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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00382
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 11-10-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00382
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Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 45th Issue Thursday, November 10, 2011 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 6A Community....................Page 7A School...........................Page 8A Sports ............Pages 9, 10, 11A In The Huddle ............Page 12A Outdoors ...................Page 13A Water Ways...............Page 14A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 15A Green Scene ................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read Daily SPORTS JENNIFER JENSENKristi and Jeff Lawhon with son Hunter and daughter Gracie. The LAWHONSWakulla’s 2011 Farm Family of the YearBy JENNIFER JENSEN jjensen@thewakullanews.netSince 1998, Jeff Lawhon, of Sopchoppy, has been the keeper of bees. Well, the keeper of about 500 beehives located in the Apalachicola National Forest. Lawhon, who was born and raised in Sopchoppy and lives on the same piece of property he grew up on, said he grew up around beekeepers and was always interested in it. He has several friends from Smith Creek who are beekeepers and he used to go along with them to harvest the honey and constantly asked them questions during each step of the process. They made fun of me because I was always asking questions,Ž Lawhon says. He then decided to give it a try himself and purchased 30 beehives. His wife, Kristi, suggested he start small, making sure it was something he wanted to do. If he felt good about it, I felt comfortable with it,Ž Kristi Lawhon says, who describes her husband as a thorough researcher. I know he wont do something that isnt a worthy investment,Ž she adds. Once Jeff Lawhon started, he was addicted. The following year, he bought out another beekeeper and then had a total of 500 beehives. I kind of fell in love with it,Ž Lawhon says. I dove head “ rst into it.Ž Now, 13 years later, the business continues to thrive and has expanded to not only harvesting honey, but leasing out bees for pollination to other farmers. Beekeepers are bene“ cial to the environment, Lawhon says. And to recognize these contributions, the Lawhon family was selected as the 2011 Wakulla County Outstanding Farm Family of the Year by the Wakulla County Extension and Wakulla County Farm Bureau. The Lawhon family includes Jeff and Kristi and their two children, 11-year-old Hunter and 8-year-old Gracie. Jeff Lawhon says people have started to understand some of what beekeepers do because wild bees have started to die off, which means a lack of pollination for farmers and gardeners. The wild bees are being killed by pests and insects. Beekeepers are able to keep their bees alive by treating for mites and other insects and keeping a close eye on them in the off season. They lease their bees to farmers who use them to pollinate their crops, like watermelons, Lawhon says. He adds that many people have also started to buy bees to put in their yards for pollination. The extension of“ ce has also bought bees and have started classes on beekeeping because of the decrease in the wild bee population. For years, people didnt understand beekeeping and all that it involves, he says. It shed some light on it,Ž Lawhon says. People started to see how in-depth beekeeping is, he says. He began receiving calls from the extension of“ ce asking questions about how to handle and take care of the bees. Once it was time to select a Farm Family of the Year, the Lawhons were mentioned. It is farming,Ž Lawhon says. Its farming for honey.Ž Lawhons grandfather used to keep bees, so it is something he has always been around. Before starting his bee business, he had a landscaping company, but decided it was time for a change and was ready to truly be his own boss and be on his schedule. He says he has always loved the outdoors and agriculture so beekeeping seemed like a good fit. Plus he loved his workplace, the forest. The solitude of the forest, that really kind of spoke to me,Ž Lawhon says. During the spring, bees make excess honey, which is taken by the beekeepers and is called robbing the honey.Ž Harvest season runs February through May, Lawhon says. Its honey and money making time in the spring,Ž Lawhon says. The bees ” y during the day and work from dusk to dawn. No matter how far they travel, the bees always manage to make it back home, to their hive, at night. Theyve got internal GPS,Ž Lawhon says. Its really interesting to watch them.Ž In each hive, the bottom of the box is where the queen lays her eggs. The honey collects in the other layers. Once a box is full, another is added. When the honey begins to over” ow, the boxes are pulled and harvested. The honey can weigh up to 70 pounds, Lawhon says. Continued on Page 2APortwood lost insurance, keeps compensationBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTourist Development Council Director Pam Portwood lost her health insurance through the county because, after her contract was amended to specify she worked 20 hours a week, she no longer quali“ ed for coverage as a full-time employee. At the county commission meeting on Monday, Nov. 7, the board voted unanimously to continue to pay Portwood some $7,745 that the county had spent on her insurance … and which is considered part of her compensation. I have had people contact me with concerns about a salary increase,Ž said County Commissioner Lynn Artz, who stressed: This is not an increase in salary … its the exact same total compensation.Ž Under questioning by County Commissioner Alan Brock, Portwood noted that she is unlikely to “ nd any health insurance coverage because of a pre-existing condition. Portwoods husband had provided insurance coverage but was laid-off. She got coverage through the county with Capital Health Plan as a contract employee. Portwood noted that she is a breast cancer survivor and so “ nding coverage outside a group plan is dif“ cult and expensive. The issue that prevents Portwood from being on the countys insurance is the number of hours worked. If she worked 30 hours a week, she would qualify. Continued on Page 3A Pam PortwoodFocus on Ability recognizes talents, not disability By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTo wrap up Disability Awareness Month, the Wakulla County School Board Exceptional Student Education Team hosted a picnic in the park, called Focus on Ability, on Nov. 3. Students, teachers, parents, school employees and members of the community gathered at Hudson Park to focus on each students ability and not their disability. Tanya English, ESE Services director, said the talents each student has needs to be the focus and those talents need to be used. She said the schools have been doing numerous activities in the classroom during the month of October to focus on ability awareness. And to let everyone know how far weve come,Ž English said. She said she got the idea for the Focus on Ability event after meeting a girl named Elizabeth at her church who had a disability, but didnt let that stop her. She learned that Elizabeth worked at Applebees and was also a member of Pyramid Players, a performing arts group. English said she was inspired by Elizabeth and the idea for the picnic was born. Superintendent of Schools David Miller said he liked that there was a focus on the students abilities. Our kids have so many great abilities,Ž Miller said. Continued on Page 2A JENNIFER JENSENTanya English, ESE Services director for the school district, was inspired to create Focus on Ability by meeting Elizabeth, behind her, who doesnt allow her disability to stop her. Riversprings Bears have perfect season... Page 10A War Eagles upset Godby to win district... Page 11ABy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netSchool board member Ray Gray faced further problems last week when Centennial Bank filed a lawsuit to foreclose on some rental property he owns. The lawsuit, “ led Oct. 31 in Wakulla Circuit Court, lists a total claim of $998,800 against Gray Services 1, and names Gray, his wife Jody and other parties that may have a claim on the property. According to the lawsuit, Gray got a loan in January 2008 from Wakulla Bank to consolidate business debt.Ž Continued on Page 3ABank “ les suit to foreclose on Grays rental property Ray Gray e county will continue to pay the TDC director more than $7,700 a year it had spent on her health insurance The school board member comments that losing his county job as parks director has affected his ability to make payments Commissioner Alan Brock chosen as chairman. Story, Page 3AIt is farming, Jeff Lawhon says of beekeeping. Its farming for honey.A picnic in the park to recognize and focus on the talents and abilities of the disabled The picnic is to let everyone know how far weve come, says organizer Tanya English Veterans Celebration, See Page 16A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comFocus on Ability recognizes talents, not disabilityContinued from Page 1A Elizabeth and the other members of the Pyramid Players performed song and dance routines during the event. There was also a presentation recognizing local businesses and school employees who provide work experience to students with disabilities. This work experience program is called Wakulla Employability Skills Training or WEST. English said this program has been in place for 20 years and it couldnt be done without the support of the local businesses. Its just an incredible program,Ž English said. The businesses and people who were recognized were Suzanne Moses, Crawfordville Elementary lunchroom manager; Tina Wilson, Riversink Elementary lunchroom manager; Ingrid Funderburke, Riversprings Middle School lunchroom manager; Elizabeth Becker, Wakulla Middle School lunchroom manager; Kathleen Newton, Wakulla High School lunchroom manager; Colleen Altenburg, Wakulla Education Center lunchroom manager; Sandra Chaganis, Shadeville Elementary School lunchroom manager; Gail Mathers, Wakulla County School Board director of Food Service; Kyle Beckett, The Donut Hole; Lewis McCartha, CHAT; Chris Beatty, Florida Wild Mammal Association; Sharon Wolfe, Wakulla High School Library; Nancy Culp, Circle C Ranch; and WinnDixie. Those in attendance were also treated to free hotdogs and drinks provided by Brian English and Bill Versiga. Continued from Page 1A Its hard work, but its rewarding,Ž Lawhon says. Once the honey is removed from the hive, the wax is uncapped and it is put in an extractor which slings the honey. It then pours the honey into a tank, which goes into another tank and is poured into a 55gallon drum. These honey“ lled drums are sold in bulk to a man in New Jersey. That honey is used for baking, Lawhon says. There is one type of honey that Lawhon doesnt sell to a wholesaler, instead, he bottles it with the help of his family and sells it. This honey comes from the Tupelo tree and is called table grade honey, Lawhon says. Halfway through the harvesting season, the boxes are cleaned out and Lawhon moves all of his hives to the riverbank and the bees only work the Tupelo tree. The Tupelo tree is only found in this area, Lawhon says. Its our specialty item,Ž he says. The honey is raw, natural and un“ ltered, he says. Nothing is added, it isnt pasteurized or heated, so it still has all its natural attributes. Its just straight up from the bee to you,Ž Lawhon says. After harvest season, Lawhon says he is just trying to keep the bees alive, treating for mites and keeping them away from bears. In the winter if the bees do not produce honey, he gives them a supplement. Thats the management part of it,Ž Lawhon says. During the busy season, Lawhon says he uses parttime labor. His family helps with bottling, but Kristi Lawhon says she stays away during the harvesting. Whey they sling honey, there are bees everywhere,Ž Kristi Lawhon says. Its hard to “ nd help, because of the bee stings,Ž Jeff Lawhon says. He adds that Hunter travels with him and has just gotten big enough to start helping with the physical work. He hasnt quite found the love for it,Ž Lawhon says and give a laugh. He adds that it might be because Hunter was stung by a bee when he was younger. Lawhon says he is a determined person and once he started beekeeping, he was going to make it successful. I dont give up,Ž Lawhon says. Jeff Lawhon is not only a beekeeper, he is also a “ re“ ghter with the Tallahassee Fire Department. Kristi Lawhon is a registered nurse and teaches at the Medical Academy at Wakulla High School. The two have been together since the ninth grade when both attended Wakulla High School. The family was recognized at the North Florida Fair in Tallahassee by the Fairboard and is featured in the Wakulla County booth at the fair, which ends Nov. 13. The family will also be honored at the Farm City Breakfast on Nov. 23 at 7 a.m. at the Livestock Pavilion in Crawfordville. e Lawhons are Wakullas 2011 Farm Family of the Year The Lawhons pose for a family portrait, including honey and beekeeping items.PHOTO COURTESY OF LAWHON FAMILY JENNIFER JENSENCerti“ cates of Appreciation and recognition were given to a number of businesses and organizations in the community for their suppor t of the disabled. The Pyramid Dancers perform for the crowd. ALUMINUM CANS TIN & STEEL CANS GLASS JARS & BOTTLES PLASTIC CONTAINERS PLASTIC BOTTLES & JUGS PLASTIC YOGURT, BUTTER & DAIRY TUBS PLASTIC CAPS & LIDS (NO STYROFOAM) FLATTENED CARDBOARD NEWSPAPERS OFFICE PAPER PHONEBOOKS CEREAL BOXES MAGAZINES/CATALOGUES JUNK MAIL PAPERBACK BOOKS A A L L L L T T H H E E S S E E I I T T E E M M S S M M A A Y Y B B E E P P L L A A C C E E D D I I N N T T H H E E S S A A M M E E R R E E C C Y Y C C L L E E B B I I N N , A A T T T T H H E E C C U U R R B B Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 NOVEMBER 19, 2011 9AM EST --F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTION Tractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneers: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU4266 business license AB2969 € John Stanley AU44.10% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646. auctionzip.com 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 SATURDAY NOVEMBER 12, 2011 -7PM EST --F&LAUCTION --CHRISTMAS SALE !! There will be toys, B.B. Guns, bycicles, dolls, games, playstations, and all kinds of newest toys. Also, for the ladies, cookware, linens, jewelry, Lots and lots of whatknots. For men: tools, tool boxes, fishing items, lots more! Lots of Christmas decorations. If you need it, we got it! So come see us on November the 12th and Join in on the fun!Auctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU4266 AB2969 For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646. auctionzip.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 3A Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.com PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Continued from Page 1AAfter Wakulla Bank failed with the crash of the local real estate market, Grays loan was one that Centennial Bank took over … while it passed on others that stayed with the FDIC. The lawsuit states that the loan has been in default since April of this year, and it appears there are 14 mobile homes on a couple dozen parcels. Reached on Tuesday, Nov. 8, Gray said he had just been served with the lawsuit that morning. You lose your job and that affects payments,Ž Gray said. Gray said Gray Services 1 is a real estate and inspection company. Besides holding elected of“ ce as a member of the Wakulla County School Board, Gray had been director of the county Parks and Recreation Department … until he was “ red on Aug. 16 for problems that reportedly included being dif“ cult for his supervisor to reach, and concerns about the number of outside businesses he operates. Gray appealed his “ ring, Continued from Page 1A County Commissioner Randy Merritt asked why the board needed to specify the number of hours worked. You know why,Ž answered Chairman Mike Stewart. Because people want to see it down on paper, Merritt answered. TDC Chairman Richard Harden asked commissioners to support the request, as did TDC members Jacki Youngstrand, Tim Jordan and Sherrie Posey Miller also spoke in support … and Panacea Waterfronts Committee member Paige Killeen also added her support. No one spoke against the measure or raised concerns. In a related matter, the board set a workshop at 4 p.m. before their regular meeting on Nov. 21 to discuss the Tourist Development Plan, which is the broad outline of the goals of the TDC and its plan for increasing tourism. In a citizen investigation of issues around the TDC, it was discovered that the required plan, if there was one, cannot be found. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe main focus of the Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committees meeting on Oct. 20 centered around parks and recreation. After going through the 101 meters Progress Energy is in charge of, Committee Member Elinor Elfner said she realized several were associated with the Medart Recreation Park. There are 18 meters at the park and Assistant Director Bryan Roddenberry said the utility bill is about $1,500 a month. These fees are associated with the four concession stands, which include bathrooms, 11 “ elds, security lights and lighting the park sign. Dan Ard, with Talquin Electric Cooperative, said 18 meters on one property is a lot and means a lot of facility charges, which is a basic fee before any kilowatts are even consumed. It seems like poor planning,Ž Ard said. Ard suggested the county put one panel at the park and combine some of those meters. Roddenberry said the wiring is a spiders web, Its piece-mealed together,Ž Roddenberry said. He said he would look into the cost and if its feasible. There was also some discussion on changing the “ eld lighting to LED. Roddenberry said the department looked into the cost and was told it would be around $80,00 for one field. He added that his plan was to do one “ eld a year. Ard said lighting is where parks and recreation will see signi“ cant savings. There is about a 75-percent savings, but there is a lot of cost upfront, he said. The only place theyll save money is sports “ eld lighting,Ž Ard said. The department has tried to be more energy cautious, by putting in motion sensors and locking up the lights, as well as using high energy ef“ cient bulbs inside and out, Roddenberry said. An energy audit was also requested on the of“ ce building, Roddenberry said. He planned to get the audit to the committee for review. The committee also discussed the plumbing issue at Newport Park, which is a public campground. The campground needs a new water heater. Currently, there are two 125 gallon tanks. David Marsh of Tallahassee Energy and Construction, and also a member of the committee, suggested the county place a meter at the campground to determine the usage. Ard said the county should do a thermal base system with a polyethylene water heater, instead of a standard metal tank to prevent corrosion. Sometimes the cheapest thing isnt always the cheapest thing,Ž Ard said. But, Roddenberry pointed out that the department has a very small budget to work with. County Commissioner Lynn Artz said the county needs to be looking at the long term costs and the return on investment. Ard said a $1,400 tank would pay for itself in two years. Roddenberry said they could put one 80-gallon tank at the park and determine the usage, then add another tank if it was necessary. There were also issues at Woolley Park that were addressed, including vandalism, security, electrical and lights being on 24/7. The lights are left on to hopefully deter vandalism. Roddenberry said a park attendant will start in December and stay for six months. Elfner said they need to get the community involved and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful to keep the park clean, as well as to keep an eye on it. The next committee meeting will be held Nov. 17 at 10 a.m. in the administration conference room.Energy Conservation Committee focuses on county parksThe Medart rec park draws concern with its 18 di erent meters and a spiderweb of wiringCounty Commissioner Alan Brock will be the next chairman of the Wakulla County Commission starting at its next meeting on Nov. 21. The board voted to make Brock the new chair at its meeting on Monday, Nov. 7, which included a vote on reorganization. County Commissioner Lynn Artz “ rst moved that current Chair Mike Stewart continue in for another year, but he said he had no interest. With that, Artz moved Brock for the job … it was approved unanimously. County Commissioner Randy Merritt was selected as vice chair. Merritt was also chosen to serve on the election canvassing board after County Commissioner Jerry Moore decided to step down. Moore is on the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee and has indicated he plans to be active in next years election. Three members of the board would be ineligible to serve on the canvassing board as they would presumably be seeking re-election, though Artz, Brock and Stewart have not said whether theyre running or not. The canvassing board consists of Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker, Supervisor of Elections Henry BuddyŽ Wells, and a county commissioner. Special to The NewsFollowing an incident where an armed man threatened to kill members of the Bay County School Board in Panama City in December 2010, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Division of Emergency Management is coordinating a county commission safety exercise that is designed to give law enforcement and elected of“ cials a lesson in what to do if they are faced with an active violent threat at the board chambers. The exercise will be held Saturday, Nov. 19 from 8 a.m. until noon at the county commission chambers in Crawfordville. The public will be informed about the exercise with signs and is asked not to interfere in the exercise or try to help.Ž One of the greatest bene“ ts of the exercise is that it allows for the joint cooperation of law enforcement at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and the county, providing the opportunity to work together under dif“ cult conditions,Ž said Sheriff Donnie Crum. Participants in the exercise include an armed bandit bad guy,Ž WCSO deputies, county employees and elected of“ cials. Disasters, Strategies and Ideas Group (DSI), Wakulla County and the sheriffs office will be delivering the training session as a number of law enforcement of“ cers are exposed to the threat scenario. Simmunitions will be used to create a real lifeŽ experience for those participating in the exercise. Simmunitions are not live ammunition but can be “ red through weapons to create the appearance of an individual being shot. With cases of disgruntled people going to meetings and threatening public officials on the rise, the exercise can help both law enforcement and the public by educating them about what to do and how to handle the situation within the board chambers. When everyone is working as a cohesive team, it lays the groundwork to being better prepared for future emergencies, which translates into lives being saved,Ž said WCSO Emergency Management Director Scott Nelson. The WCSO conducts periodic exercises and has focused on bus accidents, student hostages and ” eeing criminals in rural portions of the county in past exercises as well as having plans to conduct future exercises in the Wakulla County Courthouse and other county buildings in 2012.Portwood insuranceRay Grays rental propertybut a three-person panel of county employees upheld his dismissal at a hearing a couple of weeks ago. While Gray hasnt publicly said so, it appears his termination will ultimately be headed for a lawsuit against the county. Last month, the state Ethics Commission charged Gray with violating financial disclosure requirements and fined him $7,500. Gray commented that he had over-reportedŽ by listing extra information on the disclosure form, instead of just his personal income. He denied having done anything wrong, saying it was a matter of errors. As for the pending foreclosure lawsuit, Gray shrugged it off and tried to stay positive, saying such things happen when the real estate market busts. He did dispute some of the facts in the lawsuit, saying there were parcels listed that shouldnt have been and some that werent that should have been. In the background of the phone call, the noise of an athletic “ eld could be heard. Gray said he needed to go, he was at the soccer “ eld doing a draft. Though he was fired by the county, he said, he was still at the park as a volunteer. Safety exercise will be held at county commission on Nov. 19Brock is new chair of board Alan Brock NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 21, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. NOVEMBER 10, 2011DistrictPopulation District 17200/5893* District 25921 District 35885 District 45944 District 55826 5893 population excludes 1307 inmates currently listed at Wakulla Correctional Facility on 7/25/11 (Maximum Capacity for Wakulla Correctional Facility is 1397).City of Sopchoppy NOVEMBER 10, 17, 2011

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak outComment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Crawfordville man killed in traffic crash • Suspect shot trying to break into convenience store • Sheriff’s Report for Oct. 27 • Lawsuit filed against club over wreck • Ray Gray’s termination upheld by committee •Buddy Tooke was first commercial Stone Crabber thewakullanews.com Follow us onEditor, The News: Dear Family, Friends and Colleagues, I just registered for the JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes and accepted the challenge to form a team and raise money for JDRF. The Walk draws people together in a healthy activity for a worthy cause while raising money to help “ nd better treatments and a cure for type 1 diabetes. This years Walk takes place on April 14, 2012, and Im writing to ask for your support. Now, more than ever, each of us can make a real difference in the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. Please join my team, make a donation and begin fundraising. Its simple, fast and fun! Visit my team page (www2.jdrf.org/site/ TR?team_id=38719&pg=team&fr_id=1670) to register and join my team! Once you register, youll “ nd fundraising tips and tools in your Participant Center. Plus, I will be your coach to answer any questions you may have. If you are unable to join my team, please consider making an online donation. My team fundraising goal is $200 and with your support, I know well exceed this! Donating online is quick, easy and secure; however, if you would prefer, you can mail your contribution to the address listed below. Make your gift payable to JDRF, and please put my name in the memo “ eld. Sydney Andrews 47 Meadowlark Dr Crawfordville, FL 32327-6208 Thank you for your support and making a difference in improving the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. Sincerely, Sydney Andrews Crawfordville Editor, The News: So many times in our lives I believe that so many of us take for granted the blessings that we have in this country. We live in the greatest country in the world and sometimes we do not see the blessings that God has given us. We have these blessings because of the men and women that defend our right to freedom of speech, religion and to bear arms. If it were not for those brave individuals who defend our rights we would be nothing more than the enslaved citizens of many countries around the world. We live in a blessed place whether we admit it or not. The price of freedom is not free and many families have borne the sacri“ ce of our freedom by supporting their loved ones that so courageously and sel” essly defend this country for our rights and freedoms. Many of our military personnel would give their right arms to have some of the pleasantries that we so easily take for granted while defending this fine country of ours. Although I have not been in the military, I appreciate the sacrifice that our military personnel and their families give on a daily basis for all of us. A friend of mine lost his brother in Iraq on Oct. 24, 2011, and the sacri“ ce that my friend and his family has had to endure the last two weeks is hard to fathom. I know that the young man died in an effort to allow Americans and citizens around the world a better life. If it were not for our military personnel and the families that support them our lifestyle would be much different than what we know today. May God bless our military personnel, past present and future and their sel” ess families. Garland W. Burdette Crawfordville Editor, The News: The Chamber is currently applying for a grant, which if awarded, will permit us to add window treatments to the historic courthouse. One of the requirements is that we obtain letters of support from community based organizations and businesses. If you have ever attended a meeting, workshop or other event at the old courthouse, you more than likely noticed that it is very dif“ cult to hear or understand a speaker due to reverberation, and projected materials are hard to view in the bright rooms. We also believe that window coverings will increase the buildings energy ef“ ciency, protect previously restored rooms from sun damage and add functionality. Letters need to be in hand no later than Nov. 10. Please email us a signed copy of the letter, on your company/organization letterhead, addressed as shown below: Mrs. JuDee Dawkins, Deputy Secretary Cultural, Historical and Information Programs c/o Historic Preservation Grants Program 500 South Bronough St. Tallahassee, FL 323990250 Please mail the original copy to: Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Attn: Grant Committee PO Box 598 Crawfordville, FL 32326 We will personally deliver the grant application package. Form letters will not be acceptable, so we would like to give you the following bullet points: Added functionality (ie intimacy for weddings, meetings, and social events/limit light for projected presentations); Acoustic improvement more desirable meeting location; Prevention of sunlight damage; and Improved energy ef“ ciency This enhancement will improve our ability to afford maintaining the investment already made to restore the building. Petra Shuff Of“ ce Administrator Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Editor, The News: Many thanks to our community for their support for our Focus on Ability, Picnic in the Park held on Nov. 3 in Hudson Park. This was a culmination of Disability Awareness activities for the month of October, bringing together parents, community members and the school system. It was an honor to recognize the following local businesses with certi“ cates for providing employment opportunities for students: CHAT, The Donut Hole, Wakulla County School Board Food Service Programs, Goodwill, Winn Dixie, Circle C Ranch, Florida Wild Mammal Association and Wakulla High School Library. Vocational Employment Specialist, Vicki Strickland, with the support of Cathy Duncan, provided an experience for their students in event planning as they set up and served food during the event, and provided a PowerPoint presentation along with WHS teacher Angel San Miguel which showed the WEST (Wakulla Employability Skills Training) students on the jobs. Special appreciation goes to the Board of County Commissioners for allowing us the use of the park; Mark Stafford for providing and chairs and tables; and Bill Versiga and Brian English for sponsoring the food. A special thanks to Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells for assisting them with the cooking. The participation of the following agencies provided information to families and community regarding access of services: High School/High Tech; Family Network on Disabilities; Florida Disabled Outdoors Association; Work Force Plus; Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resource Services; Project 10 Transition; Association for Persons with Disabilities; Ability 1st; Crawfordville Lions Club; Refuge House; Vocational Rehabilitation and Florida Telecommunications Relay Incorporated. Another standing ovation to Pyramid Players for truly epitomizing what our theme, Focus on Ability, looks like. Their entertainment with songs and dance was motivating and inspirational. Another bow goes to our team of Exceptional Student Education teachers who look for individual abilities of students each day and provide instruction to challenge and help them reach their potentials. I appreciate the effort and energy that it took for our students to be a part of this experience. The community support of civic clubs, Crawfordville Rotary and Coastal Optimists by having their meeting with us was greatly appreciated. A “ nal thanks to my district staff support team who assisted with coordination of the event; Susan Damerville for providing our banner; Transportation Coordinator Pat Jones who helped get the students there; Terry Webster for transporting and cleaning the grill; principals who supported us with their presence and encouragement and Superintendent David Miller for his continuing focus on keeping kids “ rst. Sincerely, Tanya English Executive Director of Exceptional Student Education/Student Services Wakulla County School Board I put up the Halloween decorations and bought the candy this year, but somehow I wasnt my usual festive self. Yes, I wore my Halloween sweater a couple of times and wore my Halloween scrubs to work, but my spirit wasnt in it. Watching Regis Philbin on TV, still dressing up in multiple costumes at his age, made me wonder what was wrong with me. Youre old,Ž Nurse Judy, my impish alter ego, shouted without the question even being asked. Regis is old, too,Ž I replied. I look at her all decked out in her costume. Anyone would recognize her in a minute, because her out“ t resembles how she wants to look everyday. You guessed it. Nurse Judy is dressed as a princess. She is wearing a gorgeous gown adorned with ruf” es and sparkles. (Im worried about how much this has set me back, but I wont know until my credit card bill comes in.) On her head is a golden crown … not a cardboard Burger King crown, but an honest-to-goodness metal crown, although I doubt it is real gold. (I guess Ill also find that out when the bills come in.) I even think you are a bit too mature to still be dressing up,Ž I said as gently as I could since she cannot tolerate any reference to age as it relates to her. Of course, I was not gentle enough. She bristled like a porcupine, and her tongue is as sharp as his quills. What are you talking about?Ž she shouted. Just look at me. I am still an enchanting woman. I could still win beauty pageants … real beauty pageants … not like that feeble MUD queen trophy you won when you were in college. I could be Miss America or Miss Universe. Just because you are so pathetic, you shouldnt paint me with the same brush.Ž She glares at me with hands on hips. I look at her heavily rouged cheeks. Looks to me like you painted yourself,Ž I say, but I say it softly under my breath to avoid a confrontation. I heard that,Ž she spits out. How dare you make fun of me? You could learn from me. Look at yourself. Do you think its cool to sit around in a rumpled housecoat, cheeks sunken in, hair in disarray, no make-up on watching sit-coms?Ž I did comb my hair,Ž I protest. With an egg beater?Ž she asks and collapses into laughter. I rearrange my housecoat trying to cover up the food stains left over from breakfast and pat at my hair.I have inner beauty,Ž I say without much conviction. The laughter doesnt stop. That beauty must be buried so far inside, no one will ever “ nd it,Ž she chortles, opening up her trick or treat bag and munching on those treats. I watch her enviously, wishing I wasnt on a diet. I pick at the safety pin holding my garment together over my bulging stomach. I hope your teeth decay and your weight doubles,Ž I say. I think about what Ive said and it suddenly sinks in. I take that back,Ž I say, realizing that if that happens to her, it also happens to me. Try to at least use some self-control, ŽI plead. I will if you will,Ž she says. I remember how you almost gobbled up a whole turkey last Thanksgiving. Our guests feared for their lives.Ž Ah, Thanksgiving. Now theres a holiday I really look forward to. Hope your Halloween was great and please join me for Thanksgiving dinner. Just remember its BYOT (Bring your own turkey). More later, Judy Judy Conlin is a nurse who works in Wakulla and Gadsden counties. Her website is at www.nursejudyinfo.com. Judy ConlinNurse Judy’s Nook Cholesterol is just another name for ” avor.ŽREADERS WRITE:Support of Focus on Ability appreciated anks to our military and their families Help with Walk to Cure DiabetesHalloween makes Judy think about her age and waistlineChamber needs letters of support for grant

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 5AHONORING VETERANS The Veterans Day Celebration at Hudson Park on Saturday, Nov. 5, was co-sponsored by Wakulla Christian School and the Wakulla Veterans Service Of“ ce. Wakulla County presented local veterans with awards in recognition of their service. New County Administrator David Edwards encouraged all veterans to sign up with Veterans Service Of“ cer J.D. Jones to be sure they get all the bene“ ts available to them. Parade photos on Page 16A. More photos of the event are online at thewakullanews.com. The color guard that started the Veterans Day Parade. Commissioners Jerry Moore, left, and Alan Brock, right, present an award to Marine Corp. William Gainey, a Vietnam-era vet.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENSpecialist Bobby Morales was recognized at the ceremony and spoke brie” y. All veterans in attendance were given a medal in honor of their service. Navy Private Bo Burgess1959-2011Your family honors you and admires you! Burgess family Captain Major Henry Lane Mexican and Civil War THECUMMINGSFAMILYHONORSYOU! Honoring our Veterans Chris Harvey, 1990-present Army 1st Sergeant Paul Harvey, 1969-1972 Army Sta Sergeant Chris HeltonAirman 1st Class U.S. Airforce April 2011 PresentWe Love You & are Very Proud of You! Your Family In loving memory of our hero James M. Lawhon1922-2010WW II Veteran Purple Heart Recipient Sgt. Kyle A. BurnsUS ARMY Military Intelligence 2008 present So proud of you and thankful for your service to our Great Nation!Thom, Missy, & Kendalin Burns Sgt. Thomas E. BurnsUS ARMYAirborne Ranger Forward Observer 19811985Thankful for your dedication, and service to our Great Nation, and raising a son to serve his country as well! Missy, Kendalin & Kyle Burns Veteran Paratrooper Owen R. Council Im sure most of you know, or have read, about my father, Owen R. Council, and his role in WWII as a paratrooper and path“nder. He was the 7th man to land in Normandy on D-Day. He was injured later, captured by the Germans and was a POW for 8 months. The prison camp he was in was for the sick and wounded. They were all expected to die from their physical conditions. He and thousands of other POWs lived in lice and rat infested camps, in a strange land, homesick and not knowing if they would live to see their loved ones again, much less live to see another day. But Daddy was a tough, country boy who had lived through the great depression and knew how to survive. He was liberated on April 16, 1945. I have the original letter from Daddy, dated April 23, 1945, to my mother, Eleanor Council, and his daughter, Judith, that he had never seen. She was born while he was on his way overseas: Daddy is in Gods hands now. He died March 20, 2011. My sisters and I want to thank the Wakulla Christian School and the Wakulla County Veterans Services Of“ce for starting the annual celebration to honor and support our Veterans. And we thank you Veterans, every one you, for the sacri“ces you have made “ghting for the freedom of this world. God has given us many great blessings as Americans. As we celebrate Veterans Day, please dont forget the reason for this celebration, how costly our freedom truly is. Freedom is never free. It always costs someone dearly. Embrace your personal responsibility to preserve the freedom others have bought for you. Pray for our Veterans and their families, and pray that American stays free. God bless America and our Veterans.& Ill be there soon. Darling I have forgotten how to write a letter. In fact I cant write a letter so you wont know just how happy I am until I get there. Judy are you listening while your darling Mother is reading this letter to you? You can expect to meet your Daddy soon & you had better love him, O.K., good. Well Eleanor Dear, I have prayed for this happy reunion of ours & now I know it is just a matter of a few days & my prayers will be answered. It has been a long time hasnt it? So darling I will write you a letter every day that I can till we board the ship for home. It will only be a few days. Until next time you two darlings. May God bless you & keep you safe. Forever & ever yours, your loving husband & Dad, Owen.Judith Poses for Daddy Overseas MRS. O. R. COUNCIL AND DAUGHTER CPL. OWEN R. COUNCIL My Darling Wife & Baby: I am a free man & on my way home. I cant express how happy I am to know that I will in the near future have the two of you in my arms, so keep smiling Wakulla County Memorial Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4538 is holding their Annual Pancake Breakfast at their Post on Friday, November 11, from 8:00 am till 10:00 am .This breakfast is open to the public and is in appreciation of the community support that the veterans receive from their community. Located right past the Crawfordville Elementary School. Come out and support your Wakulla County Veterans and let them say thank you to their community. All are invited!!

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Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church is a host site for Gaballi Foods, a faith based ministry that saves shoppers 30 to 70 percent off AAA quality groceries. There is no income status required to qualify for participation. November food orders are placed at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church on Nov. 12 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. or you may order online at www.gaballi.com and select Host Site Ochlockonee Bay UMC. Online orders must be placed by Nov. 13, no later than 8 p.m. All orders may be picked up on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. To contact Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist, call (850) 984-0127. Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church is located at 2780 Surf Road in Panacea … behind the former Oaks Restaurant. November menu includes a Holiday Family Feast Box for $34 (10-14 pound premium whole turkey, cranberry sauce, fresh cut green beans, fresh sweet potatoes, four ears fresh yellow corn, fresh carrots, package stuffing mix, 3 pounds potatoes, two packages brown gravy mix, 12 dinner rolls and a dessert item). €8 pound Chicken and Beef Box $29 (2 pounds sirloin strip steaks, 2 pounds hamburgers and 4 pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts) € 10 pound Chicken and Beef Box $28 (2 pounds sirloin strip steaks, 2 pounds hamburgers, and 2, 3 pound whole chicken roasters).Charles H. Allen Sr. Charles Hubert Allen Sr., 72, died Oct. 31, in Tallahassee. He was born Sept. 3, 1939, in St. Marks, and had lived in Tallahassee for many years. He was the owner of Allens Mechanical Service for more than 20 years specializing in heating and air conditioning. He was a member of St. Marks Baptist Church, Masonic Lodge No. 294 in Crawfordville and a member of the Marzuq Shrine, where he was in the motorcycle escort unit until 1994. He enjoyed going to the mountains every fall, being outdoors, “ shing, hunting and nature. The family received friends on Friday, Nov. 4, at Bevis Funeral Home. The funeral services were held Saturday, Nov. 5, at Bevis Funeral Home Chapel, with a private family burial following the service. Survivors include his wife of 51 years, Dorine; a son, Charles H. ChuckŽ Allen Jr. (Kim); his motherin-law, Sarah Whaley; and a brother-in-law, Lester (Buddy) Whaley (Jean). Bevis Funeral Home, (850) 385-2193, www.bevisfh.com, was in charge of the arrangements. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationCharles H. Allen Sr. William ‘Buddy’ H. Brown Jr. Paul E. Morgan Tamara ‘Tammy’ C. Ostroski Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 CoastalChurch NewsWilliam ‘Buddy’ H. Brown Jr.William BuddyŽ Harold Brown Jr., 49, formerly of Arcadia, passed away Wednesday, Sept. 28, in Tallahassee. His body was cremated. A service will be held at the family gravesite in Oakridge Cemetery, Arcadia, at a later date. Survivors include a brother, Alan Brown of New Orleans; two sisters, Ninfa Ezell of Crawfordville and Debra Stowers of Grif“ thsville, W.Va.; a niece, Jamie Scarbrough; and a great-niece, Mikayla Scarbrough of Crawfordville. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333)Paul E. MorganPaul E. Morgan, 86, Crawfordville, passed away Friday, Nov. 4, in Crawfordville. He was born Feb. 9, 1925, in Bainbridge, Ga., to Albert Lee and Pauline Cliatt Morgan. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Survivors include his wife, A. Faye Vause Morgan of Crawfordville; sons, Joe P. Morgan (Dana) of Monticello and Richard C. Morgan of Crawfordville; daughter, Paula Faye Lovett (George) of Crawfordville; six grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and a sister, Ruth Rivers Jones of Leeds, Ala. He was preceded in death by his parents; a son, Tommy Morgan; a brother, Charles Albert Morgan; and sisters, Jimmie Lee Emerson and Faye Morgan Dunaway. The funeral was held on Tuesday, Nov. 8, at Abbey Funeral Home, with interment following at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. The family received friends on Monday, Nov. 7, at the funeral home. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, Wakulla County Chapter, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32308. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.Tamara ‘Tammy’ C. OstroskiTamara TammyŽ Christine Ostroski, 39, of Crawfordville, passed peacefully into Jesus loving arms on Friday, Nov. 4. She was an inspiration to all who knew her. Her kindness, bravery and sweet loving smile will always be remembered and missed so much. Memorial Services will be held Saturday, Nov. 12, at noon at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Survivors include her mother, Angela Johnson and Joseph Wortham; brother, Larry Johnson and wife Jenni of Crawfordville; grandmother, Betty Marchant of Augusta, Ga.; aunts, Susan Lanford, Beth Mack and Patti Massingale; and a host of cousins and friends. Earlier this month, 21 men from five Wakulla County churches, Spirit Life, River of Life, Sopchoppy UMC, OBay UMC and Crawfordville UMC attended a weekend mens retreat in Leesburg. The message for the weekend was As for me and my house.Ž There was an abundance of fellowship, learning, praise and worship. A great weekend was had by all. Thanks goes out to the home churches, and friends and family for their support. Retreat groupOBay UMC is host site for foods If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever.Ž Leslie Dyan Drew11/12/1981 ~ 11/29/2009Always on our mind; Forever in our hearts. Love, Mom, Kenny, Leila and Dad Come One Come All!DINNERONTHE GROUNDShady Sea Baptist Church47 Shady Sea Street Spring CreekSUNDAYNOV. 13Service at 11AM, Dinner at Noon until Covered Dishes Welcome!

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Special to The NewsTrinity Lutheran Church and Preschool held its Fall Festival and Oktoberfest on Oct. 29 at 10 a.m. Smokey the Bear and Sparkey the Dalmation were in attendance and people enjoyed games, German music, bratwursts and arts and craft booths. There was also the Preschool Chili Cookoff. The prize-winning chili came in several varieties. The event was a great success thanks to the participation of preschool parents, church members, and contributors. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunity Lawhons celebrate 40th anniversary Mitchell and Pam Lawhon Mitchell and Pam Lawhon, of Sopchoppy, recently celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary with their family. They were married on Oct. 23, 1971, at St. Marks Baptist Church by the Rev. Fred Harrison. They have two children, Richard Carey Lawhon (Brandy) and Robert Brian Lawhon (Stephenie). They have three grandchildren, Fisher, Lake and Chelsea Lawhon. Mitchell Lawhon works with St. Marks Powder and Pam Lawhon works with the Wakulla County School System.Charles and Margaret Parmer will celebrate 50 years together on Nov. 12 Charles and Margaret Parmer, circa 1961 Charles Wayne and Margaret Harvey Parmer of Crawfordville will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary with a family dinner on Nov. 12. The couple was married on Nov. 12, 1961, at Southside United Methodist Church in Tallahassee. They are the parents of Jeffrey Wayne Parmer and his wife Rita McAlpin Parmer of Crawfordville. The couple has two grandchildren, Jeremy Wayne Parmer and Amy Ann Parmer, also of Crawfordville. Their parents are Charles and Marion Parmer of Crawfordville and Betty Harvey of Tallahassee and the late Herbert M. Harvey.Special to The NewsWhile many Crawfordville families are busy with holiday activities, a group of local volunteers is focused on “ lling empty shoe boxes with school supplies, toys, hygiene items and notes of encouragement for needy kids overseas. Crawfordville families are participating in the worlds largest Christmas project of its kind, Operation Christmas Child, an effort that has hand-delivered 86 million gifts to kids worldwide since 1993. Local businesses, churches and schools will collect gift-“ lled shoe boxes during National Collection Week, Nov. 14-21. Volunteers can drop off their shoe box gifts at one location in the area to help kids in 100 countries know they are loved and not forgotten. The location is Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville. Hours of operation are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon and Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritans Purse, uses whatever means necessary to reach suffering children around the world with these gifts of hope. Tracking technology also allows donors to followŽ their box to the destination country where it will be hand-delivered to a child in need. To register shoe box gifts and “ nd out the destination country, use the Follow Your Box donation form found at www. samaritanspurse.org/occ. Way to get involved: Prepare„Enlist families, churches, scout troops, community groups and businesses to take part in creating shoe box gifts for needy children worldwide. Pack„Fill shoe boxes with school supplies, toys, necessity items and a letter of encouragement. Volunteer„Sign up to join Operation Christmas Child volunteers in Crawfordville as part of the effort to prepare millions of shoe box gifts for delivery to underprivileged kids on six continents. For more information on how to participate in Operation Christmas Child, call (407) 852-3727 or visit www. samaritanspurse.org/occ. Gifts being collected for kids Nov. 14-21Smokey the Bear visits Trinity Lutheran Church during the Fall Festival and Oktoberfest. From the Heart Music Hour viewing party Nov. 13Special to The NewsFrom The Heart is proud to announce the upcoming broadcast of From The Heart Music Hour, Episode 4 on WFSU-TV on Nov. 13 at 5 p.m. This two-hour program features Brian Bowen, 19 South, Sarah Mac Band, Tobacco Road Band, Mimi and The HearnDogs, The Currys, Steve Leslie and Billy Dean. It was recorded and filmed at the Monticello Opera House this past July. A viewing party is scheduled at Indian Pass Raw Bar, 8391 C-30A in Port St. Joe, on Sunday, Nov. 13. Musicians from the show are expected to perform from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Documentary on Joe Hutto will air on PBS Nov. 16Special to The NewsA documentary based on Joe Huttos “ rst book, Illuminations in the FlatwoodsŽ will air on PBS on Nov. 16 at 8 p.m. called My Life as a Turkey.Ž The “ lm tells the story of writer and naturalist Hutto, portrayed by wildlife photographer Jeff Palmerthis. It chronicles Huttos remarkable experience of imprinting wild turkey eggs and raising the hatchlings to adulthood. Deep in the wilds of the Florida Panhandle, in Sopchoppy, Hutto spent each day as a wild turkeyŽ with his family of chicks „ until the day came when he had to let his children grow up and go off on their own. As it turned out, this was harder than he ever imagined. Huttos story became his “ rst book.Trinity Lutherans Fall Festival was a success San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Happy Thanksgiving!We will be closed Wed. Nov. 23 and reopen Mon.Nov. 28 Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011 our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL 0009ATE

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Special to The NewsWakulla Middle School was very fortunate to have a group from Florida A&M Universitys Marching One Hundred come and present a special performance during Red Ribbon Week. The program was coordinated by teacher Deborah Randle, the sponsor of the WMS Students Working Against Tobacco organization. FAMU band intern Schelvin Robinson worked with Dr. Shelby Chipman at FAMU to arrange for this great musical opportunity for the students. Members of the band presented anti-drug messages to the students, as well as performed many songs and solos. The performance was very well received and the faculty, staff and students at Wakulla Middle School are very grateful to Robinson and Dr. Chipman for bringing such an outstanding performance to the school. Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolFire“ ghters visit Crawfordville Elementary Students at Crawfordville Elementary School explore the “ re truck up close, while also learning safety tips. Special to The News Once again Crawfordville Elementary School was fortunate to be visited by Wakulla County “ re“ ghters Ian Brazier, Brandon Alyea and Justin Duggan. Each of our 600 students got to listen to our guests go over safety tips and procedures while at their own home, at school, over at someone elses house or playing with a friend. The students listened with wide eyes and hands raised wanting to ask a multitude of questions and eager to get a closer look of the big, red fire truck parked closely behind. Our friendly “ re “ ghters answered many questions from enthusiastic 5-year-old kindergartners all the way up to our older 10-year-old “ fth graders. After the much appreciated safety precautions were covered, students got to explore the “ re truck and ask many more questions that were patiently answered with individual care and patience. Our students left the 30 minute experience wearing fire hats, toting coloring books and activity books and all wanting to grow up and become “ re“ ghters.Ž Thank you, Wakulla County “ re“ ghters for serving our community, giving your time and making our students feel safe and special. Students at Wakulla Middle School are entertained by FAMUs Marching One Hundred during Red Ribbon Week. FAMU band performs at Wakulla Middle Special to The NewsWakulla Highs Dramatis Personae recently held auditions for their annual one-act plays. Each fall, the drama department presents two one-act plays for students to participate in. One play is chosen to go to the District One Thespian Festival in January. The cast of this play must be comprised of students who are already members of Thespian Troupe No. 5036 or about to earn the points that will qualify them for membership. The district play for 2011 is based on a short story by Kurt Vonnegut, The Barnhouse Effect.Ž It is early in the 1950s and a college professor named Arthur Barnhouse, played by senior Jared Hansen, has discovered something he calls DynomopsychismŽ or Power of the Mind.Ž This amazing power allows the professor to manipulate all sorts and sizes of inanimate objects. A young college student, Mr. Vaughn E. Gutt, played by senior Kyle Rozanski, has been sent to assist the professor with his research by the colleges Assistant Dean Margaret Tharpe, played by senior Samantha Tomlinson. One thing leads to another until the FBI, the military and the Russians all want to know about and control the professors amazing powers. The other one-act play is a crazy comedy by John S. Wells called Competition PieceŽ about three different sets of high school students getting ready for a theatre competition. Each group is lead by a very clueless and unusual type of drama teacher. This play, with 22 actors, is directed by former WHS graduate Krissy Kosec Sanders. Sanders performed in this same play when she was a student at WHS and is now a senior at FSU majoring in theatre. She is directing the play as part of an internship with FSU. There will also be an appearance by another graduate, Corey Hager, as he reprises his role as Judge No. 3, the Grim Reaper. Dont miss the laugh-out-loud fun of this classic parody of being in a high school play. Come on out and support these talented students on Nov. 18, 19 and 20. The fun begins at 7:30 p.m. in the WHS Auditorium on Friday and Saturday evenings and at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets will be sold at the door. The cost of admission is $6 for adults and $4 for students. WHS plays will be Nov. 18, 19 and 20 Shoe Box donates shoes to Wakulla County studentsSome Wakulla County children will bene“ t from a generous donation from the owners of The Shoe Box store. Bill Weldon, his son Geoff Weldon, and Shoe Box partner Bill Day donated more than 450 pairs of new shoes to the Wakulla County School District. Guidance counselors and administrators from all of the schools met at the District Of“ ce to divide up the shoes. Some went to Special Olympics students, others were kept for Christmas to out“ t children in the same family with different sizes and some were stored to use as childrens needs arise. Such generosity is heart-warming,Ž stated Superintendent David Miller. We are grateful to business partners who understand the needs of our children.Ž The Shoe Box is located at 2820 South Monroe Street in Tallahassee. INTERNATIONALGOLDGYMNASTICS 54 Feli Way, Crawfordville850926-4431 I know life doesnt come with a schedule. Thats why at State Farm you can always count on me for whatever you need … 24/7, 365. GET TO A BETTER STATE’. CALL ME OR VISIT US ONLINE TODAY. Anytime. Anywhere. Any dayƒ Thats when you can count on State Farm.1101198 State Farm, Home Of“ce, Bloomington, IL Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 Capital Circle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Workout, lose weightƒ Each class feelsLIKE A PARTY!Saturdays 9AM-10AM Thursdays 6:30PM-7:30PMat BodyTek 56 Rainbow Dr. (behind El Jaliscos)Kim Crum 251-9195 Pam Chichester 459-5279 visit us on facebook $5 per class Tuesday, November 15th thru December 13th$50.00 or $12.00 drop-inat the Barry Building 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. Suite C, Upstairs e-mail Focusyoga@yahoo.com or call 228-380-0140 PARTNE R… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The NewsThe WMS Lady Wildcat Soccer Team defeated Riversprings in their season opener, 3-0. The offensive attack was led by Karlee Strickland and Cheyenne Whittington who each accounted for one goal and one assist. Brooke Allen added an unassisted third goal late in the second half. The Wildcats stingy defense was led by Maddie Gehrke, Desera Wishart and Kyleigh Sanders The WMS goalkeeper, Nikki Barnes played exceptionally well to ensure the shutout. The Lady Wildcats will be in action again next Wednesday at 4 p.m. against FSUS at the WMS Soccer Field. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe Wakulla High School girls cross country team won its “ rst-ever District Title in cross country for a WHS team. Also for the “ rst time ever, local runners claimed individual titles for both the boys and girls. The District Meet was held at Apalachee Regional Cross Country Park on Saturday, Nov. 5. Both girls and boys teams quali“ ed for next weeks Regional Meet that is to be contested at Alligator Lake in Lake City. WHSs top two girls, Cora Atkinson and Marty Wiedeman shadowed Florida Highs Savannah Osterbye for the “ rst two miles and then made their move in the “ nal mile and took over “ rst and second places. Wiedeman “ nished with a new personal record of 20:33 and Atkinson in 20:46. Behind the three leaders, a real battle was brewing. Three Florida High girls were grouped together in 5th to 7th place and were pursued by the remaining “ ve WHS runners. They “ nished that way, with local girls winning by a score of 27 to 30. Wiedeman was named the individual District Champion and Atkinson was the District Runner-up. All seven of the WHS girls were named to the All District Team and actually qualified individually for Regionals by “ nishing in the top thirteen places. The other local “ nishers included Raychel Gray (8th, 22:32), Lydia Wiedeman (9th, 22:35), Lilli Broadway (10th, 22:37), Kristie Hodges (12th, 22:38) and Tyler Kinard (13th, 22:40). For the “ ve runners who anchored the team, the time gap between them was only eight seconds, which is an incredibly close “ nish. For the boys, local standout Stanley Linton entered the race as the clear favorite and lived up to that billing, winning in the excellent time of 16:49, 42 seconds ahead of the next runner. Cody James ran a solid race for the local team and “ nished in 9th place in 18:39. He was followed by D.J. Victor (13th, 19:09), J.P. Piotrowski (14th, 19:20), M itchell Atkinson (16th, 19:33) and Zach Broadway (17th, 19:36). Linton was named the individual District Champion, with James, Victor and Piotrowski joining him on the All District Team. The team “ nished in third place, only three points behind runnerup Florida High, and quali“ ed for the Regional Meet. Overall, this was a pretty good meet for us,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. To have our “ rst District Championship Team and first individual champions was pretty special.Ž Special to The NewsWakulla High studentathlete Conner Smith has been working double time for the Eagles this fall. A senior, Smith is playing both football and golf for the second year in a row. His passion for competition in sports is obvious. ŽIf I could play every sport at Wakulla I would,Ž Smith says. I love to play and compete in any sport because it helps me to become a better athlete by pushing myself.Ž Smith had a busy week competing in two championships in both golf and football … all in only three days. His second place “ nish in District golf followed by a fourth place “ nish in the Regional tournament in Pensacola quali“ ed him to compete in the State Golf Championship. He traveled to Leesburg for the two-day tournament last Tuesday and Wednesday where he “ nished middle of the pack of the 96 golfers participating. A day later he was in the biggest football game this season as the Eagles took on district foe Godby on Thursday for the District 2 Class 5A Championship. The Eagles defeated Godby, 24-21, and Smith, who handles all the kicking duties, was perfect on the night … hitting three extra points and a “ eld goal which proved to be the difference on the scoreboard. His efforts were rewarded with both a team District Championship and selection by coaches as Special Teams player of the week. CROSS COUNTRYGirls win district title; Linton, Wiedeman individualSOCCERSmith has double duty KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStanley Linton and Marty Wiedeman won individual titles in the District Meet.GOLF & FOOTBALLSPECIAL TO THE NEWS Conner Smith was in a two-day golf tournament and was on the football “ eld the next day to ful“ ll his kicking duties.Wakulla Middle defeats Riversprings LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWar Eagle runners Lilli Broadway, Lydia Wiedeman, Tyler Kinard and Raychel Gray. Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 13 Months … For only $31 From now until the end of November get Special Offer straight to your mailbox

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsBy JOE JACOBSRMS CoachThe Riversprings Middle School football team had a lot to play for on Friday night, Nov. 4. At stake was the championship of the Florida Star Conference, and the first undefeated season in school history. The Bears were on a mission, and they looked like it, defeating the Falcons of Lake City Middle School 36…18. We started the season with specific goals, which we outlined every week,Ž said RMS Head Coach Joey Jacobs. The kids did a great job staying focused.Ž In a game that was for a stamp of perfection, the Bears played a complete game on offense, defense and special teams. Riversprings got the excitement started early, when eighth grader Keith Gavin received the opening kickoff and sprinted 70 yards for the “ rst touchdown of the game. Monterious Loggins added the extra point run, and the bears were up 8…0 before the scoreboard bulbs were warm. After a quick stand by the RMS defense, quarterback Feleip Franks hit Gavin again for a 48-yard touchdown pass, and after Sebastian Garner ran in the conversion, the Bears were up 16…0. The Bears next score came after Isaiah Youmas powered through the Lake City offensive line and blocked a Falcon punt into the endzone, which was promptly recovered by Loggins for another RMS touchdown. Riversprings would add two more touchdowns, a pass from Franks to Antonio Morris and a run by Garner, before the night was “ nished. Seventh grader Demarcus Lindsey also returned a kickoff 64 yards for a touchdown, but it was called back because of a penalty flag thrown on the Bears. Jacobs said, We played well in every phase of the game.Ž Offensively, RMS was led by Franks, who was 6 of 11, passing for 145 yards, 2 touchdowns, and 2 interceptions. Leading receivers were Gavin (3 for 86 yards, 1 TD) and Lindsey (2 for 48 yards). Monterious Loggins led the RMS ground attack, with 7 carries for 53 yards. Defensively, the Bears were led by defensive tackle Kyle Weaver The Big WeaveŽ had six tackles (one for loss) and two assists. Antonio Morris also had six tackles, which included a quarterback sack. Jacobs Austin chipped in “ ve tackles (two for loss) and a forced fumble, which was recovered by Youmas. Overall, the starting unit lived up to their moniker Lights Out,Ž holding the Falcons potent spread offense in check most of the night. When it was all said and done, history was made, as the Bears “ nished the season with a perfect 8…0 record. This was a great group of young men,Ž said Jacobs. They made it possible. They made it happen. Im going to miss those eighth graders. Next season begins now though,Ž Jacobs added. We have got a solid nucleus of seventh graders, led by Demarcus Lindsey, Jacob Austin and Justin Davis, who were a solid part of this seasons success. They know how to get it done.Ž Riversprings Bears are perfection LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversprings players with Coach Joe Jacobs and their championship trophy.KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKeith Gavin took the opening kickoff 70 yards for a touchdown. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDemarcus Lindsey with a tough run along the sideline. BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCoach Joey Jacobs holds the Florida Star trophy. More photos at thewakullanews.com 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. NOSHOEFIREARMS& accessoriesBUY SELL TRADE CONSIGNMENT LAYAWAY2481 Crawfordville Hwy., (next to ElJalisco) 850-926-2213 € 850-510-4170 FREE BOX OF AMMOwith any firearm purchase (up to $25 value).THRU NOVEMBER 17th We carry Kel-Tec, Ruger, S&W, Glock, Taurus, AR-15, AK-47, Remington, Savage, Saiga, Mossberg & more.STOP by and Visit Us Barber Shop & Salon 926-4080 Clipper Cuts Scalp Massage Steam Towels Style Cuts Neck Massage Hi-lites & Low-lites Color 926-4080 926-4080 3334 Crawfordville Hwy. TheresaDelta Waxing Perms Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday • 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brak es Batteries Radia tors Wat er Pumps Hub Bea rings Star ters Alterna tors and mor e!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 11AWar Eagles win district crown with upset over Godby, 24-21By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles won the district championship by defeating the rival Godby Cougars, 24-21, on Thursday night, Nov. 3. Godby, ranked fifth in the state, was undefeated and favored to win. They had home-“ eld advantage with the game being played at Gene Cox Stadium in Tallahassee. And it was their homecoming. The War Eagles dominated, and while Godby tied the game a couple of times, Wakulla never trailed. When the game ended, players dumped a Gatorade cooler on Head Coach Scott Klees. Then football players and band members took the “ eld and, arm-in-arm, swayed as they sang the schools alma mater. It was just a war,Ž said Klees. He praised his assistant coaches and players and said he was so proud of how hard they worked. Its not how you play early (in the season),Ž he said. You want to win. But sometimes you have to have adversity. How you handle that determines what kind of season youre going to have.Ž That was a reference to the start of the War Eagles season: they started 2-0, but lost a heartbreaker to North Florida Christian at home and then another loss on the road in bad weather to Fort White to face a 2-2 record. Since then, Wakulla has torn off five straight wins to improve their record to 7-2. Running back Will Thomas had a big game with 19 carries for 96 yards. Marshane Godbolt had 10 carries for 71 yards and a touchdown running the ball, and also caught a touchdown pass. Deonte Hutchinson ran the ball nine times for 65 yards. GAME RECAP Wakulla scored “ rst. After recovering a fumble at the Godby 4, Evan McCoy scored to put the War Eagles on the scoreboard “ rst. Kicker Conner Smith added the extra point to make it 7-0. Godby answered with a scoring drive of their own, to knot it at 7 all. Wakulla punted on its next drive; and the War Eagle defense, playing bend but dont break, stopped the Cougars. A short punt gave Wakulla the ball on the 40. The drive culminated with a 10-yard pass to Marshane Godbolt, who strutted into the end zone. Smiths extra point made it 14-7. In the second quarter, Godby again answered with a score to tie it at 14 each. On Wakullas next drive, Godby intercepted a pass. On offense, there appeared to be a blown call by the of“ cials when they missed a forward pass that fell incomplete … apparently the of“ cials saw it as a lateral … and the receiver picked it up and ran it up the “ eld for a gain. Coach Klees went ballistic, yelling at of“ cials, and threw some papers on the “ eld that drew a 15-yard penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct. Godby found itself first and 10 at the Wakulla 23. The War Eagle defense gave a little, but wouldnt give in. On fourth and goal to go at the 2, Wakullas Mikal Cromartie intercepted the ball in the end zone and returned it for an apparent touchdown. A penalty was called during the runback against Wakulla for an illegal block in the back, and the War Eagles got the ball on the Cougar 27. A few plays later, Godbolt was in the end zone on a 12-yard run. The ever-reliable Smith added the point after and Wakulla led 21-14. Godby got the ball and drove down the field. Again, the Wakulla defense stepped up for a goal-line stand. On a twice-tipped pass, Wakullas Nic Walker came up with an interception. In the third quarter, Smith added a 21-yard “ eld goal to put Wakulla up 24-14. In the fourth quarter, it appeared Demetrius Lindsey scored on a 25-yard run, but it was called back for a chop block penalty. Lindsey got the ball on the next play … and a shoestring tackle by a Godby defender is all that kept him from scoring. Then it started getting sloppy with penalties: a false start, then a hold. On second and 25, a long pass was intercepted by Godby at the 2. And the Cougars rumbled down the “ eld for a 98-yard scoring drive that culminated with a 20 yard touchdown run, and they had cut the lead to 24-21. But there was only 3:42 remaining. And Wakulla went into ball control mode, burning up the clock and getting “ rst downs. As the clock ticked down and victory was imminent, the Wakulla crowd erupted in cheers and players leapt up and down on the sideline. ESCAMBIA COUNTY The War Eagles travel on Thursday, Nov. 10 to Pensacola to play Escambia County. Even with a 2-6 record, Klees said Escambia scares me to death.Ž Its a much biggger school than Wakulla, he said, and the biggest mistake the War Eagles could make is to overlook them. Weve got to stay focused,Ž Klees said. Referring to his motto of the season, Keep your axe sharp,Ž from Ecclesiastes 10:10, the coach said: We de“ nitely have to keep the axe sharp this week … and every week from then on out.Ž The state playoffs start Nov. 18, with the War Eagles at home playing Gulf Breeze at 7:30 p.m. Players of the WeekOFFENSEDEFENSESPECIAL TEAMSBRANDON BUSBY Lineman Scored out at 94 percent MIKAL CROMARTIE 11 tackles and a 108yard interception return CONNER SMITH Kicker FOOTBALL PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRunning back Will Thomas hits the hole for some hard yardage. He would gain 96 yards in the game.Marshane Godbolt high-steps it to the endzone for one of two touchdowns on the night.Mikal Cromartie intercepted this pass in the endzone and returned it 108 yards. Conner Smith adds an extra point. Coach Klees allows a smile as the clock runs down.WILLIAM SNOWDENFootball players, band members and cheerleaders took the “ eld, above, after the big win, linked arms and sang the alma mater. Tamika Peterson, right, the mom of Marshane Godbolt, celebrates in the stands. Wakulla travels to Pensacola on Thursday, Nov. 10, for the nal regular season game against Escambia High School. PLAYOFFS: The War Eagles play Gulf Breeze on Friday, Nov. 18, at home at 7:30 p.m.

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMiami at Florida StateSaturday, 3:30 p.m. The game can be seen on ABC.In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate FAMU at NCCNSaturday, 2 p.m. The game can be heard on WANM 90.5.Florida at #15 South CarolinaSaturday, Noon The game can be seen on CBS.By MARTY COHENof GatorBaitIt may not have registered on whatever the latest instrument is used to detect seismic rumblings, but it sure did seem like the earth shook a bit at 3:37 Saturday afternoon in Gainesville. It was an instant after Jordan Reed jumped to corral Vanderbilts last-gasp onside kick attempt and secure Floridas 26-21 triumph, ending an agonizing “ ve-week stretch between victories for the Gators. OK, maybe it wasnt a real Richter Scale deal, but the Gator Nation did emit a collective, audible, tangible sigh of relief, temporarily halting the downward spiral for the UF football program. It was ecstatic, everybody was very, very happy, relieved … all of the above positive emotions,Ž junior defensive end Earl Okine said. It was everything (in the locker room). Our teams just tired of losing. Were willing to do whatever it takes. Theres only one thing to do when youre backed in a corner and thats “ ght back and swing. We had no other choice.Ž Players seemed to grasp head coach Will Muschamps notion of continuing the battle, even if many of the preseason goals were dashed during the past month. Keeping positive and staying together,Ž said the introspective Okine, who received a little more playing time on Saturday and batted down a pass that he almost grabbed for a highlightreel interception. We cant go to the SEC Championship (Game) anymore but (Muschamp) wanted to make sure nobody felt like the season was over, and nobody feels that way. Its all very positive.Ž OK, I can already hear some of you grumbling that the win came at the expense of Vanderbilt. But at this point, whether it was Vandy or Nashvilles Christian Brothers Academy, Florida needed a victory in the worst way. Yet nothing can be done to erase the sting of the past “ ve weeks, when the Gators dropped four in a row for the “ rst time in 23 years. But Florida showed a little resolve, especially on offense, and controlled the game basically from the outset. It was far from ” awless, but there were some things to like offensively. For the “ rst time in forever, the Gators were able to run the football. After gaining a pitiful total of just 175 yards on the ground in the four losses combined, the Gators rushed for 197 yards on 46 tries, and that counts 23 yards in losses on a ridiculous shotgun snap over quarterback John Brantleys head and taking a knee twice to end the game. With tailback Chris Rainey sidelined with an ankle he injured against Georgia, fellow senior Jeff Demps hogged the spotlight. Demps had a career afternoon, sprinting for 158 yards and a pair of touchdowns on 23 carries, and also caught a 17-yard pass. A byproduct of Raineys absence was the ability to get more people involved in the offense. Trey Burton caught three passes for 41 yards and ran four times for 11 yards. Mike Gillislee got nine carries and picked up 39 hard yards. Even freshman fullback Hunter Joyer ran it three times for 17 bowling-ball yards. Nine different players caught passes from Brantley and Jacoby Brissett, who made two nice plays in the game. Burton and Reed both caught three passes, Frankie Hammond, Andre Debose, Quinton Dunbar and Demps each caught two and Deonte Thompson, A.C. Leonard and Omarius Hines, all had one. Its been somewhat puzzling that Hines, so productive when given an opportunity last season, has been a complete non-factor this fall. But perhaps his one reception sort of symbolized the Gators recent plight, a 40-yard catch-and-run after a neat escape from pressure by Brissett, that ended when Hines fumbled on the Vandy 2-yard line and the Commodores recovered in the endzone for a touchback, snuf“ ng UFs opening drive and quieting an excited crowd. The offensive line amazingly committed just one penalty. The way things had been going, thats an accomplishment. For the day, the Gators were ” agged just three times for 17 yards. Defensively, the Gators did a nice job defending the run, limiting Vandy to just 80 yards on the ground. But the Gators also yielded a large number of passing yards and eased up in the “ nal two minutes, almost squandering a 12-point advantage. While Florida was successful, for one afternoon, cleaning up its excessive penalties, the season-long dif“ culty creating turnovers remained. For the “ fth time in nine games, the Gators did not cause a turnover. Through nine games, the Gators have caused just eight turnovers. G a t o r s e n d l o s i n g s t r e a k Gators end losing streakBy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaFlorida State footballs What Might Have Been Tour … 2011Ž stopped in Boston on Thursday, Nov. 3, and the show was the latest in a series of high-quality performances. The Seminoles fourth consecutive blowout victory was perhaps their most impressive. Facing the now-infamous four-day turnaround, on the road and in a colder-than-theyre-usedto climate, Florida State fell victim to none of the perils that so often plague talented teams on Thursday nights. Even through a lethargic third quarter, the Seminoles dispatched the overmatched Eagles with ease. The defense was once again suffocating and opportunistic, limiting Boston College to a paltry 3.5 yards per play while grabbing two interceptions and two fumble recoveries. And the Seminoles crisp, ef“ cient offense raced out to a four-touchdown, “ rst-half lead en route to a comprehensive 38-7 win at Alumni Stadium. Florida State won in a way that wouldve been right on schedule in the midst of a run to the Atlantic Coast Conference championship. Barring an unlikely Clemson collapse, the Seminoles wont be ACC champs, but that hasnt stopped them from playing like the class of the conference for the past month. No, a four-game stretch that featured Duke, Maryland, North Carolina State and Boston College isnt murderers row, but Florida State handled each like the outclassed opponents they were. The Seminoles outscored the Blue Devils, Terrapins, Wolfpack and Eagles by a combined 154-39. And theyve won four consecutive ACC games by 25 or more points for the “ rst time since the 2000 season that, of course, ended one game short of a national title. Weve done a great job of coming out, playing sharp and bringing immediacy to the game,Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. We talk about it all the time. We want immediacy.Ž These Seminoles are still a ways off the pace set by those national title teams, but its hard not watch this team now and think that this is what we all had in mind back in September when the season was new and expectations were high. Its hard not to wonder what might have been, had EJ Manuel not injured his shoulder in the third quarter of a close game against Oklahoma. Or if the Seminoles defense committed just one fewer drive-sustaining penalty at Clemson. Or if, the following week at Wake Forest, FSUs offense had turned the ball over just three or four times instead of “ ve. Theres an awful lot of wistful ifsŽ from the Seminoles September, and none of them really matter now. But this has nonetheless been an impressive turnaround. When they stumbled to 2-3, effectively eliminated from the national title race, the conference title race and their only wins over lightweights LouisianaMonroe and Charleston Southern, the Seminoles had plenty of reasons to give up on what couldve been a nightmare season. The Seminoles still have some attractive goals in front of them, most notably wins over Miami and Florida for a second consecutive year. (The Miami game) means a lot to me,Ž said senior Bert Reed, whose 8-yard touchdown catch opened the scoring. Just for this team, for me, to go out and try to lead this team against Miami, and knowing the tradition and the rivalry, it means a lot.Ž‘Noles looking more like themselves during four-game winning streakA Vanderbilt drive is stopped by the Gators defense.PHOTO COURTESY OF GAITORBAITFlorida State warms up before the start of the game. PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDSBy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaAs the moments before his “ rst career start ticked away, freshman offensive lineman Austin Barron received a little bit of advice from his quarterback. I told him before the game, Just relax. It is nothing more than practice,Ž EJ Manuel said Monday. [Boston College] is a good team and we are going to do what we have to do. Just relax and well take care of the rest for you.Ž Florida States practices dont typically take place over 1,000 miles from home … nor are they nationally televised on ESPN … but other than that, sure, its just practice. Then again, given the way Barron impressed Jimbo Fisher, perhaps he couldnt have asked for a better debut setting. I thought he played extremely well,Ž Fisher said. All the calls were right, he didnt miss a Mike (linebacker) call. A couple of blocks were close and made a mistake on a play here and there, but for the most part played a very, very good football game.Ž Barron, who played center, is just the latest to step up on FSUs injury-ravaged offensive line. Thursdays game marked the “ fth different offensive line combination that the Seminoles have used this season. He joined his former high school teammate, right tackle Bobby Hart, as the second true freshman to start along the line this season. Barrons predecessor, Bryan Stork, was a surprise scratch from Thursdays lineup after suffering a concussion. Fisher said that Stork status for the Miami game is still uncertain. Barron makes impressive debutThe crowd erupts and performs the chop during a game at Doak Campbell. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 13Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsLast weekend’s tides and wind made the shing toughOnce that wind starts blowing it just doesnt know when to quit. The weekend was pretty windy and I didnt talk to many folks who did get out. Low tides in the middle of the day made things even worse. We have pretty good tides this weekend though they are calling for rain on Thursday and a low of 34 on Friday. That typically means the wind is gonna blow again. Of course I would have a charter on Friday. I already told them if the wind blows over 15, Im not “ shing. Enough is enough! This is the time of year that the grouper start moving in close and trolling with one of the Manns Stretch 18s or 25s will produce some nice grouper in close and sometimes when you think you have a huge grouper on it turns out to be a big red“ sh. Capt. Randy Peart does a lot of shallow water trolling for grouper down off the Aucilla on those rockpiles in 18 to 25 feet of water and he is very successful. Years ago I had a charter that would “ sh with me for seven days at a time, three times a year. He and his wife would “ sh but after their divorce that came to a halt. He kept on me to go grouper “ shing so I “ nally agreed and I went and bought some of the Stretch 18s and we headed to about 20 feet of water south of the St. Marks River where all the Stone Crab traps are. Find the Stone Crab traps and theres gonna be rocks close by. We caught several nice grouper and as we trolled over one rock two rods got hit. I started reeling in the third rod and it also got hit. When we “ nally got the “ sh close to the boat so we could tell what they were I realized we had three big red“ sh about 40 inches long. I got a great picture of all three behind the boat with big ol Stretch 18s hanging out of their mouths. Bob McCullough of Shell Point said he took Jerry and DeeDee Wells from Shell Point out and they each caught reds more than 35 inches long using live pin“ sh. He “ shed with his good buddy Ed in the Ochlockonee River and said they caught and released 15 legal reds and had three big trout. All of these were caught using live shrimp up the river. Capt. David Fife has been catching both trout and reds in the Oyster Bay area “ shing live mud minnows on the bottom and throwing Mirrolures. I just got of the phone with JR at the Aucilla River Store and he said this was their 23rd year in business. He also said it was the slowest year for hunting he has ever seen. He said he “ gures the overall economy and gas prices have got folks staying at home. JR got his captains license just before the oil spill and said he decided to start using it. I would say he probably knows every rock in the area and if you want to learn that area he would sure be the one to call. He said he took his “ rst charter last weekend and on Saturday it was tough, though they did catch a 4.25pound trout on cut bait. The second day they got up in a creek on the low tide and said they caught their limit and probably threw another 40 legal trout back. If you would like to book a trip or talk to JR about a trip give him a call at (850) 838-0874. Some trout are still on the ” ats around St. Marks and Shell Point though most have moved up in the river and creeks. The warmer days will put them back on the ” ats. Look for reds around the oyster bars and up in the creeks as well. Live shrimp, Gulp, Rattlin Red Fin and numerous top water baits work well now. Remember to leave that ” oat plan with someone and know your limits. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Fees waived over Veterans weekendSpecial to The NewsThe National Forests in Florida is waiving fees at most of its day-use recreation sites over Veterans Day weekend, including the Apalachiola National Forests Leon Sinks Geological Area. The fee waivers … the third this year … are offered in cooperation with other federal agencies under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act. Day-use fees will be waived at all standard amenity fee sites operated by the Forest Service. Concessionaire operated day-use sites may be included in the waiver if the permit holder wishes to participate. Were honoring our countrys brave men and women veterans by waiving fees over the long weekend,Ž said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell. We encourage people who might not normally enjoy our beautiful public lands to get out of the house and enjoy a forest or grassland near you. Our lands offer a wide range of recreation and educational bene“ ts such as improved physical and mental health, emotional well being, a concern for nature, and a conservation ethic.Ž The fee waiver days support the goals of President Obamas Americas Great Outdoors initiative, as well as First Lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move OutsideŽ program. For more information on the Forest Services recreation fee program and how these funds are used, please visit www.fs.fed.us/passespermits/about-rec-fees.shtml. November is Manatee Awareness MonthSpecial to The News Of“ cially, its Manatee Awareness Month in the state of Florida. Gov. Rick Scott recently signed the proclamation, thereby continuing a vital time-honored tradition undertaken by Floridas governors to of“ cially proclaim November as Manatee Awareness Month. A primary purpose of this designation is to heighten public awareness about the importance of protecting Floridas of“ cial marine mammal, which the proclamation states, is a distinctive and valuable beloved natural resource,Ž and further declares that manatees face the risk of extinction due to human related threats including the loss of warm water winter habitat.Ž Patrick Rose, executive director of Save the Manatee Club, said he was grateful to Gov. Scott for supporting the need to safeguard the well-being of Floridas endangered manatees. Save the Manatee Clubs mission is to protect manatees and their habitat for future generations,Ž said Rose. To accomplish this, we work closely with federal, state, and local governments, as well as with the public at the grass roots level, and support policies based on the best scienti“ c data available.Ž The club offers a variety of ways for the public to be directly involved with manatee protection. Free public awareness waterway signage, banners, boat decals, and educational posters are produced by the club. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 H UNT ING SEA SON !! Get Ready for Grouper LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GUNSMITHING F ASTTURNAROUND! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED Located on Main Street in St. Marks WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid for your gun! $ Selling Guns Since 1999 AK 47s in stock! 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com “ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special!” Let us perk up your day! HATS US 98 PANACEAWARM WINTER HATSCLEANING/BLOCKINGColorful Bandannas! PANACEA HATSAFACT850.224.4960www.fsucu.org www.florida-classifieds.com ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA Y Y o u r a d v e r t i s i n g b u d g e t i s T O O B I G Statewide adver sing—refreshing rates (866)742 1373

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I sincerely hope all of you who feel the way I do about Sherrie have enjoyed reading the last few columns, but mostly I hope Sherrie felt the love and admiration we all have for her. I can assure all of you that the stories you read were the ones I received, but there are many, many more out there waiting to be told. This week, it is time to get back to business. As many of you may already know, ” otilla 13 has been struggling and decided some time ago to disband. They are in the “ nal stages of completing the process and should be completed by the years end. Flotilla 12 is trying our best to “ ll in the gaps and provide a presence in the Shell Point area. This past week, we held our monthly meeting down at Shell Point and had the honor of being joined by Commander Hellstern from the DIRAUX office, Master Chief Kilbourne from the Seahawk station in Carrabelle, Division Commander Mo Davis and Division Vice Commander Gordon Schmidt. It was a full room with 25 other individuals present. Commander Hellstern discussed with us his vision for the Auxiliary Eighth Coastal Region. The Commander wants to see standardization throughout the Division. There is also a need for standardization throughout, as an auxiliary we need to work hard to provide consistency within our Flotillas, as well as to the public eye. Safety is always paramount in all we do. There is a dedication to increasing awareness on the importance of life jackets, especially for children. Keep your eyes and ears open for a new campaign promoting life jacket use for children. Finally, we heard about the need to be creative and increase our public education opportunities for boaters. Education is our “ rst line of defense! As Commander Hellstern “ nished outlining his plan as the director of the Auxiliary, he challenged all of us to remember why we joined the auxiliary. In order to maintain our presence, we need to recruit and retain new members. This need includes a balance of comradery and fellowship. We are a volunteer organization, and we need to “ nd innovative ways to keep members involved. Master Chief Kilbourne discussed his gratitude for the auxiliary and hopes that we can continue to work together. Division Commander Mo Davis offered accolades to the Division overall, as well as the work of Flotilla 12. He encouraged all of us to continue to do what we do, making Division 1 the best Divisions in our District. I may be biased, but I completely agree. Before the Commander had to leave to go back to New Orleans, Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos asked for his assistance, along with Master Chief and Division Commander to present several awards. The following were given out: € Mark Rosen received a sustained service award for service in excess of 6,750 cumulative hours. This was his ninth award. € Chuck Hickman received his AUXOP Device. This is a very big accomplishment for an auxiliarist and it was an honor to have Commander Hellstern present to pin the device on Chuck. € Raye Crews, Carolyn Treadon and Duane Treadon received an award for their participation in the 2011 JAREX. € David Rabon received a certi“ cate for earning a certi“ cate of quali“ cation for vessel examiner. € Tiffanie Bourassa received a meritorious team commendation for the Flotillas Silver Oar status, as well as her certi“ cate of appointment for her staff of“ cer position. We packed a lot into the meeting before the commander had to depart, however we were far from done. Tim Ashley discussed the ongoing efforts at the North Florida Fair and our upcoming FSU Flyover on Nov. 19. Karen Katowski discussed several upcoming opportunities for public affairs events in the Apalachicola area. We are working hard to do our part to ful“ ll the commanders expectations. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCommander Hellstern pins the AUXOP Device on Auxiliarist Chuck Hickman.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCommander Hellstern joins members of Flotilla 12 for their monthly meeting. You may have noticed we were closed most of last week. We all packed out to Orlando to attend the annual Diving Equipment and Marketing Association (DEMA, of which we are members) trade show. Every year the dive industry meets nationally to display wares, network to improve market share and visit with members from around the world. This show means nonstop discussions ranging from the latests rebreather designs to the recent training and injury reports. We mostly try to catch up with friends across a wide spectrum of the diving industry to see how they are fairing in this trying economy. For Keith, Travis and Joseph, DEMA was a chance to absorb the grandeur of the community. Travis spent the week in training on every conceivable dive technology possible. His complaint was that he did not get much of a chance to walk the ” oor and visit the 660 booths representing dive manufacturing, distribution, testing and monitoring, innovation, training and travel. Keith negotiated new purchases for the store, reminding everyone that I had turned the management over to him. Our intern Joseph attended seminars and probed dive technology and techniques that he can use as he moves into graduate school. What they all bring back to Wakulla Diving will improve our service to Wakulla County. On the top of everyones list of questions to us was progress on diving in Wakulla County. I reported that we recognize the vast offshore resource that is currently underused and our interest in expanding boat/diving access. We are discussing expanding our training options to include boating and spear“ shing next year. In this manner, folks can reliably “ nd a way to get offshore to dive our many natural ledges and arti“ cial reefs. I also reported that we continue our work with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to open Wakulla to equal access cave diving. Making Wakulla County an international diving destination is not a dif“ cult concept, but will bring millions of dollars currently going to surrounding counties. I even proposed we dedicate a travel booth at the next DEMA (in Las Vegas) to Diving the Caves and Offshore waters of WakullaŽ… much like they currently do for the Bahamas. Ill bet I will “ nd community interest in that project. Dr. Hess and I had to rush home early to start a new class in Cave Rebreather diving for a Finnish person. More international rebreather classes follow nearly every week until April, suggesting the economy is getting better or our services are catching on. Call me at (850) 545-9198 and tell me what you think. It is good to be home. Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 3.6 ft. 12:43 AM 3.6 ft. 1:10 AM 3.6 ft. 1:39 AM 3.7 ft. 2:09 AM 3.6 ft. 2:42 AM 3.6 ft. 3:20 AM 3.4 ft. 4:06 AM High -0.2 ft. 7:43 AM -0.2 ft. 8:15 AM -0.2 ft. 8:47 AM -0.2 ft. 9:20 AM -0.2 ft. 9:55 AM -0.1 ft. 10:35 AM 0.1 ft. 11:21 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:11 PM 3.4 ft. 2:45 PM 3.4 ft. 3:20 PM 3.3 ft. 3:58 PM 3.2 ft. 4:38 PM 3.1 ft. 5:23 PM 3.0 ft. 6:14 PM High 1.4 ft. 7:26 PM 1.4 ft. 7:57 PM 1.4 ft. 8:31 PM 1.4 ft. 9:07 PM 1.5 ft. 9:47 PM 1.5 ft. 10:35 PM 1.5 ft. 11:34 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 3.6 ft. 12:40 AM 3.7 ft. 1:07 AM 3.7 ft. 1:36 AM 3.7 ft. 2:06 AM 3.7 ft. 2:39 AM 3.6 ft. 3:17 AM 3.5 ft. 4:03 AM High -0.2 ft. 7:40 AM -0.2 ft. 8:12 AM -0.3 ft. 8:44 AM -0.3 ft. 9:17 AM -0.2 ft. 9:52 AM -0.1 ft. 10:32 AM 0.1 ft. 11:18 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:08 PM 3.4 ft. 2:42 PM 3.4 ft. 3:17 PM 3.4 ft. 3:55 PM 3.3 ft. 4:35 PM 3.2 ft. 5:20 PM 3.1 ft. 6:11 PM High 1.5 ft. 7:23 PM 1.5 ft. 7:54 PM 1.5 ft. 8:28 PM 1.5 ft. 9:04 PM 1.6 ft. 9:44 PM 1.7 ft. 10:32 PM 1.7 ft. 11:31 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 3.3 ft. 1:19 AM 3.4 ft. 1:46 AM 3.4 ft. 2:15 AM 3.4 ft. 2:45 AM 3.4 ft. 3:18 AM 3.3 ft. 3:56 AM 3.2 ft. 4:42 AM High -0.2 ft. 8:47 AM -0.2 ft. 9:19 AM -0.2 ft. 9:51 AM -0.2 ft. 10:24 AM -0.2 ft. 10:59 AM -0.1 ft. 11:39 AM 0.0 ft. 12:25 PM Low 3.1 ft. 2:47 PM 3.1 ft. 3:21 PM 3.1 ft. 3:56 PM 3.1 ft. 4:34 PM 3.0 ft. 5:14 PM 2.9 ft. 5:59 PM 2.8 ft. 6:50 PM High 1.3 ft. 8:30 PM 1.3 ft. 9:01 PM 1.3 ft. 9:35 PM 1.3 ft. 10:11 PM 1.4 ft. 10:51 PM 1.4 ft. 11:39 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 12:35 AM 2.7 ft. 1:02 AM 2.7 ft. 1:31 AM 2.7 ft. 2:01 AM 2.7 ft. 2:34 AM 2.7 ft. 3:12 AM 2.6 ft. 3:58 AM High -0.1 ft. 7:54 AM -0.2 ft. 8:26 AM -0.2 ft. 8:58 AM -0.2 ft. 9:31 AM -0.1 ft. 10:06 AM -0.1 ft. 10:46 AM 0.0 ft. 11:32 AM Low 2.5 ft. 2:03 PM 2.5 ft. 2:37 PM 2.5 ft. 3:12 PM 2.5 ft. 3:50 PM 2.4 ft. 4:30 PM 2.3 ft. 5:15 PM 2.3 ft. 6:06 PM High 1.0 ft. 7:37 PM 1.0 ft. 8:08 PM 1.0 ft. 8:42 PM 1.0 ft. 9:18 PM 1.1 ft. 9:58 PM 1.1 ft. 10:46 PM 1.1 ft. 11:45 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 2.8 ft. 12:27 AM 2.8 ft. 12:54 AM 2.8 ft. 1:23 AM 2.9 ft. 1:53 AM 2.8 ft. 2:26 AM 2.8 ft. 3:04 AM 2.7 ft. 3:50 AM High -0.2 ft. 7:22 AM -0.2 ft. 7:54 AM -0.2 ft. 8:26 AM -0.2 ft. 8:59 AM -0.2 ft. 9:34 AM -0.1 ft. 10:14 AM 0.1 ft. 11:00 AM Low 2.6 ft. 1:55 PM 2.6 ft. 2:29 PM 2.6 ft. 3:04 PM 2.6 ft. 3:42 PM 2.5 ft. 4:22 PM 2.4 ft. 5:07 PM 2.4 ft. 5:58 PM High 1.4 ft. 7:05 PM 1.4 ft. 7:36 PM 1.4 ft. 8:10 PM 1.4 ft. 8:46 PM 1.5 ft. 9:26 PM 1.5 ft. 10:14 PM 1.5 ft. 11:13 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 3.0 ft. 12:09 AM 3.0 ft. 12:41 AM 3.0 ft. 1:17 AM 3.0 ft. 1:57 AM 2.9 ft. 2:41 AM 2.7 ft. 3:33 AM High -0.2 ft. 7:17 AM -0.2 ft. 7:49 AM -0.2 ft. 8:20 AM -0.2 ft. 8:51 AM -0.2 ft. 9:26 AM -0.1 ft. 10:06 AM -0.0 ft. 10:52 AM Low 2.5 ft. 3:26 PM 2.6 ft. 4:05 PM 2.5 ft. 4:44 PM 2.5 ft. 5:23 PM 2.5 ft. 6:04 PM 2.4 ft. 6:45 PM 2.4 ft. 7:24 PM High 1.8 ft. 6:36 PM 1.8 ft. 7:04 PM 1.8 ft. 7:35 PM 1.8 ft. 8:11 PM 1.8 ft. 8:56 PM 1.7 ft. 9:52 PM 1.6 ft. 11:05 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 10 Nov. 16First Dec. 1 Full Nov. 10 Last Nov. 18 New Nov. 24Major Times --:---:-12:13 PM 2:13 PM Minor Times 6:46 AM 7:46 AM 5:35 PM 6:35 PM Major Times 12:37 AM 2:37 AM 1:01 PM 3:01 PM Minor Times 7:40 AM 8:40 AM 6:18 PM 7:18 PM Major Times 1:26 AM 3:26 AM 1:51 PM 3:51 PM Minor Times 8:33 AM 9:33 AM 7:05 PM 8:05 PM Major Times 2:16 AM 4:16 AM 2:41 PM 4:41 PM Minor Times 9:25 AM 10:25 AM 7:57 PM 8:57 PM Major Times 3:07 AM 5:07 AM 3:32 PM 5:32 PM Minor Times 10:13 AM 11:13 AM 8:52 PM 9:52 PM Major Times 3:58 AM 5:58 AM 4:23 PM 6:23 PM Minor Times 10:58 AM 11:58 AM 9:50 PM 10:50 PM Major Times 4:48 AM 6:48 AM 5:13 PM 7:13 PM Minor Times 11:40 AM 12:40 PM 10:49 PM 11:49 PM Best Best++++ Better Good Average Average Average6:58 am 5:43 pm 5:36 pm 6:47 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:58 am 5:43 pm 6:19 pm 7:41 am 6:59 am 5:42 pm 7:06 pm 8:34 am 7:00 am 5:42 pm 7:58 pm 9:25 am 7:01 am 5:41 pm 8:53 pm 10:14 am 7:02 am 5:41 pm 9:51 pm 10:59 am 7:03 am 5:40 pm 10:50 pm 11:41 am97% 97% 91% 85% 79% 72% 66% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 15AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Oct. 28, a concerned citizen contacted the sheriffs of“ ce regarding a motorist attempting to cause damage to a speed bump on Pixie Circle in Crawfordville. Don Kemp of the Wakulla County Road and Bridge Department checked the damage and determined it to be minor. A suspect was identified, but Kemp declined to press charges. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Oct. 27, Angus McEachern of St. Marks reported a vehicle burglary. More than $3,200 worth of property was stolen from the vehicle including ammunition, “ rearms, sunglasses and other items. A forced entry was discovered. € On Oct. 27, Merwyn Jones of Crawfordville reported the grand theft of a “ rearm. The weapon is valued at $350. € On Oct. 27, Lt. Brad Taylor investigated a complaint of an underage male posting personal advertisement about himself on Craigslist. The ad claimed the 15-year-old was 18. The case has been forwarded to the Criminal Investigations Division for follow-up with the juveniles parents. € On Oct. 27, Tommy Sexton of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered. The missing items included electronic games, medications, camera, sporting equipment, televisions, of“ ce equipment and computer equipment, valued at $4,300. Some of the property was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. € On Oct. 31, Leonard Brownell of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as someone destroyed his mailbox with a vehicle. A stop sign at a nearby intersection was also run over by the same vehicle. Additional investigation in the area discovered 12 street signs and six mailboxes also damaged. Damage to the property is estimated at $900. € On Oct. 30, William Harrod of Crawfordville reported the grand theft of his truck. The vehicle was discovered damaged in a tree line near his home. Deputy Ian Dohme was investigating another case when he reportedly linked Jared Ashton Waters, 19, of Crawfordville to the vehicle theft. The keys from the victims truck were allegedly located on Waters and he was charged with the vehicle theft. A vehicle Waters was also driving during the evening was allegedly discovered with pills and a marijuana smoking pipe inside. Waters was charged with possession of narcotics equipment and leaving the scene of an accident. € On Oct. 30, Andrew Carter of Crawfordville reported observing a traf“ c crash on U.S. Highway 98 one mile east of Highway 363. The vehicle crash was a roll-over with injuries. Frank Timothy Lee, 52, of St. Marks was driving a 1997 Chevrolet pick-up truck eastbound on U.S. Highway 98 when he traveled off the south side of the highway and struck a tree with the front end of the vehicle. Lee was transported to Capital Regional Medical Center for treatment but agreed to a blood draw to determine if the crash was alcohol related. The investigation continues. € On Oct. 30, Deputy Nick Gray investigated a traffic crash at Highway 267 and Springhill Road. A tow truck operator contacted WCSO about the crash and a possible driver was identi“ ed. The vehicle was heading southbound on Springhill Road when the driver reportedly failed to stop at the intersection of Highway 267 and crashed into a fence and narrowly missed a tree. The investigation continues. € On Oct. 29, Capt. Cliff Carroll investigated a suspicious person at the closed Bayside Marina in Ochlockonee Bay. Randall John Dick, 58, of Panacea approached Captain Carroll during the investigation and allegedly began to tussle with him. Capt. Carroll arrested his suspect for loitering and prowling, obstructing a law enforcement of“ cer and battery on a law enforcement of“ cer and transported him to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. € On Oct. 29, Virginia Moore of Crawfordville reported a structure fire of a vacant 1970 mobile home on Patricia Lane in Crawfordville. The sub” oor caught “ re due to a faulty power cord. The victim was unable to put the “ re out with a fire extinguisher. Damage was estimated at $10,000. The “ re was ruled an accident. € On Oct. 28, Jordan Peters of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her purse at the Wakulla Education Center. The medications are valued at $30. € On Oct. 28, J. Harold Thurmond of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at his home. Someone cut the fence into his pasture and removed two rolls of “ eld fence and landscape timbers. The stolen property is valued at $300. € On Oct. 31, Dave Gowan of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his mailbox. Someone drove over the mailbox and destroyed it. Damage was estimated at $50. Evidence of additional criminal mischief cases were observed nearby. € On Oct. 31, Christopher Hewett of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and a window was broken. Damage was estimated at $100. The victims reported the loss of $2,000 worth of property including household appliances, “ rearms and a television. A bedroom was also ransacked. A person of interest was identi“ ed. € On Nov. 2, Susan Mastaler of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at the Goodwill Store in Crawfordville. A male juvenile in the store caused a disturbance with his mother over not getting something he wanted. The juvenile left the store and kicked the front of the victims parked vehicle. A deer whistle on a brush guard was damaged. € On Nov. 2, Deborah Brown of St. Marks reported a criminal mischief. Lt. Mike Kemp was investigating a small “ re in some woods when a bicycle was observed inside the “ re. The bike belonged to Brown. Damage was estimated at $100. € On Nov. 2, a Liberty Road resident reported that children in the neighborhood were playing with a condom that was found on a tree. It was impossible to determine if the condom had been used. One of the parents expressed concern about the safety of his son who was exposed to the condom in the facial area during the horseplay. No charges were “ led. € On Nov. 2, James Shepard of Tallahassee reported the theft of equipment from his Crawfordville property. A marine battery, two boat motors and a gas tank, valued at $1,600, were reported missing. While Deputy Ben Steinle was investigating the Shepard complaint, Deputy Clint Beam was investigating a suspicious vehicle complaint nearby. The vehicle contained property that the deputy suspected was stolen. It was determined that the property belonged to the victim and it was recovered. Kevin Eugene Lewis, 45, of Woodville was charged with dealing in stolen property, burglary, criminal mischief and grand theft in the case. During an inventory of the vehicle, aluminum foil with an unknown substance on it was found. It was determined to be methamphetamine and Lewis was also charged with possession of methamphetamine in the case. A second suspect was also identi“ ed in the case. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 709 calls for service during the past week including: 22 residential and business alarms; 76 citizen contacts; 51 investigations; 18 loud music/noise complaints; 38 medical emergencies; 41 security checks; 26 special details; 20 suspicious people; 54 traf“ c stops; and 85 watch orders. Battery warrants have been issued for a 20-yearold Crawfordville man who is accused of grabbing the buttocks of three females while the women were shopping in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. The Wakulla County cases were reported on Nov. 1 although one occurred on Oct. 31. Matthew Thomas Vautier was arrested by Leon County Sheriffs Office investigators on Nov. 1 after allegedly committing the same act at the North Monroe Street Wal-Mart. Battery is a “ rst-degree misdemeanor.On Nov. 1, a 42-yearold Crawfordville woman reported a battery that occurred at Wal-Mart on Oct. 31. The victim was shopping in the store when a male walking in the opposite direction down an aisle slapped her on her buttocks. After slapping her, the suspect wished the victim a Happy Halloween.Ž The victim reported the incident to management. Later on Nov. 1, a 28year-old Crawfordville woman reported shopping in the Wal-Mart grocery section when the same male grabbed her buttocks and said Trick or TreatŽ before running toward the exit. Digital images of the suspect and his vehicle were collected. Later on Nov. 1, a 33year-old Crawfordville woman reported having her buttocks grabbed by the same subject while grocery shopping before he ran away. Vautier was reportedly driving the same vehicle used in Crawfordville when he was arrested in Leon County. Man accused of grabbing women at Wal-Mart WCSOMatthew T. Vautier Training manual approvedWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce law enforcement and corrections personnel are not the only members of the WCSO staff to go through special training. The Florida Department of Health recently approved a training manual for the Communications Division. The 108 page manual includes items such as a brief history of on the airŽ communications systems which began in 1928 in Detroit to knowledge of what information can be disseminated to the public and what remains con“ dential. The certi“ cation of the 911 Public Safety Telecommunications Course was made a requirement by the Florida Legislature and all of the Communications staff at the WCSO is required to be certi“ ed by Oct. 1, 2012. The WCSO has 10 Communications Officers on staff and six out of the 10 are already certi“ ed in the course. TravelingJarforChange! Give To Sponsored by Donate Your Change atNew Location EVERY Week! DUX Liquor & Lounge Tallahasse 267 Capit al Circ le SEWal-Mart CrawfordvilleBellamys BELLAMYSwww.bellamysoutdoorsports.comOVERYEARS20 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.) HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA SCOREFEDERALCREDIT UNION Contact any of our three locations: Mahan Office (850) 488-1015 North Monroe Office (850) 562-6702 Crawfordville Office (850) 926-1960Visit us at www.scorefcu.com SPECIAL! AUTO REFINANCE REDUCE YOUR INTEREST RATE BY UP TO 2%!!! New auto rates as low as 2.75% for qualified applicants.Offer subject to credit approval, membership eligibility and floor rate of 2.75%No payments for the first 90 days!

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comVeterans Celebration includes para de and festival at Hudson Park PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Miss Tallahassee, who is from Wakulla County, poses for pictures at the festival following the parade, at left. Children partake in the numerous childrens activities set up at Hudson Park, which were organized by the NJROTC, above. Students from Wakulla Christian School, top, participate in the parade with their decorated float in support of veterans. The school was a co-sponsor of the celebration. Spectators, at left, watch as the parade ” oats go by throwing beads and candy, the Wakulla High School Navy Junior ROTC march in the formation during the parade, at rig ht, Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells, below, throws out candy to parade goers, while also reminding people to vote in the upcomi ng elections. More photos of the event are online at thewakullanews.com. Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR during the Medicare Annual Election Period, October 15 through December 7, 2011, to LEARN MORE about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) and Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/Medicare Seminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd H5938_DP 119 File & Use 09242011 Anna Johnson says.... Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) plan.Ž Friday, November 11 Monday, November 14 Tuesday, November 15 Tuesday, November 22 Friday, November 25 Tuesday, November 29 Wednesday, November 30 Monday, December 5 Tuesday, December 6 Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties

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15minute guaranteeTallahassee Memorial is pleased to bring InQuicker to the community for those patients requiring emergency care for non-life threatening medical conditions. With InQuicker, you never have to experience a long wait in a crowded emergency facility again. Instead, enjoy the comfort of your own home while waiting for your next emergency care visit. Simply access the InQuicker system at tmh.org to “nd projected treatment times at both the Tallahassee Memorial Bixler Emergency Center and Urgent Care Center. Once the system captures certain demographic and symptomatic information, you are added to the wait queue which holds your place in line, online. When you arrive at the emergency center for your projected treatment time, you will be seen by a nurse practitioner, physicians assistant or physician in 15 minutes or less, guaranteed. Your ER wait is over. Check-in at tmh.org to hold your place in line, online today. Online Check-in atTMH.ORG* InQuicker is only for patients experiencing non-life threatening conditions and does not affect the wait times of other emerg ency room patients. Priority treatment is always given to those with the most urgent medical conditions. your ER wait is over. Guaranteed. Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Jerry Kinder on cancer: ‘I had to nearly die to learn how to live’HEALTH & FITNESS Page 10B At the recent Mighty Mullet Festival, Sustainable Big Bend volunteers and I provided an educational booth featuring simple changes that can be easily made in your home to save energy. It was a great booth filled with so many examples to encourage these changes. One item that drew a crowd was a drape made with decorative fabric and lining with a discarded but quality quilt inserted between the layers. It is perfect for those people who may have leaky windows but few resources to make more expensive improvements or for those who rent their home. We featured a caulking gun, a shower timer, a CFL light bulb, a clothes line in hopes of reminding people of the simple changes that can be made to save energy and money. These were suggestions were featured: Attic. Make sure you have adequate insulation. Lamps and light bulbs Use compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) and properly dispose of them. CFLs last up to 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb. You will also save on airconditioning costs because they generate a quarter of the heat of regular incandescent bulbs. Contrary to popular belief, turning off ” uorescent lights really does save energy. Frequent switching may shorten bulb life, but electric bill savings will more than compensate for the shorter lifespan. When it is time to dispose of them, CFLs require special handling so dont throw them away with the regular household trash. While they can be recycled, they should not be thrown into your recycle bin either. Keep them in a safe place until a Hazardous Waste Collection Day is scheduled in Wakulla County to dispose of them properly. Garage Water heating is often the third largest energy expense in your home, after heating and cooling … it can account for 13 to 17 percent of your utility bill. If you have a dishwasher with a preheating element, setting the main water heater at 120 degrees is fine for most households. Turn the heating unit off when you leave the home for any length of time such as for a vacation. If you have a dishwasher with a preheating element, setting the main water heater at 120 degrees is “ ne for most households. Ceiling Fans. Use the air” ow mode for directing its movement. In the summer, a ceiling fan will allow you to raise your thermostat setting by as much as four degrees without feeling a difference in your comfort. Consider that in the summer, for every degree setting below 78, you spend up to eight percent more on cooling costs. Operate your fan in reverse in the winter to push warm air down without creating a chilly breeze. A ceiling fan/light combo kits that have earned the Energy Star are about 50 percent more ef“ cient than conventional fan/light units. Remember, fans cool people, not rooms. Ceiling fans are less costly than air conditioning, but they still use electricity. Running several fans 24 hours a day can add up quickly, especially if no one is home to bene“ t from them. Run the fan only when someone is in the room. Continued on Page 3B By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Tips for household conservationCommercial recycling discussed What’s a healthy alternative to diet sodas?EARTH TALK Page 3B By TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar“ eld@thewakullanews.netNon-residential recycling was at the top of the agenda at the October Wakulla County Recycling Task Force meeting. The meeting was held Oct. 27 in the commission conference room with Chair Pamela Joy facilitating. After some controversy in the community and a Letter to the Editor in The Wakulla News regarding whether recycling would be offered to area businesses by Waste Pro, the countys new vendor for residential garbage and recyclables curbside service, the committee invited Ralph Mills, regional vice president of Waste Pro out of Tallahassee, to attend and respond to questions and concerns. When asked if there would in fact be recycling offered to Wakulla County businesses, Mills said according to state statute, commercial recycling cannot be franchised by any single vendor. He said October was the “ rst month of Waste Pro offering residential curbside waste and recycling services to Wakulla residents and the focus was to make sure residents received their bins and containers and began receiving service. Its beginning to settle down now, there are very few calls coming in now,Ž Mills said. Mills said there is commercial recycling available to businesses. For $85 per month, a business can contract a small dumpster that Waste Pro will provide, but only cardboard and some paper items can be taken from those businesses. He did say that Waste Pro would offer multi-bin containers at speci“ ed locations in the county so small of“ ces that generate a little plastic, aluminum and paper could take it to a multi-centers.Ž He said there is already a multi-center located at ESG on Trice Lane, and there would be one at the transfer station. The Trice Lane multi-center will accept material Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the transfer station will accept material on Fridays and Saturdays. Mills reported that after the first month of providing service, 50 tons of recyclable material was picked up in Wakulla County. Homemade for the HolidaysSustainable Big Bend, Inc. and the UF-IFAS Extension Of“ ce co-hosted a workshop last Thursday evening with the focus on making gifts for the holidays from all sorts of materials that can be re-purposed or re-used. Toni Livingston, above left, who wears a ” ower pin made from denim zippers, shows how to make an eyeglass case from designer fabric samples, old metal measuring tapes and a little stitching, at left. Livingston shows a variety of gifts to those in attendance that can be made from all parts of a pair of jeans, at right, including her ” ower pin. e Recycling Task Force takes up the issue, and hears from Waste Pro Vice President Ralph Mills 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWe’re Here to Share the Journey...

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, November 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, November 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef O’Brady’s in Crawfordville. Please call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information. Saturday, November 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, November 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, November 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at the public library at 7 p.m. Tuesday, November 15  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. The public is encouraged to attend all meetings.  IRIS GARDEN CLUB will hold its Annual Fall Floral Design Workshop at 1 p.m. at the public library. Bring a container, and any owers to include in the arrangement. Don’t forget the greenery. The Garden Club will supply the oral foam. There will be lots of creative people there to help those in attendance. Visitors and prospective members are always welcome to attend. Call Jeannie at 926-2264 for more information.  SARRACENIA CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the public library. The program, “Understanding where Native Plants Grow,” will be presented by Dr. John Tobe. Tobe’s talk will cover using the ecological preference of native plants to help us make horticultural decisions about how, where, and why to use them in home landscapes. He will focus on climate, soils, hydrology, and overall ecological tolerances directly related to native plants of Wakulla County and the surrounding area. The program is free and open to the public. Come at 6 p.m. and enjoy social time with great snacks, a slide show of plants taken by local photographers and fellowship. Wednesday, November 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, November 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP will meet from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Please call 926-0401 ext. 217 for more information.  CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend the meetings. For more information about CCOW, visit their website at www.cowakulla.org.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, November 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsThursday, November 10  FULL MOON CLIMB will be held at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. For reservations or more information, contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at 927-7744 or 888-927-7744.  WAKULLA COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. There will be a social hour from 6 to 7 p.m. The Wakulla Democratic Women’s Club will meet at 8:30 p.m. to nominate a slate of of cers for the upcoming board elections. The quarterly meeting will include announcements regarding the WDEC Annual Democratic Gala scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 10 at Wakulla Springs. Friday, November 11  CONCERT with songwriter David Olney accompanied by well-acclaimed guitarist, Sergio Webb, will be held at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Traveling from Nashville, this duo is a must see show, performing Americana, rock ‘n’ roll and blues. Make reservations for this concert by calling Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or emailing poshjava@gmail.com. Reservations are $15 per seat. Limited seating is available and reservations are strongly encouraged. Saturday, November 12  BENEFIT AND FISH FRY FOR JEANINE ABERPOSEY and her family will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Jeanine suffered a life-altering accident on Friday, Oct. 22, and funds raised at the bene t will help with medical and living expenses as she and her husband travel to Emory Hospital in Atlanta for further treatment and therapy. The bene t will feature live entertainment throughout the day and a sh fry with all the xings.  LIONS CLUB PANCAKE BREAKFAST will be held at Beef ‘O’Brady’s from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Cost is $6 per person. Money raised will help the club provide eye care services, such as eye exams and glasses as well as hearing loss and diabetes prevention. Sunday, November 13  VIEWING PARTY for From the Heart Music Hour episode 4 will be held at Indian Pass Raw Bar, 8391 C-30A, Port St. Joe, at 5 p.m. for the full 2-hour program featuring Brian Bowen, 19 South, Sarah Mac Band, Tobacco Road Band, Mimi & The HearnDogs, The Currys, Steve Leslie and Billy Dean. It was recorded and lmed at our last live production at the Monticello Opera House this past July. Some of the From the Heart Music Hour performers will be playing their music from 1 to 4:30 p.m. before the episode airs. Monday, November 14  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, November 15  HABITAT FOR HUMANITY HOUSING PROGRAM event will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Ameris Bank’s conference room, 2628 Crawfordville Highway. This is an opportunity to see if any Wakulla residents qualify for a no interest home mortgage through this program. Bring paperwork t verify income, dependents, savings and expenses, drivers license and security cards for each member of the household. For questions, call Tara Sanders at 926-5211, Linda Boles at 926-6222 or Jo Anne Strickland at 566-1828. Thursday, November 17  CPR TRAINING will be held at the Wakulla County Health Department at 7 p.m. The cost is $25 per person. For more information or to register, call Grace Keith at 926-0400, ext. 215 or email at Grace_Keith@doh.state. .us. Saturday, November 19  WAKULLA COUNTY CHILDREN’S FUND FUNDAISER will be held at the Shell Point Volunteer Fire Department from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be a garage sale, silent auction, bake sale, chili, soup, hotdogs and drinks. All proceeds go to help the needy children of Wakulla County. If anyone has a new or used item they would like to donate contact Susan at 926-1409. By DR. FAITH HUGHESCHAT Board MemberTicks are nasty little creatures, no good for anyone. Most people know that ticks carry disease that affect people and dogs, but few people know about a deadly disease that ticks can give to your cat. We originally diagnosed Bobcat Fever, cytauxzoonosis (we call it cytox) in Wakulla County about 18 years ago. The blood of a feverish and jaundiced cat was sent to the lab for testing. Dr. Liz Wilson at Antech Laboratories found microscopic cytox organisms in the cats red blood cells. I had never heard of this organism before, so I called Dr. Wilson for more information. She was very surprised that I had a case of cytox, apparently no one else had ever seen it in our area before. The life cycle of this parasite is not completely understood, but the bob cat is its natural host and doesnt usually die from the disease. A tick carrying the cytox organism will bite a domestic cat (pet cat) and transmit the disease into its blood. The disease can affect lungs, spleen, liver and red blood cells. The red blood cells will rupture, causing anemia and jaundice (yellowing of membranes). The most common symptoms in a cat are fever, jaundice, poor appetite and lethargy. The sicker cats will have breathing dif“ culties, trouble swallowing and uncommonly will develop tremors. With proper treatment and good nursing care, Drs. Chalker, Hankley and I have 60-70 percent survival rate. Unfortunately, many on-line articles read that 99 percent of the cats die, leading some pet owners and veterinarians to euthanize the cats before trying any treatment. One of my most memorable cases was Khobar the orange tabby. Through the combined efforts of myself and Khobars owner, Beth Ann, a new experimental treatment was used to save Khobars life. Before, we only used antibiotics, fever reducers, ” uids, iron supplements and good nursing care. Since Khobars case, we now also use an injection called Imidocarb to treat all cytox cases. Dr. McMillan in Tallahassee is also experimenting with another drug and has had comparable success. The take home messageƒdo everything you can to keep the ticks off of your cats. Apply topical ” ea and tick medications such as Frontline Plus every 30 days, check your cats daily for ticks, clear out the underbrush in your yard to reduce ticks, and keep your cats in the house. CHAT of Wakulla Adoption has many loving cats and kittens that need a home. Most have already had their “ rst ” ea and tick treatment. Come see them at 1 Oak St., Crawfordville, 926-0890. You can also visit www.chatofwakulla.org or www.pet“ nder.com. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comTail Wagger... County Commission meets at 5 p.m. for a workshop. Bene t and sh fry for Jeanine AberPosey 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Wakulla Christian Coalition will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Habitat for Humanity Housing Program at Ameris Bank at 6:30 p.m. ThursdayFridayMondayTuesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingThursday, November 10  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers to discuss infrastructure shortfalls in historic neighborhoods.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for a special called meeting at 6 p.m. at city hall. They will amend the scal year budget for 2010-11. The regular meeting will follow at 7 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1501 Coastal Highway. The purpose of the meeting is to conduct general business of the council. Thursday, November 17  WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will be held at 10 a.m. in the board of county commissioner’s conference room.  RECYCLING TASK FORCE will meet at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. The purpose of the meeting is to propose and pursue ways to increase recycling in Wakulla County.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for a public workshop on the Environmental Protection Agency’s cleanup grant at 6 p.m. in city hall.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 3BDear EarthTalk: I drink diet soda but Im told its bad for me and linked to health problems. Is this true and if so can you suggest any healthier alternatives? … Mitchell James, Ronkonkoma, N.Y. While rumors have circulated for years that diet sodas are unhealthy, researchers have found no direct links between such drinks and speci“ c human health problems. Aspartame (also known as NutraSweet) is the sugar-alternative of choice for most diet soda makers. Its 180 times sweeter than sugar but contains no significant calories and does not promote tooth decay. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration first approved aspartame in 1974, though health advocates held up its widespread use for over a decade. Over half of Americans consume aspartame regularly in soda and other foods … all told, diet varieties accounted for some 29 percent of the soft drink market for the top 10 sodas in 2010, according to Beverage Digest … so it is certainly reasonable to be concerned about any potential health effects. However, initial reports that implicated aspartame in seizures, headaches, depression, anxiety, memory loss, birth defects, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus, methanol toxicity and even cancer turned out to be false (even a hoax), according to a wide range of reputable, peer-reviewed studies and clinical and epidemiological research. Another concern that has been voiced about aspartame is that it produces methanol when metabolized, which converts to formaldehyde (and then formic acid) in the body. But studies have shown that the amount of methanol in aspartame is less than that found in natural sources such as fruit juices, citrus fruits and some fermented beverages, and that the amount of formaldehyde generated is also small compared to that produced routinely by the body from other foods and drugs. While aspartame and diet sodas have not been linked directly to speci“ c health problems, researchers who surveyed the eating, drinking, smoking and exercise habits of some 2,500 New Yorkers between 2003 and 2010 did “ nd that those who drank at least one diet soda per day had a 61 percent higher risk of socalled vascular events (e.g. heart attack or stroke) than those who avoided Diet Coke and other products with aspartame. If our results are confirmed with future studies, then it would suggest that diet soda may not be the optimal substitute for sugar-sweetened beverages for protection against vascular outcomes,Ž reported the studys lead author, Hannah Gardener of the University of Miami School of Medicine. But others say that such a “ nding constitutes a link, not proof of cause and effect „ and that those who have switched to diet sodas may be replacing the calories they used to get from regular sodas with other unhealthy foods that may be increasing their risk of heart attack or stroke. The takeaway should be that those who drink soda regularly, diet or otherwise, should be sure to exercise and eat right otherwise. Or, better yet... give up the soda entirely. According to Katherine Zeratsky, a nutritionist with the Mayo Clinic, healthier choices abound. She suggests starting off the day with a glass of 100 percent fruit juice and then drinking skim milk with meals. Sip water throughout the day,Ž she recommends. For variety, try sparkling water or add a squirt of lemon or cranberry juice to your water.ŽEarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss at www.emagazine.com. What’s a healthy alternative to diet soda? Researchers have found no direct links between diet sodas and speci“ c human health problems. Initial reports that implicated aspartame, widely use to sweeten diet sodas, in a wide range of human health problems including cancer turned out to be false … though certainly much healthier beverage choices abound.PHOTO BY JULESREYES, COURTESY FLICKRContinued from Page 1B Bathroom. Dont leave water running while you are brushing your teeth. Replace older toilets with low-” ow toilets. Add a brick to the tank to reduce water use. Showers use less water than baths. Time your showers and try to keep them less than “ ve minutes in length. Consider turning off the water while you are lathering. Laundry Room. Clean the lint from the “ lter after every load. Use interior or exterior clotheslines or a drying rack when possible. Wash full loads of laundry. Use a cold water wash and rinse and earth-friendly laundry soap. Front loading washers are more ef“ cient than most top loading models. Kitchen. It may come as a surprise that washing a load of dishes in the dishwasher uses less water than doing the same number of dishes by hand. Dishwashers also do a better job of killing germs, because they use hotter water than you would normally use if washing by hand. Run your dishwasher only when it is full. Use the air dry setting instead of heat dry and use earthyfriendly dishwasher soap. By replacing a pre-1994 dishwasher with an Energy Star quali“ ed dishwasher, you can save at least $30 in annual utility costs. Clean your dishwasher following the manufacturers instruction to expect optimal cleaning. Your refrigerator is the only appliance that works continuously in your home 24 hours a day. In most households, the refrigerator is the single biggest energy consuming kitchen appliance. According to Energy Star, replacing a refrigerator bought in 1990 with a new Energy Star quali“ ed model can save enough to pay for lighting an average household for nearly four months. Your refrigerator/freezer is another place for a thermometer. Keep your refrigerator between 35 and 38 degrees and your freezer at 0. Use tight-“ tting covers on pots and pans when cooking on top of your stove and cook with a full oven. Match the burner with the pan size. Cook large batches and freeze extra portions. Utilize seasonal recipes. Windows. Weatherize your windows. Use insulated window coverings or curtains to control energy loss if you cant replace your present leaky windows. UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension and members of Sustainable Big Bend are committed to educating people on how to save energy and live more sustainable lives. In-depth UF/IFAS publications are available on all of the above named topics. Please use our www.solutionsforyourlife.com website to request information on these topics OR contact me and I will get the needed information to you. We are here to serve you! Continued from Page 1B Commissioner Lynn Artz handed out copies of data from last years collection at the land“ ll. The report indicated the total amount of material recycled was 2,403 tons, with 1,737 of that being construction and debris, which means 666 tons of material, excluding construction and debris, was recycled. The report indicated 25 percent of the solid waste was recycled, 72 percent of what was recycled was construction and debris going to Marpan. When asked where Waste Pro takes the recyclable material after it is picked up, Mills said it was taken to Recycled Fibers in Tallahassee. The Recycle Task Force made a presentation on Nov. 7 about recycling to the Wakulla County Commission recognizing America Recycles Day on Nov. 15.Commercial recycling Swenson: Tips for household conservationSip water throughout the day, a nutritionist recommends. For variety, try sparkling water or add a squirt of lemon or cranberry juice to your water. At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) Wakulla Weight Loss located at2615 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite103, Crawfordville, FL 32327850-926-3140 opt2 November Specials Purchase a water bottle and get a Mic-combo shot for free. Save $5 on a bottle of Calcium Pyruvate. Buy one bottle of multivitamins and get one for FREE Prepay for 3 regular visits and receive one visit FREE. Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 FREE INTRODUCTORY SESSIONS FOR NOVEMBER.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESSBy JERRY KINDER My wife, Marge, and I are cancer survivors. She was diagnosed in 2007 with breast cancer and I joined the team when I was diagnosed in 2010 with bladder cancer. Marge said this sharing has gone too far. I went to Mof“ tt Cancer Center in Tampa for a second opinion and thereafter started chemotherapy. The side effects of chemo are cumulative and by the eighth treatment the roof caved in. I lost 27 pounds, along with numerous side effects … of which I have lost count. Marge had to take me to the ER three times. My standoff with cancer is just another of three previous near-miss experiences which I would like to share with you. None of these experiences cover my military service or my 10 minute waltz with a grizzly bear twice my size in Yellowstone. First was the car wreck on my way from Montreal to Chicago where, when the Canadian Mounties saw the car, they went to the morgue to ID my body on the belief that no one could have survived the wreck. Second was when I was flying a plane, and third was two heart surgeries, one week apart, in Pensacola. The second surgery was required because the first went so sour that I was probably not going to make it. Being on the edge of leaving often will prompt one to do a great deal of thinking and it WILL change your priorities in life. In short, I had to nearly die in order to learn how to live. Eleven things I learned from my cancer and the other three near-death experiences are: 1. Many of our problems are caused by something we have done and all that is necessary is to stop or correct them. Ninety percent of bladder cancers are caused by smoking … unfortunately, I didnt stop in time. 2. Continuing to survive near-death situations is very disappointing to your enemies. 3. When right on the edge, if given the time, you will take inventory, asking yourself what life had been all about, you will ask, What will I be remembered for? You can ask yourself now … What do you want to be remembered for? 4. I “ nally realized life had not been about money, which was just an illusion. Naturally, one needs enough money to sustain oneself and ones family. After my cancer diagnosis, I realized it was about how I made it and how I treated others in the process. 5. I realized, in the end, I would not be judged on what I had consumed and acquired, but on what I had produced, shared and given to others … that what I got was trumped in every way by what I had given. Today the five richest men in the world have more wealth that the 57 poorest countries combined. God help them to handle it wisely. Personally, I have been a good businessman. I started with nothing and have managed to retain most of it. 6. I now know I am here for a very short time and have learned how quickly I could go, so treat each day as very precious and also “ nd a few moments to smell the ” owers. 7. As we get older, we tend to live more in the past and we should keep the good memories and what the past can teach us. Beyond that, there is no future in the past. 8. Having a funny bone is as important as having a backbone. When we laugh at ourselves, we take a giant step toward maturity and humility. It is also a medical fact that humor and laughter will extend your life. 9. There are few things that are really important, very few. We may think otherwise, but more than 80 percent of what we worry about never happens. Something else happens we forgot to worry about. 10. Love one another. Find someone to give a hug to … and, if they need it, help them. You will bene“ t MORE than they will. Jesus gave us the story of the Good Samaritan for a reason. Do it today, as no one has a guarantee on tomorrow. 11. Through my experiences, along with having cancer, I have learned to forgive others. Life is too short to waste it on hate. By forgiving someone, I cant change yesterday, but I can and do change tomorrow, not to mention improve my health.Editors Note: This is taken from Jerry Kinders speech at last months Relay for Life Kickoff.I had to nearly die to learn how to live For nearly 120 years, yoga has been a part of American life. During that time, yoga has changed Americans, and Americans have made their mark on the practice. In some cases, Asana practice has become more athletic. Vinyasa ” ows are faster, new poses are being explored, and classes include more variety. Instead of wearing a dhoti, a traditional skirtlike garment worn by Indian men, a typical Western yoga student might sport spandex shorts and a tight tank top. Yet when were sitting cross-legged with our eyes closed, or moving with our breath, we experience the same peace as the yogis of old. And though yoga may evolve in its outer form, the most important transformation in yoga will always be the change that happens within. One of the fruits of yoga practice is the realization of interconnections. Our bodies, minds and emotions interact in complex ways that science is only just beginning to understand. In this dense web of interconnections, nothing we do has a single effect. In bow pose, you bring more oxygen into the bottom of the lungs (an area that usually gets less than the upper regions), your blood pressure and heart rate rise, pressure increases in the head and neck, and you stretch the muscles and organs in the front of the body as you compress those in back, where the adrenals are located. Its my guess that the interrelated actions of this pose … along with other elements of a complete yoga practice … are what create the therapeutic bene“ t. See for yourself. Do more yoga!Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 3800140.With all the problems we are having with our economy today, stress and anxiety levels have increased due to various things from employment, housing, medical, to the holidays. It is becoming a stressful time in our lives. Job loss is at a higher risk now than in times past, and usually unexpected when it happens. With a job loss, your entire world changes, not to mention “ nancial obligations, or even how to maintain health insurance. It is a shocking, frightening, and certainly stressful experience. In fact, most medical experts relate a sudden layoff or job loss is similar to what is experienced with other significant losses, such as death. There are many ways of combating stress during these hard times and exercise plays a huge role in stress and anxiety relief. Studies by various health researchers such as the Mayo Institute have found that physical activity helps to bump up the production of brains feel-good neurotransmitters, called endorphins. When exercising, people tend to think about their exercise pace or movement and often forget for a short while about the dayto-day challenges and irritations. The longer the workout continues, the clearer the mind and the fewer problems, and an increase in energy levels and more optimism. Exercise helped them to clear their heads and maintain a calmer state throughout the day. It is like meditation in motion. Regular exercise can increase self-con“ dence and lower depression and anxiety symptoms, and improve your sleep, which are all accompanied by stress, depression and anxiety. Situations arise, but you are in command of your body and your life, you cannot change the situations around you, but your body and your life is yours to keep strong. So why not work with what you have, keep exercising and when the big problem ” ares its head, with exercise it will be a little easier to deal with. So go for a run to clear your head!Pamela Chichester, CFT, is manager of Body-Tek 24 Hour Fitness. For information about the gym and classes call (850) 926-2348 or visit Body-Teks Facebook page. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERMeditation in motionYoga shows interconnections the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Anne urmondOctober 2011 Winner Her name was drawn fromI would like to thank all of the local businesses for sponsoring this contest. My husband and I are looking forward to visiting each restaurant. We enjoy the personal relationships we have with these local establishments. Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations ank You So Much! Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Rustys Automotive MOBILE REPAIR Rustys Automotive MOBILE REPAIR 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 www.hicksair.com HEARING TECHNOLOGY SALE!FREE Demonstration!$1095SOLUTION 4 ALL SIZES. Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. The Log Cabin Barry Building PRESENTING A GRAND EVENT3 DAY SALE FREE OF CHARGEDont miss the opportunity to receive a personal demonstration on the latest in digital hearing technology!Appointments are necessary as we expect a strong response.CALL (850) 942-4007 or Toll Free 1-866-942-4007 HEAR FOR THE HOLIDAYS Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain

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By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 5 … A Leon County circuit judge has ordered the state to cease and desistŽ from taking further steps toward accepting bids for a prisonprivatization plan that she found unconstitutional. In an order dated Friday and made public Saturday, Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford sided with the Florida Police Benevolent Association in halting the procurement process during the states appeal of her earlier ruling. The Department of Corrections had argued that “ ling the appeal led to an automatic stay of Fulfords Sept. 30 ruling … effectively allowing the bidding process to go forward. Fulfords latest order vacated, or rejected, that stay. This court finds that the evidence in the record establishes the likelihood of irreparable injury to the plaintiffs (the PBA and members) if the stay is not vacated and further that the defendants are not likely to succeed on the merits on appeal, Fulford wrote. The privatization plan calls for the state to contract out the operation of 29 prison facilities across the southern part of the state. Jim Baiardi, the president of PBAs chapter for correctional of“ cers, issued a statement Saturday praising Fulfords latest ruling. The PBA is pleased that Judge Fulford has stopped this action, said Baiardi, who testi“ ed during a hearing Friday about panicŽ among officers. State correctional officers can breathe a sigh of relief today. The dispute stemmed from a Thursday announcement that the Department of Corrections was reopening the bidding process for the privatization plan. PBA attorneys argued during the hearing Friday there was no reason to move forward with bidding, unless the department was trying to gain some type of advantage in the legal challenge or in the legislative session that starts in January. But the Department of Corrections said Thursday it would not sign a privatization contract while the legal challenge is pending --a point reiterated during Fridays hearing by Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Glogau. In her ruling on the stay, however, Fulford noted the testimony of Baiardi, who also is a captain at the South Florida Reception Center. Attorney General Pam Bondi announced Monday that she would appeal Fulfords Sept. 30 ruling on the constitutionality of the privatization plan. Bondi made the decision at the request of the Legislature, after Gov. Rick Scott declined to “ le the appeal. The PBA challenged the way lawmakers approved the privatization plan, which was included in budget “ ne print … known as proviso language … instead of in a typical bill. Fulford found that the constitution required lawmakers to change state law or use an already-existing department review process before privatizing the prisons. She did not say privatization is unconstitutional, just that the way lawmakers approved the plan was unconstitutional. The 1st District Court of Appeal has not scheduled a hearing in the case, according to an online docket. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 5BBy JIM SAUNDERS THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 4 … Its hard to picture two places in Florida more different than Miami and Gretna. But international, glitzy Miami and rural, downhome Gretna are drawing headlines for the same reason: gambling. The debate about expanded gambling intensi“ ed this week, as lawmakers and lobbyists get ready to battle about adding resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties. Meanwhile, the Gadsden County Commission agreed to hold a referendum about allowing slot machines at a new Gretna racetrack and poker room. Gambling offers sizzle, but lawmakers and other state leaders also made clear this week they are concerned about, well, less-exciting issues. That includes auto insurance, workerscompensation insurance and the always-thorny Citizens Property Insurance. SPINNING THE WHEEL ON GAMBLING, JOBS House sponsor Erik Fresen, R-Miami, and Senate sponsor Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, met with a roomful of reporters Thursday to rebut criticism of their proposal to allow three resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward. Criticism is coming from various directions, including religious groups, some business organizations, the Seminole Tribe and the pari-mutuel industry. But Fresen offered an explanation that resonates from the waterfront in Miami to the timber of Gadsden County: New gambling facilities will bring new jobs. My community is begging me, he said. Can we do something to inject some capital into our economy? I have $6 billion knocking on my door from an industry who wants to come in with all private capital. But groups such as the Florida Baptist Convention, the Florida Catholic Conference and Florida Family Action held a news conference earlier to say expanded gambling is a fools bet. They say, among other things, that it hurts poor people and damages the states family-friendly reputation. We are working to make our message very clear to legislators that it is unconscionable to vote for a change that will negatively affect thousands of families in our state, said Mark Andrews, chairman of Florida Casino Watch, a group that took part in the news conference. With the legislative session starting in January, such back-and-forth arguments will continue for the foreseeable future. But one of the most important voices in the debate could be House Speaker Dean Cannon, R-Winter Park. When asked about casinos this week, Cannon was diplomatic and said he was trying to reserve judgment on the proposals. But he also didnt leave any doubt about his views of gambling. I am philosophically opposed to the expansion of gaming in our state, Cannon said. PIP, OTHER ISSUES PILE UP Gambling might be the issue du jour, but insurance issues never fade away. Lawmakers and other state leaders this week called for changes in the personal-injury protection auto insurance system, the workers-compensation insurance system and … that old perennial … Citizens Property Insurance Corp. But actually making changes isnt so easy, at least in part because so many interest groups have stakes in issues such as PIP and workers comp. A panel created to study PIP fraud and in” ated autoinsurance costs agreed that the system has soaring premiums and a rising number of claims. But panel members couldnt agree what to do about it. Its lawyers, providers and insurance companies “ ghting over a pot of money the consumers paid in and keep paying in at an extraordinary level, said Robin Westcott, the state insurance consumer advocate. Each day seems to be worse. Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinet heard presentations about PIP and the statebacked Citizens, which now insures nearly 1.5 million properties. Scott ordered Citizens of“ cials to come back with recommendations in December to stem the growth. This is something we cannot continue to do, Scott said. I expect the solution you and the board bring to me will solve the problem by June of next year, before the next hurricane season.Ž IF AT FIRST YOU DONT SUCCEED Scott and Republican lawmakers have been taking legal hits on some of their priorities. But that doesnt mean they are ready to give up. Scott announced Thursday the state will appeal a federal judges injunction against a law that requires drug tests for welfare recipients. This policy is intended to help Florida families and is an effective way to ensure that welfare dollars are used for the bene“ t of children and to help Floridians get back to work and off public assistance, Scott said. I have no doubt that the law is constitutional, and that it is supported by the great weight of judicial authority. But the appeal, like passage of the law, drew criticism, with Rep. Cynthia Stafford, D-Miami, describing the tests as mean-spirited, wasteful and unconstitutional. Scott declined Monday to appeal a circuit judges ruling that tossed out a massive prison-privatization plan. But Attorney General Pam Bondi stepped in and “ led the appeal, at the request of the Legislature. Bondis move, which came shortly before an appeal deadline, was somewhat of a surprise. But the Florida Police Benevolent Association, which filed the lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the privatization plan, vowed to “ ght to the state Supreme Court, if necessary. Weve been ready to go from the start, and were taking it to the next level, PBA Executive Director Matt Puckett said. BUSINESS UPS AND DOWNS Scott this week got to make the type of announcement he would love to repeat again and again: Boeing said it will build the next generation of manned space-” ight vehicles at the Kennedy Space Center. Boeing said it plans to have more than 150 employees in place by 2013, a number that could grow to more than 500 by 2015. That would be a boost to Scotts focus on bringing jobs to the state. Boeings choice of Florida for its commercial crew program headquarters is evidence Florida has the world-class facilities and workforce expertise needed for aerospace companies to succeed, Scott said. The governors staff, however, tried to tamp down another piece of jobs news later in the week that posed an embarrassment for the governor. Solantic, an urgent-care chain that Scott founded and later sold, said it would move at least a handful of headquarters jobs from Jacksonville to Tennessee. A far-bigger problem for Florida businesses emerged Thursday, when state analysts said many “ rms will see their unemployment taxes go up nearly $100 per employee in 2012. Lawmakers have taken steps during the past few years to avoid major unemployment-tax increases. Business groups could seek similar help in 2012, as they try to buy time until the economy improves. This system was never really designed to support unemployment at these levels for this period of time, said David Hart, vice president of governmental affairs for the Florida Chamber of Commerce. Its a challenge not just here but across the country. STORY OF THE WEEK: Scott and lawmakers pushed back against judges who rejected two of their priorities. They appealed decisions blocking drug testing for welfare recipients and prison privatization. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Our goal is not about the expansion of gaming, said Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, a Fort Lauderdale Republican who is sponsoring a bill that would allow resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties. As a matter of fact, we hope it will reduce gaming in the state.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Does what happens in Gretna stay in Gretna? Judge again blocks prison privatizationPHOTO BY BRANDON LARRABEEStephen Turner, an attorney for the Police Benevolent Association, hands an exhibit to Judge Jackie Fulford during a hearing on prison privatization Friday in Tallahassee. NEED A NEW HOME?Come see if you qualify for a no interest home mortgage through Habitat for Humanity’s Housing Program!You must be a Wakulla County Resident for at least the last year.Where:Conference Room at Ameris Bank 2628 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville When:Tuesday, November 15 Time:6:30 P.M. enter through back door Bring paperwork to verify your income, dependents, savings and expenses, driver licenses for all drivers and social security cards for everyone who will live in your home.If you have any questions please call: Tara C. Sanders 926-5211 Linda Boles 926-6222Peggy Mackin 926-5037. 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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: On Veterans Day, Friday, Nov. 11, we proudly hail all those who have kept our great country free. We encourage all Americans to display their patriotism and fly the flag every day, but especially on: Martin Luther King’s birthday, the third Monday in January  Abraham Lincoln’s birthday, February 12  George Washington’s birthday, the third Monday in February  Armed Forces Day, the third Saturday in May  Memorial Day, the last Monday in May (half-staff until noon)  Flag Day, June 14  Independence Day, July 4  Labor Day, the first Monday in September  Veterans Day, November 11 Coloring PictureSALUTE LOCAL VETERANSVeterans Day November 11 President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed a national holiday called Armistice Day to take place on November 11, 1919 and annually thereafter to commemorate the signing of the armistice treaty that ended World War I. The holiday served to honor those who served and lost their lives in the war. However, it wasnt until 34 years later when a Kansas shoe store owner proposed the holiday should be expanded to remember all veterans, not just those of World War I. Alfred King, a shoe store owner in Emporia, Kansas, began a campaign to turn Armistice Day into AllŽ Veterans Day. His towns Chamber of Commerce got involved and participated in the cause, urging all business owners to shut down on November 11 to honor veterans. U.S. Representative Ed Rees, also of Emporia, helped push a bill through Congress, which President Dwight Eisenhower later signed into law on May 26, 1954. Roughly one week later ArmisticeŽ was changed to VeteransŽ and the holiday has honored all veterans ever since.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 877-676-1403 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars  Real Estate  Rentals  Employment  Services  Yard Sales  Announcements Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting € pressure washing € sheetrock € wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 “pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUY€SELL€TRADE€REPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @ comcast.net 24 HOUR EMERGENCYRESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALSERVICEALLMAKESANDMODELSMAINTANCECONTRACTSSTOCKALLSIZE FILTERSANDMEDIA COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY SOLUTIONS 850-926-4676North Pointe Center • 1606-B Crawfordville Highwaylic# CAC1816154 A/C & Heating Specialists, LLCWWW.TALLYSENERGYSTAR.COM ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Cornerstone CookingWant a SMOKED TURKEY or HAM for your holiday get-together? Maybe you don’t want to cook at all. Let Cornerstone Cooking take some of the hassle out of the holidays for you.We also o er FULL CATERING SERVICES! Morris Pigo at (850) 661-1117 Do leaves have you bogged down this fall then call Pat Green’s Lawn ServiceCall today for a free quote! They have all the modern equipment to rid you of all those falling leaves.(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com RestaurantSpaceAvailable Soon!! Fullyequipped.Canassumefullliquorlicenseand equipmentifyouactquickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info. 110 Help Wanted Certified Prescribed Burne r Prescribed burner needed. Full-time or part-time employment. Must have burn experience, including 130-190 certifications, heavy equipment operation, and clean driving record. Salary negotiable. Contact Bobbie Dugger with B&B Du gg er Inc. 850-566-0831. 111 Medical/ Dental Help Wanted Physician’s Assistant Needed LookingforPhysicianAssistant forverybusymedicalofficethat servicesprimarycare,urgent careandcountyinmates.Positionisfulltime.Ifyouareinterestedandwouldliketolearn moreaboutthisposition,please faxresumetofax850-926-3163, A ttn:RachelBrown.Pleasebe suretoincludesalaryrequirements. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 A IR CON OF WAKULLA Heating and Cooling Gary Limbaugh 926-5592 3232 Crawfordville Highway Service, Repair, Installation FL Lic. #CAC1814304. ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 ANYTIME ELECTRIC Specializinginrepairandservice,residentialandcommercial, homesandmobilehomes. 24-hourservice.MarkOliver, ER0015233. 421-3012. BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. No’s. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 130 Entertainment ZumbaWakulla,VFWPost4538, 475ArranRd.,Saturdays 9AM-10AMandonThursdays 6:30PM-7:30PM.$5/class.Party yourselfintoshape!CallPamat 459-5279orKimat251-9195. Look us u p in facebook! 200 Items For Sale WindowHeating/AirUnit,works good$100-firm.Canoew/2 seats¢erconsole $100-firm.15HPJohnsonmoto r w/15galtank&newhose,very goodcondition$500-firm. Craftsman6.5-22”selfpropelled lawnmower&mulcher,excellent condition$125-firm.Largeoutboardmotorcontrols,2traile r lightsexcellentcondition $200-firm.Onlyexremeinterest call 850-925-6439. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org 355 Yard Sales FinalCloseOutDaysatThe ThriftStore,4360Crawfordville Hwy.10AM-5PM.Clothing $1/each,remainingfurnitureand other items drastically reduced!! Friday,Nov.11andSaturday, Nov.12.From9AM-4PMat135 BurntPineLoopinSt.Marks. Furniture and lots of g oodies. HarvestThriftStore.1596CrawfordvilleHwy.NorthPointe Plaza.ISNOWOPEN!Mostall clothesandshoes$1.00.Nice nic-nacs.Comeseeour“twofor one” rack! Sat.,Nov.12,7AM-3PM,45Will Rd.(offofLonnieRaker),Furniture,tools,householditems, bab y items. Lots more!! Sat.,November12,8AM-until.7 BirchCourt.Furniture,householditems,babyclothes,somethin g for ever y one. 435 Lost and Found Lostadultmalegoldenretriever. HisnameisCodyandwaswearingagreencollar.LastseenOctober31st.inthepremiseso f SpringCourt,nearSpringwood subdivision,closetocountyline. Please call 850-421-0030. 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.ŽFamilial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberfortheh earing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 515 Apartments for Rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134 MOVE-IN SPECIAL $99 Deposit $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99 CIVIL SERVANT 5% OFF RENT SENIOR CITIZEN 5% OFF RENT Application Fee $35 520 Townhouses for Rent 2BR/2.5BA,1300sqft.,2005 Townhome.QuietCrawfordville neighborhood.Enjoyspacious livingspace,largemaster, screenedpatio,convenienceto shoppingandparks. $750/month.TeresaBeidler, Coastwise Realty, 850-519-3766 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com Mini-WarehouseSpacesfo r lease,8X10and10X12now available.ComebyorcallWakulla Realt y, 926-5084. WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE € Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) € Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) € Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BAone-storyhomeon1.5 lotwithgarage.Excellentcondition.$95,000.Ownerfinancing. 850-251-7588 850-962-2016. Sopchoppyhouse,3BR/1BA,locatedon1/2acrelot.$75,000. Revell Realty, 850-962-2212. NewhomeinCrawfordville! 3BR/2BA,locatedinWakulla Gardens.$79,000.RevellRealty, 850-962-2212. 555 Houses for Rent 2BR/2BAhomeontheOchlockoneeRiver.Separatefamily room,1-carcarport,quietarea. Referencesrequired.NoPets. $825/mo.+1st/Dep/Last.Carol Odell,BrokerAssociate,Century 21SilverCoastRealty, 850-984-5007. 3BR/1.5BAhomeinWakulla Gardens,$600/month,plusdeposit. Call 850-766-0170. 3BR/2BA,St.Marks.Avail.Dec. 1st.Excellentcondition.Living Room,SeparateDiningRoom, Eat-InKitchen,allappliances. Garage+largestorageroom. Fencedyard.Only16milesfrom CapitalCir.,(1/2blockfrom river). $800/month. Lease & References.First&lastmonth'srent required.Nopets.Call925-6223 for appointment. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$695/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Cozycottage,Panacea.Remodeled2BR/1BA.Hardwoodfloors, ceiling-fansthroughout,W/D hook-up,openbackdeck.Close toGulfofMexico,excellentfishing!$585/month-$550/deposit. 850-926-4217. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. Homes on Acreage Home on 3 acres. 2BR/2BA, porch, storage building, large oak trees, conveniently located near post office and Walgreens. $625/month. Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $695/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. Medart,studiohouseonfou r lots.$550/permonth,plusdeposit. Revell Realty 962-2212. SmallcottagelocatedinPanacea.82LakeAve.3BR/1BA.No pets.$450/month,first&last month rent. Call 850-251-7965. Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1100 per month. BALLROOMONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE!Alabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Many Selling Absolute!Tuesday, November 15, 6:00 p.m.215 Bank Foreclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information 91 Culbreath Lane, Crawfordville, FL 88 Midnight Pass, Crawfordville, FL 2 Lots on Block D Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville, FL .516 +/acres on the east side of Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Lot 49 Southside of Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 20 Lots in the Sellars Crossing Subdivision, Crawfordville, FL 45 Harry Morrison Road, Crawfordville, FL Lots 3 & 4 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, FL Lot 24 Mashes Sand Road, Panacea, FLSelling from St. James Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Road, Carrabelle, FL 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $725mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 4Br 2Ba DWMH $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $800mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž(850) 926…5084 RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets36 Stephen Donaldson Road 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 1 Acre $700 No Smoking or pets 10 Calvary Court 3 BR/2BA 1,830 sf House. 2 Car garage, replace and POOL. $1450. Mo. No Smoking, pets negotiable60 Hummingbird Lane 4 BR/2BA, 1.964 sf house with 2 car garage, replace and POOL. $1300 Mo.No Smoking, pets negotiableAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCreek Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent --2BR/1.5BAMH,$400/mo., plusdeposit.3476SpringCreek Hwy. (365 South). 850-926-5192 --3BR/2BAMH,$625/month, $625/deposit.33LisaDrive, ( Hw y 319 So. ) 850-926-5192. 2BR/1BA,MH,Private. Fenced-infrontyard.Yardmaintenanceandgarbagepick-upincluded.2610M.L.K.Rd. $450/month,+deposit.Nopets. CallQueenat850-925-6016, leave messa g e. 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens,CAH,GoodFloorPlan. $650/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease. A vailblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-508-8783 727-642-6043. 3BR/2BADWMH.Largedeck, shed,remodeledkitchen.Great condition!NOpets,(firm). $650/month,$600/security. 850-926-6212. 3BR/2BASWMHonfiveacres. $500/month,$500/security.One mileSouthofWakullaStation. A vailable now! 850-745-8526. 605 Statewide Classi eds Announcements A dvertisingthatWorks.Putyour adinOver100PapersthroughoutFloridaforoneLOWRATE! Call(866)742-1373orvisit: www.florida-classifieds.com. Autos Wanted CASHFORCARS!AnyMake, Model,orYear.WePayMORE! RunningorNot.SellYourCaror TruckTODAY.FreeTowing!Instant Offer: (888)420-3807. Education A LLIEDHEALTHcareer training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com. Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com. Help Wanted A BetterCareerWithMelton GreatEquipment&Benefits2 Mos.CDLClassADrivingExp (877)258-8782www.meltontruck.com. Driver-BuildYourOwnHometime!Part-time,Full-time,Express&Casuallanes!Dailyo r WeeklyPay.Modernequipment! CDL-A,3monthsrecentexperiencerequired.(800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com. Drivers:RunGA,AL,MS,TN & FLHOMEWEEKENDS,EarnUp to39¢/mi,1yrOTRFlatbedexp. Call:SUNBELTTRANSPORT, LLC (800)572-5489 ext. 227. Land For Sale LAND LIQUIDATION 20 Acres $0 Down,$99/mo.ONLY$12,900 NearGrowingElPaso,T X OwnerFinancing,NOCREDIT CHECKS!MoneyBackGuaranteeFREEColorBrochure (800)755-8953www.sunsetranches.com. Pre-GrandOpeningSale!Sat. November19thOnly.6.34acres w/directlakefrontageonly $29,900!Brandnew,neverbeforeoffered!Gorgeouswooded settingwithdeepwaterfrontage onspectacularlake.Pavedrds, power,phone,muchmore.Unheardofprices-excellentfinancing.Hurryoutfor1stpick! Call now (866)952-5302, x 71. INVESTMENTOPPORTUNITY!! 1waterfront&4lakeaccess lots,$84,400.GatedlakecommunitynearAthens,GA.Excellentschools.Financingavailable. CalltheBankDirect. (888)348-5119. Miscellaneous SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instoc k readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com (800)578-1363 Ext.300N. EARNCOLLEGEDEGREEONLINE.*Medical,*Business, *CriminalJustice.Jobplacement assistance.Computeravailable. FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(877)206-5165 www.CenturaOnline.com. A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhandsonAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769. 680 Legal Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Noticeisherebygiventhatthefollowingvehicleandvesselwillbesoldfortowingand storage charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78. Date of Sale:11-30-2011 Time:9:00 a.m. Vehicle:1988 MERCURY LS Vin # :1MEBM6047JH711179 All sales by Hobbys Towing & Recovery will be held at 1498Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-7698 November 10, 2011 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 65 2010-CA-000028 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC., ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-21 Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD, ALVITA M., et al. Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorFinalJudgmententerinCaseNo. 652010-CA-000028oftheCircuitCourtof the2NDJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,wherein,THEBANKOF NEWYORKMELLONFKATHEBANKOF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERSCWABS,INC.,ASSET BACKEDCERTIFICATES,SERIES 2006-21,isPlaintiff,and,HOWARD,ALVITAM.,et.al.,areDefendants,Iwillsellto thehighestbidderforcashattheLOBBYof theCourthouse,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327,atthehourof 11a.m.onthe1stdayofDecember2011, the following described property: LOT10BLOCK52WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT5ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPOR PLATTHEREOFRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK1PAGE56OFPUBLICRECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesales,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwith60daysafterthe sale. DATED this 26th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-000143-CA WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.ASSUCCESSORBYMERGERTOWACHOVIABANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. ALLUNKNOWNBENEFICIARIESOFTHE ROUGHTONFAMILYLIVINGTRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 14, 2001, ET AL Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): ALLUNKNOWNBENEFICIARIESOFTHE ROUGHTONFA;MILYLIVINGTRUST, DATEDNOVEMBER14,2001(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) ALLUNKNOWNSUCCESSOR TRUSTEE(S)OFTHEROUGHTONFAMILYLIVINGTRUST,DATEDNOVEMBER 14, 2001 (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) __,ASTHEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOF CLEOROUGHTON,DECEASED,IFANY (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactionfor ForeclosureofMortgageonthefollowing described property: LOT22,ELLENWOODSUBDIVISION,ACCORDINGTOTHEMAPORPLAT THEREOF,ASRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK3,PAGE10AND11,INCLUSIVE, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. 1994/FLEETCRAFT DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME VIN # GAFLR35A08300HH/TITLE#68765121 VIN # GAFLR35B908300HH/TITLE368765122 StreetAddress:48CAROLINACOURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toit,onMoskowitz,Mandell, Salim&Simowitz,P.A.,AttorneyforPlaintiff,whoseaddressis800CorporateDrive, Suite500,FortLauderdale,FLORIDA 33334,30daysafterthefirstpublicationof thisNoticeinTHEWAKULLANEWSand filetheoriginalwiththeClerkofthisCourt eitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiff'sattorney orimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyoufortherelief demanded in the complaint. ThisnoticeisprovidedpursuanttoAdministrative Order No. 2.065. InaccordancewiththeAmericanwithDisabilitiesAct,ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywhoneedsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youare entitled,atnocosttoyou,toprovisionsof certainassistance.PleasecontacttheCourt Administratorat3056CrawfordvilleHIghway,Crawfordville,FL32327,PhoneNo. (850)926-1201within2workingdaysof yourreceiptofthisnoticeorpleading;ifyou arehearingimpaired,call1-800-955-8771 (TDD);ifyouarevoiceimpaired,call 1-800-995-8770(V)(ViaFloridaRelayServices). WITNESSmyhandandthesealofthis Court this 27th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-207-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION THEBANKOFNEWYORKMELLON TRUSTCOMPANY,N.A.,byandthrough itssub-servicingagent,VANDERBILT MORTGAGEANDFINANCE,INC.,aTennesseecorporationauthorizedtotransact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. BRAYNA.DEKLEandPEGGYSUE DEKLE,husbandandwife;MIDLAND FUNDINGLLC,aDelawarelimitedliability companyauthorizedtotransactbusinessin Florida,assuccessorininteresttoHouseholdFinance;FAMILYDOLLARSTORES OFFLORIDA,INC.,aFloridacorporation; UNIDENTIFIEDJOHNDOE(S)and/orUNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRYAN ARMSTRONG DEKLE YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanacitontoforeclosethatmortgage,originallyinfavorof FordConsumerFinanceCo.,Inc.datedOctober8,1996andrecordedonNovember1, 1996,inOfficialRecordsBook286,Page 583;asassignedtoVanderbiltMortgage andFinance,Inc.byAssignmentofMortgagerecordedonApril26,2011,inOfficial RecordsBook850,Page822,assubsequentlyassignedinOfficialRecordsBoo k 854,Page664,andfinallyassignedtothe BankofNewYorkMellonTrustCompany, N.A.,inOfficialRecordsBook854,Page 665,allofthePublicRecordsofWakulla County,FLorida,encumberingthefollowing realpropertylocatedinWakullaCounty, Florida, to-wit: Lot 24 Millers Way South CommenceataconcretemonumentmarkingtheSoutheastcorneroftheNortheast QuarterofLot52oftheHartsfieldSurveyof LandsinWakullaCOunty,Floridaand thencerunNorth17degrees15minutes08 secondsWest402.50feettothePOINTOF BEGINNING.FromsaidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinueNorth17degrees15minutes08secondsWest524.40feettoapoint ontheSoutherlyright-of-wayofStateRoad No.S-368,saidpointlyingonacurveconcavetotheNortherly,thencerunSouthwesterlyalongsaidcurvewitharadiusof 1091.74feetthruacentralangleof01degrees34minutes41secondsforanarcdistanceof30.07feet(chordofsaidarcbeing South77degrees12minutes43seconds West30.04feet),thencerunSouth17degrees15minutes08secondsEast291.97 feettoapointonacurvehavingaradiusof 1382.74feetthruacentralangleof31degrees08minutes57secondsforanarcdistanceof751.73feet(thechordofsaidare beingNorth87degrees31minutes55secondsWest742.51feet),thencerunSouth 17degrees15minutes08secondsEast 484.05feet,thencerunNorth72degrees 50minutes52secondsEast728.96feetto the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECTTOaroadwaycasementover andacrosstheSoutherlyandEasterly30 feet thereof. ALSOSUBJECTTOa50.00footcul-de-sac easement in the Southwest corner thereof. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toSONYAK.DAWS,Plaintiff attorney,whoseaddressisSonyaDaws, P.A.3116CapitalCircleNE,Suite5,Tallahassee,Florida32308,withinthirty(30) days,andfiletheoriginalwiththeClerkof thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiff's attorneysorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESSmyhandandsealofthisCourt on November 1st, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-252-CA CENTENNIALBANK,asSuccessorinInterest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREWM.BAKER,amarriedman,the UnknownSpouseofAndrewM.Baker,andanyandallOthersClaimingInterestsBy, Under,ThroughorAgainstANDREWM. BAKER, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TODEFENDANTS,ANDREWM.BAKER, THEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOFANDREW M.BAKER,ANDANYANDALLOTHERS CLAIMINGINTERESTSBY,UNDER, THROUGHORAGAINSTANDREWM. BAKER,ANDALLPARTIESHAVINGOR CLAIMINGTOHAVEANYRIGHTTITLE ORINTERESTINTHEPROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED: YOUARENOTIFIEDThatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots5and6,Block"11"ofPanaceaMineral Springs,Unit1,asubdivisionaspermapor platthereofrecordedinPlatBook1,Page 5,ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 24-5S-02W-057-03130-000) and: Lot55,Block"22"ofWakullaGardens,as permaporplatthereofrecordedinPlat Book1,Page39,ofthePublicRecordsof Wakulla County, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 00-00-035-008-07819-000) hasbeenfiledagainstyou.Youarerequired toserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,if any,totheComplaintonMaryEllenDavis, thePlaintiffsattorney,whoseaddressis MaryEllenDavisLawOffice,17HighDrive, SuiteC,PostOfficeBox1720Crawfordville, Florida32326,onorbeforeDecember12, 2011,andfiletheoriginalwiththeClerkof thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonthePlaintiffsattorneyorimm.ediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated on October 27, 2011 BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000304 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. LANHAM, JOHN L., et al, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorFinalJudgmententeredinCase No.65-2009-CA-000304oftheCircuit Courtofthe2NDJudicialCircuitinandfor WAKULLACounty,Florida,wherein,BAN K OFAMERICA,N.A.,isPlaintiff,and,LANHAM,JOHNL.,etal.,areDefendants,Iwill selltothehighestbidderforcashatthe LobbyoftheWakullaCountyCourthouseat 11AMonthe1stdayofDecember,2011, the following described property: LOT32,BLOCK6OFWAKULLAGARDENSUNITTWO,ACCORDINGTOTHE PLATTHEREOFASRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK1,PAGE42,OFTHEPUBLICRECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A nypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithing60days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLI S AS DEPUTY CLER K (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance.PleasecontacttheClerkofthe Court'sdisabilitycoordinatorat 850-926-0905,atleast7daysbeforeyour scheduledcourtappearance,orimmediatelyuponreceivingthisnotificationifthe timebeforethescheduledappearanceis lessthan7days;ifyouarehearingorvoice impaired, call 711. November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-00024 7 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWNHEIRSANDORBENEFICIARIESOFTHEESTATEOFBEATRICE FARMER, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWNHEIRSANDORBENEFICARIESOFTHEESTATEOFBEATRICE FARMER LAST ADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNWON YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactionfor ForeclosureofMortgageonthefollowing described property; AportionoflandsasdescribedinDeed Book5,Page678ofthePublicRecordsof WakullaCounty,Floridabeingmoreparticularly described as follows: CommenceattheNortheastcornerofthe WestHalfofLot77oftheHartsfieldSurvey ofLandsinWakullaCounty,Floridaandrun South17degrees55minutes32seconds East209.22feet;thencerunSouth72degrees12minutes,00West134.22feetto anironrodwithcap(LS#5831)forthePoint ofbeginning.FromsaidPointofBeginning continueSouth72degrees12minutes00 secondsWest75.00feettoanironrodwith cap(LS#5831);thencerunNorth72degrees12minutes00secondsEast75.00 feettoanironrodwithcap(LS#5831); thencerunsouth17degrees55minutes32 secondsEast75.00feettothePointofBeginning,containing0.129acres,moreor less. Togetherwitha20footaccesseasement described as follows: CommenceattheNortheastcornerofthe WestHalfofLot77oftheHartsfieldSurvey ofLandsinWakullaCounty,Floridaandrun South17degrees55minutes32seconds East189.22feettothePointofBeginning. FromsaidPointofBeginningcontinue South17degrees55minutes32seconds East20.00feet;thencerunSouth72degrees12minutes00secondsWest134.22 feettoanironrodwithcap(LS#5831); thencerunNorth17degrees55minutes32 secondsWest20.00feet;thencerunNorth 72degrees12minutes00secondsEast 134.22 feet to the Point of Beginning. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toit,onMarshallC.Watson, P.A.,AttorneyforPlaintiff,whoseaddressis 1800NW49thSTREET,SUITE120,FT. LAUDERDALEFL33309thirty(30)daysafterthefirstpublicationofthisNoticeinTHE WAKULLANEWSandfiletheoriginalwith theClerkofthisCourteitherbeforeservice onPlaintiff'sattorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeentered againstyouforthereliefdemandedinthe complaint. Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilityshoe needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinacourtproceeding,youareentitled,atnocosttoyoutotheprovisionof certainassistance.PleasecontactTheWakullaCountyCourthouseat850-926-0905 atleast7daysbeforeyourscheduledcourt appearance,orimmediatelyuponreceiving notificationifthetimebeforethescheduled appearanceislessthan7days.Ifyouare hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESSmyhandandthesealofthis Court this 20th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 – Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 23 26 31 43 48 52 56 60 63 2 20 34 44 3 45 21 39 53 4 15 18 35 49 5 27 32 50 61 64 6 28 46 7 24 40 57 8 22 36 54 9 33 55 19 29 51 10 16 30 41 47 11 25 37 58 62 65 12 38 13 42 59 ACROSS1.Russian-built ghter 4.Prestigious prizes since1901 10.Farmland unit 14.Chowed down 15.Lucky charm 16.Extinct cousinsof theostrich 17.Suxwith loyal or royal 18.Tinyslices of time 20.On a tilt 22.Rap's __ Boys 23.Seville"solong" 24.Awhole lot 25.Soughtaseat 26.German auto pioneerKarl 27.Mongrel dogs 29.Macbeth's title 31.Actress Blanchett 32.Three-time Burmese prime minister 33.Nestegginitials 34."It'sbeenages!" 39.Partner of food and lodging 40.Luauchow 41."__ Nagila" 43.Mr.Doubleday 46.Bivouac shelter 47.Blast-furnace materials 48.Curly poker 49.Ox's burden 51.Kama __ 52.Denomination mintedin Italy, once 54."Icouldn'tcare less"attitude 56.Overlooked by the doctor 58.Former "Tonight Show"bandleader Severinsen 60.Cleopatra's river 61.Former Speaker of theHouseTip 62.Santa __ winds 63.Driving test taker, usually 64.2000 Olympics city 65.Ginza cashDOWN1.__ tai (rum drink) 2.Words accompanyinga handshake, perhaps 3.Gainsan acceptancefrom 4.Grannies 5.Muscat'sland 6.Lay one down, in baseball 7."Don't Bring Me Down" rockers 8.Sappho's island 9.Dutchpainter Jan 10.ToriorWally 11.The Iran-__aair 12.About57degrees, mathematically 13.Dead Sea Scrolls scribe 19.Bearded former worldleader 21.Smith Brothers unit 23."Lost" network 24.Satchmo's instrument 27.Bagsa class 28.Introduction to sex? 30.Discuss thoroughly 33."What's__ for me?" 35.Deadheadicon Jerry 36.Billion years 37.Environmentalists' celebration 38.Thewholegang 42.Thick-brick link 43.Sum total 44.Clyde's partner in crime 45.It may be in a groove 46.Auto gear system, informally 50.Peloponnesian cit y 51.In a somber way 53.Bank claim 54.M __ "mnemonic" 55.Brazilian soccer legend 57.UK lexicon 59.Recyclableitem American Prole Hometown Content 10/16/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 12 34 3526 678 51 2 7345 691 8 95 4356 5872 200 9 HtCtt 192 6384 7 5 738541296 546297183 851 769324 279314658 364852917 687 923541 423175869 915486732 M A I A B C A M O U N T I T S A D E A L B O N N I E G E T S I N T O N E E D L E L O Z E N G E L I E N N A N A S G A R C I A O M A N C U T S A R G O S B U N T U N I T R A N N Y E L O T R U M P E T O E D L E S B O S E O N A S I N S T E E N I N I T P E L E C A S T R O S A D L Y A M O S H A S H O U T C O N T R A E A R T H D A Y R A D I A N E V E R Y O N E E S S E N E A S A C A N Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com 682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV NoticeisgivenpursuanttoFloridaSelf-StorageFaciltiyAct,FloridaStatutes,Chapter 83,PartIVthatCrawfordvilleSelfStorage willholdasalebysealedbidonSaturday, November26,2011,at10:00a.m.at3291 CrawfordvilleHwy.ofthecontentsof Mini-Warehousecontainingpersonalproperty of: TIFFANY HARVEY PENNY McKINNEY BeforethesaledateofSaturday,November 26,2011,theownersmayredeemtheir propertybyapaymentoftheoutstanding balanceandcostbypayinginpersonat 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. November 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF AUCTION UndertheauthorityoftheFloridaStorage facilityActthepropertydescribedbelowhas beenseizedfornonpaymentofrentand otheraccruedexpenses.Thepropertywill besoldatauctiontothehighestbidderas providedbytheselfstoragefacilityact 83.806DoubleDstorageLLCreservesthe righttorefuseanyandallbids.CashOnly. AmandaBass,Unit#37&23household items,CherylLongUnit#10household items.AuctiontobeheldatDoubleDStorageLLC289CajerPoseyRd.Crawfordville FL 32327 November 11, 2011 at 5:00 pm. November 3, 10, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 11-62-P R IN RE: Estate of Les Rybak, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofLesRybak,deceased,File#11-62-PR,ispending intheCircuitCourtforWakullaCounty,Florida,ProbateDivision,theaddressofwhich is3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.Thenameandaddress ofthepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentativesattorneyissetforth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestateonwhomacopyofthisnoticeisrequiredtobeservedmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHINTHELATER OF3MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHE FIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE OR30DAYSAFTERTHEDATEOF SERVICEOFACOPYOFTHISNOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestatemustfiletheirclaimswith thiscourtWITHIN3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTFILEDWITHINTHE TIMEPERIODSSETFORTHINSECTION 733.702OFTHEFLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NotwithstandingthetimeperiodSsetforth above,anyclaimfiledtwo(2)yearsormore after the decedents date of death is barred. Thedateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice is November 10, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representatives: Robert P. Diffenderfer, Esq. Florida Bar Number: 434906 Lewis, Longman & Walker 515 North Flagler Drive, Suite 1500 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 640-0820 E-Mail:rdiffenderfer@llw-law.com Personal Representatives: Jan Rybak-Matalon 1466 Lee Avenue Tallahassee, FL 32303 Brian Rybak 9481 NW 26th Place Sunrise, FL 33322 November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 11-63-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF BRUCE EDWIN TAFT, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheEstateofBRUCE EDWINTAFT,deceased,CaseNumber 11-63-PR,ispendingintheCircuitCourtfor WakullaCounty,Florida,ProbateDivision, theaddressofwhichis3056Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.The namesandaddressesofthePersonalRepresentativeandthePersonalRepresentative's attorney are set forth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedent'sEstateonwhomacopyofthisnoticeisservedwithinthreemonthsafterthe dateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THELATEROFTHREEMONTHSAFTER THEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OFTHISNOTICEORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERTHEDATEOFSERVICEOFACOPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstthe decedent'sEstatemustfiletheirclaimswith thisCourtWITHINTHREEMONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS,DEMANDSANDOBJECTIONSNOTSOFILEDWILLBEFOREVER BARRED. ThedateofthefirstpublicationofthisNotice is November 10, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representative: -sMARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No. 949884 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720 Crawfordville, FL 32326 Personal Representative: KEITH HENRY TAFT 31 Thames Street Crawfordville, FL 32327 Crawfordville, FL 3232 7 November 10, 17, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS OF THE NORTH FLORIDA BROADBAND AUTHORITY LEGAL RFP SELECTION/TRANSITION COMMITTEE And Board Meeting TheNorthFloridaBroadbandAuthority ("NFBA")announcesmeetingsoftheNFBA OperationsCommitteethatallinterested personsareinvitedtoattend.TheNFBAis alegalentityandpublicbodycreatedpursuanttotheprovisionsofSection163.01,FloridaStatutes,andanInterlocalAgreement amongBaker,Bradford,Columbia,Dixie, Gilchrist,Hamilton,Jefferson,Lafayette, Levy,Madison,Putnam,Suwannee,Taylor, UnionandWakullaCountiesandmunicipalitiesofCedarKey,CrossCity,LakeCity, LiveOak,Monticello,Perry,WhiteSprings andWorthingtonSprings,Florida.The NFBAwillholdthefollowingpublicmeetings: NFBATransitionCommittee-1:00p.m.on Monday,November14,2011attheCityof LakeCityCouncilChambers,205N.E.MarionAvenue,LakeCity,FL32055.The NFBATransitionCommitteewillreviewthe responsesreceivedfromLegalRFP12-02 andFinancialRFP12-01andalsoconduct generalbusinessoftheTransitionCommittee. NFBABoardofDirectors…10:00a.m.on Wednesday,November16,2011attheSuwanneeRiverWaterManagementDistrict, SuwanneeRoom,9225CountyRoad49, LiveOak,Florida32060.TheNFBABoard ofDirectorsmeetingwillbeheldtoconduct general business of the NFBA. Thefollowingpreviouslyscheduledpublic meetings have been cancelled: NFBATransitionCommittee…scheduledfor 10:00a.m.onWednesday,November16, 2011. Ifapersondecidestoappealanydecision madebytheNFBAwithrespecttoanymatterconsideredatthemeeting,suchperson willneedarecordoftheproceedingsand mayneedtoensurethataverbatimrecord ismade,includingthetestimonyandevidenceuponwhichtheappealistobemade. ppp InaccordancewiththeAmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,personsneedingspecialaccommodationoraninterpretertoparticipate inthisproceedingorhaveanyquestions pleasecontactFaithDoyle,Clerktothe NFBABoardat(877)552-3482or(407) 629-6900atleasttwo(2)businessdays prior to the date of the meeting. November 10, 2011 687 Invitations to Bid REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL PROFESSIONAL LEGAL SERVICES I.INTENT TheNorthFloridaBroadbandAuthority(the "Authority")issolicitingproposalsfrom qualifiedFloridaattorneysatlawinregard tothelegalrepresentationoftheAuthority asoutlinedintheScopeofServicesbelow. TheAuthorityisaFloridalocalgovernment authoritycreatedbyinterlocalagreement pursuanttosection163.01(7)(g),Florida Statutes,tobuildamiddlemilewireless broadbandsysteminnorthcentralFlorida, whichisfundedbyaBroadbandTechnology Opportunity Program grant. TheAttorneyselectedfromtheapplicants willberequiredtoenterintoatwo(2)year contracttoprovidelegalservicesforthe Authoritywithatwo(2)yearrenewalclause. Thecontractwouldbeterminableonthirty (30)days'noticefromeitherparty,except thatlegalcounselwouldberequiredtocontinueinsaidpositionaftertheforegoing thirty(30)days'noticeuntilsuchtimeasthe Authorityretainsothersuitablelegalcounsel.TheAuthoritymayelecttoenterintoa contractwithalawfirm,buttheAuthority willrequirethatone(1)memberofsuchlaw firmbedesignatedtheAuthority'sAttorney withinthecontract,andthatpersonspecificallyshalloverseeallfunctionsrelatingto the Authority's legal work. TheAttorneyselectedtoserveasthe Authority'sAttorney,notthelawfirmthat contractstoprovideservices,mustbea memberoftheFloridaBarAssociation,in goodstandingforatleastten(10)years.It isrequiredthattheapplicanthasatleast five(5)yearsFloridalocalgovernmentlegal experience,includinglitigationandrealestateexperience.Itisdesirablethattheapplicanthavesomeutilityortelecommunications legal experience. II.SCOPE OF SERVICES A.TheAttorneyshallprovidetheAuthoritythefollowingmonthlyservicesundera lump sum retainer, or hourly fee as quoted: 1.AttendanceatallregularBoardmeetings.AttendanceatallSpecialBoardmeetingsbarringcourthearingconflictsorshort noticehearingswherelessthanfour(4) hours notice is given legal counsel. 2.Attendanceatallworkshopsandsubcommittee meetings when requested. 3.Preparationofcontracts,policies,Resolutionsandotherdocumentsasrequested bytheBoardandstafffortheAuthority's Board. 4.ResearchandpreparationoflegalopinionsandadvicetotheAuthority,itsofficials andappointedmanagers,includingconsultations by phone or in person. 5.Consultationforalllegalmatters,a s necessary,withtheBoardofDirectorsand appointed managers. B.TheAttorneyshallprovidetheAuthoritythefollowingservicesunderanhourly ratefeestructureorothernegotiatedfee structure: 1.Litigation…(State,FederalorAdministrative) on behalf of the Authority. a.Whenspecificallydirectedbyth e Authority to file or defend a suit(s). b.WhentheAuthorityspecificallydirect s legalcounseltointerveneinalegalproceeding,ordirectslegalcounseltoappeal anyadministrativeorcourtdecision,arbitration or mediation matter. 2.Bond/NoteIssue;asspecificallydirected by the Authority. III.PROCESS TheAttorneyshallprovidetheAuthoritywith thefollowinginformationforreviewandconsideration. A.Descriptionofrelevantexperiencei n Floridalocalgovernmentlaw,litigation,real estate, utility and telecommunications. B.Biosofallattorneyswhowouldbeprovidingservices,includingthepersondesignated as the Authority's Attorney. C.List of five (5) client references. D.DetailsofallBar(Floridaorotherwise ) complaintsand/orissuesandanexplanationtoincluderesolutionand/orstatus;ten (10) previous years. E.Listincidentsoroccasionswhereyo u havebeensuedformalpracticeorbeena defendantinasuit,inthepastten(10) years. Provide details. IV.FEE STRUCTURE TheAttorneyproposingtoprovidethefollowinglegalservicesshalldetailthefeesfor services as follows: A.(1)Monthlylumpsumretainerfee,o r $ _______________ (2)Hourlyfeeforservicesnotcovere d bl$ ()y below$ ________________ B.Litigation … Hourly rate $ _______________ C.Bonds/NoteIssue…Hourlyrateorpercentage$ ________________ D.Travel … Hourly rate $ _______________ Per Diem $ _______________ V.RESPONSE Allresponsesmustbesubmittedinsealed envelopesmarkedonthefront"Proposalfor LegalServicesNFBA12-02"andreceived bytheAuthoritynolaterthan4:00p.m.on November10,2011.Anoriginalandeight (8)copiesoftheresponsemustbeprovided. All responses must be addressed to: NFBA Legal Service RFP 12-02 C/O Mr. Wendell Johnson, City Manager City of Lake City 205 N.E. Marion Avenue Lake City, FL 32055 TheresponseswillbereviewedbyAuthority StaffandforwardedtotheNFBATransition Committeefortheirconsideration.The Authorityreservestherighttorejectallapplications,negotiatewithadesiredrespondent,ortore-advertiseifdeemedappropriate. November 10, 2011 690 Gov Tax Notices NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 030 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 1490 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-078-013-10770-00 MAGNOLIA GARDENS LOT 47 BLK A OR 10 P 612 OR 204 P 367 NameinwhichassessedJOSHUACADAMS&ANGELAMAONEsaidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuchcertificateshallbesoldto thehighestbidderatthecourthousedooron the7thdayofDecember,2011,at10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 031 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 928 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-035-008-07103-000 WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT I BLOCK 12 LOT 21 OR 1 P 846 NameinwhichassessedWALTERSTEVEN&LILLIANODELLsaidpropertybeing intheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida. Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemed accordingtolawthepropertydescribedin suchcertificateshallbesoldtothehighest bidderatthecourthousedooronthe7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 032 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDE CARTERKSRORDELORISSFORT WROStheholderofthefollowingcertificate hasfiledsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobe issuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 412 Year of Issuance 2003 Description of Property Parcel 25-5S-02W-046-03538-000 AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK U LOT 17 OR 46 P 56 NameinwhichassessedMETAH.WILLIS saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 033 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 1628 Year of Issuance 2003 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-068-000-10108-006 P-1-1-M-23 1.23 AC ML IN SW CORNER OF SW 1/4 OF HS 68 NameinwhichassessedPHILLIPHARVEY saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 034 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 1197 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 35-3S-01E-263-05538-161 VILLAGES OF ST MARKS LOT BB COMMERCIAL LOT OR 293 P 623 OR 594 P 255 NameinwhichassessedLACYA.&MARY T.MURRAYsaidpropertybeinginthe CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unless suchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuch certificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidder atthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 035 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 930 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 15-3S-01W-000-04397-000 15-3S-1W P-16-M-64 IN FRACTIONAL SW 1/4 OR 4 P 394 OR 36 P 732 NameinwhichassessedVENETTAJ. WALKERsaidpropertybeingintheCounty ofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuch certificateshallberedeemedaccordingto lawthepropertydescribedinsuchcertificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidderat thecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 036 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 993 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 07-6S-01W-301-04626-A01 BULAH'S COVE SUBDV LOT 1 OR 491 P 13 OR 659 P 497 NameinwhichassessedJOHNNYPETRANDISIIsaidpropertybeinginthe CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unless suchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuch certificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidder atthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 037 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatR.E. MEADOWStheholderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiledsaidcertificateforatax deedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificate numberandyearofissuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty,andthenamesinwhich it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 846 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel # 00-00-005-000-06249-001 P-18-1-M-3 1.31 AC M/L IN THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF HS 3 BEING ON WEST SIDE OF TRIPPLETT RD OR 319 P 427 OR 441 P 327 NameinwhichassessedLINDABAKERS saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week

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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 45th Issue Thursday, November 10, 2011 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 6A Community....................Page 7A School...........................Page 8A Sports ............Pages 9, 10, 11A In The Huddle ............Page 12A Outdoors ...................Page 13A Water Ways...............Page 14A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 15A Green Scene ................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read DailySPORTS JENNIFER JENSENKristi and Jeff Lawhon with son Hunter and daughter Gracie. The LAWHONSWakullas 2011 Farm Family of the YearBy JENNIFER JENSEN jjensen@thewakullanews.netSince 1998, Jeff Lawhon, of Sopchoppy, has been the keeper of bees. Well, the keeper of about 500 beehives located in the Apalachicola National Forest. Lawhon, who was born and raised in Sopchoppy and lives on the same piece of property he grew up on, said he grew up around beekeepers and was always interested in it. He has several friends from Smith Creek who are beekeepers and he used to go along with them to harvest the honey and constantly asked them questions during each step of the process. They made fun of me because I was always asking questions, Lawhon says. He then decided to give it a try himself and purchased 30 beehives. His wife, Kristi, suggested he start small, making sure it was something he wanted to do. If he felt good about it, I felt comfortable with it, Kristi Lawhon says, who describes her husband as a thorough researcher. I know he wont do something that isnt a worthy investment, she adds. Once Jeff Lawhon started, he was addicted. The following year, he bought out another beekeeper and then had a total of 500 beehives. I kind of fell in love with it, Lawhon says. I dove head rst into it. Now, 13 years later, the business continues to thrive and has expanded to not only harvesting honey, but leasing out bees for pollination to other farmers. Beekeepers are bene cial to the environment, Lawhon says. And to recognize these contributions, the Lawhon family was selected as the 2011 Wakulla County Outstanding Farm Family of the Year by the Wakulla County Extension and Wakulla County Farm Bureau. The Lawhon family includes Jeff and Kristi and their two children, 11-year-old Hunter and 8-year-old Gracie. Jeff Lawhon says people have started to understand some of what beekeepers do because wild bees have started to die off, which means a lack of pollination for farmers and gardeners. The wild bees are being killed by pests and insects. Beekeepers are able to keep their bees alive by treating for mites and other insects and keeping a close eye on them in the off season. They lease their bees to farmers who use them to pollinate their crops, like watermelons, Lawhon says. He adds that many people have also started to buy bees to put in their yards for pollination. The extension of ce has also bought bees and have started classes on beekeeping because of the decrease in the wild bee population. For years, people didnt understand beekeeping and all that it involves, he says. It shed some light on it, Lawhon says. People started to see how in-depth beekeeping is, he says. He began receiving calls from the extension of ce asking questions about how to handle and take care of the bees. Once it was time to select a Farm Family of the Year, the Lawhons were mentioned. It is farming, Lawhon says. Its farming for honey. Lawhons grandfather used to keep bees, so it is something he has always been around. Before starting his bee business, he had a landscaping company, but decided it was time for a change and was ready to truly be his own boss and be on his schedule. He says he has always loved the outdoors and agriculture so beekeeping seemed like a good fit. Plus he loved his workplace, the forest. The solitude of the forest, that really kind of spoke to me, Lawhon says. During the spring, bees make excess honey, which is taken by the beekeepers and is called robbing the honey. Harvest season runs February through May, Lawhon says. Its honey and money making time in the spring, Lawhon says. The bees y during the day and work from dusk to dawn. No matter how far they travel, the bees always manage to make it back home, to their hive, at night. Theyve got internal GPS, Lawhon says. Its really interesting to watch them. In each hive, the bottom of the box is where the queen lays her eggs. The honey collects in the other layers. Once a box is full, another is added. When the honey begins to over ow, the boxes are pulled and harvested. The honey can weigh up to 70 pounds, Lawhon says. Continued on Page 2APortwood lost insurance, keeps compensationBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netTourist Development Council Director Pam Portwood lost her health insurance through the county because, after her contract was amended to specify she worked 20 hours a week, she no longer quali ed for coverage as a full-time employee. At the county commission meeting on Monday, Nov. 7, the board voted unanimously to continue to pay Portwood some $7,745 that the county had spent on her insurance and which is considered part of her compensation. I have had people contact me with concerns about a salary increase, said County Commissioner Lynn Artz, who stressed: This is not an increase in salary its the exact same total compensation. Under questioning by County Commissioner Alan Brock, Portwood noted that she is unlikely to nd any health insurance coverage because of a pre-existing condition. Portwoods husband had provided insurance coverage but was laid-off. She got coverage through the county with Capital Health Plan as a contract employee. Portwood noted that she is a breast cancer survivor and so nding coverage outside a group plan is dif cult and expensive. The issue that prevents Portwood from being on the countys insurance is the number of hours worked. If she worked 30 hours a week, she would qualify. Continued on Page 3A Pam PortwoodFocus on Ability recognizes talents, not disability By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTo wrap up Disability Awareness Month, the Wakulla County School Board Exceptional Student Education Team hosted a picnic in the park, called Focus on Ability, on Nov. 3. Students, teachers, parents, school employees and members of the community gathered at Hudson Park to focus on each students ability and not their disability. Tanya English, ESE Services director, said the talents each student has needs to be the focus and those talents need to be used. She said the schools have been doing numerous activities in the classroom during the month of October to focus on ability awareness. And to let everyone know how far weve come, English said. She said she got the idea for the Focus on Ability event after meeting a girl named Elizabeth at her church who had a disability, but didnt let that stop her. She learned that Elizabeth worked at Applebees and was also a member of Pyramid Players, a performing arts group. English said she was inspired by Elizabeth and the idea for the picnic was born. Superintendent of Schools David Miller said he liked that there was a focus on the students abilities. Our kids have so many great abilities, Miller said. Continued on Page 2A JENNIFER JENSENTanya English, ESE Services director for the school district, was inspired to create Focus on Ability by meeting Elizabeth, behind her, who doesnt allow her disability to stop her. Riversprings Bears have perfect season... Page 10A War Eagles upset Godby to win district... Page 11ABy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netSchool board member Ray Gray faced further problems last week when Centennial Bank filed a lawsuit to foreclose on some rental property he owns. The lawsuit, led Oct. 31 in Wakulla Circuit Court, lists a total claim of $998,800 against Gray Services 1, and names Gray, his wife Jody and other parties that may have a claim on the property. According to the lawsuit, Gray got a loan in January 2008 from Wakulla Bank to consolidate business debt. Continued on Page 3ABank les suit to foreclose on Grays rental property Ray Gray e county will continue to pay the TDC director more than $7,700 a year it had spent on her health insurance The school board member comments that losing his county job as parks director has affected his ability to make payments Commissioner Alan Brock chosen as chairman. Story, Page 3AIt is farming, Jeff Lawhon says of beekeeping. Its farming for honey.A picnic in the park to recognize and focus on the talents and abilities of the disabled The picnic is to let everyone know how far weve come, says organizer Tanya English Veterans Celebration, See Page 16A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comFocus on Ability recognizes talents, not disabilityContinued from Page 1A Elizabeth and the other members of the Pyramid Players performed song and dance routines during the event. There was also a presentation recognizing local businesses and school employees who provide work experience to students with disabilities. This work experience program is called Wakulla Employability Skills Training or WEST. English said this program has been in place for 20 years and it couldnt be done without the support of the local businesses. Its just an incredible program, English said. The businesses and people who were recognized were Suzanne Moses, Crawfordville Elementary lunchroom manager; Tina Wilson, Riversink Elementary lunchroom manager; Ingrid Funderburke, Riversprings Middle School lunchroom manager; Elizabeth Becker, Wakulla Middle School lunchroom manager; Kathleen Newton, Wakulla High School lunchroom manager; Colleen Altenburg, Wakulla Education Center lunchroom manager; Sandra Chaganis, Shadeville Elementary School lunchroom manager; Gail Mathers, Wakulla County School Board director of Food Service; Kyle Beckett, The Donut Hole; Lewis McCartha, CHAT; Chris Beatty, Florida Wild Mammal Association; Sharon Wolfe, Wakulla High School Library; Nancy Culp, Circle C Ranch; and WinnDixie. Those in attendance were also treated to free hotdogs and drinks provided by Brian English and Bill Versiga. Continued from Page 1A Its hard work, but its rewarding, Lawhon says. Once the honey is removed from the hive, the wax is uncapped and it is put in an extractor which slings the honey. It then pours the honey into a tank, which goes into another tank and is poured into a 55gallon drum. These honey- lled drums are sold in bulk to a man in New Jersey. That honey is used for baking, Lawhon says. There is one type of honey that Lawhon doesnt sell to a wholesaler, instead, he bottles it with the help of his family and sells it. This honey comes from the Tupelo tree and is called table grade honey, Lawhon says. Halfway through the harvesting season, the boxes are cleaned out and Lawhon moves all of his hives to the riverbank and the bees only work the Tupelo tree. The Tupelo tree is only found in this area, Lawhon says. Its our specialty item, he says. The honey is raw, natural and un ltered, he says. Nothing is added, it isnt pasteurized or heated, so it still has all its natural attributes. Its just straight up from the bee to you, Lawhon says. After harvest season, Lawhon says he is just trying to keep the bees alive, treating for mites and keeping them away from bears. In the winter if the bees do not produce honey, he gives them a supplement. Thats the management part of it, Lawhon says. During the busy season, Lawhon says he uses parttime labor. His family helps with bottling, but Kristi Lawhon says she stays away during the harvesting. Whey they sling honey, there are bees everywhere, Kristi Lawhon says. Its hard to nd help, because of the bee stings, Jeff Lawhon says. He adds that Hunter travels with him and has just gotten big enough to start helping with the physical work. He hasnt quite found the love for it, Lawhon says and give a laugh. He adds that it might be because Hunter was stung by a bee when he was younger. Lawhon says he is a determined person and once he started beekeeping, he was going to make it successful. I dont give up, Lawhon says. Jeff Lawhon is not only a beekeeper, he is also a re ghter with the Tallahassee Fire Department. Kristi Lawhon is a registered nurse and teaches at the Medical Academy at Wakulla High School. The two have been together since the ninth grade when both attended Wakulla High School. The family was recognized at the North Florida Fair in Tallahassee by the Fairboard and is featured in the Wakulla County booth at the fair, which ends Nov. 13. The family will also be honored at the Farm City Breakfast on Nov. 23 at 7 a.m. at the Livestock Pavilion in Crawfordville. e Lawhons are Wakullas 2011 Farm Family of the Year The Lawhons pose for a family portrait, including honey and beekeeping items.PHOTO COURTESY OF LAWHON FAMILY JENNIFER JENSENCerti cates of Appreciation and recognition were given to a number of businesses and organizations in the community for their support of the disabled. The Pyramid Dancers perform for the crowd. ALUMINUM CANS TIN & STEEL CANS GLASS JARS & BOTTLES PLASTIC CONTAINERS PLASTIC BOTTLES & JUGS PLASTIC YOGURT, BUTTER & DAIRY TUBS PLASTIC CAPS & LIDS (NO STYROFOAM) FLATTENED CARDBOARD NEWSPAPERS OFFICE PAPER PHONEBOOKS CEREAL BOXES MAGAZINES/CATALOGUES JUNK MAIL PAPERBACK BOOKS AA LL LL TT HH EE SS EE II TT EE MM SS MM AA YY BB EE PP LL AA CC EE DD II NN TT HH EE SS AA MM EE RR EE CC YY CC LL EE BB II NN ,, AA TT TT HH EE CC UU RR BB Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 NOVEMBER 19, 2011 9AM EST--F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTIONTractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneers: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU4266 business license AB2969 John Stanley AU44.10% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646. auctionzip.com 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 SATURDAY NOVEMBER 12, 2011 -7PM EST--F&LAUCTION --CHRISTMAS SALE !!There will be toys, B.B. Guns, bycicles, dolls, games, playstations, and all kinds of newest toys. Also, for the ladies, cookware, linens, jewelry, Lots and lots of whatknots. For men: tools, tool boxes, fishing items, lots more! Lots of Christmas decorations. If you need it, we got it! So come see us on November the 12th and Join in on the fun!Auctioneer: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU4266 AB2969 For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646. auctionzip.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 3A Sign up to receive email notification of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.com PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper.Continued from Page 1AAfter Wakulla Bank failed with the crash of the local real estate market, Grays loan was one that Centennial Bank took over while it passed on others that stayed with the FDIC. The lawsuit states that the loan has been in default since April of this year, and it appears there are 14 mobile homes on a couple dozen parcels. Reached on Tuesday, Nov. 8, Gray said he had just been served with the lawsuit that morning. You lose your job and that affects payments, Gray said. Gray said Gray Services 1 is a real estate and inspection company. Besides holding elected of ce as a member of the Wakulla County School Board, Gray had been director of the county Parks and Recreation Department until he was red on Aug. 16 for problems that reportedly included being dif- cult for his supervisor to reach, and concerns about the number of outside businesses he operates. Gray appealed his ring, Continued from Page 1A County Commissioner Randy Merritt asked why the board needed to specify the number of hours worked. You know why, answered Chairman Mike Stewart. Because people want to see it down on paper, Merritt answered. TDC Chairman Richard Harden asked commissioners to support the request, as did TDC members Jacki Youngstrand, Tim Jordan and Sherrie Posey Miller also spoke in support and Panacea Waterfronts Committee member Paige Killeen also added her support. No one spoke against the measure or raised concerns. In a related matter, the board set a workshop at 4 p.m. before their regular meeting on Nov. 21 to discuss the Tourist Development Plan, which is the broad outline of the goals of the TDC and its plan for increasing tourism. In a citizen investigation of issues around the TDC, it was discovered that the required plan, if there was one, cannot be found. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe main focus of the Wakulla County Energy Conservation Committees meeting on Oct. 20 centered around parks and recreation. After going through the 101 meters Progress Energy is in charge of, Committee Member Elinor Elfner said she realized several were associated with the Medart Recreation Park. There are 18 meters at the park and Assistant Director Bryan Roddenberry said the utility bill is about $1,500 a month. These fees are associated with the four concession stands, which include bathrooms, 11 elds, security lights and lighting the park sign. Dan Ard, with Talquin Electric Cooperative, said 18 meters on one property is a lot and means a lot of facility charges, which is a basic fee before any kilowatts are even consumed. It seems like poor planning, Ard said. Ard suggested the county put one panel at the park and combine some of those meters. Roddenberry said the wiring is a spiders web, Its piece-mealed together, Roddenberry said. He said he would look into the cost and if its feasible. There was also some discussion on changing the eld lighting to LED. Roddenberry said the department looked into the cost and was told it would be around $80,00 for one field. He added that his plan was to do one eld a year. Ard said lighting is where parks and recreation will see signi cant savings. There is about a 75-percent savings, but there is a lot of cost upfront, he said. The only place theyll save money is sports eld lighting, Ard said. The department has tried to be more energy cautious, by putting in motion sensors and locking up the lights, as well as using high energy ef cient bulbs inside and out, Roddenberry said. An energy audit was also requested on the of- ce building, Roddenberry said. He planned to get the audit to the committee for review. The committee also discussed the plumbing issue at Newport Park, which is a public campground. The campground needs a new water heater. Currently, there are two 125 gallon tanks. David Marsh of Tallahassee Energy and Construction, and also a member of the committee, suggested the county place a meter at the campground to determine the usage. Ard said the county should do a thermal base system with a polyethylene water heater, instead of a standard metal tank to prevent corrosion. Sometimes the cheapest thing isnt always the cheapest thing, Ard said. But, Roddenberry pointed out that the department has a very small budget to work with. County Commissioner Lynn Artz said the county needs to be looking at the long term costs and the return on investment. Ard said a $1,400 tank would pay for itself in two years. Roddenberry said they could put one 80-gallon tank at the park and determine the usage, then add another tank if it was necessary. There were also issues at Woolley Park that were addressed, including vandalism, security, electrical and lights being on 24/7. The lights are left on to hopefully deter vandalism. Roddenberry said a park attendant will start in December and stay for six months. Elfner said they need to get the community involved and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful to keep the park clean, as well as to keep an eye on it. The next committee meeting will be held Nov. 17 at 10 a.m. in the administration conference room.Energy Conservation Committee focuses on county parksThe Medart rec park draws concern with its 18 di erent meters and a spiderweb of wiringCounty Commissioner Alan Brock will be the next chairman of the Wakulla County Commission starting at its next meeting on Nov. 21. The board voted to make Brock the new chair at its meeting on Monday, Nov. 7, which included a vote on reorganization. County Commissioner Lynn Artz rst moved that current Chair Mike Stewart continue in for another year, but he said he had no interest. With that, Artz moved Brock for the job it was approved unanimously. County Commissioner Randy Merritt was selected as vice chair. Merritt was also chosen to serve on the election canvassing board after County Commissioner Jerry Moore decided to step down. Moore is on the Wakulla Republican Executive Committee and has indicated he plans to be active in next years election. Three members of the board would be ineligible to serve on the canvassing board as they would presumably be seeking re-election, though Artz, Brock and Stewart have not said whether theyre running or not. The canvassing board consists of Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker, Supervisor of Elections Henry Buddy Wells, and a county commissioner. Special to The NewsFollowing an incident where an armed man threatened to kill members of the Bay County School Board in Panama City in December 2010, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Division of Emergency Management is coordinating a county commission safety exercise that is designed to give law enforcement and elected of cials a lesson in what to do if they are faced with an active violent threat at the board chambers. The exercise will be held Saturday, Nov. 19 from 8 a.m. until noon at the county commission chambers in Crawfordville. The public will be informed about the exercise with signs and is asked not to interfere in the exercise or try to help. One of the greatest bene ts of the exercise is that it allows for the joint cooperation of law enforcement at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office and the county, providing the opportunity to work together under dif cult conditions, said Sheriff Donnie Crum. Participants in the exercise include an armed bandit bad guy, WCSO deputies, county employees and elected of cials. Disasters, Strategies and Ideas Group (DSI), Wakulla County and the sheriffs office will be delivering the training session as a number of law enforcement of cers are exposed to the threat scenario. Simmunitions will be used to create a real life experience for those participating in the exercise. Simmunitions are not live ammunition but can be red through weapons to create the appearance of an individual being shot. With cases of disgruntled people going to meetings and threatening public officials on the rise, the exercise can help both law enforcement and the public by educating them about what to do and how to handle the situation within the board chambers. When everyone is working as a cohesive team, it lays the groundwork to being better prepared for future emergencies, which translates into lives being saved, said WCSO Emergency Management Director Scott Nelson. The WCSO conducts periodic exercises and has focused on bus accidents, student hostages and eeing criminals in rural portions of the county in past exercises as well as having plans to conduct future exercises in the Wakulla County Courthouse and other county buildings in 2012.Portwood insuranceRay Grays rental propertybut a three-person panel of county employees upheld his dismissal at a hearing a couple of weeks ago. While Gray hasnt publicly said so, it appears his termination will ultimately be headed for a lawsuit against the county. Last month, the state Ethics Commission charged Gray with violating financial disclosure requirements and fined him $7,500. Gray commented that he had over-reported by listing extra information on the disclosure form, instead of just his personal income. He denied having done anything wrong, saying it was a matter of errors. As for the pending foreclosure lawsuit, Gray shrugged it off and tried to stay positive, saying such things happen when the real estate market busts. He did dispute some of the facts in the lawsuit, saying there were parcels listed that shouldnt have been and some that werent that should have been. In the background of the phone call, the noise of an athletic eld could be heard. Gray said he needed to go, he was at the soccer eld doing a draft. Though he was fired by the county, he said, he was still at the park as a volunteer. Safety exercise will be held at county commission on Nov. 19Brock is new chair of board Alan Brock NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on November 21, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Ofce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. NOVEMBER 10, 2011District Population District 17200/5893* District 25921 District 35885 District 45944 District 55826 5893 population excludes 1307 inmates currently listed at Wakulla Correctional Facility on 7/25/11 (Maximum Capacity for Wakulla Correctional Facility is 1397).City of Sopchoppy NOVEMBER 10, 17, 2011

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak outComment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Crawfordville man killed in traffic crash Suspect shot trying to break into convenience store Sheriffs Report for Oct. 27 Lawsuit filed against club over wreck Ray Grays termination upheld by committee Buddy Tooke was first commercial Stone Crabber thewakullanews.com Follow us onEditor, The News: Dear Family, Friends and Colleagues, I just registered for the JDRF Walk to Cure Diabetes and accepted the challenge to form a team and raise money for JDRF. The Walk draws people together in a healthy activity for a worthy cause while raising money to help nd better treatments and a cure for type 1 diabetes. This years Walk takes place on April 14, 2012, and Im writing to ask for your support. Now, more than ever, each of us can make a real difference in the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. Please join my team, make a donation and begin fundraising. Its simple, fast and fun! Visit my team page (www2.jdrf.org/site/ TR?team_id=38719&pg=team&fr_id=1670) to register and join my team! Once you register, youll nd fundraising tips and tools in your Participant Center. Plus, I will be your coach to answer any questions you may have. If you are unable to join my team, please consider making an online donation. My team fundraising goal is $200 and with your support, I know well exceed this! Donating online is quick, easy and secure; however, if you would prefer, you can mail your contribution to the address listed below. Make your gift payable to JDRF, and please put my name in the memo eld. Sydney Andrews 47 Meadowlark Dr Crawfordville, FL 32327-6208 Thank you for your support and making a difference in improving the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. Sincerely, Sydney Andrews Crawfordville Editor, The News: So many times in our lives I believe that so many of us take for granted the blessings that we have in this country. We live in the greatest country in the world and sometimes we do not see the blessings that God has given us. We have these blessings because of the men and women that defend our right to freedom of speech, religion and to bear arms. If it were not for those brave individuals who defend our rights we would be nothing more than the enslaved citizens of many countries around the world. We live in a blessed place whether we admit it or not. The price of freedom is not free and many families have borne the sacri ce of our freedom by supporting their loved ones that so courageously and sel essly defend this country for our rights and freedoms. Many of our military personnel would give their right arms to have some of the pleasantries that we so easily take for granted while defending this fine country of ours. Although I have not been in the military, I appreciate the sacrifice that our military personnel and their families give on a daily basis for all of us. A friend of mine lost his brother in Iraq on Oct. 24, 2011, and the sacri ce that my friend and his family has had to endure the last two weeks is hard to fathom. I know that the young man died in an effort to allow Americans and citizens around the world a better life. If it were not for our military personnel and the families that support them our lifestyle would be much different than what we know today. May God bless our military personnel, past present and future and their sel ess families. Garland W. Burdette Crawfordville Editor, The News: The Chamber is currently applying for a grant, which if awarded, will permit us to add window treatments to the historic courthouse. One of the requirements is that we obtain letters of support from community based organizations and businesses. If you have ever attended a meeting, workshop or other event at the old courthouse, you more than likely noticed that it is very dif cult to hear or understand a speaker due to reverberation, and projected materials are hard to view in the bright rooms. We also believe that window coverings will increase the buildings energy ef- ciency, protect previously restored rooms from sun damage and add functionality. Letters need to be in hand no later than Nov. 10. Please email us a signed copy of the letter, on your company/organization letterhead, addressed as shown below: Mrs. JuDee Dawkins, Deputy Secretary Cultural, Historical and Information Programs c/o Historic Preservation Grants Program 500 South Bronough St. Tallahassee, FL 323990250 Please mail the original copy to: Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Attn: Grant Committee PO Box 598 Crawfordville, FL 32326 We will personally deliver the grant application package. Form letters will not be acceptable, so we would like to give you the following bulle t points: Added functionality (ie intimacy for weddings, meetings, and social events/limit light for projected presentations); Acoustic improvement more desirable meeting location; Prevention of sunlight damage; and Improved energy ef- ciency This enhancement will improve our ability to afford maintaining the investment already made to restore the building. Petra Shuff Of ce Administrator Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Editor, The News: Many thanks to our community for their support for our Focus on Ability, Picnic in the Park held on Nov. 3 in Hudson Park. This was a culmination of Disability Awareness activities for the month of October, bringing together parents, community members and the school system. It was an honor to recognize the following local businesses with certi cates for providing employment opportunities for students: CHAT, The Donut Hole, Wakulla County School Board Food Service Programs, Goodwill, Winn Dixie, Circle C Ranch, Florida Wild Mammal Association and Wakulla High School Library. Vocational Employment Specialist, Vicki Strickland, with the support of Cathy Duncan, provided an experience for their students in event planning as they set up and served food during the event, and provided a PowerPoint presentation along with WHS teacher Angel San Miguel which showed the WEST (Wakulla Employability Skills Training) students on the jobs. Special appreciation goes to the Board of County Commissioners for allowing us the use of the park; Mark Stafford for providing and chairs and tables; and Bill Versiga and Brian English for sponsoring the food. A special thanks to Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells for assisting them with the cooking. The participation of the following agencies provided information to families and community regarding access of services: High School/High Tech; Family Network on Disabilities; Florida Disabled Outdoors Association; Work Force Plus; Florida Diagnostic and Learning Resource Services; Project 10 Transition; Association for Persons with Disabilities; Ability 1st; Crawfordville Lions Club; Refuge House; Vocational Rehabilitation and Florida Telecommunications Relay Incorporated. Another standing ovation to Pyramid Players for truly epitomizing what our theme, Focus on Ability, looks like. Their entertainment with songs and dance was motivating and inspirational. Another bow goes to our team of Exceptional Student Education teachers who look for individual abilities of students each day and provide instruction to challenge and help them reach their potentials. I appreciate the effort and energy that it took for our students to be a part of this experience. The community support of civic clubs, Crawfordville Rotary and Coastal Optimists by having their meeting with us was greatly appreciated. A nal thanks to my district staff support team who assisted with coordination of the event; Susan Damerville for providing our banner; Transportation Coordinator Pat Jones who helped get the students there; Terry Webster for transporting and cleaning the grill; principals who supported us with their presence and encouragement and Superintendent David Miller for his continuing focus on keeping kids rst. Sincerely, Tanya English Executive Director of Exceptional Student Education/Student Services Wakulla County School Board I put up the Halloween decorations and bought the candy this year, but somehow I wasnt my usual festive self. Yes, I wore my Halloween sweater a couple of times and wore my Halloween scrubs to work, but my spirit wasnt in it. Watching Regis Philbin on TV, still dressing up in multiple costumes at his age, made me wonder what was wrong with me. Youre old, Nurse Judy, my impish alter ego, shouted without the question even being asked. Regis is old, too, I replied. I look at her all decked out in her costume. Anyone would recognize her in a minute, because her out t resembles how she wants to look everyday. You guessed it. Nurse Judy is dressed as a princess. She is wearing a gorgeous gown adorned with ruf es and sparkles. (Im worried about how much this has set me back, but I wont know until my credit card bill comes in.) On her head is a golden crown not a cardboard Burger King crown, but an honest-to-goodness metal crown, although I doubt it is real gold. (I guess Ill also find that out when the bills come in.) I even think you are a bit too mature to still be dressing up, I said as gently as I could since she cannot tolerate any reference to age as it relates to her. Of course, I was not gentle enough. She bristled like a porcupine, and her tongue is as sharp as his quills. What are you talking about? she shouted. Just look at me. I am still an enchanting woman. I could still win beauty pageants real beauty pageants not like that feeble MUD queen trophy you won when you were in college. I could be Miss America or Miss Universe. Just because you are so pathetic, you shouldnt paint me with the same brush. She glares at me with hands on hips. I look at her heavily rouged cheeks. Looks to me like you painted yourself, I say, but I say it softly under my breath to avoid a confrontation. I heard that, she spits out. How dare you make fun of me? You could learn from me. Look at yourself. Do you think its cool to sit around in a rumpled housecoat, cheeks sunken in, hair in disarray, no make-up on watching sit-coms? I did comb my hair, I protest. With an egg beater? she asks and collapses into laughter. I rearrange my housecoat trying to cover up the food stains left over from breakfast and pat at my hair. I have inner beauty, I say wit hout much conviction. The laughter doesnt stop. That beauty must be buried so far inside, no one will ever nd it, she chortles, opening up her trick or treat bag and munching on those treats. I watch her enviously, wishing I wasnt on a diet. I pick at the safety pin holding my garment together over my bulging stomach. I hope your teeth decay and your weight doubles, I say. I think about what Ive said and it suddenly sinks in. I take that back, I say, realizing that if that happens to her, it also happens to me. Try to at least use some self-control, I plead. I will if you will, she says. I remember how you almost gobbled up a whole turkey last Thanksgiving. Our guests feared for their lives. Ah, Thanksgiving. Now theres a holiday I really look forward to. Hope your Halloween was great and please join me for Thanksgiving dinner. Just remember its BYOT (Bring your own turkey). More later, Judy Judy Conlin is a nurse who works in Wakulla and Gadsden counties. Her website is at www.nursejudyinfo.com. Judy ConlinNurse Judys Nook Cholesterol is just another name for avor.READERS WRITE:Support of Focus on Ability appreciated anks to our military and their families Help with Walk to Cure DiabetesHalloween makes Judy think about her age and waistlineChamber needs letters of support for grant

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 5AHONORING VETERANS The Veterans Day Celebration at Hudson Park on Saturday, Nov. 5, was co-sponsored by Wakulla Christian School and the Wakulla Veterans Service Of ce. Wakulla County presented local veterans with awards in recognition of their service. New County Administrator David Edwards encouraged all veterans to sign up with Veterans Service Of cer J.D. Jones to be sure they get all the bene ts available to them.Parade photos on Page 16A. More photos of the event are online at thewakullanews.com.The color guard that started the Veterans Day Parade. Commissioners Jerry Moore, left, and Alan Brock, right, present an award to Marine Corp. William Gainey, a Vietnam-era vet.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENSpecialist Bobby Morales was recognized at the ceremony and spoke brie y. All veterans in attendance were given a medal in honor of their service. Navy Private Bo Burgess1959-2011Your family honors you and admires you! Burgess family Captain Major Henry Lane Mexican and Civil War THECUMMINGSFAMILYHONORSYOU! Honoring our Veterans Chris Harvey, 1990-present Army 1st Sergeant Paul Harvey, 1969-1972 Army Sta SergeantChris HeltonAirman 1st Class U.S. Airforce April 2011 PresentWe Love You & are Very Proud of You! Your Family In loving memory of our hero James M. Lawhon1922-2010WW II Veteran Purple Heart Recipient Sgt. Kyle A. BurnsUS ARMY Military Intelligence 2008 present So proud of you and thankful for your service to our Great Nation!Thom, Missy, & Kendalin Burns Sgt. Thomas E. BurnsUS ARMYAirborne Ranger Forward Observer 19811985Thankful for your dedication, and service to our Great Nation, and raising a son to serve his country as well! Missy, Kendalin & Kyle Burns Veteran Paratrooper Owen R. Council Im sure most of you know, or have read, about my father, Owen R. Council, and his role in WWII as a paratrooper and pathnder. He was the 7th man to land in Normandy on D-Day. He was injured later, captured by the Germans and was a POW for 8 months. The prison camp he was in was for the sick and wounded. They were all expected to die from their physical conditions. He and thousands of other POWs lived in lice and rat infested camps, in a strange land, homesick and not knowing if they would live to see their loved ones again, much less live to see another day. But Daddy was a tough, country boy who had lived through the great depression and knew how to survive. He was liberated on April 16, 1945. I have the original letter from Daddy, dated April 23, 1945, to my mother, Eleanor Council, and his daughter, Judith, that he had never seen. She was born while he was on his way overseas: Daddy is in Gods hands now. He died March 20, 2011. My sisters and I want to thank the Wakulla Christian School and the Wakulla County Veterans Services Ofce for starting the annual celebration to honor and support our Veterans. And we thank you Veterans, every one you, for the sacrices you have made ghting for the freedom of this world. God has given us many great blessings as Americans. As we celebrate Veterans Day, please dont forget the reason for this celebration, how costly our freedom truly is. Freedom is never free. It always costs someone dearly. Embrace your personal responsibility to preserve the freedom others have bought for you. Pray for our Veterans and their families, and pray that American stays free. God bless America and our Veterans.& Ill be there soon. Darling I have forgotten how to write a letter. In fact I cant write a letter so you wont know just how happy I am until I get there. Judy are you listening while your darling Mother is reading this letter to you? You can expect to meet your Daddy soon & you had better love him, O.K., good. Well Eleanor Dear, I have prayed for this happy reunion of ours & now I know it is just a matter of a few days & my prayers will be answered. It has been a long time hasnt it? So darling I will write you a letter every day that I can till we board the ship for home. It will only be a few days. Until next time you two darlings. May God bless you & keep you safe. Forever & ever yours, your loving husband & Dad, Owen.Judith Poses for Daddy Overseas MRS. O. R. COUNCIL AND DAUGHTER CPL. OWEN R. COUNCIL My Darling Wife & Baby: I am a free man & on my way home. I cant express how happy I am to know that I will in the near future have the two of you in my arms, so keep smiling Wakulla County Memorial Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 4538 is holding their Annual Pancake Breakfast at their Post on Friday, November 11, from 8:00 am till 10:00 am.This breakfast is open to the public and is in appreciation of the community support that the veterans receive from their community. Located right past the Crawfordville Elementary School. Come out and support your Wakulla County Veterans and let them say thank you to their community. All are invited!!

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Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church is a host site for Gaballi Foods, a faith based ministry that saves shoppers 30 to 70 percent off AAA quality groceries. There is no income status required to qualify for participation. November food orders are placed at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church on Nov. 12 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. or you may order online at www.gaballi.com and select Host Site Ochlockonee Bay UMC. Online orders must be placed by Nov. 13, no later than 8 p.m. All orders may be picked up on Saturday, Nov. 17, from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. To contact Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist, call (850) 984-0127. Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church is located at 2780 Surf Road in Panacea behind the former Oaks Restaurant. November menu includes a Holiday Family Feast Box for $34 (10-14 pound premium whole turkey, cranberry sauce, fresh cut green beans, fresh sweet potatoes, four ears fresh yellow corn, fresh carrots, package stuffing mix, 3 pounds potatoes, two packages brown gravy mix, 12 dinner rolls and a dessert item). pound Chicken and Beef Box $29 (2 pounds sirloin strip steaks, 2 pounds hamburgers and 4 pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts) 10 pound Chicken and Beef Box $28 (2 pounds sirloin strip steaks, 2 pounds hamburgers, and 2, 3 pound whole chicken roasters).Charles H. Allen Sr. Charles Hubert Allen Sr., 72, died Oct. 31, in Tallahassee. He was born Sept. 3, 1939, in St. Marks, and had lived in Tallahassee for many years. He was the owner of Allens Mechanical Service for more than 20 years specializing in heating and air conditioning. He was a member of St. Marks Baptist Church, Masonic Lodge No. 294 in Crawfordville and a member of the Marzuq Shrine, where he was in the motorcycle escort unit until 1994. He enjoyed going to the mountains every fall, being outdoors, shing, hunting and nature. The family received friends on Friday, Nov. 4, at Bevis Funeral Home. The funeral services were held Saturday, Nov. 5, at Bevis Funeral Home Chapel, with a private family burial following the service. Survivors include his wife of 51 years, Dorine; a son, Charles H. Chuck Allen Jr. (Kim); his motherin-law, Sarah Whaley; and a brother-in-law, Lester (Buddy) Whaley (Jean). Bevis Funeral Home, (850) 385-2193, www.bevisfh.com, was in charge of the arrangements. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationCharles H. Allen Sr. William Buddy H. Brown Jr. Paul E. Morgan Tamara Tammy C. Ostroski Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 CoastalChurch NewsWilliam Buddy H. Brown Jr.William Buddy Harold Brown Jr., 49, formerly of Arcadia, passed away Wednesday, Sept. 28, in Tallahassee. His body was cremated. A service will be held at the family gravesite in Oakridge Cemetery, Arcadia, at a later date. Survivors include a brother, Alan Brown of New Orleans; two sisters, Ninfa Ezell of Crawfordville and Debra Stowers of Grif thsville, W.Va.; a niece, Jamie Scarbrough; and a great-niece, Mikayla Scarbrough of Crawfordville. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, was in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333)Paul E. MorganPaul E. Morgan, 86, Crawfordville, passed away Friday, Nov. 4, in Crawfordville. He was born Feb. 9, 1925, in Bainbridge, Ga., to Albert Lee and Pauline Cliatt Morgan. He served in the U.S. Navy during World War II. Survivors include his wife, A. Faye Vause Morgan of Crawfordville; sons, Joe P. Morgan (Dana) of Monticello and Richard C. Morgan of Crawfordville; daughter, Paula Faye Lovett (George) of Crawfordville; six grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; and a sister, Ruth Rivers Jones of Leeds, Ala. He was preceded in death by his parents; a son, Tommy Morgan; a brother, Charles Albert Morgan; and sisters, Jimmie Lee Emerson and Faye Morgan Dunaway. The funeral was held on Tuesday, Nov. 8, at Abbey Funeral Home, with interment following at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. The family received friends on Monday, Nov. 7, at the funeral home. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, Wakulla County Chapter, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32308. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.Tamara Tammy C. OstroskiTamara Tammy Christine Ostroski, 39, of Crawfordville, passed peacefully into Jesus loving arms on Friday, Nov. 4. She was an inspiration to all who knew her. Her kindness, bravery and sweet loving smile will always be remembered and missed so much. Memorial Services will be held Saturday, Nov. 12, at noon at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Survivors include her mother, Angela Johnson and Joseph Wortham; brother, Larry Johnson and wife Jenni of Crawfordville; grandmother, Betty Marchant of Augusta, Ga.; aunts, Susan Lanford, Beth Mack and Patti Massingale; and a host of cousins and friends. Earlier this month, 21 men from five Wakulla County churches, Spirit Life, River of Life, Sopchoppy UMC, OBay UMC and Crawfordville UMC attended a weekend mens retreat in Leesburg. The message for the weekend was As for me and my house. There was an abundance of fellowship, learning, praise and worship. A great weekend was had by all. Thanks goes out to the home churches, and friends and family for their support. Retreat groupOBay UMC is host site for foods If love could have saved you, you would have lived forever. Leslie Dyan Drew11/12/1981 ~ 11/29/2009Always on our mind; Forever in our hearts. Love, Mom, Kenny, Leila and Dad Come One Come All!DINNERONTHE GROUNDShady Sea Baptist Church47 Shady Sea Street Spring CreekSUNDAYNOV. 13Service at 11AM, Dinner at Noon until Covered Dishes Welcome!

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Special to The NewsTrinity Lutheran Church and Preschool held its Fall Festival and Oktoberfest on Oct. 29 at 10 a.m. Smokey the Bear and Sparkey the Dalmation were in attendance and people enjoyed games, German music, bratwursts and arts and craft booths. There was also the Preschool Chili Cookoff. The prize-winning chili came in several varieties. The event was a great success thanks to the participation of preschool parents, church members, and contributors. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 7AhappeningsCommunity Lawhons celebrate 40th anniversary Mitchell and Pam Lawhon Mitchell and Pam Lawhon, of Sopchoppy, recently celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary with their family. They were married on Oct. 23, 1971, at St. Marks Baptist Church by the Rev. Fred Harrison. They have two children, Richard Carey Lawhon (Brandy) and Robert Brian Lawhon (Stephenie). They have three grandchildren, Fisher, Lake and Chelsea Lawhon. Mitchell Lawhon works with St. Marks Powder and Pam Lawhon works with the Wakulla County School System.Charles and Margaret Parmer will celebrate 50 years together on Nov. 12 Charles and Margaret Parmer, circa 1961 Charles Wayne and Margaret Harvey Parmer of Crawfordville will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary with a family dinner on Nov. 12. The couple was married on Nov. 12, 1961, at Southside United Methodist Church in Tallahassee. They are the parents of Jeffrey Wayne Parmer and his wife Rita McAlpin Parmer of Crawfordville. The couple has two grandchildren, Jeremy Wayne Parmer and Amy Ann Parmer, also of Crawfordville. Their parents are Charles and Marion Parmer of Crawfordville and Betty Harvey of Tallahassee and the late Herbert M. Harvey.Special to The NewsWhile many Crawfordville families are busy with holiday activities, a group of local volunteers is focused on lling empty shoe boxes with school supplies, toys, hygiene items and notes of encouragement for needy kids overseas. Crawfordville families are participating in the worlds largest Christmas project of its kind, Operation Christmas Child, an effort that has hand-delivered 86 million gifts to kids worldwide since 1993. Local businesses, churches and schools will collect gift- lled shoe boxes during National Collection Week, Nov. 14-21. Volunteers can drop off their shoe box gifts at one location in the area to help kids in 100 countries know they are loved and not forgotten. The location is Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville. Hours of operation are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to noon and Sunday from 2 to 4 p.m. Operation Christmas Child, a project of Samaritans Purse, uses whatever means necessary to reach suffering children around the world with these gifts of hope. Tracking technology also allows donors to follow their box to the destination country where it will be hand-delivered to a child in need. To register shoe box gifts and nd out the destination country, use the Follow Your Box donation form found at www. samaritanspurse.org/occ. Way to get involved: PrepareEnlist families, churches, scout troops, community groups and businesses to take part in creating shoe box gifts for needy children worldwide. PackFill shoe boxes with school supplies, toys, necessity items and a letter of encouragement. VolunteerSign up to join Operation Christmas Child volunteers in Crawfordville as part of the effort to prepare millions of shoe box gifts for delivery to underprivileged kids on six continents. For more information on how to participate in Operation Christmas Child, call (407) 852-3727 or visit www. samaritanspurse.org/occ. Gifts being collected for kids Nov. 14-21Smokey the Bear visits Trinity Lutheran Church during the Fall Festival and Oktoberfest. From the Heart Music Hour viewing party Nov. 13Special to The NewsFrom The Heart is proud to announce the upcoming broadcast of From The Heart Music Hour, Episode 4 on WFSU-TV on Nov. 13 at 5 p.m. This two-hour program features Brian Bowen, 19 South, Sarah Mac Band, Tobacco Road Band, Mimi and The HearnDogs, The Currys, Steve Leslie and Billy Dean. It was recorded and filmed at the Monticello Opera House this past July. A viewing party is scheduled at Indian Pass Raw Bar, 8391 C-30A in Port St. Joe, on Sunday, Nov. 13. Musicians from the show are expected to perform from 1 to 4:30 p.m. Documentary on Joe Hutto will air on PBS Nov. 16Special to The NewsA documentary based on Joe Huttos rst book, Illuminations in the Flatwoods will air on PBS on Nov. 16 at 8 p.m. called My Life as a Turkey. The lm tells the story of writer and naturalist Hutto, portrayed by wildlife photographer Jeff Palmerthis. It chronicles Huttos remarkable experience of imprinting wild turkey eggs and raising the hatchlings to adulthood. Deep in the wilds of the Florida Panhandle, in Sopchoppy, Hutto spent each day as a wild turkey with his family of chicks until the day came when he had to let his children grow up and go off on their own. As it turned out, this was harder than he ever imagined. Huttos story became his rst book.Trinity Lutherans Fall Festival was a success San dwiche s Soft Shell CrabsGrou per ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS!Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Happy Thanksgiving!We will be closed Wed. Nov. 23 and reopen Mon.Nov. 28 Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL 0009ATE

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Special to The NewsWakulla Middle School was very fortunate to have a group from Florida A&M Universitys Marching One Hundred come and present a special performance during Red Ribbon Week. The program was coordinated by teacher Deborah Randle, the sponsor of the WMS Students Working Against Tobacco organization. FAMU band intern Schelvin Robinson worked with Dr. Shelby Chipman at FAMU to arrange for this great musical opportunity for the students. Members of the band presented anti-drug messages to the students, as well as performed many songs and solos. The performance was very well received and the faculty, staff and students at Wakulla Middle School are very grateful to Robinson and Dr. Chipman for bringing such an outstanding performance to the school. Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation newsSchoolFire ghters visit Crawfordville Elementary Students at Crawfordville Elementary School explore the re truck up close, while also learning safety tips. Special to The News Once again Crawfordville Elementary School was fortunate to be visited by Wakulla County re ghters Ian Brazier, Brandon Alyea and Justin Duggan. Each of our 600 students got to listen to our guests go over safety tips and procedures while at their own home, at school, over at someone elses house or playing with a friend. The students listened with wide eyes and hands raised wanting to ask a multitude of questions and eager to get a closer look of the big, red fire truck parked closely behind. Our friendly re ghters answered many questions from enthusiastic 5-year-old kindergartners all the way up to our older 10-year-old fth graders. After the much appreciated safety precautions were covered, students got to explore the re truck and ask many more questions that were patiently answered with individual care and patience. Our students left the 30 minute experience wearing fire hats, toting coloring books and activity books and all wanting to grow up and become re ghters. Thank you, Wakulla County re ghters for serving our community, giving your time and making our students feel safe and special. Students at Wakulla Middle School are entertained by FAMUs Marching One Hundred during Red Ribbon Week. FAMU band performs at Wakulla Middle Special to The NewsWakulla Highs Dramatis Personae recently held auditions for their annual one-act plays. Each fall, the drama department presents two one-act plays for students to participate in. One play is chosen to go to the District One Thespian Festival in January. The cast of this play must be comprised of students who are already members of Thespian Troupe No. 5036 or about to earn the points that will qualify them for membership. The district play for 2011 is based on a short story by Kurt Vonnegut, The Barnhouse Effect. It is early in the 1950s and a college professor named Arthur Barnhouse, played by senior Jared Hansen, has discovered something he calls Dynomopsychism or Power of the Mind. This amazing power allows the professor to manipulate all sorts and sizes of inanimate objects. A young college student, Mr. Vaughn E. Gutt, played by senior Kyle Rozanski, has been sent to assist the professor with his research by the colleges Assistant Dean Margaret Tharpe, played by senior Samantha Tomlinson. One thing leads to another until the FBI, the military and the Russians all want to know about and control the professors amazing powers. The other one-act play is a crazy comedy by John S. Wells called Competition Piece about three different sets of high school students getting ready for a theatre competition. Each group is lead by a very clueless and unusual type of drama teacher. This play, with 22 actors, is directed by former WHS graduate Krissy Kosec Sanders. Sanders performed in this same play when she was a student at WHS and is now a senior at FSU majoring in theatre. She is directing the play as part of an internship with FSU. There will also be an appearance by another graduate, Corey Hager, as he reprises his role as Judge No. 3, the Grim Reaper. Dont miss the laugh-out-loud fun of this classic parody of being in a high school play. Come on out and support these talented students on Nov. 18, 19 and 20. The fun begins at 7:30 p.m. in the WHS Auditorium on Friday and Saturday evenings and at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets will be sold at the door. The cost of admission is $6 for adults and $4 for students. WHS plays will be Nov. 18, 19 and 20 Shoe Box donates shoes to Wakulla County studentsSome Wakulla County children will bene t from a generous donation from the owners of The Shoe Box store. Bill Weldon, his son Geoff Weldon, and Shoe Box partner Bill Day donated more than 450 pairs of new shoes to the Wakulla County School District. Guidance counselors and administrators from all of the schools met at the District Of ce to divide up the shoes. Some went to Special Olympics students, others were kept for Christmas to out t children in the same family with different sizes and some were stored to use as childrens needs arise. Such generosity is heart-warming, stated Superintendent David Miller. We are grateful to business partners who understand the needs of our children. The Shoe Box is located at 2820 South Monroe Street in Tallahassee. INTERNATIONALGOLDGYMNASTICS54 Feli Way, Crawfordville850926-4431 I know life doesnt come with a schedule. Thats why at State Farm you can always count on me for whatever you need 24/7, 365. GET TO A BETTER STATE. CALL ME OR VISIT US ONLINE TODAY. Anytime. Anywhere. Any dayThats when you can count on State Farm.1101198 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL Gayla Parks, Agent 5032 Capital Circle SW Tallahassee, FL 32305 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Workout, lose weight Each class feelsLIKE A PARTY!Saturdays 9AM-10AM Thursdays 6:30PM-7:30PMat BodyTek 56 Rainbow Dr. (behind El Jaliscos)Kim Crum 251-9195 Pam Chichester 459-5279 visit us on facebook $5 per class Tuesday, November 15th thru December 13th$50.00 or $12.00 drop-inat the Barry Building 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. Suite C, Upstairs e-mail Focusyoga@yahoo.com or call 228-380-0140 PARTNE R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The NewsThe WMS Lady Wildcat Soccer Team defeated Riversprings in their season opener, 3-0. The offensive attack was led by Karlee Strickland and Cheyenne Whittington who each accounted for one goal and one assist. Brooke Allen added an unassisted third goal late in the second half. The Wildcats stingy defense was led by Maddie Gehrke, Desera Wishart and Kyleigh Sanders The WMS goalkeeper, Nikki Barnes, played exceptionally well to ensure the shutout. The Lady Wildcats will be in action again next Wednesday at 4 p.m. against FSUS at the WMS Soccer Field. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe Wakulla High School girls cross country team won its rst-ever District Title in cross country for a WHS team. Also for the rst time ever, local runners claimed individual titles for both the boys and girls. The District Meet was held at Apalachee Regional Cross Country Park on Saturday, Nov. 5. Both girls and boys teams quali ed for next weeks Regional Meet that is to be contested at Alligator Lake in Lake City. WHSs top two girls, Cora Atkinson and Marty Wiedeman, shadowed Florida Highs Savannah Osterbye for the rst two miles and then made their move in the nal mile and took over rst and second places. Wiedeman nished with a new personal record of 20:33 and Atkinson in 20:46. Behind the three leaders, a real battle was brewing. Three Florida High girls were grouped together in 5th to 7th place and were pursued by the remaining ve WHS runners. They nished that way, with local girls winning by a score of 27 to 30. Wiedeman was named the individual District Champion and Atkinson was the District Runner-up. All seven of the WHS girls were named to the All District Team and actually qualified individually for Regionals by nishing in the top thirteen places. The other local nishers included Raychel Gray (8th, 22:32), Lydia Wiedeman (9th, 22:35), Lilli Broadway (10th, 22:37), Kristie Hodges (12th, 22:38) and Tyler Kinard (13th, 22:40). For the ve runners who anchored the team, the time gap between them was only eight seconds, which is an incredibly close nish. For the boys, local standout Stanley Linton entered the race as the clear favorite and lived up to that billing, winning in the excellent time of 16:49, 42 seconds ahead of the next runner. Cody James ran a solid race for the local team and nished in 9th place in 18:39. He was followed by D.J. Victor (13th, 19:09), J.P. Piotrowski (14th, 19:20), Mitchell Atkinson (16th, 19:33) and Zach Broadway (17th, 19:36). Linton was named the individual District Champion, with James, Victor and Piotrowski joining him on the All District Team. The team nished in third place, only three points behind runnerup Florida High, and quali ed for the Regional Meet. Overall, this was a pretty good meet for us, said Coach Paul Hoover. To have our rst District Championship Team and first individual champions was pretty special. Special to The NewsWakulla High studentathlete Conner Smith has been working double time for the Eagles this fall. A senior, Smith is playing both football and golf for the second year in a row. His passion for competition in sports is obvious. If I could play every sport at Wakulla I would, Smith says. I love to play and compete in any sport because it helps me to become a better athlete by pushing myself. Smith had a busy week competing in two championships in both golf and football all in only three days. His second place nish in District golf followed by a fourth place nish in the Regional tournament in Pensacola quali ed him to compete in the State Golf Championship. He traveled to Leesburg for the two-day tournament last Tuesday and Wednesday where he nished middle of the pack of the 96 golfers participating. A day later he was in the biggest football game this season as the Eagles took on district foe Godby on Thursday for the District 2 Class 5A Championship. The Eagles defeated Godby, 24-21, and Smith, who handles all the kicking duties, was perfect on the night hitting three extra points and a eld goal which proved to be the difference on the scoreboard. His efforts were rewarded with both a team District Championship and selection by coaches as Special Teams player of the week. CROSS COUNTRYGirls win district title; Linton, Wiedeman individualSOCCERSmith has double duty KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSStanley Linton and Marty Wiedeman won individual titles in the District Meet.GOLF & FOOTBALLSPECIAL TO THE NEWS Conner Smith was in a two-day golf tournament and was on the football eld the next day to ful ll his kicking duties.Wakulla Middle defeats Riversprings LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWar Eagle runners Lilli Broadway, Lydia Wiedeman, Tyler Kinard and Raychel Gray. Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 13Months For only$31 From now until the end of November get Special Offer straight to your mailbox

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsBy JOE JACOBSRMS CoachThe Riversprings Middle School football team had a lot to play for on Friday night, Nov. 4. At stake was the championship of the Florida Star Conference, and the first undefeated season in school history. The Bears were on a mission, and they looked like it, defeating the Falcons of Lake City Middle School 368. We started the season with specific goals, which we outlined every week, said RMS Head Coach Joey Jacobs. The kids did a great job staying focused. In a game that was for a stamp of perfection, the Bears played a complete game on offense, defense and special teams. Riversprings got the excitement started early, when eighth grader Keith Gavin received the opening kickoff and sprinted 70 yards for the rst touchdown of the game. Monterious Loggins added the extra point run, and the bears were up 8 before the scoreboard bulbs were warm. After a quick stand by the RMS defense, quarterback Feleip Franks hit Gavin again for a 48-yard touchdown pass, and after Sebastian Garner ran in the conversion, the Bears were up 16. The Bears next score came after Isaiah Youmas powered through the Lake City offensive line and blocked a Falcon punt into the endzone, which was promptly recovered by Loggins for another RMS touchdown. Riversprings would add two more touchdowns, a pass from Franks to Antonio Morris, and a run by Garner, before the night was nished. Seventh grader Demarcus Lindsey also returned a kickoff 64 yards for a touchdown, but it was called back because of a penalty flag thrown on the Bears. Jacobs said, We played well in every phase of the game. Offensively, RMS was led by Franks, who was 6 of 11, passing for 145 yards, 2 touchdowns, and 2 interceptions. Leading receivers were Gavin (3 for 86 yards, 1 TD) and Lindsey (2 for 48 yards). Monterious Loggins led the RMS ground attack, with 7 carries for 53 yards. Defensively, the Bears were led by defensive tackle Kyle Weaver The Big Weave had six tackles (one for loss) and two assists. Antonio Morris also had six tackles, which included a quarterback sack. Jacobs Austin chipped in ve tackles (two for loss) and a forced fumble, which was recovered by Youmas. Overall, the starting unit lived up to their moniker Lights Out, holding the Falcons potent spread offense in check most of the night. When it was all said and done, history was made, as the Bears nished the season with a perfect 8 record. This was a great group of young men, said Jacobs. They made it possible. They made it happen. Im going to miss those eighth graders. Next season begins now though, Jacobs added. We have got a solid nucleus of seventh graders, led by Demarcus Lindsey, Jacob Austin and Justin Davis, who were a solid part of this seasons success. They know how to get it done. Riversprings Bears are perfection LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversprings players with Coach Joe Jacobs and their championship trophy.KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKeith Gavin took the opening kickoff 70 yards for a touchdown. KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDemarcus Lindsey with a tough run along the sideline. BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCoach Joey Jacobs holds the Florida Star trophy.More photos at thewakullanews.com 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. NOSHOEFIREARMS& accessoriesBUY SELL TRADE CONSIGNMENT LAYAWAY2481 Crawfordville Hwy., (next to ElJalisco) 850-926-2213 850-510-4170 FREE BOX OF AMMOwith any firearm purchase (up to $25 value).THRU NOVEMBER 17thWe carry Kel-Tec, Ruger, S&W, Glock, Taurus, AR-15, AK-47, Remington, Savage, Saiga, Mossberg & more.STOP by and Visit Us Barber Shop & Salon 926-4080 Clipper Cuts Scalp Massage Steam Towels Style Cuts Neck Massage Hi-lites & Low-lites Color 926-4080 926-4080 3334 Crawfordville Hwy. Theresa Delta Waxing Perms Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brak es Batteries Radia tors Wat er Pumps Hub Bea rings Star ters Alterna tors and mor e!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 11AWar Eagles win district crown with upset over Godby, 24-21By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles won the district championship by defeating the rival Godby Cougars, 24-21, on Thursday night, Nov. 3. Godby, ranked fifth in the state, was undefeated and favored to win. They had home- eld advantage with the game being played at Gene Cox Stadium in Tallahassee. And it was their homecoming. The War Eagles dominated, and while Godby tied the game a couple of times, Wakulla never trailed. When the game ended, players dumped a Gatorade cooler on Head Coach Scott Klees. Then football players and band members took the eld and, arm-in-arm, swayed as they sang the schools alma mater. It was just a war, said Klees. He praised his assistant coaches and players and said he was so proud of how hard they worked. Its not how you play early (in the season), he said. You want to win. But sometimes you have to have adversity. How you handle that determines what kind of season youre going to have. That was a reference to the start of the War Eagles season: they started 2-0, but lost a heartbreaker to North Florida Christian at home and then another loss on the road in bad weather to Fort White to face a 2-2 record. Since then, Wakulla has torn off five straight wins to improve their record to 7-2. Running back Will Thomas had a big game with 19 carries for 96 yards. Marshane Godbolt had 10 carries for 71 yards and a touchdown running the ball, and also caught a touchdown pass. Deonte Hutchinson ran the ball nine times for 65 yards. GAME RECAP Wakulla scored rst. After recovering a fumble at the Godby 4, Evan McCoy scored to put the War Eagles on the scoreboard rst. Kicker Conner Smith added the extra point to make it 7-0. Godby answered with a scoring drive of their own, to knot it at 7 all. Wakulla punted on its next drive; and the War Eagle defense, playing bend but dont break, stopped the Cougars. A short punt gave Wakulla the ball on the 40. The drive culminated with a 10-yard pass to Marshane Godbolt, who strutted into the end zone. Smiths extra point made it 14-7. In the second quarter, Godby again answered with a score to tie it at 14 each. On Wakullas next drive, Godby intercepted a pass. On offense, there appeared to be a blown call by the of cials when they missed a forward pass that fell incomplete apparently the of cials saw it as a lateral and the receiver picked it up and ran it up the eld for a gain. Coach Klees went ballistic, yelling at of cials, and threw some papers on the eld that drew a 15-yard penalty for unsportsmanlike conduct. Godby found itself first and 10 at the Wakulla 23. The War Eagle defense gave a little, but wouldnt give in. On fourth and goal to go at the 2, Wakullas Mikal Cromartie intercepted the ball in the end zone and returned it for an apparent touchdown. A penalty was called during the runback against Wakulla for an illegal block in the back, and the War Eagles got the ball on the Cougar 27. A few plays later, Godbolt was in the end zone on a 12-yard run. The ever-reliable Smith added the point after and Wakulla led 21-14. Godby got the ball and drove down the field. Again, the Wakulla defense stepped up for a goal-line stand. On a twice-tipped pass, Wakullas Nic Walker came up with an interception. In the third quarter, Smith added a 21-yard eld goal to put Wakulla up 24-14. In the fourth quarter, it appeared Demetrius Lindsey scored on a 25-yard run, but it was called back for a chop block penalty. Lindsey got the ball on the next play and a shoestring tackle by a Godby defender is all that kept him from scoring. Then it started getting sloppy with penalties: a false start, then a hold. On second and 25, a long pass was intercepted by Godby at the 2. And the Cougars rumbled down the eld for a 98-yard scoring drive that culminated with a 20 yard touchdown run, and they had cut the lead to 24-21. But there was only 3:42 remaining. And Wakulla went into ball control mode, burning up the clock and getting rst downs. As the clock ticked down and victory was imminent, the Wakulla crowd erupted in cheers and players leapt up and down on the sideline. ESCAMBIA COUNTY The War Eagles travel on Thursday, Nov. 10 to Pensacola to play Escambia County. Even with a 2-6 record, Klees said Escambia scares me to death. Its a much biggger school than Wakulla, he said, and the biggest mistake the War Eagles could make is to overlook them. Weve got to stay focused, Klees said. Referring to his motto of the season, Keep your axe sharp, from Ecclesiastes 10:10, the coach said: We de nitely have to keep the axe sharp this week and every week from then on out. The state playoffs start Nov. 18, with the War Eagles at home playing Gulf Breeze at 7:30 p.m. Players of the WeekOFFENSEDEFENSESPECIAL TEAMSBRANDON BUSBY Lineman Scored out at 94 percent MIKAL CROMARTIE 11 tackles and a 108yard interception return CONNER SMITH Kicker FOOTBALL PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRunning back Will Thomas hits the hole for some hard yardage. He would gain 96 yards in the game.Marshane Godbolt high-steps it to the endzone for one of two touchdowns on the night.Mikal Cromartie intercepted this pass in the endzone and returned it 108 yards. Conner Smith adds an extra point. Coach Klees allows a smile as the clock runs down.WILLIAM SNOWDENFootball players, band members and cheerleaders took the eld, above, after the big win, linked arms and sang the alma mater. Tamika Peterson, right, the mom of Marshane Godbolt, celebrates in the stands. Wakulla travels to Pensacola on Thursday, Nov. 10, for the nal regular season game against Escambia High School. PLAYOFFS: The War Eagles play Gulf Breeze on Friday, Nov. 18, at home at 7:30 p.m.

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMiami at Florida StateSaturday, 3:30 p.m. The game can be seen on ABC.In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate FAMU at NCCNSaturday, 2 p.m. The game can be heard on WANM 90.5.Florida at #15 South CarolinaSaturday, Noon The game can be seen on CBS.By MARTY COHENof GatorBaitIt may not have registered on whatever the latest instrument is used to detect seismic rumblings, but it sure did seem like the earth shook a bit at 3:37 Saturday afternoon in Gainesville. It was an instant after Jordan Reed jumped to corral Vanderbilts last-gasp onside kick attempt and secure Floridas 26-21 triumph, ending an agonizing ve-week stretch between victories for the Gators. OK, maybe it wasnt a real Richter Scale deal, but the Gator Nation did emit a collective, audible, tangible sigh of relief, temporarily halting the downward spiral for the UF football program. It was ecstatic, everybody was very, very happy, relieved all of the above positive emotions, junior defensive end Earl Okine said. It was everything (in the locker room). Our teams just tired of losing. Were willing to do whatever it takes. Theres only one thing to do when youre backed in a corner and thats ght back and swing. We had no other choice. Players seemed to grasp head coach Will Muschamps notion of continuing the battle, even if many of the preseason goals were dashed during the past month. Keeping positive and staying together, said the introspective Okine, who received a little more playing time on Saturday and batted down a pass that he almost grabbed for a highlightreel interception. We cant go to the SEC Championship (Game) anymore but (Muschamp) wanted to make sure nobody felt like the season was over, and nobody feels that way. Its all very positive. OK, I can already hear some of you grumbling that the win came at the expense of Vanderbilt. But at this point, whether it was Vandy or Nashvilles Christian Brothers Academy, Florida needed a victory in the worst way. Yet nothing can be done to erase the sting of the past ve weeks, when the Gators dropped four in a row for the rst time in 23 years. But Florida showed a little resolve, especially on offense, and controlled the game basically from the outset. It was far from awless, but there were some things to like offensively. For the rst time in forever, the Gators were able to run the football. After gaining a pitiful total of just 175 yards on the ground in the four losses combined, the Gators rushed for 197 yards on 46 tries, and that counts 23 yards in losses on a ridiculous shotgun snap over quarterback John Brantleys head and taking a knee twice to end the game. With tailback Chris Rainey sidelined with an ankle he injured against Georgia, fellow senior Jeff Demps hogged the spotlight. Demps had a career afternoon, sprinting for 158 yards and a pair of touchdowns on 23 carries, and also caught a 17-yard pass. A byproduct of Raineys absence was the ability to get more people involved in the offense. Trey Burton caught three passes for 41 yards and ran four times for 11 yards. Mike Gillislee got nine carries and picked up 39 hard yards. Even freshman fullback Hunter Joyer ran it three times for 17 bowling-ball yards. Nine different players caught passes from Brantley and Jacoby Brissett, who made two nice plays in the game. Burton and Reed both caught three passes, Frankie Hammond, Andre Debose, Quinton Dunbar and Demps each caught two and Deonte Thompson, A.C. Leonard and Omarius Hines, all had one. Its been somewhat puzzling that Hines, so productive when given an opportunity last season, has been a complete non-factor this fall. But perhaps his one reception sort of symbolized the Gators recent plight, a 40-yard catch-and-run after a neat escape from pressure by Brissett, that ended when Hines fumbled on the Vandy 2-yard line and the Commodores recovered in the endzone for a touchback, snuf ng UFs opening drive and quieting an excited crowd. The offensive line amazingly committed just one penalty. The way things had been going, thats an accomplishment. For the day, the Gators were agged just three times for 17 yards. Defensively, the Gators did a nice job defending the run, limiting Vandy to just 80 yards on the ground. But the Gators also yielded a large number of passing yards and eased up in the nal two minutes, almost squandering a 12-point advantage. While Florida was successful, for one afternoon, cleaning up its excessive penalties, the season-long dif culty creating turnovers remained. For the fth time in nine games, the Gators did not cause a turnover. Through nine games, the Gators have caused just eight turnovers. Gators end losing streak Gators end losing streakBy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaFlorida State footballs What Might Have Been Tour 2011 stopped in Boston on Thursday, Nov. 3, and the show was the latest in a series of high-quality performances. The Seminoles fourth consecutive blowout victory was perhaps their most impressive. Facing the now-infamous four-day turnaround, on the road and in a colder-than-theyre-usedto climate, Florida State fell victim to none of the perils that so often plague talented teams on Thursday nights. Even through a lethargic third quarter, the Seminoles dispatched the overmatched Eagles with ease. The defense was once again suffocating and opportunistic, limiting Boston College to a paltry 3.5 yards per play while grabbing two interceptions and two fumble recoveries. And the Seminoles crisp, ef cient offense raced out to a four-touchdown, rst-half lead en route to a comprehensive 38-7 win at Alumni Stadium. Florida State won in a way that wouldve been right on schedule in the midst of a run to the Atlantic Coast Conference championship. Barring an unlikely Clemson collapse, the Seminoles wont be ACC champs, but that hasnt stopped them from playing like the class of the conference for the past month. No, a four-game stretch that featured Duke, Maryland, North Carolina State and Boston College isnt murderers row, but Florida State handled each like the outclassed opponents they were. The Seminoles outscored the Blue Devils, Terrapins, Wolfpack and Eagles by a combined 154-39. And theyve won four consecutive ACC games by 25 or more points for the rst time since the 2000 season that, of course, ended one game short of a national title. Weve done a great job of coming out, playing sharp and bringing immediacy to the game, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. We talk about it all the time. We want immediacy. These Seminoles are still a ways off the pace set by those national title teams, but its hard not watch this team now and think that this is what we all had in mind back in September when the season was new and expectations were high. Its hard not to wonder what might have been, had EJ Manuel not injured his shoulder in the third quarter of a close game against Oklahoma. Or if the Seminoles defense committed just one fewer drive-sustaining penalty at Clemson. Or if, the following week at Wake Forest, FSUs offense had turned the ball over just three or four times instead of ve. Theres an awful lot of wistful ifs from the Seminoles September, and none of them really matter now. But this has nonetheless been an impressive turnaround. When they stumbled to 2-3, effectively eliminated from the national title race, the conference title race and their only wins over lightweights LouisianaMonroe and Charleston Southern, the Seminoles had plenty of reasons to give up on what couldve been a nightmare season. The Seminoles still have some attractive goals in front of them, most notably wins over Miami and Florida for a second consecutive year. (The Miami game) means a lot to me, said senior Bert Reed, whose 8-yard touchdown catch opened the scoring. Just for this team, for me, to go out and try to lead this team against Miami, and knowing the tradition and the rivalry, it means a lot.Noles looking more like themselves during four-game winning streakA Vanderbilt drive is stopped by the Gators defense.PHOTO COURTESY OF GAITORBAITFlorida State warms up before the start of the game. PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDSBy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaAs the moments before his rst career start ticked away, freshman offensive lineman Austin Barron received a little bit of advice from his quarterback. I told him before the game, Just relax. It is nothing more than practice, EJ Manuel said Monday. [Boston College] is a good team and we are going to do what we have to do. Just relax and well take care of the rest for you. Florida States practices dont typically take place over 1,000 miles from home nor are they nationally televised on ESPN but other than that, sure, its just practice. Then again, given the way Barron impressed Jimbo Fisher, perhaps he couldnt have asked for a better debut setting. I thought he played extremely well, Fisher said. All the calls were right, he didnt miss a Mike (linebacker) call. A couple of blocks were close and made a mistake on a play here and there, but for the most part played a very, very good football game. Barron, who played center, is just the latest to step up on FSUs injury-ravaged offensive line. Thursdays game marked the fth different offensive line combination that the Seminoles have used this season. He joined his former high school teammate, right tackle Bobby Hart, as the second true freshman to start along the line this season. Barrons predecessor, Bryan Stork, was a surprise scratch from Thursdays lineup after suffering a concussion. Fisher said that Stork status for the Miami game is still uncertain. Barron makes impressive debutThe crowd erupts and performs the chop during a game at Doak Campbell. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 13Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsLast weekends tides and wind made the shing toughOnce that wind starts blowing it just doesnt know when to quit. The weekend was pretty windy and I didnt talk to many folks who did get out. Low tides in the middle of the day made things even worse. We have pretty good tides this weekend though they are calling for rain on Thursday and a low of 34 on Friday. That typically means the wind is gonna blow again. Of course I would have a charter on Friday. I already told them if the wind blows over 15, Im not shing. Enough is enough! This is the time of year that the grouper start moving in close and trolling with one of the Manns Stretch 18s or 25s will produce some nice grouper in close and sometimes when you think you have a huge grouper on it turns out to be a big red sh. Capt. Randy Peart does a lot of shallow water trolling for grouper down off the Aucilla on those rockpiles in 18 to 25 feet of water and he is very successful. Years ago I had a charter that would sh with me for seven days at a time, three times a year. He and his wife would sh but after their divorce that came to a halt. He kept on me to go grouper shing so I nally agreed and I went and bought some of the Stretch 18s and we headed to about 20 feet of water south of the St. Marks River where all the Stone Crab traps are. Find the Stone Crab traps and theres gonna be rocks close by. We caught several nice grouper and as we trolled over one rock two rods got hit. I started reeling in the third rod and it also got hit. When we nally got the sh close to the boat so we could tell what they were I realized we had three big red sh about 40 inches long. I got a great picture of all three behind the boat with big ol Stretch 18s hanging out of their mouths. Bob McCullough of Shell Point said he took Jerry and DeeDee Wells from Shell Point out and they each caught reds more than 35 inches long using live pin sh. He shed with his good buddy Ed in the Ochlockonee River and said they caught and released 15 legal reds and had three big trout. All of these were caught using live shrimp up the river. Capt. David Fife has been catching both trout and reds in the Oyster Bay area shing live mud minnows on the bottom and throwing Mirrolures. I just got of the phone with JR at the Aucilla River Store and he said this was their 23rd year in business. He also said it was the slowest year for hunting he has ever seen. He said he gures the overall economy and gas prices have got folks staying at home. JR got his captains license just before the oil spill and said he decided to start using it. I would say he probably knows every rock in the area and if you want to learn that area he would sure be the one to call. He said he took his rst charter last weekend and on Saturday it was tough, though they did catch a 4.25pound trout on cut bait. The second day they got up in a creek on the low tide and said they caught their limit and probably threw another 40 legal trout back. If you would like to book a trip or talk to JR about a trip give him a call at (850) 838-0874. Some trout are still on the ats around St. Marks and Shell Point though most have moved up in the river and creeks. The warmer days will put them back on the ats. Look for reds around the oyster bars and up in the creeks as well. Live shrimp, Gulp, Rattlin Red Fin and numerous top water baits work well now. Remember to leave that oat plan with someone and know your limits. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Fees waived over Veterans weekendSpecial to The NewsThe National Forests in Florida is waiving fees at most of its day-use recreation sites over Veterans Day weekend, including the Apalachiola National Forests Leon Sinks Geological Area. The fee waivers the third this year are offered in cooperation with other federal agencies under the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act. Day-use fees will be waived at all standard amenity fee sites operated by the Forest Service. Concessionaire operated day-use sites may be included in the waiver if the permit holder wishes to participate. Were honoring our countrys brave men and women veterans by waiving fees over the long weekend, said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom Tidwell. We encourage people who might not normally enjoy our beautiful public lands to get out of the house and enjoy a forest or grassland near you. Our lands offer a wide range of recreation and educational bene ts such as improved physical and mental health, emotional well being, a concern for nature, and a conservation ethic. The fee waiver days support the goals of President Obamas Americas Great Outdoors initiative, as well as First Lady Michelle Obamas Lets Move Outside program. For more information on the Forest Services recreation fee program and how these funds are used, please visit www.fs.fed.us/passespermits/about-rec-fees.shtml. November is Manatee Awareness MonthSpecial to The News Of cially, its Manatee Awareness Month in the state of Florida. Gov. Rick Scott recently signed the proclamation, thereby continuing a vital time-honored tradition undertaken by Floridas governors to of cially proclaim November as Manatee Awareness Month. A primary purpose of this designation is to heighten public awareness about the importance of protecting Floridas of cial marine mammal, which the proclamation states, is a distinctive and valuable beloved natural resource, and further declares that manatees face the risk of extinction due to human related threats including the loss of warm water winter habitat. Patrick Rose, executive director of Save the Manatee Club, said he was grateful to Gov. Scott for supporting the need to safeguard the well-being of Floridas endangered manatees. Save the Manatee Clubs mission is to protect manatees and their habitat for future generations, said Rose. To accomplish this, we work closely with federal, state, and local governments, as well as with the public at the grass roots level, and support policies based on the best scienti c data available. The club offers a variety of ways for the public to be directly involved with manatee protection. Free public awareness waterway signage, banners, boat decals, and educational posters are produced by the club. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 H UNT ING SEA SON !! Get Ready for Grouper LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GUNSMITHING F ASTTURNAROUND! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED Located on Main Street in St. Marks WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid for your gun! $ Selling Guns Since 1999 AK 47s in stock! 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special! Let us perk up your day! HATS US 98 PANACEAWARM WINTER HATSCLEANING/BLOCKINGColorful Bandannas! PANACEA HATSAFACT850.224.4960www.fsucu.org www.florida-classifieds.com ADVERTISING NETWORKS OF FLORIDA Y Y our advertising budget is TOO BIG Statewide adver singrefreshing rates (866)742 1373

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I sincerely hope all of you who feel the way I do about Sherrie have enjoyed reading the last few columns, but mostly I hope Sherrie felt the love and admiration we all have for her. I can assure all of you that the stories you read were the ones I received, but there are many, many more out there waiting to be told. This week, it is time to get back to business. As many of you may already know, otilla 13 has been struggling and decided some time ago to disband. They are in the nal stages of completing the process and should be completed by the years end. Flotilla 12 is trying our best to ll in the gaps and provide a presence in the Shell Point area. This past week, we held our monthly meeting down at Shell Point and had the honor of being joined by Commander Hellstern from the DIRAUX office, Master Chief Kilbourne from the Seahawk station in Carrabelle, Division Commander Mo Davis and Division Vice Commander Gordon Schmidt. It was a full room with 25 other individuals present. Commander Hellstern discussed with us his vision for the Auxiliary Eighth Coastal Region. The Commander wants to see standardization throughout the Division. There is also a need for standardization throughout, as an auxiliary we need to work hard to provide consistency within our Flotillas, as well as to the public eye. Safety is always paramount in all we do. There is a dedication to increasing awareness on the importance of life jackets, especially for children. Keep your eyes and ears open for a new campaign promoting life jacket use for children. Finally, we heard about the need to be creative and increase our public education opportunities for boaters. Education is our rst line of defense! As Commander Hellstern nished outlining his plan as the director of the Auxiliary, he challenged all of us to remember why we joined the auxiliary. In order to maintain our presence, we need to recruit and retain new members. This need includes a balance of comradery and fellowship. We are a volunteer organization, and we need to nd innovative ways to keep members involved. Master Chief Kilbourne discussed his gratitude for the auxiliary and hopes that we can continue to work together. Division Commander Mo Davis offered accolades to the Division overall, as well as the work of Flotilla 12. He encouraged all of us to continue to do what we do, making Division 1 the best Divisions in our District. I may be biased, but I completely agree. Before the Commander had to leave to go back to New Orleans, Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos asked for his assistance, along with Master Chief and Division Commander to present several awards. The following were given out: Mark Rosen received a sustained service award for service in excess of 6,750 cumulative hours. This was his ninth award. Chuck Hickman received his AUXOP Device. This is a very big accomplishment for an auxiliarist and it was an honor to have Commander Hellstern present to pin the device on Chuck. Raye Crews, Carolyn Treadon and Duane Treadon received an award for their participation in the 2011 JAREX. David Rabon received a certi cate for earning a certi cate of quali cation for vessel examiner. Tiffanie Bourassa received a meritorious team commendation for the Flotillas Silver Oar status, as well as her certi cate of appointment for her staff of cer position. We packed a lot into the meeting before the commander had to depart, however we were far from done. Tim Ashley discussed the ongoing efforts at the North Florida Fair and our upcoming FSU Flyover on Nov. 19. Karen Katowski discussed several upcoming opportunities for public affairs events in the Apalachicola area. We are working hard to do our part to ful ll the commanders expectations. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonCommander Hellstern pins the AUXOP Device on Auxiliarist Chuck Hickman.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCommander Hellstern joins members of Flotilla 12 for their monthly meeting. You may have noticed we were closed most of last week. We all packed out to Orlando to attend the annual Diving Equipment and Marketing Association (DEMA, of which we are members) trade show. Every year the dive industry meets nationally to display wares, network to improve market share and visit with members from around the world. This show means nonstop discussions ranging from the latests rebreather designs to the recent training and injury reports. We mostly try to catch up with friends across a wide spectrum of the diving industry to see how they are fairing in this trying economy. For Keith, Travis and Joseph, DEMA was a chance to absorb the grandeur of the community. Travis spent the week in training on every conceivable dive technology possible. His complaint was that he did not get much of a chance to walk the oor and visit the 660 booths representing dive manufacturing, distribution, testing and monitoring, innovation, training and travel. Keith negotiated new purchases for the store, reminding everyone that I had turned the management over to him. Our intern Joseph attended seminars and probed dive technology and techniques that he can use as he moves into graduate school. What they all bring back to Wakulla Diving will improve our service to Wakulla County. On the top of everyones list of questions to us was progress on diving in Wakulla County. I reported that we recognize the vast offshore resource that is currently underused and our interest in expanding boat/diving access. We are discussing expanding our training options to include boating and spear shing next year. In this manner, folks can reliably nd a way to get offshore to dive our many natural ledges and arti cial reefs. I also reported that we continue our work with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to open Wakulla to equal access cave diving. Making Wakulla County an international diving destination is not a dif cult concept, but will bring millions of dollars currently going to surrounding counties. I even proposed we dedicate a travel booth at the next DEMA (in Las Vegas) to Diving the Caves and Offshore waters of Wakulla much like they currently do for the Bahamas. Ill bet I will nd community interest in that project. Dr. Hess and I had to rush home early to start a new class in Cave Rebreather diving for a Finnish person. More international rebreather classes follow nearly every week until April, suggesting the economy is getting better or our services are catching on. Call me at (850) 545-9198 and tell me what you think. It is good to be home. Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 3.6 ft. 12:43 AM 3.6 ft. 1:10 AM 3.6 ft. 1:39 AM 3.7 ft. 2:09 AM 3.6 ft. 2:42 AM 3.6 ft. 3:20 AM 3.4 ft. 4:06 AM High -0.2 ft. 7:43 AM -0.2 ft. 8:15 AM -0.2 ft. 8:47 AM -0.2 ft. 9:20 AM -0.2 ft. 9:55 AM -0.1 ft. 10:35 AM 0.1 ft. 11:21 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:11 PM 3.4 ft. 2:45 PM 3.4 ft. 3:20 PM 3.3 ft. 3:58 PM 3.2 ft. 4:38 PM 3.1 ft. 5:23 PM 3.0 ft. 6:14 PM High 1.4 ft. 7:26 PM 1.4 ft. 7:57 PM 1.4 ft. 8:31 PM 1.4 ft. 9:07 PM 1.5 ft. 9:47 PM 1.5 ft. 10:35 PM 1.5 ft. 11:34 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 3.6 ft. 12:40 AM 3.7 ft. 1:07 AM 3.7 ft. 1:36 AM 3.7 ft. 2:06 AM 3.7 ft. 2:39 AM 3.6 ft. 3:17 AM 3.5 ft. 4:03 AM High -0.2 ft. 7:40 AM -0.2 ft. 8:12 AM -0.3 ft. 8:44 AM -0.3 ft. 9:17 AM -0.2 ft. 9:52 AM -0.1 ft. 10:32 AM 0.1 ft. 11:18 AM Low 3.4 ft. 2:08 PM 3.4 ft. 2:42 PM 3.4 ft. 3:17 PM 3.4 ft. 3:55 PM 3.3 ft. 4:35 PM 3.2 ft. 5:20 PM 3.1 ft. 6:11 PM High 1.5 ft. 7:23 PM 1.5 ft. 7:54 PM 1.5 ft. 8:28 PM 1.5 ft. 9:04 PM 1.6 ft. 9:44 PM 1.7 ft. 10:32 PM 1.7 ft. 11:31 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 3.3 ft. 1:19 AM 3.4 ft. 1:46 AM 3.4 ft. 2:15 AM 3.4 ft. 2:45 AM 3.4 ft. 3:18 AM 3.3 ft. 3:56 AM 3.2 ft. 4:42 AM High -0.2 ft. 8:47 AM -0.2 ft. 9:19 AM -0.2 ft. 9:51 AM -0.2 ft. 10:24 AM -0.2 ft. 10:59 AM -0.1 ft. 11:39 AM 0.0 ft. 12:25 PM Low 3.1 ft. 2:47 PM 3.1 ft. 3:21 PM 3.1 ft. 3:56 PM 3.1 ft. 4:34 PM 3.0 ft. 5:14 PM 2.9 ft. 5:59 PM 2.8 ft. 6:50 PM High 1.3 ft. 8:30 PM 1.3 ft. 9:01 PM 1.3 ft. 9:35 PM 1.3 ft. 10:11 PM 1.4 ft. 10:51 PM 1.4 ft. 11:39 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 2.7 ft. 12:35 AM 2.7 ft. 1:02 AM 2.7 ft. 1:31 AM 2.7 ft. 2:01 AM 2.7 ft. 2:34 AM 2.7 ft. 3:12 AM 2.6 ft. 3:58 AM High -0.1 ft. 7:54 AM -0.2 ft. 8:26 AM -0.2 ft. 8:58 AM -0.2 ft. 9:31 AM -0.1 ft. 10:06 AM -0.1 ft. 10:46 AM 0.0 ft. 11:32 AM Low 2.5 ft. 2:03 PM 2.5 ft. 2:37 PM 2.5 ft. 3:12 PM 2.5 ft. 3:50 PM 2.4 ft. 4:30 PM 2.3 ft. 5:15 PM 2.3 ft. 6:06 PM High 1.0 ft. 7:37 PM 1.0 ft. 8:08 PM 1.0 ft. 8:42 PM 1.0 ft. 9:18 PM 1.1 ft. 9:58 PM 1.1 ft. 10:46 PM 1.1 ft. 11:45 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 2.8 ft. 12:27 AM 2.8 ft. 12:54 AM 2.8 ft. 1:23 AM 2.9 ft. 1:53 AM 2.8 ft. 2:26 AM 2.8 ft. 3:04 AM 2.7 ft. 3:50 AM High -0.2 ft. 7:22 AM -0.2 ft. 7:54 AM -0.2 ft. 8:26 AM -0.2 ft. 8:59 AM -0.2 ft. 9:34 AM -0.1 ft. 10:14 AM 0.1 ft. 11:00 AM Low 2.6 ft. 1:55 PM 2.6 ft. 2:29 PM 2.6 ft. 3:04 PM 2.6 ft. 3:42 PM 2.5 ft. 4:22 PM 2.4 ft. 5:07 PM 2.4 ft. 5:58 PM High 1.4 ft. 7:05 PM 1.4 ft. 7:36 PM 1.4 ft. 8:10 PM 1.4 ft. 8:46 PM 1.5 ft. 9:26 PM 1.5 ft. 10:14 PM 1.5 ft. 11:13 PM Low Thu Nov 10, 11 Fri Nov 11, 11 Sat Nov 12, 11 Sun Nov 13, 11 Mon Nov 14, 11 Tue Nov 15, 11 Wed Nov 16, 11 Date 3.0 ft. 12:09 AM 3.0 ft. 12:41 AM 3.0 ft. 1:17 AM 3.0 ft. 1:57 AM 2.9 ft. 2:41 AM 2.7 ft. 3:33 AM High -0.2 ft. 7:17 AM -0.2 ft. 7:49 AM -0.2 ft. 8:20 AM -0.2 ft. 8:51 AM -0.2 ft. 9:26 AM -0.1 ft. 10:06 AM -0.0 ft. 10:52 AM Low 2.5 ft. 3:26 PM 2.6 ft. 4:05 PM 2.5 ft. 4:44 PM 2.5 ft. 5:23 PM 2.5 ft. 6:04 PM 2.4 ft. 6:45 PM 2.4 ft. 7:24 PM High 1.8 ft. 6:36 PM 1.8 ft. 7:04 PM 1.8 ft. 7:35 PM 1.8 ft. 8:11 PM 1.8 ft. 8:56 PM 1.7 ft. 9:52 PM 1.6 ft. 11:05 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 10 Nov. 16First Dec. 1 Full Nov. 10 Last Nov. 18 New Nov. 24Major Times --:---:-12:13 PM 2:13 PM Minor Times 6:46 AM 7:46 AM 5:35 PM 6:35 PM Major Times 12:37 AM 2:37 AM 1:01 PM 3:01 PM Minor Times 7:40 AM 8:40 AM 6:18 PM 7:18 PM Major Times 1:26 AM 3:26 AM 1:51 PM 3:51 PM Minor Times 8:33 AM 9:33 AM 7:05 PM 8:05 PM Major Times 2:16 AM 4:16 AM 2:41 PM 4:41 PM Minor Times 9:25 AM 10:25 AM 7:57 PM 8:57 PM Major Times 3:07 AM 5:07 AM 3:32 PM 5:32 PM Minor Times 10:13 AM 11:13 AM 8:52 PM 9:52 PM Major Times 3:58 AM 5:58 AM 4:23 PM 6:23 PM Minor Times 10:58 AM 11:58 AM 9:50 PM 10:50 PM Major Times 4:48 AM 6:48 AM 5:13 PM 7:13 PM Minor Times 11:40 AM 12:40 PM 10:49 PM 11:49 PM Best Best++++ Better Good Average Average Average6:58 am 5:43 pm 5:36 pm 6:47 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:58 am 5:43 pm 6:19 pm 7:41 am 6:59 am 5:42 pm 7:06 pm 8:34 am 7:00 am 5:42 pm 7:58 pm 9:25 am 7:01 am 5:41 pm 8:53 pm 10:14 am 7:02 am 5:41 pm 9:51 pm 10:59 am 7:03 am 5:40 pm 10:50 pm 11:41 am97% 97% 91% 85% 79% 72% 66% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 15AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Oct. 28, a concerned citizen contacted the sheriffs of ce regarding a motorist attempting to cause damage to a speed bump on Pixie Circle in Crawfordville. Don Kemp of the Wakulla County Road and Bridge Department checked the damage and determined it to be minor. A suspect was identified, but Kemp declined to press charges. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Oct. 27, Angus McEachern of St. Marks reported a vehicle burglary. More than $3,200 worth of property was stolen from the vehicle including ammunition, rearms, sunglasses and other items. A forced entry was discovered. On Oct. 27, Merwyn Jones of Crawfordville reported the grand theft of a rearm. The weapon is valued at $350. On Oct. 27, Lt. Brad Taylor investigated a complaint of an underage male posting personal advertisement about himself on Craigslist. The ad claimed the 15-year-old was 18. The case has been forwarded to the Criminal Investigations Division for follow-up with the juveniles parents. On Oct. 27, Tommy Sexton of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered. The missing items included electronic games, medications, camera, sporting equipment, televisions, of ce equipment and computer equipment, valued at $4,300. Some of the property was entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer. On Oct. 31, Leonard Brownell of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as someone destroyed his mailbox with a vehicle. A stop sign at a nearby intersection was also run over by the same vehicle. Additional investigation in the area discovered 12 street signs and six mailboxes also damaged. Damage to the property is estimated at $900. On Oct. 30, William Harrod of Crawfordville reported the grand theft of his truck. The vehicle was discovered damaged in a tree line near his home. Deputy Ian Dohme was investigating another case when he reportedly linked Jared Ashton Waters, 19, of Crawfordville to the vehicle theft. The keys from the victims truck were allegedly located on Waters and he was charged with the vehicle theft. A vehicle Waters was also driving during the evening was allegedly discovered with pills and a marijuana smoking pipe inside. Waters was charged with possession of narcotics equipment and leaving the scene of an accident. On Oct. 30, Andrew Carter of Crawfordville reported observing a traf c crash on U.S. Highway 98 one mile east of Highway 363. The vehicle crash was a roll-over with injuries. Frank Timothy Lee, 52, of St. Marks was driving a 1997 Chevrolet pick-up truck eastbound on U.S. Highway 98 when he traveled off the south side of the highway and struck a tree with the front end of the vehicle. Lee was transported to Capital Regional Medical Center for treatment but agreed to a blood draw to determine if the crash was alcohol related. The investigation continues. On Oct. 30, Deputy Nick Gray investigated a traffic crash at Highway 267 and Springhill Road. A tow truck operator contacted WCSO about the crash and a possible driver was identi ed. The vehicle was heading southbound on Springhill Road when the driver reportedly failed to stop at the intersection of Highway 267 and crashed into a fence and narrowly missed a tree. The investigation continues. On Oct. 29, Capt. Cliff Carroll investigated a suspicious person at the closed Bayside Marina in Ochlockonee Bay. Randall John Dick, 58, of Panacea approached Captain Carroll during the investigation and allegedly began to tussle with him. Capt. Carroll arrested his suspect for loitering and prowling, obstructing a law enforcement of cer and battery on a law enforcement of cer and transported him to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. On Oct. 29, Virginia Moore of Crawfordville reported a structure fire of a vacant 1970 mobile home on Patricia Lane in Crawfordville. The sub oor caught re due to a faulty power cord. The victim was unable to put the re out with a fire extinguisher. Damage was estimated at $10,000. The re was ruled an accident. On Oct. 28, Jordan Peters of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her purse at the Wakulla Education Center. The medications are valued at $30. On Oct. 28, J. Harold Thurmond of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at his home. Someone cut the fence into his pasture and removed two rolls of eld fence and landscape timbers. The stolen property is valued at $300. On Oct. 31, Dave Gowan of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his mailbox. Someone drove over the mailbox and destroyed it. Damage was estimated at $50. Evidence of additional criminal mischief cases were observed nearby. On Oct. 31, Christopher Hewett of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and a window was broken. Damage was estimated at $100. The victims reported the loss of $2,000 worth of property including household appliances, rearms and a television. A bedroom was also ransacked. A person of interest was identi ed. On Nov. 2, Susan Mastaler of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at the Goodwill Store in Crawfordville. A male juvenile in the store caused a disturbance with his mother over not getting something he wanted. The juvenile left the store and kicked the front of the victims parked vehicle. A deer whistle on a brush guard was damaged. On Nov. 2, Deborah Brown of St. Marks reported a criminal mischief. Lt. Mike Kemp was investigating a small re in some woods when a bicycle was observed inside the re. The bike belonged to Brown. Damage was estimated at $100. On Nov. 2, a Liberty Road resident reported that children in the neighborhood were playing with a condom that was found on a tree. It was impossible to determine if the condom had been used. One of the parents expressed concern about the safety of his son who was exposed to the condom in the facial area during the horseplay. No charges were led. On Nov. 2, James Shepard of Tallahassee reported the theft of equipment from his Crawfordville property. A marine battery, two boat motors and a gas tank, valued at $1,600, were reported missing. While Deputy Ben Steinle was investigating the Shepard complaint, Deputy Clint Beam was investigating a suspicious vehicle complaint nearby. The vehicle contained property that the deputy suspected was stolen. It was determined that the property belonged to the victim and it was recovered. Kevin Eugene Lewis, 45, of Woodville was charged with dealing in stolen property, burglary, criminal mischief and grand theft in the case. During an inventory of the vehicle, aluminum foil with an unknown substance on it was found. It was determined to be methamphetamine and Lewis was also charged with possession of methamphetamine in the case. A second suspect was also identi ed in the case. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 709 calls for service during the past week including: 22 residential and business alarms; 76 citizen contacts; 51 investigations; 18 loud music/noise complaints; 38 medical emergencies; 41 security checks; 26 special details; 20 suspicious people; 54 traf c stops; and 85 watch orders. Battery warrants have been issued for a 20-yearold Crawfordville man who is accused of grabbing the buttocks of three females while the women were shopping in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. The Wakulla County cases were reported on Nov. 1 although one occurred on Oct. 31. Matthew Thomas Vautier was arrested by Leon County Sheriffs Office investigators on Nov. 1 after allegedly committing the same act at the North Monroe Street Wal-Mart. Battery is a rst-degree misdemeanor. On Nov. 1, a 42-yearold Cr awfordville woman reported a battery that occurred at Wal-Mart on Oct. 31. The victim was shopping in the store when a male walking in the opposite direction down an aisle slapped her on her buttocks. After slapping her, the suspect wished the victim a Happy Halloween. The victim reported the incident to management. Later on Nov. 1, a 28year-old Crawfordville woman reported shopping in the Wal-Mart grocery section when the same male grabbed her buttocks and said Trick or Treat before running toward the exit. Digital images of the suspect and his vehicle were collected. Later on Nov. 1, a 33year-old Crawfordville woman reported having her buttocks grabbed by the same subject while grocery shopping before he ran away. Vautier was reportedly driving the same vehicle used in Crawfordville when he was arrested in Leon County. Man accused of grabbing women at Wal-Mart WCSOMatthew T. Vautier Training manual approvedWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce law enforcement and corrections personnel are not the only members of the WCSO staff to go through special training. The Florida Department of Health recently approved a training manual for the Communications Division. The 108 page manual includes items such as a brief history of on the air communications systems which began in 1928 in Detroit to knowledge of what information can be disseminated to the public and what remains con dential. The certi cation of the 911 Public Safety Telecommunications Course was made a requirement by the Florida Legislature and all of the Communications staff at the WCSO is required to be certi ed by Oct. 1, 2012. The WCSO has 10 Communications Officers on staff and six out of the 10 are already certi ed in the course. 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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comVeterans Celebration includes para de and festival at Hudson Park PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Miss Tallahassee, who is from Wakulla County, poses for pictures at the festival following the parade, at left. Children partake in the numerous childrens activities set up at Hudson Park, which were organized by the NJROTC, above. Students from Wakulla Christian School, top, participate in the parade with their decorated float in support of veterans. The school was a co-sponsor of the celebration. Spectators, at left, watch as the parade oats go by throwing beads and candy, the Wakulla High School Navy Junior ROTC march in the formation during the parade, at rig ht, Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells, below, throws out candy to parade goers, while also reminding people to vote in the upcoming elections. More photos of the event are online at thewakullanews.com. Some things get better with age. Capital Health Plan is one of them. Plan to attend a SEMINAR during the Medicare Annual Election Period, October 15 through December 7, 2011, to LEARN MORE about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) and Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-8708943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Paid Endorsement. Call 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 to RSVP or for more information. (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., seven days a week or visit us at: www.capitalhealth.com/MedicareSeminars will be held at 10:00 a.m. at Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd H5938_DP 119 File & Use 09242011Anna Johnson says....Join me and become a member of a Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO) plan. Friday, November 11 Monday, November 14 Tuesday, November 15 Tuesday, November 22 Friday, November 25 Tuesday, November 29 Wednesday, November 30 Monday, December 5 Tuesday, December 6 Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties

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15minute guaranteeTallahassee Memorial is pleased to bring InQuicker to the community for those patients requiring emergency care for non-life threatening medical conditions. With InQuicker, you never have to experience a long wait in a crowded emergency facility again. Instead, enjoy the comfort of your own home while waiting for your next emergency care visit. Simply access the InQuicker system at tmh.org to nd projected treatment times at both the Tallahassee Memorial Bixler Emergency Center and Urgent Care Center. Once the system captures certain demographic and symptomatic information, you are added to the wait queue which holds your place in line, online. When you arrive at the emergency center for your projected treatment time, you will be seen by a nurse practitioner, physicians assistant or physician in 15 minutes or less, guaranteed. Your ER wait is over. Check-in at tmh.org to hold your place in line, online today. Online Check-in atTMH.ORG* InQuicker is only for patients experiencing non-life threatening conditions and does not affect the wait times of other emergency room patients. Priority treatment is always given to those with the most urgent medical conditions. your ER wait is over. Guaranteed. Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Jerry Kinder on cancer: I had to nearly die to learn how to liveHEALTH & FITNESS Page 10BAt the recent Mighty Mullet Festival, Sustainable Big Bend volunteers and I provided an educational booth featuring simple changes that can be easily made in your home to save energy. It was a great booth filled with so many examples to encourage these changes. One item that drew a crowd was a drape made with decorative fabric and lining with a discarded but quality quilt inserted between the layers. It is perfect for those people who may have leaky windows but few resources to make more expensive improvements or for those who rent their home. We featured a caulking gun, a shower timer, a CFL light bulb, a clothes line in hopes of reminding people of the simple changes that can be made to save energy and money. These were suggestions were featured: Attic. Make sure you have adequate insulation. Lamps and light bulbs Use compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) and properly dispose of them. CFLs last up to 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb. You will also save on airconditioning costs because they generate a quarter of the heat of regular incandescent bulbs. Contrary to popular belief, turning off uorescent lights really does save energy. Frequent switching may shorten bulb life, but electric bill savings will more than compensate for the shorter lifespan. When it is time to dispose of them, CFLs require special handling so dont throw them away with the regular household trash. While they can be recycled, they should not be thrown into your recycle bin either. Keep them in a safe place until a Hazardous Waste Collection Day is scheduled in Wakulla County to dispose of them properly. Garage. Water heating is often the third largest energy expense in your home, after heating and cooling it can account for 13 to 17 percent of your utility bill. If you have a dishwasher with a preheating element, setting the main water heater at 120 degrees is fine for most households. Turn the heating unit off when you leave the home for any length of time such as for a vacation. If you have a dishwasher with a preheating element, setting the main water heater at 120 degrees is ne for most households. Ceiling Fans. Use the air ow mode for directing its movement. In the summer, a ceiling fan will allow you to raise your thermostat setting by as much as four degrees without feeling a difference in your comfort. Consider that in the summer, for every degree setting below 78, you spend up to eight percent more on cooling costs. Operate your fan in reverse in the winter to push warm air down without creating a chilly breeze. A ceiling fan/light combo kits that have earned the Energy Star are about 50 percent more ef cient than conventional fan/light units. Remember, fans cool people, not rooms. Ceiling fans are less costly than air conditioning, but they still use electricity. Running several fans 24 hours a day can add up quickly, especially if no one is home to bene t from them. Run the fan only when someone is in the room. Continued on Page 3B By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Tips for household conservationCommercial recycling discussed Whats a healthy alternative to diet sodas?EARTH TALK Page 3BBy TAMMIE BARFIELDtbar eld@thewakullanews.netNon-residential recycling was at the top of the agenda at the October Wakulla County Recycling Task Force meeting. The meeting was held Oct. 27 in the commission conference room with Chair Pamela Joy facilitating. After some controversy in the community and a Letter to the Editor in The Wakulla News regarding whether recycling would be offered to area businesses by Waste Pro, the countys new vendor for residential garbage and recyclables curbside service, the committee invited Ralph Mills, regional vice president of Waste Pro out of Tallahassee, to attend and respond to questions and concerns. When asked if there would in fact be recycling offered to Wakulla County businesses, Mills said according to state statute, commercial recycling cannot be franchised by any single vendor. He said October was the rst month of Waste Pro offering residential curbside waste and recycling services to Wakulla residents and the focus was to make sure residents received their bins and containers and began receiving service. Its beginning to settle down now, there are very few calls coming in now, Mills said. Mills said there is commercial recycling available to businesses. For $85 per month, a business can contract a small dumpster that Waste Pro will provide, but only cardboard and some paper items can be taken from those businesses. He did say that Waste Pro would offer multi-bin containers at speci ed locations in the county so small of ces that generate a little plastic, aluminum and paper could take it to a multi-centers. He said there is already a multi-center located at ESG on Trice Lane, and there would be one at the transfer station. The Trice Lane multi-center will accept material Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and the transfer station will accept material on Fridays and Saturdays. Mills reported that after the first month of providing service, 50 tons of recyclable material was picked up in Wakulla County. Homemade for the HolidaysSustainable Big Bend, Inc. and the UF-IFAS Extension Of ce co-hosted a workshop last Thursday evening with the focus on making gifts for the holidays from all sorts of materials that can be re-purposed or re-used. Toni Livingston, above left, who wears a ower pin made from denim zippers, shows how to make an eyeglass case from designer fabric samples, old metal measuring tapes and a little stitching, at left. Livingston shows a variety of gifts to those in attendance that can be made from all parts of a pair of jeans, at right, including her ower pin. e Recycling Task Force takes up the issue, and hears from Waste Pro Vice President Ralph Mills 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.orgWere Here to Share the Journey...

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, November 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, November 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef OBradys in Crawfordville. Please call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information. Saturday, November 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu.register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, November 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, November 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION will meet at the public library at 7 p.m. Tuesday, November 15 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. The public is encouraged to attend all meetings. IRIS GARDEN CLUB will hold its Annual Fall Floral Design Workshop at 1 p.m. at the public library. Bring a container, and any owers to include in the arrangement. Dont forget the greenery. The Garden Club will supply the oral foam. There will be lots of creative people there to help those in attendance. Visitors and prospective members are always welcome to attend. Call Jeannie at 926-2264 for more information. SARRACENIA CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the public library. The program, Understanding where Native Plants Grow, will be presented by Dr. John Tobe. Tobes talk will cover using the ecological preference of native plants to help us make horticultural decisions about how, where, and why to use them in home landscapes. He will focus on climate, soils, hydrology, and overall ecological tolerances directly related to native plants of Wakulla County and the surrounding area. The program is free and open to the public. Come at 6 p.m. and enjoy social time with great snacks, a slide show of plants taken by local photographers and fellowship. Wednesday, November 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thur sday, November 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP will meet from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Please call 926-0401 ext. 217 for more information. CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. The public is invited and encouraged to attend the meetings. For more information about CCOW, visit their website at www.cowakulla.org. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, November 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Special EventsThursday, November 10 FULL MOON CLIMB will be held at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. For reservations or more information, contact the St. George Island Visitor Center at 927-7744 or 888-927-7744. WAKULLA COUNTY DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. There will be a social hour from 6 to 7 p.m. The Wakulla Democratic Womens Club will meet at 8:30 p.m. to nominate a slate of of cers for the upcoming board elections. The quarterly meeting will include announcements regarding the WDEC Annual Democratic Gala scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 10 at Wakulla Springs. Friday, November 11 CONCERT with songwriter David Olney accompanied by well-acclaimed guitarist, Sergio Webb, will be held at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Traveling from Nashville, this duo is a must see show, performing Americana, rock n roll and blues. Make reservations for this concert by calling Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or emailing poshjava@gmail.com. Reservations are $15 per seat. Limited seating is available and reservations are strongly encouraged. Saturday, November 12 BENEFIT AND FISH FRY FOR JEANINE ABERPOSEY and her family will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Jeanine suffered a life-altering accident on Friday, Oct. 22, and funds raised at the bene t will help with medical and living expenses as she and her husband travel to Emory Hospital in Atlanta for further treatment and therapy. The bene t will feature live entertainment throughout the day and a sh fry with all the xings. LIONS CLUB PANCAKE BREAKFAST will be held at Beef OBradys from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. Cost is $6 per person. Money raised will help the club provide eye care services, such as eye exams and glasses as well as hearing loss and diabetes prevention. Sunday, November 13 VIEWING PARTY for From the Heart Music Hour episode 4 will be held at Indian Pass Raw Bar, 8391 C-30A, Port St. Joe, at 5 p.m. for the full 2-hour program featuring Brian Bowen, 19 South, Sarah Mac Band, Tobacco Road Band, Mimi & The HearnDogs, The Currys, Steve Leslie and Billy Dean. It was recorded and lmed at our last live production at the Monticello Opera House this past July. Some of the From the Heart Music Hour performers will be playing their music from 1 to 4:30 p.m. before the episode airs. Monday, November 14 WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Tuesday, November 15 HABITAT FOR HUMANITY HOUSING PROGRAM event will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Ameris Banks conference room, 2628 Crawfordville Highway. This is an opportunity to see if any Wakulla residents qualify for a no interest home mortgage through this program. Bring paperwork t verify income, dependents, savings and expenses, drivers license and security cards for each member of the household. For questions, call Tara Sanders at 926-5211, Linda Boles at 926-6222 or Jo Anne Strickland at 566-1828. Thursday, November 17 CPR TRAINING will be held at the Wakulla County Health Department at 7 p.m. The cost is $25 per person. For more information or to register, call Grace Keith at 926-0400, ext. 215 or email at Grace_Keith@doh.state. .us. Saturday, November 19 WAKULLA COUNTY CHILDRENS FUND FUNDAISER will be held at the Shell Point Volunteer Fire Department from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be a garage sale, silent auction, bake sale, chili, soup, hotdogs and drinks. All proceeds go to help the needy children of Wakulla County. If anyone has a new or used item they would like to donate contact Susan at 926-1409. By DR. FAITH HUGHESCHAT Board MemberTicks are nasty little creatures, no good for anyone. Most people know that ticks carry disease that affect people and dogs, but few people know about a deadly disease that ticks can give to your cat. We originally diagnosed Bobcat Fever, cytauxzoonosis (we call it cytox) in Wakulla County about 18 years ago. The blood of a feverish and jaundiced cat was sent to the lab for testing. Dr. Liz Wilson at Antech Laboratories found microscopic cytox organisms in the cats red blood cells. I had never heard of this organism before, so I called Dr. Wilson for more information. She was very surprised that I had a case of cytox, apparently no one else had ever seen it in our area before. The life cycle of this parasite is not completely understood, but the bob cat is its natural host and doesnt usually die from the disease. A tick carrying the cytox organism will bite a domestic cat (pet cat) and transmit the disease into its blood. The disease can affect lungs, spleen, liver and red blood cells. The red blood cells will rupture, causing anemia and jaundice (yellowing of membranes). The most common symptoms in a cat are fever, jaundice, poor appetite and lethargy. The sicker cats will have breathing dif culties, trouble swallowing and uncommonly will develop tremors. With proper treatment and good nursing care, Drs. Chalker, Hankley and I have 60-70 percent survival rate. Unfortunately, many on-line articles read that 99 percent of the cats die, leading some pet owners and veterinarians to euthanize the cats before trying any treatment. One of my most memorable cases was Khobar the orange tabby. Through the combined efforts of myself and Khobars owner, Beth Ann, a new experimental treatment was used to save Khobars life. Before, we only used antibiotics, fever reducers, uids, iron supplements and good nursing care. Since Khobars case, we now also use an injection called Imidocarb to treat all cytox cases. Dr. McMillan in Tallahassee is also experimenting with another drug and has had comparable success. The take home messagedo everything you can to keep the ticks off of your cats. Apply topical ea and tick medications such as Frontline Plus every 30 days, check your cats daily for ticks, clear out the underbrush in your yard to reduce ticks, and keep your cats in the house. CHAT of Wakulla Adoption has many loving cats and kittens that need a home. Most have already had their rst ea and tick treatment. Come see them at 1 Oak St., Crawfordville, 926-0890. You can also visit www.chatofwakulla.org or www.pet nder.com. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comTail Wagger... County Commission meets at 5 p.m. for a workshop. Bene t and sh fry for Jeanine AberPosey 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Wakulla Christian Coalition will meet at 7 p.m. at the library. Habitat for Humanity Housing Program at Ameris Bank at 6:30 p.m. ThursdayFridayMondayTuesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com City and County MeetingThursday, November 10 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers to discuss infrastructure shortfalls in historic neighborhoods. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for a special called meeting at 6 p.m. at city hall. They will amend the scal year budget for 2010-11. The regular meeting will follow at 7 p.m. WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1501 Coastal Highway. The purpose of the meeting is to conduct general business of the council. Thursday, November 17 WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will be held at 10 a.m. in the board of county commissioners conference room. RECYCLING TASK FORCE will meet at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room. The purpose of the meeting is to propose and pursue ways to increase recycling in Wakulla County. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for a public workshop on the Environmental Protection Agencys cleanup grant at 6 p.m. in city hall.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 3BDear EarthTalk: I drink diet soda but Im told its bad for me and linked to health problems. Is this true and if so can you suggest any healthier alternatives? Mitchell James, Ronkonkoma, N.Y. While rumors have circulated for years that diet sodas are unhealthy, researchers have found no direct links between such drinks and speci c human health problems. Aspartame (also known as NutraSweet) is the sugar-alternative of choice for most diet soda makers. Its 180 times sweeter than sugar but contains no significant calories and does not promote tooth decay. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration first approved aspartame in 1974, though health advocates held up its widespread use for over a decade. Over half of Americans consume aspartame regularly in soda and other foods all told, diet varieties accounted for some 29 percent of the soft drink market for the top 10 sodas in 2010, according to Beverage Digest so it is certainly reasonable to be concerned about any potential health effects. However, initial reports that implicated aspartame in seizures, headaches, depression, anxiety, memory loss, birth defects, multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus, methanol toxicity and even cancer turned out to be false (even a hoax), according to a wide range of reputable, peer-reviewed studies and clinical and epidemiological research. Another concern that has been voiced about aspartame is that it produces methanol when metabolized, which converts to formaldehyde (and then formic acid) in the body. But studies have shown that the amount of methanol in aspartame is less than that found in natural sources such as fruit juices, citrus fruits and some fermented beverages, and that the amount of formaldehyde generated is also small compared to that produced routinely by the body from other foods and drugs. While aspartame and diet sodas have not been linked directly to speci c health problems, researchers who surveyed the eating, drinking, smoking and exercise habits of some 2,500 New Yorkers between 2003 and 2010 did nd that those who drank at least one diet soda per day had a 61 percent higher risk of socalled vascular events (e.g. heart attack or stroke) than those who avoided Diet Coke and other products with aspartame. If our results are confirmed with future studies, then it would suggest that diet soda may not be the optimal substitute for sugar-sweetened beverages for protection against vascular outcomes, reported the studys lead author, Hannah Gardener of the University of Miami School of Medicine. But others say that such a nding constitutes a link, not proof of cause and effect and that those who have switched to diet sodas may be replacing the calories they used to get from regular sodas with other unhealthy foods that may be increasing their risk of heart attack or stroke. The takeaway should be that those who drink soda regularly, diet or otherwise, should be sure to exercise and eat right otherwise. Or, better yet... give up the soda entirely. According to Katherine Zeratsky, a nutritionist with the Mayo Clinic, healthier choices abound. She suggests starting off the day with a glass of 100 percent fruit juice and then drinking skim milk with meals. Sip water throughout the day, she recommends. For variety, try sparkling water or add a squirt of lemon or cranberry juice to your water.EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss at www.emagazine.com. Whats a healthy alternative to diet soda? Researchers have found no direct links between diet sodas and speci c human health problems. Initial reports that implicated aspartame, widely use to sweeten diet sodas, in a wide range of human health problems including cancer turned out to be false though certainly much healthier beverage choices abound.PHOTO BY JULESREYES, COURTESY FLICKRContinued from Page 1B Bathroom. Dont leave water running while you are brushing your teeth. Replace older toilets with low- ow toilets. Add a brick to the tank to reduce water use. Showers use less water than baths. Time your showers and try to keep them less than ve minutes in length. Consider turning off the water while you are lathering. Laundry Room. Clean the lint from the lter after every load. Use interior or exterior clotheslines or a drying rack when possible. Wash full loads of laundry. Use a cold water wash and rinse and earth-friendly laundry soap. Front loading washers are more ef cient than most top loading models. Kitchen. It may come as a surprise that washing a load of dishes in the dishwasher uses less water than doing the same number of dishes by hand. Dishwashers also do a better job of killing germs, because they use hotter water than you would normally use if washing by hand. Run your dishwasher only when it is full. Use the air dry setting instead of heat dry and use earthyfriendly dishwasher soap. By replacing a pre-1994 dishwasher with an Energy Star quali ed dishwasher, you can save at least $30 in annual utility costs. Clean your dishwasher following the manufacturers instruction to expect optimal cleaning. Your refrigerator is the only appliance that works continuously in your home 24 hours a day. In most households, the refrigerator is the single biggest energy consuming kitchen appliance. According to Energy Star, replacing a refrigerator bought in 1990 with a new Energy Star quali ed model can save enough to pay for lighting an average household for nearly four months. Your refrigerator/freezer is another place for a thermometer. Keep your refrigerator between 35 and 38 degrees and your freezer at 0. Use tight- tting covers on pots and pans when cooking on top of your stove and cook with a full oven. Match the burner with the pan size. Cook large batches and freeze extra portions. Utilize seasonal recipes. Windows. Weatherize your windows. Use insulated window coverings or curtains to control energy loss if you cant replace your present leaky windows. UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension and members of Sustainable Big Bend are committed to educating people on how to save energy and live more sustainable lives. In-depth UF/IFAS publications are available on all of the above named topics. Please use our www.solutionsforyourlife.com website to request information on these topics OR contact me and I will get the needed information to you. We are here to serve you! Continued from Page 1B Commissioner Lynn Artz handed out copies of data from last years collection at the land ll. The report indicated the total amount of material recycled was 2,403 tons, with 1,737 of that being construction and debris, which means 666 tons of material, excluding construction and debris, was recycled. The report indicated 25 percent of the solid waste was recycled, 72 percent of what was recycled was construction and debris going to Marpan. When asked where Waste Pro takes the recyclable material after it is picked up, Mills said it was taken to Recycled Fibers in Tallahassee. The Recycle Task Force made a presentation on Nov. 7 about recycling to the Wakulla County Commission recognizing America Recycles Day on Nov. 15.Commercial recycling Swenson: Tips for household conservationSip water throughout the day, a nutritionist recommends. For variety, try sparkling water or add a squirt of lemon or cranberry juice to your water. At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) Wakulla Weight Loss located at2615 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite103, Crawfordville, FL 32327850-926-3140 opt2 November Specials Purchase a water bottle and get a Mic-combo shot for free. Save $5 on a bottle of Calcium Pyruvate. Buy one bottle of multivitamins and get one for FREE Prepay for 3 regular visits and receive one visit FREE. Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 FREE INTRODUCTORY SESSIONS FOR NOVEMBER.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESSBy JERRY KINDER My wife, Marge, and I are cancer survivors. She was diagnosed in 2007 with breast cancer and I joined the team when I was diagnosed in 2010 with bladder cancer. Marge said this sharing has gone too far. I went to Mof tt Cancer Center in Tampa for a second opinion and thereafter started chemotherapy. The side effects of chemo are cumulative and by the eighth treatment the roof caved in. I lost 27 pounds, along with numerous side effects of which I have lost count. Marge had to take me to the ER three times. My standoff with cancer is just another of three previous near-miss experiences which I would like to share with you. None of these experiences cover my military service or my 10 minute waltz with a grizzly bear twice my size in Yellowstone. First was the car wreck on my way from Montreal to Chicago where, when the Canadian Mounties saw the car, they went to the morgue to ID my body on the belief that no one could have survived the wreck. Second was when I was flying a plane, and third was two heart surgeries, one week apart, in Pensacola. The second surgery was required because the first went so sour that I was probably not going to make it. Being on the edge of leaving often will prompt one to do a great deal of thinking and it WILL change your priorities in life. In short, I had to nearly die in order to learn how to live. Eleven things I learned from my cancer and the other three near-death experiences are: 1. Many of our problems are caused by something we have done and all that is necessary is to stop or correct them. Ninety percent of bladder cancers are caused by smoking unfortunately, I didnt stop in time. 2. Continuing to survive near-death situations is very disappointing to your enemies. 3. When right on the edge, if given the time, you will take inventory, asking yourself what life had been all about, you will ask, What will I be remembered for? You can ask yourself now What do you want to be remembered for? 4. I nally realized life had not been about money, which was just an illusion. Naturally, one needs enough money to sustain oneself and ones family. After my cancer diagnosis, I realized it was about how I made it and how I treated others in the process. 5. I realized, in the end, I would not be judged on what I had consumed and acquired, but on what I had produced, shared and given to others that what I got was trumped in every way by what I had given. Today the five richest men in the world have more wealth that the 57 poorest countries combined. God help them to handle it wisely. Personally, I have been a good businessman. I started with nothing and have managed to retain most of it. 6. I now know I am here for a very short time and have learned how quickly I could go, so treat each day as very precious and also nd a few moments to smell the owers. 7. As we get older, we tend to live more in the past and we should keep the good memories and what the past can teach us. Beyond that, there is no future in the past. 8. Having a funny bone is as important as having a backbone. When we laugh at ourselves, we take a giant step toward maturity and humility. It is also a medical fact that humor and laughter will extend your life. 9. There are few things that are really important, very few. We may think otherwise, but more than 80 percent of what we worry about never happens. Something else happens we forgot to worry about. 10. Love one another. Find someone to give a hug to and, if they need it, help them. You will bene t MORE than they will. Jesus gave us the story of the Good Samaritan for a reason. Do it today, as no one has a guarantee on tomorrow. 11. Through my experiences, along with having cancer, I have learned to forgive others. Life is too short to waste it on hate. By forgiving someone, I cant change yesterday, but I can and do change tomorrow, not to mention improve my health.Editors Note: This is taken from Jerry Kinders speech at last months Relay for Life Kickoff.I had to nearly die to learn how to live For nearly 120 years, yoga has been a part of American life. During that time, yoga has changed Americans, and Americans have made their mark on the practice. In some cases, Asana practice has become more athletic. Vinyasa ows are faster, new poses are being explored, and classes include more variety. Instead of wearing a dhoti, a traditional skirtlike garment worn by Indian men, a typical Western yoga student might sport spandex shorts and a tight tank top. Yet when were sitting cross-legged with our eyes closed, or moving with our breath, we experience the same peace as the yogis of old. And though yoga may evolve in its outer form, the most important transformation in yoga will always be the change that happens within. One of the fruits of yoga practice is the realization of interconnections. Our bodies, minds and emotions interact in complex ways that science is only just beginning to understand. In this dense web of interconnections, nothing we do has a single effect. In bow pose, you bring more oxygen into the bottom of the lungs (an area that usually gets less than the upper regions), your blood pressure and heart rate rise, pressure increases in the head and neck, and you stretch the muscles and organs in the front of the body as you compress those in back, where the adrenals are located. Its my guess that the interrelated actions of this pose along with other elements of a complete yoga practice are what create the therapeutic bene t. See for yourself. Do more yoga!Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 3800140.With all the problems we are having with our economy today, stress and anxiety levels have increased due to various things from employment, housing, medical, to the holidays. It is becoming a stressful time in our lives. Job loss is at a higher risk now than in times past, and usually unexpected when it happens. With a job loss, your entire world changes, not to mention nancial obligations, or even how to maintain health insurance. It is a shocking, frightening, and certainly stressful experience. In fact, most medical experts relate a sudden layoff or job loss is similar to what is experienced with other significant losses, such as death. There are many ways of combating stress during these hard times and exercise plays a huge role in stress and anxiety relief. Studies by various health researchers such as the Mayo Institute have found that physical activity helps to bump up the production of brains feel-good neurotransmitters, called endorphins. When exercising, people tend to think about their exercise pace or movement and often forget for a short while about the dayto-day challenges and irritations. The longer the workout continues, the clearer the mind and the fewer problems, and an increase in energy levels and more optimism. Exercise helped them to clear their heads and maintain a calmer state throughout the day. It is like meditation in motion. Regular exercise can increase self-con- dence and lower depression and anxiety symptoms, and improve your sleep, which are all accompanied by stress, depression and anxiety. Situations arise, but you are in command of your body and your life, you cannot change the situations around you, but your body and your life is yours to keep strong. So why not work with what you have, keep exercising and when the big problem ares its head, with exercise it will be a little easier to deal with. So go for a run to clear your head!Pamela Chichester, CFT, is manager of Body-Tek 24 Hour Fitness. For information about the gym and classes call (850) 926-2348 or visit Body-Teks Facebook page. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERMeditation in motionYoga shows interconnections the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringAnne urmondOctober 2011 Winner Her name was drawn fromI would like to thank all of the local businesses for sponsoring this contest. My husband and I are looking forward to visiting each restaurant. We enjoy the personal relationships we have with these local establishments. OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations ank You So Much! Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Rustys Automotive MOBILE REPAIR Rustys Automotive MOBILE REPAIR 29 Years of ExperienceMV82996 www.hicksair.com HEARING TECHNOLOGY SALE!FREE Demonstration!$1095SOLUTION 4 ALL SIZES. Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. The Log Cabin Barry Building PRESENTING A GRAND EVENT3 DAY SALE FREE OF CHARGEDont miss the opportunity to receive a personal demonstration on the latest in digital hearing technology!Appointments are necessary as we expect a strong response.CALL (850) 942-4007 or Toll Free 1-866-942-4007 HEAR FOR THE HOLIDAYS Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain

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By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 5 A Leon County circuit judge has ordered the state to cease and desist from taking further steps toward accepting bids for a prisonprivatization plan that she found unconstitutional. In an order dated Friday and made public Saturday, Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford sided with the Florida Police Benevolent Association in halting the procurement process during the states appeal of her earlier ruling. The Department of Corrections had argued that ling the appeal led to an automatic stay of Fulfords Sept. 30 ruling effectively allowing the bidding process to go forward. Fulfords latest order vacated, or rejected, that stay. This court finds that the evidence in the record establishes the likelihood of irreparable injury to the plaintiffs (the PBA and members) if the stay is not vacated and further that the defendants are not likely to succeed on the merits on appeal, Fulford wrote. The privatization plan calls for the state to contract out the operation of 29 prison facilities across the southern part of the state. Jim Baiardi, the president of PBAs chapter for correctional of cers, issued a statement Saturday praising Fulfords latest ruling. The PBA is pleased that Judge Fulford has stopped this action, said Baiardi, who testi ed during a hearing Friday about panic among officers. State correctional officers can breathe a sigh of relief today. The dispute stemmed from a Thursday announcement that the Department of Corrections was reopening the bidding process for the privatization plan. PBA attorneys argued during the hearing Friday there was no reason to move forward with bidding, unless the department was trying to gain some type of advantage in the legal challenge or in the legislative session that starts in January. But the Department of Corrections said Thursday it would not sign a privatization contract while the legal challenge is pending --a point reiterated during Fridays hearing by Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Glogau. In her ruling on the stay, however, Fulford noted the testimony of Baiardi, who also is a captain at the South Florida Reception Center. Attorney General Pam Bondi announced Monday that she would appeal Fulfords Sept. 30 ruling on the constitutionality of the privatization plan. Bondi made the decision at the request of the Legislature, after Gov. Rick Scott declined to le the appeal. The PBA challenged the way lawmakers approved the privatization plan, which was included in budget ne print known as proviso language instead of in a typical bill. Fulford found that the constitution required lawmakers to change state law or use an already-existing department review process before privatizing the prisons. She did not say privatization is unconstitutional, just that the way lawmakers approved the plan was unconstitutional. The 1st District Court of Appeal has not scheduled a hearing in the case, according to an online docket. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 5BBy JIM SAUNDERS THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 4 Its hard to picture two places in Florida more different than Miami and Gretna. But international, glitzy Miami and rural, downhome Gretna are drawing headlines for the same reason: gambling. The debate about expanded gambling intensi- ed this week, as lawmakers and lobbyists get ready to battle about adding resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties. Meanwhile, the Gadsden County Commission agreed to hold a referendum about allowing slot machines at a new Gretna racetrack and poker room. Gambling offers sizzle, but lawmakers and other state leaders also made clear this week they are concerned about, well, less-exciting issues. That includes auto insurance, workerscompensation insurance and the always-thorny Citizens Property Insurance. SPINNING THE WHEEL ON GAMBLING, JOBS House sponsor Erik Fresen, R-Miami, and Senate sponsor Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, met with a roomful of reporters Thursday to rebut criticism of their proposal to allow three resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward. Criticism is coming from various directions, including religious groups, some business organizations, the Seminole Tribe and the pari-mutuel industry. But Fresen offered an explanation that resonates from the waterfront in Miami to the timber of Gadsden County: New gambling facilities will bring new jobs. My community is begging me, he said. Can we do something to inject some capital into our economy? I have $6 billion knocking on my door from an industry who wants to come in with all private capital. But groups such as the Florida Baptist Convention, the Florida Catholic Conference and Florida Family Action held a news conference earlier to say expanded gambling is a fools bet. They say, among other things, that it hurts poor people and damages the states family-friendly reputation. We are working to make our message very clear to legislators that it is unconscionable to vote for a change that will negatively affect thousands of families in our state, said Mark Andrews, chairman of Florida Casino Watch, a group that took part in the news conference. With the legislative session starting in January, such back-and-forth arguments will continue for the foreseeable future. But one of the most important voices in the debate could be House Speaker Dean Cannon, R-Winter Park. When asked about casinos this week, Cannon was diplomatic and said he was trying to reserve judgment on the proposals. But he also didnt leave any doubt about his views of gambling. I am philosophically opposed to the expansion of gaming in our state, Cannon said. PIP, OTHER ISSUES PILE UP Gambling might be the issue du jour, but insurance issues never fade away. Lawmakers and other state leaders this week called for changes in the personal-injury protection auto insurance system, the workers-compensation insurance system and that old perennial Citizens Property Insurance Corp. But actually making changes isnt so easy, at least in part because so many interest groups have stakes in issues such as PIP and workers comp. A panel created to study PIP fraud and in ated autoinsurance costs agreed that the system has soaring premiums and a rising number of claims. But panel members couldnt agree what to do about it. Its lawyers, providers and insurance companies ghting over a pot of money the consumers paid in and keep paying in at an extraordinary level, said Robin Westcott, the state insurance consumer advocate. Each day seems to be worse. Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinet heard presentations about PIP and the statebacked Citizens, which now insures nearly 1.5 million properties. Scott ordered Citizens of cials to come back with recommendations in December to stem the growth. This is something we cannot continue to do, Scott said. I expect the solution you and the board bring to me will solve the problem by June of next year, before the next hurricane season. IF AT FIRST YOU DONT SUCCEED Scott and Republican lawmakers have been taking legal hits on some of their priorities. But that doesnt mean they are ready to give up. Scott announced Thursday the state will appeal a federal judges injunction against a law that requires drug tests for welfare recipients. This policy is intended to help Florida families and is an effective way to ensure that welfare dollars are used for the bene t of children and to help Floridians get back to work and off public assistance, Scott said. I have no doubt that the law is constitutional, and that it is supported by the great weight of judicial authority. But the appeal, like passage of the law, drew criticism, with Rep. Cynthia Stafford, D-Miami, describing the tests as mean-spirited, wasteful and unconstitutional. Scott declined Monday to appeal a circuit judges ruling that tossed out a massive prison-privatization plan. But Attorney General Pam Bondi stepped in and led the appeal, at the request of the Legislature. Bondis move, which came shortly before an appeal deadline, was somewhat of a surprise. But the Florida Police Benevolent Association, which filed the lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the privatization plan, vowed to ght to the state Supreme Court, if necessary. Weve been ready to go from the start, and were taking it to the next level, PBA Executive Director Matt Puckett said. BUSINESS UPS AND DOWNS Scott this week got to make the type of announcement he would love to repeat again and again: Boeing said it will build the next generation of manned space- ight vehicles at the Kennedy Space Center. Boeing said it plans to have more than 150 employees in place by 2013, a number that could grow to more than 500 by 2015. That would be a boost to Scotts focus on bringing jobs to the state. Boeings choice of Florida for its commercial crew program headquarters is evidence Florida has the world-class facilities and workforce expertise needed for aerospace companies to succeed, Scott said. The governors staff, however, tried to tamp down another piece of jobs news later in the week that posed an embarrassment for the governor. Solantic, an urgent-care chain that Scott founded and later sold, said it would move at least a handful of headquarters jobs from Jacksonville to Tennessee. A far-bigger problem for Florida businesses emerged Thursday when state analysts said many rms will see their unemployment taxes go up nearly $100 per employee in 2012. Lawmakers have taken steps during the past few years to avoid major unemployment-tax increases. Business groups could seek similar help in 2012, as they try to buy time until the economy improves. This system was never really designed to support unemployment at these levels for this period of time, said David Hart, vice president of governmental affairs for the Florida Chamber of Commerce. Its a challenge not just here but across the country. STORY OF THE WEEK: Scott and lawmakers pushed back against judges who rejected two of their priorities. They appealed decisions blocking drug testing for welfare recipients and prison privatization. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Our goal is not about the expansion of gaming, said Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, a Fort Lauderdale Republican who is sponsoring a bill that would allow resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties. As a matter of fact, we hope it will reduce gaming in the state.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Does what happens in Gretna stay in Gretna? Judge again blocks prison privatizationPHOTO BY BRANDON LARRABEEStephen Turner, an attorney for the Police Benevolent Association, hands an exhibit to Judge Jackie Fulford during a hearing on prison privatization Friday in Tallahassee. NEED A NEW HOME?Come see if you qualify for a no interest home mortgage through Habitat for Humanitys Housing Program!You must be a Wakulla County Resident for at least the last year.Where:Conference Room at Ameris Bank 2628 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville When:Tuesday, November 15 Time:6:30 P.M. enter through back door Bring paperwork to verify your income, dependents, savings and expenses, driver licenses for all drivers and social security cards for everyone who will live in your home.If you have any questions please call: Tara C. Sanders 926-5211 Linda Boles 926-6222Peggy Mackin 926-5037. CallPau l s WellGet ThemAll TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyTOTAL PEST CONTROLSERVICEEVERYTHING FROM TERMITESTOMICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years.Monticello Tallahassee Quincy Wakulla rr s TM David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm TheWorks coffeeespressolatts cappuccinofrapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8am-9pm Sunday12-5pm 27FAzaleaDrBehindBealls850.253.7253www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a rt u p B u s i n e s s o f t h eY e a r

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com This page sponsored in part by: On Veterans Day, Friday, Nov. 11, we proudly hail all those who have kept our great country free. We encourage all Americans to display their patriotism and fly the flag every day, but especially on: Martin Luther Kings birthday, the third Monday in January Abraham Lincolns birthday, February 12 George Washingtons birthday, the third Monday in February Armed Forces Day, the third Saturday in May Memorial Day, the last Monday in May (half-staff until noon) Flag Day, June 14 Independence Day, July 4 Labor Day, the first Monday in September Veterans Day, November 11 Coloring PictureSALUTE LOCAL VETERANSVeterans Day November 11 President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed a national holiday called Armistice Day to take place on November 11, 1919 and annually thereafter to commemorate the signing of the armistice treaty that ended World War I. The holiday served to honor those who served and lost their lives in the war. However, it wasnt until 34 years later when a Kansas shoe store owner proposed the holiday should be expanded to remember all veterans, not just those of World War I. Alfred King, a shoe store owner in Emporia, Kansas, began a campaign to turn Armistice Day into All Veterans Day. His towns Chamber of Commerce got involved and participated in the cause, urging all business owners to shut down on November 11 to honor veterans. U.S. Representative Ed Rees, also of Emporia, helped push a bill through Congress, which President Dwight Eisenhower later signed into law on May 26, 1954. Roughly one week later Armistice was changed to Veterans and the holiday has honored all veterans ever since.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 877-676-1403 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! Denises ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting pressure washing sheetrock wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065 pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUYSELLTRADEREPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @comcast.net 24 HOUR EMERGENCYRESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIALSERVICEALLMAKESANDMODELSMAINTANCECONTRACTSSTOCKALLSIZE FILTERSANDMEDIA COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY SOLUTIONS850-926-4676North Pointe Center 1606-B Crawfordville Highwaylic# CAC1816154 A/C & Heating Specialists, LLCWWW.TALLYSENERGYSTAR.COM ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building. Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved Cornerstone CookingWant a SMOKED TURKEY or HAM for your holiday get-together? Maybe you dont want to cook at all. Let Cornerstone Cooking take some of the hassle out of the holidays for you.We also o er FULL CATERING SERVICES! Morris Pigo at (850) 661-1117 Do leaves have you bogged down this fall then call Pat Greens Lawn ServiceCall today for a free quote! They have all the modern equipment to rid you of all those falling leaves.(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com RestaurantSpaceAvailable Soon!! Fullyequipped.Canassumefullliquorlicenseand equipmentifyouactquickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info. 110 Help Wanted Certified Prescribed Burner Prescribed burner needed. Full-time or part-time employment. Must have burn experience, including 130-190 certifications, heavy equipment operation, and clean driving record. Salary negotiable. Contact Bobbie Dugger with B&B Du gg er Inc. 850-566-0831. 111 Medical/ Dental Help Wanted Physicians Assistant Needed LookingforPhysicianAssistant forverybusymedicalofficethat servicesprimarycare,urgent careandcountyinmates.Positionisfulltime.Ifyouareinterestedandwouldliketolearn moreaboutthisposition,please faxresumetofax850-926-3163, A ttn:RachelBrown.Pleasebe suretoincludesalaryrequirements. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 A IR CON OF WAKULLA Heating and Cooling Gary Limbaugh 926-5592 3232 Crawfordville Highway Service, Repair, Installation FL Lic. #CAC1814304. ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 ANYTIME ELECTRIC Specializinginrepairandservice,residentialandcommercial, homesandmobilehomes. 24-hourservice.MarkOliver, ER0015233. 421-3012. BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. Nos. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 130 Entertainment ZumbaWakulla,VFWPost4538, 475ArranRd.,Saturdays 9AM-10AMandonThursdays 6:30PM-7:30PM.$5/class.Party yourselfintoshape!CallPamat 459-5279orKimat251-9195. Look us u p in facebook! 200 Items For Sale WindowHeating/AirUnit,works good$100-firm.Canoew/2 seats¢erconsole $100-firm.15HPJohnsonmoto r w/15galtank&newhose,very goodcondition$500-firm. Craftsman6.5-22selfpropelled lawnmower&mulcher,excellent condition$125-firm.Largeoutboardmotorcontrols,2traile r lightsexcellentcondition $200-firm.Onlyexremeinterest call 850-925-6439. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org 355 Yard Sales FinalCloseOutDaysatThe ThriftStore,4360Crawfordville Hwy.10AM-5PM.Clothing $1/each,remainingfurnitureand other items drastically reduced!! Friday,Nov.11andSaturday, Nov.12.From9AM-4PMat135 BurntPineLoopinSt.Marks. Furniture and lots of g oodies. HarvestThriftStore.1596CrawfordvilleHwy.NorthPointe Plaza.ISNOWOPEN!Mostall clothesandshoes$1.00.Nice nic-nacs.Comeseeourtwofor one rack! Sat.,Nov.12,7AM-3PM,45Will Rd.(offofLonnieRaker),Furniture,tools,householditems, bab y items. Lots more!! Sat.,November12,8AM-until.7 BirchCourt.Furniture,householditems,babyclothes,somethin g for ever y one. 435 Lost and Found Lostadultmalegoldenretriever. HisnameisCodyandwaswearingagreencollar.LastseenOctober31st.inthepremiseso f SpringCourt,nearSpringwood subdivision,closetocountyline. Please call 850-421-0030. 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.Familial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberfortheh earing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 515 Apartments for Rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134MOVE-IN SPECIAL $99 Deposit $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99 CIVIL SERVANT 5% OFF RENT SENIOR CITIZEN 5% OFF RENTApplication Fee $35 520 Townhouses for Rent 2BR/2.5BA,1300sqft.,2005 Townhome.QuietCrawfordville neighborhood.Enjoyspacious livingspace,largemaster, screenedpatio,convenienceto shoppingandparks. $750/month.TeresaBeidler, Coastwise Realty, 850-519-3766 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com Mini-WarehouseSpacesfo r lease,8X10and10X12now available.ComebyorcallWakulla Realt y, 926-5084. WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BAone-storyhomeon1.5 lotwithgarage.Excellentcondition.$95,000.Ownerfinancing. 850-251-7588 850-962-2016. Sopchoppyhouse,3BR/1BA,locatedon1/2acrelot.$75,000. Revell Realty, 850-962-2212. NewhomeinCrawfordville! 3BR/2BA,locatedinWakulla Gardens.$79,000.RevellRealty, 850-962-2212. 555 Houses for Rent 2BR/2BAhomeontheOchlockoneeRiver.Separatefamily room,1-carcarport,quietarea. Referencesrequired.NoPets. $825/mo.+1st/Dep/Last.Carol Odell,BrokerAssociate,Century 21SilverCoastRealty, 850-984-5007. 3BR/1.5BAhomeinWakulla Gardens,$600/month,plusdeposit. Call 850-766-0170. 3BR/2BA,St.Marks.Avail.Dec. 1st.Excellentcondition.Living Room,SeparateDiningRoom, Eat-InKitchen,allappliances. Garage+largestorageroom. Fencedyard.Only16milesfrom CapitalCir.,(1/2blockfrom river). $800/month. Lease & References.First&lastmonth'srent required.Nopets.Call925-6223 for appointment. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$695/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Cozycottage,Panacea.Remodeled2BR/1BA.Hardwoodfloors, ceiling-fansthroughout,W/D hook-up,openbackdeck.Close toGulfofMexico,excellentfishing!$585/month-$550/deposit. 850-926-4217. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. Homes on Acreage Home on 3 acres. 2BR/2BA, porch, storage building, large oak trees, conveniently located near post office and Walgreens. $625/month. Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $695/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. Medart,studiohouseonfou r lots.$550/permonth,plusdeposit. Revell Realty 962-2212. SmallcottagelocatedinPanacea.82LakeAve.3BR/1BA.No pets.$450/month,first&last month rent. Call 850-251-7965.Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. 415 Mashes Sands Rd.3BR/2BA home on Ochlockonee Bay $825 per month.Ochloconee Bayfront Home3BR/2BA home w/ dock, open deck, screened porch, workshop and replace $1100 per month. BALLROOMONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE!Alabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Many Selling Absolute!Tuesday, November 15, 6:00 p.m.215 Bank Foreclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information 91 Culbreath Lane, Crawfordville, FL 88 Midnight Pass, Crawfordville, FL 2 Lots on Block D Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville, FL .516 +/acres on the east side of Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Lot 49 Southside of Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 20 Lots in the Sellars Crossing Subdivision, Crawfordville, FL 45 Harry Morrison Road, Crawfordville, FL Lots 3 & 4 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, FL Lot 24 Mashes Sand Road, Panacea, FLSelling from St. James Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Road, Carrabelle, FL 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1100mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $725mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 4Br 2Ba DWMH $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $800mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $400mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.(850) 926 RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Efciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets36 Stephen Donaldson Road 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 1 Acre $700 No Smoking or pets 10 Calvary Court 3 BR/2BA 1,830 sf House. 2 Car garage, replace and POOL. $1450. Mo. No Smoking, pets negotiable60 Hummingbird Lane 4 BR/2BA, 1.964 sf house with 2 car garage, replace and POOL. $1300 Mo.No Smoking, pets negotiableAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCreek Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent --2BR/1.5BAMH,$400/mo., plusdeposit.3476SpringCreek Hwy. (365 South). 850-926-5192 --3BR/2BAMH,$625/month, $625/deposit.33LisaDrive, ( Hw y 319 So. ) 850-926-5192. 2BR/1BA,MH,Private. Fenced-infrontyard.Yardmaintenanceandgarbagepick-upincluded.2610M.L.K.Rd. $450/month,+deposit.Nopets. CallQueenat850-925-6016, leave messa g e. 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens,CAH,GoodFloorPlan. $650/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease. A vailblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-508-8783 727-642-6043. 3BR/2BADWMH.Largedeck, shed,remodeledkitchen.Great condition!NOpets,(firm). $650/month,$600/security. 850-926-6212. 3BR/2BASWMHonfiveacres. $500/month,$500/security.One mileSouthofWakullaStation. A vailable now! 850-745-8526. 605 Statewide Classi eds Announcements A dvertisingthatWorks.Putyour adinOver100PapersthroughoutFloridaforoneLOWRATE! Call(866)742-1373orvisit: www.florida-classifieds.com. Autos Wanted CASHFORCARS!AnyMake, Model,orYear.WePayMORE! RunningorNot.SellYourCaror TruckTODAY.FreeTowing!Instant Offer: (888)420-3807. Education A LLIEDHEALTHcareer training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com. Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com. Help Wanted A BetterCareerWithMelton GreatEquipment&Benefits2 Mos.CDLClassADrivingExp (877)258-8782www.meltontruck.com. Driver-BuildYourOwnHometime!Part-time,Full-time,Express&Casuallanes!Dailyo r WeeklyPay.Modernequipment! CDL-A,3monthsrecentexperiencerequired.(800)414-9569. www.driveknight.com. Drivers:RunGA,AL,MS,TN & FLHOMEWEEKENDS,EarnUp to39/mi,1yrOTRFlatbedexp. Call:SUNBELTTRANSPORT, LLC (800)572-5489 ext. 227. Land For Sale LAND LIQUIDATION 20 Acres $0 Down,$99/mo.ONLY$12,900 NearGrowingElPaso,T X OwnerFinancing,NOCREDIT CHECKS!MoneyBackGuaranteeFREEColorBrochure (800)755-8953www.sunsetranches.com. Pre-GrandOpeningSale!Sat. November19thOnly.6.34acres w/directlakefrontageonly $29,900!Brandnew,neverbeforeoffered!Gorgeouswooded settingwithdeepwaterfrontage onspectacularlake.Pavedrds, power,phone,muchmore.Unheardofprices-excellentfinancing.Hurryoutfor1stpick! Call now (866)952-5302, x 71. INVESTMENTOPPORTUNITY!! 1waterfront&4lakeaccess lots,$84,400.GatedlakecommunitynearAthens,GA.Excellentschools.Financingavailable. CalltheBankDirect. (888)348-5119. Miscellaneous SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instoc k readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com (800)578-1363 Ext.300N. EARNCOLLEGEDEGREEONLINE.*Medical,*Business, *CriminalJustice.Jobplacement assistance.Computeravailable. FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(877)206-5165 www.CenturaOnline.com. A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhandsonAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769. 680 Legal Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Noticeisherebygiventhatthefollowingvehicleandvesselwillbesoldfortowingand storage charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78. Date of Sale:11-30-2011 Time:9:00 a.m. Vehicle:1988 MERCURY LS Vin # :1MEBM6047JH711179 All sales by Hobbys Towing & Recovery will be held at 1498Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-7698 November 10, 2011 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 65 2010-CA-000028 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC., ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-21 Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD, ALVITA M., et al. Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorFinalJudgmententerinCaseNo. 652010-CA-000028oftheCircuitCourtof the2NDJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,wherein,THEBANKOF NEWYORKMELLONFKATHEBANKOF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERSCWABS,INC.,ASSET BACKEDCERTIFICATES,SERIES 2006-21,isPlaintiff,and,HOWARD,ALVITAM.,et.al.,areDefendants,Iwillsellto thehighestbidderforcashattheLOBBYof theCourthouse,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327,atthehourof 11a.m.onthe1stdayofDecember2011, the following described property: LOT10BLOCK52WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT5ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPOR PLATTHEREOFRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK1PAGE56OFPUBLICRECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesales,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwith60daysafterthe sale. DATED this 26th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-000143-CA WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.ASSUCCESSORBYMERGERTOWACHOVIABANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. ALLUNKNOWNBENEFICIARIESOFTHE ROUGHTONFAMILYLIVINGTRUST, DATED NOVEMBER 14, 2001, ET AL Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): ALLUNKNOWNBENEFICIARIESOFTHE ROUGHTONFA;MILYLIVINGTRUST, DATEDNOVEMBER14,2001(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) ALLUNKNOWNSUCCESSOR TRUSTEE(S)OFTHEROUGHTONFAMILYLIVINGTRUST,DATEDNOVEMBER 14, 2001 (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) __,ASTHEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOF CLEOROUGHTON,DECEASED,IFANY (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactionfor ForeclosureofMortgageonthefollowing described property: LOT22,ELLENWOODSUBDIVISION,ACCORDINGTOTHEMAPORPLAT THEREOF,ASRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK3,PAGE10AND11,INCLUSIVE, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. 1994/FLEETCRAFT DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME VIN # GAFLR35A08300HH/TITLE#68765121 VIN # GAFLR35B908300HH/TITLE368765122 StreetAddress:48CAROLINACOURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toit,onMoskowitz,Mandell, Salim&Simowitz,P.A.,AttorneyforPlaintiff,whoseaddressis800CorporateDrive, Suite500,FortLauderdale,FLORIDA 33334,30daysafterthefirstpublicationof thisNoticeinTHEWAKULLANEWSand filetheoriginalwiththeClerkofthisCourt eitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiff'sattorney orimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyoufortherelief demanded in the complaint. ThisnoticeisprovidedpursuanttoAdministrative Order No. 2.065. InaccordancewiththeAmericanwithDisabilitiesAct,ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywhoneedsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youare entitled,atnocosttoyou,toprovisionsof certainassistance.PleasecontacttheCourt Administratorat3056CrawfordvilleHIghway,Crawfordville,FL32327,PhoneNo. (850)926-1201within2workingdaysof yourreceiptofthisnoticeorpleading;ifyou arehearingimpaired,call1-800-955-8771 (TDD);ifyouarevoiceimpaired,call 1-800-995-8770(V)(ViaFloridaRelayServices). WITNESSmyhandandthesealofthis Court this 27th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-207-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION THEBANKOFNEWYORKMELLON TRUSTCOMPANY,N.A.,byandthrough itssub-servicingagent,VANDERBILT MORTGAGEANDFINANCE,INC.,aTennesseecorporationauthorizedtotransact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. BRAYNA.DEKLEandPEGGYSUE DEKLE,husbandandwife;MIDLAND FUNDINGLLC,aDelawarelimitedliability companyauthorizedtotransactbusinessin Florida,assuccessorininteresttoHouseholdFinance;FAMILYDOLLARSTORES OFFLORIDA,INC.,aFloridacorporation; UNIDENTIFIEDJOHNDOE(S)and/orUNIDENTIFIED JANE DOE(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRYAN ARMSTRONG DEKLE YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanacitontoforeclosethatmortgage,originallyinfavorof FordConsumerFinanceCo.,Inc.datedOctober8,1996andrecordedonNovember1, 1996,inOfficialRecordsBook286,Page 583;asassignedtoVanderbiltMortgage andFinance,Inc.byAssignmentofMortgagerecordedonApril26,2011,inOfficial RecordsBook850,Page822,assubsequentlyassignedinOfficialRecordsBoo k 854,Page664,andfinallyassignedtothe BankofNewYorkMellonTrustCompany, N.A.,inOfficialRecordsBook854,Page 665,allofthePublicRecordsofWakulla County,FLorida,encumberingthefollowing realpropertylocatedinWakullaCounty, Florida, to-wit: Lot 24 Millers Way South CommenceataconcretemonumentmarkingtheSoutheastcorneroftheNortheast QuarterofLot52oftheHartsfieldSurveyof LandsinWakullaCOunty,Floridaand thencerunNorth17degrees15minutes08 secondsWest402.50feettothePOINTOF BEGINNING.FromsaidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinueNorth17degrees15minutes08secondsWest524.40feettoapoint ontheSoutherlyright-of-wayofStateRoad No.S-368,saidpointlyingonacurveconcavetotheNortherly,thencerunSouthwesterlyalongsaidcurvewitharadiusof 1091.74feetthruacentralangleof01degrees34minutes41secondsforanarcdistanceof30.07feet(chordofsaidarcbeing South77degrees12minutes43seconds West30.04feet),thencerunSouth17degrees15minutes08secondsEast291.97 feettoapointonacurvehavingaradiusof 1382.74feetthruacentralangleof31degrees08minutes57secondsforanarcdistanceof751.73feet(thechordofsaidare beingNorth87degrees31minutes55secondsWest742.51feet),thencerunSouth 17degrees15minutes08secondsEast 484.05feet,thencerunNorth72degrees 50minutes52secondsEast728.96feetto the POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECTTOaroadwaycasementover andacrosstheSoutherlyandEasterly30 feet thereof. ALSOSUBJECTTOa50.00footcul-de-sac easement in the Southwest corner thereof. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toSONYAK.DAWS,Plaintiff attorney,whoseaddressisSonyaDaws, P.A.3116CapitalCircleNE,Suite5,Tallahassee,Florida32308,withinthirty(30) days,andfiletheoriginalwiththeClerkof thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonPlaintiff's attorneysorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESSmyhandandsealofthisCourt on November 1st, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-252-CA CENTENNIALBANK,asSuccessorinInterest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREWM.BAKER,amarriedman,the UnknownSpouseofAndrewM.Baker,andanyandallOthersClaimingInterestsBy, Under,ThroughorAgainstANDREWM. BAKER, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TODEFENDANTS,ANDREWM.BAKER, THEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOFANDREW M.BAKER,ANDANYANDALLOTHERS CLAIMINGINTERESTSBY,UNDER, THROUGHORAGAINSTANDREWM. BAKER,ANDALLPARTIESHAVINGOR CLAIMINGTOHAVEANYRIGHTTITLE ORINTERESTINTHEPROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED: YOUARENOTIFIEDThatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots5and6,Block"11"ofPanaceaMineral Springs,Unit1,asubdivisionaspermapor platthereofrecordedinPlatBook1,Page 5,ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 24-5S-02W-057-03130-000) and: Lot55,Block"22"ofWakullaGardens,as permaporplatthereofrecordedinPlat Book1,Page39,ofthePublicRecordsof Wakulla County, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 00-00-035-008-07819-000) hasbeenfiledagainstyou.Youarerequired toserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,if any,totheComplaintonMaryEllenDavis, thePlaintiffsattorney,whoseaddressis MaryEllenDavisLawOffice,17HighDrive, SuiteC,PostOfficeBox1720Crawfordville, Florida32326,onorbeforeDecember12, 2011,andfiletheoriginalwiththeClerkof thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonthePlaintiffsattorneyorimm.ediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated on October 27, 2011 BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000304 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. LANHAM, JOHN L., et al, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorFinalJudgmententeredinCase No.65-2009-CA-000304oftheCircuit Courtofthe2NDJudicialCircuitinandfor WAKULLACounty,Florida,wherein,BAN K OFAMERICA,N.A.,isPlaintiff,and,LANHAM,JOHNL.,etal.,areDefendants,Iwill selltothehighestbidderforcashatthe LobbyoftheWakullaCountyCourthouseat 11AMonthe1stdayofDecember,2011, the following described property: LOT32,BLOCK6OFWAKULLAGARDENSUNITTWO,ACCORDINGTOTHE PLATTHEREOFASRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK1,PAGE42,OFTHEPUBLICRECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A nypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithing60days after the sale. Dated this 26th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLI S AS DEPUTY CLER K (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance.PleasecontacttheClerkofthe Court'sdisabilitycoordinatorat 850-926-0905,atleast7daysbeforeyour scheduledcourtappearance,orimmediatelyuponreceivingthisnotificationifthe timebeforethescheduledappearanceis lessthan7days;ifyouarehearingorvoice impaired, call 711. November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-00024 7 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWNHEIRSANDORBENEFICIARIESOFTHEESTATEOFBEATRICE FARMER, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWNHEIRSANDORBENEFICARIESOFTHEESTATEOFBEATRICE FARMER LAST ADDRESS UNKNOWN CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNWON YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactionfor ForeclosureofMortgageonthefollowing described property; AportionoflandsasdescribedinDeed Book5,Page678ofthePublicRecordsof WakullaCounty,Floridabeingmoreparticularly described as follows: CommenceattheNortheastcornerofthe WestHalfofLot77oftheHartsfieldSurvey ofLandsinWakullaCounty,Floridaandrun South17degrees55minutes32seconds East209.22feet;thencerunSouth72degrees12minutes,00West134.22feetto anironrodwithcap(LS#5831)forthePoint ofbeginning.FromsaidPointofBeginning continueSouth72degrees12minutes00 secondsWest75.00feettoanironrodwith cap(LS#5831);thencerunNorth72degrees12minutes00secondsEast75.00 feettoanironrodwithcap(LS#5831); thencerunsouth17degrees55minutes32 secondsEast75.00feettothePointofBeginning,containing0.129acres,moreor less. Togetherwitha20footaccesseasement described as follows: CommenceattheNortheastcornerofthe WestHalfofLot77oftheHartsfieldSurvey ofLandsinWakullaCounty,Floridaandrun South17degrees55minutes32seconds East189.22feettothePointofBeginning. FromsaidPointofBeginningcontinue South17degrees55minutes32seconds East20.00feet;thencerunSouth72degrees12minutes00secondsWest134.22 feettoanironrodwithcap(LS#5831); thencerunNorth17degrees55minutes32 secondsWest20.00feet;thencerunNorth 72degrees12minutes00secondsEast 134.22 feet to the Point of Beginning. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toit,onMarshallC.Watson, P.A.,AttorneyforPlaintiff,whoseaddressis 1800NW49thSTREET,SUITE120,FT. LAUDERDALEFL33309thirty(30)daysafterthefirstpublicationofthisNoticeinTHE WAKULLANEWSandfiletheoriginalwith theClerkofthisCourteitherbeforeservice onPlaintiff'sattorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeentered againstyouforthereliefdemandedinthe complaint. Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilityshoe needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinacourtproceeding,youareentitled,atnocosttoyoutotheprovisionof certainassistance.PleasecontactTheWakullaCountyCourthouseat850-926-0905 atleast7daysbeforeyourscheduledcourt appearance,orimmediatelyuponreceiving notificationifthetimebeforethescheduled appearanceislessthan7days.Ifyouare hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESSmyhandandthesealofthis Court this 20th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 10, 17, 2011

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 23 26 31 43 48 52 56 60 63 2 20 34 44 3 45 21 39 53 4 15 18 35 49 5 27 32 50 61 64 6 28 46 7 24 40 57 8 22 36 54 9 33 55 19 29 51 10 16 30 41 47 11 25 37 58 62 65 12 38 13 42 59 ACROSS1.Russian-built ghter 4.Prestigious prizes since1901 10.Farmland unit 14.Chowed down 15.Lucky charm 16.Extinct cousinsof theostrich 17.Suxwith loyal or royal 18.Tinyslices of time 20.On a tilt 22.Rap's __ Boys 23.Seville"solong" 24.Awhole lot 25.Soughtaseat 26.German auto pioneerKarl 27.Mongrel dogs 29.Macbeth's title 31.Actress Blanchett 32.Three-time Burmese prime minister 33.Nestegginitials 34."It'sbeenages!" 39.Partner of food and lodging 40.Luauchow 41."__ Nagila" 43.Mr.Doubleday 46.Bivouac shelter 47.Blast-furnace materials 48.Curly poker 49.Ox's burden 51.Kama __ 52.Denomination mintedin Italy, once 54."Icouldn'tcare less"attitude 56.Overlooked by the doctor 58.Former "Tonight Show"bandleader Severinsen 60.Cleopatra's river 61.Former Speaker of theHouseTip 62.Santa __ winds 63.Driving test taker, usually 64.2000 Olympics city 65.Ginza cashDOWN1.__ tai (rum drink) 2.Words accompanyinga handshake, perhaps 3.Gainsan acceptancefrom 4.Grannies 5.Muscat'sland 6.Lay one down, in baseball 7."Don't Bring Me Down" rockers 8.Sappho's island 9.Dutchpainter Jan 10.ToriorWally 11.The Iran-__aair 12.About57degrees, mathematically 13.Dead Sea Scrolls scribe 19.Bearded former worldleader 21.Smith Brothers unit 23."Lost" network 24.Satchmo's instrument 27.Bagsa class 28.Introduction to sex? 30.Discuss thoroughly 33."What's__ for me?" 35.Deadheadicon Jerry 36.Billion years 37.Environmentalists' celebration 38.Thewholegang 42.Thick-brick link 43.Sum total 44.Clyde's partner in crime 45.It may be in a groove 46.Auto gear system, informally 50.Peloponnesian cit y 51.In a somber way 53.Bank claim 54.M __ "mnemonic" 55.Brazilian soccer legend 57.UK lexicon 59.Recyclableitem American Prole Hometown Content 10/16/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 12 34 3526 678 51 2 7345 69 1 8 95 4356 5872 00 9 HtCtt 192 6384 7 5 738541296 546297183 851 769324 279314658 364852917 687 923541 423175869 915486732 M A I A B C A M O U N T I T S A D E A L B O N N I E G E T S I N T O N E E D L E L O Z E N G E L I E N N A N A S G A R C I A O M A N C U T S A R G O S B U N T U N I T R A N N Y E L O T R U M P E T O E D L E S B O S E O N A S I N S T E E N I N I T P E L E C A S T R O S A D L Y A M O S H A S H O U T C O N T R A E A R T H D A Y R A D I A N E V E R Y O N E E S S E N E A S A C A N Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV NoticeisgivenpursuanttoFloridaSelf-StorageFaciltiyAct,FloridaStatutes,Chapter 83,PartIVthatCrawfordvilleSelfStorage willholdasalebysealedbidonSaturday, November26,2011,at10:00a.m.at3291 CrawfordvilleHwy.ofthecontentsof Mini-Warehousecontainingpersonalproperty of: TIFFANY HARVEY PENNY McKINNEY BeforethesaledateofSaturday,November 26,2011,theownersmayredeemtheir propertybyapaymentoftheoutstanding balanceandcostbypayinginpersonat 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. November 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF AUCTION UndertheauthorityoftheFloridaStorage facilityActthepropertydescribedbelowhas beenseizedfornonpaymentofrentand otheraccruedexpenses.Thepropertywill besoldatauctiontothehighestbidderas providedbytheselfstoragefacilityact 83.806DoubleDstorageLLCreservesthe righttorefuseanyandallbids.CashOnly. AmandaBass,Unit#37&23household items,CherylLongUnit#10household items.AuctiontobeheldatDoubleDStorageLLC289CajerPoseyRd.Crawfordville FL 32327 November 11, 2011 at 5:00 pm. November 3, 10, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 11-62-P R IN RE: Estate of Les Rybak, Deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofLesRybak,deceased,File#11-62-PR,ispending intheCircuitCourtforWakullaCounty,Florida,ProbateDivision,theaddressofwhich is3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.Thenameandaddress ofthepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentativesattorneyissetforth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestateonwhomacopyofthisnoticeisrequiredtobeservedmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHINTHELATER OF3MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHE FIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE OR30DAYSAFTERTHEDATEOF SERVICEOFACOPYOFTHISNOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedentsestatemustfiletheirclaimswith thiscourtWITHIN3MONTHSAFTERTHE DATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTFILEDWITHINTHE TIMEPERIODSSETFORTHINSECTION 733.702OFTHEFLORIDAPROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NotwithstandingthetimeperiodSsetforth above,anyclaimfiledtwo(2)yearsormore after the decedents date of death is barred. Thedateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice is November 10, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representatives: Robert P. Diffenderfer, Esq. Florida Bar Number: 434906 Lewis, Longman & Walker 515 North Flagler Drive, Suite 1500 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Telephone: (561) 640-0820 E-Mail:rdiffenderfer@llw-law.com Personal Representatives: Jan Rybak-Matalon 1466 Lee Avenue Tallahassee, FL 32303 Brian Rybak 9481 NW 26th Place Sunrise, FL 33322 November 10, 17, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 11-63-PR IN RE: ESTATE OF BRUCE EDWIN TAFT, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheEstateofBRUCE EDWINTAFT,deceased,CaseNumber 11-63-PR,ispendingintheCircuitCourtfor WakullaCounty,Florida,ProbateDivision, theaddressofwhichis3056Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville,Florida32327.The namesandaddressesofthePersonalRepresentativeandthePersonalRepresentative's attorney are set forth below. ALL CREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedent'sEstateonwhomacopyofthisnoticeisservedwithinthreemonthsafterthe dateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THELATEROFTHREEMONTHSAFTER THEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OFTHISNOTICEORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERTHEDATEOFSERVICEOFACOPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstthe decedent'sEstatemustfiletheirclaimswith thisCourtWITHINTHREEMONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS,DEMANDSANDOBJECTIONSNOTSOFILEDWILLBEFOREVER BARRED. ThedateofthefirstpublicationofthisNotice is November 10, 2011. Attorney for Personal Representative: -sMARY ELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No. 949884 MARY ELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720 Crawfordville, FL 32326 Personal Representative: KEITH HENRY TAFT 31 Thames Street Crawfordville, FL 32327 Crawfordville, FL 3232 7 November 10, 17, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGS OF THE NORTH FLORIDA BROADBAND AUTHORITY LEGAL RFP SELECTION/TRANSITION COMMITTEE And Board Meeting TheNorthFloridaBroadbandAuthority ("NFBA")announcesmeetingsoftheNFBA OperationsCommitteethatallinterested personsareinvitedtoattend.TheNFBAis alegalentityandpublicbodycreatedpursuanttotheprovisionsofSection163.01,FloridaStatutes,andanInterlocalAgreement amongBaker,Bradford,Columbia,Dixie, Gilchrist,Hamilton,Jefferson,Lafayette, Levy,Madison,Putnam,Suwannee,Taylor, UnionandWakullaCountiesandmunicipalitiesofCedarKey,CrossCity,LakeCity, LiveOak,Monticello,Perry,WhiteSprings andWorthingtonSprings,Florida.The NFBAwillholdthefollowingpublicmeetings: NFBATransitionCommittee-1:00p.m.on Monday,November14,2011attheCityof LakeCityCouncilChambers,205N.E.MarionAvenue,LakeCity,FL32055.The NFBATransitionCommitteewillreviewthe responsesreceivedfromLegalRFP12-02 andFinancialRFP12-01andalsoconduct generalbusinessoftheTransitionCommittee. NFBABoardofDirectors10:00a.m.on Wednesday,November16,2011attheSuwanneeRiverWaterManagementDistrict, SuwanneeRoom,9225CountyRoad49, LiveOak,Florida32060.TheNFBABoard ofDirectorsmeetingwillbeheldtoconduct general business of the NFBA. Thefollowingpreviouslyscheduledpublic meetings have been cancelled: NFBATransitionCommitteescheduledfor 10:00a.m.onWednesday,November16, 2011. Ifapersondecidestoappealanydecision madebytheNFBAwithrespecttoanymatterconsideredatthemeeting,suchperson willneedarecordoftheproceedingsand mayneedtoensurethataverbatimrecord ismade,includingthetestimonyandevidenceuponwhichtheappealistobemade. pp p InaccordancewiththeAmericanswithDisabilitiesAct,personsneedingspecialaccommodationoraninterpretertoparticipate inthisproceedingorhaveanyquestions pleasecontactFaithDoyle,Clerktothe NFBABoardat(877)552-3482or(407) 629-6900atleasttwo(2)businessdays prior to the date of the meeting. November 10, 2011 687 Invitations to Bid REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL PROFESSIONAL LEGAL SERVICES I.INTENT TheNorthFloridaBroadbandAuthority(the "Authority")issolicitingproposalsfrom qualifiedFloridaattorneysatlawinregard tothelegalrepresentationoftheAuthority asoutlinedintheScopeofServicesbelow. TheAuthorityisaFloridalocalgovernment authoritycreatedbyinterlocalagreement pursuanttosection163.01(7)(g),Florida Statutes,tobuildamiddlemilewireless broadbandsysteminnorthcentralFlorida, whichisfundedbyaBroadbandTechnology Opportunity Program grant. TheAttorneyselectedfromtheapplicants willberequiredtoenterintoatwo(2)year contracttoprovidelegalservicesforthe Authoritywithatwo(2)yearrenewalclause. Thecontractwouldbeterminableonthirty (30)days'noticefromeitherparty,except thatlegalcounselwouldberequiredtocontinueinsaidpositionaftertheforegoing thirty(30)days'noticeuntilsuchtimeasthe Authorityretainsothersuitablelegalcounsel.TheAuthoritymayelecttoenterintoa contractwithalawfirm,buttheAuthority willrequirethatone(1)memberofsuchlaw firmbedesignatedtheAuthority'sAttorney withinthecontract,andthatpersonspecificallyshalloverseeallfunctionsrelatingto the Authority's legal work. TheAttorneyselectedtoserveasthe Authority'sAttorney,notthelawfirmthat contractstoprovideservices,mustbea memberoftheFloridaBarAssociation,in goodstandingforatleastten(10)years.It isrequiredthattheapplicanthasatleast five(5)yearsFloridalocalgovernmentlegal experience,includinglitigationandrealestateexperience.Itisdesirablethattheapplicanthavesomeutilityortelecommunications legal experience. II.SCOPE OF SERVICES A.TheAttorneyshallprovidetheAuthoritythefollowingmonthlyservicesundera lump sum retainer, or hourly fee as quoted: 1.AttendanceatallregularBoardmeetings.AttendanceatallSpecialBoardmeetingsbarringcourthearingconflictsorshort noticehearingswherelessthanfour(4) hours notice is given legal counsel. 2.Attendanceatallworkshopsandsubcommittee meetings when requested. 3.Preparationofcontracts,policies,Resolutionsandotherdocumentsasrequested bytheBoardandstafffortheAuthority's Board. 4.ResearchandpreparationoflegalopinionsandadvicetotheAuthority,itsofficials andappointedmanagers,includingconsultations by phone or in person. 5.Consultationforalllegalmatters,a s necessary,withtheBoardofDirectorsand appointed managers. B.TheAttorneyshallprovidetheAuthoritythefollowingservicesunderanhourly ratefeestructureorothernegotiatedfee structure: 1.Litigation(State,FederalorAdministrative) on behalf of the Authority. a.Whenspecificallydirectedbyth e Authority to file or defend a suit(s). b.WhentheAuthorityspecificallydirect s legalcounseltointerveneinalegalproceeding,ordirectslegalcounseltoappeal anyadministrativeorcourtdecision,arbitration or mediation matter. 2.Bond/NoteIssue;asspecificallydirected by the Authority. III.PROCESS TheAttorneyshallprovidetheAuthoritywith thefollowinginformationforreviewandconsideration. A.Descriptionofrelevantexperiencei n Floridalocalgovernmentlaw,litigation,real estate, utility and telecommunications. B.Biosofallattorneyswhowouldbeprovidingservices,includingthepersondesignated as the Authority's Attorney. C.List of five (5) client references. D.DetailsofallBar(Floridaorotherwise ) complaintsand/orissuesandanexplanationtoincluderesolutionand/orstatus;ten (10) previous years. E.Listincidentsoroccasionswhereyo u havebeensuedformalpracticeorbeena defendantinasuit,inthepastten(10) years. Provide details. IV.FEE STRUCTURE TheAttorneyproposingtoprovidethefollowinglegalservicesshalldetailthefeesfor services as follows: A.(1)Monthlylumpsumretainerfee,o r $ _______________ (2)Hourlyfeeforservicesnotcovere d bl$ ()y below$ ________________ B.Litigation Hourly rate $ _______________ C.Bonds/NoteIssueHourlyrateorpercentage$ ________________ D.Travel Hourly rate $ _______________ Per Diem $ _______________ V.RESPONSE Allresponsesmustbesubmittedinsealed envelopesmarkedonthefront"Proposalfor LegalServicesNFBA12-02"andreceived bytheAuthoritynolaterthan4:00p.m.on November10,2011.Anoriginalandeight (8)copiesoftheresponsemustbeprovided. All responses must be addressed to: NFBA Legal Service RFP 12-02 C/O Mr. Wendell Johnson, City Manager City of Lake City 205 N.E. Marion Avenue Lake City, FL 32055 TheresponseswillbereviewedbyAuthority StaffandforwardedtotheNFBATransition Committeefortheirconsideration.The Authorityreservestherighttorejectallapplications,negotiatewithadesiredrespondent,ortore-advertiseifdeemedappropriate. November 10, 2011 690 Gov Tax Notices NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 030 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 1490 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-078-013-10770-00 MAGNOLIA GARDENS LOT 47 BLK A OR 10 P 612 OR 204 P 367 NameinwhichassessedJOSHUACADAMS&ANGELAMAONEsaidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuchcertificateshallbesoldto thehighestbidderatthecourthousedooron the7thdayofDecember,2011,at10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 031 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 928 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-035-008-07103-000 WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT I BLOCK 12 LOT 21 OR 1 P 846 NameinwhichassessedWALTERSTEVEN&LILLIANODELLsaidpropertybeing intheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida. Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemed accordingtolawthepropertydescribedin suchcertificateshallbesoldtothehighest bidderatthecourthousedooronthe7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 032 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDE CARTERKSRORDELORISSFORT WROStheholderofthefollowingcertificate hasfiledsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobe issuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 412 Year of Issuance 2003 Description of Property Parcel 25-5S-02W-046-03538-000 AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK U LOT 17 OR 46 P 56 NameinwhichassessedMETAH.WILLIS saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 033 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 1628 Year of Issuance 2003 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-068-000-10108-006 P-1-1-M-23 1.23 AC ML IN SW CORNER OF SW 1/4 OF HS 68 NameinwhichassessedPHILLIPHARVEY saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 034 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 1197 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 35-3S-01E-263-05538-161 VILLAGES OF ST MARKS LOT BB COMMERCIAL LOT OR 293 P 623 OR 594 P 255 NameinwhichassessedLACYA.&MARY T.MURRAYsaidpropertybeinginthe CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unless suchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuch certificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidder atthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 035 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 930 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 15-3S-01W-000-04397-000 15-3S-1W P-16-M-64 IN FRACTIONAL SW 1/4 OR 4 P 394 OR 36 P 732 NameinwhichassessedVENETTAJ. WALKERsaidpropertybeingintheCounty ofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuch certificateshallberedeemedaccordingto lawthepropertydescribedinsuchcertificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidderat thecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 036 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 993 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 07-6S-01W-301-04626-A01 BULAH'S COVE SUBDV LOT 1 OR 491 P 13 OR 659 P 497 NameinwhichassessedJOHNNYPETRANDISIIsaidpropertybeinginthe CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unless suchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuch certificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidder atthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 037 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatR.E. MEADOWStheholderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiledsaidcertificateforatax deedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificate numberandyearofissuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty,andthenamesinwhich it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 846 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel # 00-00-005-000-06249-001 P-18-1-M-3 1.31 AC M/L IN THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF HS 3 BEING ON WEST SIDE OF TRIPPLETT RD OR 319 P 427 OR 441 P 327 NameinwhichassessedLINDABAKERS saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 10, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PrismTM TV Pure Broadband 10 MBPS a month for 6 months* CenturyLinkTM PrismTM. TV TV.NOW YOU HAVE A BETTER TV CHOICE.Call 866.484.7057Americas fastest growing broadband company now brings you a better choice in television. Its not cable. Its not satellite. Its Prism.Its interactive TV that you control from the moment you click the remote. Its so advanced, it even updates automatically. Simply put, its the best way to watch all your favorite shows, teams you name it. So turn off cable and satellite, and turn on TV worth switching for.*Offer ends 12/31/2011. Offer and stated rates are available to new, rst-time CenturyLink Prism TV residential customers in select areas only. The $65.95 monthly rate applies to up to 10 Mbps Pure Broadband and Prism TV package for six (6) months of service with a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months, after which standard rates apply. A $6.99 monthly DVR service fee applies when the Quad Play DVR is purchased with Prism TV package. Promotional offer cannot be combined with any other Prism offers. All prices, packages and programming are subject to change without notice. Taxes, fees, an d surcharges will apply. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and a shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. Customer must cancel DVR and/or HD service by calling CenturyLink Customer Service before the end of the three-month promotional period to avoid monthly charges, or the standard mo nthly rate for each service will apply until service(s) are cancelled. Offers may be limited to specic locations. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restric tions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services listed are governed by tariffs, local terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at http://about.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply, including a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time High -Speed Internet activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain in-state surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply based on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharge s. Monthly Rate for All Service Bundles The monthly rate for all bundled services will apply while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more s ervices are cancelled, the standard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband Early termination results in customer being responsible for payment of the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data trafc transmissi on/connection and cannot be used for voice trafc transmission, except for 911 services. CenturyLink Prism TV All plans require separate local phone service plan and include digital channels (including local channels), one (1) set-top box (STB), one (1) modem gateway, and up to four (4) standard direct video streams to residence. CenturyLink-provided STBs are required to view TV. If a term agreement applies to the offer, an early termination fee in the amount of discounts received applies if customer terminates services before the end of the appl icable term agreement. 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If customer does not contact CenturyLink to resum e full activation of applicable services before the end of six (6) consecutive month period, all applicable monthly charges, fees, surcharges, contractual obligations, etc., will resume automatically. Vacation Pr ogram services will have restrictions and limitations that will vary for each applicable service. Contact CenturyLink for details. Equipment Minimum equipment and CenturyLink professional installation are required. At initial installation, each customer receives: one (1) VDSL 2 modem; up to six (6) STBs (standard plan includes one (1) STB; additional STBs are available for an additional monthly rate, per STB); and one (1) remote control per STB installed. All equip ment must be returned to designated CenturyLink retail store within thirty (30) days after service disconnection in an undamage d condition, or customer is charged for each equipment piece not returned or returned as damaged. Prism TV Plan Quad Play DVR service excluded and is available for an additional monthly fee. Green Lantern: 2011 Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are trademarks of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owners. PUTYOUR PRISMTM TV ON VACATION WHEN YOU HEAD BACK NORTH Bundle BRILLIANT TV with Pure Speed for an even BETTER experience.