchoppy woman died in a single vehicle accident in a desolate area of the Apalachicola National Forest on Tuesday, Nov. 8. Misty Dawn Allen died at the scene of the accident which was called in by a passing motorist at 5:15 p.m. She was eastbound on Forest Road 329 near the Monkey Creek area when her 1997 Chevrolet truck left the roadway as she drove around a curve. She overcorrected and the truck flipped on the driver side partially ejecting Allen, pinning her under the vehicle. She was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the accident. The next day, Nov. 9, deputies arrested Phillip Joshua Strickland, 26, charging him with failure to remain at the scene of an accident involving death. Strickland was arrested at his Crawfordville home. He allegedly admitted to investigators that he was at the crash and walked away from it to a friends home in the Sopchoppy area. Phillip Joshua Strickland SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRobbie Rowther, Alan Brock, Sherrie Posey Miller, Stacy Harvey and Louis Garcia at the “ sh fry. One-Acts onstage... See Arts, 1B

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netEvery 10 years, the Wakulla County Commission looks at revising the district boundaries after the census data is released to ensure each district is as equal as possible. Due to the increase in population in the last 10 years, the commission decided it was necessary to amend the districts of the county. From 2000 to 2010, the population saw a 34.6-percent increase, one of the highest in the state. The problem is that this increase was not evenly distributed, but mainly occurred in the Crawfordville area. The redistricting map that was proposed kept the highest percentage difference of all “ ve districts at 0.2 percent, according to County Planner Melissa Corbett. It also kept all current school board members and county commissioners in the same district, Corbett said. The proposed map split the communities of Medart and Panacea. Portions of each community would be a part of district 4, as well as district 5. Commissioner Lynn Artz said when drawing up the map, the planning department followed major highways to make it easier. However, Panacea and Medart are on both sides of Highway 98, which caused them to be split apart, she said. Artz said she would like to see the communities stay as part of one district. She suggested Panacea stay in its current district, which is district 4, and keep Medart in district 5. This way each community still has one commissioner to express their concerns to and there is no confusion, she said. Paige Killeen, with the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership, said she, along with the other members, would like to see Panacea as one district. We would be going between two commissioners,Ž Killeen said. Commissioner Alan Brock did point out that commissioners are elected countywide. We represent every community,Ž Brock said. He suggested that maybe in the future, the county do away with districts all together. He also suggested the county look at creating an alternate district boundary map where St. Marks is in district 1, which is currently located within the boundaries of district 4. District 1 would also encompass all property east of the Wakulla River and south of Coastal Highway. The other commissioners agreed to go along with Artzs proposal and voted to re-advertise and vote on the amended district boundaries at the next meeting. Also on the agenda was to schedule a public hearing to establish the Wakulla County Airport Committee. The committee would take over the operation of the airport, as well as look for grants to improve it. The committee will be made up of seven members: One selected by the commission, one selected by the Tourist Development Council, one selected by the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership, one selected by the Wakulla Airport Advisory Group who holds at least a sports pilot certi“ cate, one selected by the Tar Pine Homeowners Association who also holds a sports pilot certi“ cate, and three selected by County Administrator David Edwards, approved by the commission. The commission will hold a public hearing and approve the committee at a later meeting. € At the commission meeting, Artz brought up a grant from Global Green from the Environmental Protection Agency that would provide technical assistance in applying the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System to a target neighborhood where signi“ cant redevelopment or infrastructure improvements will be occurring. According to Artz, nine communities would be selected for a three-day intensive visit and consultation by a team from Global Green. At the conclusion of the visit, the team will present recommendations for both physical and policy changes that may include street width changes, integrated energy and water infrastructure, creating standards for in-“ ll and transit oriented development or zoning code revisions to allow for urban agriculture or mixed use development. This grant is funded 100 percent and does not require a match, she said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he wouldnt support it. Im drowning in green,Ž Moore said. Green is not my best color.Ž He added that he didnt want any more rules and regulations for businesses. Artz said rules and regulations werent mentioned. She agreed to write the application and then have the county staff review and submit it. The commission voted four to one, with Moore opposing, to apply for the grant. € In other news, the county is losing another employee. Edwards announced that Special Projects Coordinator Jennifer Langston is moving on and has accepted another job. We wish her well,Ž Edwards said. Commissioner Mike Stewart said he was sorry to hear she would be leaving and Artz thanked her for her hard work. Edwards said he would like to get permission to advertise for the position, but that it would be reshaped and turned into a hybrid position with an emphasis on grants and community development. The next county commission meeting is scheduled for Nov. 21 at 5 p.m. A workshop on the Tourist Development Council plan will take place prior to the meeting at 4 p.m. PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comCOUNTY COMMISSIONWorkshop held to discuss what to do about Wakulla GardensBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netAt a workshop last week, county commissioners seemed to agree that they would support sending out some form of mail ballot to homeowners in Wakulla Gardens to ask residents if they would support paying additional fees for improvements to their neighborhood … speci“ cally for stormwater and paved roads, and for sewer. Commissioner Alan Brock, who suggested the workshop held on Thursday, Nov. 10, and chaired it, anticipated that homeowners in Wakulla Gardens would be supportive of paved roads … though he indicated he felt that was probably the least important of potential improvements. The most important, in terms of ranking from “ rst to last, were water for lots that arent on central water, stormwater treatment, sewer and then paving the roads. This is an expensive project,Ž Brock said, noting the price tag of more than $30 million for improvements. If residents of the neighborhood dont support paying for improvements, they need to be aware that its probably not going to happen for a long time.Ž The numbers provided by Brock for the workshop contemplated improvements to the neighborhood totaling more than $34 million. The bulk of it, almost $23 million, was for construction of water, sewer, stormwater and roads. The remaining $11 million was for general costs such as lot acquisition and surveying and engineering. The “ rst thing to fall out was providing additional water service. Since a majority of residents are on Talquin water, the commissions concern was that it wouldnt be fair to charge other residents of the neighborhood for something that bene“ ted only a few. Commissioner Lynn Artz indicated her concern that, if residents were to support stormwater and paved roads, there would be more construction and, without a sewer connection, more water pollution. Commissioner Randy Merritt expressed some concerns about some of the figures being used. For example, 800 lots for acquisition at $6,000 each for stormwater control, for a total of $4.8 million, seemed like more parcels than necessary, he said. Commissioner Jerry Moore suggested that, in any mailout to the citizens, that You have to put these things together that go together … like stormwater and roads.Ž Meaning the two improvements are linked: both should be developed concurrently. Public Works Director Cleve Fleming reported that a road sealant was being looked at that would suppress dust on unpaved roads and function as a less expensive alternative to paving … costing about $2,300 a mile. There are 21 miles of unpaved roads in Wakulla Gardens. Some of those are underwater in heavy storms and impassable. The drawback to the tackless tackŽ proposed for use on some roads is that the roadway must be dug up and remixed every year. Recently, public works applied a limerock aggregate to the roads in Wakulla Gardens … with the intent that it could be used as road base when the roads were paved. With the weather unusally dry, down 23 inches in rain up to this point in the year, the roads have been dry and dusty. I know the dust is aggravating and I dont want to minimize the effect of it,Ž Fleming said, but it has improved the roads.Ž The main problem with Wakulla Gardens is that its overplatted … the lots are small, typically about 50 feet by 150. And there are more than 3,700 of them … and about 970, or about one-third, have homes on them. In a more urban environment with access to infrastructure, there wouldnt be as much of a problem. But Wakulla Gardens has no central sewer … the small lots have septic tanks … and a number of them have wells rather than a water provider. The roads are unpaved, and heavy rains like Tropical Storm Fay mean ” ooding. The subdivision was never meant to be built on. The neighborhood was designed with an eye to market the land to Northerners during the Worlds Fair to own land in Florida. During the recent real estate boom, with Tallahassee increasingly expensive for “ rst-time homebuyers, builders found a market for the inexpensive homes in Wakulla Gardens. As the buildout became accelerated, residents of the neighborhood complained about problems there. During his tenure as a county commissioner, Ed Brimner took upon himself the task of trying to improve the neighborhood … and held numerous meetings about what should be done and how to pay for it. Plans were discussed for expanding the countys sewer system into the subdivision. A localized assessment for the neighborhood could produce money to pay for all kinds of improvements, Brimner told them, sidewalks and street lights. But residents expressed concern that they did not have the money to pay for sewer tap fees, nor the monthly cost of sewer service. Many were getting by paycheck to paycheck, and there was no extra money for running a sewer line to their house, or paying to “ ll in their septic tanks. Artz was also involved in the effort to merge lots in the neighborhood, as she recalled at the workshop, and was behind a letter sent out encouraging residents to combine lots … or even to donate lots to the county. A localized assessment for the neighborhood would be paid on a per lot basis … estimated at about $822 per year per lot. Bonded over 30 years, that would produce the funds needed for work. But County Attorney Heather Encinosa of the Nabors law “ rm, noted that the drawback is that a prepayment of the assessment would be around $12,000 … which is more than the value of many of the lots in the neighborhood, and which means it will likely be dif“ cult to get “ nancing and sell bonds. Brock noted that the biggest cost was sewer fees and suggested that other improvements … namely, stormwater and roads could be put before residents to see if they would be willing to pay for those. Merritt suggested sending out a postcard to each address and ask residents if they would pay an assessment for the improvements. But, Merritt added, if Wakulla Gardens residents dont want to pay for it, then Im done with it.ŽWith population shifts, redrawing the lines for 5 districts Alan BrockThe board appears to support contacting neighborhood residents to see what improvements they are willing to pay for Wakullas population increased 34.6 percent over the past 10 years, most of it in the Crawfordville area. e challenge is to draw new district boundaries City of Sopchoppy NOVEMBER 10, 17, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICECity of St. MarksP.O. Box 296 • 788 Port Leon Drive • St. Marks FL 32355-0296 Phone: (850) 925-6224 • Fax: (850) 925-5657 The City of St. Marks is currently applying for two (2) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Cleanup grants for $400,000 to assist with remediation efforts at the former St. Marks Re nery site. The City will hold a public workshop to enable citizens to review the Grant application, a draft of the “Analysis for Brown elds Cleanup Alternatives (ABCA)” and offer time for questions and comments. The meeting will be held at City Hall, 788 Port Leon Drive, City of St. Marks. Florida 32355 commencing at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 17, 2011 until no later than 6:45 p.m. Alternatively, inquiries and comments can be submitted electronically by addressing an e-mail to Roger Register with Cardno TBE, the City’s Brown elds Consultant at roger.register@cardno.com. Place “St. Marks EPA Cleanup Grant” in the subject line of the email. Paper copies of the application will be available at the public meeting or can be obtained in electronic format after November 14, 2011 by emailing a request to the above referenced e-mail address. NOVEMBER 17, 2011

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 – Page 3Areaders speak outComment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Sopchoppy woman dies in traffic accident UPDATE: Passenger arrested • Fire at Promise Land Ministries • Sheriff’s Report for Nov. 10 • Coast Guard Auxiliary for Nov. 17 • Bank files suit to foreclose on Gray’s rental property • From the Dock for Nov. 17 • Anne Rozier Hutchins obituary thewakullanews.com Follow us onRemembering Papa RaymondDuring times of sadness and loss, I wish I viewed life through the eyes of a child. I wish I still had that innocence. But, when children become adults, we lose that innocence, and when tragedy strikes, we do not have a childlike perspective or think of the glass as half full. Instead, we think selfishly and think about how the tragic event affects us. I was reminded of this childlike innocence last week when my family lost its patriarch. My grandfather, who was affectionately known as Papa by his 16 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren, passed away on Nov. 5 at the age of 84, after being in and out of the hospital for the last year. While all the adults struggled with this loss and spoke of their sadness and some of their guilt for maybe not visiting him enough, my 8-year-old brother became frustrated listening to their comments. He couldnt understand why everyone was so sad. He told my mother and father that this was not a sad time. This is a happy time,Ž he said. Papa is in heaven with God, Jesus, his parents and grandmas parents.Ž He continued that this was a time of celebration. My mother shared this story with me right after Papa passed away and I couldnt help but crack a smile. He was right. Papa was no longer in pain and we all know is in a better place. A place we all hope to go to one day and join him. While all of us were mourning, we should have instead been celebrating his life. Those who were able to make it to the nursing home the day Papa died were given the opportunity to go to his bedside and say goodbye to him. After Papa took his last breath, my parents asked my brother if he would like to see Papa. They said it was his choice. He said he would. My mother made sure to tell my brother that Papa was no longer alive and was already gone. My brother said, I know. But he can still hear me.Ž So, my little brother walked into the room, gave Papa a wave and said, Goodbye, Papa.Ž And that was it. For him, that was all that needed to be said. A couple days later, several family members, along with my parents, little brother and grandma, gathered around a bon“ re. Following the lead of my brother Joshua, they shared funny memories of Papa. His children told stories of their childhood, getting in trouble and having to answer to Papa, who could be very stern. They also sang songs in tribute of him and remembered the man we all so dearly loved. After one song, my brother said, I bet Papa is up there just dancing. Cause he couldnt when he was here.Ž Again, I bet he was right. During his last few months, Papa was in a nursing home and was restricted to a wheelchair and wouldnt have been able to dance. These innocent little comments make us all stop and remember the man we knew, the good times we shared and that Papa truly is in a better place, looking down on us and reminiscing with us. My aunt said this was clearly God using the innocence of a child to smack us all upside the head and to stop thinking our selfish thoughts, but to start thinking the way my little brother does. Papa truly was an amazing person, who affected the lives of many. This was evident at his funeral and burial. The funeral was held in Lake Wales, where my grandmother and he had lived for about 15 years. He moved from Lake Wales about two years ago, but by the looks of the full church, you would have thought he never left. Along with friends and family, the mass was also attended by several priests and deacons and was lead by Bishop John Noonan, all who spoke of their close relationship with Papa, as well as my grandma. It was amazing, and almost overwhelming, to see the in” uence he had in the lives of these priests and deacons and how much they all loved and respected him. My grandparents befriended each one of them, inviting them over for dinner and other events and making them feel like a member of our family. Faith has always been a big part of my grandparents lives. They both have such strong faith, believing it can get you through anything. Papa wasnt someone who simply went to church to ful“ ll his Catholic requirements and that was the extent of it. He lived it every day. He taught his children these beliefs and values who then passed it on to their children. He was someone who was always involved in the church. And after his children were grown and began to have families of their own, he decided to go back to school to become a deacon. He became a deacon at the age of 61. The “ rst person he baptized was my cousin and the last was my second cousin a little more than a year ago. I remember Papa wore a robe during baptisms that was decorated with the handprints and names of all his grandchildren, which my mother made for him. My grandfather taught me not only about faith, but also the importance of family. This is true especially during dif“ cult times. We all came together after Papas death and I know we will continue to be there for my grandma and each other, because thats the way my family is. I have an incredible family and I know Papa agreed. Papa loved his family. Getting the family together meant so much to him. I will miss visiting him and seeing the way his face would light up when we saw each other. And I will miss the kisses on my cheek that he gave for hellos and goodbyes. The love he had for his family was amazing, but could never hold a candle to the love he had for my grandma. The love they had for each other was so evident, so bright. It could be seen every time their eyes locked or every time they grabbed each others hand. They taught me what true love is and how special marriage is. My grandparents were married for 63 years, but had been together since eighth grade. They had a unbelievable bond. They are a shining example of what marriage should be, loving each other, supporting each other, respecting each other and creating a beautiful life together. They set such a great example for us all. I hope I can follow in their footsteps and be crazy in love with my husband after all those years. So, although this is a sad time, I have to remember the happy times and be proud of the man my grandfather was, a loyal, honest, spiritual, loving, caring man. I hope he is looking down on all of us with that same pride. Until we meet again...I love and miss you, Papa. Jennifer Jensenjjensen@thewakullanews.netEditor, The News: Vendors are needed for the Christmas in Panacea Marketplace and participants for Parade and Celebration of Lights in the seventh annual A Panacea Christmas. It is time to pull out your Christmas trees, decorations, holly, lights and bows and decorate your home or business for Saturday, Dec. 3. Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership will sponsor this annual event with our boat on trailer parade and lighting of the Christmas tree. Visit Santa after the parade. Join in the parade fun by decorating your boat, golf cart, ” oat, or your horse. We welcome entries from all over. For more information contact Sherrie Miller at 528-1527. We are looking for arts and crafts vendor who would like to set up from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Christmas in Panacea Marketplace. There will be a $20 charge for vendors. Contact Eloise Crum at 984-5501 or 528-1989. Applications can be picked up at Crums Mini Mall or Poseys Steamroom. Visit our website www.visitpanacea.com. Sherrie Miller Panacea Editor, The News: If parents are concerned that student names and social security numbers were posted on the internet by the school district, they should attend the School Board meeting next Tuesday, Nov. 22. A school board re-organizational meeting will start at 5:45 p.m. According to the agenda, they will approve or disapprove the 2012 SALARIES for themselves as school board members. The regular meeting will start at 6 p.m., right after they have voted to become volunteersŽ instead of overpaid employees. Our district spent $174,934 for their salaries and benefits in 2009-10. Divide that by “ ve members equals $34,986 per year. Divide by 12 (one meeting a month) to get $2,915 for a one hour meeting. That comes to $48 a minute! In 2009-10, the 67 Florida school districts paid $15,102,268 to 360 school board members. The teachers and student programs deserve the big bucks, not administrators and board members. Most states consider these elected of“ cials to be unpaid volunteers. Florida has the highest paid members in the nation! Call or e-mail senators and representatives today and ask them to put the 2011 Senate Bill 2172 back on the agenda. This would save our schools $15 million a year! So come on out to the school board meeting at the district of“ ce (old Crawfordville Elementary). Watch our school board members set an example for the rest of the districts by being the “ rst district in Florida to declare themselves UNPAID VOLUNTEERS! Donna Sanford Crawfordville Editor, The News:Well it has been a couple of weeks since my last Letter to the Editor (Why arent businesses allowed to recycle?Ž Oct. 20). My concerns were pertaining to the new garbage service and how the whole thing was handled. My words were pretty stern and thought that I would get more response from our elected of“ cials … guess I was wrong. I received one phone call from Alan Brock. He explained that the commissioners had to move fast to get the contract done and signed,Ž so some pertinent information was not addressed or included … i.e., the commercial recycling issue. To me the phone call was just a sugarcoating phone conversation. I was told things are in the works.Ž I guess the other commissioners were on vacation at the time my letter was published. I did let them know where I worked and all of my contact information. Still I did not get any response. Surprised? Not me. I guess I will have to make an appearance at the next commissioners meeting and voice my opinion. This will only cause more problems in the long run with a roomful of irate people instead of just me. On Nov. 11, I was visited at the deli by Ralph Mills from Waste Pro. I was almost impressed until he told me that he was sent by Commissioner Mike Stewart. Was Stewart passing the buck? You decide. I do thank Mr. Mills for giving me more speci“ cs about the issues I raised. He went into some detail about the laws in the state regarding commercial recycling. He also informed me that there was an open drop off for recycling on Trice Lane at ESG, and also is still recycling available at the land“ ll on Friday and Saturday. I wonder why the community did not know that. The commissioners really need to utilize the resources in this county and communicate more with us. One great idea which has always been here is the Chamber of Commerce. Put the Chamber to good use and send out a mass mailing or e-mail. Also, we have Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, which is run by a paid person. Isnt recycling high on the list of priorities? They can spread the word. My point is, commissioners, you leave us (the people and business owners of Wakulla County), the ones who have elected you, and can also vote you out, to sit and wonder what is happening in our community. Most of the business owners know each other, we talk, and I cant speak for everyone, but I am fed up with the lack of communication. Once again, thank you Mr. Mills and Waste Pro for stepping up and trying to straighten things out. Take notes, commissioners, on how to deal with community. Jeff True CrawfordvilleREADERS WRITE:Update on business recycling concerns Show concern at school board meeting Panacea Christmas seeks vendors Don Raymond, known as Papa to his family, with his wife of 63 years, Shirley. e innocence of a little brother provides a perspective on loss is is a happy time, said my 8-year-old brother. Papa is in heaven with God, Jesus, his parents and grandmas parents. is, he said, was a time of celebration.

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationMisty Dawn Allen Dominic A. Fruggiero Jr. Janet Grace Frye Alethea Carraway Reddick Butler Lawhon Mack McCabe Luckett Lydia Joy Herington Markley Victor Joseph Palumbo R. Douglass Strickland Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 CoastalChurch News R. Douglass StricklandR. Douglass Strickland, 74, of Sopchoppy, passed away Sunday, Nov. 13, in Tallahassee. He was a Bureau Chief for 36 years for Park Lands and Development for the State of Florida. He was a U.S. Army veteran. He was a resident of Sopchoppy for 50 years coming from Tampa. He was a member of the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. He loved the Lord and his family and friends and demonstrated this by the way he lived. He was a humble man and put others “ rst, and always had a positive attitude. He will be greatly missed until that day we are united again in Heaven. Family received friends Tuesday, Nov. 15, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-9263333). Services were held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church at 11 a.m. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, 131 Rose St., Sopchoppy FL 32358. Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Maj Strickland of Sopchoppy; a son, Robert Boen BoŽ Strickland (Heather) of Sopchoppy; two daughters, Kimberly Roddenberry (Thurman) of Sopchoppy and Kelly Wright (David) of Crawfordville; a sister, Julynn Trent (David) of Tampa; six grandchildren, Becton Roddenberry, Kelsey Strickland, Brooklyn Roddenberry, Karlee Strickland, Bailey Strickland and Gracie Strickland. He was predeceased by a grandson, Robert Boen Strickland II. Bevis Funeral Home,Harvey-Young Chapel was in charge of arrangements 850-926-3333 or www. bevisfh.com.Mack McCabe LuckettMack McCabe Luckett, 91, of Panacea, passed away on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. His daughter and good friends were with him. He was born Oct. 4, 1920, in West Madison, Ind., where he later farmed for many years. He bought two farms, renovated them and sold each at a pro“ t. He was an avid hunter and “ sherman. He was a World War II veteran and served overseas as a paratrooper and in the Armed Guard. He was also a 32 Degree Mason. His father died early on, and he was working to help support his family by the time he was 15 years old. These were hard times. He ran traplines and later planted trees with the CCC. His many occupations included the railroad, construction supervisor, employment in two mental hospitals, and the Tennessee Valley Authority at Land Between The Lakes, now a state park. He and wife Catherine moved to Wakulla County 27 years ago. He grew a large garden and had fruit trees. She canned a lot, they gave a lot away. He loved his dogs, good music, and his family. He was a voracious reader. He traded stories of his life with many friends. He was happiest working in his garden with his little dog Maggie nearby. He was a good friend, neighbor and father. He will be dearly missed. A memorial service was held Saturday, Oct. 29, at Ochlockonee Bay Methodist Church. Survivors include his daughter, Barbara Robinson (Butch); three stepchildren, Linda Lorentzen, Carol Bell and Jim Cline; grandsons, John, Randy and Chris Cleveland, Bobby, Gary and Stevie Luckett; granddaughter, Pam Luckett; several great grandchildren; and one sister. He was predeceased by his sons, Mack Jr. and Walter Luckett; a grandson, Jeff Luckett; “ rst wife and mother of his children, Louise E. Bennett Luckett; and second wife, Catherine Luckett.Dominic A. Fruggiero Jr.Dominic Anthony Fruggiero Jr., 65, of Crawfordville, passed away on Sunday, Nov. 13, in Crawfordville. He was a supervisor for a janitorial service. He was a U.S. Army veteran. Services will be held at a later date. Survivors include his wife of 46 years, Linda Fruggiero of Crawfordville; a son, Richard Fruggiero of Crawfordville; a daughter, Angela Akins of Crawfordville; two brothers, Rocco Fruggiero of Woodville and Ronnie Fruggiero of Indiana; a sister, Arlene Fruggiero of Georgia; eight grandchildren, Jessica Fruggiero, Joseph and Jamie Yeomans, Brittany Rayburn, Tommy Joe Nazworth, Dylan, Devin and Dustin Fruggiero; and nine great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by a daughter, Annette Fruggiero; a son, Tony Fruggiero; and great-granddaughter, Kyndell Fruggiero. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel (850-9263333) is in charge of arrangements.Janet Grace FryeJanet Grace Frye, 74, of Crawfordville, passed away Sunday, Nov. 13, in Crawfordville. She was born in Baltimore, Md., and was a resident of Crawfordville since 1980 coming from Tallahassee. She owned and operated a janitorial service. Services will be held at a later date. Survivors include a daughter, Cindy Hager (Michael) of Crawfordville; a brother, Richard Guagiardo (Connie) of Bainbridge, Ga.; two sisters, Toni Kennedy (Manuel) of Crawfordville and Charlene Hoyer of Maryland; two grandchildren, Corey M. Hager and Cassandra L. Hager; and David Denmark, who she loved like a son. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel, Crawfordville (850-926-3333) is in charge of arrangements.Misty Dawn AllenMisty Dawn Allen, 25, of Wakulla County went to be with the Lord on Nov. 8 after an auto accident. She was laid to rest on Monday, Nov. 14. Survivors include her children, daughters Katelyn Sky Allen and Shelby Dawn Eversoll, and a son, Adam Vaughn Eversoll; mother, Sandra Stahl and husband Brad; stepfather (Dad) Larry Dunsford; brother, Willie Ray Leverett; one sister, Tessa Mitchell Silhavy Dow of Virginia Beach, Va.; “ ance, Bronson Tharpe; and several aunts, uncles and cousins. She was predeceased by her father, Cliffton Vaughn Allen; brother, Cory Vaughn Allen; and maternal and paternal grandparents. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, Florida (850-926-3333) was in charge of the arrangements.Biker shoebox run is plannedThe members of Spirit Life Church are collecting shoeboxes to give as gifts to needy children this Christmas. Shoeboxes collected by Nov. 16 will be delivered by a group of motorcyclists who will be leaving the church on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 8:30 a.m. The destination will be Power Country Radio station, WQLC 102FM at 9206 West U.S. Highway 90 in Lake City. For all those who deliver a gift-“ lled shoebox for needy children, or sponsor a shoebox for $20, will be treated to a free lunch there between the hours of 9 a.m. and noon. Anyone who would like to join the group on their trip is welcome. Spirit Life Church will be open at 7:30 a.m. for coffee and donuts before the motorcycle group leaves. If you like to ride a motorcycle and are looking for a good group of people to ride with, join them on the Nov. 19. For more information, contact Sharon McClendon at smctupper@embarqmail.com.Thanksgiving service set at Christ Church AnglicanThanksgiving is an unusual combination of a secular and a sacred holiday. It is secular because it is a day recognized by the United States as a national holiday and sacred because of its origins. The Pilgrim feast emphasizing our basic motivation and response to being Christian … gratitude. We remember the hardships of that tiny group of Pilgrims some 370 years ago, the “ re out of which their gratitude that “ rst Thanksgiving was born: uncooperative climate, the enmity of some natives, the burdens of the unknown, and the terrors of anxiety and despair. Some died “ ghting, others died hungry. Their graves were carefully smoothed over so that their enemies could not compute their losses. In the face of despair they replanted their crops and fasted and watched … and perhaps most importantly, they prayed. Finally, a suf“ cient harvest came, enough to keep them alive. The settlers called in the friendlier tribes and set a day for Thanksgiving to God. They had been delivered. Once again there was hope for the new world and their passion for this new land was renewed. In the United States of America for those of us who are the bene“ ciaries of their courage and faith, Thanksgiving Day is a call for us to remember. Christ Church Anglican will celebrate our national Day of Thanksgiving on Wednesday, Nov. 23, Thanksgiving eve, at 7 p.m. The service this year is, as always, the deeply moving and important ceremony of giving thanks with a special historic twist. The liturgy is from the 1604 Book of Common Prayer. Christ Church is located at 3383 Coastal Highway just east of Wakulla County High School. This is a community celebration. Everyone is invited.More obituaries on Page 5A

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 – Page 5AhappeningsCommunityAlethea C.R.B. LawhonAlethea Carraway Reddick Butler Lawhon, 89, passed away on Friday, Nov. 11, at home surrounded by family. A lifelong resident of this area she will be missed by all. She was a member of First Baptist Church in Crawfordville. She loved signing in the choir and participating in her Sunday School class. She was active member of the Wakulla Historical Society and numerous organizations and charities that she supported. She was retired from the Florida Public Service Commission. She was an avid cake baker and decorator, she loved to “ sh, travel and take care of others. She loved her church, community, family and her many friends. A memorial service was held Monday, Nov. 14, at 11 a.m. at the First Baptist Church in Crawfordville. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include her two loving sisters, Valda Cook and Evelyn Gowdy; her daughters, Rene Strickland (Ralph) and Desiree Head (Tarp); stepdaughters, June Grimes (Charlie) and Nancy Smith (Larry); and 11 grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren and many nieces and nephews that she dearly loved. She was predeceased by her parents, Mildred and Phillip Carraway; brother, Regnold Carraway; sister, Norma Clark; husbands, Virgil Reddick, Curry Butler and Hallie Lawhon; and her son, Maxie Reddick. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) was in charge of the arrangements.Lydia J.H. MarkleyLydia Joy Herrington Markley of Woodville passed away unexpectedly this week. A 25-year resident of the Tallahassee area, she was a tireless supporter of various organizations for the blind, volunteer ministry organizations, and several local churches. In spite of the onset of blindness as an adult, she managed to complete a degree at Tallahassee Community College while in her 50s, and continued to serve others until her untimely passing. Survivors include three loving sons: Chris Bonts (Marcie) of Auburn, Ala., Jeff Bonts (Ashley) of Crawfordville and Brian Bonts (Sarah) of Jacksonville; two brothers, Frank L. Herrington (Cheryl) of Jacksonville and John L. Herrington of Orange Park; two nephews, Patrick and Andrew Herrington of Jacksonville; and four grandchildren, Tyler, Blake, Brooke and Owen Bonts; and a host of close friends. A private memorial service for friends and family was held Saturday, Nov. 12. In lieu of ” owers, the family requests that donations be made to the National Federation of the Blind, 200 East Wells Street at Jernigan Place, Baltimore MD 21230 (410-659-9314, ext 2371).Victor Joseph PalumboVictor Joseph Palumbo, 80, of Crawfordville, passed away Thursday, Nov. 10, in Tallahassee. He was born Aug. 18, 1931, in Dunmore, Penn., to Dominic J. and Mary G. Sica Palumbo. He was a four year veteran of the U.S. Navy. A Memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, Nov. 26, at 11 a.m. at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Tallahassee with family receiving friends after the service in the social hall. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Myelodyplastic Syndromes at www.marrow.org. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh.com. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Joan. L. Viola Palumbo; son, John Palumbo; daughter, Deborah A. Palumbo; grandchildren, Lauren Elizabeth Baker, Thomas Justin Baker IV, and Victor Andre Palumbo; a brother, John Palumbo; and a sister, Josephine Russo. He was predeceased by his parents; and siblings, Antoinette, Frances, Joseph and Dominic.ObituariesContinued from Page 4ABirth announcementsHeath and Angie Shivers Gebhart of Woodville announce the birth of their daughter, Madison Manelli Gebhart, at 9:01 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 18 at Tallahassee Memorial Women Pavilion. She weighed 8 pounds and was 20.25 inches long. She has a big brother Wyatt, who is 4. Her maternal grandparents are Gary and Rita deMontmollin Shivers of Woodville. Her paternal grandparents are Gary and Nancy Gebhart of Wacissa. Her maternal great-grandparents are Floyd deMontmollin, Sr., of Woodville and the late Margarita Manelli deMontmollin and John and Betty Shivers of Crawfordville. Rob and Stephenie Lawhon of Tallahassee announce the birth of their daughter, Chelsea Kay Lawhon, on Oct. 5 at 8:02 a.m. She weighed 7 pounds, 7 ounces and was 19.75 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are the late Ken Matthews and Elaine Matthews of Sopchoppy. Her paternal grandparents are Mitch and Pam Lawhon.Pvt. Gowan wishes everyone Happy Holidays Special to The NewsPvt. Clarance Brett RenŽ Gowan wont be home for Christmas this year. He is proudly serving his country from Camp Casey is Dongducheon, South Korea. He is the grandson of Finley and Jean McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay and the son of Paul and Michelle McMillan Kirby of Tallahassee. He celebrated his 19th birthday in July while training for his current assignment and is expected to complete his first tour in Korea next June. He wishes his friends and family happy holidays and says to never take for granted. the freedoms we enjoy Pvt. Clarance Brett Gowan with Michelle (mom), Andy (brother) and father Paul Kirby.Madison M. GebhartChelsea K. LawhonHappy “ rst birthdayAmeerah Aaliyah Godbolt will celebrate her first birthday on Nov. 17. She is the daughter of Amber Anderson and Michael Godbolt Jr. of Sopchoppy. Her maternal grandparents are Angel Avery of Sopchoppy and John Anderson of Tallahassee. Her paternal grandparents are Delene and Michael Godbolt Sr. of Sopchoppy. Maternal Great-Grandparents are Percell and Brenda Sanders of Sopchoppy Paternal greatgrandparents are Dora Mae Webster of Crawfordville, Willie Gene Allen of Sopchoppy, Dorothy Burney of Sopchoppy and Benjamin Godbolt Jr. of Tallahassee. A party will be Nov. 19 at noon at Hickory Park. All family and friends are invited. TravelingJarforChange! Give To Sponsored byDonate Your Change atNew Location EVERY Week! 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Special to The NewsOn Saturday, Oct. 15, the day was truly perfect for Shadevilles 28th Fall Festival. Grannys Attic and the Book Barn were “ lled with oodles and oodles of interesting items for folks of all ages, the entertainment kept our spirits high and everyone enjoyed the snowcones, nachos and cheese, hamburgers, hotdogs and popcorn. The games and prizes were first rate and the amount of fun our kids enjoyed has never been better. Many thanks to our schools faithful PTO members, business partners, Crawfordville Volunteer Fire Department “ re“ ghters, school resource of“ cer, faculty and staff, as well as the terri“ c classroom volunteers who put in hours and hours ensuring the event would be a huge success. The festival is our schools only fundraiser of the year, and this year we will see a pro“ t of approximately $30,000. The funds earned at this years Fall Festival will be used to bring us closer to our schools vision of providing each student with opportunities to achieve at the highest academic level, prepare them for the rapidly changing technological world and to produce responsible citizens. We plan to provide each classroom teacher and paraprofessional with additional funds for educational materials, increase our schools educational technology, enhance our physical education, music, art and media centers equipment, purchase custodial supplies that keep our school sparkling and create a safe learning environment, as well as continue to support Project Learning Tree activities schoolwide. This years classroom representatives who took home the coveted crowns for the highest Big Item DrawingŽ ticket sales were Lynley Kendrick and Landon Ray from Mrs. Alvarezs kindergarten, Emily Pearson and Legion Taylor from Miss Gerrells “ rst grade, Sharee Allen and Daniel Brattain from Mrs. Hesters second grade, Emily Hughes and Ian Dubay from Mrs. Kerces third grade, Zoie Hill and Chase Roberts from Mrs. Nalls fourth grade, Tara Gray and Kody Ledbetter from Mrs. McCords “ fth grade and Izabel Hernandez and Shayne Wilson from Mrs. Brattain and Mrs. Metcalfs multi-age classes. Additionally, these hard working classes have earned a fun-“ lled “ eld trip to the IMAX theatre. Bingo prizes, grannys attic treasures, mouthwatering cakes, donated books and sodas all added together to win a classroom game and pizza party for several homerooms. This years high donation winners were Mrs. Marshs fifth grade, Mrs. Harveys fourth grade, Mrs. Braleys third grade, Mrs. Reeves second grade, Miss Gerrells “ rst grade, Miss Smiths kindergarten, and Mrs. Metcalfs and Mrs. Brattains multi…grade classroom. A giant heartfelt thanks to the parents, families and friends who contributed goodies and items to our donation efforts this year. The Fall Festival is always a tremendously rewarding event. I love the sound of families having fun together in such a wholesome atmosphere. Although it was a warm and windy day this year, it didnt seem to dampen the spirits of the many, many folks who came and enjoyed the afternoons events,Ž said Principal Susan Brazier. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolShadeville Fall Festival was a huge success SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWinners for the big item drawing ticket sales were crowned at this years Shadeville Fall Festival. Additional 4K-VPK class at Wakulla ChristianWakulla Christian has added another 4K-VPK class. The Voluntary Prekindergarten program (VPK) is a legislatively mandated program designed to prepare four-year-olds for kindergarten. Participation is free for all four-year-olds born on or before Sept. 1 who are Florida residents. Eligibility for participation is based on proof of birth and proof of residency. Wakulla Christian School is a private Christian school offering 3K through seventh grade, located at 1391 Crawfordville Highway. For further information contact WCS school of“ ce at (850) 926-5583. Crawfordville celebrates Red Ribbon Week By ANGIE WALKERPrincipal of Crawfordville Elementary SchoolRed Ribbon Week was celebrated throughout the state, and Crawfordville Elementary School was no exception. We had a theme each day to show support for living a healthy life style and staying away from drugs. Students dressed up in pajamas one day, favorite team sports another, cougar colors, as a twin and swearing sneakers/hats along with the teachers and staff to show a united front to our, Say No to DrugsŽ campaign. The week had a variety of guest speakers, videos, ribbons handed out, arm bands worn and class activities planned. Friday was the culminating day for our students with the theme of Celebrate SuccessŽ stressed. Students got to spend 30 minutes outside with their grade level visiting with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce, viewing their boat and petting their horse while listening to the job functions of the deputies and the various departments. Students got to six different stations during their 30 minute visit outside playing games and testing their strength and skill at things like tug-of war and musical chairs. At the end of their time outside, the departed with a frozen ice pop in their hand, and little sweat on their brow and a smile on their face. It was truly a successful day. Our special area teachers planned, set up and cleaned up for the entire day. They are the best. Again, I would like to thank our many volunteers who came for the day. They worked from 10:15 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. in the hot sun with 600 students and only a few breaks. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 – Page 7ABy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles took a long trip over to Pensacola to face Escambia County, but were never really challenged … with Wakulla pounding Escambia 35-7. We were able to play everybody, even the JV guys who made the trip,Ž said Head Coach Scott Klees. We got up on them and started subbing quite early,Ž he said. The one touchdown that the War Eagle defense gave up came when two defenders ran into each other, Klees said. The defense really played great,Ž Klees said. Our offensive line played great.Ž Evan McCoy had two carries for 110 yards and two touchdowns and was named Offensive Player of the Week. Wide receiver Damonte Morris got some playing time as running back, and had six carries for 72 yards and a touchdown. Will Thomas and Marshane Godbolt also scored touchdowns. On defense, C.J. Roberts had six tackles, two for a loss and graded out at 86 percent. On special teams, Tamarick Holmes had four tackles and two assists. The win means Wakulla “ nishes the regular season with a record of 8-2. PLAYOFFS START The playoffs get underway this week, with Wakulla hosting Gulf Breeze on Friday, Nov. 18, at 7:30 p.m. They are very big,Ž Klees said of Gulf Breeze. Their offense plays a spread offense with four or “ ve wide-outs in a formation, Klees said, noting that their quarterback is one of the leading players in the state. Its going to be a big test for our defense,Ž he said. On offense, the game plan will be to try to use Wakullas running game to control time of possession and keep Gulf Breeze off the “ eld. sports news and team views SportsGirls team going to state, Linton quali es individuallyBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Saturday, Nov. 12, the Wakulla High School cross country teams traveled to Alligator Lake Park in Lake City to compete in the Regional Meet. They were greeted with temperatures in the upper 20s, a beautiful and fast course and intense competition from some of the premiere cross country programs in the state. The “ rst six teams and 15 individuals at this meet quali“ ed for the State Finals Meet which will be held this Saturday in Dade City. After the dust settled, the local girls team “ nished in sixth place and became the “ rst team in the history of the program to qualify for the State Finals Meet. The WHS boys team also had a good outing, “ nishing in eighth place, just two places from qualifying for the State Meet and also the best “ nish ever for a WHS boys team. Three of the local harriers … senior Stanley Linton sophomore Marty Wiedeman and senior Cora Atkinson … placed in the top 15 to qualify individually for the State Meet. The girls race started at 8:55 a.m. with the temperature in the low 40s and clear skies. The WHS duo of Wiedeman and Atkinson went out hard with the goal of “ nishing in the top 15 overall, no matter what the pace. At the “ rst-mile checkpoint, Wiedeman and Atkinson were in a tight group in the top 20 runners. By the two-mile mark, where Mrs. CoachŽ (Myrna Hoover) was manning her normal station, the No. 2 through No. 7 WHS girls had separated a little from each other and Wiedeman and Atkinson were in 14th and 15th places, with a pack of runners right on their heels. Wiedeman came ” ying down the “ nal stretch, “ nishing in 8th place in a new school record time of 19:57, with Atkinson powering along right behind her in 11th place and “ nishing in the excellent time of 20:01 (also under the old school record), with both times qualifying as State Elite times. The remaining “ ve WHS runners on the course were “ ghting for every spot and left everything they had on the course. Junior Raychel Gray was the next to “ nish in 51st place in a personal record (PR) time of 22:08, with freshman Lydia Wiedeman next to cross the line in 54th place (22:12). Next came senior Kristie Hodges in 55th place (22:14, a new PR), with freshman Lilli Broadway in 57th place (22:30) and Tyler Kinard in 65th place (22:45) rounding out the WHS “ nishers. The team “ nished sixth with a combined score of 173, four points ahead of perennial powerhouse West Florida Tech, and earned their spot in the State Meet. The boys race didnt start until 9:50 a.m., after the temperatures had warmed up and it didnt take long for the race to heat up either. The lead boys went through the “ rst mile at a sub-5:00 pace with local standout Stanley Linton in the thick of it in “ fth place. The other WHS boys were strung out behind the leaders and working together with senior Cody James leading this group and freshman J.P. Piortrowski in close pursuit. Sophomore Brandon Trussell freshman Mitchell Atkinson and seniors D.J Victor and Zach Broadway were close behind. By the two mile mark, Linton had powered into second place, approximately 10 seconds behind the leader and pushing hard to close the gap. Trussell had started to exert himself and had moved into second on the team, with James close behind. As the runners approached the finish line, Linton was still in second place, but running strong and closing on the leader … however, he ran out of real estate and had to settle for a second place finish in the excellent time of 16:13, which quali“ es as a National Elite Time. Trussell was the next WHS runner to “ nish and crossed the line in a new PR of 17:57, in 45th place. James continued to push the pace, “ nishing strong in 53rd place in 18:12, with Piotrowski close behind in 55th, in a new PR of 18:21. The remaining WHS runners crossed the line in the following order: Victor (72nd, 18:57), Broadway (74th, 19:01) and Atkinson (77th, 19:03). The team finished in eighth place, which is the highest any WHS boys team has ever “ nished at Regionals and just missed qualifying for State. The local boys were only six points behind District Champion Marianna and 25 points ahead of District Runner-up Florida High. Because they placed in the top 15 overall, Linton, Wiedeman and Atkinson were named to the All Region Team. COACHS COMMENTS This is the meet we have waited a long time for,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. Our kids have worked so hard, not just this year, but for the last four years with the speci“ c goal in mind of qualifying a team to the State Meet and they have now done it! I couldnt be more proud of them. This is a special group of both upper classmen and new runners and they have absolutely focused on this goal and no matter what adversity they encountered, they never waivered in their belief that they were going to State this year and now they are, which is the “ rst time ever for our program.Ž This dream really began four years ago when six freshmen girls came into the program and didnt care that we had never quali“ ed a team for the State Meet and their goal that “ rst year was to go to State. At Regionals that year, “ ve of the seven girls we ran came from that group and they finished in seventh place and missed qualifying by one place. They never gave up on that goal and planted that seed in the mind of the runners that came into the program after them and even instilled that desire and belief in the boys teams. Because of the desire, toughness and ferocity of these girls, we called them the Tigers and three of the original ones are still with us today. They are seniors Cora Atkinson, Kristie Hodges and Emily McCullers. The Tigers have done more to mold this program than anything else. Now the new kids that come in have the expectation of succeeding and our new runners this year were critical to our success, especially Lydia, Lillie and Tyler. The boys also did really well. For the “ rst time ever they averaged under 18:00 (17:56) for the “ ve scoring runners and “ nished higher as a team than we ever have. Brandon, J.P., Zach and Mitchell all set PRs and Cody and D.J. ran solidly. And Stanley just keeps getting better and better and rising to the level of the competition. He and Cody have set the standard this year for dedication and pure hard work,Ž said Coach Hoover. The State Meet will be held at the Little Everglades Ranch in Dade City this Saturday, Nov. 19, with the girls running at 10:10 a.m. and the boys at 10:50 a.m.CROSS COUNTRYThere will be a dedication ceremony for Coach Buddy Tomaini held during intermission of the WHS wrestling tournament on Dec. 3, at the high school gym. There will be a break in the action at 1 p.m. and the wrestling room will of“ cially be named to honor Coach Tomaini. He was vital in starting the wrestling program for Wakulla High School. We would like everyone who has previously wrestled or other friends of the program to please come out and support Coach Tomaini during this event. It will be a great opportunity to see old friends and teammates and while youre there you can cheer on this years War Eagle wrestling team.BASEBALLFormer Wakulla pitcher Robby Coles signs with FSUSpecial to The NewsMARIANNA „ Chipola College pitcher Robby Coles of Crawfordville will be a Seminole next year. The right-hander signed a scholarship with Florida State at a press conference at Chipola on Nov. 9. Its a dream come true for me to play at Florida State,Ž Coles said. Coach (Mike) Martin and the Seminoles have a great tradition and I look forward to becoming a part of the program.Ž Of his time at Chipola, Coles said, I love playing for Coach (Jeff) Johnson. He has helped me improve a lot.Ž Robby is a great kid who has worked hard for us,Ž said Coach Johnson. Were looking for more good things from him this season.Ž At 6 feet tall and 170 pounds, Coles amassed a 9-3 record at Chipola last season and helped lead the team to a state title. After sharing the Panhandle Conference title with Northwest Florida State, Coles pitched a gem to give the Indians a 6-5 win over the Raiders in the championship game of the FSCAA State Tournament. Coles pitched seven innings, giving up only one run with four strikeouts. It was his second win in the tournament. For his work, Coles won the Robert Purkey, Jr., Memorial Award as the Outstanding Pitcher in the state tournament. Coles also was named to the Panhandle All Conference Second Team. Coles helped lead the Indians to a “ fth place “ nish in the NJCAA National Baseball Tournament. Chipola finished the 2011 season with a record of 40-22. Coles played his high school ball at Wakulla High where he led the 2010 War Eagles to the Elite 8 of the Regionals for the “ rst time in 42 years. Chipola Coach Jeff Johnson, Robby Coles, mom Jan Coles Forester. Standing, sister Whitney Coles, brother Chase Forester and father Tracy Forester. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFOOTBALLWakulla wallops Escambia, 35-7Dedication set to honor Coach Buddy TomainiWRESTLING Players of the WeekEVAN MCCOY 2 rushes, 110 yards, 2 TDs C.J. ROBERTS 6 tackles, 2 for loss TAMARICK HOLMES 4 tackles, 2 assistsOFFENSEDEFENSE SPECIAL TEAMS WAKULLA vs. GULF BREEZE The rst game of the state playoffs will be played on Friday, Nov. 18, at Reynolds Field at J.D. Jones Stadium at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $8.After winning last weeks district meet: Coach Greg James, Lilli Broadway, Kristie Hodges, Emily McCullers, Tyler Kinard, Cora Atkinson, Margaret Wiedeman, Raychel Gray, Lydia Wiedeman, and Coach Paul Hoover. PHOTOS BY LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Runner Stanley Linton “ nished second in 16:13, a National Elite time.

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comVirginia at #23 Florida StateSaturday, 7:30 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPN2.In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate Miami at South FloridaSaturday, 3:30 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPNU.Furman at FloridaSaturday, 1 p.m. The game can be seen on Pay-Per-View.By MARTY COHENof GatorBaitThe emotions will certainly be ramped up a bit next Saturday, Nov. 26, when Florida takes on Florida State in what will be the “ nal chance for this Gator team to salvage something worth remembering for 2011. Theres always a little extra juice when the Seminoles come to town, regardless of the records (and please, dont throw them out the window, let the other media boys use that tired clich), magni“ ed by the proceedings for Senior Day. We can only surmise that theres nothing worse than losing the “ nal home game of your college career. It hasnt happened very often for Floridas players, just three times in the past 17 seasons … 1999 in an ugly 30-23 loss to FSU that began a threegame losing skid to end the season, 2001 in a gutwrenching 34-32 setback to Tennessee in a contest that was shifted because of 9/11 and ended up costing the Gators a shot at a potential trip to the Rose Bowl for the national championship, and the last time, in 2003, the galling 38-34 travesty to the of“ cials-aided Seminoles. In the even-numbered years, it was South Carolina for a while before a parade of pre-FSU, Southern Conference patsies … Western Carolina, The Citadel and Appalachian State … which really cheapens the signi“ cance of the last home contest, featuring a yawning early-afternoon start against an opponent that can only hope to keep the score semi-respectable. But in odd-numbered years, its a visit from the Seminoles and thats the proper way to close out your Gator-playing days, a fullthrottle, high-volume clash with the boys from Tallahassee. The “ nal bow before The Swamp crowd should be meaningful. Yes this has been a lost season, an empty experience in the “ rst year of Will Muschamps tenure. But no Gator wants to “ nish his career on a sour note. Think back to 1997, the season after Floridas “ rst national championship, when crushing losses to LSU and Georgia derailed a shot at another SEC title. After the glorious run of four consecutive SEC championships, it was a bitter pill at the time for the Gator faithful. But it also produced some of the grandest theater ever on Florida Field, when the Gators rallied for a heart-stopping 32-29 victory over the top-ranked Seminoles in a game many consider the greatest and most thrilling theyd ever been a part of in The Swamp. There were no title aspirations to keep marinating that day for the Gators, just the opportunity to knock off the Seminoles at the peak of their run. Anyone who was there, and there were at least 150,000 of you, will never forget the emotion in that stadium, or eventually on University Avenue, by games end. Certainly there is nowhere near as much at stake on Saturday, but dont tell that to the departing seniors who have experienced the unreal high of winning a national title in 2008 and the searing lows of the past two seasons in which the Gators have gone a painful 10-10 in their last 20 games. There wont be many seniors making that trek out of the South endzone tunnel for the “ nal time on Saturday, just nine scholarship guys if you count sixthyear center Dan Wenger who joined the UF program this summer after spending his “ rst “ ve seasons at Notre Dame. It gives you the idea of the overall numbers situation Muschamp inherited when only eight seniors remain whove been at Florida for the duration of four or “ ve turbulent years. Eight, thats it. Two of those are fourthyear guys who did not redshirt … tailback Jeff Demps and defensive end William Green. Green was probably the more sought-after recruit, a prize catch out of Alabama who never really lived up to expectations. Demps on the other hand, when healthy, provided numerous highlight-reel plays and when healthy, was a key component of Floridas 26-2 run in his “ rst two years of 2008-09. But its the six “ fth-year seniors whove really seen it all, coming to campus shortly after Florida won its initial national title under Urban Meyer, experiencing the magic carpet ride of Tim Tebows Heisman Trophy season in 2007, the back-to-back 13-1 seasons that produced another national championship followed by an undefeated regular season, and then suffering through the tough spiral of the last two years, with a coaching change to boot. The “ fth-year six-pack sort of comes in pairs, beginning with two who never achieved much on the “ eld mostly for health reasons, offensive guard James Wilson and cornerback Moses Jenkins. L o o k i n g t o “ n a l b o w Looking to “ nal bowBy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaThe “ nal score suggested another Florida State … Miami classic. Jimbo Fisher dubbed it as one. And maybe for a few, frantic “ nal minutes it was. But the truth is that each of the 82,322 fans that poured into Doak Campbell Stadium for the Seminoles 23-19 triumph over the Hurricanes witnessed a sloppy, disjointed and downright strange affair that will likely show more warts upon repeated viewings. The ” ow of that game was weird,Ž Jimbo Fisher said. It was a different type of game. It wasnt ” uid. There was no rhythm to the game.Ž At times, the game grinded on like an 84 Chevy in desperate need of an oil change. But this is still Florida State, and the team on the other sideline still had that orange and green UŽ on its helmet. And the Seminoles will never, ever be in the business of attaching asterisks to victories against Miami. Who cares that the Hurricanes, who entered the game with a 5-4 record, are still stumbling around in search of their glory days … and, with two weeks to go … bowl eligibility. And so what that, with a last-second “ eld goal, Clemson clinched the ACCs Atlantic Division, of“ cially extending FSUs conference title drought to six seasons. With its original preseason aspirations … both national and conference … off the table, Florida States in-state rivalries with the Hurricanes and Florida Gators mean more than ever. And that showed in a big way as soon as the clock hit zero. Its a big reason why EJ Manuel ran over toward the student section and gave a Nolan Ryan-sized windup into what had to be the biggest “ st pump of his life. Its why Greg Reid, whose 83-yard punt return for a touchdown gave the Seminoles points theyd end up desperately needing, tossed his helmet into the air and skipped around the “ eld in joyous celebration. And its why Fisher could have an ear-to-ear grin on his face as he made his way off the “ eld, greeted by his wife, Candi, and young son, Ethan, and tossing his hat into the throng of fans chanting his name. Thats what rivalry games bring out in you,Ž Fisher said. Its a huge deal,Ž Reid said. Were 1-0 right now in the state, and thats one of the goals on this team.Ž You can bet it was a goal for the Hurricanes too. Thanks to a tumultuous offseason that only compounded the usual troubles that come with a coaching change, Miami has struggled in Al Goldens “ rst season. But let wins over Ohio State and Georgia Tech … as well as a down-tothe-wire loss to Virginia Tech … serve as evidence that the Hurricanes still have enough talent to hang with almost anybody in the country. And Saturday in Tallahassee, against an opponent that featured no less than seven starters from their backyard (and several more on the bench), the Hurricanes had an opportunity to beat a rival and put an exclamation point on an otherwise mediocre-as-usual season. And had Nick OLeary not come up with an onside kick recovery to seal the game, they might have pulled off the upset. Instead, the Seminoles escaped with a four-point win and a 2-0 record against Miami under Jimbo Fisher. Im not good at math,Ž Golden said, but we are a lot of points better (than last seasons 45-17 loss to FSU) than we were last year, and were playing on the road, in a hostile environment, so I am encouraged by that.ŽWins over Miami always worth celebratingJaye Howard raises his arms … in exasperation? … in what has been a less-than-glorious season for the Gators.PHOTO BY STEVE JOHNON COURTESY OF GAITORBAITCelebrating the 23-19 win over Miami at Doak Campbell. PHOTOS BY MARK WALLHEISER SPECIAL TO THE OSCEOLABy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaGreg Reid knew he had a chance as soon as he scanned downfield and saw nothing but the Florida State Marching Chiefs, with not a single white Miami jersey impeding his route to the end zone. That unobstructed view made for a wide, unobstructed running lane, which, after grabbing the ball off a bounce, the speedy Reid promptly ran through for an 83-yard punt return for a touchdown that gave FSU a 10-point halftime lead over the Hurricanes. The Seminoles went on to down UM 23-19, their second consecutive victory over their in-state rivals and third in four years.At the other end of the end zone, man,Ž Reid said. There was clearly nobody.Ž It was a welcome return to form for Reid, who, despite his electrifying reputation, hadnt scored a touchdown since Florida State opened the 2010 season against Samford … a span of 22 games. Thats not to say Reid had been ineffective for the last 14 months … Jimbo Fisher often spoke of how close Reid was to breaking a big play, how special he was with the ball in his hands … but more often than not a missed block, a missed cut or a penalty ” ag frustrated his efforts. This time, there werent too many blocks needed, Reid simply sped his way untouched past the Hurricanes. And, in a rare instance for a game that featured 19 total penalties, not a single yellow ” ag hit the “ eld. Finally,Ž Reid said. I didnt hear any whistles, nobody. I was just (like) “ nally.Reid returns to the end zoneGreg Reid has an 83-yard return for a touchdown. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 – Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, it was another beautiful weekend for “ shing or doing just about anything outdoors related you wanted to do. A bit on the chilly side in the morning but it warmed up nicely. As I am writing this article it is the last day of gag grouper season. Now they are looking at making July 1 through Oct. 30 permanent gag grouper season for the recreational “ sherman. This will hurt an economy that is already in the drink, keeping the folks at home who would normally go offshore “ shing … rather than spending money at the marinas for gas, bait, tackle, ice, etc. It will hurt the restaurants and motels and de“ nitely the sale of offshore boats. If youre concerned about this new season that is being proposed send an email to commissioners@ myfwc.com or gulfcouncil@ gulfcouncil.com. Mike Pearson took some buddies from Tifton out last Wednesday for their last offshore trip before the season closed and had a great day. They got their limit of gag grouper, caught some big kings and Spanish and got over some wrecks and caught and released a bunch of red snapper in the 15-pound range. He also said the wrecks had some big Goliath grouper on them and several times they would grab the snapper on the way up. Tom Riddle from Tifton took some of his clients out on that same day and they also had a good catch. They got their limit of grouper, caught some big amberjack and had a 35-pound cobia. Capt. Kent over at AMS said he went out one day last week and caught some nice reds out of Panacea “ shing the white Gulp. One of their customers “ shed the white trout hole out of Panacea and caught 50 one day and 70 the next. Stephan Shelhaus from Cincinnati keeps his boat over at Shell Island and comes down with his dad about three times a year. I talked to him on Saturday and he said they fished up in East River on Friday and caught about eight big sheepshead and nine or 10 reds. They used live shrimp on the bottom. I talked to JR at the Aucilla and he said he took a friend on Saturday and they ran way up a creek and caught some 5-pound reds until they got tired of catching them. He said if you could ever get a Gulp past the reds you could catch a nice trout. Saturday morning after the cold snap came through folks were getting their limit of trout in the river but after it warmed back up they moved back on the ” ats. He suggests “ shing the ” ats or up in the creeks right now. Remember, if you want to learn the Aucilla, JR has gotten his captains license and is taking charters. He can be reached at the store at (850) 584-4595. Capt. David Fife said lots of reds are being caught around Oyster Bay using live shrimp, live minnows and the Gulp. Trout are starting to move back up in the creeks and their are plenty of sheepshead around the oyster bars. The weather forecast for last Friday was calling for 20 to 25 knot winds out of the northwest but decreasing in the afternoon. I was scheduled to take Michael Chase and his friend Bart from Massachusetts, who was down here with his 10year-old son Robert for the Miami game on Saturday. We decided to play it by ear and watch the weather and as it turned out, the forecast was all wrong. Because of the extremely low tide we werent able to get out until 12:30. Capt. David Fife told me of a place he knew some reds were being caught so I changed my plan from white trout and hopefully a bull red to reds. In 15 minutes we had our limit and then it was catch and release. All were about 25-inches and we caught them on the Gulp and live shrimp. This was Roberts “ rst time in a boat “ shing and he caught four big reds and two smaller ones and I dont know how many he missed. Fortunately Michael was ” exible on Friday and we were able to make the trip work and I think and hope they had a good time. We “ shed out on the ” ats for trout for a while but only caught two small “ sh. On that Wednesday I had gone when it was still warm and caught 19 trout using a white Gulp. The water temperature on Wednesday was 64 and on Friday when we went it was in the 50s and made it up to 60. The water has been warming back up and I believe you will be able to catch trout back out on the ” ats, as well as in the creeks this weekend. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Water’s warming, look for trout on the ats this weekend SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMary Louise Grif“ n with 37-inch red“ sh caught with Capt. Jody Campbell “ shing near Panacea.FWC solicits feedback on new bear management plan From FWC NewsAfter dwindling to as few as 300 bears in the 1970s, the Florida black bear population has rebounded to an estimated 3,000 bears today. Bears and their cubs roam forests and swamps from Eglin Air Force Base in the Panhandle to Ocala National Forest in the states midsection and Big Cypress National Preserve in Southwest Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which worked with its partners to increase the states black bear population, recently released a new draft management plan for the bear and is asking for public input. Both a summary of public feedback and the draft plan will go before the FWC at its February 2012 meeting. The Florida black bear is truly a conservation success story,Ž said FWC Executive Director Nick Wiley. Bear populations have clearly bene“ ted from broad public support and diligent conservation efforts across Florida, particularly in those communities where black bears have become more common.Ž The goal of the draft management plan is to maintain sustainable black bear populations in suitable habitats throughout Florida for the bene“ t of the species and people.Ž It includes measurable objectives regarding bear populations, habitat, citizen education and outreach, and human-bear con” icts. When a bear management plan is approved, the bear will no longer be on the states list of threatened species. A similar process was followed for the bald eagle, which is no longer listed as a state threatened species but is carefully managed through speci“ c conservation measures established under an FWC management plan. Input on the draft bear management plan will include four public workshops: in Bristol on Nov. 22, Naples on Nov. 29, Deland on Dec. 6, and Gainesville on Dec. 13. Go to MyFWC.com/Bear to access workshop details, read the plan and comment online. The draft bear management plan includes: € Establishment of seven bear management units (BMUs) to provide localized bear management and public involvement appropriate to the area, from about 1,000 bears in the Central BMU, which includes Ocala National Forest, to about 20 bears in the Big Bend BMU, which includes Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge. € A section on the history of bear hunting in Florida. A bear hunt is not proposed in the plan. Currently, Florida black bears may not be hunted, harmed or killed, and similar prohibitions would continue under a rule proposed in the plan. € Creation of Bear Smart CommunitiesŽ in areas of high bear activity. Humanbear con” icts are on the rise in Florida. In 2010, the FWC received more than 4,000 calls from citizens about bears. A Bear Smart CommunityŽ would involve residents, local governments, businesses and schools in changing peoples behaviors to reduce human-bear con” icts. Black bears are generally shy and nonaggressive toward humans. But bears can smell food from more than a mile away and so are tempted to leave forests and swamps to dine on garbage and pet food that is left outdoors and unsecured. Suggestions on revising the bear plan will be accepted online through Jan. 10, 2012, at MyFWC.com/ Bear, where more information also is available on the Florida black bear. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. 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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comUnderwaterWakullaBy Travis KerstingIf any of you have driven past the North Florida Fairgrounds this past week, you have undoubtedly seen the fair happenings. It has been a long 10 days, but a very good opportunity to get the word out about the Auxiliary and all we do. Many thanks to the members who rose to the occasion and staffed our booth. In addition to the fair, we also had a patrol out on the water Sunday. Rather than having to rely on others to send in news to share with you, this week I was able to get away and get some “ rsthand news for you all. Coxswain Mark Rosen had asked all of us to be dockside at Shell Island Fish Camp by 9:30 a.m. I thought I had a few extra minutes when I arrived, but Mike Harrison and Bill Wannall were already at the dock completing Bills new facility inspection. Norma Hill pulled in right after me and we all waited for Mark to arrive. He had stopped at the storage shed to make sure we had ” oat coats to protect us from the morning cold. While it was not that chilly before leaving the dock, one we got going, well... that was another story. As we prepared to leave the docks, FWC came up to the docks. It is nice to be out in joint forces. Once we had gone over the pre-underway check off, we headed out to the Birds Roost knowing that the weather would be getting worse as the day progressed. Thankfully it was not too bad out there, but we were without much company. As we worked out way back into the river, we observed several boaters “ shing in the shallow areas near the oyster bars. When we rounded the bend by the river split, we saw our friend from FWC. He was checking licenses and “ sh limits. Mark made an executive decision and we headed for lunch at Riverside Caf before the crowds hit. For this crew member, it was nice to be still and on land for a while as it took most of lunch to feel as though we were not still moving. As we had lunch, the winds picked up and we decided to stay in the river for the remainder of the afternoon. Many people may agree that it is often not the large things we do that get us noticed, it is the small things. We were ” agged down by two gentlemen as we made our way up river. One of the boaters had cut himself in the hand when the “ sh he landed had other ideas! Thankfully with some teeth grinding and ingenuity, he was able to get the hook out and we provided him with some “ rst aid supplies. After reaching the 98 Bridge, we started heading back down river and back towards the docks. It was a beautiful and peaceful afternoon to be out and about. Bill had to use many navigation skills as we weaved in and out of fishing lines coming from boats ” anking the shores. In true to Mark style, we were challenged to a person in the water drill as we neared the Fort area. Good teamwork and communication saved our personŽ in under the one-minute mark! This may have been from our earlier practice in recovering Mikes hat that took a ” ying leap off his head and into the channel! Thankfully, we all made it through the day and were able to be in the right place at the right time. Next week, Flotilla 12 will be hard at work once again. The FSU homecoming game Flyover will be Saturday night. If you are at the game, be sure to look up, if you are watching from home, we hope you can catch a glimpse of the plane. The game is set for nighttime, but the Coast Guard is always Semper Paratus and will still be there. Sunday we also have a patrol on the books, weather permitting. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Bill Wannall, Mike Harrison and Mark Rosen on patrol.PHOTOS BY CAROLYN BROWN TREADON I would argue that most people driving a car do so with a spare tire, perhaps a few tools and even a ” ashlight. These people may go their entire driving career without ever having a ” at or some other roadside emergency, but they still dont go without these safety precautions. In scuba such a redundancy means having an additional source of suf“ cient breathing gas available. To handle emergency situations under water, the technical diving community, including cave divers, wreck divers and those folks doing very deepŽ dives, have adopted the rule of thirds. This rule means that they use one-third of their breathing gas for descent and exploring, such as a wreck. They have one-third of their gas supply for their ascent to the surface. This leaves a third, which is for emergency situations, unplanned decompression obligations, or any other issue which might prevent return to terra “ rma. These technicalŽ divers usually have a minimum of two large cylinders and frequently upwards of four or “ ve. Each cylinder goes one-third unused if the dive goes as planned. In contrast, most recreational open water divers dont carry much for redundant equipment. Recreational divers frequently come in asking me about something divers call a pony bottle.Ž When I started diving about 10 years ago, the pony bottles I saw were small. Divers in my local area carried the small Spare AirŽ branded device which contains a mere three cubic feet of air. Some carried a six-cubic foot tank and fewer carried a 13 or 19 cubic foot tank. I rarely advise a diver to carry a pony tank. In my diving past I did carry one at some point, and still own a variety of them, but I have not carried one in three or four years. Why? Because most divers look for a pony bottle because they are diving deeper and they want it to get them back to the surface in case of emergency. That makes sense until you start looking at the math: Your average diver uses about .5 to .7 cubic feet of breathing gas on the surface. As we descend we use DOUBLE that amount of gas at 33 feet. An aluminum 19 cubic feet that lasts for 27 minutes on the surface now only lasts 13 minutes. At 66 feet your cylinder lasts nine minutes. Now most people who want a pony bottle say they only want it for dives between 130, which is the recreational limit, and 150 feet. These divers may get “ ve minutes worth of gas from that cylinder assuming their breathing rate has not increased due to panic or work load. I took a Spare AirŽ to 146 feet and calmly took one full breath while kneeling on the bottom, with three friends watching. I took one more small breath and was out of gas. I switched back to my primary gas supply to “ nish the dive. That experiment proved to me that I could easily drain that cylinder just getting to the surface, much less try and solve a problem, complete any necessary decompression, search for a buddy, etc. As a result, I tend to urge people to carry a redundant supply of gas that is proportional to the dive pro“ le they plan to do. In most cases that means a tank of considerable size. Some of you will argue that you have a buddy with additional air, and you might be right. I can almost guarantee that at some point you will be separated from them for whatever reason. That would be a bad time to need them and their breathing gas just to get you home. Just because you have a buddy doesnt mean they have the ability to get you both out of trouble. If you are both low on gas and nearing the end of your dive when a problem arises then the buddy will be of little help. If you are frequently pushing recreational depth limits, or approach decompression diving, or have a higher SAC rate, then you are probably a candidate for larger bailout supplies or even double cylinders. The good news is: these larger tanks, and the training about how to handle them, are available today, unlike 15 years ago. Each diver needs to evaluate their needs. You can never go wrong with visiting your local dive store, physically trying a dive with a redundant gas supply and asking lots of questions. Its not if you might need it, but a matter of when. Norma Hill, Bill Wannall and Mike Harrison on patrol. In January of 2009, the Crawfordville Volunteer Fire Rescue Department lost an incredibly valuable member inthe line of duty, Captain Richard Rhea. CaptainRhea was one of the most knowledgable and well respected members of, not only our department, but of the entire re ghting and EMS community in Wakulla County. He was the Training Of cer for our department and was instrumental in ensuring that our department members, both new and old, were excellently prepared to protect the life and property of our community. In a tting tribute to Captain Rhea, a scholarship fund was set up in his name to assist students wanting to pursue careers in re ghting or emergency medical services. In an effort to raise money for this scholarship fund, I recently ran the Ignite the Fight 5K in full personal protective equipment. That included bunker pants,bunker coat, helmet and self contained breathing appartatus. When I set out on this endeavor I hada goal of raising$200. Thanks to the overwhelming support of my community and friends,$660was raised to support the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund.Down Home Foreign Care Repair Shadeville Elementary School Susan Payne Turner Mr. and Mrs. Joe Verbic Matt Brazier Mr. and Mrs. Craig Kittendorf Will McHugh Hugh Harts eld Nick Campbell Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Theobald Mr. and Mrs. Matt Stolk Mr. and Mrs. Herman Stolk Erin Brazier Bob Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Linenger Mr. and Mrs. Bill Rochus I would also like to extend a special thanks to The Wakulla News for sponsoring me by running this ad, ensuring that all $660 was deposited directly into the Richard Rhea Sholarship Fund.Fire ghter Ian Brazier Thanks Sponsors! Ian BrazierFire ghterCrawfordville Volunteer Fire Rescue Department Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 3.2 ft. 5:03 AM High 0.3 ft. 12:16 PM 1.4 ft. 12:48 AM 1.2 ft. 2:10 AM 0.7 ft. 3:27 AM 0.2 ft. 4:32 AM -0.4 ft. 5:30 AM -0.8 ft. 6:22 AM Low 3.0 ft. 7:11 PM 3.0 ft. 6:20 AM 2.8 ft. 8:01 AM 2.9 ft. 9:40 AM 3.1 ft. 10:58 AM 3.3 ft. 12:02 PM 3.5 ft. 12:58 PM High 0.5 ft. 1:19 PM 0.8 ft. 2:28 PM 1.0 ft. 3:33 PM 1.1 ft. 4:33 PM 1.3 ft. 5:26 PM 1.4 ft. 6:14 PM Low 3.1 ft. 8:10 PM 3.2 ft. 9:05 PM 3.3 ft. 9:55 PM 3.5 ft. 10:41 PM 3.7 ft. 11:24 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 3.3 ft. 5:00 AM High 0.3 ft. 12:13 PM 1.6 ft. 12:45 AM 1.3 ft. 2:07 AM 0.8 ft. 3:24 AM 0.2 ft. 4:29 AM -0.4 ft. 5:27 AM -0.9 ft. 6:19 AM Low 3.1 ft. 7:08 PM 3.0 ft. 6:17 AM 2.9 ft. 7:58 AM 3.0 ft. 9:37 AM 3.2 ft. 10:55 AM 3.4 ft. 11:59 AM 3.6 ft. 12:55 PM High 0.6 ft. 1:16 PM 0.8 ft. 2:25 PM 1.0 ft. 3:30 PM 1.2 ft. 4:30 PM 1.4 ft. 5:23 PM 1.5 ft. 6:11 PM Low 3.1 ft. 8:07 PM 3.2 ft. 9:02 PM 3.4 ft. 9:52 PM 3.6 ft. 10:38 PM 3.8 ft. 11:21 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 3.4 ft. 12:00 AM High 1.4 ft. 12:38 AM 1.3 ft. 1:52 AM 1.1 ft. 3:14 AM 0.6 ft. 4:31 AM 0.1 ft. 5:36 AM -0.3 ft. 6:34 AM -0.7 ft. 7:26 AM Low 3.0 ft. 5:39 AM 2.8 ft. 6:56 AM 2.6 ft. 8:37 AM 2.7 ft. 10:16 AM 2.9 ft. 11:34 AM 3.1 ft. 12:38 PM 3.2 ft. 1:34 PM High 0.2 ft. 1:20 PM 0.5 ft. 2:23 PM 0.7 ft. 3:32 PM 0.9 ft. 4:37 PM 1.0 ft. 5:37 PM 1.2 ft. 6:30 PM 1.3 ft. 7:18 PM Low 2.8 ft. 7:47 PM 2.8 ft. 8:46 PM 2.9 ft. 9:41 PM 3.1 ft. 10:31 PM 3.3 ft. 11:17 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 2.4 ft. 4:55 AM High 0.2 ft. 12:27 PM 1.1 ft. 12:59 AM 0.9 ft. 2:21 AM 0.5 ft. 3:38 AM 0.1 ft. 4:43 AM -0.3 ft. 5:41 AM -0.6 ft. 6:33 AM Low 2.3 ft. 7:03 PM 2.2 ft. 6:12 AM 2.1 ft. 7:53 AM 2.2 ft. 9:32 AM 2.3 ft. 10:50 AM 2.5 ft. 11:54 AM 2.6 ft. 12:50 PM High 0.4 ft. 1:30 PM 0.6 ft. 2:39 PM 0.7 ft. 3:44 PM 0.8 ft. 4:44 PM 0.9 ft. 5:37 PM 1.0 ft. 6:25 PM Low 2.3 ft. 8:02 PM 2.4 ft. 8:57 PM 2.5 ft. 9:47 PM 2.6 ft. 10:33 PM 2.8 ft. 11:16 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 2.5 ft. 4:47 AM High 0.3 ft. 11:55 AM 1.4 ft. 12:27 AM 1.1 ft. 1:49 AM 0.7 ft. 3:06 AM 0.2 ft. 4:11 AM -0.4 ft. 5:09 AM -0.8 ft. 6:01 AM Low 2.4 ft. 6:55 PM 2.3 ft. 6:04 AM 2.2 ft. 7:45 AM 2.3 ft. 9:24 AM 2.4 ft. 10:42 AM 2.6 ft. 11:46 AM 2.7 ft. 12:42 PM High 0.5 ft. 12:58 PM 0.7 ft. 2:07 PM 0.9 ft. 3:12 PM 1.1 ft. 4:12 PM 1.2 ft. 5:05 PM 1.4 ft. 5:53 PM Low 2.4 ft. 7:54 PM 2.5 ft. 8:49 PM 2.6 ft. 9:39 PM 2.7 ft. 10:25 PM 2.9 ft. 11:08 PM 3.0 ft. 11:51 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 2.5 ft. 4:35 AM High 0.1 ft. 11:44 AM 1.4 ft. 12:34 AM 1.1 ft. 1:59 AM 0.7 ft. 3:10 AM 0.3 ft. 4:10 AM -0.1 ft. 5:03 AM -0.4 ft. 5:54 AM Low 2.4 ft. 7:59 PM 2.3 ft. 5:56 AM 2.1 ft. 7:38 AM 2.0 ft. 9:32 AM 2.1 ft. 11:20 AM 2.3 ft. 12:50 PM 2.4 ft. 2:03 PM High 0.3 ft. 12:41 PM 0.6 ft. 1:42 PM 0.9 ft. 2:42 PM 1.2 ft. 3:40 PM 1.4 ft. 4:35 PM 1.6 ft. 5:24 PM Low 2.4 ft. 8:31 PM 2.4 ft. 8:59 PM 2.5 ft. 9:27 PM 2.6 ft. 9:56 PM 2.8 ft. 10:27 PM 2.9 ft. 11:02 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 17 Nov. 23First Dec. 1 Full Dec. 10 Last Nov. 18 New Nov. 24Major Times 5:38 AM 7:38 AM 6:02 PM 8:02 PM Minor Times 12:19 PM 1:19 PM 11:49 PM 12:49 AM Major Times 6:27 AM 8:27 AM 6:51 PM 8:51 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:56 PM 1:56 PM Major Times 7:16 AM 9:16 AM 7:40 PM 9:40 PM Minor Times 12:51 AM 1:51 AM 1:32 PM 2:32 PM Major Times 8:06 AM 10:06 AM 8:31 PM 10:31 PM Minor Times 1:54 AM 2:54 AM 2:09 PM 3:09 PM Major Times 8:57 AM 10:57 AM 9:24 PM 11:24 PM Minor Times 2:59 AM 3:59 AM 2:47 PM 3:47 PM Major Times 9:52 AM 11:52 AM 10:20 PM 12:20 AM Minor Times 4:06 AM 5:06 AM 3:30 PM 4:30 PM Major Times 10:49 AM 12:49 PM 11:19 PM 1:19 AM Minor Times 5:15 AM 6:15 AM 4:17 PM 5:17 PM Average Average Average Average+ Average Good Better7:03 am 5:40 pm 11:50 pm 12:20 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:04 am 5:39 pm --:-12:57 pm 7:05 am 5:39 pm 12:52 am 1:33 pm 7:06 am 5:38 pm 1:55 am 2:10 pm 7:07 am 5:38 pm 3:00 am 2:48 pm 7:08 am 5:38 pm 4:07 am 3:31 pm 7:08 am 5:38 pm 5:16 am 4:18 pm59% 52% 45% 38% 31% 23% 15% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 – Page 11AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Nov. 3, Theresa Miller of Jerrys Bait and Tackle in Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a boat, trailer and motor owned by Sean McAuliffe of Tallahassee. The boat was stored on the property and was taken during the night or early morning hours. The vessel is valued at $2,500. The boat was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC computer. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: € On Nov. 3, a Crawfordville female reported being the victim of harassing telephone calls and texts. The suspect insinuated relationships with the victim. Evidence was collected. € On Nov. 3, Carolyn Brantley of Ochlockonee Bay reported a felony criminal mischief. The victim observed damage to her home as someone attempted to break in. Damage is estimated at $1,045. Evidence was collected at the scene and the case was sent to the Criminal Investigations Division. € On Nov. 3, Don Kemp of the Wakulla County Public Works Department reported a criminal mischief on Mount Zion Road in Crawfordville. A motorist created $250 damage to the dirt road by spinning tires. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Nov. 6, a resident of River Plantation reported that a 44-year-old male and his 5-year-old daughter were both naked in a boat on the Wakulla River. Deputy Cole Wells reported that the man and child were dressed when he arrived to investigate. The male subject told Deputy Wells that he dropped his keys in the river and removed his clothing to retrieve them. The childs clothing was removed so she could urinate in the river. The River Plantation resident stated she was concerned about the welfare of the child. The case has been turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division and contact was made with the Department of Children and Families. € On Nov. 6, FHP Trooper Brian Speigner reported a criminal mischief at Wakulla High School. It appears as if someone struck the WHS sign with a blunt object. Damage was estimated at $200. € On Nov. 4, a motor grader operator with the Wakulla County Public Works Department reported being threatened by a Crawfordville resident as he attempted to grade a road. The victim stated he would shoot the road grader operator if he continued to grade the road. It was determined that the county has an easement to grade the road. The operator was attempting to “ x the road for an upcoming funeral. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Lt. Billy Jones asked the two parties to resolve their differences without charges being “ led. € On Nov. 6, Tanya Price of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of jewelry and computer software from her home. The stolen property is valued at $3,675. € On Nov. 6, Deputy Randy Phillips investigated an elderly/disabled neglect complaint involving a 56-year-old victim. The victim was locked outside his home by the suspect/ caregiver. The victim was wearing soiled and dirty clothing when questioned by the deputy. WCSO deputies went to a fast food restaurant and purchased food for the victim. Eventually, the caregiver returned home and stated that she must have forgotten to give the victim a key. EMS was called to the scene and determined the victim was healthy. The investigation is ongoing. € On Nov. 6, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received a complaint of a motorist striking a deer at the Fire Tower Bridge and U.S. Highway 319. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston discovered the injured deer suffering and put it down. € On Nov. 6, Amanda Sutton of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim lost $100 from the vehicle. € On Nov. 4, Oscar R. Smith of Crawfordville reported the loss of his wallet from his vehicle. Credit cards, a drivers license and Social Security card were lost. € On Nov. 5, Jodie Farnsworth of Crawfordville reported a structure fire. Two large storage sheds were on “ re when Deputy Ward Kromer arrived on the scene. Wakulla County Firefighters extinguished the “ re but the sheds were a total loss. The buildings and contents were valued at $2,500. The cause of the “ re is still to be determined. € On Nov. 4, Kelvin Robbins of Panacea reported a theft of a gas tank from his “ shing boat. The property is valued at $130. A suspect has been identi“ ed and the tank was returned to the owner. € On Nov. 4, William Excorpizo of Crawfordville reported a grand theft as someone stole three extension cords, valued at $170. A semi-truck radiator was also stolen. It is valued at $300. € On Nov. 7, Vesco Specialized Carriers of Conyers, Ga., reported a tractor trailer accident on Shadeville Highway near U.S. Highway 319. Deputy Ben Steinle responded to a disabled tractor trailer in the roadway. The load was a Caterpillar drill weighing more than 100,000 pounds. As the driver, Joe Hunter of Garden City, Ga., approached the intersection the tongue area of the trailer broke in half. The trailer could not be moved out of the roadway without specialized equipment. Due to the location of the accident three off-duty deputies, Rachel Oliver, Mike Helms and Matt Helms, were needed for traf“ c control. There were no injuries. The case was reported at 5:17 p.m. on Nov. 7 and was cleared at 2:51 a.m. Nov. 8. There were no injuries although damage to the highway was reported due to the weight of the trailer. € On Nov. 7, Magnus D. Peavy of Panacea reported a criminal mischief to a construction site on River Plantation Road. A portable toilet was tipped over, a front end loader was raised up on its hydraulic stabilizers, a log splitter was tipped on its side and tires were used to spin out on grass. In addition, $1,500 worth of damage was done to a pickup truck on site. A person of interest was identi“ ed. € On Nov. 7, Brittney Dawkins of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary and grand theft of a five foot long python. The snake and the living quarters tank are valued at $425. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Nov. 7, a stolen Harley-Davidson motorcycle was recovered in a wooded area off Floyd Gray Road. The 2008 motorcycle was stolen out of Leon County. The bike is valued at $9,600. The motorcycle was transported to the WCSO impound area. Leon County made an arrest in the case. € On Nov. 7, Tamela Miller of Captain Seaniles in Crawfordville reported a retail theft. A customer removed small bottles of liquor without paying for them. The victim requested a trespass warning against the suspect. The loss of property is estimated at $9. € On Nov. 8, Charles Ferrell Barwick of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a trailer from his property. The property is valued at $750. The trailer is owned by Sheryl Ferrell. € On Nov. 8, Christy Basso and Frances Collinsworth, both of Crawfordville, reported a residential burglary. A ” at screen television and computer equipment, valued at $1,950, was reported missing. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Nov. 9, Tina Walker of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of three dirt bikes valued at $2,900. The motorcycles were secured to the victims carport. € On Nov. 9, Karla Wood of Panacea reported the theft of medications from her residence. No forced entry was discovered. The different medications were valued at $650. € On Nov. 9, Leonard Crum of the WCSO Maintenance Division reported discovering narcotics in a “ ling cabinet in a hut behind the jail. A smoking pipe and 11 grams of cocaine was discovered and turned over to the evidence section. € On Nov. 9, Deputy Randy Phillips investigated a grass fire on Curtis Mill Road in Sopchoppy. A structure was also partially destroyed. It was valued at $5,000. The owner of the structure has not been determined although it may be owned by the Florida Division of Forestry. Wakulla Fire“ ghters determined that the “ re was not of a suspicious origin and the case was closed. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 703 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportATM thief guilty, judge sentences him to 30 years By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA man charged with stealing ATMs went to trial last week, was found guilty by a jury and sentenced by the judge to 30 years in state prison. Joel Cooper, 37, had a two-day trial on Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 7 and 8, and was found guilty of burglary of a structure causing more than $1,000 damage; criminal mischief; and felony ” eeing or attempting to elude of“ cer. Because of more than 20 previous felony convictions, Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford went ahead with the sentencing shortly after the jury returned a guilty verdict and ordered Cooper to serve 30 years. Assistant State Attorney Lorena Vollrath-Bueno, who prosecuted the case, said Cooper had been implicated in a number of similar crimes throughout Florida and Georgia. After a rash of similar crimes in the area, in October 2009 Wakulla Sheriffs Capt. Bill Poole had the Stop N Save convenience store at Spring Creek Highway and U.S. Highway 98 under surveillance when Cooper and an accomplice allegedly broke into the store and chained the ATM to a car and pulled it out into the parking lot. Poole ordered the men in the vehicle to stop … they didnt … and he “ red two shots, one of which struck the car. A high-speed chase ensued with Poole and Deputy William Hudson in pursuit. Cooper and his accomplice escaped into Leon County where there was another getaway car on Natural Bridge Road. A month after the incident, in November 2009, Cooper was arrested by U.S. Marshals -reportedly in a stolen car with chains, hooks and crowbars inside. Bueno said that Cooper had a system worked out for stealing cars to use in his robberies … typically going for older cars on lots, where salespeople were more likely to allow a customer to take it for a test drive. The test drive gave Cooper an opportunity to copy a set of keys for the vehicle at a hardware store, return the car to the lot, then later come back and take the car. There are a couple of men suspected of being the accomplice with Cooper in the October 2009 burglary, Bueno said.Drug take-back bin available at WCSOThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce has added a secure disposal container in the lobby of the facility at 15 Oak Street in Crawfordville for unwanted drugs. The drop box will allow us to remove the unwanted narcotics from the streets while also making sure the drugs are properly disposed off and do not pose a threat to humans, animals or the environment,Ž said Interim, Sheriff Donnie Crum. The sheriffs of“ ce has also had requests to dispose of needles or used sharps.Ž The Wakulla County Health Department accepts the used sharps, but they must be disposed of in approved containers which can be purchased at any pharmacy or at the health department. If not in a sharps container, they must be in a metal can or bleach bottle with the lid taped securely. For more information about disposing of needles, call the Wakulla County Health Department Health Educator Grace Keith at 926-0400, extension 215. DEADLINE FOR THE NOV. 23rd ISSUE IS FRIDAY, NOV. 18th at 11 AM. CALL IN YOUR CLASSIFIED AT 877-676-1403 www.florida-classifieds.com ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA Y Y o u r a d v e r t i s i n g b u d g e t i s T O O B I G Statewide adver sing—refreshing rates (866)742 1373 Octob e r Medicare Open Enrollment Starts Early This Year!OCTOBER 15 DECEMBER 7THIS IS THE TIME TO: Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders Florida Department of Elder AffairsFLORIDA SHIP SHINE is a Florida Department of Elder Aairs program operated in partnership with your local Area Agency on Aging to provide information and assistance with Medicare. All services are free, objective and condential. WE DO NOT SELL INSURANCE OR REPRESENT ANY INSURANCE ENTITY. 1-800-96-ELDERSe Habla Espaol (800-963-5337)MARK YOUR CALENDAR! BENEFITat Hudson Park Saturday, Nov. 19thPlease join family and friends for a MULLET DINNER on behalf of BILLIE JO HARTSFIELD BARKSDALE. Saturday, November 19th, 11AM-4PM at Hudson Park, Crawfordville Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome 850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe Center Full Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A You have to get everything managed and controlled,Ž Kinder says. And you have to scale the house.Ž If an entertainer asked too much, Kinder says he moved on to the next choice. Kinder started fundraising after college not knowing what he wanted to do with his life. He was single, could travel and it sounded interesting, he says. It “ t,Ž Kinder says. And he was a natural. Kinder says its all about having fun and doing things that arent expected. At one of his golf tournaments, he put a toilet seat on the “ rst tee. Golfers had to sit on the toilet to tee off. Another time, he got a camel from the Ringling Brothers and had it as a guest at one of his tournaments. I learned they can spit and get nasty,Ž Kinder says. He also tried to make the prizes fun as well. So he gave people actual doors for door prizes. He also gave away a months worth of pork chops. But instead of a gift certi“ cate to a meat market, the winner won a live pig. But we gave it back,Ž Kinder says. And the winner actually did win a gift certi“ cate. One year during a golf tournament for a hospital, Kinder says he became tired of the best golfers winning the prizes. He says he felt that the worst golfer should also be recognized. So he developed the worst golfer award which was a bedpan with golf balls lining the edges. Kinder says while walking on the street one day he ran into a man who won the bedpan at one of Kinders tournaments. The man told Kinder he keeps the bedpan on the wall at his of“ ce. THE EARLY YEARS Kinder was born in Wisconsin and lived on a farm with his family. His great-grandfather, who he spent a lot of time with, served in the Civil War. He passed away at the age of 97 and Kinder says there was a story in the local newspaper after his greatgrandfather died stating that he was the last living Civil War vet in the entire state of Wisconsin. Im probably the only person who can say that, that I hung out with someone who served during the Civil War,Ž Kinder says. When Kinder was a teenager, his family moved to Chicago. When he was in high school, he joined the Navy and served for three years, a little over a year of that was on a carrier. He “ nished high school while he was in the Navy and was mailed his diploma. Following the Navy, he went to college and majored in history, with a minor in philosophy. Kinder says nobody wanted to hire a philosophy major. And I couldnt get a boat to Greece,Ž Kinder says. So he started as a professional fundraising consultant. Later on, he also received his masters degree in hospital administration from George Washington University. He did his residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. ENCOUNTER IN MEMPHIS During his time as a fundraising consultant, one of his campaigns took him to Memphis, Tenn., in 1968. He was doing a citywide campaign for Goodwill and ended up going to a city meeting to make a presentation. During this meeting, there was talk about a strike that was currently going on with the sanitation workers and the city. Kinder recalls the mayor not wanting to negotiate or agree to their terms. At the meeting, a man stood up and told the audience if the mayor wouldnt support the workers, he was going to bring in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to march. King ended up coming to Memphis. A couple of weeks following that meeting, Kinder was still in Memphis and King was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Kinder remembers the chaos following Kings death, riots in the streets, people busting up store fronts. Everything came unglued,Ž Kinder says. VARIOUS CELEBRITIES As a consultant, Kinder also spent his fair share in Las Vegas. Through a mutual friend, he met Nat King Cole, who performed at The Sands Hotel in Vegas. Although this was a time of segregation, Kinder says he never stereotyped anyone. He learned this after he got into a major car accident. Another motorist, who happened to be African American, saw what happened and pulled Kinder out of the car. Kinder says the paramedics told him he shouldnt have survived. After meeting Cole, he also met members of his trio, including drummer Lee Young. Young and Kinder became good friends and shared a love of golf. During one of their outings, Young told Kinder that he wished he could stay at the hotel where the trio played. In those days, African Americans werent allowed to stay at The Sands Hotel. Through his relationship with the Nat King Cole, he met comedians Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, who opened the show for the trio. Kinder says he became good friends with Rowan and he performed at one of his fundraising events. Later on, Rowan and Martin would end up having a very successful television show together, Rowan and Martins Laugh-In.Ž Another person Kinder met through his connections was Bob Newhart. Rowan introduced the two and got Newhart to do a show for one of Kinders events. Kinder says he hung out with Newhart before and after the show and he learned they had a lot in common, one of those being that they both were from Chicago. We also look a lot alike, but he has all the money,Ž Kinder says. Kinder also got the chance to hang out with comedy legend Bob Hope. Hope performed three different shows for Kinder. Hes the best ad liber,Ž Kinder says. Ive never met anyone better.Ž He remembers hearing a story about Hope during the last few days of his life that made him chuckle. Hope lived to be 100 years old and the last year of his life, he was blind and bedridden. His wife asked Hope where he wanted to be buried. His response, Surprise me.Ž He was still so sharp,Ž Kinder says. Kinder recalls Hope never having a problem getting a plane to take him to his next destination. Prior to one of his shows, everyone had made it to the venue except Hope. When Kinder asked where Hope was, his assistant told him he was in Miami and Kinder would need to pick him up. Kinder says he asked the assistant how he was supposed to do that. The assistant told him to get a plane. Well, after two phone calls and name dropping, Kinder had a plane for Hope. Kinder says in the 70s, Hope was the most famous entertainer and people and companies would simply lend him planes. He “ nally broke down and bought a plane when he was 87,Ž Kinder says. It was fun times.Ž Not only could Hope get planes, he could also get a room in a booked hotel. When Kinder was putting on a fundraiser for Easter Seals in Tampa, he went to reserve a large number of hotel rooms and the best suite in the hotel for Hope. When he asked for the rooms, he was told there were no rooms available. As Kinder was going to leave, the concierge asked him who the suite was for. That would have been for Bob Hope,Ž Kinder says he told the concierge. Well that changed everything. The manager came out and told Kinder there were rooms available. I found out they always have a room.Ž Kinder says. Kinder decided instead to book the rooms at another hotel and ended up meeting the owner of the Yankees, George Steinbrenner. Kinder says they talked and hung out and he even got to meet some of the Yankee players. It was more fun than staying at the Hyatt,Ž Kinder says. Hope was also very down to earth, Kinder says. For Hope, it wasnt all about the money. Hope did a show for a hospital that had 100 beds. He performed for half the cost some other celebrities requested, Kinder says. Throughout the years, Kinder says he met a lot of people with money. Hardly any of them have enough,Ž Kinder says. And although it makes for some interesting stories, Kinder says some celebrities arent worth knowing. Theres many people worth knowing, but they arent celebrities,Ž Kinder says. His wife of 42 years, Marge, says her husband has lived as interesting life and has many stories. Some you want to know and some you dont,Ž Marge says. The two met while Jerry Kinder was doing a fundraiser for the Girl Scouts in New Jersey, Marges home state. I was single and thought, surely I can scout some girls,Ž Jerry Kinder says. He met Marge and the two eventually were married. He moved on and didnt forget me,Ž Marge Kinder says. The Kinders moved to Wakulla County 17 years ago. They started an expense reduction consulting “ rm, 13 years ago, where they “ nd ways to cut costs without letting go of personnel. The two are also very involved in Relay for Life, both being cancer survivors. Marge Kinder started the Cancer Support Group in Wakulla County because there wasnt one. Jerry Kinder found out he is now cancer free and says he has started to get his pep back. He plans to start fundraising again and become a volunteer with the Florida Sheriffs Associations charity golf tournaments. Now that Im able to bounce around again,Ž Kinder says. I can still do it. You never forget it.Ž He is also open to performing standup comedy for charities. Anyone interested in contacting Jerry Kinder can email him at jkinder2@ comcast.net or call him at 926-6050.Jerry Kinder Kinder and wife Marge, top, with Bob Newhart. The signed photo says, To Marge and Jerry, Thanks for a great time. At right, Kinder with pal Dan Rowan. Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center will host the 5TH ANNUALFREE COUNTY WIDE THANKSGIVING DINNERThe dinner will be held at the Senior Center located at 33 Michael Drive in CrawfordvilleNovember 22, 20114:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.Please join us for this very special event! If you have any questions please call 926-7145. Presented by Escambia Countys Extension Service via Polycom video conferencing. When:November 22, 2011 Where:Wakulla County UF IFAS Extension Of“ce 84 Cedar Ave., Crawfordville, FL Time:6:30 p.m. EST/ 5:30 p.m. CST Cost:$5 per person. Price includes materials and handouts.This program will cover Floridas new cottage food regulations and include a time for questions and answers with our Small Farms and FCS Staff. Farms or individuals interested or currently marketing processed foods are encouraged to attend. Cottage Foods:Navigating Floridas new regulations for Small Producers Must pre-register by November 15th.To register for Wakulla County, contact the Wakulla County Extension Of“ce at 850-926-3931. To register for Escambia County, contact the Escambia County Extension Service at 850-475-5230. WakullaCounty

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& Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 United Way is in the midst of a fundraising drivePage 4B Crawfordville’s Kitsune Books wins ve awardsPage 3B By SUSAN SOLBURGWHS Drama TeacherWakulla Highs Dramatis Personae will present Kurt Vonneguts The Barnhouse EffectŽ and John S. Wells Competition PieceŽ in performances this weekend. It is early in the 1950s and a college professor named Arthur Barnhouse, played by senior Jared Hansen, has discovered something he calls DynomopsychismŽ or Power of the Mind.Ž ON-STAGE e Barnhouse E ect and Competition PieceThe Barnhouse Effect, above, features Kyle Rozanski, Jared Hansen and Ronnie Allen. Competition Piece, right, features Rami McIver, Brett Deross, Shelby Hawkins and Sierra Moss.PHOTOS BY SUSAN SOLBURG/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDramatis Personaes annual OneAct Plays featuring Kurt Vonneguts  e Barnhouse E ectŽ and John S. Wells Competition PieceŽ will be performed on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 18 and 19, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 20, at 2 p.m. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children.Wakulla High Schools Dramatis Personae presents two one-act comediesThis amazing power allows the professor to manipulate all sorts and sizes of inanimate objects. A young college student, Mr. Vaughn E. Gutt, played by senior Kyle Rozanski, has been sent to assist the professor with his research by the colleges Assistant Dean Margaret Tharpe, played by senior Samantha Tomlinson. One thing leads to another until the FBI, the military and the Russians all want to know about and control the professors amazing powers. The paranoia that surrounded new and dangerous technologies runs rampant in this satirical look at the early years of the space race. The other one-act play is about three different sets of high school students getting ready for a theatre competition. Each group is lead by a very clueless and unusual type of drama teacher. The whole process from play selection, casting and rehearsal will make for mucho mayhem and merriment. This play with 22 actors is directed by former WHS graduate Krissy Kosec Sanders. Sanders performed in this same play while a student at WHS and is now a senior at FSU majoring in Theatre. Also we will have a guest appearance by another graduate, Corey Hager, as he reprises his role as Judge No. 3, the Grim Reaper. 15minute guaranteeTallahassee Memorial is pleased to bring InQuicker to the community for those patients requiring emergency care for non-life threatening medical conditions. With InQuicker, you never have to experience a long wait in a crowded emergency facility again. Instead, enjoy the comfort of your own home while waiting for your next emergency care visit. Simply access the InQuicker system at tmh.org to “nd projected treatment times at both the Tallahassee Memorial Bixler Emergency Center and Urgent Care Center. Once the system captures certain demographic and symptomatic information, you are added to the wait queue which holds your place in line, online. When you arrive at the emergency center for your projected treatment time, you will be seen by a nurse practitioner, physicians assistant or physician in 15 minutes or less, guaranteed. Your ER wait is over. Check-in at tmh.org to hold your place in line, online today. Online Check-in atTMH.ORG* InQuicker is only for patients experiencing non-life threatening conditions and does not affect the wait times of other emerg ency room patients. Priority treatment is always given to those with the most urgent medical conditions. your ER wait is over. Guaranteed. Saturday, Nov. 19 at 8pmAt POSH JAVAin Downtown Sopchoppy$10 Cover/RESERVED SEATING: (850) 962-1010 Organics & GiftsFred Figueroa, Carly Bak & Craig Daniel HardinSabal like the tree, represents the people and places of Florida.

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, November 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP will meet from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Please call 926-0401 ext. 217 for more information.  CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend the meetings. For more information about CCOW, visit their website at www.cowakulla.org.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, November 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, November 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Vendors wanting to participate, call Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or 528-5838, or email posh_faery@ yahoo.com.  ORDER OF THE CONFEDERATE ROSE Mary C. Gwaltney chapter will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405.  SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS Wakulla Guards Camp will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405. Sunday, November 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, November 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, November 22  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m. Wednesday, November 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, November 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, November 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsThursday, November 17  CPR TRAINING will be held at the Wakulla County Health Department at 7 p.m. The cost is $25 per person. For more information or to register, call Grace Keith at 926-0400, ext. 215 or email at Grace_Keith@doh.state. .us. Saturday, November 19  WAKULLA COUNTY CHILDREN’S FUND FUNDRAISER will be held at the Shell Point Volunteer Fire Department from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. They will be having a garage sale, silent auction, bake sale, chili, soup, hotdogs and drinks. All proceeds go to help the needy children of Wakulla County. If anyone has a new or slightly used item they would like to donate for the silent auction contact Susan at 926-1409.  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet from 10 a.m. to noon. at Christ Church Anglican, located at 3383 Coastal Highway in Crawfordville. Children should bring their favorite train and a snack and drink. All Spectrum children and their siblings are invited to come to this play date. Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times. Social disorders are associated with Autism and Spectrum children and many social activities cost money. The play date allows each child to interact with others, and costs no money. Trains are a common interest among Spectrum children and a great way for the kids to light up. Please RSVP to Carrie Stevens at 274-9474 or carriejstevens@comcast.net.  BIKER’S SHOEBOX RUN will start at 8:30 a.m. at Spirit Life Church, 131 Rose Street, Sopchoppy. The members of Spirit Life Church are collecting shoe boxes lled with gifts to give to needy children this Christmas. Shoeboxes will be delivered by a group of motorcyclists who will be leaving the church heading to Power Country Radio station at 9206 West U.S. Highway 90 in Lake City. Spirit Life Church will be open at 7:30 a.m. for coffee and donuts before the motorcycle group leaves. For more information contact Sharon McClendon at smctupper@embarqmail.com.  OPEN HOUSE FOR THE HOLIDAYS will be held at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sponsored by the Photo Club, this family-friendly day of fun will include free holiday photographs, crafts for the kids, yummy holiday treats and hot cider and outdoor wagon rides. A chili lunch will be available for a small donation. No advance reservations necessary. Call the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge at 925-6121 for more information or visit their website at www.fws.gov/saintmarks.  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at the Sunset Restaurant in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812, Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol. com, You may also call Linda Wood at 850-899-0025 in Port St. Joe, or email Sheri at skpsky2000@comcast.net. Find more information about the club, visit www.nationalbuttonsociety.org or www.FloridaStateButtonSociety.org. Bring buttons to the meeting for free appraisals. Tuesday, November 22  FREE COUNTYWIDE THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive. For more information, call 926-7145. Wednesday, November 23  14TH ANNUAL FARM CITY BREAKFAST will be held at 7 a.m. at the Livestock Pavilion by the North Florida Fair Association, Wakulla County Farm Bureau and University of Florida/IFAS/Wakulla County Cooperative Extension Service to recognize Jeff Lawhon and his family as the new North Florida Fair Association’s 2011 Outstanding Farm Family for Wakulla County. R.S.V.P. by Nov. 22 at wakulla@ifas.u .edu or call 926-3931 if you will be attending the breakfast. We want to thank you for your support of agriculture in Wakulla County, and we hope you can be with us at our breakfast. Thursday, November 24 THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held by Alcoholics Anonymous at 5 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. The meeting will follow at 8 p.m.Upcoming EventsWednesday, November 30  CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at Mike’s Seafood Grille, 2302 Crawfordville Highway, from noon until 1:15 p.m. Please RSVP to the Wakulla Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Cost is $12 per person. Friday, December 2  COMMUNITY RECEPTION to launch Healing Arts of Wakulla County, which will involve the arts in community wellness, will be held from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at The Works Co-Working Cafe in Crawfordville. Artists, healthcare professionals, instructors and the public are invited to attend. Refreshments and drinks will be available. RSVP to 926-3526. By JOAN HENDRIX CHAT President Gizmo is a small 1-yearold terrier mix, chocolate/white bicolor with a medium wiry coat, droopy ears, long tail and beautiful brown eyes. His tail is forever wagging; hes sweet, friendly and a very sociable dog. Thats our Gizmo. This was a typical weekend day and Gizmo, as usual, was out playing in the yard, which is a chain link fenced yard. Of course the grass always looks greener on the other side so he decided to dig under the fence to play with the other dogs who were barking at him. It didnt take him long to dig a little tunnel and get half way under the fencing, when the other dogs decided to come take a look at the activity by the fence. They frightened Gizmo and he decided to back out where he knew he would be safe. Unfortunately, the sharp bottom of the fencing dug into his back and ripped his skin open and cut him deeply. This was the “ rst accident weve ever had of this nature. He was immediately removed from the situation, brought inside, wrapped in a towel and a veterinarian was called. Because it was the weekend, we “ nally reached Jeanette from VCA who came to CHAT, looked at the injury and described the type and severity of the wound to Dr. Faith Hughes, who was available by phone. Gizmo was wrapped in a clean bandage in order to keep the area as sterile as possible. Dr. Hughes arrived shortly, examined Gizmo, and gave him pain medicine until he could be scheduled for surgery. Gizmo died twice on the operation table and was brought back to life by Jenny Cruse, Burdette and Dr. Hughes. He stayed some days at VCA where his daily care was provided by all the wonderful vet techs at VCA. He was brought to CHAT to his own private room to heal quietly. During this period of time he developed a fever due to an infection and Dr. Hughes recommended that he be brought back to VCA where he is today being cared for again by loving hands. We are all cheering for this little guy especially since he has such a strong determination to live. It is our hope that he will be adopted by a family who will give him lots of love and attention which he so well deserves. If you have a chain link fence and a small dog, please secure or reinforce the bottom so that it is impossible to dig under. For big dogs, make sure they cant dig under, climb over or jump over any type of fence. Walk the perimeter of your fencing occasionally to ascertain if there is any type of activity by your dog around the bottom of the fence or otherwise. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comTail Wagger... CPR training at the Health Department at 7 p.m. Open House for the Holidays at St. Marks Refuge County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. Free Thanksgiving dinner 4 to 7 p.m. at the Senior Center. ThursdaySaturdayMondayTuesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingThursday, November 17  WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will be held at 10 a.m. in the board of county commissioner’s conference room.  RECYCLING TASK FORCE will meet at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. The purpose of the meeting is to propose and pursue ways to increase recycling in Wakulla County.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for a public workshop on the Environmental Protection Agency’s cleanup grant at 6 p.m. in city hall. Monday, November 21  COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Gizmo

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 – Page 3B 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Office (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Office (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Office (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New auto rates as low as 2.75% for qualified applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and floor rate of 2.75%No payments for the first 90 days! 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Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com The Worksw a kull a scoworking c a f www.theworksc a fe.com “ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special!” Let us perk up your day! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHoot Gibson will headline the Sopchoppy Opry at its show on Saturday, Nov. 26, at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy Gym. Hoot Gibson at the Sopchoppy OpryCrawfordville publisher wins ve book awardsSpecial to The NewsKitsune Books of Crawfordville, which published Cookie & Me,Ž won a whopping “ ve awards for its authors in the 2011 Florida Publishers Association (FPA) Presidents Book Awards competition. Tallahassee author Mary Jane Ryals won the Gold Medal for Adult Florida Fiction in the 2011 Florida Publishers Association (FPA) Presidents Book Awards. Ryals winning novel is Cookie & MeŽ (Kitsune Books, 2010, ISBN: 978-0-9819495-6-7), a bittersweet telling of the summer of 1963 when racial tensions bubble over and a young girl experiences friendship and love in one heady Florida July. With an ear for regional voices as pitch perfect as a tuning fork, Ryals brings to life her beloved South during the tumultuous days of the early civil rights movement. Set in Tallahassee, Cookie & MeŽ tells the story of Rayann, who is white and somewhat privileged, and Cookie, who is black and living a marginalized life that Rayann never realized existed until that one life-changing summer. Cookie & MeŽ previously won a Bronze Medal from the 2010 Florida Book Awards, and is a 2012 selection of FSUs OLLI Book Club. The cover was painted by Carol Lynne Knight, co-editor of Anhinga Press. In addition to Ryals Gold Medal win, Silver Medals were awarded to the following books published by Kitsune Books: € Big Boys Dont Spy,Ž K.E.M. Johnstons clever James Bond spoof, is aimed at 8 to 12 year old readers. Tallahassee award-winning childrens author Susan Womble says, Masterful inventions and a melding of cultures add ingenuity and ” avor to author Johnstons tale of how family can be counted on above everything else. Hold on tight for a fast-paced ride inside the mind of the 12-year-old James Bond clone!Ž The commissioned cover was painted by local artist, John Roberge. (ISBN: 978-0-9819495-9-8) € Here I Am a Writer,Ž Christopher McIlroys moving memoir, contains poems and stories produced by McIlroys Native American students involved in the school ArtsReach program in Arizona. A decade or more later, McIlroy went in search of the young writers whod opened their hearts in his classes, to see how theyd fared in the intervening years and if they were still writing at all. What he chronicles is as much his journey of discovery as theirs. (ISBN: 978-0-9827409-1-0) Its unusual for a publisher to have two wins in a single category, but thats what happened in the Poetry Category. € She Returns to the Floating World,Ž poetry collection from Pacific Northwest poet Jeannine Hall Gailey, is a book about transformation that examines two recurring motifs in Japanese folk tales and popular culture: the woman who disappearsŽ and the older sister/savior.Ž Many of the poems are persona poems spoken by characters from anime and manga, mythology and fairy tales, like the story of the kitsune, or fox-woman, a thread that weaves throughout the book. (ISBN: 978-0-98274092-7) € Moon” ower,Ž poetry collection by South Florida poet and teacher Gianna Russo, documents the transition from a painful past to a hopeful future through excellent pacing and control of tone. Russo is a master of the unexpected yet perfect turnaround, always taking readers a step beyond where they expect to go. Kitsune Books was founded by Anne Petty in 2006 to make available to the reading public an eclectic variety of artistic, well-written books that are slightly off the beaten path. We appreciate a quirky sense of humor, the ability to transport readers seamlessly into the story or poem and wordsmithery thats music to the ears. We welcome both new and previously published authors. Kitsune Books was featured in the February 2011 issue of Writers Digest. Submissions Guidelines: www.kitsunebooks. com/submissions.html.Special to The NewsThe group Sabal will perform at Posh Organics in Sopchoppy on Saturday, Nov. 19, beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets for the show are $10. The music of Sabal is a combined effort of three talented points of view. These three musicians, singers and songwriters blend their unique styles into a harmonious ensemble of swampy Americana music. Sabal like the tree it takes its name from represents the people and places of Florida. With her powerful soulful voice, Carly Bak brings light to her original songs telling stories of her life and experiences. Delivering songs of his north central Florida heritage, craig daniel hardin adds a contemporary yet rooted sound and conscience with his singing and songwriting. As the anchoring musical force of the trio Fred Figueroa showcases his talent through the harmonica and guitar. His soulful songs and his bluesy sounds round out the sounds of Sabal. Posh is located at 64 Winthrop Ave. in Sopchoppy. For reservations, call (850) 962-1010. Sabal will perform at Posh Organics on Nov. 19SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFred Figueroa, Carly Bak and craig daniel hardin perform as Sabal at Posh Organics on Saturday, Nov. 19.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCovers of the “ ve award-winning books published by Crawfordvilles own Kitsune Books.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com TheWorks coffee•espresso•latts cappuccino•frapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8a m-9pm Sunday1 2-5pm 27FAzaleaDr•BehindBealls•850.253.7253•www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a rt u p B u s i n e s s o f t h eY e a r 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat FRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTORCOLD SPECIALTY SANWHICHES • SALADSSEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday • 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment onlyBy KEITH BLACKMARSpecial to The NewsReports about the weakened economy are rampant on the television news, on radio and in the newspapers, but for the crew of the Wakulla County United Way Committee, 2011 has become a time of opportunity. A group of six individuals who work or live in Wakulla County or both, joined two members of the United Way Leadership Team earlier this year to raise money for many agencies who rely on charitable contributions for their survival. United Way Vice President of Resource Development Heather Mitchell and Campaign Associate Marc Dickieson have been working with the Wakulla committee which includes: UW Chairman and Wakulla County Commissioner Alan Brock, Trish Andrews of CSG, Keith Blackmar of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, Betsy Ennis-Short of St. Marks Powder, Courtney Peacock of Capital City Bank and Nannette Watts of ESG. The committee recently awarded $118,336.83 to 24 agencies that serve Wakulla County and a total of 29,257 individuals who call Wakulla County home. The agencies represented a wide range of interests including programs that help residents through the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, YMCA, Special Olympics, Refuge House, Big Bend Hospice and more. ST. MARKS POWDER IS INVOLVED IN THE DRIVE St. Marks Powder has always been a corporate partner of the United Way. The company matches 25 percent of all designated United Way funds raised by the employees and the present campaign has just about reached the goal of $65,000. The majority of the money raised by the company and employees goes to United Way to help residents of Wakulla County. It is my responsibility in difficult times to help others „ whether it is with time or money,Ž said longtime St. Marks Powder employee John Nichols. We need to do what we can afford to do to help. We are a pretty sorry lot if we cant help each other.Ž With an employee workforce of approximately 380, St. Marks Powder is hoping to have at least 50 percent of their employees participate in their Charities Drive which includes a Bingo game, online auction, special drawings, bake sale, dessert contest, candy jar guessing game, golf tournament, and a company sponsored lunch for all the contributors. St. Marks Powder Campaign Chairperson Betsy Ennis-Short is proud of the efforts of her fellow employees. Every year our employees step up and meet and exceed the charitable fundraising goals we place before them,Ž she said. VOLUNTEER NANNETTE WATTS Volunteer Nannette Watts didnt know much about the United Way campaign until her supervisor at ESG, Cleve Fleming, volunteered his public works operation to assist the campaign. It has been an eye opener for Watts ever since. Cleve is always willing to help,Ž said Watts of her boss. At first I thought, what did he get us into now? Seeing it for the “ rst time, I saw how many people it helped. When we “ nished with the allocation meetings, I thought I probably wouldnt volunteer again next year, but the allocations process and learning about what the agencies do, it was just awesome.Ž The experience of the allocations committee completely turned my mind aroundŽ on the agencies and how they serve the public, but also gave her knowledge that she has shared with residents who come into her of“ ce. ESG has held Friday luncheons during the campaign where members of the staff and visitors can purchase a lunch and the proceeds go toward United Way. Im encouraged by it,Ž said Watts. DONT KNOW WHAT WED DO WITHOUT UNITED WAY Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center Director R.H. Carter knows the impact United Way funding has in keeping senior citizen programs alive. This year his agency was cut slightly but still received $83,555.29 during the allocations process. I dont know what we would do without them,Ž said Carter of the United Way. It has been very helpful to us. I appreciate the United Way.Ž United Way dollars help the center fund three areas: supervision for seniors who are visiting the center with extreme memory impairments while their caregivers run errands; a larger chunk of the money is spent on the popular congregate meals that are served in the facility; and funding also goes toward some in-home services. We average 60 seniors a day eating lunch and our grant funding provides money to feed about 20 of them,Ž says Carter. The rest comes from United Way.Ž The center relies on United Way, county contributions, a few grants and several large fundraisers to make the operation successful.United Way is the midst of its annual fundraising drive KEITH BLACKMARNannette Watts didnt know much about United Way until her supervisor at ESG, Cleve Fleming, volunteered his public works operation to assist the campaign.We average 60 seniors a day eating lunch (at the senior center) and our grant funding provides money to feed about 20 of them, says Senior Center Director R.H. Carter. The rest comes from United Way. Optimists install new o cersSpecial to The NewsThe Panacea Coastal Optimists Club held the installation for its new officers on Oct. 27 at Poseys Up the Creek in Panacea. The 2011-12 officers include President Larry Massa, Vice-President Sally Gandy, Secretary Debra Range and Treasurer Susan Payne Turner. Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond administered the oath at the installation ceremony. The 2011-12 Directors for the Optimists are Noah Posey, Walt Dickson and Bill Versiga. The club meets on Thursdays at noon at Poseys Up the Creek in Panacea.TAMMIE BARFIELDClerk of Courts Brent Thurmond administers the oath to Optimists new of“ cers: Larry Massa is president, Debra Range is secretary and Susan Payne Turner is treasurer.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 – Page 5B The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary..........36 classrooms/newspapers.........$576/yr Medart Elementary...................33 classrooms/newspapers.........$528/yr Riversink Elementary................20 classrooms/newspapers.........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary..............40 classrooms/newspapers.........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School........10 classrooms/newspapers.........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name_________________________________ Address_______________________________ City_______________________State____Zip_________ Phone______________Email_______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink)By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 11 … Could it all stem from this? Backers of a little school in Lakeland hope the states future … one that includes lots of jobs in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, could have reached an important milestone this week. Maybe not Priestley and oxygen or Einstein and relativity-big, but important nonetheless toward setting the state on a high-tech path to the future. Some people hope that a vote taken this week at a state university system board of governors meeting in Boca Raton laid the groundwork for Florida to have a major university focused mainly on science … one that would eventually be in the league of the big schools that have Tech on the end of their names … the Virginia Techs, Georgia Techs, Cal Techs and MITs of the world. Others argue that Florida has some pretty big scientific superstars in its university arsenal already … USF, FSU and UF in particular would argue theres an awful lot of cutting-edge research there. And they also argue that cutting away a new university from USF doesnt guarantee success, anyway. The University of South Florida Polytechnic may have been born this week with the vote to allow officials to push forward with developing what is now a branch campus of USF in Tampa into a break-away, stand-alone university along the growing I-4 corridor in Central Florida. It has to be said may have beenŽ because the decision wasnt fully final … there were several conditions put on the effort, and the idea will have to go back before the board for further approval. The vote by the BOG on Wednesday night, after a day of tense discussion, came after a relatively short push for the school to break away from the USF system, which backers had argued was holding USF-Poly back. It also probably pointed out the influence of one of its biggest backers, hometown Sen. JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, who also holds legislative purse strings as chairman of the Senate Budget Committee. Many faculty and students at the Lakeland branch campus were opposed to the move … and USF was against it as well. But it seems lately science and technology are the answer to every question posed about the future in Florida … and going against the march of progress wasnt likely to win the day. Right after the vote the board took a step to make sure nobody else tries to do this. The board voted to put a moratorium on other branch campuses splitting off in the next five years, or until after USF Polytechnic is fully independent. Meanwhile on Thursday, state university system officials were putting forward their own ideas for how to tie funding to the performance of the various state universities. The writing is on the wall … the governor and the Republican Legislature want more than science degrees … they want accountability from the university system if the state is going to pay for it. Much like the GOP has pushed K-12 schools to be more accountable for what they produce, the ball toward measuring the outcomes is rolling up the hill to the ivory towers of collegiate academia and doesnt appear likely to stop. But university presidents this week also were asking for greater flexibility if theyre going to be held to a higher standard. Setting tuition based on market rates and other measures of flexibility are likely to be debated over the next year or so alongside accountability issues. POLITICS While it was a mostly quiet political week in Florida, much of the political news around the nation this week focused on Election Day on Tuesday. There were a handful of municipal races on the ballot here, but in other states voters surprised many observers by rejecting a Mississippi constitutional amendment proposal that would have made life begin at conception. The same personhoodŽ idea is being pushed in Florida, but it was evident this week that it is nearly certain to be unable to get the signatures in time to get the measure before voters in 2012. Lawmakers moved up the date for turning in signatures … and the personhood backers appear highly unlikely to make the earlier deadline. Supporters say theyll aim for 2014. In other elections around the country, Ohio voters sent a message to that states Gov. John Kasich that efforts to curtail the collective bargaining power of union members arent as popular as the governor thought. The voters repealed a law that limited union members rights. Floridas Gov. Rick Scott was confusing, at best, earlier this year on just whether he thought Florida also should try to end collective bargaining rights … first he said he thought it was fine, then he said we ought to get rid ofŽ collective bargaining, but said he couldnt see getting rid of it because it would require a constitutional amendment. The Foundation for Floridas Future, which has battled the states teachers union over things like merit pay and school vouchers, told Sunshine State News earlier this year that it will try to take on union bargaining rights next year in the Legislature. Florida and Ohio are so different in terms of the relative role unions play in work life that its impossible to say whether the Ohio experience says anything about what might happen here. Still one interesting issue that the attention to the Ohio vote raised for Florida government watchers: for Florida state workers worried about their take-home pay, it could be worse. The Ohio law that was repealed by voters required state government workers in the Buckeye state to put 10 percent of their salary toward their pension, and pay 15 percent of their health care costs. One of the most controversial measures passed by lawmakers in Tallahassee this past year required state workers to put 3 percent of their pay toward their pension. Thats in effect, but being challenged in court. GREER SAGA It wasnt that there wasnt political drama available in Florida this week, it just didnt happen in the voting booth. Former Republican Party Chairman Jim Greer was back in the news, as the GOP tried and failed to get his lawsuit against the party thrown out. And Greers lawyer released a long list of politicos he wants to depose … as in take a deposition, not throw out of office … a list that could lead to some embarrassing testimony about the partys inner workings. Greer has made it clear he wont take his ouster from the party quietly. The list of possible depositions only reinforced that. It includes five current lawmakers and two former U.S. senators and a former presidential nominee. The list includes former Gov. Charlie Crist, who picked Greer to chair the party, and Crists wife Carol. It also includes former U.S. Sens. Mel Martinez and George LeMieux … who is running to try to go back to the Senate. Also up for possible depositions in the lawsuit over a severance package that Greer said he was denied: House Speaker Dean Cannon, Senate President Mike Haridopolos, projected future speakers Will Weatherford and Chris Dorworth, and Sen. John Thrasher, who doubled as chairman after Greers departure. The list even includes former GOP presidential candidate John McCain. FRANCISCO FRANCO IS STILL DEAD; GOV. SCOTT IS STILL UNPOPULAR A Quinnipiac University poll released this week had good news for Gov. Rick Scott … his approval rating isnt going down. The bad news was it isnt really going up much either. Scotts approval rating came in at 36 percent in the Thursday poll, right around where it has been for a few months. AND A POLITICAL MOVE TO MARK Panama City Attorney Alvin Peters jumped into the race for Congress in the Panhandles 2nd Congressional District. The Democrat said hell run against freshman Republican Rep. Steve Southerland and Independent Party candidate Nancy Argenziano. STORY OF THE WEEK : The Board of Governors of the state university system allows the University of South FloridaPolytechnic to move forward with a plan to break away from the USF system to become an independent polytechnic university. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: This document is a piece of crap.Ž Board of Governors member John W. Temple, summoning all the eloquence he could muster when asked what he thought about the plan put forward by the University of South Florida-Polytechnic to be an independent university.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Polly want a technic? Move on toward new university

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: List 10 words that rhyme with “snood.” 1. _____________ 2. _____________ 3. _____________ 4. _____________ 5. _____________ 6. _____________ 7. _____________ 8. _____________ 9. _____________ 10. ____________What Rhymes with…Some answers: brood, crude, dude, feud, food, glued, mood, rude, screwed, viewed Jokes and Riddles Q: What do turkeys like to eat on Thanksgiving?A: Nothing, they’re already stuffed.Q: Why did the turkey join the band?A: He had the drumsticks for it. COLORING PICTURE COLORING PICTURE 1) Turkeys have unusual beak features called a wattle and a snood. Fact or Fiction? 2) Domestic turkeys are usually lighter than wild turkeys. Fact or Fiction? 3) Female turkeys are usually smaller than male turkeys. Fact or Fiction? 4) Female turkeys are called hens. Fact or Fiction? 5) Male turkeys are called toms or gobblers. Fact or Fiction? 6) Baby turkeys are called poults. Fact or Fiction? 7) A group of turkeys is called a gaggle. Fact or Fiction? 8) Turkeys cannot fly. Fact or Fiction? 9) When mating, wild turkeys puff out their feathers and gobble. Fact or Fiction? 10) Benjamin Franklin wanted to make the turkey the national bird of the United States instead of the bald eagle. Fact or Fiction? e Many Americans like to eat turkey on Thanksgiving Day. Here are some questions about turkey. How many can you answer correctly?Answers: 1) Fact, 2) Fiction, domestic turkeys are usually heavier than wild turkeys, 3) Fact, 4) Fact, 5) Fact, 6) Fact, 7) Fiction, a group of turkeys is usually called a rafter, 8) Fiction, some types of turkeys can fly, 9) Fact, 10) Fact g Fact or Fiction?Turkey Challenge Each year as Thanksgiving approaches, the president of the United States receives two turkeys from the National Turkey Federation and the Poultry and Egg National Board. Rather than eat them, the president pardons the turkeys in a small ceremony at the White House. When the tradition started is not clear. Some say that President Abraham Lincoln started it when he pardoned his son Tad’s pet turkey. Others say President Harry Truman started the tradition in 1947, although there is no official proof of that. President John F. Kennedy was given a turkey in 1963, but chose not to eat it. In 1989, President George H.W. Bush pardoned the turkey for the first time officially. Since then, every president has pardoned an official turkey and an alternate every year. The turkeys are sent to a farm or ranch to live out the rest of their days. Pardon, Mr. Turkey Name That Turkey Since 1989, American presidents have pardoned a couple of turkeys on the eve of Thanksgiving and allowed them to live out their days in peace. Each of the following is one such turkey. Fill in the blanks to name that turkey.Answers: 1) Katie, 2) Marshmallow, 3) Flyer, 4) Apple, 5) Pumpkin, 6) Courage, 7) Biscuits 1. K A __ I __2. M A R __ __ M A __ __ O W3. F L __ E R4. A __ __ L E5. P __ M P __ I N6. C __ U R A __ E7. B __ S C U __ T S

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They have all the modern equipment to rid you of all those falling leaves.(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUY€SELL€TRADE€REPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @ comcast.net Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net Free Offers Free Dog male, Carin terrier,14 mos old, black/gray, all shots, neutered,needs yard,potty trained 850-212-3252 Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts and boiled green peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Trades/ Skills Certified Prescribed BurnerPrescribed burner needed. Full-time or part-time employment. Must have burn experience, including 130-190 certifications, heavy equipment operation, and clean driving record. Salary negotiable. Contact Bobbie Dugger with B&B Dugger, Inc. 850-566-0831 Garage/ Yard Sales Crawfordville Sat Nov 19 8:30AM-2PM Household items, clothes ect. 672 Shadeville Road IN HOME MOVING YARD SALEThurs 17th & Mon 21st, Noon to 9pm Dinette set, Refrig. treadmill, Christmas Items, hummel etc (850) 926-5824 Mobile Homes For Rent 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath SWMH, quiet street $400/month, $400 deposit.References required! 904-583-1177 2bed/2bath MH North of Crawfordville Wakulla County water & garbage provided, 1st, last and security reqd. $550 mo 850-960-4230 Mobile Homes For Rent 3BR/2BA DWMHWakulla Gardens, CHA,good floor plan,$650/month+deposit, application, references, 1 year lease Available now! Call for for appointments 850-508-8783, 727-642-6043 3BR/2BA SWMHon five acres. $500/mo.$500/sec. One mile South of Wakulla Station. Avilable now! 850-745-8526 Crawfordville 3/2 DW on 1.5 acres move in condition $650 mo. rent to own 850-926-9540 Crawfordville 3/2 on 1/2 acre $700 month plus deposit 850-766-0170 M/H for rent, 3BR/1BA.$450/mo. includes water, garbage, lawn-care. Quiet neighborhood. No pets. Call 850-926-3280 Real Estate For Rent 12x60 3 BR/1BAolder home. Central A/C,gas, heat, range.Garbage/ water included.Talquin/ Wakulla Gas. No pets $450/mo. + $350/deposit #20 Cutchin Ct (off East-Ivan Rd.) 850-926-1428 leave message 2BR/2BA home on the Ochlockonee River, separate family room, 1 car carport, quiet area. References required.No pets. $825/mo.+1st/Dep/Last Carol Odell, Broker Associate Century 21 Silver Coast Realty 850-984-5007 3BR/2BA DWMHLarge deck, shed, remodeled kitchen, Great condition! NO Pets, (firm) $650/month $600/sec 850-926-6212 WAKULLA GARDENS3BR./1.5BA HOME $525/month, plus deposit Call 850-766-0170 Apartments Swimming pool and gym Move in special $99 Deposit $300 Local Hero Discount $99 Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo 2BR as LOW as $700/mo 3BDR as LOW as $800/mo. Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent 2BR/1BA Duplex near downtown Crawfordville. $600/ mo, $500/security Call 566-7391 Crawfordville, clean, large 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths duplex, $675 per month. Call Linda 850-926-0283 Rental Houses 3BR/2BA in Mysterious Waters $695/rent, same deposit, no pets. Call Jim at 566-5165 Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposit. 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished Medart studio house on four lots, $500/per month, plus deposit. Revel Realty 850-962-2212 New home in Crawfordville! 3BR/2BA, located in Wakulla Gardens $79,000 Revell Realty 850-962-2212 Storage/ Warehouses Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease, 8x10 and 10x12 now available. Come by or call Wakulla Realty, 926-5084 Real Estate For Sale 3BR/2BA one-story home on 1.5 lot with garage. Excellent condition. $95,000. Owner financing. 850-251-7588, 850-962-2016. SOPCHOPPYHOME, 3/BR/1BA, located on 1/2 acre lot. $75,000. Revell Realty 850-962-2212 Commercial Real Estate Affordable Office Space at the Barry Building. Great atmosphere! Includes all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen use, conference room. Rates start at $250/mo. 850-210-5849 or our website at www.BarryBuilding.com Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300  Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-656-6340 Restaurant Space Available Soon!! Fully equipped. Can assume full liquor license and equipment if you act quickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE € Fitness Studio -1000/sf, wall to wall mat & mirrors € Retail 1250/sf storefront w/back storage € Divided office space 1074/sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Waterfront Homes 2BR/1BA, $850/month Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-545-8755 850-926-1385 Lots For Sale 2acre lot for sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR Sales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in CrawfordvilleDoug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. Nos ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926-5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Pressure Cleaning A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed-John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETEBLOCKS, BRICKS, PAVERSLANDSCAPEPLANTS, SOD, TRACTOR WORK Call JOSEPH FRANCIS 850-556-1178 OR 850-556-3761 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5010-1117 10/26 sale Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83 part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, November 26,2011, at 10:00 a.m at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: TIFFANY HARVEY PENNY MCKINNEY Before the sale date of Saturday November 26, 2011, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. November 10 & 17, 2011 Self Storage Notices Heating/AC Services THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT:Re-Organizational Meeting and Regular School Board Meeting DATE:Tuesday, November 22, 2011 TIME::5:45 P.M. Re-Organizational Meeting Regular Meeting will be held immediately after the re-org meeting PLACE : School Board Room 69 Arran Road,Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE::Re-Organizational & Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5013-1117 Vs. Lanham, John L. 65-2009-CA-000304, Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000304 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. LANHAM, JOHN L., et al, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000304 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is Plaintiff, and, LANHAM, JOHN L., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse at 11AM on the 1st day of December, 2011, the following described property: LOT 32, BLOCK 6 OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $725mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 4Br 2Ba DWMH $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $800mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž(850) 926…5084 Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1100 per month. DEADLINE FOR THE NOV. 23rd ISSUE IS FRIDAY, NOV. 18th at 11 AM. CALL IN YOUR CLASSIFIED AT 877-676-1403 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5008-1117 TWN Taft, Bruce Edwin 11-63-PR Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 11-63-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF BRUCE EDWIN TAFT, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRUCE EDWIN TAFT, deceased, Case Number 11-63-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF 5009-1117 TWN Rybak, Les 11-62-PRIN Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 11-62-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF LES RYBAK DECEASED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Les Rybak, deceased, File#11-62-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative adn the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and the other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claim with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Notwithstanding the time periods set forth above, any claim filed two (2) years or more after the decedents date of death is barred. The date of the first publication of this notice is November 10, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representatives: Robert P. Diffenderfer, Esq. Florida Bar Number: 434906 Lewis, Longman & Walker 515 North Flagler Drive, Suite 1500 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 640-0820 E-mail: rdiffender@llw-law.com Personal Representatives: Jan Rybek-Matalon 1466 Lee Avenue Tallahassee, FL 32303 Brian Rybek 9481 NW 26th Place Sunrise, FL 33322 November 10 & 17, 2011 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5000-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 033 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CLYDE K CARTER SR OR DELORISS FORT WROS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1628 Year of Issuance2003 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-068-000-10108-006 P-1-1-M-23 1.23 AC ML IN SW CORNER OF SW 1/4 OF HS 68 Name in which assessed PHILLIP HARVEY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5001-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 032 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CLYDE K CARTER SR OR DELORISS FORT WROS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 412 Year of Issuance2003 Description of Property: Parcel # 25-5S-02W-046-03538-000 AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK U LOT 17 OR 46 P 56 Name in which assessed META H WILLIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5002-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 034 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1197 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 35-3S-01E-263-05538-161 VILLAGES OF ST MARKS LOT BB COMMERCIAL LOT OR 293 P 623 OR 594 P 255 Name in which assessed LACY A. & MARY T. MURRAY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5003-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 030 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CLYDE K CARTER SR OR DELORISS FORT WROS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1490 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10770-00 MAGNOLIA GARDENS LOT 47 BLK A OR 10 P 612 OR 204 P 367 Name in which assessed JOSHUA C ADAMS & ANGELA MAONE said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5004-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 031 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CLYDE K CARTER SR OR DELORISS FORT WROS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 928 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-035-008-07103-000 WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT I BLOCK 12 LOT 21 OR 1 P 846 Name in which assessed WALTER STEVEN & LILLIAN ODELL said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. 5005-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 035 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 930 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 15-3S-01W-000-04397-000 15-3S-1W P-16 M-64 IN FRACTIONAL SW 1/4 OR 4 P 394 OR 36 P 732 Name in which assessed VENETTA J WALKER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5006-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 036 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 993 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 07-6S-01W-301-04626-A01 BULAHS COVE SUBDV LOT 1 OR 491 P 13 OR 659 P 497 Name in which assessed JOHNNY PETRANDIS II said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5007-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 037 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that R.E. MEADOWS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 846 Year of Issuance2004 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-005-000-06249-001 P-18-1-M-3 1.31 AC M/L ON THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF HS 3 BEING ON WEST SIDE OF TRIPLETT RD OR 319 P 427 OR 441 P 327 Name in which assessed LINDA BAKER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5012-1124 Vs. Galloway, Charles 10-000346-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-000346-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES GALLOWAY and BRENDA GALLOWAY, husband and wife, defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgement of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida described as:: Lot 3 of HERON POINT, a subdivision as per map of plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 34 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 1st day of November, 2011. (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court /s/By: Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 November 17 & 24,2011 (SEAL) BY /s/ DESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 850-926-0905, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 10 & 17, 2011 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE TO THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is November 10,2011. Personal Representative /s/Keith Henry Taft 31 Thames Street, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for the Personal Representative /s/MARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.949884 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, FL 32326 November 10 & 17, 2011 Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 DEADLINE FOR THE NOV. 23rd ISSUE IS FRIDAY, NOV. 18th at 11 AM. CALL IN YOUR CLASSIFIED AT 877-676-1403 RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets36 Stephen Donaldson Road 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 1 Acre $700 No Smoking or pets RENT TO OWN!!60 Hummingbird Lane 4 BR/2BA, 1.964 sf house with 2 car garage, replace and POOL. $1300 Mo. No Smoking, pets negotiable 59 Chickat 3BR/2BA House $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 55 Janet Drive 3BR/2BA MH, Paradise Village, canal front, dock, community pool, Lawn Maint. Incl. $800 Mo. No Smoking/Pets 11 Quiet Cove, Panacea 2BR/2BA $850 mo. No Smoking/Pets negotiableAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 – Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 40 42 49 56 61 64 2 36 57 3 37 58 21 33 53 4 15 18 34 50 5 29 43 6 30 44 7 31 41 54 59 62 65 22 24 38 55 8 16 19 39 51 9 35 52 10 32 45 11 25 46 60 63 66 12 26 47 13 27 48ACROSS1.Donaldsonor Spade 4. "The__ knees" (great) 8.Half the "Who's on First?" team 14.Indian, Brave or Chief 15.Green feeling? 16.Signals from a downed ier, perhaps 17.Conquistador's treasure 18.Former Fed head Greenspan 19.Building,after demolition 20.They'rechecked 23.Turnsinside out 24.Relative of -esque 25.Slacker'sbane 28.Fiddleroflegend 29.Oerlessons 32.Pouting expression 33.Chat room patrons 35.First Lady after Hillary 36.They'rechecked 40.__-washy 41.Makes tolerable 42.Toboot 43.Belarus's capital 45.Ump's call 49.Day-__ colors 50.Give the boot to 51.Likemostruns,in baseball 53.They'rechecked 56.Play merrily 59.Not even fair 60.Actor Billy __ Williams 61.Birdonabaseball cap 62.Partner of tried 63.Cyberspace initials 64.Sweet drink 65.Srs.' exams 66.Sr.,et al.DOWN1.Wordwith wellor soft2.Make it big 3.Sentimental sort 4.Beauty's beloved 5.Any military recruit, these days 6.Indiana's Bayh 7.In __ (harmonious) 8.From square one 9.Show embarrassment 10.Streisand,in fanzines 11.Heavenly body 12.__Aviv 13."TheWasteLand" initials 21.Mustachioed Marx 22.Tosspot's utterance 25.Soup du __ 26.Sharer's word 27.Arthur or Benaderet 30.Suxwith mock or crock 31.Colorado ski spot 32.Baton wielder 34.Shade of blue 35.Strongalkali 36.Bunker or Nob 37.__buco 38.__ Palmas, Canary Islands 39.Invited to dinner, perhaps 40.Tongueor tail action 43.Spaceoccupier 44.Helpful connections 46.How Rome wasn't built? 47.Shower item? 48.Ford ops 50.Rhea's"Cheers" role 52.Farm measures 53.Catcall 54.Many NYC dwellings 55.One ofAsta's masters 56.Onein theclink 57.Live and breathe 58.Old __ (London theater) American Prole Hometown Content 10/23/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 234 5 6 16 7648 5 87 62 491 4 359 41 398651 200 9 HtCtt 189 7234 5 6 534186297 726549138 953 218674 861374925 247965813 412 837569 675491382 398652741 S P O K E N W A G C O N A R R I V E H I L L A R E M O O N E R O S S O V I C G R O U C H O H O O T B E A S T S K Y C A R L A E N L I S T E E M A T T E R E V A N E R Y I N S S Y N C A S P E N A P T S H I C L A S N O R A A F R E S H A S K E D O U T B L U S H L Y E A C R E S B A B S M A E S T R O O R B J O U R I N A D A Y T E L O U R S M E T E O R T S E B E A E D S E L S Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-000143-CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. ALL UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE ROUGHTON FAMILY LIVING TRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 14, 2001, ET AL Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): ALL UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE ROUGHTON FA;MILY LIVING TRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 14, 2001 (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) ALL UNKNOWN SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE(S) OF THE ROUGHTON FAMILY LIVING TRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 14, 2001 (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) ___, AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CLEO ROUGHTON, DECEASED, IF ANY (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 22, ELLEN WOOD SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THEMAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 10 AND 11, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. 1994/FLEETCRAFT DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME VIN # GAFLR35A08300HH/TITLE#68765121 VIN # GAFLR35B908300HH/TITLE368765122 Street Address: 48 CAROLINA COURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 has been led against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Moskowitz, Mandell, Salim & Simowitz, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 800 Corporate Drive, Suite 500, Fort Lauderdale, FLORIDA 33334, 30 days after the rst publication of this Notice in THE WAKULLA NEWS and le the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville HIghway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Phone No. (850) 926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 27th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000247 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF BEATRICE FARMER, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS AND OR BENEFICARIES OF THE ESTATE OF BEATRICE FARMER LAST ADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNWON YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property; A portion of lands as described in Deed Book 5, Page 678 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the West Half of Lot 77 of the Harts eld Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run South 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 209.22 feet; thence run South 72 degrees 12 minutes, 00 West 134.22 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831) for the Point of beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue South 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West 75.00 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831); thence run North 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds East 75.00 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831); thence run south 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 75.00 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 0.129 acres, more or less. Together with a 20 foot access easement described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the West Half of Lot 77 of the Harts eld Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run South 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 189.22 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue South 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 20.00 feet; thence run South 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West 134.22 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831); thence run North 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds West 20.00 feet; thence run North 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds East 134.22 feet to the Point of Beginning. has been led against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 thirty (30) days after the rst publication of this Notice in THE WAKULLA NEWS and le the original with the Clerk of this Court Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability shoe needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact The Wakulla County Courthouse at 850-926-0905 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving noti cation if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 20th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-207-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, N.A., by and through its subservicing agent, VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. BRYAN A. DEKLE and PEGGY SUE DEKLE, husband and wife; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, a Delaware limited liability company authorized to transact business in Florida, as successor in interest to Household Finance; FAMILY DOLLAR STORES OF FLORIDA, INC., a Florida corporation; UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) and/or UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRYAN ARMSTRONG DEKLE YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an aciton to foreclose that mortgage, originally in favor of Ford Consumer Finance Co., Inc. dated October 8, 1996 and recorded on November 1, 1996, in Of cial Records Book 286, Page 583; as assigned to Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc. by Assignment of Mortgage recorded on April 26, 2011, in Of cial Records Book 850, Page 822, as subsequently assigned in Of cial Records Book 854, Page 664, and nally assigned to the Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A., in Of cial Records Book 854, Page 665, all of the Public Records of Wakulla County, FLorida, encumbering the following real property located in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 24 Millers Way South Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 52 of the Harts eld Survey of Lands in Wakulla COunty, Florida and thence run North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 402.50 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 524.40 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road No. S-368, said point lying on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 1091.74 feet thru a central angle of 01 degrees 34 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 30.07 feet (chord of said arc being South 77 degrees 12 minutes 43 seconds West 30.04 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 291.97 feet to a point on a curve having a radius of 1382.74 feet thru a central angle of 31 degrees 08 minutes 57 seconds for an arc distance of 751.73 feet (the chord of said are being North 87 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds West 742.51 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 484.05 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 50 minutes 52 seconds East 728.96 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO a roadway casement over and across the Southerly and Easterly 30 feet thereof. ALSO SUBJECT TO a 50.00 foot cul-de-sac easement in the Southwest corner thereof. has been led against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to SONYA K. DAWS, Plaintiff attorney, whose address is Sonya Daws, P.A. 3116 Capital Circle NE, Suite 5, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within thirty (30) days, and le the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on November 1st, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011Selling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK CASE NO.: 2010 000047 CA 2720 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32304, Plaintiff, v. SOUTHERN HOMES PROPERTY & DEVELOPMENT, INC., a Florida Corporation, and JOSEPH A. CULLEY, A/K/A JOSEPH A. CULLEY, III, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff's Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 1, BLOCK B OF GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 77 & 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on December 8, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must le a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to le a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator's of ce not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 17, 23, 2011 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK CASE NO: 10-CA-046 2720 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32304, Plaintiff, v. SOUTHERN HOMES PROPERTY & DEVELOPMENT, INC., a Florida Corporation, and JOSEPH A. CULLEY, A/K/A JOSEPH A. CULLEY, III, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff's Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 7, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND LOT 47, BLOCK "8", WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on December 8, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must le a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to le a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator's of ce not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 17, 23, 2011

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PrismTM TV Pure Broadband … 10 MBPS a month for 6 months* CenturyLinkTM PrismTM. TV TV.NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE. Call 866.484.7057Americas fastest growing broadband company now brings you a better choice in television. Its not cable. Its not satellite. Its Prism. Its interactive TV that you control from the moment you click the remote. Its so advanced, it even updates automatically. Simply put, its the best way to watch all your favorite shows, teams … you name it. So turn off cable and satellite, and turn on TV worth switching for.*Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offer and stated rates are available to new, “rst-time CenturyLink’ Prism’ TV residential customers in select areas only. The $65.95 monthly rate applies to up to 10 Mbps Pure Broadband and Prism’ TV package for six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. 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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 46th Issue Thursday, November 17, 2011 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 2A Comment & Opinion ....Page 3A Church..........................Page 4A Community....................Page 5A School...........................Page 6A Sports ..........................Page 7A In The Huddle ..............Page 8A Outdoors .....................Page 9A Water Ways...............Page 10A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 11A Arts & Entertainment ...Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read DailySPORTS 7A Cross country girls, Linton qualify for state meet Wakullas Robby Coles, at Chipola, signs with FSUSpecial to The NewsMore than 260 people turned out for the sh fry in Panacea last week to benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters. The fish fry, held on Tuesday, Nov. 8, featured a Poseys shrimp dinner paired with the musical offerings of Brandon Stricklands new band, The Possums, all in the name of helping more Wakulla County youth achieve success in life. Presented by Waste Pro USA and supported by numerous generous sponsors and individual donors, the dinner event raised more than $6,000 to support Big Brothers Big Sisters expanding efforts. We are encouraged by the renewed and growing support of Wakulla County residents, said Stacy Harvey, Wakulla County program coordinator. With so many folks in attendance, it is clear Wakulla County residents want us here and care about helping youth facing adversity reach their full potential. The outpouring of support has been phenomenal, said agency CEO Louis Garcia. The BIG Catch Charity Fish Fry had almost twice the attendance it had last year. I am positive this has to do with the hard work of Commissioner Alan Brock, Stacy Harvey, Sherrie Posey Miller and the various news outlets for helping us to get the word out. It also has to do with momentum, explained Garcia. We are gaining traction in Wakulla County and we are making more new matches each month. This is just the beginning. While it is important for us to secure sustainable funding each year for continued service and growth, it is just as important for us to recruit more dedicated volunteers. Moving forward, we need to put together a Wakulla County advisory committee and to recruit and enroll many more volunteer mentors. Big Brothers Big Sisters is currently seeking safe adult mentors willing to spend time with a child two to four times monthly for a minimum of 12 months. Being a Big Brother or a Big Sister is both enjoyable and ful lling. Volunteers have the opportunity to help shape a childs future for the better by empowering them to achieve. Volunteering just a few hours a month can change the course of a childs life for the better, forever. By simply changing their perspective on what the world can offer, volunteers can literally change lives. Sometimes, it is as simple as playing basketball, making crafts, reading or shing. For information about how to become a mentor, contact Stacy Harvey at wakulla@bbbsbigbend.org or 850.366.3865 or visit www.bigbendmentoring. org/wakulla. Big Brothers Big Sisters raises $6,000 at sh fryBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen someone first meets Crawfordville resident Jerry Kinder, they learn quickly that he is quite the jokester with a vibrant sense of humor. What they dont know is that he learned from the best. In conversations with Kinder, the names Bob Hope, Dick Martin, Dan Rowan and Bob Newhart, roll off his tongue. He shares stories about these famous comedians from a different time he encountered over the years. Kinder says their humor ended up rubbing off on him. He met many celebrities, developing lasting friendships with some, through his job as a professional fundraising consultant for 22 years. He traveled all over the U.S. and conducted 75 major fundraising campaigns for churches, Easter Seals, hospitals, the YMCA, Boy Scouts, Goodwill and more. He organized golf tournaments, comedy shows and other events to raised money for these organizations. Although he wasnt a comedian back then, Kinder now performs standup comedy at charity events. He says he learned standup from the entertainers he hired as a fundraising consultant. I just watched them work, he says. As a consultant, he organized the entire fundraiser from the ground up. I organized the whole thing, Kinder says. From A to Z. He organized golf tournaments, shows and bene ts, which is how he met celebrities, by getting them to be the guest speaker at his event. This was done either through networking and contacts he had already made or the same route as everyone else, through an agent. They all have an agent, Kinder says. After that, the trick is knowing what you are doing, he says. One has to know their audience and demographics of the city where the event is held to have a successful fundraiser. Kinder says a lot of people end up paying too much for the rental of the facility and the entertainer, which in turn makes them charge more for tickets and the event bombs.Continued on Page 12AHes a funny fundraiser Fire burns Promise Land MinistriesJENNIFER JENSENJerry KinderJerry Kinders sense of humor aided him throughout his career as a fundraising consultant. He does standup comedy for charities and he doesnt just bear a faint resemblance to Bob Newhart, his delivery sounds like him too.He traveled the world as a fundraising consultant and met a lot of celebrities, hanging out with the likes of Bob Hope and Dan Rowan Staff ReportA structure re reported at 11:46 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 13, resulted in the loss of one building and damage to a second at Promise Land Ministries in Crawfordville. A utility building caught fire near living quarters which was beginning to catch fire as well when law enforcement of cials arrived. A resident of the facility attempted to put out the blaze with a re extinguisher but was unsuccessful. Wakulla County re ghters arrived on scene and gained control of the blaze. The utility building was a total loss. The living quarters sustained damage to one side of the structure, estimated at $6,000. Damage to the utility building was estimated at $30,000. The building was lled with miscellaneous donations and appliances. The cause of the re is still to be determined, but it was not suspicious in nature. One man was treated and cleared by EMS staff for smoke inhalation at the scene. He was transported to a Tallahassee hospital by a private vehicle. Promise Land is in need of: A house trailer. Several of the men are sleeping in the church until new living arrangements can be found. Extra large storage shed. This is perhaps the most important as they have no place to store donated items and they primarily support themselves by doing handy work and yard work. The building would be used to store their equipment. The building that held their clothes, bathroom supplies, washers and dryers and linens was also lost. They also need washers, dryers, bath towels, shaving cream, razors, deodorant, shampoo, soap, socks, water pump and a freezer. Please contact Joe Brown at (850) 284-1264 for more information or mail donations to Promise Land Ministries, 20 Church Road, Crawfordville FL 32327. COURTESY OF JERRY KINDERJerry Kinder, right, in the 1970s sharing a private plane with comedian Bob Hope.Sopchoppy woman dies in car wreck; passenger arrestedSpecial to The NewsA 25-year-old Sopchoppy woman died in a single vehicle accident in a desolate area of the Apalachicola National Forest on Tuesday, Nov. 8. Misty Dawn Allen died at the scene of the accident which was called in by a passing motorist at 5:15 p.m. She was eastbound on Forest Road 329 near the Monkey Creek area when her 1997 Chevrolet truck left the roadway as she drove around a curve. She overcorrected and the truck flipped on the driver side partially ejecting Allen, pinning her under the vehicle. She was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the accident. The next day, Nov. 9, deputies arrested Phillip Joshua Strickland, 26, charging him with failure to remain at the scene of an accident involving death. Strickland was arrested at his Crawfordville home. He allegedly admitted to investigators that he was at the crash and walked away from it to a friends home in the Sopchoppy area. Phillip Joshua Strickland SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRobbie Rowther, Alan Brock, Sherrie Posey Miller, Stacy Harvey and Louis Garcia at the sh fry. One-Acts onstage... See Arts, 1B

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netEvery 10 years, the Wakulla County Commission looks at revising the district boundaries after the census data is released to ensure each district is as equal as possible. Due to the increase in population in the last 10 years, the commission decided it was necessary to amend the districts of the county. From 2000 to 2010, the population saw a 34.6-percent increase, one of the highest in the state. The problem is that this increase was not evenly distributed, but mainly occurred in the Crawfordville area. The redistricting map that was proposed kept the highest percentage difference of all ve districts at 0.2 percent, according to County Planner Melissa Corbett. It also kept all current school board members and county commissioners in the same district, Corbett said. The proposed map split the communities of Medart and Panacea. Portions of each community would be a part of district 4, as well as district 5. Commissioner Lynn Artz said when drawing up the map, the planning department followed major highways to make it easier. However, Panacea and Medart are on both sides of Highway 98, which caused them to be split apart, she said. Artz said she would like to see the communities stay as part of one district. She suggested Panacea stay in its current district, which is district 4, and keep Medart in district 5. This way each community still has one commissioner to express their concerns to and there is no confusion, she said. Paige Killeen, with the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership, said she, along with the other members, would like to see Panacea as one district. We would be going between two commissioners, Killeen said. Commissioner Alan Brock did point out that commissioners are elected countywide. We represent every community, Brock said. He suggested that maybe in the future, the county do away with districts all together. He also suggested the county look at creating an alternate district boundary map where St. Marks is in district 1, which is currently located within the boundaries of district 4. District 1 would also encompass all property east of the Wakulla River and south of Coastal Highway. The other commissioners agreed to go along with Artzs proposal and voted to re-advertise and vote on the amended district boundaries at the next meeting. Also on the agenda was to schedule a public hearing to establish the Wakulla County Airport Committee. The committee would take over the operation of the airport, as well as look for grants to improve it. The committee will be made up of seven members: One selected by the commission, one selected by the Tourist Development Council, one selected by the Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership, one selected by the Wakulla Airport Advisory Group who holds at least a sports pilot certi cate, one selected by the Tar Pine Homeowners Association who also holds a sports pilot certi cate, and three selected by County Administrator David Edwards, approved by the commission. The commission will hold a public hearing and approve the committee at a later meeting. At the commission meeting, Artz brought up a grant from Global Green from the Environmental Protection Agency that would provide technical assistance in applying the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System to a target neighborhood where signi cant redevelopment or infrastructure improvements will be occurring. According to Artz, nine communities would be selected for a three-day intensive visit and consultation by a team from Global Green. At the conclusion of the visit, the team will present recommendations for both physical and policy changes that may include street width changes, integrated energy and water infrastructure, creating standards for in- ll and transit oriented development or zoning code revisions to allow for urban agriculture or mixed use development. This grant is funded 100 percent and does not require a match, she said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he wouldnt support it. Im drowning in green, Moore said. Green is not my best color. He added that he didnt want any more rules and regulations for businesses. Artz said rules and regulations werent mentioned. She agreed to write the application and then have the county staff review and submit it. The commission voted four to one, with Moore opposing, to apply for the grant. In other news, the county is losing another employee. Edwards announced that Special Projects Coordinator Jennifer Langston is moving on and has accepted another job. We wish her well, Edwards said. Commissioner Mike Stewart said he was sorry to hear she would be leaving and Artz thanked her for her hard work. Edwards said he would like to get permission to advertise for the position, but that it would be reshaped and turned into a hybrid position with an emphasis on grants and community development. The next county commission meeting is scheduled for Nov. 21 at 5 p.m. A workshop on the Tourist Development Council plan will take place prior to the meeting at 4 p.m. PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.comCOUNTY COMMISSIONWorkshop held to discuss what to do about Wakulla GardensBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netAt a workshop last week, county commissioners seemed to agree that they would support sending out some form of mail ballot to homeowners in Wakulla Gardens to ask residents if they would support paying additional fees for improvements to their neighborhood speci cally for stormwater and paved roads, and for sewer. Commissioner Alan Brock, who suggested the workshop held on Thursday, Nov. 10, and chaired it, anticipated that homeowners in Wakulla Gardens would be supportive of paved roads though he indicated he felt that was probably the least important of potential improvements. The most important, in terms of ranking from rst to last, were water for lots that arent on central water, stormwater treatment, sewer and then paving the roads. This is an expensive project, Brock said, noting the price tag of more than $30 million for improvements. If residents of the neighborhood dont support paying for improvements, they need to be aware that its probably not going to happen for a long time. The numbers provided by Brock for the workshop contemplated improvements to the neighborhood totaling more than $34 million. The bulk of it, almost $23 million, was for construction of water, sewer, stormwater and roads. The remaining $11 million was for general costs such as lot acquisition and surveying and engineering. The rst thing to fall out was providing additional water service. Since a majority of residents are on Talquin water, the commissions concern was that it wouldnt be fair to charge other residents of the neighborhood for something that bene ted only a few. Commissioner Lynn Artz indicated her concern that, if residents were to support stormwater and paved roads, there would be more construction and, without a sewer connection, more water pollution. Commissioner Randy Merritt expressed some concerns about some of the figures being used. For example, 800 lots for acquisition at $6,000 each for stormwater control, for a total of $4.8 million, seemed like more parcels than necessary, he said. Commissioner Jerry Moore suggested that, in any mailout to the citizens, that You have to put these things together that go together like stormwater and roads. Meaning the two improvements are linked: both should be developed concurrently. Public Works Director Cleve Fleming reported that a road sealant was being looked at that would suppress dust on unpaved roads and function as a less expensive alternative to paving costing about $2,300 a mile. There are 21 miles of unpaved roads in Wakulla Gardens. Some of those are underwater in heavy storms and impassable. The drawback to the tackless tack proposed for use on some roads is that the roadway must be dug up and remixed every year. Recently, public works applied a limerock aggregate to the roads in Wakulla Gardens with the intent that it could be used as road base when the roads were paved. With the weather unusally dry, down 23 inches in rain up to this point in the year, the roads have been dry and dusty. I know the dust is aggravating and I dont want to minimize the effect of it, Fleming said, but it has improved the roads. The main problem with Wakulla Gardens is that its overplatted the lots are small, typically about 50 feet by 150. And there are more than 3,700 of them and about 970, or about one-third, have homes on them. In a more urban environment with access to infrastructure, there wouldnt be as much of a problem. But Wakulla Gardens has no central sewer the small lots have septic tanks and a number of them have wells rather than a water provider. The roads are unpaved, and heavy rains like Tropical Storm Fay mean ooding. The subdivision was never meant to be built on. The neighborhood was designed with an eye to market the land to Northerners during the Worlds Fair to own land in Florida. During the recent real estate boom, with Tallahassee increasingly expensive for rst-time homebuyers, builders found a market for the inexpensive homes in Wakulla Gardens. As the buildout became accelerated, residents of the neighborhood complained about problems there. During his tenure as a county commissioner, Ed Brimner took upon himself the task of trying to improve the neighborhood and held numerous meetings about what should be done and how to pay for it. Plans were discussed for expanding the countys sewer system into the subdivision. A localized assessment for the neighborhood could produce money to pay for all kinds of improvements, Brimner told them, sidewalks and street lights. But residents expressed concern that they did not have the money to pay for sewer tap fees, nor the monthly cost of sewer service. Many were getting by paycheck to paycheck, and there was no extra money for running a sewer line to their house, or paying to ll in their septic tanks. Artz was also involved in the effort to merge lots in the neighborhood, as she recalled at the workshop, and was behind a letter sent out encouraging residents to combine lots or even to donate lots to the county. A localized assessment for the neighborhood would be paid on a per lot basis estimated at about $822 per year per lot. Bonded over 30 years, that would produce the funds needed for work. But County Attorney Heather Encinosa of the Nabors law rm, noted that the drawback is that a prepayment of the assessment would be around $12,000 which is more than the value of many of the lots in the neighborhood, and which means it will likely be dif cult to get nancing and sell bonds. Brock noted that the biggest cost was sewer fees and suggested that other improvements namely, stormwater and roads could be put before residents to see if they would be willing to pay for those. Merritt suggested sending out a postcard to each address and ask residents if they would pay an assessment for the improvements. But, Merritt added, if Wakulla Gardens residents dont want to pay for it, then Im done with it.With population shifts, redrawing the lines for 5 districts Alan BrockThe board appears to support contacting neighborhood residents to see what improvements they are willing to pay for Wakullas population increased 34.6 percent over the past 10 years, most of it in the Crawfordville area. e challenge is to draw new district boundaries City of Sopchoppy NOVEMBER 10, 17, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICECity of St. MarksP.O. Box 296 788 Port Leon Drive St. Marks FL 32355-0296 Phone: (850) 925-6224 Fax: (850) 925-5657 The City of St. Marks is currently applying for two (2) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Cleanup grants for $400,000 to assist with remediation efforts at the former St. Marks Re nery site. The City will hold a public workshop to enable citizens to review the Grant application, a draft of the Analysis for Brownelds Cleanup Alternatives (ABCA) and offer time for questions and comments. The meeting will be held at City Hall, 788 Port Leon Drive, City of St. Marks. Florida 32355 commencing at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 17, 2011 until no later than 6:45 p.m. Alternatively, inquiries and comments can be submitted electronically by addressing an e-mail to Roger Register with Cardno TBE, the Citys Brown elds Consultant at roger.register@cardno.com. Place St. Marks EPA Cleanup Grant in the subject line of the email. Paper copies of the application will be available at the public meeting or can be obtained in electronic format after November 14, 2011 by emailing a request to the above referenced e-mail address. NOVEMBER 17, 2011

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 Page 3Areaders speak outComment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sopchoppy woman dies in traffic accident UPDATE: Passenger arrested Fire at Promise Land Ministries Sheriffs Report for Nov. 10 Coast Guard Auxiliary for Nov. 17 Bank files suit to foreclose on Grays rental property From the Dock for Nov. 17 Anne Rozier Hutchins obituary thewakullanews.com Follow us onRemembering Papa RaymondDuring times of sadness and loss, I wish I viewed life through the eyes of a child. I wish I still had that innocence. But, when children become adults, we lose that innocence, and when tragedy strikes, we do not have a childlike perspective or think of the glass as half full. Instead, we think selfishly and think about how the tragic event affects us. I was reminded of this childlike innocence last week when my family lost its patriarch. My grandfather, who was affectionately known as Papa by his 16 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren, passed away on Nov. 5 at the age of 84, after being in and out of the hospital for the last year. While all the adults struggled with this loss and spoke of their sadness and some of their guilt for maybe not visiting him enough, my 8-year-old brother became frustrated listening to their comments. He couldnt understand why everyone was so sad. He told my mother and father that this was not a sad time. This is a happy time, he said. Papa is in heaven with God, Jesus, his parents and grandmas parents. He continued that this was a time of celebration. My mother shared this story with me right after Papa passed away and I couldnt help but crack a smile. He was right. Papa was no longer in pain and we all know is in a better place. A place we all hope to go to one day and join him. While all of us were mourning, we should have instead been celebrating his life. Those who were able to make it to the nursing home the day Papa died were given the opportunity to go to his bedside and say goodbye to him. After Papa took his last breath, my parents asked my brother if he would like to see Papa. They said it was his choice. He said he would. My mother made sure to tell my brother that Papa was no longer alive and was already gone. My brother said, I know. But he can still hear me. So, my little brother walked into the room, gave Papa a wave and said, Goodbye, Papa. And that was it. For him, that was all that needed to be said. A couple days later, several family members, along with my parents, little brother and grandma, gathered around a bon re. Following the lead of my brother Joshua, they shared funny memories of Papa. His children told stories of their childhood, getting in trouble and having to answer to Papa, who could be very stern. They also sang songs in tribute of him and remembered the man we all so dearly loved. After one song, my brother said, I bet Papa is up there just dancing. Cause he couldnt when he was here. Again, I bet he was right. During his last few months, Papa was in a nursing home and was restricted to a wheelchair and wouldnt have been able to dance. These innocent little comments make us all stop and remember the man we knew, the good times we shared and that Papa truly is in a better place, looking down on us and reminiscing with us. My aunt said this was clearly God using the innocence of a child to smack us all upside the head and to stop thinking our selfish thoughts, but to start thinking the way my little brother does. Papa truly was an amazing person, who affected the lives of many. This was evident at his funeral and burial. The funeral was held in Lake Wales, where my grandmother and he had lived for about 15 years. He moved from Lake Wales about two years ago, but by the looks of the full church, you would have thought he never left. Along with friends and family, the mass was also attended by several priests and deacons and was lead by Bishop John Noonan, all who spoke of their close relationship with Papa, as well as my grandma. It was amazing, and almost overwhelming, to see the in uence he had in the lives of these priests and deacons and how much they all loved and respected him. My grandparents befriended each one of them, inviting them over for dinner and other events and making them feel like a member of our family. Faith has always been a big part of my grandparents lives. They both have such strong faith, believing it can get you through anything. Papa wasnt someone who simply went to church to ful ll his Catholic requirements and that was the extent of it. He lived it every day. He taught his children these beliefs and values who then passed it on to their children. He was someone who was always involved in the church. And after his children were grown and began to have families of their own, he decided to go back to school to become a deacon. He became a deacon at the age of 61. The rst person he baptized was my cousin and the last was my second cousin a little more than a year ago. I remember Papa wore a robe during baptisms that was decorated with the handprints and names of all his grandchildren, which my mother made for him. My grandfather taught me not only about faith, but also the importance of family. This is true especially during dif cult times. We all came together after Papas death and I know we will continue to be there for my grandma and each other, because thats the way my family is. I have an incredible family and I know Papa agreed. Papa loved his family. Getting the family together meant so much to him. I will miss visiting him and seeing the way his face would light up when we saw each other. And I will miss the kisses on my cheek that he gave for hellos and goodbyes. The love he had for his family was amazing, but could never hold a candle to the love he had for my grandma. The love they had for each other was so evident, so bright. It could be seen every time their eyes locked or every time they grabbed each others hand. They taught me what true love is and how special marriage is. My grandparents were married for 63 years, but had been together since eighth grade. They had a unbelievable bond. They are a shining example of what marriage should be, loving each other, supporting each other, respecting each other and creating a beautiful life together. They set such a great example for us all. I hope I can follow in their footsteps and be crazy in love with my husband after all those years. So, although this is a sad time, I have to remember the happy times and be proud of the man my grandfather was, a loyal, honest, spiritual, loving, caring man. I hope he is looking down on all of us with that same pride. Until we meet again...I love and miss you, Papa. Jennifer Jensenjjensen@thewakullanews.netEditor, The News: Vendors are needed for the Christmas in Panacea Marketplace and participants for Parade and Celebration of Lights in the seventh annual A Panacea Christmas. It is time to pull out your Christmas trees, decorations, holly, lights and bows and decorate your home or business for Saturday, Dec. 3. Panacea Waterfronts Florida Partnership will sponsor this annual event with our boat on trailer parade and lighting of the Christmas tree. Visit Santa after the parade. Join in the parade fun by decorating your boat, golf cart, oat, or your horse. We welcome entries from all over. For more information contact Sherrie Miller at 528-1527. We are looking for arts and crafts vendor who would like to set up from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Christmas in Panacea Marketplace. There will be a $20 charge for vendors. Contact Eloise Crum at 984-5501 or 528-1989. Applications can be picked up at Crums Mini Mall or Poseys Steamroom. Visit our website www.visitpanacea.com. Sherrie Miller Panacea Editor, The News: If parents are concerned that student names and social security numbers were posted on the internet by the school district, they should attend the School Board meeting next Tuesday, Nov. 22. A school board re-organizational meeting will start at 5:45 p.m. According to the agenda, they will approve or disapprove the 2012 SALARIES for themselves as school board members. The regular meeting will start at 6 p.m., right after they have voted to become volunteers instead of overpaid employees. Our district spent $174,934 for their salaries and benefits in 2009-10. Divide that by ve members equals $34,986 per year. Divide by 12 (one meeting a month) to get $2,915 for a one hour meeting. That comes to $48 a minute! In 2009-10, the 67 Florida school districts paid $15,102,268 to 360 school board members. The teachers and student programs deserve the big bucks, not administrators and board members. Most states consider these elected of cials to be unpaid volunteers. Florida has the highest paid members in the nation! Call or e-mail senators and representatives today and ask them to put the 2011 Senate Bill 2172 back on the agenda. This would save our schools $15 million a year! So come on out to the school board meeting at the district of ce (old Crawfordville Elementary). Watch our school board members set an example for the rest of the districts by being the rst district in Florida to declare themselves UNPAID VOLUNTEERS! Donna Sanford Crawfordville Editor, The News:Well it has been a couple of weeks since my last Letter to the Editor (Why arent businesses allowed to recycle? Oct. 20). My concerns were pertaining to the new garbage service and how the whole thing was handled. My words were pretty stern and thought that I would get more response from our elected of cials guess I was wrong. I received one phone call from Alan Brock. He explained that the commissioners had to move fast to get the contract done and signed, so some pertinent information was not addressed or included i.e., the commercial recycling issue. To me the phone call was just a sugarcoating phone conversation. I was told things are in the works. I guess the other commissioners were on vacation at the time my letter was published. I did let them know where I worked and all of my contact information. Still I did not get any response. Surprised? Not me. I guess I will have to make an appearance at the next commissioners meeting and voice my opinion. This will only cause more problems in the long run with a roomful of irate people instead of just me. On Nov. 11, I was visited at the deli by Ralph Mills from Waste Pro. I was almost impressed until he told me that he was sent by Commissioner Mike Stewart. Was Stewart passing the buck? You decide. I do thank Mr. Mills for giving me more speci cs about the issues I raised. He went into some detail about the laws in the state regarding commercial recycling. He also informed me that there was an open drop off for recycling on Trice Lane at ESG, and also is still recycling available at the land ll on Friday and Saturday. I wonder why the community did not know that. The commissioners really need to utilize the resources in this county and communicate more with us. One great idea which has always been here is the Chamber of Commerce. Put the Chamber to good use and send out a mass mailing or e-mail. Also, we have Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, which is run by a paid person. Isnt recycling high on the list of priorities? They can spread the word. My point is, commissioners, you leave us (the people and business owners of Wakulla County), the ones who have elected you, and can also vote you out, to sit and wonder what is happening in our community. Most of the business owners know each other, we talk, and I cant speak for everyone, but I am fed up with the lack of communication. Once again, thank you Mr. Mills and Waste Pro for stepping up and trying to straighten things out. Take notes, commissioners, on how to deal with community. Jeff True CrawfordvilleREADERS WRITE:Update on business recycling concerns Show concern at school board meeting Panacea Christmas seeks vendors Don Raymond, known as Papa to his family, with his wife of 63 years, Shirley. e innocence of a little brother provides a perspective on loss is is a happy time, said my 8-year-old brother. Papa is in heaven with God, Jesus, his parents and grandmas parents. is, he said, was a time of celebration.

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationMisty Dawn Allen Dominic A. Fruggiero Jr. Janet Grace Frye Alethea Carraway Reddick Butler Lawhon Mack McCabe Luckett Lydia Joy Herington Markley Victor Joseph Palumbo R. Douglass Strickland Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 CoastalChurch News R. Douglass StricklandR. Douglass Strickland, 74, of Sopchoppy, passed away Sunday, Nov. 13, in Tallahassee. He was a Bureau Chief for 36 years for Park Lands and Development for the State of Florida. He was a U.S. Army veteran. He was a resident of Sopchoppy for 50 years coming from Tampa. He was a member of the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. He loved the Lord and his family and friends and demonstrated this by the way he lived. He was a humble man and put others rst, and always had a positive attitude. He will be greatly missed until that day we are united again in Heaven. Family received friends Tuesday, Nov. 15, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-9263333). Services were held Wednesday, Nov. 16, at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church at 11 a.m. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, 131 Rose St., Sopchoppy FL 32358. Survivors include his wife of 53 years, Maj Strickland of Sopchoppy; a son, Robert Boen Bo Strickland (Heather) of Sopchoppy; two daughters, Kimberly Roddenberry (Thurman) of Sopchoppy and Kelly Wright (David) of Crawfordville; a sister, Julynn Trent (David) of Tampa; six grandchildren, Becton Roddenberry, Kelsey Strickland, Brooklyn Roddenberry, Karlee Strickland, Bailey Strickland and Gracie Strickland. He was predeceased by a grandson, Robert Boen Strickland II. Bevis Funeral Home,Harvey-Young Chapel was in charge of arrangements 850-926-3333 or www. bevisfh.com.Mack McCabe LuckettMack McCabe Luckett, 91, of Panacea, passed away on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. His daughter and good friends were with him. He was born Oct. 4, 1920, in West Madison, Ind., where he later farmed for many years. He bought two farms, renovated them and sold each at a pro t. He was an avid hunter and sherman. He was a World War II veteran and served overseas as a paratrooper and in the Armed Guard. He was also a 32 Degree Mason. His father died early on, and he was working to help support his family by the time he was 15 years old. These were hard times. He ran traplines and later planted trees with the CCC. His many occupations included the railroad, construction supervisor, employment in two mental hospitals, and the Tennessee Valley Authority at Land Between The Lakes, now a state park. He and wife Catherine moved to Wakulla County 27 years ago. He grew a large garden and had fruit trees. She canned a lot, they gave a lot away. He loved his dogs, good music, and his family. He was a voracious reader. He traded stories of his life with many friends. He was happiest working in his garden with his little dog Maggie nearby. He was a good friend, neighbor and father. He will be dearly missed. A memorial service was held Saturday, Oct. 29, at Ochlockonee Bay Methodist Church. Survivors include his daughter, Barbara Robinson (Butch); three stepchildren, Linda Lorentzen, Carol Bell and Jim Cline; grandsons, John, Randy and Chris Cleveland, Bobby, Gary and Stevie Luckett; granddaughter, Pam Luckett; several great grandchildren; and one sister. He was predeceased by his sons, Mack Jr. and Walter Luckett; a grandson, Jeff Luckett; rst wife and mother of his children, Louise E. Bennett Luckett; and second wife, Catherine Luckett.Dominic A. Fruggiero Jr.Dominic Anthony Fruggiero Jr., 65, of Crawfordville, passed away on Sunday, Nov. 13, in Crawfordville. He was a supervisor for a janitorial service. He was a U.S. Army veteran. Services will be held at a later date. Survivors include his wife of 46 years, Linda Fruggiero of Crawfordville; a son, Richard Fruggiero of Crawfordville; a daughter, Angela Akins of Crawfordville; two brothers, Rocco Fruggiero of Woodville and Ronnie Fruggiero of Indiana; a sister, Arlene Fruggiero of Georgia; eight grandchildren, Jessica Fruggiero, Joseph and Jamie Yeomans, Brittany Rayburn, Tommy Joe Nazworth, Dylan, Devin and Dustin Fruggiero; and nine great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by a daughter, Annette Fruggiero; a son, Tony Fruggiero; and great-granddaughter, Kyndell Fruggiero. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel (850-9263333) is in charge of arrangements.Janet Grace FryeJanet Grace Frye, 74, of Crawfordville, passed away Sunday, Nov. 13, in Crawfordville. She was born in Baltimore, Md., and was a resident of Crawfordville since 1980 coming from Tallahassee. She owned and operated a janitorial service. Services will be held at a later date. Survivors include a daughter, Cindy Hager (Michael) of Crawfordville; a brother, Richard Guagiardo (Connie) of Bainbridge, Ga.; two sisters, Toni Kennedy (Manuel) of Crawfordville and Charlene Hoyer of Maryland; two grandchildren, Corey M. Hager and Cassandra L. Hager; and David Denmark, who she loved like a son. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel, Crawfordville (850-926-3333) is in charge of arrangements.Misty Dawn AllenMisty Dawn Allen, 25, of Wakulla County went to be with the Lord on Nov. 8 after an auto accident. She was laid to rest on Monday, Nov. 14. Survivors include her children, daughters Katelyn Sky Allen and Shelby Dawn Eversoll, and a son, Adam Vaughn Eversoll; mother, Sandra Stahl and husband Brad; stepfather (Dad) Larry Dunsford; brother, Willie Ray Leverett; one sister, Tessa Mitchell Silhavy Dow of Virginia Beach, Va.; ance, Bronson Tharpe; and several aunts, uncles and cousins. She was predeceased by her father, Cliffton Vaughn Allen; brother, Cory Vaughn Allen; and maternal and paternal grandparents. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, Florida (850-926-3333) was in charge of the arrangements.Biker shoebox run is plannedThe members of Spirit Life Church are collecting shoeboxes to give as gifts to needy children this Christmas. Shoeboxes collected by Nov. 16 will be delivered by a group of motorcyclists who will be leaving the church on Saturday, Nov. 19 at 8:30 a.m. The destination will be Power Country Radio station, WQLC 102FM at 9206 West U.S. Highway 90 in Lake City. For all those who deliver a gift- lled shoebox for needy children, or sponsor a shoebox for $20, will be treated to a free lunch there between the hours of 9 a.m. and noon. Anyone who would like to join the group on their trip is welcome. Spirit Life Church will be open at 7:30 a.m. for coffee and donuts before the motorcycle group leaves. If you like to ride a motorcycle and are looking for a good group of people to ride with, join them on the Nov. 19. For more information, contact Sharon McClendon at smctupper@embarqmail.com.Thanksgiving service set at Christ Church AnglicanThanksgiving is an unusual combination of a secular and a sacred holiday. It is secular because it is a day recognized by the United States as a national holiday and sacred because of its origins. The Pilgrim feast emphasizing our basic motivation and response to being Christian gratitude. We remember the hardships of that tiny group of Pilgrims some 370 years ago, the re out of which their gratitude that rst Thanksgiving was born: uncooperative climate, the enmity of some natives, the burdens of the unknown, and the terrors of anxiety and despair. Some died ghting, others died hungry. Their graves were carefully smoothed over so that their enemies could not compute their losses. In the face of despair they replanted their crops and fasted and watched and perhaps most importantly, they prayed. Finally, a suf cient harvest came, enough to keep them alive. The settlers called in the friendlier tribes and set a day for Thanksgiving to God. They had been delivered. Once again there was hope for the new world and their passion for this new land was renewed. In the United States of America for those of us who are the bene ciaries of their courage and faith, Thanksgiving Day is a call for us to remember. Christ Church Anglican will celebrate our national Day of Thanksgiving on Wednesday, Nov. 23, Thanksgiving eve, at 7 p.m. The service this year is, as always, the deeply moving and important ceremony of giving thanks with a special historic twist. The liturgy is from the 1604 Book of Common Prayer. Christ Church is located at 3383 Coastal Highway just east of Wakulla County High School. This is a community celebration. Everyone is invited.More obituaries on Page 5A

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 Page 5AhappeningsCommunityAlethea C.R.B. LawhonAlethea Carraway Reddick Butler Lawhon, 89, passed away on Friday, Nov. 11, at home surrounded by family. A lifelong resident of this area she will be missed by all. She was a member of First Baptist Church in Crawfordville. She loved signing in the choir and participating in her Sunday School class. She was active member of the Wakulla Historical Society and numerous organizations and charities that she supported. She was retired from the Florida Public Service Commission. She was an avid cake baker and decorator, she loved to sh, travel and take care of others. She loved her church, community, family and her many friends. A memorial service was held Monday, Nov. 14, at 11 a.m. at the First Baptist Church in Crawfordville. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include her two loving sisters, Valda Cook and Evelyn Gowdy; her daughters, Rene Strickland (Ralph) and Desiree Head (Tarp); stepdaughters, June Grimes (Charlie) and Nancy Smith (Larry); and 11 grandchildren and eight greatgrandchildren and many nieces and nephews that she dearly loved. She was predeceased by her parents, Mildred and Phillip Carraway; brother, Regnold Carraway; sister, Norma Clark; husbands, Virgil Reddick, Curry Butler and Hallie Lawhon; and her son, Maxie Reddick. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com) was in charge of the arrangements.Lydia J.H. MarkleyLydia Joy Herrington Markley of Woodville passed away unexpectedly this week. A 25-year resident of the Tallahassee area, she was a tireless supporter of various organizations for the blind, volunteer ministry organizations, and several local churches. In spite of the onset of blindness as an adult, she managed to complete a degree at Tallahassee Community College while in her 50s, and continued to serve others until her untimely passing. Survivors include three loving sons: Chris Bonts (Marcie) of Auburn, Ala., Jeff Bonts (Ashley) of Crawfordville and Brian Bonts (Sarah) of Jacksonville; two brothers, Frank L. Herrington (Cheryl) of Jacksonville and John L. Herrington of Orange Park; two nephews, Patrick and Andrew Herrington of Jacksonville; and four grandchildren, Tyler, Blake, Brooke and Owen Bonts; and a host of close friends. A private memorial service for friends and family was held Saturday, Nov. 12. In lieu of owers, the family requests that donations be made to the National Federation of the Blind, 200 East Wells Street at Jernigan Place, Baltimore MD 21230 (410-659-9314, ext 2371).Victor Joseph PalumboVictor Joseph Palumbo, 80, of Crawfordville, passed away Thursday, Nov. 10, in Tallahassee. He was born Aug. 18, 1931, in Dunmore, Penn., to Dominic J. and Mary G. Sica Palumbo. He was a four year veteran of the U.S. Navy. A Memorial Mass will be held on Saturday, Nov. 26, at 11 a.m. at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in Tallahassee with family receiving friends after the service in the social hall. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Myelodyplastic Syndromes at www.marrow.org. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh.com. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Joan. L. Viola Palumbo; son, John Palumbo; daughter, Deborah A. Palumbo; grandchildren, Lauren Elizabeth Baker, Thomas Justin Baker IV, and Victor Andre Palumbo; a brother, John Palumbo; and a sister, Josephine Russo. He was predeceased by his parents; and siblings, Antoinette, Frances, Joseph and Dominic.ObituariesContinued from Page 4ABirth announcementsHeath and Angie Shivers Gebhart of Woodville announce the birth of their daughter, Madison Manelli Gebhart, at 9:01 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 18 at Tallahassee Memorial Women Pavilion. She weighed 8 pounds and was 20.25 inches long. She has a big brother Wyatt, who is 4. Her maternal grandparents are Gary and Rita deMontmollin Shivers of Woodville. Her paternal grandparents are Gary and Nancy Gebhart of Wacissa. Her maternal great-grandparents are Floyd deMontmollin, Sr., of Woodville and the late Margarita Manelli deMontmollin and John and Betty Shivers of Crawfordville. Rob and Stephenie Lawhon of Tallahassee announce the birth of their daughter, Chelsea Kay Lawhon, on Oct. 5 at 8:02 a.m. She weighed 7 pounds, 7 ounces and was 19.75 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are the late Ken Matthews and Elaine Matthews of Sopchoppy. Her paternal grandparents are Mitch and Pam Lawhon.Pvt. Gowan wishes everyone Happy Holidays Special to The NewsPvt. Clarance Brett Ren Gowan wont be home for Christmas this year. He is proudly serving his country from Camp Casey is Dongducheon, South Korea. He is the grandson of Finley and Jean McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay and the son of Paul and Michelle McMillan Kirby of Tallahassee. He celebrated his 19th birthday in July while training for his current assignment and is expected to complete his first tour in Korea next June. He wishes his friends and family happy holidays and says to never take for granted. the freedoms we enjoy Pvt. Clarance Brett Gowan with Michelle (mom), Andy (brother) and father Paul Kirby.Madison M. GebhartChelsea K. LawhonHappy rst birthdayAmeerah Aaliyah Godbolt will celebrate her first birthday on Nov. 17. She is the daughter of Amber Anderson and Michael Godbolt Jr. of Sopchoppy. Her maternal grandparents are Angel Avery of Sopchoppy and John Anderson of Tallahassee. Her paternal grandparents are Delene and Michael Godbolt Sr. of Sopchoppy. Maternal Great-Grandparents are Percell and Brenda Sanders of Sopchoppy Paternal greatgrandparents are Dora Mae Webster of Crawfordville, Willie Gene Allen of Sopchoppy, Dorothy Burney of Sopchoppy and Benjamin Godbolt Jr. of Tallahassee. A party will be Nov. 19 at noon at Hickory Park. All family and friends are invited. TravelingJarforChange! Give To Sponsored byDonate Your Change atNew Location EVERY Week! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Rustys Automotive MOBILE REPAIR Rustys Automotive MOBILE REPAIR 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 Ac 4:12 Neither is there salvation in any other: for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved. 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Special to The NewsOn Saturday, Oct. 15, the day was truly perfect for Shadevilles 28th Fall Festival. Grannys Attic and the Book Barn were lled with oodles and oodles of interesting items for folks of all ages, the entertainment kept our spirits high and everyone enjoyed the snowcones, nachos and cheese, hamburgers, hotdogs and popcorn. The games and prizes were first rate and the amount of fun our kids enjoyed has never been better. Many thanks to our schools faithful PTO members, business partners, Crawfordville Volunteer Fire Department re ghters, school resource of cer, faculty and staff, as well as the terri c classroom volunteers who put in hours and hours ensuring the event would be a huge success. The festival is our schools only fundraiser of the year, and this year we will see a pro t of approximately $30,000. The funds earned at this years Fall Festival will be used to bring us closer to our schools vision of providing each student with opportunities to achieve at the highest academic level, prepare them for the rapidly changing technological world and to produce responsible citizens. We plan to provide each classroom teacher and paraprofessional with additional funds for educational materials, increase our schools educational technology, enhance our physical education, music, art and media centers equipment, purchase custodial supplies that keep our school sparkling and create a safe learning environment, as well as continue to support Project Learning Tree activities schoolwide. This years classroom representatives who took home the coveted crowns for the highest Big Item Drawing ticket sales were Lynley Kendrick and Landon Ray from Mrs. Alvarezs kindergarten, Emily Pearson and Legion Taylor from Miss Gerrells rst grade, Sharee Allen and Daniel Brattain from Mrs. Hesters second grade, Emily Hughes and Ian Dubay from Mrs. Kerces third grade, Zoie Hill and Chase Roberts from Mrs. Nalls fourth grade, Tara Gray and Kody Ledbetter from Mrs. McCords fth grade and Izabel Hernandez and Shayne Wilson from Mrs. Brattain and Mrs. Metcalfs multi-age classes. Additionally, these hard working classes have earned a fun- lled eld trip to the IMAX theatre. Bingo prizes, grannys attic treasures, mouthwatering cakes, donated books and sodas all added together to win a classroom game and pizza party for several homerooms. This years high donation winners were Mrs. Marshs fifth grade, Mrs. Harveys fourth grade, Mrs. Braleys third grade, Mrs. Reeves second grade, Miss Gerrells rst grade, Miss Smiths kindergarten, and Mrs. Metcalfs and Mrs. Brattains multigrade classroom. A giant heartfelt thanks to the parents, families and friends who contributed goodies and items to our donation efforts this year. The Fall Festival is always a tremendously rewarding event. I love the sound of families having fun together in such a wholesome atmosphere. Although it was a warm and windy day this year, it didnt seem to dampen the spirits of the many, many folks who came and enjoyed the afternoons events, said Principal Susan Brazier. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolShadeville Fall Festival was a huge success SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWinners for the big item drawing ticket sales were crowned at this years Shadeville Fall Festival. Additional 4K-VPK class at Wakulla ChristianWakulla Christian has added another 4K-VPK class. The Voluntary Prekindergarten program (VPK) is a legislatively mandated program designed to prepare four-year-olds for kindergarten. Participation is free for all four-year-olds born on or before Sept. 1 who are Florida residents. Eligibility for participation is based on proof of birth and proof of residency. Wakulla Christian School is a private Christian school offering 3K through seventh grade, located at 1391 Crawfordville Highway. For further information contact WCS school of ce at (850) 926-5583. Crawfordville celebrates Red Ribbon Week By ANGIE WALKERPrincipal of Crawfordville Elementary SchoolRed Ribbon Week was celebrated throughout the state, and Crawfordville Elementary School was no exception. We had a theme each day to show support for living a healthy life style and staying away from drugs. Students dressed up in pajamas one day, favorite team sports another, cougar colors, as a twin and swearing sneakers/hats along with the teachers and staff to show a united front to our, Say No to Drugs campaign. The week had a variety of guest speakers, videos, ribbons handed out, arm bands worn and class activities planned. Friday was the culminating day for our students with the theme of Celebrate Success stressed. Students got to spend 30 minutes outside with their grade level visiting with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, viewing their boat and petting their horse while listening to the job functions of the deputies and the various departments. Students got to six different stations during their 30 minute visit outside playing games and testing their strength and skill at things like tug-of war and musical chairs. At the end of their time outside, the departed with a frozen ice pop in their hand, and little sweat on their brow and a smile on their face. It was truly a successful day. Our special area teachers planned, set up and cleaned up for the entire day. They are the best. Again, I would like to thank our many volunteers who came for the day. They worked from 10:15 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. in the hot sun with 600 students and only a few breaks. Thank you. 13Months For only$31 From now until the end of November get Special Offer straight to your mailbox Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 Page 7ABy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles took a long trip over to Pensacola to face Escambia County, but were never really challenged with Wakulla pounding Escambia 35-7. We were able to play everybody, even the JV guys who made the trip, said Head Coach Scott Klees. We got up on them and started subbing quite early, he said. The one touchdown that the War Eagle defense gave up came when two defenders ran into each other, Klees said. The defense really played great, Klees said. Our offensive line played great. Evan McCoy had two carries for 110 yards and two touchdowns and was named Offensive Player of the Week. Wide receiver Damonte Morris got some playing time as running back, and had six carries for 72 yards and a touchdown. Will Thomas and Marshane Godbolt also scored touchdowns. On defense, C.J. Roberts had six tackles, two for a loss and graded out at 86 percent. On special teams, Tamarick Holmes had four tackles and two assists. The win means Wakulla nishes the regular season with a record of 8-2. PLAYOFFS START The playoffs get underway this week, with Wakulla hosting Gulf Breeze on Friday, Nov. 18, at 7:30 p.m. They are very big, Klees said of Gulf Breeze. Their offense plays a spread offense with four or ve wide-outs in a formation, Klees said, noting that their quarterback is one of the leading players in the state. Its going to be a big test for our defense, he said. On offense, the game plan will be to try to use Wakullas running game to control time of possession and keep Gulf Breeze off the eld. sports news and team views SportsGirls team going to state, Linton quali es individuallyBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Saturday, Nov. 12, the Wakulla High School cross country teams traveled to Alligator Lake Park in Lake City to compete in the Regional Meet. They were greeted with temperatures in the upper 20s, a beautiful and fast course and intense competition from some of the premiere cross country programs in the state. The rst six teams and 15 individuals at this meet quali ed for the State Finals Meet which will be held this Saturday in Dade City. After the dust settled, the local girls team nished in sixth place and became the rst team in the history of the program to qualify for the State Finals Meet. The WHS boys team also had a good outing, nishing in eighth place, just two places from qualifying for the State Meet and also the best nish ever for a WHS boys team. Three of the local harriers senior Stanley Linton, sophomore Marty Wiedeman and senior Cora Atkinson placed in the top 15 to qualify individually for the State Meet. The girls race started at 8:55 a.m. with the temperature in the low 40s and clear skies. The WHS duo of Wiedeman and Atkinson went out hard with the goal of nishing in the top 15 overall, no matter what the pace. At the rst-mile checkpoint, Wiedeman and Atkinson were in a tight group in the top 20 runners. By the two-mile mark, where Mrs. Coach (Myrna Hoover) was manning her normal station, the No. 2 through No. 7 WHS girls had separated a little from each other and Wiedeman and Atkinson were in 14th and 15th places, with a pack of runners right on their heels. Wiedeman came ying down the nal stretch, nishing in 8th place in a new school record time of 19:57, with Atkinson powering along right behind her in 11th place and nishing in the excellent time of 20:01 (also under the old school record), with both times qualifying as State Elite times. The remaining ve WHS runners on the course were ghting for every spot and left everything they had on the course. Junior Raychel Gray was the next to nish in 51st place in a personal record (PR) time of 22:08, with freshman Lydia Wiedeman next to cross the line in 54th place (22:12). Next came senior Kristie Hodges in 55th place (22:14, a new PR), with freshman Lilli Broadway in 57th place (22:30) and Tyler Kinard in 65th place (22:45) rounding out the WHS nishers. The team nished sixth with a combined score of 173, four points ahead of perennial powerhouse West Florida Tech, and earned their spot in the State Meet. The boys race didnt start until 9:50 a.m., after the temperatures had warmed up and it didnt take long for the race to heat up either. The lead boys went through the rst mile at a sub-5:00 pace with local standout Stanley Linton in the thick of it in fth place. The other WHS boys were strung out behind the leaders and working together with senior Cody James leading this group and freshman J.P. Piortrowski in close pursuit. Sophomore Brandon Trussell, freshman Mitchell Atkinson and seniors D.J Victor and Zach Broadway were close behind. By the two mile mark, Linton had pow ered into second place, approximately 10 seconds behind the leader and pushing hard to close the gap. Trussell had started to exert himself and had moved into second on the team, with James close behind. As the runners approached the finish line, Linton was still in second place, but running strong and closing on the leader however, he ran out of real estate and had to settle for a second place finish in the excellent time of 16:13, which quali es as a National Elite Time. Trussell was the next WHS runner to nish and crossed the line in a new PR of 17:57, in 45th place. James continued to push the pace, nishing strong in 53rd place in 18:12, with Piotrowski close behind in 55th, in a new PR of 18:21. The remaining WHS runners crossed the line in the following order: Victor (72nd, 18:57), Broadway (74th, 19:01) and Atkinson (77th, 19:03). The team finished in eighth place, which is the highest any WHS boys team has ever nished at Regionals and just missed qualifying for State. The local boys were only six points behind District Champion Marianna and 25 points ahead of District Runner-up Florida High. Because they placed in the top 15 overall, Linton, Wiedeman and Atkinson were named to the All Region Team. COACHS COMMENTS This is the meet we have waited a long time for, said Coach Paul Hoover. Our kids have worked so hard, not just this year, but for the last four years with the speci c goal in mind of qualifying a team to the State Meet and they have now done it! I couldnt be more proud of them. This is a special group of both upper classmen and new runners and they have absolutely focused on this goal and no matter what adversity they encountered, they never waivered in their belief that they were going to State this year and now they are, which is the rst time ever for our program. This dream really began four years ago when six freshmen girls came into the program and didnt care that we had never quali ed a team for the State Meet and their goal that rst year was to go to State. At Regionals that year, ve of the seven girls we ran came from that group and they finished in seventh place and missed qualifying by one place. They never gave up on that goal and planted that seed in the mind of the runners that came into the program after them and even instilled that desire and belief in the boys teams. Because of the desire, toughness and ferocity of these girls, we called them the Tigers and three of the original ones are still with us today. They are seniors Cora Atkinson, Kristie Hodges and Emily McCullers. The Tigers have done more to mold this program than anything else. Now the new kids that come in have the expectation of succeeding and our new runners this year were critical to our success, especially Lydia, Lillie and Tyler. The boys also did really well. For the rst time ever they averaged under 18:00 (17:56) for the ve scoring runners and nished higher as a team than we ever have. Brandon, J.P., Zach and Mitchell all set PRs and Cody and D.J. ran solidly. And Stanley just keeps getting better and better and rising to the level of the competition. He and Cody have set the standard this year for dedication and pure hard work, said Coach Hoover. The State Meet will be held at the Little Everglades Ranch in Dade City this Saturday, Nov. 19, with the girls running at 10:10 a.m. and the boys at 10:50 a.m.CROSS COUNTRYThere will be a dedication ceremony for Coach Buddy Tomaini held during intermission of the WHS wrestling tournament on Dec. 3, at the high school gym. There will be a break in the action at 1 p.m. and the wrestling room will of- cially be named to honor Coach Tomaini. He was vital in starting the wrestling program for Wakulla High School. We would like everyone who has previously wrestled or other friends of the program to please come out and support Coach Tomaini during this event. It will be a great opportunity to see old friends and teammates and while youre there you can cheer on this years War Eagle wrestling team.BASEBALLFormer Wakulla pitcher Robby Coles signs with FSUSpecial to The NewsMARIANNA Chipola College pitcher Robby Coles of Crawfordville will be a Seminole next year. The right-hander signed a scholarship with Florida State at a press conference at Chipola on Nov. 9. Its a dream come true for me to play at Florida State, Coles said. Coach (Mike) Martin and the Seminoles have a great tradition and I look forward to becoming a part of the program. Of his time at Chipola, Coles said, I love playing for Coach (Jeff) Johnson. He has helped me improve a lot. Robby is a great kid who has worked hard for us, said Coach Johnson. Were looking for more good things from him this season. At 6 feet tall and 170 pounds, Coles amassed a 9-3 record at Chipola last season and helped lead the team to a state title. After sharing the Panhandle Conference title with Northwest Florida State, Coles pitched a gem to give the Indians a 6-5 win over the Raiders in the championship game of the FSCAA State Tournament. Coles pitched seven innings, giving up only one run with four strikeouts. It was his second win in the tournament. For his work, Coles won the Robert Purkey, Jr., Memorial Award as the Outstanding Pitcher in the state tournament. Coles also was named to the Panhandle All Conference Second Team. Coles helped lead the Indians to a fth place nish in the NJCAA National Baseball Tournament. Chipola finished the 2011 season with a record of 40-22. Coles played his high school ball at Wakulla High where he led the 2010 War Eagles to the Elite 8 of the Regionals for the rst time in 42 years. Chipola Coach Jeff Johnson, Robby Coles, mom Jan Coles Forester. Standing, sister Whitney Coles, brother Chase Forester and father Tracy Forester. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFOOTBALLWakulla wallops Escambia, 35-7Dedication set to honor Coach Buddy TomainiWRESTLING Players of the WeekEVAN MCCOY 2 rushes, 110 yards, 2 TDs C.J. ROBERTS 6 tackles, 2 for loss TAMARICK HOLMES 4 tackles, 2 assistsOFFENSE DEFENSE SPECIAL TEAMS WAKULLA vs. GULF BREEZE The rst game of the state playoffs will be played on Friday, Nov. 18, at Reynolds Field at J.D. Jones Stadium at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $8.After winning last weeks district meet: Coach Greg James, Lilli Broadway, Kristie Hodges, Emily McCullers, Tyler Kinard, Cora Atkinson, Margaret Wiedeman, Raychel Gray, Lydia Wiedeman, and Coach Paul Hoover. PHOTOS BY LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Runner Stanley Linton nished second in 16:13, a National Elite time.

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comVirginia at #23 Florida StateSaturday, 7:30 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPN2.In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate Miami at South FloridaSaturday, 3:30 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPNU.Furman at FloridaSaturday, 1 p.m. The game can be seen on Pay-Per-View.By MARTY COHENof GatorBaitThe emotions will certainly be ramped up a bit next Saturday, Nov. 26, when Florida takes on Florida State in what will be the nal chance for this Gator team to salvage something worth remembering for 2011. Theres always a little extra juice when the Seminoles come to town, regardless of the records (and please, dont throw them out the window, let the other media boys use that tired clich), magni ed by the proceedings for Senior Day. We can only surmise that theres nothing worse than losing the nal home game of your college career. It hasnt happened very often for Floridas players, just three times in the past 17 seasons 1999 in an ugly 30-23 loss to FSU that began a threegame losing skid to end the season, 2001 in a gutwrenching 34-32 setback to Tennessee in a contest that was shifted because of 9/11 and ended up costing the Gators a shot at a potential trip to the Rose Bowl for the national championship, and the last time, in 2003, the galling 38-34 travesty to the of cials-aided Seminoles. In the even-numbered years, it was South Carolina for a while before a parade of pre-FSU, Southern Conference patsies Western Carolina, The Citadel and Appalachian State which really cheapens the signi cance of the last home contest, featuring a yawning early-afternoon start against an opponent that can only hope to keep the score semi-respectable. But in odd-numbered years, its a visit from the Seminoles and thats the proper way to close out your Gator-playing days, a fullthrottle, high-volume clash with the boys from Tallahassee. The nal bow before The Swamp crowd should be meaningful. Yes this has been a lost season, an empty experience in the rst year of Will Muschamps tenure. But no Gator wants to nish his career on a sour note. Think back to 1997, the season after Floridas rst national championship, when crushing losses to LSU and Georgia derailed a shot at another SEC title. After the glorious run of four consecutive SEC championships, it was a bitter pill at the time for the Gator faithful. But it also produced some of the grandest theater ever on Florida Field, when the Gators rallied for a heart-stopping 32-29 victory over the top-ranked Seminoles in a game many consider the greatest and most thrilling theyd ever been a part of in The Swamp. There were no title aspirations to keep marinating that day for the Gators, just the opportunity to knock off the Seminoles at the peak of their run. Anyone who was there, and there were at least 150,000 of you, will never forget the emotion in that stadium, or eventually on University Avenue, by games end. Certainly there is nowhere near as much at stake on Saturday, but dont tell that to the departing seniors who have experienced the unreal high of winning a national title in 2008 and the searing lows of the past two seasons in which the Gators have gone a painful 10-10 in their last 20 games. There wont be many seniors making that trek out of the South endzone tunnel for the nal time on Saturday, just nine scholarship guys if you count sixthyear center Dan Wenger who joined the UF program this summer after spending his rst ve seasons at Notre Dame. It gives you the idea of the overall numbers situation Muschamp inherited when only eight seniors remain whove been at Florida for the duration of four or ve turbulent years. Eight, thats it. Two of those are fourthyear guys who did not redshirt tailback Jeff Demps and defensive end William Green. Green was probably the more sought-after recruit, a prize catch out of Alabama who never really lived up to expectations. Demps on the other hand, when healthy, provided numerous highlight-reel plays and when healthy, was a key component of Floridas 26-2 run in his rst two years of 2008-09. But its the six fth-year seniors whove really seen it all, coming to campus shortly after Florida won its initial national title under Urban Meyer, experiencing the magic carpet ride of Tim Tebows Heisman Trophy season in 2007, the back-to-back 13-1 seasons that produced another national championship followed by an undefeated regular season, and then suffering through the tough spiral of the last two years, with a coaching change to boot. The fth-year six-pack sort of comes in pairs, beginning with two who never achieved much on the eld mostly for health reasons, offensive guard James Wilson and cornerback Moses Jenkins. Looking to nal bow Looking to nal bowBy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaThe nal score suggested another Florida State Miami classic. Jimbo Fisher dubbed it as one. And maybe for a few, frantic nal minutes it was. But the truth is that each of the 82,322 fans that poured into Doak Campbell Stadium for the Seminoles 23-19 triumph over the Hurricanes witnessed a sloppy, disjointed and downright strange affair that will likely show more warts upon repeated viewings. The ow of that game was weird, Jimbo Fisher said. It was a different type of game. It wasnt uid. There was no rhythm to the game. At times, the game grinded on like an 4 Chevy in desperate need of an oil change. But this is still Florida State, and the team on the other sideline still had that orange and green U on its helmet. And the Seminoles will never, ever be in the business of attaching asterisks to victories against Miami. Who cares that the Hurricanes, who entered the game with a 5-4 record, are still stumbling around in search of their glory days and, with two weeks to go bowl eligibility. And so what that, with a last-second eld goal, Clemson clinched the ACCs Atlantic Division, of cially extending FSUs conference title drought to six seasons. With its original preseason aspirations both national and conference off the table, Florida States in-state rivalries with the Hurricanes and Florida Gators mean more than ever. And that showed in a big way as soon as the clock hit zero. Its a big reason why EJ Manuel ran over toward the student section and gave a Nolan Ryan-sized windup into what had to be the biggest st pump of his life. Its why Greg Reid, whose 83-yard punt return for a touchdown gave the Seminoles points theyd end up desperately needing, tossed his helmet into the air and skipped around the eld in joyous celebration. And its why Fisher could have an ear-to-ear grin on his face as he made his way off the eld, greeted by his wife, Candi, and young son, Ethan, and tossing his hat into the throng of fans chanting his name. Thats what rivalry games bring out in you, Fisher said. Its a huge deal, Reid said. Were 1-0 right now in the state, and thats one of the goals on this team. You can bet it was a goal for the Hurricanes too. Thanks to a tumultuous offseason that only compounded the usual troubles that come with a coaching change, Miami has struggled in Al Goldens rst season. But let wins over Ohio State and Georgia Tech as well as a down-tothe-wire loss to Virginia Tech serve as evidence that the Hurricanes still have enough talent to hang with almost anybody in the country. And Saturday in Tallahassee, against an opponent that featured no less than seven starters from their backyard (and several more on the bench), the Hurricanes had an opportunity to beat a rival and put an exclamation point on an otherwise mediocre-as-usual season. And had Nick OLeary not come up with an onside kick recovery to seal the game, they might have pulled off the upset. Instead, the Seminoles escaped with a four-point win and a 2-0 record against Miami under Jimbo Fisher. Im not good at math, Golden said, but we are a lot of points better (than last seasons 45-17 loss to FSU) than we were last year, and were playing on the road, in a hostile environment, so I am encouraged by that.Wins over Miami always worth celebratingJaye Howard raises his arms in exasperation? in what has been a less-than-glorious season for the Gators.PHOTO BY STEVE JOHNON COURTESY OF GAITORBAITCelebrating the 23-19 win over Miami at Doak Campbell. PHOTOS BY MARK WALLHEISER SPECIAL TO THE OSCEOLABy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaGreg Reid knew he had a chance as soon as he scanned downfield and saw nothing but the Florida State Marching Chiefs, with not a single white Miami jersey impeding his route to the end zone. That unobstructed view made for a wide, unobstructed running lane, which, after grabbing the ball off a bounce, the speedy Reid promptly ran through for an 83-yard punt return for a touchdown that gave FSU a 10-point halftime lead over the Hurricanes. The Seminoles went on to down UM 23-19, their second consecutive victory over their in-state rivals and third in four years.At the other end of the end zone, man, Reid said. There was clearly nobody. It was a welcome return to form for Reid, who, despite his electrifying reputation, hadnt scored a touchdown since Florida State opened the 2010 season against Samford a span of 22 games. Thats not to say Reid had been ineffective for the last 14 months Jimbo Fisher often spoke of how close Reid was to breaking a big play, how special he was with the ball in his hands but more often than not a missed block, a missed cut or a penalty ag frustrated his efforts. This time, there werent too many blocks needed, Reid simply sped his way untouched past the Hurricanes. And, in a rare instance for a game that featured 19 total penalties, not a single yellow ag hit the eld. Finally, Reid said. I didnt hear any whistles, nobody. I was just (like) nally.Reid returns to the end zoneGreg Reid has an 83-yard return for a touchdown. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, it was another beautiful weekend for shing or doing just about anything outdoors related you wanted to do. A bit on the chilly side in the morning but it warmed up nicely. As I am writing this article it is the last day of gag grouper season. Now they are looking at making July 1 through Oct. 30 permanent gag grouper season for the recreational sherman. This will hurt an economy that is already in the drink, keeping the folks at home who would normally go offshore shing rather than spending money at the marinas for gas, bait, tackle, ice, etc. It will hurt the restaurants and motels and de nitely the sale of offshore boats. If youre concerned about this new season that is being proposed send an email to commissioners@ myfwc.com or gulfcouncil@ gulfcouncil.com. Mike Pearson took some buddies from Tifton out last Wednesday for their last offshore trip before the season closed and had a great day. They got their limit of gag grouper, caught some big kings and Spanish and got over some wrecks and caught and released a bunch of red snapper in the 15-pound range. He also said the wrecks had some big Goliath grouper on them and several times they would grab the snapper on the way up. Tom Riddle from Tifton took some of his clients out on that same day and they also had a good catch. They got their limit of grouper, caught some big amberjack and had a 35-pound cobia. Capt. Kent over at AMS said he went out one day last week and caught some nice reds out of Panacea shing the white Gulp. One of their customers shed the white trout hole out of Panacea and caught 50 one day and 70 the next. Stephan Shelhaus from Cincinnati keeps his boat over at Shell Island and comes down with his dad about three times a year. I talked to him on Saturday and he said they fished up in East River on Friday and caught about eight big sheepshead and nine or 10 reds. They used live shrimp on the bottom. I talked to JR at the Aucilla and he said he took a friend on Saturday and they ran way up a creek and caught some 5-pound reds until they got tired of catching them. He said if you could ever get a Gulp past the reds you could catch a nice trout. Saturday morning after the cold snap came through folks were getting their limit of trout in the river but after it warmed back up they moved back on the ats. He suggests shing the ats or up in the creeks right now. Remember, if you want to learn the Aucilla, JR has gotten his captains license and is taking charters. He can be reached at the store at (850) 584-4595. Capt. David Fife said lots of reds are being caught around Oyster Bay using live shrimp, live minnows and the Gulp. Trout are starting to move back up in the creeks and their are plenty of sheepshead around the oyster bars. The weather forecast for last Friday was calling for 20 to 25 knot winds out of the northwest but decreasing in the afternoon. I was scheduled to take Michael Chase and his friend Bart from Massachusetts, who was down here with his 10year-old son Robert for the Miami game on Saturday. We decided to play it by ear and watch the weather and as it turned out, the forecast was all wrong. Because of the extremely low tide we werent able to get out until 12:30. Capt. David Fife told me of a place he knew some reds were being caught so I changed my plan from white trout and hopefully a bull red to reds. In 15 minutes we had our limit and then it was catch and release. All were about 25-inches and we caught them on the Gulp and live shrimp. This was Roberts rst time in a boat shing and he caught four big reds and two smaller ones and I dont know how many he missed. Fortunately Michael was exible on Friday and we were able to make the trip work and I think and hope they had a good time. We shed out on the ats for trout for a while but only caught two small sh. On that Wednesday I had gone when it was still warm and caught 19 trout using a white Gulp. The water temperature on Wednesday was 64 and on Friday when we went it was in the 50s and made it up to 60. The water has been warming back up and I believe you will be able to catch trout back out on the ats, as well as in the creeks this weekend. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Waters warming, look for trout on the ats this weekend SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMary Louise Grif n with 37-inch red sh caught with Capt. Jody Campbell shing near Panacea.FWC solicits feedback on new bear management plan From FWC NewsAfter dwindling to as few as 300 bears in the 1970s, the Florida black bear population has rebounded to an estimated 3,000 bears today. Bears and their cubs roam forests and swamps from Eglin Air Force Base in the Panhandle to Ocala National Forest in the states midsection and Big Cypress National Preserve in Southwest Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, which worked with its partners to increase the states black bear population, recently released a new draft management plan for the bear and is asking for public input. Both a summary of public feedback and the draft plan will go before the FWC at its February 2012 meeting. The Florida black bear is truly a conservation success story, said FWC Executive Director Nick Wiley. Bear populations have clearly bene ted from broad public support and diligent conservation efforts across Florida, particularly in those communities where black bears have become more common. The goal of the draft management plan is to maintain sustainable black bear populations in suitable habitats throughout Florida for the bene t of the species and people. It includes measurable objectives regarding bear populations, habitat, citizen education and outreach, and human-bear con icts. When a bear management plan is approved, the bear will no longer be on the states list of threatened species. A similar process was followed for the bald eagle, which is no longer listed as a state threatened species but is carefully managed through speci c conservation measures established under an FWC management plan. Input on the draft bear management plan will include four public workshops: in Bristol on Nov. 22, Naples on Nov. 29, Deland on Dec. 6, and Gainesville on Dec. 13. Go to MyFWC.com/Bear to access workshop details, read the plan and comment online. The draft bear management plan includes: Establishment of seven bear management units (BMUs) to provide localized bear management and public involvement appropriate to the area, from about 1,000 bears in the Central BMU, which includes Ocala National Forest, to about 20 bears in the Big Bend BMU, which includes Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge. A section on the history of bear hunting in Florida. A bear hunt is not proposed in the plan. Currently, Florida black bears may not be hunted, harmed or killed, and similar prohibitions would continue under a rule proposed in the plan. Creation of Bear Smart Communities in areas of high bear activity. Humanbear con icts are on the rise in Florida. In 2010, the FWC received more than 4,000 calls from citizens about bears. A Bear Smart Community would involve residents, local governments, businesses and schools in changing peoples behaviors to reduce human-bear con icts. Black bears are generally shy and nonaggressive toward humans. But bears can smell food from more than a mile away and so are tempted to leave forests and swamps to dine on garbage and pet food that is left outdoors and unsecured. Suggestions on revising the bear plan will be accepted online through Jan. 10, 2012, at MyFWC.com/ Bear, where more information also is available on the Florida black bear. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTING & SEFETYEQUIPMENT ORANGE BLAZE VESTS BUCKSHOT RIFLE SHELLS COVER SCENT o ata iha M at (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 GEAR UP!!! LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GUNSMITHING F ASTTURNAROUND! 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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comUnderwaterWakullaBy Travis KerstingIf any of you have driven past the North Florida Fairgrounds this past week, you have undoubtedly seen the fair happenings. It has been a long 10 days, but a very good opportunity to get the word out about the Auxiliary and all we do. Many thanks to the members who rose to the occasion and staffed our booth. In addition to the fair, we also had a patrol out on the water Sunday. Rather than having to rely on others to send in news to share with you, this week I was able to get away and get some rsthand news for you all. Coxswain Mark Rosen had asked all of us to be dockside at Shell Island Fish Camp by 9:30 a.m. I thought I had a few extra minutes when I arrived, but Mike Harrison and Bill Wannall were already at the dock completing Bills new facility inspection. Norma Hill pulled in right after me and we all waited for Mark to arrive. He had stopped at the storage shed to make sure we had oat coats to protect us from the morning cold. While it was not that chilly before leaving the dock, one we got going, well... that was another story. As we prepared to leave the docks, FWC came up to the docks. It is nice to be out in joint forces. Once we had gone over the pre-underway check off, we headed out to the Birds Roost knowing that the weather would be getting worse as the day progressed. Thankfully it was not too bad out there, but we were without much company. As we worked out way back into the river, we observed several boaters shing in the shallow areas near the oyster bars. When we rounded the bend by the river split, we saw our friend from FWC. He was checking licenses and sh limits. Mark made an executive decision and we headed for lunch at Riverside Caf before the crowds hit. For this crew member, it was nice to be still and on land for a while as it took most of lunch to feel as though we were not still moving. As we had lunch, the winds picked up and we decided to stay in the river for the remainder of the afternoon. Many people may agree that it is often not the large things we do that get us noticed, it is the small things. We were agged down by two gentlemen as we made our way up river. One of the boaters had cut himself in the hand when the sh he landed had other ideas! Thankfully with some teeth grinding and ingenuity, he was able to get the hook out and we provided him with some rst aid supplies. After reaching the 98 Bridge, we started heading back down river and back towards the docks. It was a beautiful and peaceful afternoon to be out and about. Bill had to use many navigation skills as we weaved in and out of fishing lines coming from boats anking the shores. In true to Mark style, we were challenged to a person in the water drill as we neared the Fort area. Good teamwork and communication saved our person in under the one-minute mark! This may have been from our earlier practice in recovering Mikes hat that took a ying leap off his head and into the channel! Thankfully, we all made it through the day and were able to be in the right place at the right time. Next week, Flotilla 12 will be hard at work once again. The FSU homecoming game Flyover will be Saturday night. If you are at the game, be sure to look up, if you are watching from home, we hope you can catch a glimpse of the plane. The game is set for nighttime, but the Coast Guard is always Semper Paratus and will still be there. Sunday we also have a patrol on the books, weather permitting. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Bill Wannall, Mike Harrison and Mark Rosen on patrol.PHOTOS BY CAROLYN BROWN TREADON I would argue that most people driving a car do so with a spare tire, perhaps a few tools and even a ashlight. These people may go their entire driving career without ever having a at or some other roadside emergency, but they still dont go without these safety precautions. In scuba such a redundancy means having an additional source of suf cient breathing gas available. To handle emergency situations under water, the technical diving community, including cave divers, wreck divers and those folks doing very deep dives, have adopted the rule of thirds. This rule means that they use one-third of their breathing gas for descent and exploring, such as a wreck. They have one-third of their gas supply for their ascent to the surface. This leaves a third, which is for emergency situations, unplanned decompression obligations, or any other issue which might prevent return to terra rma. These technical divers usually have a minimum of two large cylinders and frequently upwards of four or ve. Each cylinder goes one-third unused if the dive goes as planned. In contrast, most recreational open water divers dont carry much for redundant equipment. Recreational divers frequently come in asking me about something divers call a pony bottle. When I started diving about 10 years ago, the pony bottles I saw were small. Divers in my local area carried the small Spare Air branded device which contains a mere three cubic feet of air. Some carried a six-cubic foot tank and fewer carried a 13 or 19 cubic foot tank. I rarely advise a diver to carry a pony tank. In my diving past I did carry one at some point, and still own a variety of them, but I have not carried one in three or four years. Why? Because most divers look for a pony bottle because they are diving deeper and they want it to get them back to the surface in case of emergency. That makes sense until you start looking at the math: Your average diver uses about .5 to .7 cubic feet of breathing gas on the surface. As we descend we use DOUBLE that amount of gas at 33 feet. An aluminum 19 cubic feet that lasts for 27 minutes on the surface now only lasts 13 minutes. At 66 feet your cylinder lasts nine minutes. Now most people who want a pony bottle say they only want it for dives between 130, which is the recreational limit, and 150 feet. These divers may get ve minutes worth of gas from that cylinder assuming their breathing rate has not increased due to panic or work load. I took a Spare Air to 146 feet and calmly took one full breath while kneeling on the bottom, with three friends watching. I took one more small breath and was out of gas. I switched back to my primary gas supply to nish the dive. That experiment proved to me that I could easily drain that cylinder just getting to the surface, much less try and solve a problem, complete any necessary decompression, search for a buddy, etc. As a result, I tend to urge people to carry a redundant supply of gas that is proportional to the dive pro le they plan to do. In most cases that means a tank of considerable size. Some of you will argue that you have a buddy with additional air, and you might be right. I can almost guarantee that at some point you will be separated from them for whatever reason. That would be a bad time to need them and their breathing gas just to get you home. Just because you have a buddy doesnt mean they have the ability to get you both out of trouble. If you are both low on gas and nearing the end of your dive when a problem arises then the buddy will be of little help. If you are frequently pushing recreational depth limits, or approach decompression diving, or have a higher SAC rate, then you are probably a candidate for larger bailout supplies or even double cylinders. The good news is: these larger tanks, and the training about how to handle them, are available today, unlike 15 years ago. Each diver needs to evaluate their needs. You can never go wrong with visiting your local dive store, physically trying a dive with a redundant gas supply and asking lots of questions. Its not if you might need it, but a matter of when. Norma Hill, Bill Wannall and Mike Harrison on patrol. In January of 2009, the Crawfordville Volunteer Fire Rescue Department lost an incredibly valuable member inthe line of duty, Captain Richard Rhea. CaptainRhea was one of the most knowledgable and well respected members of, not only our department, but of the entire reghting and EMS community in Wakulla County. He was the Training Of cer for our department and was instrumental in ensuring that our department members, both new and old, were excellently prepared to protect the life and property of our community. In a tting tribute to Captain Rhea, a scholarship fund was set up in his name to assist students wanting to pursue careers in reghting or emergency medical services. In an effort to raise money for this scholarship fund, I recently ran the Ignite the Fight 5K in full personal protective equipment. That included bunker pants,bunker coat, helmet and self contained breathing appartatus. When I set out on this endeavor I hada goal of raising$200. Thanks to the overwhelming support of my community and friends,$660was raised to support the Richard Rhea Scholarship Fund.Down Home Foreign Care Repair Shadeville Elementary School Susan Payne Turner Mr. and Mrs. Joe Verbic Matt Brazier Mr. and Mrs. Craig Kittendorf Will McHugh Hugh Harts eld Nick Campbell Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Theobald Mr. and Mrs. Matt Stolk Mr. and Mrs. Herman Stolk Erin Brazier Bob Wilson Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Linenger Mr. and Mrs. Bill Rochus I would also like to extend a special thanks to The Wakulla News for sponsoring me by running this ad, ensuring that all $660 was deposited directly into the Richard Rhea Sholarship Fund.Fireghter Ian Brazier Thanks Sponsors! Ian BrazierFireghterCrawfordville Volunteer Fire Rescue Department Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 3.2 ft. 5:03 AM High 0.3 ft. 12:16 PM 1.4 ft. 12:48 AM 1.2 ft. 2:10 AM 0.7 ft. 3:27 AM 0.2 ft. 4:32 AM -0.4 ft. 5:30 AM -0.8 ft. 6:22 AM Low 3.0 ft. 7:11 PM 3.0 ft. 6:20 AM 2.8 ft. 8:01 AM 2.9 ft. 9:40 AM 3.1 ft. 10:58 AM 3.3 ft. 12:02 PM 3.5 ft. 12:58 PM High 0.5 ft. 1:19 PM 0.8 ft. 2:28 PM 1.0 ft. 3:33 PM 1.1 ft. 4:33 PM 1.3 ft. 5:26 PM 1.4 ft. 6:14 PM Low 3.1 ft. 8:10 PM 3.2 ft. 9:05 PM 3.3 ft. 9:55 PM 3.5 ft. 10:41 PM 3.7 ft. 11:24 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 3.3 ft. 5:00 AM High 0.3 ft. 12:13 PM 1.6 ft. 12:45 AM 1.3 ft. 2:07 AM 0.8 ft. 3:24 AM 0.2 ft. 4:29 AM -0.4 ft. 5:27 AM -0.9 ft. 6:19 AM Low 3.1 ft. 7:08 PM 3.0 ft. 6:17 AM 2.9 ft. 7:58 AM 3.0 ft. 9:37 AM 3.2 ft. 10:55 AM 3.4 ft. 11:59 AM 3.6 ft. 12:55 PM High 0.6 ft. 1:16 PM 0.8 ft. 2:25 PM 1.0 ft. 3:30 PM 1.2 ft. 4:30 PM 1.4 ft. 5:23 PM 1.5 ft. 6:11 PM Low 3.1 ft. 8:07 PM 3.2 ft. 9:02 PM 3.4 ft. 9:52 PM 3.6 ft. 10:38 PM 3.8 ft. 11:21 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 3.4 ft. 12:00 AM High 1.4 ft. 12:38 AM 1.3 ft. 1:52 AM 1.1 ft. 3:14 AM 0.6 ft. 4:31 AM 0.1 ft. 5:36 AM -0.3 ft. 6:34 AM -0.7 ft. 7:26 AM Low 3.0 ft. 5:39 AM 2.8 ft. 6:56 AM 2.6 ft. 8:37 AM 2.7 ft. 10:16 AM 2.9 ft. 11:34 AM 3.1 ft. 12:38 PM 3.2 ft. 1:34 PM High 0.2 ft. 1:20 PM 0.5 ft. 2:23 PM 0.7 ft. 3:32 PM 0.9 ft. 4:37 PM 1.0 ft. 5:37 PM 1.2 ft. 6:30 PM 1.3 ft. 7:18 PM Low 2.8 ft. 7:47 PM 2.8 ft. 8:46 PM 2.9 ft. 9:41 PM 3.1 ft. 10:31 PM 3.3 ft. 11:17 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 2.4 ft. 4:55 AM High 0.2 ft. 12:27 PM 1.1 ft. 12:59 AM 0.9 ft. 2:21 AM 0.5 ft. 3:38 AM 0.1 ft. 4:43 AM -0.3 ft. 5:41 AM -0.6 ft. 6:33 AM Low 2.3 ft. 7:03 PM 2.2 ft. 6:12 AM 2.1 ft. 7:53 AM 2.2 ft. 9:32 AM 2.3 ft. 10:50 AM 2.5 ft. 11:54 AM 2.6 ft. 12:50 PM High 0.4 ft. 1:30 PM 0.6 ft. 2:39 PM 0.7 ft. 3:44 PM 0.8 ft. 4:44 PM 0.9 ft. 5:37 PM 1.0 ft. 6:25 PM Low 2.3 ft. 8:02 PM 2.4 ft. 8:57 PM 2.5 ft. 9:47 PM 2.6 ft. 10:33 PM 2.8 ft. 11:16 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 2.5 ft. 4:47 AM High 0.3 ft. 11:55 AM 1.4 ft. 12:27 AM 1.1 ft. 1:49 AM 0.7 ft. 3:06 AM 0.2 ft. 4:11 AM -0.4 ft. 5:09 AM -0.8 ft. 6:01 AM Low 2.4 ft. 6:55 PM 2.3 ft. 6:04 AM 2.2 ft. 7:45 AM 2.3 ft. 9:24 AM 2.4 ft. 10:42 AM 2.6 ft. 11:46 AM 2.7 ft. 12:42 PM High 0.5 ft. 12:58 PM 0.7 ft. 2:07 PM 0.9 ft. 3:12 PM 1.1 ft. 4:12 PM 1.2 ft. 5:05 PM 1.4 ft. 5:53 PM Low 2.4 ft. 7:54 PM 2.5 ft. 8:49 PM 2.6 ft. 9:39 PM 2.7 ft. 10:25 PM 2.9 ft. 11:08 PM 3.0 ft. 11:51 PM High Thu Nov 17, 11 Fri Nov 18, 11 Sat Nov 19, 11 Sun Nov 20, 11 Mon Nov 21, 11 Tue Nov 22, 11 Wed Nov 23, 11 Date 2.5 ft. 4:35 AM High 0.1 ft. 11:44 AM 1.4 ft. 12:34 AM 1.1 ft. 1:59 AM 0.7 ft. 3:10 AM 0.3 ft. 4:10 AM -0.1 ft. 5:03 AM -0.4 ft. 5:54 AM Low 2.4 ft. 7:59 PM 2.3 ft. 5:56 AM 2.1 ft. 7:38 AM 2.0 ft. 9:32 AM 2.1 ft. 11:20 AM 2.3 ft. 12:50 PM 2.4 ft. 2:03 PM High 0.3 ft. 12:41 PM 0.6 ft. 1:42 PM 0.9 ft. 2:42 PM 1.2 ft. 3:40 PM 1.4 ft. 4:35 PM 1.6 ft. 5:24 PM Low 2.4 ft. 8:31 PM 2.4 ft. 8:59 PM 2.5 ft. 9:27 PM 2.6 ft. 9:56 PM 2.8 ft. 10:27 PM 2.9 ft. 11:02 PM HighGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 17 Nov. 23First Dec. 1 Full Dec. 10 Last Nov. 18 New Nov. 24Major Times 5:38 AM 7:38 AM 6:02 PM 8:02 PM Minor Times 12:19 PM 1:19 PM 11:49 PM 12:49 AM Major Times 6:27 AM 8:27 AM 6:51 PM 8:51 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:56 PM 1:56 PM Major Times 7:16 AM 9:16 AM 7:40 PM 9:40 PM Minor Times 12:51 AM 1:51 AM 1:32 PM 2:32 PM Major Times 8:06 AM 10:06 AM 8:31 PM 10:31 PM Minor Times 1:54 AM 2:54 AM 2:09 PM 3:09 PM Major Times 8:57 AM 10:57 AM 9:24 PM 11:24 PM Minor Times 2:59 AM 3:59 AM 2:47 PM 3:47 PM Major Times 9:52 AM 11:52 AM 10:20 PM 12:20 AM Minor Times 4:06 AM 5:06 AM 3:30 PM 4:30 PM Major Times 10:49 AM 12:49 PM 11:19 PM 1:19 AM Minor Times 5:15 AM 6:15 AM 4:17 PM 5:17 PM Average Average Average Average+ Average Good Better7:03 am 5:40 pm 11:50 pm 12:20 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:04 am 5:39 pm --:-12:57 pm 7:05 am 5:39 pm 12:52 am 1:33 pm 7:06 am 5:38 pm 1:55 am 2:10 pm 7:07 am 5:38 pm 3:00 am 2:48 pm 7:08 am 5:38 pm 4:07 am 3:31 pm 7:08 am 5:38 pm 5:16 am 4:18 pm59% 52% 45% 38% 31% 23% 15% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 Page 11AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Nov. 3, Theresa Miller of Jerrys Bait and Tackle in Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a boat, trailer and motor owned by Sean McAuliffe of Tallahassee. The boat was stored on the property and was taken during the night or early morning hours. The vessel is valued at $2,500. The boat was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC computer. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: On Nov. 3, a Crawfordville female reported being the victim of harassing telephone calls and texts. The suspect insinuated relationships with the victim. Evidence was collected. On Nov. 3, Carolyn Brantley of Ochlockonee Bay reported a felony criminal mischief. The victim observed damage to her home as someone attempted to break in. Damage is estimated at $1,045. Evidence was collected at the scene and the case was sent to the Criminal Investigations Division. On Nov. 3, Don Kemp of the Wakulla County Public Works Department reported a criminal mischief on Mount Zion Road in Crawfordville. A motorist created $250 damage to the dirt road by spinning tires. A suspect has been identi ed. On Nov. 6, a resident of River Plantation reported that a 44-year-old male and his 5-year-old daughter were both naked in a boat on the Wakulla River. Deputy Cole Wells reported that the man and child were dressed when he arrived to investigate. The male subject told Deputy Wells that he dropped his keys in the river and removed his clothing to retrieve them. The childs clothing was removed so she could urinate in the river. The River Plantation resident stated she was concerned about the welfare of the child. The case has been turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division and contact was made with the Department of Children and Families. On Nov. 6, FHP Trooper Brian Speigner reported a criminal mischief at Wakulla High School. It appears as if someone struck the WHS sign with a blunt object. Damage was estimated at $200. On Nov. 4, a motor grader operator with the Wakulla County Public Works Department reported being threatened by a Crawfordville resident as he attempted to grade a road. The victim stated he would shoot the road grader operator if he continued to grade the road. It was determined that the county has an easement to grade the road. The operator was attempting to x the road for an upcoming funeral. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Lt. Billy Jones asked the two parties to resolve their differences without charges being led. On Nov. 6, Tanya Price of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of jewelry and computer software from her home. The stolen property is valued at $3,675. On Nov. 6, Deputy Randy Phillips investigated an elderly/disabled neglect complaint involving a 56-year-old victim. The victim was locked outside his home by the suspect/ caregiver. The victim was wearing soiled and dirty clothing when questioned by the deputy. WCSO deputies went to a fast food restaurant and purchased food for the victim. Eventually, the caregiver returned home and stated that she must have forgotten to give the victim a key. EMS was called to the scene and determined the victim was healthy. The investigation is ongoing. On Nov. 6, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received a complaint of a motorist striking a deer at the Fire Tower Bridge and U.S. Highway 319. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston discovered the injured deer suffering and put it down. On Nov. 6, Amanda Sutton of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim lost $100 from the vehicle. On Nov. 4, Oscar R. Smith of Crawfordville reported the loss of his wallet from his vehicle. Credit cards, a drivers license and Social Security card were lost. On Nov. 5, Jodie Farnsworth of Crawfordville reported a structure fire. Two large storage sheds were on re when Deputy Ward Kromer arrived on the scene. Wakulla County Firefighters extinguished the re but the sheds were a total loss. The buildings and contents were valued at $2,500. The cause of the re is still to be determined. On Nov. 4, Kelvin Robbins of Panacea reported a theft of a gas tank from his shing boat. The property is valued at $130. A suspect has been identi ed and the tank was returned to the owner. On Nov. 4, William Excorpizo of Crawfordville reported a grand theft as someone stole three extension cords, valued at $170. A semi-truck radiator was also stolen. It is valued at $300. On Nov. 7, Vesco Specialized Carriers of Conyers, Ga., reported a tractor trailer accident on Shadeville Highway near U.S. Highway 319. Deputy Ben Steinle responded to a disabled tractor trailer in the roadway. The load was a Caterpillar drill weighing more than 100,000 pounds. As the driver, Joe Hunter of Garden City, Ga., approached the intersection the tongue area of the trailer broke in half. The trailer could not be moved out of the roadway without specialized equipment. Due to the location of the accident three off-duty deputies, Rachel Oliver, Mike Helms and Matt Helms, were needed for traf c control. There were no injuries. The case was reported at 5:17 p.m. on Nov. 7 and was cleared at 2:51 a.m. Nov. 8. There were no injuries although damage to the highway was reported due to the weight of the trailer. On Nov. 7, Magnus D. Peavy of Panacea reported a criminal mischief to a construction site on River Plantation Road. A portable toilet was tipped over, a front end loader was raised up on its hydraulic stabilizers, a log splitter was tipped on its side and tires were used to spin out on grass. In addition, $1,500 worth of damage was done to a pickup truck on site. A person of interest was identi ed. On Nov. 7, Brittney Dawkins of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary and grand theft of a five foot long python. The snake and the living quarters tank are valued at $425. A suspect has been identi ed. On Nov. 7, a stolen Harley-Davidson motorcycle was recovered in a wooded area off Floyd Gray Road. The 2008 motorcycle was stolen out of Leon County. The bike is valued at $9,600. The motorcycle was transported to the WCSO impound area. Leon County made an arrest in the case. On Nov. 7, Tamela Miller of Captain Seaniles in Crawfordville reported a retail theft. A customer removed small bottles of liquor without paying for them. The victim requested a trespass warning against the suspect. The loss of property is estimated at $9. On Nov. 8, Charles Ferrell Barwick of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a trailer from his property. The property is valued at $750. The trailer is owned by Sheryl Ferrell. On Nov. 8, Christy Basso and Frances Collinsworth, both of Crawfordville, reported a residential burglary. A at screen television and computer equipment, valued at $1,950, was reported missing. A suspect has been identi ed. On Nov. 9, Tina Walker of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of three dirt bikes valued at $2,900. The motorcycles were secured to the victims carport. On Nov. 9, Karla Wood of Panacea reported the theft of medications from her residence. No forced entry was discovered. The different medications were valued at $650. On Nov. 9, Leonard Crum of the WCSO Maintenance Division reported discovering narcotics in a ling cabinet in a hut behind the jail. A smoking pipe and 1 1 grams of cocaine was discovered and turned over to the evidence section. On Nov. 9, Deputy Randy Phillips investigated a grass fire on Curtis Mill Road in Sopchoppy. A structure was also partially destroyed. It was valued at $5,000. The owner of the structure has not been determined although it may be owned by the Florida Division of Forestry. Wakulla Fire ghters determined that the re was not of a suspicious origin and the case was closed. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 703 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportATM thief guilty, judge sentences him to 30 years By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA man charged with stealing ATMs went to trial last week, was found guilty by a jury and sentenced by the judge to 30 years in state prison. Joel Cooper, 37, had a two-day trial on Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 7 and 8, and was found guilty of burglary of a structure causing more than $1,000 damage; criminal mischief; and felony eeing or attempting to elude of cer. Because of more than 20 previous felony convictions, Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford went ahead with the sentencing shortly after the jury returned a guilty verdict and ordered Cooper to serve 30 years. Assistant State Attorney Lorena Vollrath-Bueno, who prosecuted the case, said Cooper had been implicated in a number of similar crimes throughout Florida and Georgia. After a rash of similar crimes in the area, in October 2009 Wakulla Sheriffs Capt. Bill Poole had the Stop N Save convenience store at Spring Creek Highway and U.S. Highway 98 under surveillance when Cooper and an accomplice allegedly broke into the store and chained the ATM to a car and pulled it out into the parking lot. Poole ordered the men in the vehicle to stop they didnt and he red two shots, one of which struck the car. A high-speed chase ensued with Poole and Deputy William Hudson in pursuit. Cooper and his accomplice escaped into Leon County where there was another getaway car on Natural Bridge Road. A month after the incident, in November 2009, Cooper was arrested by U.S. Marshals -reportedly in a stolen car with chains, hooks and crowbars inside. Bueno said that Cooper had a system worked out for stealing cars to use in his robberies typically going for older cars on lots, where salespeople were more likely to allow a customer to take it for a test drive. The test drive gave Cooper an opportunity to copy a set of keys for the vehicle at a hardware store, return the car to the lot, then later come back and take the car. There are a couple of men suspected of being the accomplice with Cooper in the October 2009 burglary, Bueno said.Drug take-back bin available at WCSOThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce has added a secure disposal container in the lobby of the facility at 15 Oak Street in Crawfordville for unwanted drugs. The drop box will allow us to remove the unwanted narcotics from the streets while also making sure the drugs are properly disposed off and do not pose a threat to humans, animals or the environment, said Interim, Sheriff Donnie Crum. The sheriffs of ce has also had requests to dispose of needles or used sharps. The Wakulla County Health Department accepts the used sharps, but they must be disposed of in approved containers which can be purchased at any pharmacy or at the health department. If not in a sharps container, they must be in a metal can or bleach bottle with the lid taped securely. For more information about disposing of needles, call the Wakulla County Health Department Health Educator Grace Keith at 926-0400, extension 215. DEADLINE FOR THE NOV. 23rd ISSUE IS FRIDAY, NOV. 18th at 11 AM. CALL IN YOUR CLASSIFIED AT 877-676-1403 www.florida-classifieds.com ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA Y Y our advertising budget is TOO BIG Statewide adver singrefreshing rates (866)742 1373 Octob e rMedicare Open Enrollment Starts Early This Year!OCTOBER 15 DECEMBER 7THIS IS THE TIME TO: Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders Florida Department of Elder AffairsFLORIDA SHIP SHINE is a Florida Department of Elder Aairs program operated in partnership with your local Area Agency on Aging to provide information and assistance with Medicare. All services are free, objective and condential. WE DO NOT SELL INSURANCE OR REPRESENT ANY INSURANCE ENTITY. 1-800-96-ELDERSe Habla Espaol (800-963-5337)MARK YOUR CALENDAR! BENEFITat Hudson Park Saturday, Nov. 19thPlease join family and friends for a MULLET DINNER on behalf of BILLIE JO HARTSFIELD BARKSDALE. Saturday, November 19th, 11AM-4PM at Hudson Park, Crawfordville Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe CenterFull Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A You have to get everything managed and controlled, Kinder says. And you have to scale the house. If an entertainer asked too much, Kinder says he moved on to the next choice. Kinder started fundraising after college not knowing what he wanted to do with his life. He was single, could travel and it sounded interesting, he says. It t, Kinder says. And he was a natural. Kinder says its all about having fun and doing things that arent expected. At one of his golf tournaments, he put a toilet seat on the rst tee. Golfers had to sit on the toilet to tee off. Another time, he got a camel from the Ringling Brothers and had it as a guest at one of his tournaments. I learned they can spit and get nasty, Kinder says. He also tried to make the prizes fun as well. So he gave people actual doors for door prizes. He also gave away a months worth of pork chops. But instead of a gift certi cate to a meat market, the winner won a live pig. But we gave it back, Kinder says. And the winner actually did win a gift certi cate. One year during a golf tournament for a hospital, Kinder says he became tired of the best golfers winning the prizes. He says he felt that the worst golfer should also be recognized. So he developed the worst golfer award which was a bedpan with golf balls lining the edges. Kinder says while walking on the street one day he ran into a man who won the bedpan at one of Kinders tournaments. The man told Kinder he keeps the bedpan on the wall at his of ce. THE EARLY YEARS Kinder was born in Wisconsin and lived on a farm with his family. His great-grandfather, who he spent a lot of time with, served in the Civil War. He passed away at the age of 97 and Kinder says there was a story in the local newspaper after his greatgrandfather died stating that he was the last living Civil War vet in the entire state of Wisconsin. Im probably the only person who can say that, that I hung out with someone who served during the Civil War, Kinder says. When Kinder was a teenager, his family moved to Chicago. When he was in high school, he joined the Navy and served for three years, a little over a year of that was on a carrier. He nished high school while he was in the Navy and was mailed his diploma. Following the Navy, he went to college and majored in history, with a minor in philosophy. Kinder says nobody wanted to hire a philosophy major. And I couldnt get a boat to Greece, Kinder says. So he started as a professional fundraising consultant. Later on, he also received his masters degree in hospital administration from George Washington University. He did his residency at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. ENCOUNTER IN MEMPHIS During his time as a fundraising consultant, one of his campaigns took him to Memphis, Tenn., in 1968. He was doing a citywide campaign for Goodwill and ended up going to a city meeting to make a presentation. During this meeting, there was talk about a strike that was currently going on with the sanitation workers and the city. Kinder recalls the mayor not wanting to negotiate or agree to their terms. At the meeting, a man stood up and told the audience if the mayor wouldnt support the workers, he was going to bring in Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to march. King ended up coming to Memphis. A couple of weeks following that meeting, Kinder was still in Memphis and King was assassinated on the balcony of his hotel room. Kinder remembers the chaos following Kings death, riots in the streets, people busting up store fronts. Everything came unglued, Kinder says. VARIOUS CELEBRITIES As a consultant, Kinder also spent his fair share in Las Vegas. Through a mutual friend, he met Nat King Cole, who performed at The Sands Hotel in Vegas. Although this was a time of segregation, Kinder says he never stereotyped anyone. He learned this after he got into a major car accident. Another motorist, who happened to be African American, saw what happened and pulled Kinder out of the car. Kinder says the paramedics told him he shouldnt have survived. After meeting Cole, he also met members of his trio, including drummer Lee Young. Young and Kinder became good friends and shared a love of golf. During one of their outings, Young told Kinder that he wished he could stay at the hotel where the trio played. In those days, African Americans werent allowed to stay at The Sands Hotel. Through his relationship with the Nat King Cole, he met comedians Dan Rowan and Dick Martin, who opened the show for the trio. Kinder says he became good friends with Rowan and he performed at one of his fundraising events. Later on, Rowan and Martin would end up having a very successful television show together, Rowan and Martins Laugh-In. Another person Kinder met through his connections was Bob Newhart. Rowan introduced the two and got Newhart to do a show for one of Kinders events. Kinder says he hung out with Newhart before and after the show and he learned they had a lot in common, one of those being that they both were from Chicago. We also look a lot alike, but he has all the money, Kinder says. Kinder also got the chance to hang out with comedy legend Bob Hope. Hope performed three different shows for Kinder. Hes the best ad liber, Kinder says. Ive never met an yone better. He remembers hearing a story about Hope during the last few days of his life that made him chuckle. Hope lived to be 100 years old and the last year of his life, he was blind and bedridden. His wife asked Hope where he wanted to be buried. His response, Surprise me. He was still so sharp, Kinder says. Kinder recalls Hope never having a problem getting a plane to take him to his next destination. Prior to one of his shows, everyone had made it to the venue except Hope. When Kinder asked where Hope was, his assistant told him he was in Miami and Kinder would need to pick him up. Kinder says he asked the assistant how he was supposed to do that. The assistant told him to get a plane. Well, after two phone calls and name dropping, Kinder had a plane for Hope. Kinder says in the 70s, Hope was the most famous entertainer and people and companies would simply lend him planes. He nally broke down and bought a plane when he was 87, Kinder says. It was fun times. Not only could Hope get planes, he could also get a room in a booked hotel. When Kinder was putting on a fundraiser for Easter Seals in Tampa, he went to reserve a large number of hotel rooms and the best suite in the hotel for Hope. When he asked for the rooms, he was told there were no rooms available. As Kinder was going to leave, the concierge asked him who the suite was for. That would have been for Bob Hope, Kinder says he told the concierge. Well that changed everything. The manager came out and told Kinder there were rooms available. I found out they always have a room. Kinder says. Kinder decided instead to book the rooms at another hotel and ended up meeting the owner of the Yankees, George Steinbrenner. Kinder says they talked and hung out and he even got to meet some of the Yankee players. It was more fun than staying at the Hyatt, Kinder says. Hope was also very down to earth, Kinder says. For Hope, it wasnt all about the money. Hope did a show for a hospital that had 100 beds. He performed for half the cost some other celebrities requested, Kinder says. Throughout the years, Kinder says he met a lot of people with money. Hardly any of them have enough, Kinder says. And although it makes for some interesting stories, Kinder says some celebrities arent worth knowing. Theres many people worth knowing, but they arent celebrities, Kinder says. His wife of 42 years, Marge, says her husband has lived as interesting life and has many stories. Some you want to know and some you dont, Marge says. The two met while Jerry Kinder was doing a fundraiser for the Girl Scouts in New Jersey, Marges home state. I was single and thought, surely I can scout some girls, Jerry Kinder says. He met Marge and the two eventually were married. He moved on and didnt forget me, Marge Kinder says. The Kinders moved to Wakulla County 17 years ago. They started an expense reduction consulting rm, 13 years ago, where they nd ways to cut costs without letting go of personnel. The two are also very involved in Relay for Life, both being cancer survivors. Marge Kinder started the Cancer Support Group in Wakulla County because there wasnt one. Jerry Kinder found out he is now cancer free and says he has started to get his pep back. He plans to start fundraising again and become a volunteer with the Florida Sheriffs Associations charity golf tournaments. Now that Im able to bounce around again, Kinder says. I can still do it. You never forget it. He is also open to performing standup comedy for charities. Anyone interested in contacting Jerry Kinder can email him at jkinder2@ comcast.net or call him at 926-6050.Jerry Kinder Kinder and wife Marge, top, with Bob Newhart. The signed photo says, To Marge and Jerry, Thanks for a great time. At right, Kinder with pal Dan Rowan. Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center will host the 5TH ANNUALFREE COUNTY WIDE THANKSGIVING DINNERThe dinner will be held at the Senior Center located at 33 Michael Drive in CrawfordvilleNovember 22, 20114:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.Please join us for this very special event! If you have any questions please call 926-7145. Presented by Escambia Countys Extension Service via Polycom video conferencing. When:November 22, 2011 Where:Wakulla County UF IFAS Extension Ofce 84 Cedar Ave., Crawfordville, FL Time:6:30 p.m. EST/ 5:30 p.m. CST Cost:$5 per person. Price includes materials and handouts.This program will cover Floridas new cottage food regulations and include a time for questions and answers with our Small Farms and FCS Staff. Farms or individuals interested or currently marketing processed foods are encouraged to attend. Cottage Foods:Navigating Floridas new regulations for Small Producers Must pre-register by November 15th.To register for Wakulla County, contact the Wakulla County Extension Ofce at 850-926-3931. To register for Escambia County, contact the Escambia County Extension Service at 850-475-5230. WakullaCounty

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& Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 United Way is in the midst of a fundraising drivePage 4B Crawfordvilles Kitsune Books wins ve awardsPage 3B By SUSAN SOLBURGWHS Drama TeacherWakulla Highs Dramatis Personae will present Kurt Vonneguts The Barnhouse Effect and John S. Wells Competition Piece in performances this weekend. It is early in the 1950s and a college professor named Arthur Barnhouse, played by senior Jared Hansen, has discovered something he calls Dynomopsychism or Power of the Mind. ON-STAGE e Barnhouse E ect and Competition PieceThe Barnhouse Effect, above, features Kyle Rozanski, Jared Hansen and Ronnie Allen. Competition Piece, right, features Rami McIver, Brett Deross, Shelby Hawkins and Sierra Moss.PHOTOS BY SUSAN SOLBURG/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDramatis Personaes annual OneAct Plays featuring Kurt Vonneguts e Barnhouse E ect and John S. Wells Competition Piece will be performed on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 18 and 19, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Nov. 20, at 2 p.m. Tickets are $6 for adults, $4 for children.Wakulla High Schools Dramatis Personae presents two one-act comediesThis amazing power allows the professor to manipulate all sorts and sizes of inanimate objects. A young college student, Mr. Vaughn E. Gutt, played by senior Kyle Rozanski, has been sent to assist the professor with his research by the colleges Assistant Dean Margaret Tharpe, played by senior Samantha Tomlinson. One thing leads to another until the FBI, the military and the Russians all want to know about and control the professors amazing powers. The paranoia that surrounded new and dangerous technologies runs rampant in this satirical look at the early years of the space race. The other one-act play is about three different sets of high school students getting ready for a theatre competition. Each group is lead by a very clueless and unusual type of drama teacher. The whole process from play selection, casting and rehearsal will make for mucho mayhem and merriment. This play with 22 actors is directed by former WHS graduate Krissy Kosec Sanders. Sanders performed in this same play while a student at WHS and is now a senior at FSU majoring in Theatre. Also we will have a guest appearance by another graduate, Corey Hager, as he reprises his role as Judge No. 3, the Grim Reaper. 15minute guaranteeTallahassee Memorial is pleased to bring InQuicker to the community for those patients requiring emergency care for non-life threatening medical conditions. With InQuicker, you never have to experience a long wait in a crowded emergency facility again. Instead, enjoy the comfort of your own home while waiting for your next emergency care visit. Simply access the InQuicker system at tmh.org to nd projected treatment times at both the Tallahassee Memorial Bixler Emergency Center and Urgent Care Center. Once the system captures certain demographic and symptomatic information, you are added to the wait queue which holds your place in line, online. When you arrive at the emergency center for your projected treatment time, you will be seen by a nurse practitioner, physicians assistant or physician in 15 minutes or less, guaranteed. Your ER wait is over. Check-in at tmh.org to hold your place in line, online today. Online Check-in atTMH.ORG* InQuicker is only for patients experiencing non-life threatening conditions and does not affect the wait times of other emergency room patients. Priority treatment is always given to those with the most urgent medical conditions. your ER wait is over. Guaranteed. Saturday, Nov. 19 at 8pmAt POSH JAVAin Downtown Sopchoppy$10 Cover/RESERVED SEATING: (850) 962-1010 Organics & GiftsFred Figueroa, Carly Bak & Craig Daniel HardinSabal like the tree, represents the people and places of Florida.

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, November 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP will meet from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Please call 926-0401 ext. 217 for more information. CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend the meetings. For more information about CCOW, visit their website at www.cowakulla.org. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, November 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, November 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Vendors wanting to participate, call Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or 528-5838, or email posh_faery@ yahoo.com. ORDER OF THE CONFEDERATE ROSE Mary C. Gwaltney chapter will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405. SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS Wakulla Guards Camp will meet at 5 p.m. at the library. For more information, call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405. Sunday, November 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, November 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, November 22 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. Wednesday, November 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE D ANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, November 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, November 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 5440719 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsThursday, November 17 CPR TRAINING will be held at the Wakulla County Health Department at 7 p.m. The cost is $25 per person. For more information or to register, call Grace Keith at 926-0400, ext. 215 or email at Grace_Keith@doh.state. .us. Saturday, November 19 WAKULLA COUNTY CHILDRENS FUND FUNDRAISER will be held at the Shell Point Volunteer Fire Department from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. They will be having a garage sale, silent auction, bake sale, chili, soup, hotdogs and drinks. All proceeds go to help the needy children of Wakulla County. If anyone has a new or slightly used item they would like to donate for the silent auction contact Susan at 926-1409. TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet from 10 a.m. to noon. at Christ Church Anglican, located at 3383 Coastal Highway in Crawfordville. Children should bring their favorite train and a snack and drink. All Spectrum children and their siblings are invited to come to this play date. Children must be accompanied by a parent at all times. Social disorders are associated with Autism and Spectrum children and many social activities cost money. The play date allows each child to interact with others, and costs no money. Trains are a common interest among Spectrum children and a great way for the kids to light up. Please RSVP to Carrie Stevens at 274-9474 or carriejstevens@comcast.net. BIKERS SHOEBOX RUN will start at 8:30 a.m. at Spirit Life Church, 131 Rose Street, Sopchoppy. The members of Spirit Life Church are collecting shoe boxes lled with gifts to give to needy children this Christmas. Shoeboxes will be delivered by a group of motorcyclists who will be leaving the church heading to Power Country Radio station at 9206 West U.S. Highway 90 in Lake City. Spirit Life Church will be open at 7:30 a.m. for coffee and donuts before the motorcycle group leaves. For more information contact Sharon McClendon at smctupper@embarqmail.com. OPEN HOUSE FOR THE HOLIDAYS will be held at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sponsored by the Photo Club, this family-friendly day of fun will include free holiday photographs, crafts for the kids, yummy holiday treats and hot cider and outdoor wagon rides. A chili lunch will be available for a small donation. No advance reservations necessary. Call the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge at 925-6121 for more information or visit their website at www.fws.gov/saintmarks. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at the Sunset Restaurant in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812, Don (president) or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594 or email bardon56@aol. com, You may also call Linda Wood at 850-899-0025 in Port St. Joe, or email Sheri at skpsky2000@comcast.net. Find more information about the club, visit www.nationalbuttonsociety.org or www.FloridaStateButtonSociety.org. Bring buttons to the meeting for free appraisals. Tuesday, November 22 FREE COUNTYWIDE THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive. For more information, call 926-7145. Wednesday, November 23 14TH ANNUAL FARM CITY BREAKFAST will be held at 7 a.m. at the Livestock Pavilion by the North Florida Fair Association, Wakulla County Farm Bureau and University of Florida/IFAS/Wakulla County Cooperative Extension Service to recognize Jeff Lawhon and his family as the new North Florida Fair Associations 2011 Outstanding Farm Family for Wakulla County. R.S.V.P. by Nov. 22 at wakulla@ifas.u .edu or call 926-3931 if you will be attending the breakfast. We want to thank you for your support of agriculture in Wakulla County, and we hope you can be with us at our breakfast. Thursday, November 24 THANKSGIVING DINNER will be held by Alcoholics Anonymous at 5 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. The meeting will follow at 8 p.m.Upcoming EventsWednesday, November 30 CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at Mikes Seafood Grille, 2302 Crawfordville Highway, from noon until 1:15 p.m. Please RSVP to the Wakulla Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Cost is $12 per person. Friday, December 2 COMMUNITY RECEPTION to launch Healing Arts of Wakulla County, which will involve the arts in community wellness, will be held from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at The Works Co-Working Cafe in Crawfordville. Artists, healthcare professionals, instructors and the public are invited to attend. Refreshments and drinks will be available. RSVP to 926-3526. By JOAN HENDRIX CHAT President Gizmo is a small 1-yearold terrier mix, chocolate/white bicolor with a medium wiry coat, droopy ears, long tail and beautiful brown eyes. His tail is forever wagging; hes sweet, friendly and a very sociable dog. Thats our Gizmo. This was a typical weekend day and Gizmo, as usual, was out playing in the yard, which is a chain link fenced yard. Of course the grass always looks greener on the other side so he decided to dig under the fence to play with the other dogs who were barking at him. It didnt take him long to dig a little tunnel and get half way under the fencing, when the other dogs decided to come take a look at the activity by the fence. They frightened Gizmo and he decided to back out where he knew he would be safe. Unfortunately, the sharp bottom of the fencing dug into his back and ripped his skin open and cut him deeply. This was the rst accident weve ever had of this nature. He was immediately removed from the situation, brought inside, wrapped in a towel and a veterinarian was called. Because it was the weekend, we nally reached Jeanette from VCA who came to CHAT, looked at the injury and described the type and severity of the wound to Dr. Faith Hughes, who was available by phone. Gizmo was wrapped in a clean bandage in order to keep the area as sterile as possible. Dr. Hughes arrived shortly, examined Gizmo, and gave him pain medicine until he could be scheduled for surgery. Gizmo died twice on the operation table and was brought back to life by Jenny Cruse, Burdette and Dr. Hughes. He stayed some days at VCA where his daily care was provided by all the wonderful vet techs at VCA. He was brought to CHAT to his own private room to heal quietly. During this period of time he developed a fever due to an infection and Dr. Hughes recommended that he be brought back to VCA where he is today being cared for again by loving hands. We are all cheering for this little guy especially since he has such a strong determination to live. It is our hope that he will be adopted by a family who will give him lots of love and attention which he so well deserves. If you have a chain link fence and a small dog, please secure or reinforce the bottom so that it is impossible to dig under. For big dogs, make sure they cant dig under, climb over or jump over any type of fence. Walk the perimeter of your fencing occasionally to ascertain if there is any type of activity by your dog around the bottom of the fence or otherwise. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comTail Wagger... CPR training at the Health Department at 7 p.m. Open House for the Holidays at St. Marks Refuge County Commission meeting at 5 p.m. Free Thanksgiving dinner 4 to 7 p.m. at the Senior Center. ThursdaySaturdayMondayTuesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingThursday, November 17 WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will be held at 10 a.m. in the board of county commissioners conference room. RECYCLING TASK FORCE will meet at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. The purpose of the meeting is to propose and pursue ways to increase recycling in Wakulla County. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for a public workshop on the Environmental Protection Agencys cleanup grant at 6 p.m. in city hall. Monday, November 21 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Gizmo

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 Page 3B 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Office (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Office (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Office (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New auto rates as low as 2.75% for qualified applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and floor rate of 2.75%No payments for the first 90 days! 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Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com The Worksw a kulla scoworking caf www.theworksca fe.com ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special! Let us perk up your day! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHoot Gibson will headline the Sopchoppy Opry at its show on Saturday, Nov. 26, at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy Gym. Hoot Gibson at the Sopchoppy OpryCrawfordville publisher wins ve book awardsSpecial to The NewsKitsune Books of Crawfordville, which published Cookie & Me, won a whopping ve awards for its authors in the 2011 Florida Publishers Association (FPA) Presidents Book Awards competition. Tallahassee author Mary Jane Ryals won the Gold Medal for Adult Florida Fiction in the 2011 Florida Publishers Association (FPA) Presidents Book Awards. Ryals winning novel is Cookie & Me (Kitsune Books, 2010, ISBN: 978-0-9819495-6-7), a bittersweet telling of the summer of 1963 when racial tensions bubble over and a young girl experiences friendship and love in one heady Florida July. With an ear for regional voices as pitch perfect as a tuning fork, Ryals brings to life her beloved South during the tumultuous days of the early civil rights movement. Set in Tallahassee, Cookie & Me tells the story of Rayann, who is white and somewhat privileged, and Cookie, who is black and living a marginalized life that Rayann never realized existed until that one life-changing summer. Cookie & Me previously won a Bronze Medal from the 2010 Florida Book Awards, and is a 2012 selection of FSUs OLLI Book Club. The cover was painted by Carol Lynne Knight, co-editor of Anhinga Press. In addition to Ryals Gold Medal win, Silver Medals were awarded to the following books published by Kitsune Books: Big Boys Dont Spy, K.E.M. Johnstons clever James Bond spoof, is aimed at 8 to 12 year old readers. Tallahassee award-winning childrens author Susan Womble says, Masterful inventions and a melding of cultures add ingenuity and avor to author Johnstons tale of how family can be counted on above everything else. Hold on tight for a fast-paced ride inside the mind of the 12-year-old James Bond clone! The commissioned cover was painted by local artist, John Roberge. (ISBN: 978-0-9819495-9-8) Here I Am a Writer, Christopher McIlroys moving memoir, contains poems and stories produced by McIlroys Native American students involved in the school ArtsReach program in Arizona. A decade or more later, McIlroy went in search of the young writers whod opened their hearts in his classes, to see how theyd fared in the intervening years and if they were still writing at all. What he chronicles is as much his journey of discovery as theirs. (ISBN: 978-0-9827409-1-0) Its unusual for a publisher to have two wins in a single category, but thats what happened in the Poetry Category. She Returns to the Floating World, poetry collection from Pacific Northwest poet Jeannine Hall Gailey, is a book about transformation that examines two recurring motifs in Japanese folk tales and popular culture: the woman who disappears and the older sister/savior. Many of the poems are persona poems spoken by characters from anime and manga, mythology and fairy tales, like the story of the kitsune, or fox-woman, a thread that weaves throughout the book. (ISBN: 978-0-98274092-7) Moon ower, poetry collection by South Florida poet and teacher Gianna Russo, documents the transition from a painful past to a hopeful future through excellent pacing and control of tone. Russo is a master of the unexpected yet perfect turnaround, always taking readers a step beyond where they expect to go. Kitsune Books was founded by Anne Petty in 2006 to make available to the reading public an eclectic variety of artistic, well-written books that are slightly off the beaten path. We appreciate a quirky sense of humor, the ability to transport readers seamlessly into the story or poem and wordsmithery thats music to the ears. We welcome both new and previously published authors. Kitsune Books was featured in the February 2011 issue of Writers Digest. Submissions Guidelines: www.kitsunebooks. com/submissions.html.Special to The NewsThe group Sabal will perform at Posh Organics in Sopchoppy on Saturday, Nov. 19, beginning at 8 p.m. Tickets for the show are $10. The music of Sabal is a combined effort of three talented points of view. These three musicians, singers and songwriters blend their unique styles into a harmonious ensemble of swampy Americana music. Sabal like the tree it takes its name from represents the people and places of Florida. With her powerful soulful voice, Carly Bak brings light to her original songs telling stories of her life and experiences. Delivering songs of his north central Florida heritage, craig daniel hardin adds a contemporary yet rooted sound and conscience with his singing and songwriting. As the anchoring musical force of the trio Fred Figueroa showcases his talent through the harmonica and guitar. His soulful songs and his bluesy sounds round out the sounds of Sabal. Posh is located at 64 Winthrop Ave. in Sopchoppy. For reservations, call (850) 962-1010. Sabal will perform at Posh Organics on Nov. 19SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFred Figueroa, Carly Bak and craig daniel hardin perform as Sabal at Posh Organics on Saturday, Nov. 19.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCovers of the ve award-winning books published by Crawfordvilles own Kitsune Books.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com TheWorks coffeeespressolatts cappuccinofrapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8am-9pm Sunday12-5pm 27FAzaleaDrBehindBealls850.253.7253www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a rt u p B u s i n e s s o f t h eY e a r 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyof926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatFRESHMADE TO ORDERHOTORCOLD SPECIALTY SANWHICHES SALADSSEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTYPLATTERS Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment onlyBy KEITH BLACKMARSpecial to The NewsReports about the weakened economy are rampant on the television news, on radio and in the newspapers, but for the crew of the Wakulla County United Way Committee, 2011 has become a time of opportunity. A group of six individuals who work or live in Wakulla County or both, joined two members of the United Way Leadership Team earlier this year to raise money for many agencies who rely on charitable contributions for their survival. United Way Vice President of Resource Development Heather Mitchell and Campaign Associate Marc Dickieson have been working with the Wakulla committee which includes: UW Chairman and Wakulla County Commissioner Alan Brock, Trish Andrews of CSG, Keith Blackmar of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, Betsy Ennis-Short of St. Marks Powder, Courtney Peacock of Capital City Bank and Nannette Watts of ESG. The committee recently awarded $118,336.83 to 24 agencies that serve Wakulla County and a total of 29,257 individuals who call Wakulla County home. The agencies represented a wide range of interests including programs that help residents through the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, YMCA, Special Olympics, Refuge House, Big Bend Hospice and more. ST. MARKS POWDER IS INVOLVED IN THE DRIVE St. Marks Powder has always been a corporate partner of the United Way. The company matches 25 percent of all designated United Way funds raised by the employees and the present campaign has just about reached the goal of $65,000. The majority of the money raised by the company and employees goes to United Way to help residents of Wakulla County. It is my responsibility in difficult times to help others whether it is with time or money, said longtime St. Marks Powder employee John Nichols. We need to do what we can afford to do to help. We are a pretty sorry lot if we cant help each other. With an employee workforce of approximately 380, St. Marks Powder is hoping to have at least 50 percent of their employees participate in their Charities Drive which includes a Bingo game, online auction, special drawings, bake sale, dessert contest, candy jar guessing game, golf tournament, and a company sponsored lunch for all the contributors. St. Marks Powder Campaign Chairperson Betsy Ennis-Short is proud of the efforts of her fellow employees. Every year our employees step up and meet and exceed the charitable fundraising goals we place before them, she said. VOLUNTEER NANNETTE WATTS Volunteer Nannette Watts didnt know much about the United Way campaign until her supervisor at ESG, Cleve Fleming, volunteered his public works operation to assist the campaign. It has been an eye opener for Watts ever since. Cleve is always willing to help, said Watts of her boss. At first I thought, what did he get us into now? Seeing it for the rst time, I saw how many people it helped. When we nished with the allocation meetings, I thought I probably wouldnt volunteer again next year, but the allocations process and learning about what the agencies do, it was just awesome. The experience of the allocations committee completely turned my mind around on the agencies and how they serve the public, but also gave her knowledge that she has shared with residents who come into her of ce. ESG has held Friday luncheons during the campaign where members of the staff and visitors can purchase a lunch and the proceeds go toward United Way. Im encouraged by it, said Watts. DONT KNOW WHAT WED DO WITHOUT UNITED WAY Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center Director R.H. Carter knows the impact United Way funding has in keeping senior citizen programs alive. This year his agency was cut slightly but still received $83,555.29 during the allocations process. I dont know what we would do without them, said Carter of the United Way. It has been very helpful to us. I appreciate the United Way. United Way dollars help the center fund three areas: supervision for seniors who are visiting the center with extreme memory impairments while their caregivers run errands; a larger chunk of the money is spent on the popular congregate meals that are served in the facility; and funding also goes toward some in-home services. We average 60 seniors a day eating lunch and our grant funding provides money to feed about 20 of them, says Carter. The rest comes from United Way. The center relies on United Way, county contributions, a few grants and several large fundraisers to make the operation successful.United Way is the midst of its annual fundraising drive KEITH BLACKMARNannette Watts didnt know much about United Way until her supervisor at ESG, Cleve Fleming, volunteered his public works operation to assist the campaign.We average 60 seniors a day eating lunch (at the senior center) and our grant funding provides money to feed about 20 of them, says Senior Center Director R.H. Carter. The rest comes from United Way. Optimists install new o cersSpecial to The NewsThe Panacea Coastal Optimists Club held the installation for its new officers on Oct. 27 at Poseys Up the Creek in Panacea. The 2011-12 officers include President Larry Massa, Vice-President Sally Gandy, Secretary Debra Range and Treasurer Susan Payne Turner. Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond administered the oath at the installation ceremony. The 2011-12 Directors for the Optimists are Noah Posey, Walt Dickson and Bill Versiga. The club meets on Thursdays at noon at Poseys Up the Creek in Panacea.TAMMIE BARFIELDClerk of Courts Brent Thurmond administers the oath to Optimists new of cers: Larry Massa is president, Debra Range is secretary and Susan Payne Turner is treasurer.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 Page 5B The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary..........36 classrooms/newspapers.........$576/yr Medart Elementary...................33 classrooms/newspapers.........$528/yr Riversink Elementary................20 classrooms/newspapers.........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary..............40 classrooms/newspapers.........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School........10 classrooms/newspapers.........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bareld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name_________________________________ Address_______________________________ City_______________________State____Zip_________ Phone______________Email_______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink)By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 11 Could it all stem from this? Backers of a little school in Lakeland hope the states future one that includes lots of jobs in science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, could have reached an important milestone this week. Maybe not Priestley and oxygen or Einstein and relativity-big, but important nonetheless toward setting the state on a high-tech path to the future. Some people hope that a vote taken this week at a state university system board of governors meeting in Boca Raton laid the groundwork for Florida to have a major university focused mainly on science one that would eventually be in the league of the big schools that have Tech on the end of their names the Virginia Techs, Georgia Techs, Cal Techs and MITs of the world. Others argue that Florida has some pretty big scientific superstars in its university arsenal already USF, FSU and UF in particular would argue theres an awful lot of cutting-edge research there. And they also argue that cutting away a new university from USF doesnt guarantee success, anyway. The University of South Florida Polytechnic may have been born this week with the vote to allow officials to push forward with developing what is now a branch campus of USF in Tampa into a break-away, stand-alone university along the growing I-4 corridor in Central Florida. It has to be said may have been because the decision wasnt fully final there were several conditions put on the effort, and the idea will have to go back before the board for further approval. The vote by the BOG on Wednesday night, after a day of tense discussion, came after a relatively short push for the school to break away from the USF system, which backers had argued was holding USF-Poly back. It also probably pointed out the influence of one of its biggest backers, hometown Sen. JD Alexander, R-Lake Wales, who also holds legislative purse strings as chairman of the Senate Budget Committee. Many faculty and students at the Lakeland branch campus were opposed to the move and USF was against it as well. But it seems lately science and technology are the answer to every question posed about the future in Florida and going against the march of progress wasnt likely to win the day. Right after the vote the board took a step to make sure nobody else tries to do this. The board voted to put a moratorium on other branch campuses splitting off in the next five years, or until after USF Polytechnic is fully independent. Meanwhile on Thursday, state university system officials were putting forward their own ideas for how to tie funding to the performance of the various state universities. The writing is on the wall the governor and the Republican Legislature want more than science degrees they want accountability from the university system if the state is going to pay for it. Much like the GOP has pushed K-12 schools to be more accountable for what they produce, the ball toward measuring the outcomes is rolling up the hill to the ivory towers of collegiate academia and doesnt appear likely to stop. But university presidents this week also were asking for greater flexibility if theyre going to be held to a higher standard. Setting tuition based on market rates and other measures of flexibility are likely to be debated over the next year or so alongside accountability issues. POLITICS While it was a mostly quiet political week in Florida, much of the political news around the nation this week focused on Election Day on Tuesday. There were a handful of municipal races on the ballot here, but in other states voters surprised many observers by rejecting a Mississippi constitutional amendment proposal that would have made life begin at conception. The same personhood idea is being pushed in Florida, but it was evident this week that it is nearly certain to be unable to get the signatures in time to get the measure before voters in 2012. Lawmakers moved up the date for turning in signatures and the personhood backers appear highly unlikely to make the earlier deadline. Supporters say theyll aim for 2014. In other elections around the country, Ohio voters sent a message to that states Gov. John Kasich that efforts to curtail the collective bargaining power of union members arent as popular as the governor thought. The voters repealed a law that limited union members rights. Floridas Gov. Rick Scott was confusing, at best, earlier this year on just whether he thought Florida also should try to end collective bargaining rights first he said he thought it was fine, then he said we ought to get rid of collective bargaining, but said he couldnt see getting rid of it because it would require a constitutional amendment. The Foundation for Floridas Future, which has battled the states teachers union over things like merit pay and school vouchers, told Sunshine State News earlier this year that it will try to take on union bargaining rights next year in the Legislature. Florida and Ohio are so different in terms of the relative role unions play in work life that its impossible to say whether the Ohio experience says anything about what might happen here. Still one interesting issue that the attention to the Ohio vote raised for Florida government watchers: for Florida state workers worried about their take-home pay, it could be worse. The Ohio law that was repealed by voters required state government workers in the Buckeye state to put 10 percent of their salary toward their pension, and pay 15 percent of their health care costs. One of the most controversial measures passed by lawmakers in Tallahassee this past year required state workers to put 3 percent of their pay toward their pension. Thats in effect, but being challenged in court. GREER SAGA It wasnt that there wasnt political drama available in Florida this week, it just didnt happen in the voting booth. Former Republican Party Chairman Jim Greer was back in the news, as the GOP tried and failed to get his lawsuit against the party thrown out. And Greers lawyer released a long list of politicos he wants to depose as in take a deposition, not throw out of office a list that could lead to some embarrassing testimony about the partys inner workings. Greer has made it clear he wont take his ouster from the party quietly. The list of possible depositions only reinforced that. It includes five current lawmakers and two former U.S. senators and a former presidential nominee. The list includes former Gov. Charlie Crist, who picked Greer to chair the party, and Crists wife Carol. It also includes former U.S. Sens. Mel Martinez and George LeMieux who is running to try to go back to the Senate. Also up for possible depositions in the lawsuit over a severance package that Greer said he was denied: House Speaker Dean Cannon, Senate President Mike Haridopolos, projected future speakers Will Weatherford and Chris Dorworth, and Sen. John Thrasher, who doubled as chairman after Greers departure. The list even includes former GOP presidential candidate John McCain. FRANCISCO FRANCO IS STILL DEAD; GOV. SCOTT IS STILL UNPOPULAR A Quinnipiac University poll released this week had good news for Gov. Rick Scott his approval rating isnt going down. The bad news was it isnt really going up much either. Scotts approval rating came in at 36 percent in the Thursday poll, right around where it has been for a few months. AND A POLITICAL MOVE TO MARK Panama City Attorney Alvin Peters jumped into the race for Congress in the Panhandles 2nd Congressional District. The Democrat said hell run against freshman Republican Rep. Steve Southerland and Independent Party candidate Nancy Argenziano. STORY OF THE WEEK: The Board of Governors of the state university system allows the University of South FloridaPolytechnic to move forward with a plan to break away from the USF system to become an independent polytechnic university. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: This document is a piece of crap. Board of Governors member John W. Temple, summoning all the eloquence he could muster when asked what he thought about the plan put forward by the University of South Florida-Polytechnic to be an independent university.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Polly want a technic? Move on toward new university

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: List 10 words that rhyme with snood. 1. _____________ 2. _____________ 3. _____________ 4. _____________ 5. _____________ 6. _____________ 7. _____________ 8. _____________ 9. _____________ 10. ____________What Rhymes withSome answers: brood, crude, dude, feud, food, glued, mood, rude, screwed, viewed Jokes and Riddles Q: What do turkeys like to eat on Thanksgiving?A: Nothing, theyre already stuffed.Q: Why did the turkey join the band?A: He had the drumsticks for it. COLORING PICTURE COLORING PICTURE 1) Turkeys have unusual beak features called a wattle and a snood. Fact or Fiction? 2) Domestic turkeys are usually lighter than wild turkeys. Fact or Fiction? 3) Female turkeys are usually smaller than male turkeys. Fact or Fiction? 4) Female turkeys are called hens. Fact or Fiction? 5) Male turkeys are called toms or gobblers. Fact or Fiction? 6) Baby turkeys are called poults. Fact or Fiction? 7) A group of turkeys is called a gaggle. Fact or Fiction? 8) Turkeys cannot fly. Fact or Fiction? 9) When mating, wild turkeys puff out their feathers and gobble. Fact or Fiction? 10) Benjamin Franklin wanted to make the turkey the national bird of the United States instead of the bald eagle. Fact or Fiction? eMany Americans like to eat turkey on Thanksgiving Day. Here are some questions about turkey. How many can you answer correctly?Answers: 1) Fact, 2) Fiction, domestic turkeys are usually heavier than wild turkeys, 3) Fact, 4) Fact, 5) Fact, 6) Fact, 7) Fiction, a group of turkeys is usually called a rafter, 8) Fiction, some types of turkeys can fly, 9) Fact, 10) Fact gFact or Fiction?Turkey Challenge Each year as Thanksgiving approaches, the president of the United States receives two turkeys from the National Turkey Federation and the Poultry and Egg National Board. Rather than eat them, the president pardons the turkeys in a small ceremony at the White House. When the tradition started is not clear. Some say that President Abraham Lincoln started it when he pardoned his son Tads pet turkey. Others say President Harry Truman started the tradition in 1947, although there is no official proof of that. President John F. Kennedy was given a turkey in 1963, but chose not to eat it. In 1989, President George H.W. Bush pardoned the turkey for the first time officially. Since then, every president has pardoned an official turkey and an alternate every year. The turkeys are sent to a farm or ranch to live out the rest of their days. Pardon, Mr. Turkey Name That TurkeySince 1989, American presidents have pardoned a couple of turkeys on the eve of Thanksgiving and allowed them to live out their days in peace. Each of the following is one such turkey. Fill in the blanks to name that turkey.Answers: 1) Katie, 2) Marshmallow, 3) Flyer, 4) Apple, 5) Pumpkin, 6) Courage, 7) Biscuits 1. K A __ I __2. M A R __ __ M A __ __ O W3. F L __ E R4. A __ __ L E5. P __ M P __ I N6. C __ U R A __ E7. B __ S C U __ T S

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting pressure washing sheetrock wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 24 HOUR EMERGENCYRESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALSERVICEALLMAKESANDMODELSMAINTANCECONTRACTSSTOCKALLSIZE FILTERSANDMEDIA COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY SOLUTIONS850-926-4676North Pointe Center 1606-B Crawfordville Highwaylic# CAC1816154 A/C & Heating Specialists, LLCWWW.TALLYSENERGYSTAR.COM New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Cornerstone CookingWant a SMOKED TURKEY or HAM for your holiday get-together? Maybe you dont want to cook at all. Let Cornerstone Cooking take some of the hassle out of the holidays for you.We also o er FULL CATERING SERVICES! Morris Pigo at (850) 661-1117BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can x those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo.850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com DouglasMOBILEMARINE Outboard Repair & Service Electronics Installation Fiberglass RepairFactory trained: Honda, Yamaha, Suzuki and Tohatsu850-228-0889 LICENSED & INSURED 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building. Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com.FOXTROT FARM Learn: horse care, equipment, safety with some riding time. for private lessons on our new school ponies. English lessons on your horse; will come to your place. Call -LAURIE WESTBROOK 850-926-2004 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Do leaves have you bogged down this fall then call Pat Greens Lawn ServiceCall today for a free quote! They have all the modern equipment to rid you of all those falling leaves.(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUYSELLTRADEREPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @comcast.net Denises ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net Free Offers Free Dog male, Carin terrier,14 mos old, black/gray, all shots, neutered,needs yard,potty trained 850-212-3252 Good Things to Eat Farm fresh vegetables Peas blanched and frozen, okra chopped and frozen, green boiling peanuts and boiled green peanuts. We also custom-process cows, hogs, goats and deer. Raker Farms 926-7561 Trades/ Skills Certified Prescribed BurnerPrescribed burner needed. Full-time or part-time employment. Must have burn experience, including 130-190 certifications, heavy equipment operation, and clean driving record. Salary negotiable. Contact Bobbie Dugger with B&B Dugger, Inc. 850-566-0831 Garage/ Yard Sales Crawfordville Sat Nov 19 8:30AM-2PM Household items, clothes ect. 672 Shadeville Road IN HOME MOVING YARD SALEThurs 17th & Mon 21st, Noon to 9pm Dinette set, Refrig. treadmill, Christmas Items, hummel etc (850) 926-5824 Mobile Homes For Rent 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath SWMH, quiet street $400/month, $400 deposit.References required! 904-583-1177 2bed/2bath MH North of Crawfordville Wakulla County water & garbage provided, 1st, last and security reqd. $550 mo 850-960-4230 Mobile Homes For Rent 3BR/2BA DWMHWakulla Gardens, CHA,good floor plan,$650/month+deposit, application, references, 1 year lease Available now! Call for for appointments 850-508-8783, 727-642-6043 3BR/2BA SWMHon five acres. $500/mo.$500/sec. One mile South of Wakulla Station. Avilable now! 850-745-8526 Crawfordville 3/2 DW on 1.5 acres move in condition $650 mo. rent to own 850-926-9540 Crawfordville 3/2 on 1/2 acre $700 month plus deposit 850-766-0170 M/H for rent, 3BR/1BA.$450/mo. includes water, garbage, lawn-care. Quiet neighborhood. No pets. Call 850-926-3280 Real Estate For Rent 12x60 3 BR/1BAolder home. Central A/C,gas, heat, range.Garbage/ water included.Talquin/ Wakulla Gas. No pets $450/mo. + $350/deposit #20 Cutchin Ct (off East-Ivan Rd.) 850-926-1428 leave message 2BR/2BA home on the Ochlockonee River, separate family room, 1 car carport, quiet area. References required.No pets. $825/mo.+1st/Dep/Last Carol Odell, Broker Associate Century 21 Silver Coast Realty 850-984-5007 3BR/2BA DWMHLarge deck, shed, remodeled kitchen, Great condition! NO Pets, (firm) $650/month $600/sec 850-926-6212 WAKULLA GARDENS3BR./1.5BA HOME $525/month, plus deposit Call 850-766-0170 Apartments Swimming pool and gym Move in special $99 Deposit $300 Local Hero Discount $99 Civil Servant 5% off rent Senior Citizen 5% off rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo 2BR as LOW as $700/mo 3BDR as LOW as $800/mo. Application Fee $35 850-926-1134 Duplexes For Rent 2BR/1BA Duplex near downtown Crawfordville. $600/ mo, $500/security Call 566-7391 Crawfordville, clean, large 2 bedrooms, 2 full baths duplex, $675 per month. Call Linda 850-926-0283 Rental Houses 3BR/2BA in Mysterious Waters $695/rent, same deposit, no pets. Call Jim at 566-5165 Cozy cottage, Panacea. Remodeled 2BR/1BA. Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, open back deck, Close to Gulf of Mexico, excellent fishing! $585/month-$550/deposit. 850-926-4217 Rent: Houses Unfurnished Medart studio house on four lots, $500/per month, plus deposit. Revel Realty 850-962-2212 New home in Crawfordville! 3BR/2BA, located in Wakulla Gardens $79,000 Revell Realty 850-962-2212 Storage/ Warehouses Mini-Warehouse Spaces for lease, 8x10 and 10x12 now available. Come by or call Wakulla Realty, 926-5084 Real Estate For Sale 3BR/2BA one-story home on 1.5 lot with garage. Excellent condition. $95,000. Owner financing. 850-251-7588, 850-962-2016. SOPCHOPPYHOME, 3/BR/1BA, located on 1/2 acre lot. $75,000. Revell Realty 850-962-2212 Commercial Real Estate Affordable Office Space at the Barry Building. Great atmosphere! Includes all utilities, trash p/u, full kitchen use, conference room. Rates start at $250/mo. 850-210-5849 or our website at www.BarryBuilding.com Choice corner lot at juncture of Crawfordville Highway and paved Whitlock Way 200 X300 Commercial zoning guaranteed $70,000 Dixie Properties 850-656-6340 Restaurant Space Available Soon!! Fully equipped. Can assume full liquor license and equipment if you act quickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio-1000/sf, wall to wall mat & mirrors Retail1250/sf storefront w/back storage Divided office space1074/sf Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 Waterfront Homes 2BR/1BA, $850/month Access to boat ramp, dock, and park on Wakulla River. 51 Mysterious Waters Rd. 850-545-8755 850-926-1385 Lots For Sale 2acre lot for sale near new Shadeville School, corner of Steel Court and Spring Creek Hwy.(city water). Owner financing call 850-556-1178 or 850-556-3765 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR Sales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in CrawfordvilleDoug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. Nos ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926-5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial, residential and mobile homes. Repair, sales, service, installation. All makes and models. Lic. #RA0062516 926-3546 Landclearing/ Bushhogging BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway Larry Carter Owner/Operator 850-925-7931 or 850-694-7041 Licensed & Insured Pressure Cleaning A-1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed-John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 Services Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETEBLOCKS, BRICKS, PAVERSLANDSCAPEPLANTS, SOD, TRACTOR WORK Call JOSEPH FRANCIS 850-556-1178 OR 850-556-3761 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 5010-1117 10/26 sale Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83 part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, November 26,2011, at 10:00 a.m at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: TIFFANY HARVEY PENNY MCKINNEY Before the sale date of Saturday November 26, 2011, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. November 10 & 17, 2011 Self Storage Notices Heating/AC Services THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY announces the following: EVENT:Re-Organizational Meeting and Regular School Board Meeting DATE:Tuesday, November 22, 2011 TIME::5:45 P.M. Re-Organizational Meeting Regular Meeting will be held immediately after the re-org meeting PLACE : School Board Room 69 Arran Road,Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE::Re-Organizational & Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County Schools P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850 926-0065 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5013-1117 Vs. Lanham, John L. 65-2009-CA-000304, Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000304 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. LANHAM, JOHN L., et al, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000304 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., is Plaintiff, and, LANHAM, JOHN L., et al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse at 11AM on the 1st day of December, 2011, the following described property: LOT 32, BLOCK 6 OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT TWO, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim with in 60 days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $725mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 4Br 2Ba DWMH $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $800mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.(850) 926Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 877-676-1403

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1100 per month. DEADLINE FOR THE NOV. 23rd ISSUE IS FRIDAY, NOV. 18th at 11 AM. CALL IN YOUR CLASSIFIED AT 877-676-1403 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5008-1117 TWN Taft, Bruce Edwin 11-63-PR Public Notice IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 11-63-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF BRUCE EDWIN TAFT, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BRUCE EDWIN TAFT, deceased, Case Number 11-63-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF 5009-1117 TWN Rybak, Les 11-62-PRIN Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 11-62-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF LES RYBAK, DECEASED NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Les Rybak, deceased, File#11-62-PR, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative adn the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and the other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claim with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. Notwithstanding the time periods set forth above, any claim filed two (2) years or more after the decedents date of death is barred. The date of the first publication of this notice is November 10, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representatives: Robert P. Diffenderfer, Esq. Florida Bar Number: 434906 Lewis, Longman & Walker 515 North Flagler Drive, Suite 1500 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 640-0820 E-mail: rdiffender@llw-law.com Personal Representatives: Jan Rybek-Matalon 1466 Lee Avenue Tallahassee, FL 32303 Brian Rybek 9481 NW 26th Place Sunrise, FL 33322 November 10 & 17, 2011 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration 5000-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 033 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CLYDE K CARTER SR OR DELORISS FORT WROS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1628 Year of Issuance2003 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-068-000-10108-006 P-1-1-M-23 1.23 AC ML IN SW CORNER OF SW 1/4 OF HS 68 Name in which assessed PHILLIP HARVEY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5001-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 032 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CLYDE K CARTER SR OR DELORISS FORT WROS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 412 Year of Issuance2003 Description of Property: Parcel # 25-5S-02W-046-03538-000 AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK U LOT 17 OR 46 P 56 Name in which assessed META H WILLIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5002-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 034 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1197 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 35-3S-01E-263-05538-161 VILLAGES OF ST MARKS LOT BB COMMERCIAL LOT OR 293 P 623 OR 594 P 255 Name in which assessed LACY A. & MARY T. MURRAY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5003-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 030 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CLYDE K CARTER SR OR DELORISS FORT WROS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1490 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10770-00 MAGNOLIA GARDENS LOT 47 BLK A OR 10 P 612 OR 204 P 367 Name in which assessed JOSHUA C ADAMS & ANGELA MAONE said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5004-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 031 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CLYDE K CARTER SR OR DELORISS FORT WROS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 928 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-035-008-07103-000 WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT I BLOCK 12 LOT 21 OR 1 P 846 Name in which assessed WALTER STEVEN & LILLIAN ODELL said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. 5005-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 035 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 930 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 15-3S-01W-000-04397-000 15-3S-1W P-16 M-64 IN FRACTIONAL SW 1/4 OR 4 P 394 OR 36 P 732 Name in which assessed VENETTA J WALKER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5006-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 036 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 993 Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel # 07-6S-01W-301-04626-A01 BULAHS COVE SUBDV LOT 1 OR 491 P 13 OR 659 P 497 Name in which assessed JOHNNY PETRANDIS II said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 5007-1117 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 037 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that R.E. MEADOWS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 846 Year of Issuance2004 Description of Property: Parcel # 00-00-005-000-06249-001 P-18-1-M-3 1.31 AC M/L ON THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF HS 3 BEING ON WEST SIDE OF TRIPLETT RD OR 319 P 427 OR 441 P 327 Name in which assessed LINDA BAKER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5012-1124 Vs. Galloway, Charles 10-000346-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 10-000346-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to GULF STATE COMMUNITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES GALLOWAY and BRENDA GALLOWAY, husband and wife, defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Order of Final Summary Judgement of Foreclosure in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida described as:: Lot 3 of HERON POINT, a subdivision as per map of plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 34 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 1st day of November, 2011. (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court /s/By: Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Steve M. Watkins, III FBN: 0794996 41 Commerce Street Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 November 17 & 24,2011 (SEAL) BY /s/ DESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 850-926-0905, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 10 & 17, 2011 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE TO THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is November 10,2011. Personal Representative /s/Keith Henry Taft 31 Thames Street, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for the Personal Representative /s/MARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.949884 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, FL 32326 November 10 & 17, 2011 Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Clerk Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, November 3, 10, 17,2011 DEADLINE FOR THE NOV. 23rd ISSUE IS FRIDAY, NOV. 18th at 11 AM. CALL IN YOUR CLASSIFIED AT 877-676-1403 RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets36 Stephen Donaldson Road 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 1 Acre $700 No Smoking or pets RENT TO OWN!!60 Hummingbird Lane 4 BR/2BA, 1.964 sf house with 2 car garage, replace and POOL. $1300 Mo. No Smoking, pets negotiable 59 Chickat 3BR/2BA House $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 55 Janet Drive 3BR/2BA MH, Paradise Village, canal front, dock, community pool, Lawn Maint. Incl. $800 Mo. No Smoking/Pets 11 Quiet Cove, Panacea 2BR/2BA $850 mo. No Smoking/Pets negotiableAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 17, 2011 Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 28 40 42 49 56 61 64 2 36 57 3 37 58 21 33 53 4 15 18 34 50 5 29 43 6 30 44 7 31 41 54 59 62 65 22 24 38 55 8 16 19 39 51 9 35 52 10 32 45 11 25 46 60 63 66 12 26 47 13 27 48ACROSS1.Donaldsonor Spade 4. "The__ knees" (great) 8.Half the "Who's on First?" team 14.Indian, Brave or Chief 15.Green feeling? 16.Signals from a downed ier, perhaps 17.Conquistador's treasure 18.Former Fed head Greenspan 19.Building,after demolition 20.They'rechecked 23.Turnsinside out 24.Relative of -esque 25.Slacker'sbane 28.Fiddleroflegend 29.Oerlessons 32.Pouting expression 33.Chat room patrons 35.First Lady after Hillary 36.They'rechecked 40.__-washy 41.Makes tolerable 42.Toboot 43.Belarus's capital 45.Ump's call 49.Day-__ colors 50.Give the boot to 51.Likemostruns,in baseball 53.They'rechecked 56.Play merrily 59.Not even fair 60.Actor Billy __ Williams 61.Birdonabaseball cap 62.Partner of tried 63.Cyberspace initials 64.Sweet drink 65.Srs.' exams 66.Sr.,et al.DOWN1.Wordwith wellor soft2.Make it big 3.Sentimental sort 4.Beauty's beloved 5.Any military recruit, these days 6.Indiana's Bayh 7.In __ (harmonious) 8.From square one 9.Show embarrassment 10.Streisand,in fanzines 11.Heavenly body 12.__Aviv 13."TheWasteLand" initials 21.Mustachioed Marx 22.Tosspot's utterance 25.Soup du __ 26.Sharer's word 27.Arthur or Benaderet 30.Suxwith mock or crock 31.Colorado ski spot 32.Baton wielder 34.Shade of blue 35.Strongalkali 36.Bunker or Nob 37.__buco 38.__ Palmas, Canary Islands 39.Invited to dinner, perhaps 40.Tongueor tail action 43.Spaceoccupier 44.Helpful connections 46.How Rome wasn't built? 47.Shower item? 48.Ford ops 50.Rhea's"Cheers" role 52.Farm measures 53.Catcall 54.Many NYC dwellings 55.One ofAsta's masters 56.Onein theclink 57.Live and breathe 58.Old __ (London theater)American Prole Hometown Content 10/23/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 234 5 6 16 7648 5 87 62 491 4 359 41 398651 00 9 HtCtt 189 7234 5 6 534186297 726549138 953 218674 861374925 247965813 412 837569 675491382 398652741 S P O K E N W A G C O N A R R I V E H I L L A R E M O O N E R O S S O V I C G R O U C H O H O O T B E A S T S K Y C A R L A E N L I S T E E M A T T E R E V A N E R Y I N S S Y N C A S P E N A P T S H I C L A S N O R A A F R E S H A S K E D O U T B L U S H L Y E A C R E S B A B S M A E S T R O O R B J O U R I N A D A Y T E L O U R S M E T E O R T S E B E A E D S E L S Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-000143-CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WACHOVIA BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. ALL UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE ROUGHTON FAMILY LIVING TRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 14, 2001, ET AL Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): ALL UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE ROUGHTON FA;MILY LIVING TRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 14, 2001 (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) ALL UNKNOWN SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE(S) OF THE ROUGHTON FAMILY LIVING TRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 14, 2001 (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) ___, AS THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CLEO ROUGHTON, DECEASED, IF ANY (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: LOT 22, ELLEN WOOD SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THEMAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 10 AND 11, INCLUSIVE, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. 1994/FLEETCRAFT DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME VIN # GAFLR35A08300HH/TITLE#68765121 VIN # GAFLR35B908300HH/TITLE368765122 Street Address: 48 CAROLINA COURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 has been led against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Moskowitz, Mandell, Salim & Simowitz, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 800 Corporate Drive, Suite 500, Fort Lauderdale, FLORIDA 33334, 30 days after the rst publication of this Notice in THE WAKULLA NEWS and le the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the American with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville HIghway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Phone No. (850) 926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 27th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000247 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF BEATRICE FARMER, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS AND OR BENEFICARIES OF THE ESTATE OF BEATRICE FARMER LAST ADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNWON YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property; A portion of lands as described in Deed Book 5, Page 678 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the West Half of Lot 77 of the Harts eld Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run South 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 209.22 feet; thence run South 72 degrees 12 minutes, 00 West 134.22 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831) for the Point of beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue South 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West 75.00 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831); thence run North 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds East 75.00 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831); thence run south 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 75.00 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 0.129 acres, more or less. Together with a 20 foot access easement described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the West Half of Lot 77 of the Harts eld Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run South 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 189.22 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue South 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 20.00 feet; thence run South 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West 134.22 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831); thence run North 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds West 20.00 feet; thence run North 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds East 134.22 feet to the Point of Beginning. has been led against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49th STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 thirty (30) days after the rst publication of this Notice in THE WAKULLA NEWS and le the original with the Clerk of this Court Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability shoe needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact The Wakulla County Courthouse at 850-926-0905 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving noti cation if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 20th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-207-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, N.A., by and through its subservicing agent, VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. BRYAN A. DEKLE and PEGGY SUE DEKLE, husband and wife; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC, a Delaware limited liability company authorized to transact business in Florida, as successor in interest to Household Finance; FAMILY DOLLAR STORES OF FLORIDA, INC., a Florida corporation; UNIDENTIFIED JOHN DOE(S) and/or UNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRYAN ARMSTRONG DEKLE YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an aciton to foreclose that mortgage, originally in favor of Ford Consumer Finance Co., Inc. dated October 8, 1996 and recorded on November 1, 1996, in Of cial Records Book 286, Page 583; as assigned to Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance, Inc. by Assignment of Mortgage recorded on April 26, 2011, in Of cial Records Book 850, Page 822, as subsequently assigned in Of cial Records Book 854, Page 664, and nally assigned to the Bank of New York Mellon Trust Company, N.A., in Of cial Records Book 854, Page 665, all of the Public Records of Wakulla County, FLorida, encumbering the following real property located in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Lot 24 Millers Way South Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of Lot 52 of the Harts eld Survey of Lands in Wakulla COunty, Florida and thence run North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 402.50 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds West 524.40 feet to a point on the Southerly right-of-way of State Road No. S-368, said point lying on a curve concave to the Northerly, thence run Southwesterly along said curve with a radius of 1091.74 feet thru a central angle of 01 degrees 34 minutes 41 seconds for an arc distance of 30.07 feet (chord of said arc being South 77 degrees 12 minutes 43 seconds West 30.04 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 291.97 feet to a point on a curve having a radius of 1382.74 feet thru a central angle of 31 degrees 08 minutes 57 seconds for an arc distance of 751.73 feet (the chord of said are being North 87 degrees 31 minutes 55 seconds West 742.51 feet), thence run South 17 degrees 15 minutes 08 seconds East 484.05 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 50 minutes 52 seconds East 728.96 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO a roadway casement over and across the Southerly and Easterly 30 feet thereof. ALSO SUBJECT TO a 50.00 foot cul-de-sac easement in the Southwest corner thereof. has been led against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to SONYA K. DAWS, Plaintiff attorney, whose address is Sonya Daws, P.A. 3116 Capital Circle NE, Suite 5, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within thirty (30) days, and le the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on November 1st, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011Selling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK CASE NO.: 2010 000047 CA 2720 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32304, Plaintiff, v. SOUTHERN HOMES PROPERTY & DEVELOPMENT, INC., a Florida Corporation, and JOSEPH A. CULLEY, A/K/A JOSEPH A. CULLEY, III, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 1, BLOCK B OF GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 77 & 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on December 8, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must le a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to le a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators of ce not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 17, 23, 2011 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE STATE BANK CASE NO: 10-CA-046 2720 West Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32304, Plaintiff, v. SOUTHERN HOMES PROPERTY & DEVELOPMENT, INC., a Florida Corporation, and JOSEPH A. CULLEY, A/K/A JOSEPH A. CULLEY, III, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK 7, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AND LOT 47, BLOCK , WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, except as set forth herein after, at public sale on December 8, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Standard Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must le a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to le a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators of ce not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court November 17, 23, 2011

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