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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00381
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 11-03-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00381
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Preceded by: Wakulla County news

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Florida Commission on Ethics recently nished its final investigation on the possible ethics violation against former County Administrator Benjamin Pingree and found no probable cause in four of the six allegations. The allegations related to a real estate transaction with the chief executive of cer of Inspired Technologies, a company that has a contract with the county for IT services. However, probable cause was found that Pingree violated state disclosure laws by failing to disclose a piece of property in Franklin County on his 2007 and 2008 statement of nancial interests, according to a press release from the commission. The commission recommended Pingree pay a civil penalty of $400 for the error, which the governor would have to impose by executive order. Continued on Page 2A Special to The NewsA 25-year-old Crawfordville man was shot by a Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputy at 12:14 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, after law enforcement of cials received eyewitness information that the man was allegedly attempting to break into the USA Grocery convenience store at 2911 Crawfordville Highway, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. The suspect, Curtis Jacob Davis, was observed attempting to gain entry into the store after operating hours. A witness reported that each time a vehicle would pass the location the suspect would run for the south side of the building to conceal himself. Deputies arrived on scene and allegedly discovered the suspect hiding in some bushes. The suspect reportedly refused to comply with law enforcement commands and allegedly lunged toward a deputy with a weapon. The deputy fired his weapon striking the suspect. Continued on Page 16A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 44th Issue Thursday, November 3, 2011 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 6A Community....................Page 7A School...........................Page 8A Sports ..................Pages 9, 10A In The Huddle ............Page 11A Outdoors ...................Page 14A Water Ways...............Page 15A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 17A Business .......................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B Published Weekly, Published Weekly, Read Daily Read DailySPORTS 9A Curtis Jacob Davis Pingree ned $400 by Ethics Commission Suspect shot at convenience storeJudge Mike Carter will speak to Historical SocietyBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsOn Tuesday, Nov. 8, the Wakulla County Historical Societys monthly meeting will focus on former county judge Mike Carter. The meeting will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library and begins at 7 p.m. Judge Carter will speak about his term in public of ce, including the tale of his election into judgeship that earned him the title Landslide Carter. He will also delve into the history of his family ties to the county, dating as far back as his great-great-great grandfather John Manning Roberts and his wife, Arcadia, who moved to the county around 1850 attempting to start their life together. By the 1860s, J.M. Roberts would be dead, and his wife would remarry. The years would bring forth children and extended family as well as a urry of geographical movement for many of them throughout Wakulla and Florida. From Smith Creek to Telogia, from Jackson County to Liberty County and back, Judge Carters early ancestors were a people on the move. As a boy, he was elected school patrol captain. During high school, he was class president of his sophomore, junior and senior classes. In his junior year he was involved in an automobile accident that did severe damage to his left ankle, leaving him to wear a cast for two years. He was still wearing that cast when he entered the University of Florida. Seeking a sense of freedom, but weighed down by his physical ailment, he left the university and went to New York as a merchant seaman. He would sail to France and the Caribbean. It was 1959 when Communist leader Fidel Castro arrived in Havana, greeted by crowds that cheered him as he took hold of power in Cuba, less than 100 miles from Florida. By April, Castro made an unof cial visit to the U.S. with speaking engagements at Columbia, Harvard and Princeton universities, saying clearly that revolutions arise due to the state of internal conditions, and that there is no democracy where hunger, unemployment and injustice are plentiful. Continued on Page 16A FILE PHOTOMike Carter and wife Andrea at the recent Historical Society banquet at Wakulla Springs. The former county administrator is cleared of four of six charges, but its found that he failed to disclose property in Franklin County Former Administrator Ben PingreeRay Gray must pay $7,500 in fines for Ethics violations. See Page 2A Crawfordville man is killed in traffic crash. See Page 16A Wakulla County Historical Society meets on Tuesday, Nov. 8, at the public library at 7 p.m. Carters topics are expected to include his family ties to Wakulla, as well as his own world travels including a stint as a merchant seaman Wakulla RoyaltyWILLIAM SNOWDENWakulla High Schools Homecoming King Cody Cash and Queen Mary Warren Adkison were crowned Friday night at halftime of the Wakulla-Trinity Christian game. For more Homecoming photos, see Page 12A. For coverage of the football game, which Wakulla won, 42-14, see Page 10A.Between Homecoming at Wakulla High School on Friday night and the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival in Panacea on Saturday, there were a number of people wearing crowns this weekendWILLIAM SNOWDENEloise and Ronald Fred Crum were crowned Mullet King and Queen at the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival in Panacea. For more photos, see Page 18A. TRICK OR TREATSee Page 13AVOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles make regional quarter nalsMIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLRiversprings Bears move on to playoffs

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Continued from Page 1A I am extremely pleased with all the ndings of the Florida Ethics Commission and the recent outcome of their independent review, Pingree said. I want to thank them for the thorough, professional and timely manner in which their de nitive inquiry was conducted. Pingree was in the hot seat for several months at numerous county commission meetings, where residents brought up issues with no-bid contracts, the countys purchasing policy, the increase in the personnel budget and the archiving of county records. In August 2010, Pingree said he asked the Commission on Ethics for a written opinion regarding his real estate purchase, however, he said at the time he was told the board could not give a written opinion until an ethics complaint was led. He said he was told a resident planned to le a complaint. Residents Renee and Stephen Calhoun, Steve Fults, Debra Fults, Anne Ahrendt, Charles Hickman, John Probert, Valerie LaHart, Larry Roberts and Al Shylkofski ended up ling the complaint against Pingree on Oct. 11, 2010. My whole thing is that he hid it from the beginning, Renee Calhoun said of Pingrees real estate purchase. Shortly after the complaint was filed, Pingree reached a settlement agreement with the group. The settlement included the withdrawal of the complaint, that the group couldnt le another complaint, that it would remove any written information or material from the internet aboutPingree with respect to the previous activities, that no one can comment negatively about the other party, that Pingrees next employer receive a copy of the agreement, that Pingree submit his resignation and that each party agrees to hold each other harmless relating to the ling of the complaint. At the time, Pingree said he chose to enter into an agreement because his new job with the Zoological Society of Florida was pending. Once a complaint is turned over to the Commission on Ethics, it has jurisdiction over the matter and can accept or deny a withdrawal request. In this case, the request was denied. Pingree said he listed all his assets correctly over time, but in two instances, in 2007 and 2008, he listed an asset on the form for an adjacent year. I accepted full responsibility for my oversight and made the correction immediately upon discovery, over a year ago, through the proper re- ling process, Pingree said. The modest ne applied for my honest mistake is both understandable and appropriate. County Attorney Heather Encinosa, who represented Pingree in the complaint, said Pingree conceded the unintentional errors and led an amended form on Oct. 27, 2010. Renee Calhoun said Pingree never disclosed he owned the property until citizens brought the issue forward. Calhoun questioned whether Pingree would have to repay the county for the legal costs associated with this complaint since probable cause was found in two instances. According to county policy, any public of cer, employee or agent who is provided defense by the county attorney at the publics expense must repay attorneys fees and costs paid from public funds for their defense for all counts, charges and allegations where they were found to be personally liable by virtue of acting outside the scope of their employment or function or acting in bad faith, with malicious purpose, or in a manner exhibiting wanton and willful disregard of human rights, safety or property. The cost of representing Pingree from Sept. 30, 2010 to June 30, 2011, was a little more than $13,500, according to invoices the county received from Nabors Giblin and Nickerson. Encinosa said Pingree would not have to repay the county because he prevailed in the four counts that alleged he misused his position or accepted a thing of value in exchange for his of cial action or that he accepted a thing of value when he knew it was being given to in uence him. The Commission on Ethics determined there was no basis for those allegations, Encinosa said. And the other two allegations were not contested during the ethics process, she said. Pingree said, As expected, I am proud to con rm that the outcome independently supports our integrity, process and good service record. Pingree was county administrator from Jan. 2, 2007, to Nov. 30, 2010. In December 2007, Pingree purchased Craig Goodsons home in Wakulla County and Goodson purchased Pingrees home in Franklin County, according to the investigative report. Goodson is the CEO of Inspired Technologies, a company who has been doing business with the county since 2003. Pingree told the Wakulla County Commission when this issue was brought up in August 2010 that he purchased the home from the individual and it had nothing to do with Inspired Technologies. The report stated that a contract between the county and Inspired Technologies was signed by Pingree on Jan. 10, 2007, however, the contract was negotiated on Nov. 2, 2006, before Pingree took his position. There was also allegations that the countys purchasing policy was violated when a no-bid contract was awarded to Inspired Technologies, but the report states that Assistant County Administrator Tim Barden said the purchases fell under the purchasing policys exemptions. The report stated that there was insuf cient evidence to show Pingree solicited or accepted a thing of value, or received a thing of value meant to in uence his actions as administrator. In response to Pingree misusing his public position by entering into a real estate transaction with a company doing business with Wakulla County and awarding that company a contract, no probable cause was found. Each subsequent contract has been approved by the Board of County Commissioners. There is insufficient evidence to show Respondent used his position for a special privilege, bene t or exemption for himself or others, the report stated. The report stated that Pingree did have a contractual relationship with Goodson, but negotiations between the county and Inspired Technologies happened before Pingree took of ce and the real estate transaction occurred almost a year after Pingree signed the initial contact and the rest were approved by the County Commission. There is insufficient evidence to show that Respondent had a continuing or frequently recurring con ict or that there was an impediment to the full and faithful of his public duties, the report said. Pingree resigned from his position in November 2010 and now serves as the chief executive of cer of the Zoological Society of Florida in Miami.Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County School Board Member Ray Gray faces a ne of $7,500 for violating the nancial disclosure requirements in the Florida Constitution. There were errors and omissions on Grays CE Form 6 for 2005 through 2009, which lists full and public disclosure of nancial interests, according to the Florida Commission on Ethics. I over-reported, Gray said. He said he listed extra information on his form, instead of just listing his personal income. He said he listed the gross income of the business, not just his share. I basically gave too much info, Gray said. The commission recommended that Gray pay a ne of $1,500 per year. Gray said he had an attorney ll out his form in 2010 to ensure he did it properly. The ethics complaint was led last year during the election. Included in the complaint was also an allegation that Gray misused his position when he asked a school employee to put his campaign petition in the teachers lounge at school. The commission said it found no probable cause that he misused his position as a school board member, according to a press release. I didnt do anything wrong, Gray said. Gray was re-elected to the school board last November for his fourth term. Ray Gray ned $7,500 by Ethics Commission Ray Gray e school board member is fined for violating financial disclosure requirements. I over-reported, Gray says of the violations. Former Administrator Pingree ned $400 by Ethics Commission My whole thing is that he hid it from the beginning, says one of the citizens who pursued ethics charges. For his part, Pingree says he is extremely pleased with the ndings of the Ethics Commission. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Interested parties may inspect ordinance at 788 Port Leon Drive and be heard at the meeting. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Office at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 925-6224. NOVEMBER 3, 2011 Member of the Board If you have a question about these actions, contact the Chair of the Clerk of the Value Adjustment Board. NOTICE TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARDAttention ParentsYour child may be eligible for FREE TUTORINGduring the 2011 2012 school year! No cost to parents of eligible students Must receive free or reduced-priced meals to qualify Must attend COAST Charter School, Crawfordville Elementary or Medart ElementaryPlease contact Sue Anderson, Wakulla County School Board, 926-0065, before November 18, 2011 if you are interested in your child receiving free tutoring.NOVEMBER 3, 2011

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notificatioin of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.com THE AMENDED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF ST. MARKS GENERALWATERGARBAGESEWERTOTALALL Millage Rate Per $1,000 5.0327FUNDFUNDFUNDFUNDFUNDS ESTIMATED REVENUES: Taxes: Ad Valorem Tax 150,037 $ 150,037 $ Franchise Fees 30,000 30,000 UtilityTax 30,000 30,000 Communications Service Tax 12,705 12,705 Licenses & Permits 4,290 4,290 Intergovernmental Revenue 36,618 36,618 Charges for Services 31,642150,00080,00098,000359,642 Miscellaneous Revenues 6,300 1,0007,300 Other Sources 300 300 Grant Revenue 150,000 TOTAL SOURCES 451,892150,00080,00099,000630,892 Transfers In 152,000 152,000 Fund Balances/Carried Forward Balances 243,0621,618,008 71,0012,119,6854,051,756 Total Revenues, Transfers, and Fund Balances 846,954 $ 1,768,008 $ 151,001$ 2,218,685 $ 4,834,648 $ EXPENDITURES: General Government Services 257,995 $ 257,995 $ Physical Environment 1,680150,00080,000169,000400,680 Transportation Culture/Recreation 24,817 24,817 Other Nonoperating 17,400 17,400 Grant Expenditures 150,000 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 451,892150,00080,000169,000700,892 Transfers Out 152,000 152,000 Fund Balances/Reserves 395,062 1,466,008 71,001 2,049,685 3,981,756 Total Expenditures, Transfers, and Fund Balances 846,954 $ 1,768,008 $ 151,001$ 2,218,685 $ 4,834,648 $ BUDGET SUMMARYCity of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2010-2011The tentative, adopted and/or nal budgets are on le in the ofce of the above mentioned taxing authority as a public record.THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF ST. MARKS ARE -8.11% LESS THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES. GENERALWATERGARBAGESEWERTOTALALL Millage Rate Per $1,000 5.0327 FUNDFUNDFUNDFUNDFUNDS ESTIMATED REVENUES: Taxes: Ad Valorem Tax 150,037 150,037 Franchise Fees 30,000 30,000 UtilityTax 30,000 30,000 Communications Service Tax -8.1112,705 12,705 Licenses & Permits 4,290 4,290 Intergovernmental Revenue 36,618 36,618 Charges for Services 31,642136,62079,00096,418343,680 Miscellaneous Revenues 6,3001,500 3,60011,400 Other Sources 300300 TOTAL SOURCES 301,892138,12079,000100,018619,030 Transfers In 8,000 60,00068,000 Fund Balances/Reserves/Net Assets TOTAL REVENUES, TRANSFERS, AND BALANCES 309,892138,12079,000160,018687,030 EXPENDITURES: General Government Services 201,109 201,109 Physical Environment 1,680135,93071,000159,182367,791 Transportation Culture/Recreation 24,817 24,817 Other Nonoperating 17,40017,400 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 245,005135,93071,000159,182611,117 Transfers Out 60,000 8,000 68,000 Fund Balance 4,8862,1918367,913 TOTALAPPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES BALANCES 309,892138,12079,000160,018687,030 BUDGET SUMMARYCity of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2010-2011The tentative, adopted and/or nal budgets are on le in the ofce of the above mentioned taxing authority as a public record. SPECIAL MEETING MONDAYNovember 7, 2011 at 6:00 pm Amending Operating Budget of the City of St. Marks for Fiscal Year 2010-2011.The City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Ofce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224. NOVEMBER 3, 2011

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Crawfordville man killed in traffic crash Suspect shot trying to break into convenience store Sheriffs Report for Oct. 27 Lawsuit filed against club over wreck Ray Grays termination upheld by committee Buddy Tooke was first commercial Stone Crabber thewakullanews.com Follow us onBy JO ANN PALMERDirector, KWCB This past Saturday, Oct. 29, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Jefferson County Solid Waste and ESG Operations held their semi-annual Hazardous Waste Day. More than 215 vehicles made their way around the ESG facility to of oad a record amount of hazardous waste materials. County Commissioner Alan Brock, KWCB President Don Henderson and Secretary Bruce Ashley greeted people with a reusable shopping bag as a thank you. Board member Ray Cade directed cars to their appropriate stop and assisted with sorting and unloading. Doug Jones, Lori Gilbertson, Erica Morse, Woody Palmer, Sherri Kraeft, Marc Dickieson, Mrs. Cleve Fleming and Director Jo Ann Palmer stuffed bags, kept count of the vehicles and answered many questions about the event. Several times during the morning we had cars backed up to Trice Lane, but everyone was patient because they appreciated the opportunity to clean out their garage, attic and in at least one case, their barn. Wakulla High School NJROTC Cadets Blake Bonts, Chris Broussard, Cody Daugherty, Matthew Freeman, Allison Gordon, James Gunn, Mark Hill, Sean Hill, Danielle Howell, Gabe Hutchins, Stanley Linton, Brantley Lockwood, Brandon McCauley, David Moss, Dilyn Sharp, Jacob Sizemore, Riley Welch and former cadet Patrick Fleming, under the direction of Capt. Ron Huddleston, worked tirelessly during the entire event. They unloaded cars in line, pulled and sorted paint cans, stacked electronics and did whatever they were asked. They are a great group of young people and we always appreciate their commitment to KWCB. According to Roller, the lead man on site for Veolia, their truck was full. They pulled away at exactly 1 p.m. with 11 pallets of electronics, which included old televisions, computer parts, lamps, and small appliances, 34 boxes of orescent light tubes and 150 pounds of non-PCP batteries. Thats a total of 1,470 burned out lights the majority of them coming from our local county of ces and public schools. The Environmental Quality Company, out of Tampa, pulled away loaded with 47 full drums. Nathan Ehnis, the eld chemist, calculated the weight of every item placed in the drums. The list included 4.090 pounds of ammable liquids, propane, toxic, oxidizing and chemicals solids, lithium, acid and solid based batteries. They collected 1,230 gallons of ammable, toxic and acid liquids. The most unusual item was several gallons and 8 pounds of DDT, which was banned in the U.S. in 1972. Sam and John from Jefferson County hauled away latex paint this year, estimated at 1,225 gallons and three re extinguishers. ESG staff Brent Pell, Marvin Lee, Jeff Bearden and Mike King stacked paint into the huge containers using the forklift, shuf ed heavy equipment, helped the cadets sort and stack paint, answered countless questions, kept everyone safe around their facility. Cleve Fleming was the all around go-to man. He had stayed up a great deal of the night smoking Boston butts for a fundraiser for the United Way. Several people pulled though the line looking for their butt. The rst couple of times took us by surprise until we got the story. Cleve provided donuts and pizza for all of us, which is always appreciated, especially by hungry teenagers. Jimmy Freeman of J&K Petroleum from Cairo, Ga., said it was one of the better years. He collected approximately 150 gallons of used oils, fuels, gasoline and diesel. Waste Pro has a couple of full roll-offs from all the other stuff people brought. So many people expressed their appreciation for what KWCB is doing and encouraged us to keep up the good work. Most people said they come every time we hold the amnesty event, and that they start collecting for the next event right way. Although it is important to think of everything before disposing of it, it is especially important to keep fluorescent lights, including the new smaller ones, batteries of any kind, oil, solvents, antifreeze, gas, diesel and every chemical out of the land ll. Thank you to everyone who came out both to help, and dispose of hazardous waste. If you have any questions or comments, please contact Keep Wakulla County Beautiful at helpkwcb@gmail. com or by phone at (850) 735-7111. Remember, reuse where possible, reduce your personal trash and recycle. Its good for everyone. Editor, The News: Thank you so much for your article in Wakulla News about Domestic Violence. We have an annual event called Healing Night that offers a chance for women to express their healing using art, writing, songs or performance. It is free and when I saw your article I knew I had to let you know about it. It is in Tallahassee, but we could have it in Wakulla County if there was enough interest. HEALING NIGHT 2011 Contact us if you would like to participate as a writer, performer or artist. We are looking for all types of creative expression. We want all levels of expertise. This is an event for women who use any art form as an expression of healing from the experience of emotional or physical abuse. It is a powerful display of triumphant journeys. Women are invited to display any type of creative object, read their written work or act in any type of performance piece they choose while in the company of other supportive women. And they can just show up as well. Tell a friend. So many women have experienced a deeper healing through their participation and attendance at Healing Night, an annual event dedicated to women. If you have heard of Healing Night you know how powerful this experience is. Have you written something? Painted something? Have you thought of ways to express your experience of healing? Come join us for another year when women reach another level of their authentic self. It is free. Also, Vickie Spray will facilitate a free (donations accepted) workshop the following day at the same location. Opening Reception Ar tists Exhibit will be held Saturday, Nov. 5, beginning at 6 p.m. at Abundance Wellness Center, 325 John Knox Road, Building T, in Tallahassee. How Many Freaken Layers Are There? A Spiritual Approach to Healing, a workshop facilitated by Vickie Spray, will be held on Sunday, Nov. 6 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the same location. Please contact us if you would like to be a presenter: Vickie Spray at 322-6944 vickiespray@yourlifeexpressions.com Robin McDougall at 2120760 robin.mcdougall@comcast.org Vickie Spray Tallahassee Editor, The News: A big thank you to everyone involved in making the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival a huge success. The support, participation and the hard work of our festival committee is appreciated beyond the point that words can express. The support of our sponsors helps make this event happen for our community and for the enjoyment of all who attend. Thanks to our shermen for the hard work in going out and harvesting the Stone Crabs for all to enjoy. Thanks to our food vendors for supplying fantastic foods and our arts and crafts vendors in providing handmade items that you can only nd at events like this. The Kids Zone provided by Coast Charter School was a fun place to be with all the activities for children to enjoy. But, most of all we want to thank the many people who attended and enjoyed the glorious blessing of a beautiful day with great food, shopping, entertainment and fun. For anyone who was there, you know the result was over the top, and outstanding. To all of these groups and those who attended, we of the St. Marks Stone Crab Committee, wish to extend our heartfelt gratitude, and thanks for making this great event such a success. Thank you. Sincerely, Mike Pruitt Chairman St. Marks Stone Crab Committee Editor, The News: The Volunteer Fire Department of Panacea hosted a wonderful haunted house that many of us thoroughly enjoyed. Thanks to the volunteers and their families for all their efforts in creating a thrill-seekers delight! Lynette Coleman lynette.coleman@gmail.com Editor, The News: A benefit fish fry will be held on Saturday, Nov. 12, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville for the family of Jeanine and Jeff Posey. Jeanine was involved in a serious accident in Perry earlier this month that broke her back and left her paralyzed from the waist down. She and her husband Jeff are currently in Atlanta at Shepards Spinal Cord Clinic where Jeanine will go through extensive therapy and wheelchair training. During their time in Atlanta, neither Jeanine nor Jeff will be able to work. The Nov. 12 benefit is being held to raise funds to help defray the costs of their situation, and to help with the expense of revamping their home to make it wheelchair accessible. The benefit will include food (either fried mullet or pulled pork), entertainment by the Coon Bottom Creek Band and Jerry Evans, a bake sale and yard sale, and face painting and other activities for the kids. Come out and spend the day having fun, and help a local family in their time of need. Thank you in advance.Friends and family of Jeanine Aber-PoseyEditor, The News: My wife has put out Halloween decorations for children since my son was a small child. The past 11 years, we have lived on Tiger Hammock Road. She has put the decorations out and someone stole the Frankenstein decoration we have had for more than 11 years. She is very sad about this and we hoped they would return it. Charles S. Gunter Crawfordville Garbage cans lined up on the road, and what a bear sees.READERS WRITE:Fish fry set to bene t Jeanine Aber-Posey Haunted House was thoroughly enjoyed anks for support of Stone Crab Festival Join us for Healing Night in Tallahassee ief, return Halloween decorationsRecord amount of stu brought in for Hazardous Waste Day JO ANN PALMERCounty commissioner Alan Brock greets KWCB President Don Henderson as he drives up at Hazardous Waste Day on Saturday.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 5A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netResidents, community leaders and advocates gathered at dusk on Oct. 27 to remember those friends, family and loved ones who have been lost to drugs and alcohol and those who are currently struggling with addiction, as well as those who have overcome the disease. The Narcotics Overdose and Prevention and Education Task Force held its third annual candlelight vigil under the pavilion at Hudson Park during Red Ribbon Week, sponsored by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, Disc Village and Big Bend Community Based Care. Gayle Myers of Disc Village said drug overdose is becoming the leading cause of death in the United States. According to NOPEs website, drug overdose deaths are second only to car crashes for unintentional injury deaths. Were going to remember that tonight as we remember those lost, Myers said. The vigils goal is to create awareness about this disease and in turn hopefully eliminate the prejudice that surrounds addiction, which will give hope for survival, according to the website. A video played in the background during the event, showing the names and faces of those who have died around the nation from drug overdose. Family and friends were asked to submit a photo for the memorial video of their loved one. Only a few were submitted from Wakulla County. Judge Jill Walker was the guest speaker for the event and stressed the importance of early prevention and education. Tonight is one of life and death, Judge Walker said. Theres something about putting a face to a very tragic issue that makes it very real for everyone. Walker said young people need to be taught at an early age the dangers of drugs and alcohol and learn the signs of a possible overdose. Prescription drugs have become a huge issue and Oxycodone is one of the most misused drugs, she said. We need to stop the grocery shopping of prescription drugs, Walker said. Walker also spoke of juvenile drug court and the positive effects it has on those teenagers who partake in it. She said those who enter drug court are all different, many who would never be suspected of being a drug user. Theres no single face to drug abuse, Walker said. When someone is showing signs of drug abuse, Walker said the community needs to offer help and support, not ignore the signs. Addiction is a disease, it isnt a character flaw, Walker said. At the end of drug court, Walker makes each participant write an essay about what the class taught them. She shared a few excerpts from those essays during the vigil. One student said, I was a lost soul drowning myself with my own destruction. Walker said those in the community need to continue to bring a better life to those who are addicted. A time was also given for those in the community to give testimonials. Only two people spoke, but their words were powerful. Rachel Ward said she was an addict for several years and didnt make the decision to get sober until the state took her son away from her. She is now sober and about to graduate from Sisters in Sobriety. She has also recently been awarded custody of her son. It is possible, Ward said. Dont lose hope. A man, also an addict, spoke of hope. He told those in attendance not to give up on their loved ones. But told them an addict has to want to change. Following the testimonials, Pastor Jeff McFalls spoke of his 10-year struggle with addiction and his 20plus years of sobriety. He said to remember the good times and good memories of those who have been taken. You can keep them alive in your memory, McFalls said. After the program, all were invited to light a candle and gather in a circle under the night sky for a moment of silence. Afterwards, Superintendent of Schools David Miller played Taps on the trumpet. Ward said she decided to come to the vigil because a part of rehab is about giving back to the community. She wanted to share her story to let those who are suffering know that it is possible and there is hope. How else are they going to know? Ward said. She added that someone might connect with her story and thats whats important, to know that there is someone to talk to who can relate to them. For more information about NOPE, visit www. nopetaskforce.org or call 866-612-NOPE or 926-0024.Candlelight vigil held to remember those lost to addiction KEEPING VIGIL: Members of the community with candles, top; the votive candles are passed out, middle; and Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker, below. 0009ATETravelingJarforChange! Give To Sponsored byDonate Your Change atNew Location EVERY Week! The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com harvestdonations@yahoo.com Check out our Buy One Get One FREE rack. HATS US 98 PANACEAWARM WINTER HATSCLEANING/BLOCKINGColorful Bandannas! PANACEA HATSAFACT TWO FRIENDS CONSIGNMEN T Weve Moved Downtown to Crawfordville at the light.850-926-1825 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon.Color Tag 50%OFFTues.----Seniors 25%OFFThurs.---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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Anne R. HutchinsAnne Rozier Hutchins, 87, of Eastpoint, passed away on Oct. 28 in Crawfordville. She was born in Atlanta, Ga., and had been a resident of Eastpoint since 2003. She was a member of Northside Drive Baptist Church in Atlanta. She graduated from Atlanta School of Law. She was a secretary for Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company for 25 years. Graveside services were held Wednesday, Nov. 2, at Westview Cemetery in Atlanta. Survivors include her husband, Ralph K. Hutchins of Eastpoint; two sons, John H. Hutchins (Sue) of Crawfordville and Joseph R. Hutchins (Melanie) of Douglasville, Ga.; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a son, Ken Hutchins, in 1956. Bevis Funeral Home-Harvey Young Chapel was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333).Mack M. LuckettMack McCabe Luckett, 91, of Panacea, passed away on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. His daughter and good friends were with him. He was born Oct. 26, 1920, in West Madison, Ind., where he later farmed for many years. He bought two farms, renovated them and sold each at a pro t. He was an avid hunter and sherman. He was a World War II veteran and served overseas as a paratrooper and in the Armed Guard. He was also a 32 Degree Mason. His father died early on, and he was working to help support his family by the time he was 15 years old. These were hard times. He ran traplines and later planted trees with the CCC. His many occupations included the railroad, construction supervisor, employment in two mental hospitals, and the Tennessee Valley Authority at Land Between The Lakes, now a state park. He and wife Catherine moved to Wakulla County 27 years ago. He grew a large garden and had fruit trees. She canned a lot, they gave a lot away. He loved his dogs, good music and his family. He was a voracious reader. He traded stories of his life with many friends. He was happiest working in his garden with his little dog Maggie nearby. He was a good friend, neighbor and father. He will be dearly missed. A memorial service was held Saturday, Oct. 29, at Ochlockonee Bay Methodist Church. Survivors include his daughter, Barbara Robinson (Butch); three stepchildren, Linda Lorentzen, Carol Bell, and Jim Cline; grandsons, John, Randy, and Chris Cleveland, Bobby, Gary and Stevie Luckett; one granddaughter, Pam Luckett; several great-grandchildren; and one sister. He was predeceased by his sons, Mack Jr. and Walter Luckett; a grandson, Jeff Luckett; rst wife and mother of his children, Louise E. Bennett Luckett; and second wife, Catherine Luckett. Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationAnne Rozier Hutchins Mack McCabe Luckett Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Coastal Church News Some upcoming events happening at Wakulla United Methodist Church, located at 1584 Old Woodville Road: Sunday, Nov. 6, at 4:30 p.m. Chancel Choir Practice. Monday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. Busy Bee Crafters Create your Own Wreath. Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 6 p.m. Praise Team Practice. Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 6 a.m. Mens Bible Study and Breakfast Meeting (8 a.m.). Thursday, Nov. 10, at 9 a.m Busy Bee Quilters. The church can be reached at 4215741.Upcoming events at Wakulla UMCSome upcoming events happening at Wakulla United Methodist Church, located at 1584 Old Woodville Road: Sunday, Nov. 6, at 4:30 p.m. Chancel Choir practice. Monday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. Busy Bee Crafters Create Your Own Wreath. Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 6 p.m. Praise Team practice. Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 6 a.m. Mens Bible study and breakfast meeting (8 a.m.). Thursday, Nov. 10, at 9 a.m Busy Bee Quilters. The church can be reached at 4215741.Volunteers collecting gifts for needyWhile many Crawfordville families are busy with holiday activities, a group of local volunteers is focused on lling empty shoe boxes with school supplies, toys, hygiene items and notes of encouragement for needy kids overseas. Crawfordville families are participating in the worlds largest Christmas project of its kind Operation Christmas Child an effort that has hand-delivered 86 million gifts to kids worldwide since 1993. This year-round project of Samaritans Purse is coming to its peak, as local businesses, churches and schools prepare to collect gift- lled shoe boxes during National Collection Week, Nov. 14-21. Volunteers can drop off their shoe box gifts at one bustling location in the area to help kids in 100 countries know they are loved and not forgotten. The local drop off site is Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee St. in Crawfordville, on weekdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon, and on Sundays from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Operation Christmas Child, a project of international Christian relief and evangelism organization Samaritans Purse, uses whatever means necessary to reach suffering children around the world with these gifts of hope, including sea containers, trucks, trains, airplanes, boats, camels and dog sleds. Tracking technology also allows donors to follow their box to the destination country where it will be hand-delivered to a child in need. To register shoe box gifts and nd out the destination country, use the Follow Your Box donation form found at www.samaritanspurse.org/occ. Regular Sunday Services and Times8:30 am Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship Service 6 pm Evening Service 7 pm Discipleship Training(On Hwy. 319 one block south of the Courthouse)850-926-7896 office www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Panacea Full Gospel Assembly12 Taylor Street, Panacea Park Homecoming Revival October 31 November 4 7 P.M. Nightly Special Singing NightlyEVERY ONE WELCOME! GOSPEL SINGMt. Beasor Primitive Baptist Church invites you to join them for a Gospel Sing on Saturday, November 5th at 6:00 p.m. featuring Broken Strings from Coffee County, Alabama. Broken Strings is an acoustic band that enjoys playing Front Porch Style gospel music. Mt. Beasor P.B. Church is located at 29 Wintrhop Avenue in Sopchoppy.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 7AhappeningsCommunityLong weds Shayna Seres at Bradleys Pond Shayna N. Seres and Thomas A. Long Shayna Nicole Seres and Thomas Austin Long, both of Crawfordville, were married on Oct. 9 at Bradleys Pond in Tallahassee. The ceremony was performed by Pastor John Johnson. The bride is the daughter of Gary Seres and Carma Gordon. She is a graduate of Wakulla High School and Tallahassee Community College. The groom is the son of Tommy Long, Debra Gatlin and Mike Gatlin. He is also a graduate of Wakulla High School. The maid of honor was Elizabeth McCabe and the best man was Levi Workowski, the brother of the bride. The bridesmaids were Amanda Smith, Trista Seres, sister of the bride, Jillian Valim and Kelly Carnivalle. The junior bridesmaid was Macy Musgrove. The groomsmen were Justin Branch, Ben Strickland, Mac Rudd and Matt Greene. The ring bearer was Dex Teat. The couple said of each other that this was the best catch of their lives.Big Brothers Big Sisters sh fry will be Nov. 8Special to The NewsWakulla Countys Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Program will host its second annual Big Catch Charity Fish Fry on Tuesday, Nov. 8 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Presented by Waste Pro USA, the dinner event will take place at Poseys Dockside Caf located at 99 Rock Landing Road in Panacea. The events purpose is to raise awareness about Big Brothers Big Sisters in Wakulla County, to raise funds for the growing youth mentoring program and to bring the community together for dinner on a Tuesday night. The sh fry will feature shrimp plates, sides and iced tea catered by Poseys, beer for purchase, and live music by The Possums, Brandon Strickland, Cody Solburg and Brian White in a relaxing, family-friendly environment. Youth mentoring advocate, Commissioner Alan Brock, said, Wakulla County has welcomed Big Brothers Big Sisters with open arms. As the agency concludes its rst year in the county, serving more children is its top priority. The agency still needs more volunteer mentors, both men and women, to pair with children on its waiting list. We hope the Big Catch Charity Fish Fry will create greater awareness and raise donations to help with volunteer recruitment and ongoing case management. Building awareness and raising sustainable funding will be key to our future growth, said Big Brothers Big Sisters chief executive officer, Louis Garcia. The concept is simple, said longtime Wakulla County resident and program coordinator, Stacy Harvey. After meeting with their mentors twice monthly for a year, children experience improved self-con dence, improved relationships with guardians, teachers and peers, avoidance of risky behaviors, and improved academic outcomes. Plainly put, our program works. The rst one hundred Big Catch Charity Fish Fry tickets are $10 for two tickets. Guests may secure discounted tickets at Poseys Steam Room (1506 Coastal Highway), Poseys Dockside Caf (99 Rock Landing Road,) or by calling Harvey at 366-3865. Regular tickets are available at those locations or at www.bbbs. org/BIGCatch. For ticket information or to learn more, contact Harvey at wakulla@ bbbsbigbend.org or 366-3865. Wakulla performers in Carrabelle for festivalSteve Stange and Janice McFarland, of Wakulla, singing songs, sea shanties and telling tall tales at the Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival in Carrabelle on Oct. 15.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNora Duncan joins Society of Collegiate ScholarsNora Duncan of Crawfordville recently accepted membership in the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. She will be honored at South University Onlines induction in the fall. NSCS is the only interdisciplinary honors organization for rst and second year students. Membership is invitation only, based on a grade point average and class standing. Senior Service Day will be held at the Senior Center, 22 Michael Drive, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with the Area Agency on Aging. There will be application services for Medicare, home energy assistance, ampli ed telephone distribution, Medicaid and food stamp assistance. Bring a form of identi cation for application services. Senior Service Day Nov. 8 Find us on Today you are all of the memories, people, and places that have made you who you are...Today you are a million precious things, and a hundred different reasons to smile and wish and dream about...Today all the people you know and love are thinking about you! As you celebrate 70 years, its a day to look back on the good things the years have brought, and a day to look forward toall thegood times to come... and most of all, its a day to celebrate the special person you are.Happy 70th Birthday Granny Grannys 70th Birthday Party Nov. 6, 2011 from 1pm 3pm

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolMohr is Project Learning Tree Educator of the Year SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Special to The NewsMedart Elementary School teacher Brooke Mohr was recently recognized as the 2011 Project Learning Tree Educator of the Year. Mohr will be presented with her award on Nov. 5 at the Riverside Retreat in Labelle during the Florida Project Learning Tree Professional Development Conference. She was awarded a full scholarship, which includes the cost of registration and lodging, to attend the workshop. Funds were also provided for a substitute teacher so Mohr could attend the conference on Nov. 4 and 5. Robin Will submitted the nomination and the PLT committee said it was aware of the many contributions Mohr has made to PLT. Medart Principal Bobby Pearce, Project Learning Tree Educator of the Year Brooke Mohr, Superintendent of Schools David Miller and Chairman of the School Board Mike Scott. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Middle School bandsWMS bands have upcoming performancesSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Middle Schools bands are off to a very busy start this year. The seventh and eighth grade bands have played at four football games this fall and the eighth graders are played at a high school game on Oct. 21. The eighth graders will also be performing at the Wakulla Middle School Veterans Day program on Nov. 10 and will go on a eld trip to play for the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center on Dec. 8. The seventh graders will be traveling to perform for the SEC preschool children on Dec. 15. The sixth grade band will have their musical debut on Nov. 14 in their fall concert at Wakulla Middle School. They will have a eld trip to perform for the residents at Eden Springs on Nov. 17. The winter concert for the seventh, eighth and jazz bands will be on Dec. 5 at Wakulla Middle School. Band director, Laura Hudson, is very happy to have a Florda A&M University student intern, Shelvin Robinson, working with the Wakulla Middle School band program this fall. Our band students are thriving at WMS and much of their success is due to the enthusiasm and expertise that Mr. Robinson brings to our program, Hudson said. I hope many people will have the opportunity to hear our students perform at one of their concerts this semester.Minshew will serve on Youth Advocacy BoardSpecial to The NewsFloridas Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) kicked off the new school year with a fresh start by introducing new members for its Youth Advisory Board. Ashlynn Minshew of Wakulla County was named Youth Advocacy Board Member. She will serve as one of three representatives for the Northern Region of Florida SWAT. This will be her rst year on the board. The mission of SWAT is to mobilize, educate and equip Florida youth to revolt against and de-glamorize the use of tobacco. They are a united movement of empowered youth working towards a tobacco-free future. The Youth Advocacy Board works in collaboration with the Florida Department of Healths Bureau of Tobacco Prevention Program and Tobacco Free Florida to determine the direction and scope of both the SWAT organization and the youth tobacco prevention component of the statewide media campaign. Few words can completely describe the excitement I feel about the upcoming year, Minshew said. I look forward to working together with the statewide board to change opinions about tobacco and help our peers make informed decisions about tobacco use. Members of the SWAT Youth Advocacy Board will serve a term through June 30, 2012. Youth advocates play a key role in changing perceptions about tobacco in our state, said Deputy Secretary Kim Ber eld. These ambitious students have the energy, passion and knowledge to create positive results and in uence in both their peers and the community as a whole. Wakulla Middle School student Ashlynn Minshew will be one of three representatives for the Northern Region of Floridas Students Working Against Tobacco. Open enrollment for Florida Prepaid College Plans beginsThe Florida Prepaid College Board annual enrollment period began on Oct. 17, which means parents can purchase a Prepaid College Plan to prepay higher education costs at this years plan prices until the Jan. 31, 2012, deadline. Plans will include tuition and most mandatory fees, as well as the 4-Year Florida College Plan, which was launched in 2010 in response to the evolving Florida College landscape. The Florida Prepaid College Boards plan options include: 2-Year Florida College Plan: prepays 60 lower division semester hours of tuition, registration fees and local fees at a Florida College. 4-Year Florida College Plan: prepays the tuition, registration fees and local fees for 60 lower division as well as 60 upper division semester hours at a Florida College. 2 + 2 Florida Plan: prepays 60 lower division semester hours of tuition, registration fees and local fees at a Florida College and 60 undergraduate semester hours of tuition, registration fees, tuition differential fee and local fees at a Florida state university. 4-Year Florida University Plan: prepays tuition, registration fees, the tuition differential fee and local fees for 120 semester hours at any of the 11 state universities in Florida. For more information on plan options or to sign up online for the Florida Prepaid College Plan, visit www.my oridaprepaid.com or call 1-800-552-4723. Wakulla Weight Loss located at2615 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite103, Crawfordville, FL 32327850-926-3140 opt2 November Specials Purchase a water bottle and get a Mic-combo shot for free. Save $5 on a bottle of Calcium Pyruvate. Buy one bottle of multivitamins and get one for FREE Prepay for 3 regular visits and receive one visit FREE. Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FLA volunteer effort sponsored by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, a partnership of 30 agencies and providers serving the needs of youth and families in Wakulla County.Last year Operation Santa helped 48 families in Wakulla experience the joy of Christmas and this year would like to help even more. But we need your help!What you can do to help:Identify families who have a need and help them with a condential Assistance Application. Ask your church family to assist. Adopt a family, ask a business or friends to adopt a family. Ask for help at meetings you attend.Donate and ask for donations cash will be used to shop for needed items.Sign up to staff the Operation Santa Store the rst two weeks in December to assemble Christmas boxes, shop for families and various other volunteer duties. Families in need will be helped on an appointment basis.Items to Donate:Gently worn or new clothes that are clean, folded and in a box, labeled with sizes Clean, and in good repair, toys, electronics, games, bikes, books, puzzles. Household items, kitchen ware, tools, workshop items.Call 926-3526 for InformationThe Wakulla County Library is a collection point and is now open to receive donations.What you can do to volunteer and earn community service hours towards your future college scholarship:Sign up to volunteer to work with the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth sponsored Operation Santa to assemble Christmas boxes, sort and distribute items and various other volunteer duties.Call Lisa Russell at 926-7125 Ext. 319 for more information Operation Santa 2011STUDENTS!Voulunteer for Operation Santa 2011 EARN COMMUNITY SERVICE HOURS Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe CenterFull Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS TRACK COACHMembers of the WHS cross country teams competed Friday afternoon, Oct. 28, at the All-Comers Championships hosted by Maclay High School in Tallahassee. With the district meet looming next weekend, only a limited number of the varsity runners competed at this meet. The runners who did compete were ones who needed to race either for training or to help determine the line-ups for the district meet. The top ve runners for the girls had been established, so none of them competed, but the number six and seven slots were up for grabs and those spots were settled after the race. For the boys, only two of the top seven ran, with several runners battling for the number seven slot. Senior Kristie Phillips set the pace for the girls, covering the challenging course in 23:12 and grabbing the number six slot for Districts. Freshman Tyler Kinard was close behind in 23:16 and earned the number seven slot. Seniors Emily McCullers (23:56) and Norma Woodcock (24:53) were next to nish, with Savanna Strickland (26:46) rounding out the scoring for WHS. Senior David Victor (19:07) was the rst WHS nisher, with junior Hunter Phillips (19:14) and senior Zach Broadway (19:22) close behind. Others scoring for the local team were Tyler Bennett (19:45) and Brantley Lockwood (20:15). Broadways performance was an all-time personal record for him. This meet helped us answer some questions as to the line-up for the district meet and that was the main reason we went to it and ran who we did, said Coach Paul Hoover. There werent many surprises, but the performance of the meet for us had to be Zachs. He was sick for the rst month and a half of the season and is just now starting to run normally, so we were really pleased with his effort. The district meet will be contested on Saturday, Nov. 5, at the Apalachee Cross County Park east of Tallahassee, with the girls race set to start at 10:15 a.m. and the boys at 11 a.m. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy RICHARD LAWHONSpecial to The NewsAfter completing a perfect regular season district play of 4-0, the Lady War Eagles hosted the District 2 Class 5A championship on Tuesday, Oct. 25. The night would start with the Lady Raiders of Rickards playing the Lady Bulldogs of Suwannee. Suwannee would beat Rickards 3-0, leaving the Lady War Eagles to play the Lady Bulldogs in the championship match. Beginning the rst set of the championship match, the Lady War Eagles would come out playing very strong, executing on offense and defense. The Lady War Eagles took rst set 25-13. Starting the second set, with the momentum on their side, the Lady War Eagles would play even better. The Lady War Eagles dominated the set, winning 25-12. The Lady War Eagles would begin to struggle in the third set, falling behind at the beginning of this set and would not be able to close the gap, losing 17-25. As the fourth set started the Lady War Eagles came out playing their hearts out. The Lady Bulldogs fought hard to win, but just couldnt muster up enough rallies to win the championship. The Lady War Eagles would win the fourth set 2515 and the District 2 Class 5A championship to move on to the regional quarter- nals against Arnold High School on Tuesday, Nov. 1. The key players for this championship match were Ashley Roberts with 15 kills and 9 digs, Chelsea Carroll with 31 assists, 9 digs and 6 aces, Emily Haley with 9 kills, 5 digs and 5 aces, Jordan Pryor with 19 digs and Marina Petrandis with 8 kills and 5 digs.VOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles win districtWakulla County Parks and Recreation will be holding the Tackle Football Super Bowl Games at Wakulla High Schools J.D. Jones Stadium on Monday, Nov. 7, with the peewee division game at 6:15 p.m. and the junior division at 7:30 p.m. The Mustangs ended the season in rst place in the peewee division and the Bull Dogs took rst in the junior division. Teams will play in a single elimination playoff scheduled this week to determine who will play for the Super Bowl trophy.Super Bowl set for Nov. 7TACKLE FOOTBALLThe Lady War Eagles were scheduled to play regional playoff on Tuesday, Nov. 1. Check our website for results. LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCora Atkinson, Margaret Wiedeman, Tyler Kinard run through the water hazard.CROSS COUNTRYRunners compete at the All-Comers Championships By JOE JACOBSRMS Head CoachOn Thursday night, Oct. 27, the Riversprings Bears traveled to boot hill to play the Broncos for the Western Division title of the Florida Star Conference, and the right to play in the conference championship game. Riversprings fans were not disappointed, as the Bears defeated Madison 344. Coach Joey Jacobs said, Our defense played outstanding, and our quarterback (Feleip Franks) was phenomenal. Franks and his trusty receivers lit up the Madison County defense. He was 6 of 11 for 211 yards and 4 touchdowns. Franks would set a new RMS record for passing yardage in a game, previously held by former RMS and Wakulla High School great Cory Eddinger. Keith Gavin was Franks favorite target, catching three passes for 145 yards (another RMS record) and two touchdowns. Jacob Austin caught two passes for 71 yards and two touchdowns. Running back Demarcus Lindsey led all rushers with 5 carries for 64 yards and a touchdown. In all, the Bears produced 333 yards of total offense. The defense provided stout resistance against the Madison squad. The Bears were led defensively by linebacker Monterious Loggins, who had eight tackles (three of which were for a loss) and two assists. Big Kyle Weaver finished with five tackles and three assists. Antonio Morris and Isaiah Youmas also made their presence known on the defensive side of the ball. Morris had four tackles and three assists, while Youmas had three tackles, four assists, a forced fumble and two fumble recoveries. The win over Madison sets up a showdown for the conference championship between Riversprings and Lake City Middle at J.D. Jones Stadium at Wakulla High School on Friday, Nov. 4. The game will be at 7 p.m.MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLRMS beats Madison, 34-14The Bears will play Friday, Nov. 4, at J.D. Jones Stadium at 7 p.m. against Lake City Middle. A normal days activities put several hundred tons of force on your feet. So its no surprise that foot ailments are such a common and painful health problem. But there is help. Point your feet in the direction of Dr. Derickson, a podiatrist at Capital Regional Medical Group and see for yourself, foot pain does not have to be a fact of life. But healthy feet can be. For more information, call us today. No referral necessary.Now taking patients in Crawfordville. 2nd and 4th Tuesday every month from 2-4pm. Considering the miles you put on your feet,no wonder they break down sometimes. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite D | CapitalRegionalMedicalGroup.com CRAWFORDVILLEKevin Derickson, DPM 850-878-8235 CAP-886PodiatryPrintB&W.indd1 10/31/1110:34:56AM 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95

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Wakulla High School vs. Godby for District Championship Thursday!By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles improved their record to 6-2 with a win over Trinity Christian to celebrate homecoming on Friday, Oct. 28. The win set up a big showdown for the district championship with the upcoming game on Thursday night, Nov. 3, in Tallahassee against rival Godby High School. The War Eagle defense gave up a couple of touchdowns in the rst half to a tough-running Trinity team. Then Wakullas defense seemed to wake up, getting back to the hard-hitting, shutdown defense theyve played for the past couple weeks. The game was also notable for the running attack of Deonte Hutchinson who scored a couple of touchdowns. It was a good win for us, said War Eagle Head Coach Scott Klees. Wakulla has so many offensive weapons workhorse running back Will Thomas, the lightning quick Marshane Godbolt, and the deep threat of quarterback Caleb Stephens throwing to receiver Lyntonio Bowdrie. While Hutchinson has been in the mix of weapons, and has often shined as a kick returner, it was a breakout game for him as a running back. Each week, its been somebody different, Klees noted. He joked that it appeared hes not doing his job as coach, that he should be giving the ball more to Hutchinson and Godbolt since they seem to score every time they touch it. Part of what set up Hutchinsons break-out game was Trinity trying to load up to take away the big play threat of Godbolt. Offensively, if you take away one guy, were going to run the other way, Klees said. And they spent all night taking out Marshane, he said, which left Hutchinson to rumble. Quarterback Stephens went 4 for 7 on the night with 61 yards passing and 2 TDs. Thomas carried the ball 13 times for 138 yards and a touchdown. Hutchinson touched the ball six times and gained 156 yards and scored two touchdowns. Bowdrie caught a TD pass, as did Brandon Nichols. And reserve running back Sheldon Johnson got some playing time in the fourth quarter, running twice for 13 yards and a touchdown. Wakulla drew rst blood with a nice drive to start the game that culminated in a quick ve-yard TD pass from Stephens to Bowdrie. Kicker Conner Smith added the extra point to Wakulla up 7-0. Trinity answered with an 85-yard scoring drive of its own, but missed the extra point to make it 7-6. After a muffed kickoff was recovered by Trinity, they mounted a drive to score to start the second quarter. With a two-point conversion, they were up 14-7. On the War Eagles ensuing drive, Hutchinson broke a big run to get the ball into Trinity territory and then Stephens threw a long touchdown pass to receiver Brandon Nichols. The everreliable Smith added the extra point to tie it at 14. Wakulla wore down Trinity after that. After a couple of back-and-forth turnovers, Hutchinson tore off a 75yard run for a touchdown to put the War Eagles up 21-14. Trinity tried to respond, but the War Eagles intercepted a fourth down pass with just 1:10 remaining in the half. Back on offense, Godbolt tore off a long run down the eld to Trinitys 10. A couple of plays later, Hutchinson took it in from there leaving a trail of would-be tacklers behind him. At halftime, Wakulla was up 28-14. In the third-quarter, Trinitys running attack was still proving somewhat troublesome. On the other side of the ball, Hutchinson made a touchdown-saving tackle. In the fourth quarter, Thomas took the ball in from the 3 to score, and the War Eagles were up 35-14. Reserve players took the field after that, and running back Sheldon Johnson scored on an impressive 10yard run with 5:34 remaining in the game to make it 42-14. LOOKING TO GODBY It should be a good game, Klees said of Thursday nights game against Godby to decide the district champion. Weve got to play our best game offensively, defensively and on special teams, Klees said. If we do, weve got a great chance. Its been a challenge having a shorter week to practice, the coach said. Wakulla plays Godby at Gene Cox Stadium in Tallahassee at 7 p.m. Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsWar Eagles celebrate Homecoming with a 42-14 win WILLIAM SNOWDENReserve running back Sheldon Johnson reaches across the goal line to score on a 10 yard run in the fourth quarter. WILLIAM SNOWDENDeonte Hutchinson leaves a trail of would-be tacklers in his wake on his way to the end zone for one of his two touchdowns of the night. BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWar Eagle Head Coach Scott Klees talks to the team.Wakulla trounces Trinity Christian in a breakout game for Deonte Hutchinson, who gains 156 yards on six carries UP NEXT: Godby to decide the district champion on Thursday, Nov. 3 at Gene Cox Stadium in Tallahassee at 7 p.m. Players of the WeekDefense O ense Special TeamsDAMONTE MORRIS Klees said Morris plays hard every down. DEONTE HUTCHINSON 6 carries for 156 yards, 2 TDs TAMARICK HOLMES 8 tackles including a sack and 3 tackles for a lossMore photos at thewakullanews.com Wakulla High SchoolLady War Eagles District Champions Wakulla High School War Eagles JV Football GOES UNDEFEATED! Good Luck!Riversprings Middle School Bears vs. Lake City for Conference Friday! www.hicksair.com McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brak es Batteries Radia tors Wat er Pum ps Hub Bea rings Star ters Alterna tors and mor e!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093 Workout, lose weight Each class feelsLIKE A PARTY!Saturdays 9AM-10AM (T.B.A.) Thursdays 6:30PM-7:30PMat VFW POST 4538, 475 Arran Rd., CrawfordvilleKim Crum 251-9195 Pam Chichester 459-5279 visit us on facebook Congratulations TheWakulla newsfrom your fans at

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 911AFlorida State at Boston CollegeThursday, 8 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPN.In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate Duke at MiamiSaturday, 3 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPN3.Vanderbilt at Florida Saturday, 12:20 p.m. The game can be seen on WCTV.By MARTY COHENof GatorBaitJACKSONVILLE Understandably there is reason for Georgia to celebrate any win over Florida after all, the Dawgs have now claimed just four victories in the last 22 meetings in this series. But the way a host of Georgia players frolicked around the eld at the conclusion of the cringe-inducing 24-20 victory Saturday night, jumping up in the stands to rejoice with their fans, you would have thought the release of pent-up emotion followed a triumph of the ages. Well. this was hardly a replica of Game Six of the recent World Series, OK. This was horrible football from start to nish, with Georgia winding up just a little less awful than Florida in coming out with a victory that keeps the Dawgs in the race for the East title. And if the Dawgs should make it to Atlanta, to face either Alabama or LSU, lets open the point spread at about 50. The Dawgs were able to out-terrible the Gators and we suppose, given the lack of anything to truly rejoice over during the last four seasons, success in this venue warrants, perhaps, some divine exultation for the Georgia folks. To God be the glory, was actually the way Georgia head coach Mark Richt opened his postgame press conference. Really? After that game? Well, I dont want to sound blasphemous, but we heard outside the Florida locker room that God actually turned the contest off at halftime, after watching these two lousy clubs slog their way through 30 minutes of football. (Im just kidding, please dont take this crack the wrong way.) Richt went on to explain the secular signi cance of the circumstance, and why the outcome was so vital to Georgia. Im thankful for what just happened, said Richt, who certainly should be. I know it was just a ballgame, but it seemed like a lot more than that. Just to see our players and fans celebrate in this place especially was awesome. Im very glad to be a part of this today. In hindsight I can say this now that its over, but this was more than just another game to win and keep pace in the Eastern Division. You could see it with our guys, but we didnt try to make it any bigger than it needed to be. We wanted them to focus on their jobs, and I thought they did that. OK, so maybe that explains the Dawgs postgame revelry, but after the 60 minutes of agonizing football for Florida, its getting more dif cult to try and offer any perspective for the October spiral. The Gators have lost four straight for the rst time since 1988, and are staring down the barrel at the possibility of the rst losing season since the infamous 0-10-1 campaign of 1979. And its getting near-impossible to watch. Yes quarterback John Brantley returned and put forth a courageous effort, playing on a bad wheel for the rst time since going down near halftime against Alabama four weeks ago. Brantley supplied an early jolt to a staggering offense that eventually sunk under the weight of its own ineptitude. It was an embarrassing offensive effort, as the Gators were credited with minus-19 yards rushing, and even if you factor out the sacks and a 10-yard loss on a poor shotgun snap, Floridas running backs managed just 34 yards in 15 attempts. The lone positive running play was emblematic of the entire afternoon, a 17-yard run by Chris Rainey that ended with a fumble deep in Gator territory shortly before halftime, perhaps the pivotal mistake (and de nitely the most inexcusable) in a game lled with dozens of miscues. Offensively, Florida mustered an incredible 19 snaps (or almost snaps) that lost yardage, either through negative plays or penalties. Nineteen! Offensive coordinator Charlie Weis moved up to the press box for this game, offering a different perspective than he got from the sidelines, where hed been the rst seven contests. Maybe for Homecoming this Saturday he can watch the game from a couch in his of ce, because the further away from this ugly offense the better. It was a collectively abysmal effort on the offensive side, as the star of September Rainey became the goat of late October. The likable Rainey had a forgettable afternoon, unable to come up with a pair of passes that likely would have been touchdowns, on top of the egregious fumble. With Florida leading 17-3 and two minutes before halftime, Rainey tried to make something happen on a third-and-22 from the Gator 8-yard line. While doing his whirling dervish running and carrying the ball loosely, Rainey had the ball dislodged and with it, UFs fortunes began to crumble. A cringe-inducing loss A cringe-inducing loss By TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaThe sti ing run defense, stout secondary and physical hitting that Florida States defense has become accustomed to the last few weeks were all present Saturday afternoon at Doak Campbell Stadium. Weve been this defense all year. The difference between now and the rst games is we werent able to get turnovers, safety Lamarcus Joyner said. If you dont get turnovers, all of a sudden you get points on the board. So with the turnovers we got today, that was just a great improvement for the defense. And thats what weve been focusing on. And this time, for a welcome change, so too were the turnovers. Three of them, to be exact the most the Seminoles have forced this season. Each, two interceptions and a fumble recovery, were a part of a dominant effort by FSUs defense in a 34-0 victory over North Carolina State. Turnovers have been a bit of a sore spot for defensive coordinator Mark Stoop group. FSU had forced just nine turnovers against 14 committed coming into Saturdays contest. The Seminoles bad turnover luck bordered on star-crossed when, in the second quarter, safety Lamarcus Joyner appeared to have his third interception near the sideline. Instead, replay showed that Joyner bobbled the ball as he fell out of bounds. No possession and no interception. The Seminoles, though, made things right later in the quarter when Glennon sailed a deep, rst-down pass over his receivers head and into the waiting arms of Florida States Xavier Rhodes, who juggled the ball a bit before securing the rst interception by a Florida State cornerback this season. It felt good to get that rst interception of the season. I really thought after a while that I wasnt going to get one, said Rhodes, whose four interceptions in 2010 tied for the team lead. FSU didnt have to wait too long for its next turnover. On one of the Wolfpacks rare forays deep into Seminole territory (NC State nished just two drives on FSUs side of the 50-yard line), Christian Jones chased down Glennon on second-and-eight from the Florida State 21, forcing a fumble that freshman defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan recovered and returned 12 yards. Then on NC States next possession, defensive tackle Everett Dawkins tipped Glennons pass at the line and linebacker Vince Williams hauled in the ball for FSUs nal turnover of the day. Williams credited the defensive linemen with making his life as a linebacker a little bit easier. Those big boys up there are eating, he said. It isnt that hard to play middle linebacker when your two D-tackles are just destroying guards and centers. With Jernigan and Dawkins disrupting the middle and defensive Brandon Jenkins and Bjoern Werner turning in another solid combined effort, the Wolfpack became one-dimensional, allowing the Seminoles pass rush to chase after Glennon with impunity.FSU D torments Wolfpack with three turnoversBulldog cornerback Brandon Boykin with the ball. PHOTO BY STEVE JOHNSONDefensive tackle Timmy Jernigan recovers a fumble and returns it for 12 yards. PHOTOS BY COLIN HACKLEY/ THE OSCEOLABy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaThere were times Saturday when EJ Manuel took a hit and was slow to get up. Then there were other times when Manuel absorbed a blow and perhaps made those in attendance wonder how he even got up at all. Thats simply the risk that Manuel takes when he runs the option holding the ball until the last possible instant before pitching to a running back and its a big reason why Florida States running game has opened up in recent weeks. Hes got a knack for (running the option), FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. He can get down the eld and run it and put pressure on. Hes got a natural knack for it, and if you dont hit him, he can run. Its another dimension that we have which we have to use. The Seminoles used that dimension to perfection on the games rst touchdown. Facing rst-and-goal at the NC State 7-yard line, Manuel took the snap and ran off the left tackle, gaining a few yards before a host of Wolfpack defenders surrounded him. But instead of going down, Manuel withstood a big knock and pitched to freshman running back Devonta Freeman, who easily ran untouched into the end zone. Manuel pulled the same escape act later in the game, this time to the right side, with a surprise, two-handed pitch to Jermaine Thomas that went for another nice gain. Added Manuel: I think its just a matter of trying to make plays, knowing that if I hold it to the last second and get it out there, Devontas going to score a touchdown, bar none. [Running backs] Coach [Eddie] Gran, he always preaches at us to make sure we always keep that pitch relationship with the quarterback, no matter what, said Thomas, who nished with a team-high 48 rushing yards Saturday. Especially with EJ and how hes able to run the ball and pitching it at the last minute.Manuel ignites Noles option attackQuarterback EJ Manuel escapes from a North Carolina State defender. 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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com HOMECOMING 2011 PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHOMECOMING COURT: Freshman representatives Kasey James and Hunter Hurst; sophomore representatives Aaron Smith and Colbi King; junior represent atives Alexis Crockett, Amber Alvarez, Kevon White. John Cole; senior representatives Becca Pearce, Mary Warren Adkison, Brooke Edwards, Ashley Ro berts, Alina McCullers, Cody Cash, Tammarick Holmes, Will Thomas, Evan McCoy and Brandon Busby.WILLIAM SNOWDEN1981 STATE CHAMPS: Thirty years after winning the state football championship, former Head Coach J.D. Jones was reunited with members of his coaching staff, past players on the championship team, as well as cheerleaders and band members, who were recognized during the Homecoming festivities. BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMary Warren Adkison is crowned the 2011 Homecoming Queen by last years queen, Jasmine Casey.See more photos of Homecoming festivities online at thewakullanews.com Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Giving to another as a gesture of love, respect, gratitude and appreciation is truly satisfying and ful filling. Homemade gifts are a traditional, thrifty and meaningful way to express the seasons sentiments.Homemade For the Holidays Workshop November 3rd Homemade For the Holidays &Call the Extension Of fice at 926-3931 to register Homemade for the Holidays is sponsored by Ope n to ALL ages Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 13ABy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe fourth Annual 4-H National Youth Science Day was held earlier this month and to celebrate fourth graders participated in a science experiment entitled, Wired for Wind. Students designed and created a wind turbine, making the blades out of paper and popsicle sticks. The students then tested their turbines to see if they would work. The students placed their turbines on a generator in front of a fan at various speeds and measured how much energy was being created. Sherri Kraeft, Wakulla County 4-H agent, said the students were learning about non-renewable and renewable energy and the experiment was a good way to compare the two. Kraeft said National Science Day is all about 4Hs Million New Scientists, 1 Million New Ideas campaign, which works to engage 1 million young people in science, engineering, technology and applied math programs by the year 2013. The idea is to show them these elds can be fun in hopes that they will purse a degree in one of these elds. Fourth grade teacher Margaret Callaghan said the students also learned that wind energy is used in all states but ve, one of those being Florida. They are learning by doing, Callaghan said. Fourth grader at Riversink Elementary School, Siler Jones, said the experiment was fun. The more wind used for the windmill, the more electricity the windmill makes. Jones said. Another fourth grader, Courtney Krause, tested her windmill and at rst it barely moved. She then gured out this was because all the blades werent facing the same way. If they were all the same, then they would be going, but if one was different, it wouldnt go at all, Krause said. Krause was then able to redesign her windmill and it worked perfectly. Im glad we have wind, Krause said with a huge smile on her face. The experiment was sponsored by 4-H and Progress Energy who donated all the kits. After the experiments were done, the students signed a banner thanking Progress Energy. National Youth Science Day is held every year and each year a different experiment is performed, Kraeft said. This year, the students shared their knowledge with public at a booth at the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 22. For more information about 4-H, visit wakulla.ifas. u .edu or call 926-3931.Fourth graders investigate wind JENNIFER JENSENFourth grader Siler Jones tests his wind turbine as 4-H agent Sherri Kraeft looks on.TRICK OR TREAT JENNIFER JENSEN JENNIFER JENSEN PHOTO BY KAREN WELLS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHAPPY HALLOWEEN: Janet Creel, left, dresses as a witch and sits on her rooftop to talk to trick-or-treaters in Audubon Forest; Deputy Cole Wells, above, hands out candy in The Farms; and people get ready to be scared on a Haunted Hayride in St. Marks.More photos online at thewakulllanews.com NEED A NEW HOME?Come see if you qualify for a no interest home mortgage through Habitat for Humanitys Housing Program!You must be a Wakulla County Resident for at least the last year.Where:Conference Room at Ameris Bank 2628 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville When:Tuesday, November 15 Time:6:30 P.M. enter through back door Bring paperwork to verify your income, dependents, savings and expenses, driver licenses for all drivers and social security cards for everyone who will live in your home.If you have any questions please call: Tara C. Sanders 926-5211 Linda Boles 926-6222Peggy Mackin 926-5037. TheWorks coffeeespressolatts cappuccinofrapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8am-9pm Sunday12-5pm 27FAzaleaDrBehindBealls850.253.7253www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a rt u p B u s i n e s s o f t h eY e a r! WalkOnYourDry&RestoredCarpetWhenWeLeave! (850)544-4439G aryGuy,owner2GreatGuys@comcast.net License#7692StateofFloridaCall 2 Great GuysDry ~CarpetCleaningRemovesand PreventsMold andMildewGrowth.Reduces DustMitesby70% DustMite Allergensby75% CatAllergensby87% MoldSporesby85% Safefor petsandchildren. MEMBER CERTIFIED Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.)

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsCooler weather is heating up the shingThe weather is great for shing and the cooler water temperatures are turning the sh on. Inshore and offshore shing is good right now and should stay good until we get a lot of rain. Last week Alan Lamarche, owner of Plantation Security, took Eric Staller from Tall Timbers Research Station, Ed Epps, plantation manager for Horseshoe Plantation, and Dale McCorkle, plantation manager of Dekle Plantation. They shed with live and dead bait in 35 to 60 feet of water and came in with their limits of red and gag grouper. Alan said there are plenty of grouper out there but not many people are shing for them because of gas prices and limits put on them. Larry Hess of Shell Point said the trout bite turned on and he has found them around the Oyster Bars looking for a grub under the Cajun Thunder. He has also been doing extremely well on black sea bass in about 30 feet of water. Occasionally he will hook a legal grouper while shing for sea bass and on trout rods they put up quite a ght. Buc Grice from Blakely, Ga., spent the week at his home on the Ochlockonee River and said he caught a lot of sh except for one day during that time. He primarily shes a grub on the bottom and shed from the Ochlockonee River mouth to the Shell Point Reef. On days with early morning low tides, he shed the outside of Shell Point Reef and caught lots of trout, a few reds and Spanish. He said he hooked quite a few big Spanish but got cut off by most. Mark and Louise Prance of Shell Point were gone for a month out west and then got back and had to take care of their rental properties. They did nally go shing last week and Mark said they caught a 26.5 and 27-inch red and quite a few nice ounder. They were using cut bait on the bottom. Capt. Luke Frazier over at AMS in Medart said he went over to the white trout hole at the mouth of the Panacea Channel and they caught about 50 nice white trout in about two hours. He used a white Gulp on the bottom and said if you tipped it with a piece of cut bait you could catch some of those big whiting that are over there. The folks at Shell Island Fish Camp said plenty of sh are being caught in the mouth of the St. Marks River and up in East River in the holes. The ats are also still producing trout and some nice reds are coming from Big Pass and Little Pass using pin sh and mudminnows. Capt. David Fife said the trout nally started cooperating and he has been doing pretty well using live mud minnows under a cork or on the bottom. He has been getting his limit of reds every time he goes and is catching some nice ounder. He said there are also plenty of white trout around. David shes from Spring Creek to Panacea. Capt. Randy Peart said he shed the mouth of the Ochlockonee River and they caught reds, trout and whiting using live pilchards. On Friday he took Harold Fulford from Carrolton, Ga., out and the trolled for grouper and then shed the bottom. He said they never got the rst strike. He then went to a rock pile in about 12 feet of water off the Aucilla River and he said they caught some huge rock bass, key west grunts, a 24-inch gag grouper and a bull red. They were using light tackle and pilchards on the bottom. To end the day they went in around Cobb Rocks and said they lost probably ve or six big trout and landed one that was more than 20 inches. He said shing around the Econ na has picked up and trout are being caught on live bait, top water and grubs. I have a lot of people ask me if I ever get tired of shing. I usually say no but if they had asked me that question on Sunday afternoon I would have had to say yes. I shed 12 days in a row and was sure glad not to have to get in that boat on Monday morning. The last thing I wanted to do was pick up a shing rod. Overall shing was good except for the Saturday that Buc Grice said he didnt catch any sh. We caught trout in 14 feet of water, on the ats and up in the creeks. During that time we probably caught 15 Spanish, one pompano and had six reds over 37 inches. Four of those reds were the biggest reds those folks had ever caught. We were fishing for white trout one day and had a king mackerel that looked to weigh about 40 pounds come straight up, grab the white trout I was reeling in and almost jump in the boat. That was pretty exciting. I was reeling in a white trout one day and felt something hit it coming in so I gave it some line and set the hook. I had it on for a minute and it came loose. It hit again and this time I was able to get the hook in it. I handed the rod to one of my clients and 20 minutes later we landed a 38-inch red, and it was on the lightest rod I had on the boat. The biggest trout we caught came from the flats using live shrimp under a cork. I could kick myself because the first time I shed there was on Friday afternoon and we only shed for about an hour. We caught three trout more than 20 inches and lost another three or four. On Saturday I had a group from Macon, Ga., and it seems like every time they come down in the wind howls. Saturday was no exception. I shed around Oyster Bay and we caught three nice reds, a few trout and some white trout and whiting. I nally decided to try the ats when we nally got enough water and thats where we did our best. We had some nice trout and Spanish out there. Capt. Jerry Alexander took part of the group that day and they shed way up in the creeks. They came in with four nice reds, threw back eight more than 25 inches and had eight real nice trout. They caught everything on mud minnows. The weather looks good for the next week so shing should continue to be good. Remember to know your limits and leave that oat plan with someone. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Eric Staller, resource coordinator/land manager at Tall Timbers Research Station & Land Conservancy, shows off one of a boat limit of gag and red grouper caught this week in Apalachee Bay. Also on board were Plantation Managers Ed Epp of Horseshoe and Dale McCorkle of Dekle. The crew were guests of Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security Inc. who took them shing out of Shell Point. Alan said that there are tons of gag grouper out there and no one to catch them. They shed all day, catching and releasing sh and never saw another boat. It appears evident that the economy, short season and restrictive recreational limits have discouraged and curtailed the hundreds of grouper shers who once traversed these Big Bend Gulf waters. Alan said that he has invited both FWC and NOAH Fisheries Biologists to go with him so he can show them that there are more gag grouper than ever, but they insist that the sh arent there.ALAN LAMARCHE/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCatching grouper HAVE YOU HEARD THE NEWS?has expanded their circulation department! LOOK The Wakulla News has a new number to call for Subscriptions.877-401-6408CALL ALISON OR NECIA TODAY! 877-401-6408 They haven't actually expanded, they're just taking advantage of Citrus Publishing's call center in Crystal River.Be a part of the conversationSubscribe Today by calling Toll FreeSubscribe Today by calling Toll Freeget877-401-6408or visit TheWakullaNews.com LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GUNSMITHING F ASTTURNAROUND! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED Located on Main Street in St. Marks WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid for your gun! $ Selling Guns Since 1999 AK 47s in stock! IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 15Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonAgain, I want to continue sharing with all of you the fond memories and stories that have been coming in about Sherrie. Anne DelBello sent in a photo of Sherrie, one that I think Sherrie will feel worthy. She was given the wedding bouquet from Capt. and Mrs. James Montgomery on Feb. 14, 2009. Mo Davis, the current Division Commander sent in the following: I rst met Sherrie Alverson at our winter division meeting in 2004. I was fairly new in the Auxiliary and attending my rst division meeting. I think she sensed that I was a little unsure of myself as she quickly came over to me, introduced herself and made a point of introducing me to many other members. From the very first minute I met her, I knew I had a new friend. I found quickly that Sherrie was an old salt and was the person to go to if there were any questions about the Auxiliary. After all, Sherrie was from Shell Point, Flotilla 13, which was recognized as one of the best Flotillas in the District and she had served as Flotilla Commander, Flotilla Staff Officer for many different positions, Division Finance Of cer and Chaplain. Through the years, I always enjoyed seeing Sherrie at our division meetings, getting that special hug and talking about what was going on. I always enjoyed the many emails we exchanged and remember that she, although she was having some health problems of her own, never forgot to ask how my wife was doing in her fight with cancer. Sherrie will leave a very rich heritage and will really be missed in the Auxiliary, but after 40 years of dedicated service she has earned a chance to lay back a little. While technology has been great in many ways, this day it has failed me. Another long time Coast Guard Auxiliary member Mark Rosen was one of the rst to respond to my request for stories about Sherrie. Somehow I lost the e-mail and, due to a computer crash, so did Mark. What I can assure you is that Mark had great things to say, he always calls Sherrie the Queen of the Auxiliary, a title well deserved! If you have fond memories or funny stories about Sherrie, please send them to me at Carolyn.treadon@uscgaux. net. Sherrie can use all of our support and encouragement. It is time that we provide for her what she has so sel essly given to all of us for so many years. This past weekend, several members of Flotilla 12 headed over to Carrabelle to participate in the Crooked River Lighthouse Lantern Festival. Tim Ashley, Phil and Norma Hill and Mike Harrison headed over. They were visited by Karen Katowski from the St. George Island branch of our otilla. Throughout the day members talked to visitors about the auxiliary and had lots of materials to share! As the night dawned, lanterns were lit and the festival took on a new light (no pun intended). Pictures do not do justice to the beauty that the lanterns held. Thank you to Phil and Norma Hill for sending along many wonderful pictures from the day. Tim Ashley, the Flotillas public affairs officer, wants to remind members that we will be staffing an exhibitors display promoting our various USCG Auxiliarys activities and programs at the North Florida Fair beginning Thursday, Nov. 3. Please stop by and visit if you are there. Saturday, Flotilla 12 will hold our November meeting at the former Flotilla 13 building at Shell Point. We will have fellowship from 9:30 a.m. with our business meeting at 10 a.m. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! Sherrie Alverson with the bouquet at the wedding of Capt. and Mrs. James Montgomery in February 2009.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Jack Rosenau turned 92 last Friday. Many of you attended his party on Old Fort Drive in Tallahassee. He is best known locally for his many contributions to the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary at Shell Point, serving in nearly every capacity available including the evening Air Patrol. Many of his exploits have been heralded by Sherrie Alverson in the adjourning column so I will not repeat them here. What is less known, but equally impressive is that his real job was with the U.S. Geological Survey as the Floridas hydrologist. Most of us searching for windows into the Karst relied on decades of Jacks baseline water quality documents. He summarized them in a government printed book called The Springs of Florida. Those of us who could keep a copy were popular since the referenced springs had latitude/longitude GPS coordinates, as well as water quality data. He visited as many of the springs as possible taking ow, chemical signature and morphological descriptions long before many of us were terribly concerned. He worked with a few cave divers, but back then, cave diving was a secret society. He did discover new springs and once named one Kini in Wakulla, a Hawaiian name for his wife. I discussed underground water ow with him, but had little to contribute until Parker Turner joined our program at FSU. By then Jack had retired, one step ahead of the computer, an unwelcome intrusion into his world. I am moved to write this column about his contribution after attending Dr. Todd Kincades recent presentation at Wakulla Springs where his Project Baseline was discussed. The impressive Google Earth frame upon which the Karst features are overlaid represents technology not available back in Jacks time. But monitoring these features is not new, not invented by Global Underwater Explorers and certainly rich in historic interest. Project Baseline can become a very useful database if we see it as a continuation of previous pioneers. And I am proud to call him Dad, the father of my wife. Happy birthday, Dad. Mike Harrison greets visitors at the Crooked River Lighthouse Lantern Festival in Carrabelle. BALLROOMAlabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Online Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute! Nov. 14-17 & Nov. 21-22215 BankForeclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information 20960 N.E. 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AM 1.1 ft. 4:23 AM 0.7 ft. 5:16 AM 0.4 ft. 5:58 AM 0.1 ft. 6:35 AM -0.1 ft. 7:10 AM Low 2.7 ft. 7:44 AM 2.7 ft. 9:43 AM 2.9 ft. 10:55 AM 3.0 ft. 11:46 AM 3.2 ft. 12:26 PM 3.3 ft. 1:03 PM 3.3 ft. 1:37 PM H i gh 1.1 ft. 2:46 PM 1.3 ft. 3:49 PM 1.3 ft. 4:40 PM 1.4 ft. 5:20 PM 1.4 ft. 5:54 PM 1.4 ft. 6:25 PM 1.4 ft. 6:55 PM Low 2.7 ft. 9:09 PM 2.9 ft. 10:00 PM 3.1 ft. 10:40 PM 3.2 ft. 11:15 PM 3.4 ft. 11:46 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fri Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a te 3.6 ft. 12:12 AM H i gh 2.0 ft. 1:15 AM 1.7 ft. 3:04 AM 1.2 ft. 4:20 AM 0.8 ft. 5:13 AM 0.4 ft. 5:55 AM 0.1 ft. 6:32 AM -0.1 ft. 7:07 AM Low 2.8 ft. 7:41 AM 2.8 ft. 9:40 AM 2.9 ft. 10:52 AM 3.1 ft. 11:43 AM 3.2 ft. 12:23 PM 3.3 ft. 1:00 PM 3.4 ft. 1:34 PM H i gh 1.2 ft. 2:43 PM 1.4 ft. 3:46 PM 1.5 ft. 4:37 PM 1.5 ft. 5:17 PM 1.5 ft. 5:51 PM 1.5 ft. 6:22 PM 1.5 ft. 6:52 PM Low 2.8 ft. 9:06 PM 2.9 ft. 9:57 PM 3.1 ft. 10:37 PM 3.3 ft. 11:12 PM 3.4 ft. 11:43 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fri Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a te 3.1 ft. 12:22 AM 3.2 ft. 12:51 AM H i gh 1.7 ft. 2:22 AM 1.4 ft. 4:11 AM 1.0 ft. 5:27 AM 0.7 ft. 6:20 AM 0.3 ft. 7:02 AM 0.1 ft. 7:39 AM -0.1 ft. 8:14 AM Low 2.5 ft. 8:20 AM 2.5 ft. 10:19 AM 2.7 ft. 11:31 AM 2.8 ft. 12:22 PM 2.9 ft. 1:02 PM 3.0 ft. 1:39 PM 3.1 ft. 2:13 PM H i gh 1.0 ft. 3:50 PM 1.1 ft. 4:53 PM 1.2 ft. 5:44 PM 1.3 ft. 6:24 PM 1.3 ft. 6:58 PM 1.3 ft. 7:29 PM 1.3 ft. 7:59 PM Low 2.5 ft. 9:45 PM 2.7 ft. 10:36 PM 2.8 ft. 11:16 PM 3.0 ft. 11:51 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fri Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a te 2.6 ft. 12:07 AM H i gh 1.3 ft. 1:29 AM 1.1 ft. 3:18 AM 0.8 ft. 4:34 AM 0.5 ft. 5:27 AM 0.3 ft. 6:09 AM 0.1 ft. 6:46 AM -0.0 ft. 7:21 AM Low 2.0 ft. 7:36 AM 2.1 ft. 9:35 AM 2.2 ft. 10:47 AM 2.3 ft. 11:38 AM 2.4 ft. 12:18 PM 2.5 ft. 12:55 PM 2.5 ft. 1:29 PM H i gh 0.8 ft. 2:57 PM 0.9 ft. 4:00 PM 1.0 ft. 4:51 PM 1.0 ft. 5:31 PM 1.0 ft. 6:05 PM 1.0 ft. 6:36 PM 1.0 ft. 7:06 PM Low 2.0 ft. 9:01 PM 2.1 ft. 9:52 PM 2.3 ft. 10:32 PM 2.4 ft. 11:07 PM 2.5 ft. 11:38 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fri Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a teH i gh 1.8 ft. 12:57 AM 1.5 ft. 2:46 AM 1.1 ft. 4:02 AM 0.7 ft. 4:55 AM 0.4 ft. 5:37 AM 0.1 ft. 6:14 AM -0.1 ft. 6:49 AM Low 2.1 ft. 7:28 AM 2.1 ft. 9:27 AM 2.2 ft. 10:39 AM 2.4 ft. 11:30 AM 2.5 ft. 12:10 PM 2.6 ft. 12:47 PM 2.6 ft. 1:21 PM H i gh 1.1 ft. 2:25 PM 1.2 ft. 3:28 PM 1.3 ft. 4:19 PM 1.4 ft. 4:59 PM 1.4 ft. 5:33 PM 1.4 ft. 6:04 PM 1.4 ft. 6:34 PM Low 2.1 ft. 8:53 PM 2.2 ft. 9:44 PM 2.4 ft. 10:24 PM 2.5 ft. 10:59 PM 2.6 ft. 11:30 PM 2.7 ft. 11:59 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fri Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a teH i gh 1.5 ft. 1:25 AM 1.2 ft. 2:45 AM 0.9 ft. 3:48 AM 0.6 ft. 4:40 AM 0.3 ft. 5:25 AM 0.1 ft. 6:05 AM -0.1 ft. 6:42 AM Low 2.3 ft. 6:44 AM 2.2 ft. 8:38 AM 2.2 ft. 10:31 AM 2.3 ft. 11:57 AM 2.4 ft. 1:03 PM 2.5 ft. 1:57 PM 2.5 ft. 2:44 PM H i gh 0.7 ft. 2:08 PM 0.9 ft. 3:00 PM 1.1 ft. 3:47 PM 1.3 ft. 4:28 PM 1.5 ft. 5:05 PM 1.6 ft. 5:38 PM 1.7 ft. 6:08 PM Low 2.5 ft. 9:22 PM 2.5 ft. 9:49 PM 2.6 ft. 10:13 PM 2.7 ft. 10:35 PM 2.8 ft. 10:56 PM 2.8 ft. 11:17 PM 2.9 ft. 11:42 PM H i ghGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 3 Nov. 9First Nov. 2 Full Nov. 10 Last Nov. 18 New Nov. 24Major Times 8:12 AM 10:12 AM 8:34 PM 10:34 PM Minor Times 1:31 AM 2:31 AM 2:45 PM 3:45 PM Major Times 8:56 AM 10:56 AM 9:17 PM 11:17 PM Minor Times 2:26 AM 3:26 AM 3:17 PM 4:17 PM Major Times 9:38 AM 11:38 AM 9:58 PM 11:58 PM Minor Times 3:21 AM 4:21 AM 3:47 PM 4:47 PM Major Times 9:19 AM 11:19 AM 9:34 PM 11:34 PM Minor Times 3:13 AM 4:13 AM 3:18 PM 4:18 PM Major Times 10:00 AM 12:00 PM 10:22 PM 12:22 AM Minor Times 4:06 AM 5:06 AM 3:48 PM 4:48 PM Major Times 10:43 AM 12:43 PM 11:05 PM 1:05 AM Minor Times 4:59 AM 5:59 AM 4:21 PM 5:21 PM Major Times --:---:-11:27 AM 1:27 PM Minor Times 5:52 AM 6:52 AM 4:56 PM 5:56 PM Average Average Average Average Good Better Better6:52 am 5:48 pm 1:45 pm 12:32 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:53 am 5:47 pm 2:17 pm 1:28 am 6:54 am 5:47 pm 2:48 pm 2:21 am 6:54 am 5:46 pm 3:18 pm 3:14 am 6:55 am 5:45 pm 3:49 pm 4:07 am 6:56 am 5:45 pm 4:22 pm 4:59 am 6:57 am 5:44 pm 4:57 pm 5:53 am54% 60% 67% 73% 79% 85% 91% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakulla commercial shermen were in court in Tallahassee last week with their newest challenge to state rules on mullet shing. The state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission was asking the court to throw out the lawsuit, contending the issues have been argued and lost by shermen before. But questions by Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford at the hearing on Oct. 25 indicated that perhaps she found some legal basis for the case to go forward. The judge is expected to have a ruling by the end of this week. Jonathan Glogau of the Attorney Generals Office, which represents the FWC in the lawsuit, argued that shermen have mounted two previous challenges to rules that regulate mullet nets and, in both cases, courts found the rules were not arbitrary and capricious and that met the rational basis test for rulemaking. Fishermen, represented by attorney Ron Mowrey, argue that the rule limiting mullet nets to mesh no larger than two-inches stretch catches only juvenile mullet not legal-size, adult mullet. Ultimately, they claim, the rule is having the opposite effect of what was intended by the FWC, causing shermen to waste the resource by killing off the small sh. That was the point Judge Fulford made at the hearing in response to Glogaus argument that its all been argued before, noting that in the earlier cases challenging the two-inch mesh rule the effect whether it caught juvenile sh or not was speculation. Now, she asked, isnt the effect shown in the studies presented by shermen? And, she asked, if its true that the small-mesh nets are harming the resource, how are shermen supposed to challenge the rule? The court is not in the position off gauging the effectiveness of the rule, Glogau answered. He argued that, once a court has determined that there is a rational basis for the rule, that is the end of proper court oversight. If this rule is creating a resource problem, Glogau said, it is not for the court to tell the agency thats for the political process... Its for the commission to look at the data if these rules do what they want them to do. Mowrey argued that FWC has been negligent in its regulation of the sheries of the State of Florida. Causing the killing, over shing and waste of marine resources is a direct violation of the single purpose and intent of the 1994 net shing law, he said. The local shermen also contend they have been singled out for selective enforcement of net laws noting that a Resource Protection Unit from FWC has targeted Wakulla and Franklin county shermen. While those two counties are among the smallest in the state, they rank one or two in number of prosecutions for net violations, Mowrey said, claiming it was directly a result of the political activism of local shermen in opposition to FWC regulations. Glogau countered that the Resource Protection Unit was working an area that has given the FWC trouble. Franklin and Wakulla counties and northwest Florida has a higher incidence of net violations, Glogau said, and putting of cers there is just good police work.Fishermens lawsuit challenges net ruleContinued from Page 1A First aid was administered by law enforcement until Wakulla EMS arrived on scene and transported the suspect to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. The suspect spent several days in the hospital under guard. As of Tuesday, Nov. 1, Davis was released from TMH and was being held at the Wakulla County Jail on $70,000 bond. The weapon allegedly used by the suspect was recovered at the scene. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement was called to the scene to investigate. The suspect faces charges of aggravated assault against a police officer, criminal mischief, burglary, possession of burglary tools and loitering and prowling in the case. The deputy has been placed on administrative leave until an internal review is conducted which is common practice in cases involving shootings. Suspect shot at storeContinued from Page 1ACarter is uid in his discussion of what the climate of those times were like, along with recollections of what the events triggered in him as a young man: I didnt want to just feel like a citizen of Florida, or of the United States, he explains. I wanted to be a world citizen. But in order for me to do that, I would have to go out and see the world for myself. Carters interest in Latin American history grew to the point that he once boarded a work-away freighter to Amsterdam, then took a train to Spain for enrollment at the University of Madrid. He would study Spanish language and culture for seven months as a special student. He later returned to University of Florida to receive his Bachelor of Arts degree. Four months later he would nd himself in Mexico on a motorcycle with nothing more than camping gear, writing implements, a recorder, and camera, capturing not only the visual aspects of his travels, but the spirit of the people and their culture as well. When discussing Latin America in the early s, it seemed like everyone was going communist or democratic, he explains. He quotes the line often attributed to Winston Churchill: If youre not a liberal when youre 20, you have no heart. If youre not a conservative when youre 40, you have no brains. What I found, when I went, was that it was not communist or democratic, but a land of the haves and have-nots. It was only when one couldnt get what they wanted, theyd call the other communist and things like that. I wanted to know more and understand, to nd a way to shine my light of democracy. Upon his return home, he would arrive with numerous tapes, lm and more than 1,500 pages in journal form of his adventure. He was determined to study law, and did so, nishing 33 in his class of 90 graduates. From there, he would pass the Florida Bar exam, gaining admission into the Florida and American Bar Associations. He would go on to serve as assistant district attorney in Atlanta. He later resigned, leaving for Europe in 1973. I was developing my 15-year plan, he explains. My rst 15 years, Id make as much money as possible. The second 15, Id work in the government to do all the good that I could do. The third 15, Id teach. In all, Id put in 45 years. After that His trip to Europe began Sept. 3, 1973, with his arrival in Reykjavik, Iceland. Within four months hed traveled to more than 13 countries. Jan. 11, 1974, found him in Cairo, Egypt. He would tour Africa by train, truck and the Nile River. From East Africa he took ship to India. In May he would leave Calcutta by plane, traveling to Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan and more. By July, he was back in the U.S., by way of Hawaii. By August he was in Tallahassee and ready to settle down. Which he did with his wife, Andrea. This appears to have been an adventure in itself. He speaks of their long courtship, and his going to Tampa to meet with her family: I walk in, and theres her immediate family, and extended family, many with clipboards, ready to evaluate me. I think I walked away with a B-plus. Luckily, the head of the group was Jose, Andreas grandfather. He didnt speak English, Carter explains. I knew then that my travels and studies in the language had prepared me for that very moment. Carter will speak to Historical SocietySpecial to The NewsA 48-year-old Crawfordville man died in a one vehicle accident on Coastal Highway 98 in Medart early Sunday morning, Oct. 30, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. William Todd Sapp was discovered by a passing motorist who contacted the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. He was dead at the scene at the 2800 block of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway 98) at 2:31 a.m. Investigators determined that Sapp was driving a 2003 Mitsubishi four door northbound on the highway when he failed to negotiate a curve near the former Pigotts Cash and Carry. The vehicle left the road and began to overturn as it crashed sideways and then roof- rst into a large palm tree. The cause of the crash is still under investigation. Lt. Dale Evans, Lt. Billy Jones and Deputy Ben Steinle investigated and they were assisted at the scene by Wakulla EMS.Man killed in wreck The student identi cation card used by Mike Carter during his travels to Europe in the 1970s. HEARING TECHNOLOGY SALE!FREE Demonstration!$1095SOLUTION 4 ALL SIZES. Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 17AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Oct. 20, Elizabeth Webster of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run accident at Timmons Road and Webster Road in Crawfordville. A motorist on Timmons Road was allegedly driving at a high rate of speed and struck the stop sign. The vehicle left the scene at a high rate of speed. The post was bent but the sign was still visible to motorists. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Oct. 21, Megan Scott of Sopchoppy reported the theft of her driver license. The license was taken from an unlocked vehicle at Azalea Park. Her purse was stolen but the license was the only item of value lost. Deputy Lorne Whaley investigated. On Oct. 21, Darrin McGlamry of Riversprings Middle School reported the theft of a Blackberry from his classroom. Sgt. Ray Johnson and Coach Shannon Smith identi ed a student suspect through video evidence. The phone was returned to the victim and the 12-year-old juvenile was issued a juvenile civil citation and ordered to perform 32 hours of community service. On Oct. 24, Edwin C. Brown of Crawfordville reported an illegal dumping of trash at a county park at 8046 Coastal Highway. The re pit where a group of juveniles were camping was covered in soda and beer cans. Cans were also observed at other locations at the park. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. On Oct. 24, Christina Hanna of Crawfordville reported the theft of an oversized mailbox from Hydra Engineering in Crawfordville. The box is valued at $50. Lt. C.L. Morrison investigated. On Oct. 23, David George of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Computer equipment, electronic equipment and other miscellaneous property, valued at $2,340, was taken from a vehicle. The items were entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. On Oct. 23, Lashawnia Webster of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone cut the victims vehicle fuel line. A forced entry was also observed at a door to her residence. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. On Oct. 23, Uvon James Martin, 26, of Tallahassee was charged with driving while license is suspended or revoked following a traf c stop on Crawfordville Highway. Deputy Nick Gray observed the motorist cross the solid white line three times within a quarter mile. Det. Rob Giddens determined that Martins driver license was suspended and this was his third violation. He was issued a traffic citation and taken to the Wakulla County Jail without incident by Deputy Jeremy Johnston. On Oct. 24, a concerned parent contacted Riversprings Middle School Assistant Principal Michele Baggett regarding a male student passing out pills at school. A search of the students locker found pills and synthetic marijuana. The 14year-old male student was suspended from school for 10 days and placed at the Second Chance School for the remainder of the school year. The pills turned out to be Ritalin and were given to five female students. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. On Oct. 24, David Causey of Quincy reported a vehicle theft in Crawfordville. The victim was removing trees from local property when he discovered his truck missing. The equipment in the vehicle was valued at $1,215. The vehicle was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. Later, it was recovered in Tallahassee by Tallahassee Police Department investigators. Deputy Nick Gray removed the vehicle from the NCIC/FCIC listing. Missing property was also recovered with the truck. On Oct. 26, Reed Brown of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. He arrived at his property and discovered a forced entry. Damage to the door and frame was estimated at $300. A radio, valued at $100, was discovered missing. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Oct. 25, Fredrick Edward Strain, 44, of Panacea was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked after driving to the probation office without a valid license. Deputy Vicki Mitchell observed Strain driving on Crawfordville Highway and conducted a traf c stop. The suspect was warned by a probation of cer that he should not be driving without a valid license. On Oct. 26, a clerk at the Sopchoppy Express Lane reported a retail theft as a female, who has been identi ed, removed beer from the establishment without paying for it. Yolanda Evette Calloway, 40, of Sopchoppy was issued a trespass warning for the store and a notice to appear in court for the theft of the two beers, valued at $2.78. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. On Oct. 26, a disorderly conduct was reported at Sopchoppy Education Center when a 15-year-old female student was observed cursing at the school staff. She was charged with disruption of a school function. Sgt. Joe Page removed her from school property and released her into the custody of her father. On Oct. 26, Andrew Jolly of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. Three unauthorized charges were discovered on the victims bank account which totaled $451. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Oct. 26, Peter Gonzalez of Crawfordville reported an illegal dumping. The victim reported that two deer carcasses were dumped on his property. In 2010, the victim reported the dumping of 20 deer on his property. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. On Oct. 26, a concerned citizen reported a hit and run at the Mighty Mullet in Panacea. A suspect, who was identi ed, left the parking area and struck a vehicle owned by Tammie Barwick of Panacea. Investigators have been attempting to locate and speak to the hit and run driver. Sgt. John Zarate investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 704 calls for service during the past week including: 22 residential and business alarms; 75 citizen contacts; 11 disturbances; 44 investigations; 46 medical emergencies; 55 security checks; 23 special details; 11 traf c enforcements; 35 traffic stops; 13 reckless vehicles; and 114 welfare checks.Special to The NewsTwo Tallahassee men were arrested following a robbery at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville and an ensuing high speed vehicle chase that ended a few miles later, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. Eustace J. Cameron, 39, was charged with grand theft, armed robbery and resisting an of cer without violence. Ronnie Bernard Spearman, Sr., 44, was charged with armed robbery, grand theft, knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked, aggravated eeing/eluding a law enforcement of cer when lights/sirens activated and resisting arrest without violence. Lt. Jimmy Sessor was on party patrol in the WalMart parking lot Monday, Oct. 31 at 12:36 a.m. when he observed Cameron pushing two shopping carts outside Wal-Mart with a store employee in pursuit asking him to stop. When the lieutenant attempted to stop the man, he jumped into a waiting vehicle and the two suspects drove north on U.S. Highway 319. Lt. Sessor followed the suspects to the U.S. Highway 319 and Highway 267 intersection where two Florida Highway Patrolmen, who were called in to assist, helped stop the vehicle. Spearman complied with orders to get out of the vehicle but Cameron jumped into the drivers seat and attempted to put the vehicle in gear before being physically removed from the vehicle. An inventory of the vehicle discovered $150 worth of clothing in the original packaging, two homemade pipes and 71 grams of an unknown powder wrapped in aluminum foil. A Wal-Mart employee told investigators that he attempted to stop Cameron from removing the two buggies from the store but Cameron threatened him with a gun which he did not have. The property in the two buggies was valued at $1,377 for a total of $1,528. The two men were transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Two arrested in Wal-Mart robbery case Ronnie B. Spearman Sr. Eustace J. 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Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comIts the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival in Panacea FISHY FASHIONS: Paul Johnson, David Kemp, Mullet King Ronald Fred Crum and his Queen Eloise Crum with Pam Portwood. Governors Executive Chef John Minas demonstrated cooking mullet and shared the results. Larry Tucker gets some tartar sauce.MULLET STYLE: The guys from Mineral Springs Seafood show off their mullet haircut-wigs while cooking mullet.BOATWORKS: Wakulla Jr. ROTC cadets help work on a mahogany boat donated to the Maritime Center. The weather was brisk on Saturday morning at Woolley Park, with the wind coming off the bay. There was lots to do at the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival from the crowning of the king and queen, to a cooking demonstration with Governors Executive Chef John Minas, listening to music from the Sarah Mac Band, or eating food and pursuing arts and crafts from the vendors. The real point of the festival is to celebrate the local maritime heritage, and there was information about boat building, navigation and even scrimshaw work on horns. A vendor at the festival, left, waits for customers after setting up. The cool weather may have kept the crowd down.More photos online at thewakullanews.comPHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Cant Cant access access The The Wakulla Wakulla news ews online online content? content? Subscribe Subscribe today and today and get full get full access! access! 15minute guaranteeTallahassee Memorial is pleased to bring InQuicker to the community for those patients requiring emergency care for non-life threatening medical conditions. With InQuicker, you never have to experience a long wait in a crowded emergency facility again. Instead, enjoy the comfort of your own home while waiting for your next emergency care visit. Simply access the InQuicker system at tmh.org to nd projected treatment times at both the Tallahassee Memorial Bixler Emergency Center and Urgent Care Center. Once the system captures certain demographic and symptomatic information, you are added to the wait queue which holds your place in line, online. When you arrive at the emergency center for your projected treatment time, you will be seen by a nurse practitioner, physicians assistant or physician in 15 minutes or less, guaranteed. Your ER wait is over. Check-in at tmh.org to hold your place in line, online today. Online Check-in atTMH.ORG* InQuicker is only for patients experiencing non-life threatening conditions and does not affect the wait times of other emergency room patients. Priority treatment is always given to those with the most urgent medical conditions. your ER wait is over. Guaranteed.

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Taking Care of Business Business News from Business News from Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011By JOHN SHUFFChamber President My good friend Ralph Thomas and I were sitting together a few evenings ago at the Oct. 17 BOCC meeting. As I was leaving we agreed, being the policy wonks that we are, that our commissioners had not given us much to mull over this month. The only issue that has gotten the ags to ying has been the controversy over re-zoning Commodore Commons subdivision from commercial to residential reviving the old push-and-pull between property rights advocates and those who believe that as areas become more populated, a need is developed for more rules to encourage peaceful coexistence. Planning and zoning ordinances that allow for choices are good. The citizens and our county government have developed a plan for Crawfordville called Our Town. We need to begin the lengthy work of implementing the comprehensive plan changes that are called for in that plan, making sure they allow developers optional uses, and developing a corridor along U.S. Highway 319 that allows for future road widening, with the goal being to make Crawfordville a more congruous and better functioning town. Your Chamber of Commerce is taking the lead on this issue and all the other facets of the Our Town plan to ultimately provide a better community within which to live our lives, raise our children and operate our businesses. We have been studying several funding sources for myriad projects, with our main emphasis on xing the intersections along 319 to improve traf c ow. Please note that we did not say four-lane 319 which, at a $200 million price tag, is completely out of our range and beyond the budget parameters of a constrained DOT. Please also note that herein lies a reason for implementing the comprehensive plan changes and corridor mentioned above; if we dont encourage Crawfordville to broaden out then it will strip out. If it strips out we will all be trying to use one road to access all services causing gridlock for the citizens and driving up the value of property along the highway making it even more difficult to tackle the biggest challenge to growth in Wakulla County the eventual four-laning of 319, we just went full circle. By not implementing the Our Town concept, your commute to Tallahassee will get worse as time goes by. And what type of impression do we think is conveyed to the 100,000 trips that typically pass through Crawfordville on any given weekend? Would having a few of those transients think this may be a nice place to live be good, thereby creating the critical mass necessary to give us the shopping choices we desire?Continued on Page 4B By JO ANN PALMERSpecial to The News On the third Thursday of each month, Chamber members look forward to the monthly mixer. We get together to reconnect, catch up on family and friends, hear news and happenings in the business community and Wakulla County, or just to enjoy a little time away from the hectic business of business. On Oct. 20, Nancy Matheny, owner of Two Blondes Liquor & Gifts in Panacea opened her doors for the October mixer and featured beer tasting. The weather was perfect for the gathering to enjoy and meander around the quaint shop while snacking on a tray of sandwiches provided by Adam Cutter of the Coastal Corner. Adam, the new owner of Coastal Corner, wanted to show off his ability to provide visitors to the beautiful coastal area a great alternative to seafood, and Nancy was pleased to pair his food with the great selection of beer. Nancy introduced her staff which includes daughter and partner, Maura Evans, staff, Greta Williams and Trey McCulloch. She told the group that the property has been in her family since the 1970s and that Two Blondes began in 2009. She gave a brief history of the beer and liquor trade, and con rmed that while it has for many years been a male-dominated business, women are taking on the challenge and changing the face of the industry. Continued on Page 4B Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite #1 The Log Cabin Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Presidents Message e Our Town issue continues to developTwo Blondes hosts mixer PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENBEER TASTING: Maura Evans of Two Blondes tells Chamber members Dan Hinchee and Bill Russell about some of the beers offered as Greta Williams assists. Barbara Guzzetta enjoys the food. Rapid Response Training at Wakulla Correctional See Page 10B Chamber members turn out for luncheon See Page 4B

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, November 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB will meet at Hudson Park at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. WAKULLA WRITERS GROUP will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. at the public library. Everyone is invited to attend. WAKULLA GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the main meeting room of the public library. All are invited to attend. Friday, November 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, November 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations and events. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate my phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu. register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_ faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, November 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, November 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. WAKULLA COUNTY AUTISM SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 7 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center. This gathering provides an opportunity for families of school age children (Pre-K through 12) with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. No cost and no registration is necessary. Tuesday, November 8 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. The public is encouraged to attend all meetings. Wednesday, November 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, November 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. F AMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, November 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef OBradys in Crawfordville. Please call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information.Special EventsThursday, November 3 FOCUS ON ABILITY, A PICNIC IN THE PARK will be held to recognize Disability Awareness Month in Hudson Park from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. by the Wakulla County School District There will be free hot dogs, informational booths and entertainment by Pyramid Players. Call 926-7125 or the ESE Department at 926-0065 for more information. BLOOD DRIVE will be held by the Southeastern Community Blood Center from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce parking lot. Individuals who donate blood will receive a free tote bag. Anyone interested in donating blood is asked to call Captain Larry Massa at 251-5169. For more information about giving blood, visit http://www.scbcinfo.org/default.htm or call 877-7181. Saturday, November 5 FIFTH ANNUAL VETERANS PARADE will be held at 10 a.m. in Hudson Park by Wakulla Christian School and the Wakulla County Veterans Services Of ce. After the parade, there will be a Veterans Award Ceremony, live patriotic entertainment, a silent auction, game booths, rides, crafts and a sh fry. All proceeds will go to support local veterans programs. For more information, contact Wakulla Christian School at 926-5583. UP AND CLOSE PERSONAL SPOTLIGHT with Wakulla County historian Betty Green will be held by the St. Marks Yacht Club at 7:30 p.m. Green is a charter member of the Wakulla County Historical Society and co-founder of the Historical Museum. This event is open to the public. There will be light refreshments, a meet and greet time at the beginning of the evening. The Club is located at 36 Yacht Club Lane, St. Marks. Seating is limited, call Mickey Cantner at 210-7058 or email pelicancove1@earthlink. net for reservations. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. YARD SALE will be held by the Sopchoppy United Methodist Women from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2002 Sopchoppy Highway. A barbecue pork sandwich plate will also be for sale from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. All proceeds go toward missions. Call 962-5818 for more information. FAMILY FUN DAY FESTIVAL will be hosted by Riversprings Middle School from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be bingo, a sweet shop, drawing, food, Champions-Titus Academy, yard sale, home run derby, athletic competitions, climbing wall, bean bag toss, soda ring toss and more. Money will go towards the schools athletic programs. The school is located at 800 Spring Creek Highway. Call 9262300 for more information. Sunday, November 6 FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will be held at 2 p.m. with a focus on Caves, Sinkholes and Springs presented by Harley Means. These geologic features are components of Karst Topography, and are common in our area of the Florida Panhandle, including on the St. Marks Refuge. Means supervises the Geological Investigations Section of the Florida Geological Survey and is an Assistant State Geologist. It will be held in the new Environmental Education Center at 1255 Lighthouse Road on the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Refreshments and informal discussion will follow. Monday, November 7 WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 2:30 p.m. in room 130. For more information, contact Angie Gentry, chairperson, at angela.gentry@ wcsb.us. Tuesday, November 8 SECOND ANNUAL BIG CATCH CHARITY FISH FRY will be held from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Poseys Dockside Caf, 99 Rock Landing Road in Panacea. The event is for Big Brothers Big Sisters in Wakulla County. There will be shrimp plates, sides and iced tea, beer for purchase and live music. Tickets are $10 and available online at www. bbbs.org/BIGCatch or can be purchased at the event. For more information, contact Stacy Harvey at wakulla@ bbbsbigbend.org or 366-3865. APALACHEE REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL will hold a public meeting of The Wakulla County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board at 10 a.m. at the public library. In addition to its regular business, the agenda includes the adoption of the annual evaluation of the CTC, grievance procedures, board bylaws and the TD Service Plan. The public is invited to the annual public hearing that will follow this meeting. SENIOR SERVICE DAY will be held at the Senior Center, 22 Michael Drive, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with the Area Agency on Aging. There will be application services for Medicare, home energy assistance, ampli ed telephone distribution, Medicaid and food stamp assistance. Thursday, November 10 FULL MOON CLIMB will be held at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. For reservations or more information, contact the Visitor Center at 850-927-7744 or 888-927-7744. Saturday, November 12 BENEFIT AND FISH FRY FOR JEANINE ABERPOSEY and her family will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Jeanine was involved in a serious accident that broke her back and left her paralyzed from the waist down. She and her husband are currently in Atlanta at Shepards Spinal Cord Clinic where she will go through extensive therapy. The bene t will feature live entertainment by the Coon Bottom Creek Band and Jerry Evans, a bake sale and yard sale, and face painting and other activities for the kids, as well as a sh fry. Sunday, November 13 VIEWING PARTY for From the Heart Music Hour episode 4 will be held at Indian Pass Raw Bar, 8391 C-30A, Port St. Joe, at 5 p.m. for the full 2-hour program featuring Brian Bowen, 19 South, Sarah Mac Band, Tobacco Road Band, Mimi & The HearnDogs, The Currys, Steve Leslie and Billy Dean. It was recorded and lmed at the Monticello Opera House. Some of the musicians will perform from 1 to 4:30 p.m. before the episode airs. Monday, November 14 WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorFriday Night Movie On Friday, Nov. 4, we are happy to show the next action packed lm from Marvel Studios leading in to the sure to be blockbuster Avengers lm next summer. Starring Chris Evans (The Fantastic Four) Tommy Lee Jones and Hugo Weaving (The Matrix Trilogy) and following along the lines of Iron Man, The Incredible Hulk and Thor, this lm tells the story of a typical -pound weakling whose determination to join the military during World War II catches the eye of a scientist who is developing a super soldier serum for the United States. After the scientist is killed in an attack by the minions of the evil Red Skull, this Captain leads a group of soldiers into a battle to defeat the Red Skull, and make the world safe once again. Based upon one of the most iconic comic book characters of all time, this PG-13 (for violence and action) rated lm is sure to be fun for the entire family. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show and we ask that minors be accompanied by an adult and not just dropped off. Genealogy Group Meeting This week the Wakulla Genealogy Group is proud to present Jay Collins, the president of the Tallahassee Genealogical Society as their speaker. Collins will be speaking on the importance of DNA to genealogical research using his 20 years of experience in genealogy and family history research. The meeting is at 6 p.m. in our Main Meeting Room and is of course open to the public. Computer Classes for November We are excited to offer the following computer classes to the citizens of Wakulla County this month. On Thursday, Nov. 3, we have Microsoft Publisher: Getting Started at 9:30 a.m. & Computer Basics: Sur ng the Internet at 1:30 p.m. On Thursday, Nov. 10, were offering Skype: Getting Started at 2:30 p.m. with Genealogy Basics: Documentation & Organization at 6 p.m. Finally on Thursday, Nov. 17, we have Facebook: New Features at 9:30 a.m. with Computer Basics: Email starting at 1:30 p.m. All are free and open to the public but do require early registration as seating is limited. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Focus on Ability, A Picnic in the Park from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hudson Park. Veterans Parade at 10 a.m. at Hudson Park. First Sunday at the Refuge presentation at 2 p.m. in the Educational Center. Senior Service Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Senior Center. ThursdaySaturdaySundayTuesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.comLibrary News... City and County MeetingMonday, November 7 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular commission meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, November 10 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers to discuss infrastructure shortfalls in historic neighborhoods.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 3B WE BUY ALL GOLD, SCRAP GOLD, GOLD JEWELRY*This amount depends upon rarity, condition and what collectors are willing to payWE HAVE UNCOVERED SOME OF THE RAREST NOTES IN UNITED STATES HISTORY!PAYING CASH FOR COINS PRE-1970 & CURRENCYBRING IN YOUR OLD BANK NOTES TO FIND OUT IF YOU HAVE A HIDDEN GEM! INDIAN CENT UP TO $500* $2.5 LIBERTY HEAD GOLD COIN UP TO $3,800* ARMS OF CALIFORNIA GOLD HALF DOLLAR UP TO $8,500* 1797 $1 UP TO $200,000* $5 LIBERTY HEAD GOLD COIN UP TO $4,500* GOLD DOLLAR TYPE II UP TO $14,000* 1798 $5 UP TO $125,000* $10 INDIAN GOLD COIN UP TO $5,500* $5 DRAPED BUST RIGHT LE UP TO $40,000* DRAPED BUST HALF CENT UP TO $5,000* $20 ST. GAUDENS GOLD COIN UP TO $6,800* FLOWING HAIR STELLA GOLD COIN UP TO $125,000* 1832 CLASSIC HALF CENT UP TO $80,000* MERCURY DIME UP TO $3,600* 3 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,500* MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR UP TO $100,000* LIBERTY V NICKEL UP TO $2,800* BARBER DIME UP TO $2,800* JEFFERSON WAR NICKEL UP TO $2,000* WHEAT BACK CENT UP TO $1,500* STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER UP TO $4,400* SHIELD NICKEL UP TO $4,000* WALKING LIBERTY HALF DOLLAR UP TO $4,700* CAPPED BUST HALF DIME UP TO $10,000* BARBER QUARTER UP TO $3,200* 2 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,000* PEACE DOLLAR UP TO $3,000* BUFFALO NICKEL UP TO $1,800* BRAIDED HAIR LARGE CENT UP TO $3,800* SEATED LIBERTY DIME UP TO $6,500* BARBER HALF DOLLAR UP TO $6,750* KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR UP TO 8X FACE VALUE* O $125 000 WE ALSO PURCHASE POCKET & WRIST WATCHES, COSTUME JEWELRY, STERLING SILVER Paid Advertisement WE BUY ALL GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY GOLD GOLD JEW E L RY FREEADMISSIONCONTINUES IN CRAWFORDVILLE EVERY DAYTHROUGH SATURDAYOCT. 31ST NOV. 5THMF 9AMPM SAT 9AM-4PMBEST WESTERN PLUS WAKULLA INN & SUITES3292 COASTAL HIGHWAY 98 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327DIRECTIONS: (850) 926-3737 SHOW INFO: (217) 787-7767

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comBy JO ANN PALMERSpecial to The NewsAt noon on Wednesday, Oct. 26, about 30 Chamber members and guests converged on the newly opened Bouys Restaurant in Panacea. Owner Kim Williams and her staff greeted the crowd attending the monthly networking luncheon with some of their famous smoked fish and deviled crab spread. As members moved from table to table chatting, Kim and her staff took orders from a menu offering a choice of three delicious meals. There was shrimp, grilled, fried or blackened, served with your choice of potato and a salad with your choice of shrimp or chicken. It was a great selection and truly showcased the talent of Kim and her staff. For the several brand new members in attendance, it was an opportunity to introduce themselves and give the audience an overview of what they do and what their business is about. Dee Shriver talked about the new package store she opened at the intersection of 98 and Spring Creek Road. Carol Ann Williams told us to watch for television ads about her new business, Legal Shield, Dallas Marshall told about the amenities he offers for visitors at the Panacea RV Park. And Mike Keller passed out menus for his new restaurant, Mikes Seafood Grille. He will be hosting the November networking luncheon on Nov. 30. Thanks to all the new members who attended. Mary Wallace introduced her guest and encouraged everyone to bring someone with them every time they attend. The luncheons are very successful and a venue for sharing information, networking and just spending a little time eating a great meal and visiting with fellow business people. Mary also encourages attendees to sit with someone they dont know, you might learn something. I sat with Mary Ellen Davis and learned that we both like big cities and motorcycles, so it works. Always an exciting part of the hour are the door prizes, and cash drawing. The $30 cash was won by Dallas Marshall, a new member. He said, Beginners luck and happily took the money. Other prizes donated were gift certi cates from The Works Co-Working Caf, a beautiful glass platter donated by Lionel Dazevedo and was won by June Vauses mother, who was a guest. There were restaurant gift certi cates, a Halloween gift bag and an emergency ashlight from Cook Insurance. There are always a great variety of prizes and we appreciate everyone for their generosity. Thank you Kim for a great lunch. When you want fresh seafood, visit their market, Mineral Springs, the rst business on the right as you get into Panacea on 98, or come on down to the new restaurant, Bouys and let them do the cooking. Either way, youll be treated great and have wonderful food. Plan to join us next month, Nov. 30 at Mikes Seafood Grille. Watch for the invitation and if you are not a Chamber member, membership has many advantages. Contact Petra Shuff at (850) 926-1848 for information. Taking Care of Business Taking Care of Business Business News from Business News from Tell us about your business: Dr. Jim Carey opened his doors in 1974 in Tallahassee. Joining him in 1995 was Jeffrey Jones, our board certi ed orthodontist. In 2003, Dr. Careys son Bart joined the practice also. All three doctors received their undergraduate degrees from Florida State University. Dr. Jim Carey and Dr. Bart Carey are board certi ed pediatric dentists. Being a dual specialty of ce we are the only dental practice in the Wakulla area that can provide all your childs dental needs from infancy through high school in one location. Our Crawfordville patients can also be seen in our Tallahassee of ce when necessary. Dr. Jones also treats adults as well as children and teens for orthodontics (braces). You do not have to be a pediatric dental patient to be seen for orthodontics. What services, products do you offer? We are a dual specialty practice. The dental side of our practice is exclusive to children. Most children begin preventive dental visits around age 2 to 3. We offer comprehensive exams, nutrition counseling, dental cleanings, uoride treatments, dental bondings, stainless steel crowns for children, extractions for children when necessary, sealants and sedation dentistry for larger cases. Our orthodontic practice offers screenings for children beginning at age 7 to detect the need for early interceptive orthodontic treatment i.e., appliances for crossbite and/or expansion. Comprehensive (full) orthodontic treatment (braces) is available for teens and adults. In addition to traditional braces we offer clear braces, lingual (behind the teeth) braces and the Invisalign clear aligner system. What sets your business apart from the competition? Our dual specialty practice offers dentistry for children and orthodontic treatment for adults, teens and children. We are the only childrens dentist in the Wakulla County area. All three doctors practice in both locations: Tallahassee and Crawfordville. All three doctors hold diplomate certi cates indicating advanced education and training in dentistry and all are board certi ed in their specialty. What should we be on the lookout for? We are always striving to improve our services and provide quality state-of-the-art dentistry for children. We also look forward to having more adults come to us for their orthodontic needs. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 1998. Why did you join the Chamber? We feel it is important to be a part of the community. It keeps us in touch with what the citizens of Wakulla County want and need in a local business. We enjoy sponsoring community events. Why should local businesses join the Chamber? Local businesses should join the Chamber for the same reasons as stated above. It also gives the businesses a voice in the community and a sense of camaraderie facilitating them to work together. Whats your reason why Wakulla residents should Shop Local? To create and maintain a thriving community it is important to support local business. Seeing businesses be successful entices other new businesses to come to our community assuring a standard of growth for the area as a whole. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Visit our website, www. drscareyandjones.com for information on our practice and the doctors. It also provides up-to-date information on dental procedures, FAQs and tips on what to do in a dental or orthodontic emergency situation. We can also be found on Facebook. To schedule an appointment or for questions call (850) 926-1777 or the Tallahassee of ce at (850) 893-5177. The address is 2001-A Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. The Tallahassee of ce is located at 1272 Timberlane Road. Business: Drs. Carey & Jones, Dentistry for Children Orthodontics for Adults and ChildrenOwner: James A. Carey, D.D.S.New Chamber membersLongleaf Timber Products, Inc. Panacea RV Park Black Bean Cuban Cuisine Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc. Legal Shield & Go Small BizChamber members turn out for luncheon JENNIFER JENSENMary Ellen Davis tastes a beer from Greta Williams as Two Blondes owner Nancy Matheny looks on. Continued from Page 1B Nancy boasts her store as t he last stop for 40 miles and offers a great selection of beer, wine, liquor, snacks, local artist jewelry, gift baskets and crafts. She and her staff pride themselves on being available to assist customers with all their needs, including gift baskets for any occasion. She also offers special orders, so when you stop in, if you dont see what you are looking for, ask. The staff is always there to help you. Be sure to keep them in mind for special gifts and items during the holidays. Visit their website for the hours of operation at www.liquorandgifts.com or call them at (850) 9848808. If you are interested in joining the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce, contact Petra Shuff at (850) 926-1848 or visit the website at wakullacountychamber.com. Two Blondes hosts mixerShu : Our Town developsContinued from Page 1B With all this in mind, we have also been working with the property appraisers of ce to de ne the boundaries of Our Town as one of our goals is to set up a Community Redevelopment Act (CRA) district, similar to the St. Marks district, to help fund projects that are inside the Our Town boundaries. In fact, Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman, has just completed delineating the Our Town area, in less than two weeks using in-house staff. This is a perfect example of our government working with the citizens to better our community. These districts do not charge more tax, but instead, allow future tax increases caused by property value increases to be spent in the CRA area. We will continue to ll you in on our progress with this very complex project. THANKS TO JO ANN PALMER Enough of that stuff, we had a very enjoyable after-hours mixer at Two Blondes Liquors on Oct. 20. With Petra being gone Jo Ann Palmer filled in and did a great job of introducing the hosts and guests for a very enjoyable evening. Actually Jo Ann has been doing the Chamber a great service for the entire time that Petra has been out of town lling in for her on a daily basis at the Chamber of ce helping to keep the ball rolling. I sincerely hope everybody has reason to feel a little more optimistic as we approach the holiday season. One of the reasons for our increased membership has been the luncheons that Mary Wallace started, and they continue to be a great networking opportunity for our membership. The after-hours mixers, like the one at Two Blondes Liquors, are also good opportunities to meet and greet. Most of us have a tendency to plow that row, and turn our mind inward as we go from day to day trying to survive the current conditions. Break out of that mold from time to time and nd out what everybody else is doing; it will be a bene t to us all! Congratulations to all who helped make the Food Drive a resounding success, and have a great November. JO ANN PALMERA table of Chamber members, including Don Henderson, Tim Jordan, Lynda Kinsey, Shirley Howard, Sharol Brown, Amy Geiger and Kelii Kirkland. New Chamber member Dallas Marshall, the new owner of Panacea RV Park, introduces himself. Also at the table are Dee Shriver and Carol Ann Williams and her guest.PHOTOS BY TAMMIE BARFIELD Mike Keller of Mikes Seafood Grille talks about his new restaurant. Carol Ann Williams talks about her new business, Legal Shield. Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce GREAT OFFICE SPACEat The Barry BuildingFREELast Months Rent!Facilities, great atmosphere, all utilities.850-210-5849RATES START AT $250/month www.BarryBuilding.com facebook.com/GamerZParadise Exp. 11/30/11 (850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!Buy 1 hr of Gaming for $3 Get 1 hr FREE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 5BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 28 The Republican eld for the U.S. Senate gained a well-known contender this week and lawmakers got their rst glimpse of a controversial gambling measure that has already attracted the attention of casino fat cats and The Mouse. While backers of resort gaming began testing the waters, a federal judge early this week ordered state of- cials to stop testing the water of applicants seeking temporary cash assistance from the feds in a battle pitting drug tests against federal protections from unnecessary searches. But the judicial reworks werent limited to the federal courts, as state circuit judges heard testimony on church/state separation and pension contributions from state employees. MACK ENTERS U.S. SENATE RACE U.S. Rep. Connie Mack (IV) entered an already crowded eld of GOP hopefuls vying to challenge popular Democratic incumbent, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson. The Cape Coral Republican brings to the race a recognizable name that has so far eluded the eld. Much of that is based on the fame of his father, a former U.S. senator, and his great-grandfather, a baseball manager for more than 50 years in the early 20th century. Macks entry immediately brought attacks from contenders who already were arguing who is more outside the Washington establishment. Its been a recurring theme in a tea party dominated primary season that even Pat Robertson worries is veering too far to the right. He knows first-hand from his many years working with the Washington establishment how broken our government is and Im certain that voters will closely examine his record on job creation, immigration and government spending, said Mike McCalister, a candidate in that GOP primary who has never held elected public of ce. Macks campaign responded that he is the most viable candidate to challenge his two-term Democrat Nelson, but he still faces tough odds. A late March survey of GOP voters by Public Policy Polling, a Democratic rm based in North Carolina that regularly polls Florida, found Mack leading the race with 28 percent to 14 percent for LeMieux and 4 percent for Adam Hasner. The candidate emerging from the eld would still have to recoup a double digit gap with Nelson, though. GAMBLING BILL While many issues have yet to percolate up to the top of the legislative agenda, one sure bet took a step forward this week as backers of destination gambling showed their hand. A much anticipated bill permitting up to three luxury casinos was filed Wednesday, accelerating an intense lobbying war that will play a big role in the legislative session when it begins in January. The 142-page bill (HB 487) allows the state to issue up to three resort casino permits in counties where voters have already passed or would pass referenda approving expanding gambling. So far, only Broward and Miami-Dade counties have done so, but the bill as written does not limit the resorts to those counties only. These are not strip mall internet cafes. The proposal limits successful bids to those able to put together a development eclipsing $2 billion, of which gambling comprises not more than 10 percent of the footprint. It also creates more government. Modeled after similar regulatory agencies in New Jersey and Nevada, the proposed Department of Gaming Control would strictly regulate gambling in the state, from the parimutuel race track facilities, to Internet cafs. The proposal faces opposition from at least one business group: the Florida Chamber of Commerce has said it will ght the move to expand gaming in Florida. The statewide friend of business joins Disney as an opponent. The mouse that roars fears the luxury venues could prompt would-be Disney visitors to choose blackjack over Capt. Blackbeard. The venues are being touted for their economic development potential. Meanwhile, state-backed efforts to lure businesses may not be getting as much bang for their taxpayer bucks. The Department of Economic Opportunity released the names of six companies it says received state incentive money to create jobs but didnt deliver as many jobs as promised. The South Florida SunSentinel and Orlando Sentinel reported that nearly $40 million has been paid in incentives to companies that have fallen short of promised job creation by 3,600 jobs. Almost all of the incentive packages were negotiated a few years ago, when Charlie Crist was governor. One company, Gartner, Inc., was paid $1.2 million from 2009 to 2011 to create 400 jobs, but appears not to have been credited with any, the Sentinel papers reported. The state is renegotiating terms with the companies. COURTS A federal judge on Monday barred the state from drug testing applicants for federal nancial assistance until the lawsuit challenging the new law is resolved. U.S. District Court Judge Mary Scriven rejected the states arguments that the drug-testing program did not violate the U.S. Constitutions ban on unreasonable searches and would instead ensnare thousands of would-be welfare recipients in an impermissible dragnet. Meanwhile, a state circuit judge heard arguments this week on whether a proposed constitutional amendment making it easier for taxpayer funds to go to religious institutions should go on the ballot in November 2012. Leon Circuit Judge Terry Lewis is being asked to throw out the proposal crafted by lawmakers earlier this year. A lawsuit filed by the Florida Education Association, says the ballot language is misleading. STORY OF THE WEEK: Two: a federal judge in Miami issued an injunction, barring the state from enforcing its mandatory drug testing of federal cash assistance until a lawsuit challenging the law is resolved. And U.S. Rep. Connie Mack enters the U.S. Senate race, at least giving the Republican eld a name more than a few people know. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Its going to get a lot more fun, Jennifer Duffy, senior editor of the Cook Political Report on the entrance of Connie Mack into Floridas Senate race.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Its a Mack Attack in Senate raceJudge sounds skeptical of pension changesBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 26 The judge tasked with deciding the fate of an overhaul of the states pension plan voiced extreme skepticism about the plan last week, endangering one of the key accomplishments of the last legislative session and threatening to blow a nearly billion-dollar hole in the current budget. In one particularly pointed exchange, Circuit Court Judge Jackie Fulford forcefully pressed a lawyer for the state on how the changes to the pension plan, including a requirement that employees contribute 3 percent of their pay to their retirement and the elimination of cost-of-living adjustments for any work after June 30, 2011, would affect one of the state employees suing over the revamp. Hes paying more, getting less and in fact, the COLA does change. ... Its like youre punishing him for continuing to work, said Fulford, who took the rare step of leaving the bench to point to a display on the wall while making her points. The legal questions about the changes to the pension plan revolve around whether the changes to the program break a portion of the law declaring the system a contractual obligation between the state and its employees. The employees and unions suing the state contend that the changes go too far. Attorneys defending the plan say it falls within the bounds of a 1981 Florida Supreme Court decision allowing the Legislature to alter pensions as long as it only does so with bene ts earned after the law takes effect. It happens only in the future, said David Godofsky. It affects only the bene ts earned in the future. But Ron Meyer, a lawyer for the Florida Education Association, argued that asking employees to contribute some of their income went to the very heart and structure of the pension plan. And the complicated formula for guring out the cost-of-living adjustments essentially lowers the COLA percentage for current employees. Meyer said the Legislature would have been within its rights to make those changes for new employees alone. But the state got greedy, he told Fulford. The state wanted more money. Under the plan approved by the Legislature earlier this year, cost-of-living increases will not apply to wages earned after June 30 leaving those employees who worked for the state before then with a split set of bene ts. The 3 percent COLA remains in effect for bene ts earned before that date, but doesnt apply for those earned after the cutoff. The state will calculate the COLA for those employees by reducing the 3 percent threshold based on how long after June 30 an employee works. That effectively lowers the COLA for those employees, breaking the states agreement, Meyer and an expert witness for the plaintiffs argued. The state and its expert countered that the annual COLA dollar amount employees receive will be the same as if they retired today; it simply wont increase as much as it would if the COLA were applied to bene ts earned in the future. The net effect is zero on the COLA, said Paul Zeisler, an actuary who served as the states expert. Fulford sounded skeptical. The bene t from the COLA goes down period, right? she pressed Zeisler, who denied that would be the effect. She also questioned the notion that asking employees to contribute to the plan for the rst time in more than 35 years could be compared to the changes in the calculation of bene ts the Supreme Court was weighing in the earlier case. But youre not changing their benefits, she said. Youre saying, Give me money for it.Feinberg is grilled on claims processGulf Coast members of Congress expressed frustration Thursday at what some said were dif culties in getting rightful compensation from BP by people who were affected by last years Gulf oil spill. In questioning Gulf Coast Claims Administrator Ken Feinberg, the House Natural Resources Committee urged him to be more aggressive in making sure those who lost money because of the spill last year. Id have to say were frustrated, many of us feel frustrated in the whole process, said Rep. Steven Palazzo, a Republican who represents the Gulf coastal area of Mississippi. Id also say were insulted. Members said theyre worried about the number of claims that arent being paid because of alleged fraud or lack of documentation. Is it not true that the burden you have placed on many of these individuals and businesses for additional info.that there has been a great inconsistency in the payment process, asked Rep. Jo Bonner, RAla. Feinberg defended the work of the claims facility, which is paying compensation out of a $20 billion pot set aside by the British oil company. I point, with pride frankly, to the fact that overall theres $6 billion thats gone out in one year, Feinberg said, adding that the claims facility is trying to make sure that all legitimate claims are paid. The Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in April of last year, killing 11 and spilling 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf. the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringAnne urmondOctober 2011 Winner Her name was drawn fromI would like to thank all of the local businesses for sponsoring this contest. My husband and I are looking forward to visiting each restaurant. We enjoy the personal relationships we have with these local establishments. OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations ank You So Much! Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor PARTNE R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special! Let us perk u p your day! LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatTry One of Our Home Made Parfaits 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Two Sections 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 44th Issue Thursday, November 3, 2011 The Wakulla n ewsFront row, left to right, Clara Alford, Madison Brown, Summer Broga, and in the back row, right to left, Madelyn Montpellier, Marina Harvey, Ella Roberts, Rachel Freeman, Alysse Warburton. Try Its: Media On my honor, I will try: To serve God and my country, To help people at all times, And to live by the Girl Scout Law.Girl Scouts Troop 165 visit This page sponsored in part by: List 10 words that rhyme with time. 1. ______________ 2. ______________ 3. ______________ 4. ______________ 5. ______________ 6. ______________ 7. ______________ 8. ______________ 9. ______________ 10. _____________What Rhymes withSome answers: chime, crime, dime, grime, Im, lime, mime, prime, rhyme, slime Answers: 1) Fact, 2) Fiction, every four years, a Leap Year takes place and February has 29 days, 3) Fiction, November has just 30 days, whereas other months have 31, 4) Fact, 5) Fiction, seven months have 31 days, 6) Fact, 7) Fiction, June has just 30 days, while July and August have 31 days, 8) Fiction, March has 31 days, while April and September have 30, 9) Fact, 10) Fact Years are divided into 12 months, January through December. Some months are shorter than others. Do you know how many days are in each month? Take this quiz and find out.1) February is the shortest month of the year. Fact or Fiction?2) There are only 28 days in February. Fact or Fiction?3) November is the longest month of the year. Fact or Fiction?4) There are more months with 31 days than 30. Fact or Fiction?5) Eight months have 31 days. Fact or Fiction?6) Four months have 30 days. Fact or Fiction?7) June and July have 31 days, Fact or Fiction?8) March, April and September have 30 days. Fact or Fiction?9) May and October have 31 days. Fact or Fiction?10) January and December have 31 days. Fact or Fiction? Fact or Fiction? Month Challenge What Time Is It?The answer to that question depends upon where you are in the world. At midday in Chicago, your watch might read 12 p.m., Friday, January 15, 2010, whereas in Sydney, Australia, it would read 5 a.m., Saturday, January 16, 2010. The difference in time around the world has to do with the International Date Line and time zones. The International Date Line is an imaginary line in the middle of the Pacific Ocean that divides the earth into two days. Generally places in the eastern hemisphere are a day ahead of places in the western hemisphere. Earth is divided into time zones. The United States has several, including Eastern, Central, Mountain and Pacific Standard Time. Generally, the farther west the area, the earlier in the day it is. At 7 p.m. Central Time in Chicago, it is 6 p.m. Mountain Time in Denver and 5 p.m. Pacific Time in Los Angeles. COLORING PICTURE Name That TimeMost clocks have two arrows. The short arrow is known as the little hand and tells the hour. The long arrow is known as the big hand and tells the minute. When the little hand is on 11 and the big hand is on 12, for example, it is 11 oclock. Write in the time under each clock face pictured.Answers: 1) 12 oclock, 2) 9 oclock, 3) 1 oclock, 4) 6 oclock 4) ______ oclock 3) ______ oclock1) ______ oclock2) ______ oclock Jokes and RiddlesQ: What month has 28 days?A: All of them! A: The letter M. Q: What occurs once in a minute, twice in a moment and never in a thousand years?Daylight Savings Time ends Sunday, November 6 Dont forget to turn back your clock 1 hour.

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Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com RestaurantSpaceAvailable Soon!! Fullyequipped.Canassumefullliquorlicenseand equipmentifyouactquickly! Call 850-421-5039 for more info. 110 Help Wanted Certified Prescribed Burner Prescribed burner needed. Full-time or part-time employment. Must have burn experience, including 130-190 certifications, heavy equipment operation, and clean driving record. Salary negotiable. Contact Bobbie Dugger with B&B Du gg er Inc. 850-566-0831. Part-TimeFriday,Saturdayand Sunday.ExperiencedFrycook, grill/prep,butnotlimitedto.The WarfExpressatSummerCamp. ContactSandy850-697-2277 (Thursday-Saturday). 111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted Physicians Assistant Needed LookingforPhysicianAssistant forverybusymedicalofficethat servicesprimarycare,urgent careandcountyinmates.Positionisfulltime.Ifyouareinterestedandwouldliketolearn moreaboutthisposition,please faxresumetofax850-926-3163, A ttn:RachelBrown.Pleasebe suretoincludesalaryrequirements. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 A IR CON OF WAKULLA Heating and Cooling Gary Limbaugh 926-5592 3232 Crawfordville Highway Service, Repair, Installation FL Lic. #CAC1814304. ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. Nos. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 130 Entertainment ZumbaWakulla,VFWPost4538, 475ArranRd.,Saturdays 9AM-10AMandonThursdays 6:30PM-7:30PM.$5/class.Party yourselfintoshape!CallPamat 459-5279orKimat251-9195. Look us u p in facebook! 255 Guns GUN SHOW Tallahassee Mall Sat.,Nov-5,9AM-5PM,Sun., Nov-6,9AM-4PM.GunTradersis nowbuyingGOLD!Concealed WeaponsClassesDaily.Bring yourGUNS&GOLDtosello r trade. GunTraderGunShows.com 352-339-4780 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org Lookingforagoodhomeforan 18-monthold,blackandwhite, spayedandmicrochippedcat. A bout10lbs.andasweetpersonality.Indoor/outdoor.Current withshotsandfleatreatment. Call 850-926-7451. LOW COST PET VACCINATIONAnimal Health Services will be at the CHATAdoption Center1 Oak Street, CrawfordvilleSATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5from 12:30pm to 1:30pm for more information call 926-0890 355 Yard Sales FIRSTFRIDAY&SATURDAY!8AM 2PMNO EARLYBIRDSMini-Warehouse-Boats-RV s519-5128508-51772MILESSOUTHOFTHECOURTHOUSEYARD SALE ForeverFriendsFarmandCauzicanCareWeeklyYardSale! EveryThursday,FridayandSaturdayatMacksMeats(corner ofSpringCreekHwy.and ShadevilleRd.)Lotsofstuff. Proceedstobenefitrescuedanimals. HUGESALE!Sat.,Nov.5, 8AM-1PM42CynthiaSt.(of f HarveyMillRd).Fullbed,accent table,chairs,misc.camping equipment,NASCARscanner w/dualheadphones,6000Lb. tow-hitch,holidayandhomedecor,jewelry/watches,purses, luggage,girlsclothing/shoes, much more. HugeYardSale!Sat./Nov.5, 8AM-1PM,43Timberwood Court(WakullaStation).Fishing items,collectibles,toys,tools, VHS,DVDs,LotsofMiscellaneousitems.421-6138.Canceli f rain. GIGANTICYARD SALEUnder the gigantic mastodon on Martin Luther King Road! HarvestThriftStore.1596CrawfordvilleHwy.NorthPointe Plaza.ISNOWOPEN!Mostall clothesandshoes$1.00.Nice nic-nacs.Comeseeourtwofo r one rack! HugeMulti-FamilyYardSale!! Saturday,November5,9AM, 117ApacheeRd.(Turnon FeatherTrailoffofSpringCree k Hwy.) Look for the signs. INDOOR FLEA MARKET at Crawfordville Womans Club $15 donation for an 8x10 space Saturday, November 12, 2011 Call Nita Burke at 294-6482 to reserve your space. MultiFamilySale!!Saturday, 11/5,7:30AM-12Noon152Fox RunCircle,Crawfordville.All proceedsbenefitYouthwitha Mission. 440 Personals and Notices Singlewhitemale62lookingfo r female.Ihaveanicehomein Panacea.Liveinfree (room-&-board).Lighthousekeepingandcompanionship. LetsMeet.Wes984-5733.No lar g e women p lease.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Efciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 64 Blackfoot 1,300sf 3BR/2BA House with ofce & garage $850 Mo. No Smoking/Pets negotiable52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets36 Stephen Donaldson Road 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 1 Acre $700 No Smoking or petsAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate Lynn Cole-Eddinger lynncole5228@msn.comDavid Hoover dhoover2@hotmail.com NEW LISTING24 LAKE ELLEN, 3bedroom, 2 bath,double wide mobile home on 2 lotsdown the street from boat ramp. New metal roof, new ooring in living areas. All appliances including washer and dryer. Asking $32,900. REDUCED PRICE 23 HARBOUR POINT DRIVE, Immaculate furnished 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath 1774 sq. foot townhome on deep water canal w/dock. Community pool, oating dock, & gated community. Reduced to $229,000 457 HUNTERS TRACE/HUNTERS GLEN PLANTATION, Ultimate 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath all brick, custom built home on 20 acres in gated community. Reduced $25,000! Go to COASTWISE. HOMESANDLAND.COM to view a list of all the special features and see pictures of this gorgeous home then call David or Lynn for appointment. FEATURED LISTING 14 HARRIS CIRCLE, BUCKHORN CREEK, Good as new, shows like a model home. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, mobile home with covered front porch and screened back porch. Backs up to Wildlife preserve and has private access to deep water landing providing quick access to the Ochlockonee River. Asking $69,000 Call David! COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. (850) 926 ~ (850) 926 fax 520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Ofce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. BALLROOMONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE!Alabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Many Selling Absolute!Tuesday, November 15, 6:00 p.m.215 Bank Foreclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information 91 Culbreath Lane, Crawfordville, FL 88 Midnight Pass, Crawfordville, FL 2 Lots on Block D Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville, FL .516 +/acres on the east side of Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Lot 49 Southside of Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 20 Lots in the Sellars Crossing Subdivision, Crawfordville, FL 45 Harry Morrison Road, Crawfordville, FL Lots 3 & 4 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, FL Lot 24 Mashes Sand Road, Panacea, FLSelling from St. James Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Road, Carrabelle, FL 4Br 2Ba House $1220mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $800mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1200mo + Sec. Dep. 2 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.(850) 926 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens,CAH,GoodFloorPlan. $675/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease. A vailblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-508-8783 727-642-6043. 3BR/2BAM/Hforrent.Large deck,shed,roomy,quient neighborhood.Nopets-FIRM! A vailableOctober1st.Callfo r appt./application.$685/month, $600/security. 850-926-6212. Nice4BR/2BADoublewideon oneacre.NearMedartElementarySchool.C/H/A,utilityroom, fireplace.Rent$795/month.Garbagepick-upincluded.Call 850-228-7197. 605 Statewide Classi eds A nnouncements A dvertisingthatWorks.Putyou r adinOver100PapersthroughoutFloridaforoneLOWRATE! Call(866)742-1373orvisit: www.florida-classifieds.com Auctions MAJORLANDAUCTION-5228 +/-Acressoldin35tracts. TractslocatedinBenton,Henry, Carroll,PerryCountiesinTennesseeandCallowayCounty, Kentucky.SALEAheldThursday,November17,at2PMat ParisConventionCenterin Paris,TN.SALEBheldFriday November18,at1PMatPerry CountyCommunityBuildingin Linden,TN.Inspectionmeetings heldNovember4and11from 2-6PMatPerryCountyCommunityBuildinginLinden,andon November5and12from2-6PM attheHamptonInninParis. Woltz&Associates,Inc.;Real EstateBrokers&Auctioneers, Roanoke,VA.KY#72173, TL#2752.Goto www.woltz.com/755/orcall (800)551-3588formoreinformation. Autos Wanted CASHFORCARS!AnyMake, Model,orYear.WePayMORE! RunningorNot.SellYourCaro r TruckTODAY.FreeTowing!Instant Offer: (888)420-3807 Business Opportunities THINKCHRISTMAS,START NOW!OWNAREDHOT!DOLLAR,DOLLARPLUS,MAILBO X ORDISCOUNTPARTYSTORE FROM$51,900WORLDWIDE! 100%TURNKEY(800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.COM Education A LLIEDHEALTHcareer training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com Help Wanted A pplyNow,12DriversNeeded Top5%Pay2Mos.CDLClass A DrivingExp(877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Drivers:RunGA,AL,MS,TN & FLHOMEWEEKENDS,EarnUp to39/mi,1yrOTRFlatbedexp. Call:SUNBELTTRANSPORT, LLC (800)572-5489 ext. 227 Miscellaneous A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhighpayingAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769 A TTENDCOLLEGEONLINE fromHome.*Medical,*Business, *Paralegal,*Accounting,*CriminalJustice.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.Call (888)203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com. SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instoc k readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Out of Area Real Estate Pre-GrandOpeningSale!6.34 acresw/directlakefrontage only$29,900!Brandnew,neve r beforeoffered!Gorgeous woodedsettingwithdeepwate r frontageonspectacularlake. Pavedrds,power,phone,much ,p,p, more.Unheardofprices-excellentfinancing.Hurryoutfor1st pick!Callnow(866)952-5302.x 67 BeautifulHomeon66Acres A uctionThursday,Novembe r 17th,10AMRoopville,Carroll County,GA10%BP,GAL#316 JLToddAuctionCo (800)241-7591 www.jltodd.com NewloghouseinFancyGap, Virgnia.Recessionprices,139k. 5acres42K.Magnificentviews, creeks,waterfalls,Paved,MountainTop.Call(336)210-2999o r visit mountainlandvirginia.com. 680 Legal Notices 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-216-C A CENTENNIALBANK,assuccessorininterest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. EDWARDR.LANGFORDandKARLYNC. LANGFORD, husband and wife, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISGIVENthatpursuanttoaFinal JudgmentofForeclosuredatedOctober6, 2011,intheabove-styledcause,Iwillsellto thehighestandbestbidderforcashinthe LobbyoftheClerk'sOffice,oftheWakulla CountyCourthouseinCrawfordville,Florida, onNovember10th,2011,at11:00a.m.,the following described property: EXHIBIT "A" Lot11,BlockC,SectionsC&D,OchlockoneeShores,asubdivisionaspermapor platthereofrecordedinPlatBook1,Page 17,ofthePublicRecordsofWakulla County, Florida. Subjecttoeasements,restrictionsandreservations of record. (ParcelIdentificationNumber:07-6S-01 W-027 -04697 -000). Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyowner(s)asofthedateoftheLis Pendens,mustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. DATED ON October 7, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court LAWYER FOR PLAINTIFF: Mary Ellen Davis, Esquire 17 High Drive, Suite C Post Office Box 1720 Crawfordville, FL 32326 (850) 926-6003 October 27, 2011 November 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-252-CA CENTENNIALBANK,asSuccessorinInterest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREWM.BAKER,amarriedman,the UnknownSpouseofAndrewM.Baker,andanyandallOthersClaimingInterestsBy, Under,ThroughorAgainstANDREWM. BAKER, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TODEFENDANTS,ANDREWM.BAKER, THEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOFANDREW M.BAKER,ANDANYANDALLOTHERS CLAIMINGINTERESTSBY,UNDER, THROUGHORAGAINSTANDREWM. BAKER,ANDALLPARTIESHAVINGOR CLAIMINGTOHAVEANYRIGHTTITLE ORINTERESTINTHEPROPERTY PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.Familial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthehear ing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 515 Apartments for Rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99Application Fee $35 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 500 Real Estate Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BAone-storyhomeon1.5 lotwithgarage.Excellentcondition.$95,000.Ownerfinancing. 850-251-7588 850-962-2016. 555 Houses for Rent 2BR/1BA,duplexneardowntownCrawfordville.$600/month, $500/security. Call 566-7391. 3BR/1BA(onstilts).$700/month, plusutilities.Nopets!Pleasecall 850-926-2766 for more details. 3BR/1.5BAhomeinWakulla Gardens,$600/month,plusdeposit. Call 850-766-0170. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. Homes on Acreage Home on 3 acres. 2BR/2BA, porch, storage building, large oak trees, conveniently located near post office and Walgreens. $625/month. Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $695/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. Medart,studiohouseonfou r lots.$550/permonth,plusdeposit. Revell Realty 962-2212. Residential/Commercial,house forrentinthecenterofCrawfordville.2BR/1BA.Callformore details. 850-926-9782. 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCreek Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 2BR/2BA,SW,MHforrent. NorthofCrawfordville. $550/month.First,lastanddep osit. 850-960-4230. 535 Comm. Property for Sale

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 Page 9B Brain Teaser 1 14 17 22 26 30 46 50 53 57 60 2 20 33 41 3 42 4 27 43 18 23 38 47 5 15 34 44 54 58 61 6 31 55 7 28 51 8 24 48 9 25 45 19 21 32 39 10 16 29 35 52 59 62 11 36 49 12 37 13 40 56 ACROSS1.Sportingwingtips 5.Predatory whales 10.Have the nerve 14.Golfer Isao __ 15.Boilsorbroils 16.QED middle 17."The Bridge on the River Kwai" tune, to a cheating golfer? 20.Brand that "nobody doesn'tlike" 21.Quite similar 22."Beavis and Butthead"chuckle 23.Wordbeforekiteor turtle 24.Hard-working sort 26.Outelder's yell 28.Form 1040 completer 29.Bottom-line gure 30.Deepsleeps 31.Agronomists' concerns 33.Shutterbug's command, to a cheating golfer? 38.Had a row? 39."Amistad" character 41.Go bad 44.Hightailedit 45.Propelledlikea shueboarddisk 46.Pooh-poohed 48.Bloomers worn around the neck 49.USNAgrad 50.Role for Patti or Madonna 51.Unyielding 53. Is in ne fettle, toa cheating golfer? 57."Rule, Britannia" composerThomas 58.Jelly avor 59.Watchreadouts, briey 60.Hanoi holidays 61.Surfer wannabe 62.Smeltery materialsDOWN1.Cul-de-__ 2.Slammer 3.State with a panhandle 4.Noted Christian 5.Spottedwildcat 6.Pricey timepiece 7.Faceone's responsibilities 8.Rapsheetletters 9.LatviaorLithuania, once:Abbr. 10.Admit to a poker game 11.Rollin, so to speak 12.Handful for Serena orVenus 13.Obsolete anesthetic 18.Oreo makers 19.Fold, spindle,or mutilate 22."How Dry IAm" punctuation, maybe 24.Gathered intelligence 25.Chaucerpiece 27.Titfor __ 28.Skater Sasha 31.Valuableviolin, for short 32.Sushi alternative 34.Also-ranof fable 35.Day-__ paints 36.Lilac color 37.Night, to poets 40.Magazine VIPs: Abbr. 41."One if by land" man 42.Pointin theright direction 43.Bibliography data 45.Bottom-feeder's milieu 46.Make more lean 47."__Kapital" 48.Parkinsonism treatment 51.Just__(the slightestbit) 52.Hesangabout Alice's 54."That'sdisgusting!" 55.Country club gure 56.Trickyturn American Prole Hometown Content 10/9/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 1 23 452 678 87 396 23 94 12657 2 87 735 916 00 9 HtCtt 591 4287 6 3 784653219 362197485 875 349126 236571894 149286357 423 865971 617932548 958714632 S A C H I C D E F A T H O O S E G O W R E V E R E O K L A H O M A O R I E N T D I O R T A T T I T L E S N A B I S C O D A S O C E L O T H A R E U G H R O L E X S T R A D P R O C O P E C O H E N A T A D A K A S P I E D L D O P A S S R T A L E S E A B E D M A R S A S H I M I D E A L I N G L O A R L O A R R I V E L A V E N D E R R A C K E T E V E N T I D E E T H E R E D S E S S Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com681 Foreclosure Proceedings OSO HEREIN DESCRIBED: YOUARENOTIFIEDThatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots5and6,Block"11"ofPanaceaMineral Springs,Unit1,asubdivisionaspermapor platthereofrecordedinPlatBook1,Page 5,ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 24-5S-02W-057-03130-000) and: Lot55,Block"22"ofWakullaGardens,as permaporplatthereofrecordedinPlat Book1,Page39,ofthePublicRecordsof Wakulla County, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 00-00-035-008-07819-000) hasbeenfiledagainstyou.Youarerequired toserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,if any,totheComplaintonMaryEllenDavis, thePlaintiffsattorney,whoseaddressis MaryEllenDavisLawOffice,17HighDrive, SuiteC,PostOfficeBox1720Crawfordville, Florida32326,onorbeforeDecember12, 2011,andfiletheoriginalwiththeClerkof thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonthePlaintiffsattorneyorimm.ediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated on October 27, 2011 BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011 000093 CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100 Jacksonville, Florida 32256, Plaintiff, v. THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES OFLYLEF.RINKEL,DECEASED,AND ALLOTHERPERSONSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE NAMEDDEFENDANTS;THEUNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS,LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEESOFBETTYC.RINKELA/K/ABETTY RAILEYRINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALL OTHERPERSONSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANTS, DANNYDANFORD,MIKERINKEL,JERRY RINKEL,AMBERGREENE,BARBARA WALLACE,NANCYSYKES,CARISDAVIS, andTHEUNKNOWNTENANTINPOSSESSIONOF25ElizabethStreet,Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENTHAT,pursuanttoPlaintiff'sFinalSummaryJudgmentof Foreclosureenteredintheabove-captioned action,IwillsellthepropertysituatedinWakullaCounty,Florida,describedasfollows, to wit: Lot26,EvergreenAcresUnitNo.II,accordingtotheplatthereof,recordedinPlatBoo k 1,Page(s)77,ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida;togetherwiththatcertain1983EASTMobileHome ID#FS485142FX8740GAanda1972REE MobileHomeID#s2162217BGand 2162217AG. Property Address: 25 Elizabeth Street, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 atpublicsale,tothehighestandbestbidder,forcash,exce p tassetforthhereinaf,,p ter,atpublicsaleonNovember17,2011,at 11:00a.m.EST,orassoonthereafteras thesalemayproceed,tothehighestbidder forcash,exceptasprescribedinparagraph 7,attheWakullaCountyCourthouse,3056 CrawfordvilleHwy,Crawfordville,Florida 32327. Ifyouareasubordinatelienholderclaiming arighttofundsremainingafterthesale,you mustfileaclaimwiththeClerkofCourtno laterthan60daysafterthesale.Ifyoufail tofileaclaim,youwillnotbeentitledtoany remaining funds. NoticetoPersonsWithDisabilities:Ifyou areapersonwithadisabilitywhoneedsany accommodationinordertoparticipateinthis proceeding,youareentitled,atnocostto you,totheprovisionofcertainassistance. PleasecontacttheCourtAdministratorsofficenotlaterthansevendayspriortothe proceeding. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 27, 2011 November 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 65 2010-CA-000028 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC., ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-21 Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD, ALVITA M., et al. Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorFinalJudgmententerinCaseNo. 652010-CA-000028oftheCircuitCourtof the2NDJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,wherein,THEBANKOF NEWYORKMELLONFKATHEBANKOF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERSCWABS,INC.,ASSET BACKEDCERTIFICATES,SERIES 2006-21,isPlaintiff,and,HOWARD,ALVITAM.,et.al.,areDefendants,Iwillsellto thehighestbidderforcashattheLOBBYof theCourthouse,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327,atthehourof 11a.m.onthe1stdayofDecember2011, the following described property: LOT10BLOCK52WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT5ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPOR PLATTHEREOFRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK1PAGE56OFPUBLICRECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesales,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwith60daysafterthe sale. DATED this 26th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 37-2010-CA-00188 6 SEC.: ______________ AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, v. ANGELAD.FINDLAY ; CHRISTOPHER ; FINDLAY;ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIESCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER, ANDAGAINSTTHEHEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES MAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSES, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHERCLAIMANTS;andAMBERVALLEY HOMEOWNERSASSOCIATION,INC. F/K/ATIMBERRIDGEHOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF TALLAHASSEE, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalSummaryJudgmentofForeclosuredatedOctober13,2011,enteredin CivilCaseNo.37-2010-CA-001886ofthe CircuitCourtoftheSecondJudicialCircuit inandforLeonCounty,Florida,whereinthe Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highestbidderforcashon18thdayofNovember,2011,at11:00a.m.,intheNorthRotunda,PlazaLevel,LeonCountyCourthouse,301S.MonroeStreet,Tallahassee, Florida32301,relativetothefollowingdescribedpropertyassetforthintheFinal Judgment, to wit: LOT17,BLOCK"B",VILLAGESATWILSONGREEN,ASUBDIVISIONASPER MAPORPLATTHEREOF,RECORDEDIN PLATBOOK16,PAGE67,OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFLEONCOUNTY,FLORIDA. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance.Pleasecontact:CourtAdministrator Phone: (850) 577-4401 Ifyouarehearingorvoiceimpaired,call FloridaRelayService,hearing 800-955-8771, voice 800-955-8770. DATEDATTALLAHASSEE,FLORIDA THIS18th DAY OF October, 2011. BOB INZE R CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sANGELA BRADFORD AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Leon County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 27, 2011 November 3, 2011 INTHECIRCUITCOURTOFTHE2 n dJU DICIALCIRCUITOFFLORIDA,INAND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CASE # 2009-CA-000470 DIVISION #: BACHomeLoansServicing,L.P.f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. DebraMooreDyala/k/aDebraA.Dyaln/k/a DebraStory,IndividuallyandasCo-PersonalRepresentativeoftheEstateofJames ClarenceStorya/k/aJamesC.Story,DeceasedandRebeccaL.Story,Individually andasCo-PersonalRepresentativeofthe EstateofJamesClarenceStorya/k/a JamesC.Story,Deceased;UnknownHeirs, Devisees,Grantees,Assignees,Creditors, LienorsandTrusteesofJamesClarence Storya/k/aJamesC.Story,Deceased,and allotherPersonsClaimingBy,Through,UnderandAgainsttheNamedDefendant(s); UnknownPartiesinPossession#1;UnknownPartiesinPossession#2;Ifliving, andallUnknownPartiesclaimingby, through,underandagainsttheabove namedDefendant(s)whoarenotknownto bedeadoralive,whethersaidUnknown PartiesmayclaimaninterestasSpouse, Heirs,Devisees,Grantees,orOtherClaimants Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan Orderreschedulingforeclosuresaledated October13th,2011enteredinCivilCase No.2009-CA-000470oftheCircuitCourtof the2ndJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,whereinBACHomeLoan Servicing,L.P.f/k/aCountrywideHome LoanServicing,L.P.,PlaintiffandDebra MooreDyala/k/aDebraA.Dyaln/k/aDebra Story,IndividuallyandasCo-PersonalRepresentativeoftheEstateofJamesClarence Storya/k/aJamesC.Story,Deceasedand RebeccaL.Story,Individually,andas Co-PersonalRepresentativeoftheEstateof JamesClarenceStorya/k/aJamesC. Story,Deceasedaredefendant(s),Iwillsell tothehighestandbestbidderforcash,AT THEFRONTLOBBYOFTHEWAKULLA COUNTYCOURTHOUSELOCATEDAT CHURCHSTREET,HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE,FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M.,onNovember17,2011,thefollowing describedpropertyassetforthinsaidFinal Judgment, to wit: LOT23,BLOCKA,NORTHWOOD,A SUBDIVISION,ACCORDINGTOTHEMAP ORPLATTHEREOF,ASRECORDEDIN PLATBOOK2,PAGES91THROUGH97, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSONCLAIMINGANINTEREST INTHESURPLUSFROMTHESALE,IF ANY,OTHERTHANTHEPROPERTY OWNERASOFTHEDATEOFTHELIS PENDENSMUSTFILEACLAIMWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATEDatCRAWFORDVILLE,Florida,this 14th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 27, 2011 November 3, 2011 682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF AUCTION UndertheauthorityoftheFloridaStorage facilityActthepropertydescribedbelowhas beenseizedfornonpaymentofrentand otheraccruedexpenses.Thepropertywill besoldatauctiontothehighestbidderas providedbytheselfstoragefacilityact 83.806DoubleDstorageLLCreservesthe righttorefuseanyandallbids.CashOnly. AmandaBass,Unit#37&23household items,CherylLongUnit#10household items.AuctiontobeheldatDoubleDStorageLLC289CajerPoseyRd.Crawfordville FL 32327 November 11, 2011 at 5:00 pm. November 3, 10, 2011 690 Gov Tax Notices NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 030 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 1490 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-078-013-10770-00 MAGNOLIA GARDENS LOT 47 BLK A OR 10 P 612 OR 204 P 367 NameinwhichassessedJOSHUACADAMS&ANGELAMAONEsaidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuchcertificateshallbesoldto thehighestbidderatthecourthousedooron the7thdayofDecember,2011,at10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 031 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 928 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-035-008-07103-000 WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT I BLOCK 12 LOT 21 OR 1 P 846 NameinwhichassessedWALTERSTEVEN&LILLIANODELLsaidpropertybeing intheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida. Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemed accordingtolawthepropertydescribedin suchcertificateshallbesoldtothehighest bidderatthecourthousedooronthe7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 032 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDE CARTERKSRORDELORISSFORT WROStheholderofthefollowingcertificate hasfiledsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobe issuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 412 Year of Issuance 2003 Description of Property Parcel 25-5S-02W-046-03538-000 AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK U LOT 17 OR 46 P 56 NameinwhichassessedMETAH.WILLIS saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 033 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 1628 Year of Issuance 2003 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-068-000-10108-006 P-1-1-M-23 1.23 AC ML IN SW CORNER OF SW 1/4 OF HS 68 NameinwhichassessedPHILLIPHARVEY saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 034 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 1197 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 35-3S-01E-263-05538-161 VILLAGES OF ST MARKS LOT BB COMMERCIAL LOT OR 293 P 623 OR 594 P 255 NameinwhichassessedLACYA.&MARY T.MURRAYsaidpropertybeinginthe CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unless suchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuch certificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidder atthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 035 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 930 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 15-3S-01W-000-04397-000 15-3S-1W P-16-M-64 IN FRACTIONAL SW 1/4 OR 4 P 394 OR 36 P 732 NameinwhichassessedVENETTAJ. WALKERsaidpropertybeingintheCounty ofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuch certificateshallberedeemedaccordingto lawthepropertydescribedinsuchcertificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidderat thecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 036 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 993 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 07-6S-01W-301-04626-A01 BULAH'S COVE SUBDV LOT 1 OR 491 P 13 OR 659 P 497 NameinwhichassessedJOHNNYPETRANDISIIsaidpropertybeinginthe CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unless suchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuch certificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidder atthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 037 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatR.E. MEADOWStheholderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiledsaidcertificateforatax deedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificate numberandyearofissuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty,andthenamesinwhich it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 846 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel # 00-00-005-000-06249-001 P-18-1-M-3 1.31 AC M/L IN THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF HS 3 BEING ON WEST SIDE OF TRIPPLETT RD OR 319 P 427 OR 441 P 327 NameinwhichassessedLINDABAKERS saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comRapid Response Training at Wakulla CorrectionalBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTwenty-nine Rapid Response Teams from around the North Florida region converged on Wakulla Correctional Institutions Harry K. Singletary Training Academy on Oct. 21 for their annual training exercise. Each team represented a prison in the region, spanning from Pensacola to Gainesville. The teams are broken into seven platoons, consisting of four to five teams, and receive training in six different areas, including munitions, platoon and squad formation, a riot and baton scenario and a physical tness competition. The physical tness competition was an obstacle course where each team competed for the best nishing time. Taking home rst place was Gulf Correctional Institution. Second place went to Northwest Florida Reception Center and Holmes Correctional Institution took third place, according to Paula Bryant, with the Public Affairs Of- ce of the Florida Department of Corrections. The Rapid Response Teams are the departments rst responders to incidents and disturbances on prison grounds. They are trained in crowd control and riot suppression, according to the DOC. The teams train monthly and gather to train with their platoons quarterly. All the platoons come together yearly at this event for a training exercise. Rapid Response Team members are required to pass an annual assessment where they are required to perform to a certain standard or they are removed from the team, Bryant said. e annual training exercise includes DOC teams from around the region. A Rapid Response Team member participates in a riot and baton scenario, above, where he learns how to use his baton properly. A platoon engages in a formation exercise, below. Two team members re during the munitions station, bottom, while another squad lines up in formation. At left, a platoon nishes its training exercise at the ring range. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENMore photos online at thewakullanews.com Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011. Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-89 43) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, November 4 Satur day, November 5 Monday, November 7 Friday, November 11 Monday, November 14 Tuesday, November 15 Tuesday, November 22 Friday, November 25 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink)



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Florida Commission on Ethics recently “ nished its final investigation on the possible ethics violation against former County Administrator Benjamin Pingree and found no probable cause in four of the six allegations. The allegations related to a real estate transaction with the chief executive of“ cer of Inspired Technologies, a company that has a contract with the county for IT services. However, probable cause was found that Pingree violated state disclosure laws by failing to disclose a piece of property in Franklin County on his 2007 and 2008 statement of “ nancial interests, according to a press release from the commission. The commission recommended Pingree pay a civil penalty of $400 for the error, which the governor would have to impose by executive order. Continued on Page 2A Special to The NewsA 25-year-old Crawfordville man was shot by a Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputy at 12:14 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 27, after law enforcement of“ cials received eyewitness information that the man was allegedly attempting to break into the USA Grocery convenience store at 2911 Crawfordville Highway, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. The suspect, Curtis Jacob Davis, was observed attempting to gain entry into the store after operating hours. A witness reported that each time a vehicle would pass the location the suspect would run for the south side of the building to conceal himself. Deputies arrived on scene and allegedly discovered the suspect hiding in some bushes. The suspect reportedly refused to comply with law enforcement commands and allegedly lunged toward a deputy with a weapon. The deputy fired his weapon striking the suspect. Continued on Page 16A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 44th Issue Thursday, November 3, 2011 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 6A Community....................Page 7A School...........................Page 8A Sports ..................Pages 9, 10A In The Huddle ............Page 11A Outdoors ...................Page 14A Water Ways...............Page 15A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 17A Business .......................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y Published Weekly, R e a d D a i l y Read Daily SPORTS … 9A Curtis Jacob Davis Pingree ned $400 by Ethics Commission Suspect shot at convenience storeJudge Mike Carter will speak to Historical SocietyBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsOn Tuesday, Nov. 8, the Wakulla County Historical Societys monthly meeting will focus on former county judge Mike Carter. The meeting will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library and begins at 7 p.m. Judge Carter will speak about his term in public of“ ce, including the tale of his election into judgeship that earned him the title Landslide Carter.Ž He will also delve into the history of his family ties to the county, dating as far back as his great-great-great grandfather John Manning Roberts and his wife, Arcadia, who moved to the county around 1850 attempting to start their life together. By the 1860s, J.M. Roberts would be dead, and his wife would remarry. The years would bring forth children and extended family as well as a ” urry of geographical movement for many of them throughout Wakulla and Florida. From Smith Creek to Telogia, from Jackson County to Liberty County and back, Judge Carters early ancestors were a people on the move. As a boy, he was elected school patrol captain. During high school, he was class president of his sophomore, junior and senior classes. In his junior year he was involved in an automobile accident that did severe damage to his left ankle, leaving him to wear a cast for two years. He was still wearing that cast when he entered the University of Florida. Seeking a sense of freedom, but weighed down by his physical ailment, he left the university and went to New York as a merchant seaman. He would sail to France and the Caribbean. It was 1959 when Communist leader Fidel Castro arrived in Havana, greeted by crowds that cheered him as he took hold of power in Cuba, less than 100 miles from Florida. By April, Castro made an unof“ cial visit to the U.S. with speaking engagements at Columbia, Harvard and Princeton universities, saying clearly that revolutions arise due to the state of internal conditions, and that there is no democracy where hunger, unemployment and injustice are plentiful. Continued on Page 16A FILE PHOTOMike Carter and wife Andrea at the recent Historical Society banquet at Wakulla Springs. The former county administrator is cleared of four of six charges, but its found that he failed to disclose property in Franklin County Former Administrator Ben PingreeRay Gray must pay $7,500 in fines for Ethics violations. See Page 2A Crawfordville man is killed in traffic crash. See Page 16A Wakulla County Historical Society meets on Tuesday, Nov. 8, at the public library at 7 p.m. Carters topics are expected to include his family ties to Wakulla, as well as his own world travels … including a stint as a merchant seaman Wakulla RoyaltyWILLIAM SNOWDENWakulla High Schools Homecoming King Cody Cash and Queen Mary Warren Adkison were crowned Friday night at halftime of the Wakulla-Trinity Christian game. For more Homecoming photos, see Page 12A. For coverage of the football game, which Wakulla won, 42-14, see Page 10A.Between Homecoming at Wakulla High School on Friday night and the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival in Panacea on Saturday, there were a number of people wearing crowns this weekendWILLIAM SNOWDENEloise and Ronald Fred Crum were crowned Mullet King and Queen at the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival in Panacea. For more photos, see Page 18A. TRICK OR TREATSee Page 13AVOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles make regional quarter nalsMIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLRiversprings Bears move on to playoffs

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Continued from Page 1A I am extremely pleased with all the “ ndings of the Florida Ethics Commission and the recent outcome of their independent review,Ž Pingree said. I want to thank them for the thorough, professional and timely manner in which their de“ nitive inquiry was conducted.Ž Pingree was in the hot seat for several months at numerous county commission meetings, where residents brought up issues with no-bid contracts, the countys purchasing policy, the increase in the personnel budget and the archiving of county records. In August 2010, Pingree said he asked the Commission on Ethics for a written opinion regarding his real estate purchase, however, he said at the time he was told the board could not give a written opinion until an ethics complaint was “ led. He said he was told a resident planned to “ le a complaint. Residents Renee and Stephen Calhoun, Steve Fults, Debra Fults, Anne Ahrendt, Charles Hickman, John Probert, Valerie LaHart, Larry Roberts and Al Shylkofski ended up “ ling the complaint against Pingree on Oct. 11, 2010. My whole thing is that he hid it from the beginning,Ž Renee Calhoun said of Pingrees real estate purchase. Shortly after the complaint was filed, Pingree reached a settlement agreement with the group. The settlement included the withdrawal of the complaint, that the group couldnt “ le another complaint, that it would remove any written information or material from the internet aboutPingree with respect to the previous activities, that no one can comment negatively about the other party, that Pingrees next employer receive a copy of the agreement, that Pingree submit his resignation and that each party agrees to hold each other harmless relating to the “ ling of the complaint. At the time, Pingree said he chose to enter into an agreement because his new job with the Zoological Society of Florida was pending. Once a complaint is turned over to the Commission on Ethics, it has jurisdiction over the matter and can accept or deny a withdrawal request. In this case, the request was denied. Pingree said he listed all his assets correctly over time, but in two instances, in 2007 and 2008, he listed an asset on the form for an adjacent year. I accepted full responsibility for my oversight and made the correction immediately upon discovery, over a year ago, through the proper re-“ ling process,Ž Pingree said. The modest “ ne applied for my honest mistake is both understandable and appropriate.Ž County Attorney Heather Encinosa, who represented Pingree in the complaint, said Pingree conceded the unintentional errors and “ led an amended form on Oct. 27, 2010. Renee Calhoun said Pingree never disclosed he owned the property until citizens brought the issue forward. Calhoun questioned whether Pingree would have to repay the county for the legal costs associated with this complaint since probable cause was found in two instances. According to county policy, any public of“ cer, employee or agent who is provided defense by the county attorney at the publics expense must repay attorneys fees and costs paid from public funds for their defense for all counts, charges and allegations where they were found to be personally liable by virtue of acting outside the scope of their employment or function or acting in bad faith, with malicious purpose, or in a manner exhibiting wanton and willful disregard of human rights, safety or property. The cost of representing Pingree from Sept. 30, 2010 to June 30, 2011, was a little more than $13,500, according to invoices the county received from Nabors Giblin and Nickerson. Encinosa said Pingree would not have to repay the county because he prevailed in the four counts that alleged he misused his position or accepted a thing of value in exchange for his of“ cial action or that he accepted a thing of value when he knew it was being given to in” uence him. The Commission on Ethics determined there was no basis for those allegations,Ž Encinosa said. And the other two allegations were not contested during the ethics process, she said. Pingree said, As expected, I am proud to con“ rm that the outcome independently supports our integrity, process and good service record.Ž Pingree was county administrator from Jan. 2, 2007, to Nov. 30, 2010. In December 2007, Pingree purchased Craig Goodsons home in Wakulla County and Goodson purchased Pingrees home in Franklin County, according to the investigative report. Goodson is the CEO of Inspired Technologies, a company who has been doing business with the county since 2003. Pingree told the Wakulla County Commission when this issue was brought up in August 2010 that he purchased the home from the individual and it had nothing to do with Inspired Technologies. The report stated that a contract between the county and Inspired Technologies was signed by Pingree on Jan. 10, 2007, however, the contract was negotiated on Nov. 2, 2006, before Pingree took his position. There was also allegations that the countys purchasing policy was violated when a no-bid contract was awarded to Inspired Technologies, but the report states that Assistant County Administrator Tim Barden said the purchases fell under the purchasing policys exemptions. The report stated that there was insuf“ cient evidence to show Pingree solicited or accepted a thing of value, or received a thing of value meant to in” uence his actions as administrator. In response to Pingree misusing his public position by entering into a real estate transaction with a company doing business with Wakulla County and awarding that company a contract, no probable cause was found. Each subsequent contract has been approved by the Board of County Commissioners. There is insufficient evidence to show Respondent used his position for a special privilege, bene“ t or exemption for himself or others,Ž the report stated. The report stated that Pingree did have a contractual relationship with Goodson, but negotiations between the county and Inspired Technologies happened before Pingree took of“ ce and the real estate transaction occurred almost a year after Pingree signed the initial contact and the rest were approved by the County Commission. There is insufficient evidence to show that Respondent had a continuing or frequently recurring con” ict or that there was an impediment to the full and faithful of his public duties,Ž the report said. Pingree resigned from his position in November 2010 and now serves as the chief executive of“ cer of the Zoological Society of Florida in Miami.Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWakulla County School Board Member Ray Gray faces a “ ne of $7,500 for violating the “ nancial disclosure requirements in the Florida Constitution. There were errors and omissions on Grays CE Form 6 for 2005 through 2009, which lists full and public disclosure of “ nancial interests, according to the Florida Commission on Ethics. I over-reported,Ž Gray said. He said he listed extra information on his form, instead of just listing his personal income. He said he listed the gross income of the business, not just his share. I basically gave too much info,Ž Gray said. The commission recommended that Gray pay a “ ne of $1,500 per year. Gray said he had an attorney “ ll out his form in 2010 to ensure he did it properly. The ethics complaint was “ led last year during the election. Included in the complaint was also an allegation that Gray misused his position when he asked a school employee to put his campaign petition in the teachers lounge at school. The commission said it found no probable cause that he misused his position as a school board member, according to a press release. I didnt do anything wrong,Ž Gray said. Gray was re-elected to the school board last November for his fourth term. Ray Gray “ ned $7,500 by Ethics Commission Ray Gray e school board member is fined for violating financial disclosure requirements. I over-reported, Gray says of the violations. Former Administrator Pingree “ ned $400 by Ethics Commission My whole thing is that he hid it from the beginning, says one of the citizens who pursued ethics charges. For his part, Pingree says he is extremely pleased with the “ ndings of the Ethics Commission. NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Interested parties may inspect ordinance at 788 Port Leon Drive and be heard at the meeting. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Office at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 925-6224. NOVEMBER 3, 2011 Member of the Board If you have a question about these actions, contact the Chair of the Clerk of the Value Adjustment Board. NOTICE TAX IMPACT OF VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARDAttention ParentsYour child may be eligible for FREE TUTORINGduring the 2011 2012 school year!• No cost to parents of eligible students • Must receive free or reduced-priced meals to qualify • Must attend COAST Charter School, Crawfordville Elementary or Medart ElementaryPlease contact Sue Anderson, Wakulla County School Board, 926-0065, before November 18, 2011 if you are interested in your child receiving free tutoring.NOVEMBER 3, 2011

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Sign up to receive email notificatioin of new public notices at FloridaPublicNotices.com THE AMENDED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF ST. MARKS GENERALWATERGARBAGESEWERTOTALALL Millage Rate Per $1,0005.0327FUNDFUNDFUNDFUNDFUNDS ESTIMATED REVENUES: Taxes: Ad Valorem Tax150,037 $ 150,037 $ Franchise Fees30,00030,000 UtilityTax30,00030,000 Communications Service Tax12,70512,705 Licenses & Permits4,2904,290 Intergovernmental Revenue36,61836,618 Charges for Services31,642150,00080,00098,000359,642 Miscellaneous Revenues6,3001,0007,300 Other Sources300300 Grant Revenue150,000 TOTAL SOURCES 451,892150,00080,00099,000630,892 Transfers In152,000152,000 Fund Balances/Carried Forward Balances243,0621,618,008 71,0012,119,6854,051,756 Total Revenues, Transfers, and Fund Balances846,954 $ 1,768,008 $ 151,001 $ 2,218,685 $ 4,834,648 $ EXPENDITURES: General Government Services257,995 $ 257,995 $ Physical Environment1,680150,00080,000169,000400,680 TransportationCulture/Recreation24,81724,817 Other Nonoperating17,40017,400 Grant Expenditures150,000 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 451,892150,00080,000169,000700,892 Transfers Out152,000 152,000 Fund Balances/Reserves395,062 1,466,008 71,001 2,049,685 3,981,756 Total Expenditures, Transfers, and Fund Balances846,954 $ 1,768,008 $ 151,001 $ 2,218,685 $ 4,834,648 $ BUDGET SUMMARYCity of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2010-2011The tentative, adopted and/or “nal budgets are on “le in the of“ce of the above mentioned taxing authority as a public record. THE PROPOSED OPERATING BUDGET EXPENDITURES OF THE CITY OF ST. MARKS ARE-8.11% LESS THAN LAST YEAR'S TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES. GENERALWATERGARBAGESEWERTOTALALL Millage Rate Per $1,0005.0327 FUNDFUNDFUNDFUNDFUNDS ESTIMATED REVENUES: Taxes: Ad Valorem Tax150,037150,037 Franchise Fees30,00030,000 UtilityTax30,00030,000 Communications Service Tax-8.1112,70512,705 Licenses & Permits4,2904,290 Intergovernmental Revenue36,61836,618 Charges for Services31,642136,62079,00096,418343,680 Miscellaneous Revenues6,3001,5003,60011,400 Other Sources300300 TOTAL SOURCES 301,892138,12079,000100,018619,030 Transfers In8,00060,00068,000 Fund Balances/Reserves/Net AssetsTOTAL REVENUES, TRANSFERS, AND BALANCES309,892138,12079,000160,018687,030 EXPENDITURES: General Government Services201,109201,109 Physical Environment1,680135,93071,000159,182367,791 TransportationCulture/Recreation24,81724,817 Other Nonoperating17,40017,400 TOTAL EXPENDITURES 245,005135,93071,000159,182611,117 Transfers Out60,000 8,00068,000 Fund Balance4,8862,1918367,913 TOTALAPPROPRIATED EXPENDITURES BALANCES309,892138,12079,000160,018687,030 BUDGET SUMMARYCity of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2010-2011The tentative, adopted and/or “nal budgets are on “le in the of“ce of the above mentioned taxing authority as a public record. SPECIAL MEETING MONDAYNovember 7, 2011 at 6:00 pm Amending Operating Budget of the City of St. Marks for Fiscal Year 2010-2011.The City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224. NOVEMBER 3, 2011

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Crawfordville man killed in traffic crash • Suspect shot trying to break into convenience store • Sheriff’s Report for Oct. 27 • Lawsuit filed against club over wreck • Ray Gray’s termination upheld by committee •Buddy Tooke was first commercial Stone Crabber thewakullanews.com Follow us onBy JO ANN PALMERDirector, KWCB This past Saturday, Oct. 29, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Jefferson County Solid Waste and ESG Operations held their semi-annual Hazardous Waste Day. More than 215 vehicles made their way around the ESG facility to of” oad a record amount of hazardous waste materials. County Commissioner Alan Brock, KWCB President Don Henderson and Secretary Bruce Ashley greeted people with a reusable shopping bag as a thank you. Board member Ray Cade directed cars to their appropriate stop and assisted with sorting and unloading. Doug Jones, Lori Gilbertson, Erica Morse, Woody Palmer, Sherri Kraeft, Marc Dickieson, Mrs. Cleve Fleming and Director Jo Ann Palmer stuffed bags, kept count of the vehicles and answered many questions about the event. Several times during the morning we had cars backed up to Trice Lane, but everyone was patient because they appreciated the opportunity to clean out their garage, attic and in at least one case, their barn. Wakulla High School NJROTC Cadets Blake Bonts, Chris Broussard, Cody Daugherty, Matthew Freeman, Allison Gordon, James Gunn, Mark Hill, Sean Hill, Danielle Howell, Gabe Hutchins, Stanley Linton, Brantley Lockwood, Brandon McCauley, David Moss, Dilyn Sharp, Jacob Sizemore, Riley Welch and former cadet Patrick Fleming, under the direction of Capt. Ron Huddleston, worked tirelessly during the entire event. They unloaded cars in line, pulled and sorted paint cans, stacked electronics and did whatever they were asked. They are a great group of young people and we always appreciate their commitment to KWCB. According to Roller,Ž the lead man on site for Veolia, their truck was full. They pulled away at exactly 1 p.m. with 11 pallets of electronics, which included old televisions, computer parts, lamps, and small appliances, 34 boxes of ” orescent light tubes and 150 pounds of non-PCP batteries. Thats a total of 1,470 burned out lights … the majority of them coming from our local county of“ ces and public schools. The Environmental Quality Company, out of Tampa, pulled away loaded with 47 full drums. Nathan Ehnis, the “ eld chemist, calculated the weight of every item placed in the drums. The list included 4.090 pounds of ” ammable liquids, propane, toxic, oxidizing and chemicals solids, lithium, acid and solid based batteries. They collected 1,230 gallons of ” ammable, toxic and acid liquids. The most unusual item was several gallons and 8 pounds of DDT, which was banned in the U.S. in 1972. Sam and John from Jefferson County hauled away latex paint this year, estimated at 1,225 gallons and three “ re extinguishers. ESG staff Brent Pell, Marvin Lee, Jeff Bearden and Mike King stacked paint into the huge containers using the forklift, shuf” ed heavy equipment, helped the cadets sort and stack paint, answered countless questions, kept everyone safe around their facility. Cleve Fleming was the all around go-to man. He had stayed up a great deal of the night smoking Boston butts for a fundraiser for the United Way. Several people pulled though the line looking for their butt. The “ rst couple of times took us by surprise until we got the story. Cleve provided donuts and pizza for all of us, which is always appreciated, especially by hungry teenagers. Jimmy Freeman of J&K Petroleum from Cairo, Ga., said it was one of the better years. He collected approximately 150 gallons of used oils, fuels, gasoline and diesel. Waste Pro has a couple of full roll-offs from all the otherŽ stuff people brought. So many people expressed their appreciation for what KWCB is doing and encouraged us to keep up the good work. Most people said they come every time we hold the amnesty event, and that they start collecting for the next event right way. Although it is important to think of everything before disposing of it, it is especially important to keep fluorescent lights, including the new smaller ones, batteries of any kind, oil, solvents, antifreeze, gas, diesel and every chemical out of the land“ ll. Thank you to everyone who came out both to help, and dispose of hazardous waste. If you have any questions or comments, please contact Keep Wakulla County Beautiful at helpkwcb@gmail. com or by phone at (850) 735-7111. Remember, reuse where possible, reduce your personal trash and recycle. Its good for everyone. Editor, The News: Thank you so much for your article in Wakulla News about Domestic Violence. We have an annual event called Healing Night that offers a chance for women to express their healing using art, writing, songs or performance. It is free and when I saw your article I knew I had to let you know about it. It is in Tallahassee, but we could have it in Wakulla County if there was enough interest. HEALING NIGHT 2011 Contact us if you would like to participate as a writer, performer or artist. We are looking for all types of creative expression. We want all levels of expertise. This is an event for women who use any art form as an expression of healing from the experience of emotional or physical abuse. It is a powerful display of triumphant journeys. Women are invited to display any type of creative object, read their written work or act in any type of performance piece they choose while in the company of other supportive women. And they can just show up as well. Tell a friend. So many women have experienced a deeper healing through their participation and attendance at Healing Night, an annual event dedicated to women. If you have heard of Healing Night you know how powerful this experience is. Have you written something? Painted something? Have you thought of ways to express your experience of healing? Come join us for another year when women reach another level of their authentic self. It is free. Also, Vickie Spray will facilitate a free (donations accepted) workshop the following day at the same location. Opening Reception Artists Exhibit will be held Saturday, Nov. 5, beginning at 6 p.m. at Abundance Wellness Center, 325 John Knox Road, Building T, in Tallahassee. How Many Freaken Layers Are There? A Spiritual Approach to Healing,Ž a workshop facilitated by Vickie Spray, will be held on Sunday, Nov. 6 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the same location. Please contact us if you would like to be a presenter: Vickie Spray at 322-6944 vickiespray@yourlifeexpressions.com Robin McDougall at 2120760 robin.mcdougall@comcast.org Vickie Spray Tallahassee Editor, The News: A big thank you to everyone involved in making the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival a huge success. The support, participation and the hard work of our festival committee is appreciated beyond the point that words can express. The support of our sponsors helps make this event happen for our community and for the enjoyment of all who attend. Thanks to our “ shermen for the hard work in going out and harvesting the Stone Crabs for all to enjoy. Thanks to our food vendors for supplying fantastic foods and our arts and crafts vendors in providing handmade items that you can only “ nd at events like this. The Kids ZoneŽ provided by Coast Charter School was a fun place to be with all the activities for children to enjoy. But, most of all we want to thank the many people who attended and enjoyed the glorious blessing of a beautiful day with great food, shopping, entertainment and fun. For anyone who was there, you know the result was over the top, and outstanding. To all of these groups and those who attended, we of the St. Marks Stone Crab Committee, wish to extend our heartfelt gratitude, and thanks for making this great event such a success. Thank you. Sincerely, Mike Pruitt Chairman St. Marks Stone Crab Committee Editor, The News: The Volunteer Fire Department of Panacea hosted a wonderful haunted house that many of us thoroughly enjoyed. Thanks to the volunteers and their families for all their efforts in creating a thrill-seekers delight! Lynette Coleman lynette.coleman@gmail.com Editor, The News: A benefit fish fry will be held on Saturday, Nov. 12, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville for the family of Jeanine and Jeff Posey. Jeanine was involved in a serious accident in Perry earlier this month that broke her back and left her paralyzed from the waist down. She and her husband Jeff are currently in Atlanta at Shepards Spinal Cord Clinic where Jeanine will go through extensive therapy and wheelchair training. During their time in Atlanta, neither Jeanine nor Jeff will be able to work. The Nov. 12 benefit is being held to raise funds to help defray the costs of their situation, and to help with the expense of revamping their home to make it wheelchair accessible. The benefit will include food (either fried mullet or pulled pork), entertainment by the Coon Bottom Creek Band and Jerry Evans, a bake sale and yard sale, and face painting and other activities for the kids. Come out and spend the day having fun, and help a local family in their time of need. Thank you in advance.Friends and family of Jeanine Aber-PoseyEditor, The News: My wife has put out Halloween decorations for children since my son was a small child. The past 11 years, we have lived on Tiger Hammock Road. She has put the decorations out and someone stole the Frankenstein decoration we have had for more than 11 years. She is very sad about this and we hoped they would return it. Charles S. Gunter Crawfordville Garbage cans lined up on the road, and what a bear sees.READERS WRITE:Fish fry set to bene“ t Jeanine Aber-Posey Haunted House was thoroughly enjoyed anks for support of Stone Crab Festival Join us for Healing Night in Tallahassee ief, return Halloween decorationsRecord amount of stu brought in for Hazardous Waste Day JO ANN PALMERCounty commissioner Alan Brock greets KWCB President Don Henderson as he drives up at Hazardous Waste Day on Saturday.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 5A By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netResidents, community leaders and advocates gathered at dusk on Oct. 27 to remember those friends, family and loved ones who have been lost to drugs and alcohol and those who are currently struggling with addiction, as well as those who have overcome the disease. The Narcotics Overdose and Prevention and Education Task Force held its third annual candlelight vigil under the pavilion at Hudson Park during Red Ribbon Week, sponsored by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, Disc Village and Big Bend Community Based Care. Gayle Myers of Disc Village said drug overdose is becoming the leading cause of death in the United States. According to NOPEs website, drug overdose deaths are second only to car crashes for unintentional injury deaths. Were going to remember that tonight as we remember those lost,Ž Myers said. The vigils goal is to create awareness about this disease and in turn hopefully eliminate the prejudice that surrounds addiction, which will give hope for survival, according to the website. A video played in the background during the event, showing the names and faces of those who have died around the nation from drug overdose. Family and friends were asked to submit a photo for the memorial video of their loved one. Only a few were submitted from Wakulla County. Judge Jill Walker was the guest speaker for the event and stressed the importance of early prevention and education. Tonight is one of life and death,Ž Judge Walker said. Theres something about putting a face to a very tragic issue that makes it very real for everyone.Ž Walker said young people need to be taught at an early age the dangers of drugs and alcohol and learn the signs of a possible overdose. Prescription drugs have become a huge issue and Oxycodone is one of the most misused drugs, she said. We need to stop the grocery shopping of prescription drugs,Ž Walker said. Walker also spoke of juvenile drug court and the positive effects it has on those teenagers who partake in it. She said those who enter drug court are all different, many who would never be suspected of being a drug user. Theres no single face to drug abuse,Ž Walker said. When someone is showing signs of drug abuse, Walker said the community needs to offer help and support, not ignore the signs. Addiction is a disease, it isnt a character flaw,Ž Walker said. At the end of drug court, Walker makes each participant write an essay about what the class taught them. She shared a few excerpts from those essays during the vigil. One student said, I was a lost soul drowning myself with my own destruction.Ž Walker said those in the community need to continue to bring a better life to those who are addicted. A time was also given for those in the community to give testimonials. Only two people spoke, but their words were powerful. Rachel Ward said she was an addict for several years and didnt make the decision to get sober until the state took her son away from her. She is now sober and about to graduate from Sisters in Sobriety. She has also recently been awarded custody of her son. It is possible,Ž Ward said. Dont lose hope.Ž A man, also an addict, spoke of hope. He told those in attendance not to give up on their loved ones. But told them an addict has to want to change. Following the testimonials, Pastor Jeff McFalls spoke of his 10-year struggle with addiction and his 20plus years of sobriety. He said to remember the good times and good memories of those who have been taken. You can keep them alive in your memory,Ž McFalls said. After the program, all were invited to light a candle and gather in a circle under the night sky for a moment of silence. Afterwards, Superintendent of Schools David Miller played TapsŽ on the trumpet. Ward said she decided to come to the vigil because a part of rehab is about giving back to the community. She wanted to share her story to let those who are suffering know that it is possible and there is hope. How else are they going to know?Ž Ward said. She added that someone might connect with her story and thats whats important, to know that there is someone to talk to who can relate to them. For more information about NOPE, visit www. nopetaskforce.org or call 866-612-NOPE or 926-0024.Candlelight vigil held to remember those lost to addiction KEEPING VIGIL: Members of the community with candles, top; the votive candles are passed out, middle; and Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker, below. 0009ATETravelingJarforChange! Give To Sponsored byDonate Your Change atNew Location EVERY Week! 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Anne R. HutchinsAnne Rozier Hutchins, 87, of Eastpoint, passed away on Oct. 28 in Crawfordville. She was born in Atlanta, Ga., and had been a resident of Eastpoint since 2003. She was a member of Northside Drive Baptist Church in Atlanta. She graduated from Atlanta School of Law. She was a secretary for Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company for 25 years. Graveside services were held Wednesday, Nov. 2, at Westview Cemetery in Atlanta. Survivors include her husband, Ralph K. Hutchins of Eastpoint; two sons, John H. Hutchins (Sue) of Crawfordville and Joseph R. Hutchins (Melanie) of Douglasville, Ga.; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a son, Ken Hutchins, in 1956. Bevis Funeral Home-Harvey Young Chapel was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333).Mack M. LuckettMack McCabe Luckett, 91, of Panacea, passed away on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. His daughter and good friends were with him. He was born Oct. 26, 1920, in West Madison, Ind., where he later farmed for many years. He bought two farms, renovated them and sold each at a pro“ t. He was an avid hunter and “ sherman. He was a World War II veteran and served overseas as a paratrooper and in the Armed Guard. He was also a 32 Degree Mason. His father died early on, and he was working to help support his family by the time he was 15 years old. These were hard times. He ran traplines and later planted trees with the CCC. His many occupations included the railroad, construction supervisor, employment in two mental hospitals, and the Tennessee Valley Authority at Land Between The Lakes, now a state park. He and wife Catherine moved to Wakulla County 27 years ago. He grew a large garden and had fruit trees. She canned a lot, they gave a lot away. He loved his dogs, good music and his family. He was a voracious reader. He traded stories of his life with many friends. He was happiest working in his garden with his little dog Maggie nearby. He was a good friend, neighbor and father. He will be dearly missed. A memorial service was held Saturday, Oct. 29, at Ochlockonee Bay Methodist Church. Survivors include his daughter, Barbara Robinson (Butch); three stepchildren, Linda Lorentzen, Carol Bell, and Jim Cline; grandsons, John, Randy, and Chris Cleveland, Bobby, Gary and Stevie Luckett; one granddaughter, Pam Luckett; several great-grandchildren; and one sister. He was predeceased by his sons, Mack Jr. and Walter Luckett; a grandson, Jeff Luckett; “ rst wife and mother of his children, Louise E. Bennett Luckett; and second wife, Catherine Luckett. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationAnne Rozier Hutchins Mack McCabe Luckett Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Coastal Church News Some upcoming events happening at Wakulla United Methodist Church, located at 1584 Old Woodville Road: Sunday, Nov. 6, at 4:30 p.m. … Chancel Choir Practice. Monday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. … Busy Bee Crafters … Create your Own Wreath.Ž Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 6 p.m. … Praise Team Practice. Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 6 a.m. … Mens Bible Study and Breakfast Meeting (8 a.m.). Thursday, Nov. 10, at 9 a.m … Busy Bee Quilters. The church can be reached at 4215741.Upcoming events at Wakulla UMCSome upcoming events happening at Wakulla United Methodist Church, located at 1584 Old Woodville Road: Sunday, Nov. 6, at 4:30 p.m. … Chancel Choir practice. Monday, Nov. 7, at 7 p.m. … Busy Bee Crafters … Create Your Own Wreath.Ž Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 6 p.m. … Praise Team practice. Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 6 a.m. … Mens Bible study and breakfast meeting (8 a.m.). Thursday, Nov. 10, at 9 a.m … Busy Bee Quilters. The church can be reached at 4215741.Volunteers collecting gifts for needyWhile many Crawfordville families are busy with holiday activities, a group of local volunteers is focused on “ lling empty shoe boxes with school supplies, toys, hygiene items and notes of encouragement for needy kids overseas. Crawfordville families are participating in the worlds largest Christmas project of its kind … Operation Christmas Child … an effort that has hand-delivered 86 million gifts to kids worldwide since 1993. This year-round project of Samaritans Purse is coming to its peak, as local businesses, churches and schools prepare to collect gift-“ lled shoe boxes during National Collection Week, Nov. 14-21. Volunteers can drop off their shoe box gifts at one bustling location in the area to help kids in 100 countries know they are loved and not forgotten. The local drop off site is Crawfordville United Methodist Church, 176 Ochlockonee St. in Crawfordville, on weekdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon, and on Sundays from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Operation Christmas Child, a project of international Christian relief and evangelism organization Samaritans Purse, uses whatever means necessary to reach suffering children around the world with these gifts of hope, including sea containers, trucks, trains, airplanes, boats, camels and dog sleds. Tracking technology also allows donors to followŽ their box to the destination country where it will be hand-delivered to a child in need. To register shoe box gifts and “ nd out the destination country, use the Follow Your Box donation form found at www.samaritanspurse.org/occ. Regular Sunday Services and Times8:30 am Contemporary Worship Service 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship Service 6 pm Evening Service 7 pm Discipleship Training(On Hwy. 319 one block south of the Courthouse)850-926-7896 office www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc.551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES Panacea Full Gospel Assembly12 Taylor Street, Panacea Park Homecoming Revival October 31 November 4 7 P.M. Nightly Special Singing NightlyEVERY ONE WELCOME! GOSPEL SINGMt. Beasor Primitive Baptist Church invites you to join them for a Gospel Sing on Saturday, November 5th at 6:00 p.m. featuring Broken Strings from Coffee County, Alabama. Broken Strings is an acoustic band that enjoys playing Front Porch StyleŽ gospel music. Mt. Beasor P.B. Church is located at 29 Wintrhop Avenue in Sopchoppy.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 7AhappeningsCommunityLong weds Shayna Seres at Bradleys Pond Shayna N. Seres and Thomas A. Long Shayna Nicole Seres and Thomas Austin Long, both of Crawfordville, were married on Oct. 9 at Bradleys Pond in Tallahassee. The ceremony was performed by Pastor John Johnson. The bride is the daughter of Gary Seres and Carma Gordon. She is a graduate of Wakulla High School and Tallahassee Community College. The groom is the son of Tommy Long, Debra Gatlin and Mike Gatlin. He is also a graduate of Wakulla High School. The maid of honor was Elizabeth McCabe and the best man was Levi Workowski, the brother of the bride. The bridesmaids were Amanda Smith, Trista Seres, sister of the bride, Jillian Valim and Kelly Carnivalle. The junior bridesmaid was Macy Musgrove. The groomsmen were Justin Branch, Ben Strickland, Mac Rudd and Matt Greene. The ring bearer was Dex Teat. The couple said of each other that this was the best catch of their lives.ŽBig Brothers Big Sisters “ sh fry will be Nov. 8Special to The NewsWakulla Countys Big Brothers Big Sisters Mentoring Program will host its second annual Big Catch Charity Fish Fry on Tuesday, Nov. 8 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Presented by Waste Pro USA, the dinner event will take place at Poseys Dockside Caf located at 99 Rock Landing Road in Panacea. The events purpose is to raise awareness about Big Brothers Big Sisters in Wakulla County, to raise funds for the growing youth mentoring program and to bring the community together for dinner on a Tuesday night. The “ sh fry will feature shrimp plates, sides and iced tea catered by Poseys, beer for purchase, and live music by The Possums, Brandon Strickland, Cody Solburg and Brian White in a relaxing, family-friendly environment. Youth mentoring advocate, Commissioner Alan Brock, said, Wakulla County has welcomed Big Brothers Big Sisters with open arms. As the agency concludes its “ rst year in the county, serving more children is its top priority. The agency still needs more volunteer mentors, both men and women, to pair with children on its waiting list. We hope the Big Catch Charity Fish Fry will create greater awareness and raise donations to help with volunteer recruitment and ongoing case management.Ž Building awareness and raising sustainable funding will be key to our future growth,Ž said Big Brothers Big Sisters chief executive officer, Louis Garcia. The concept is simple,Ž said longtime Wakulla County resident and program coordinator, Stacy Harvey. After meeting with their mentors twice monthly for a year, children experience improved self-con“ dence, improved relationships with guardians, teachers and peers, avoidance of risky behaviors, and improved academic outcomes. Plainly put, our program works.Ž The “ rst one hundred Big Catch Charity Fish Fry tickets are $10 for two tickets. Guests may secure discounted tickets at Poseys Steam Room (1506 Coastal Highway), Poseys Dockside Caf (99 Rock Landing Road,) or by calling Harvey at 366-3865. Regular tickets are available at those locations or at www.bbbs. org/BIGCatch. For ticket information or to learn more, contact Harvey at wakulla@ bbbsbigbend.org or 366-3865. Wakulla performers in Carrabelle for festivalSteve Stange and Janice McFarland, of Wakulla, singing songs, sea shanties and telling tall tales at the Forgotten Coast Black Bear Festival in Carrabelle on Oct. 15.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNora Duncan joins Society of Collegiate ScholarsNora Duncan of Crawfordville recently accepted membership in the National Society of Collegiate Scholars. She will be honored at South University Onlines induction in the fall. NSCS is the only interdisciplinary honors organization for “ rst and second year students. Membership is invitation only, based on a grade point average and class standing. Senior Service Day will be held at the Senior Center, 22 Michael Drive, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with the Area Agency on Aging. There will be application services for Medicare, home energy assistance, ampli“ ed telephone distribution, Medicaid and food stamp assistance. Bring a form of identi“ cation for application services. Senior Service Day Nov. 8 Find us on Today you are… all of the memories, people, and places that have made you who you are...Today you are… a million precious things, and a hundred different reasons to smile and wish and dream about...Today all the people you know and love are thinking about you! As you celebrate 70 years, its a day to look back on the good things the years have brought, and a day to look forward toall thegood times to come... and most of all, its a day to celebrate the special person you are.Happy 70th Birthday Granny Grannys 70th Birthday Party Nov. 6, 2011 from 1pm 3pm

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schoolsSchoolMohr is Project Learning Tree Educator of the Year SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Special to The NewsMedart Elementary School teacher Brooke Mohr was recently recognized as the 2011 Project Learning Tree Educator of the Year. Mohr will be presented with her award on Nov. 5 at the Riverside Retreat in Labelle during the Florida Project Learning Tree Professional Development Conference. She was awarded a full scholarship, which includes the cost of registration and lodging, to attend the workshop. Funds were also provided for a substitute teacher so Mohr could attend the conference on Nov. 4 and 5. Robin Will submitted the nomination and the PLT committee said it was aware of the many contributions Mohr has made to PLT. Medart Principal Bobby Pearce, Project Learning Tree Educator of the Year Brooke Mohr, Superintendent of Schools David Miller and Chairman of the School Board Mike Scott. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla Middle School bandsWMS bands have upcoming performancesSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Middle Schools bands are off to a very busy start this year. The seventh and eighth grade bands have played at four football games this fall and the eighth graders are played at a high school game on Oct. 21. The eighth graders will also be performing at the Wakulla Middle School Veterans Day program on Nov. 10 and will go on a “ eld trip to play for the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center on Dec. 8. The seventh graders will be traveling to perform for the SEC preschool children on Dec. 15. The sixth grade band will have their musical debut on Nov. 14 in their fall concert at Wakulla Middle School. They will have a “ eld trip to perform for the residents at Eden Springs on Nov. 17. The winter concert for the seventh, eighth and jazz bands will be on Dec. 5 at Wakulla Middle School. Band director, Laura Hudson, is very happy to have a Florda A&M University student intern, Shelvin Robinson, working with the Wakulla Middle School band program this fall. Our band students are thriving at WMS and much of their success is due to the enthusiasm and expertise that Mr. Robinson brings to our program,Ž Hudson said. I hope many people will have the opportunity to hear our students perform at one of their concerts this semester.ŽMinshew will serve on Youth Advocacy BoardSpecial to The NewsFloridas Students Working Against Tobacco (SWAT) kicked off the new school year with a fresh start by introducing new members for its Youth Advisory Board. Ashlynn Minshew of Wakulla County was named Youth Advocacy Board Member. She will serve as one of three representatives for the Northern Region of Florida SWAT. This will be her “ rst year on the board. The mission of SWAT is to mobilize, educate and equip Florida youth to revolt against and de-glamorize the use of tobacco. They are a united movement of empowered youth working towards a tobacco-free future. The Youth Advocacy Board works in collaboration with the Florida Department of Healths Bureau of Tobacco Prevention Program and Tobacco Free Florida to determine the direction and scope of both the SWAT organization and the youth tobacco prevention component of the statewide media campaign. Few words can completely describe the excitement I feel about the upcoming year,Ž Minshew said. I look forward to working together with the statewide board to change opinions about tobacco and help our peers make informed decisions about tobacco use.Ž Members of the SWAT Youth Advocacy Board will serve a term through June 30, 2012. Youth advocates play a key role in changing perceptions about tobacco in our state,Ž said Deputy Secretary Kim Ber“ eld. These ambitious students have the energy, passion and knowledge to create positive results and in” uence in both their peers and the community as a whole.Ž Wakulla Middle School student Ashlynn Minshew will be one of three representatives for the Northern Region of Floridas Students Working Against Tobacco. Open enrollment for Florida Prepaid College Plans beginsThe Florida Prepaid College Board annual enrollment period began on Oct. 17, which means parents can purchase a Prepaid College Plan to prepay higher education costs at this years plan prices until the Jan. 31, 2012, deadline. Plans will include tuition and most mandatory fees, as well as the 4-Year Florida College Plan, which was launched in 2010 in response to the evolving Florida College landscape. The Florida Prepaid College Boards plan options include: € 2-Year Florida College Plan: prepays 60 lower division semester hours of tuition, registration fees and local fees at a Florida College. € 4-Year Florida College Plan: prepays the tuition, registration fees and local fees for 60 lower division as well as 60 upper division semester hours at a Florida College. € 2 + 2 Florida Plan: prepays 60 lower division semester hours of tuition, registration fees and local fees at a Florida College and 60 undergraduate semester hours of tuition, registration fees, tuition differential fee and local fees at a Florida state university. € 4-Year Florida University Plan: prepays tuition, registration fees, the tuition differential fee and local fees for 120 semester hours at any of the 11 state universities in Florida. For more information on plan options or to sign up online for the Florida Prepaid College Plan, visit www.my” oridaprepaid.com or call 1-800-552-4723. Wakulla Weight Loss located at2615 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite103, Crawfordville, FL 32327850-926-3140 opt2 November Specials Purchase a water bottle and get a Mic-combo shot for free. Save $5 on a bottle of Calcium Pyruvate. Buy one bottle of multivitamins and get one for FREE Prepay for 3 regular visits and receive one visit FREE. Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011 our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FLA volunteer effort sponsored by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, a partnership of 30 agencies and providers serving the needs of youth and families in Wakulla County.Last year Operation Santa helped 48 families in Wakulla experience the joy of Christmas and this year would like to help even more. But we need your help!What you can do to help:Identify families who have a need and help them with a con“dential Assistance ApplicationŽ. Ask your church family to assist. Adopt a family, ask a business or friends to adopt a family. Ask for help at meetings you attend.Donate and ask for donations … cash will be used to shop for needed items.Sign up to staffŽ the Operation Santa Store the “rst two weeks in December to assemble Christmas boxes, shop for families and various other volunteer duties. Families in need will be helped on an appointment basis.Items to Donate:Gently worn or new clothes that are clean, folded and in a box, labeled with sizes Clean, and in good repair, toys, electronics, games, bikes, books, puzzles. Household items, kitchen ware, tools, workshop items.Call 926-3526 for InformationThe Wakulla County Library is a collection point and is now open to receive donations.What you can do to volunteer and earn community service hours towards your future college scholarship:Sign up to volunteer to work with the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth sponsored Operation Santa to assemble Christmas boxes, sort and distribute items and various other volunteer duties.Call Lisa Russell at 926-7125 Ext. 319 for more information Operation Santa 2011STUDENTS!Voulunteer for Operation Santa 2011 EARN COMMUNITY SERVICE HOURS Appointments & Walk-Ins Welcome 850-926-TEAZ(8329)1626 Crawfordville Hwy., Northpointe Center Full Service Family Hair Care Salon!Wed-Fri 10-6 Sat. 9-3850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS TRACK COACHMembers of the WHS cross country teams competed Friday afternoon, Oct. 28, at the All-Comers Championships hosted by Maclay High School in Tallahassee. With the district meet looming next weekend, only a limited number of the varsity runners competed at this meet. The runners who did compete were ones who needed to race either for training or to help determine the line-ups for the district meet. The top “ ve runners for the girls had been established, so none of them competed, but the number six and seven slots were up for grabs and those spots were settled after the race. For the boys, only two of the top seven ran, with several runners battling for the number seven slot. Senior Kristie Phillips set the pace for the girls, covering the challenging course in 23:12 and grabbing the number six slot for Districts. Freshman Tyler Kinard was close behind in 23:16 and earned the number seven slot. Seniors Emily McCullers (23:56) and Norma Woodcock (24:53) were next to “ nish, with Savanna Strickland (26:46) rounding out the scoring for WHS. Senior David Victor (19:07) was the “ rst WHS “ nisher, with junior Hunter Phillips (19:14) and senior Zach Broadway (19:22) close behind. Others scoring for the local team were Tyler Bennett (19:45) and Brantley Lockwood (20:15). Broadways performance was an all-time personal record for him. This meet helped us answer some questions as to the line-up for the district meet and that was the main reason we went to it and ran who we did,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. There werent many surprises, but the performance of the meet for us had to be Zachs. He was sick for the “ rst month and a half of the season and is just now starting to run normally, so we were really pleased with his effort. The district meet will be contested on Saturday, Nov. 5, at the Apalachee Cross County Park east of Tallahassee, with the girls race set to start at 10:15 a.m. and the boys at 11 a.m. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy RICHARD LAWHONSpecial to The NewsAfter completing a perfect regular season district play of 4-0, the Lady War Eagles hosted the District 2 Class 5A championship on Tuesday, Oct. 25. The night would start with the Lady Raiders of Rickards playing the Lady Bulldogs of Suwannee. Suwannee would beat Rickards 3-0, leaving the Lady War Eagles to play the Lady Bulldogs in the championship match. Beginning the “ rst set of the championship match, the Lady War Eagles would come out playing very strong, executing on offense and defense. The Lady War Eagles took “ rst set 25-13. Starting the second set, with the momentum on their side, the Lady War Eagles would play even better. The Lady War Eagles dominated the set, winning 25-12. The Lady War Eagles would begin to struggle in the third set, falling behind at the beginning of this set and would not be able to close the gap, losing 17-25. As the fourth set started the Lady War Eagles came out playing their hearts out. The Lady Bulldogs fought hard to win, but just couldnt muster up enough rallies to win the championship. The Lady War Eagles would win the fourth set 2515 and the District 2 Class 5A championship to move on to the regional quarter“ nals against Arnold High School on Tuesday, Nov. 1. The key players for this championship match were Ashley Roberts with 15 kills and 9 digs, Chelsea Carroll with 31 assists, 9 digs and 6 aces, Emily Haley with 9 kills, 5 digs and 5 aces, Jordan Pryor with 19 digs and Marina Petrandis with 8 kills and 5 digs.VOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles win districtWakulla County Parks and Recreation will be holding the Tackle Football Super Bowl Games at Wakulla High Schools J.D. Jones Stadium on Monday, Nov. 7, with the peewee division game at 6:15 p.m. and the junior division at 7:30 p.m. The Mustangs ended the season in “ rst place in the peewee division and the Bull Dogs took “ rst in the junior division. Teams will play in a single elimination playoff scheduled this week to determine who will play for the Super Bowl trophy.Super Bowl set for Nov. 7TACKLE FOOTBALLThe Lady War Eagles were scheduled to play regional playoff on Tuesday, Nov. 1. Check our website for results. LISA KINARD/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCora Atkinson, Margaret Wiedeman, Tyler Kinard run through the water hazard.CROSS COUNTRYRunners compete at the All-Comers Championships By JOE JACOBSRMS Head CoachOn Thursday night, Oct. 27, the Riversprings Bears traveled to boot hill to play the Broncos for the Western Division title of the Florida Star Conference, and the right to play in the conference championship game. Riversprings fans were not disappointed, as the Bears defeated Madison 34…14. Coach Joey Jacobs said, Our defense played outstanding, and our quarterback (Feleip Franks) was phenomenal.Ž Franks and his trusty receivers lit up the Madison County defense. He was 6 of 11 for 211 yards and 4 touchdowns. Franks would set a new RMS record for passing yardage in a game, previously held by former RMS and Wakulla High School great Cory Eddinger. Keith Gavin was Franks favorite target, catching three passes for 145 yards (another RMS record) and two touchdowns. Jacob Austin caught two passes for 71 yards and two touchdowns. Running back Demarcus Lindsey led all rushers with 5 carries for 64 yards and a touchdown. In all, the Bears produced 333 yards of total offense. The defense provided stout resistance against the Madison squad. The Bears were led defensively by linebacker Monterious Loggins who had eight tackles (three of which were for a loss) and two assists. Big Kyle Weaver finished with five tackles and three assists. Antonio Morris and Isaiah Youmas also made their presence known on the defensive side of the ball. Morris had four tackles and three assists, while Youmas had three tackles, four assists, a forced fumble and two fumble recoveries. The win over Madison sets up a showdown for the conference championship between Riversprings and Lake City Middle at J.D. Jones Stadium at Wakulla High School on Friday, Nov. 4. The game will be at 7 p.m.MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLRMS beats Madison, 34-14The Bears will play Friday, Nov. 4, at J.D. Jones Stadium at 7 p.m. against Lake City Middle. A normal days activities put several hundred tons of force on your feet. So its no surprise that foot ailments are such a common and painful health problem. But there is help. Point your feet in the direction of Dr. Derickson, a podiatrist at Capital Regional Medical Group and see for yourself, foot pain does not have to be a fact of life. But healthy feet can be. For more information, call us today. No referral necessary.Now taking patients in Crawfordville. 2nd and 4th Tuesday every month from 2-4pm. Considering the miles you put on your feet,no wonder they break down sometimes. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite D | CapitalRegionalMedicalGroup.com CRAWFORDVILLEKevin Derickson DPM 850-878-8235 CAP-886PodiatryPrintB&W.indd1 10/31/1110:34:56AM 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95

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Wakulla High School vs. Godby for District Championship Thursday!By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles improved their record to 6-2 with a win over Trinity Christian to celebrate homecoming on Friday, Oct. 28. The win set up a big showdown for the district championship with the upcoming game on Thursday night, Nov. 3, in Tallahassee against rival Godby High School. The War Eagle defense gave up a couple of touchdowns in the “ rst half to a tough-running Trinity team. Then Wakullas defense seemed to wake up, getting back to the hard-hitting, shutdown defense theyve played for the past couple weeks. The game was also notable for the running attack of Deonte Hutchinson who scored a couple of touchdowns. It was a good win for us,Ž said War Eagle Head Coach Scott Klees. Wakulla has so many offensive weapons … workhorse running back Will Thomas, the lightning quick Marshane Godbolt, and the deep threat of quarterback Caleb Stephens throwing to receiver Lyntonio Bowdrie. While Hutchinson has been in the mix of weapons, and has often shined as a kick returner, it was a breakout game for him as a running back. Each week, its been somebody different,Ž Klees noted. He joked that it appeared hes not doing his job as coach, that he should be giving the ball more to Hutchinson and Godbolt since they seem to score every time they touch it. Part of what set up Hutchinsons break-out game was Trinity trying to load up to take away the big play threat of Godbolt. Offensively, if you take away one guy, were going to run the other way,Ž Klees said. And they spent all night taking out Marshane,Ž he said, which left Hutchinson to rumble. Quarterback Stephens went 4 for 7 on the night with 61 yards passing and 2 TDs. Thomas carried the ball 13 times for 138 yards and a touchdown. Hutchinson touched the ball six times and gained 156 yards and scored two touchdowns. Bowdrie caught a TD pass, as did Brandon Nichols. And reserve running back Sheldon Johnson got some playing time in the fourth quarter, running twice for 13 yards and a touchdown. Wakulla drew “ rst blood with a nice drive to start the game that culminated in a quick “ ve-yard TD pass from Stephens to Bowdrie. Kicker Conner Smith added the extra point to Wakulla up 7-0. Trinity answered with an 85-yard scoring drive of its own, but missed the extra point to make it 7-6. After a muffed kickoff was recovered by Trinity, they mounted a drive to score to start the second quarter. With a two-point conversion, they were up 14-7. On the War Eagles ensuing drive, Hutchinson broke a big run to get the ball into Trinity territory and then Stephens threw a long touchdown pass to receiver Brandon Nichols. The everreliable Smith added the extra point to tie it at 14. Wakulla wore down Trinity after that. After a couple of back-and-forth turnovers, Hutchinson tore off a 75yard run for a touchdown to put the War Eagles up 21-14. Trinity tried to respond, but the War Eagles intercepted a fourth down pass with just 1:10 remaining in the half. Back on offense, Godbolt tore off a long run down the “ eld to Trinitys 10. A couple of plays later, Hutchinson took it in from there … leaving a trail of would-be tacklers behind him. At halftime, Wakulla was up 28-14. In the third-quarter, Trinitys running attack was still proving somewhat troublesome. On the other side of the ball, Hutchinson made a touchdown-saving tackle. In the fourth quarter, Thomas took the ball in from the 3 to score, and the War Eagles were up 35-14. Reserve players took the field after that, and running back Sheldon Johnson scored on an impressive 10yard run with 5:34 remaining in the game to make it 42-14. LOOKING TO GODBY It should be a good game,Ž Klees said of Thursday nights game against Godby to decide the district champion. Weve got to play our best game … offensively, defensively and on special teams,Ž Klees said. If we do, weve got a great chance.Ž Its been a challenge having a shorter week to practice, the coach said. Wakulla plays Godby at Gene Cox Stadium in Tallahassee at 7 p.m. Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsWar Eagles celebrate Homecoming with a 42-14 win WILLIAM SNOWDENReserve running back Sheldon Johnson reaches across the goal line to score on a 10 yard run in the fourth quarter. WILLIAM SNOWDENDeonte Hutchinson leaves a trail of would-be tacklers in his wake on his way to the end zone for one of his two touchdowns of the night. BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWar Eagle Head Coach Scott Klees talks to the team.Wakulla trounces Trinity Christian in a breakout game for Deonte Hutchinson, who gains 156 yards on six carries UP NEXT: Godby to decide the district champion on Thursday, Nov. 3 at Gene Cox Stadium in Tallahassee at 7 p.m. Players of the WeekDefense O ense Special TeamsDAMONTE MORRIS Klees said Morris plays hard every down. DEONTE HUTCHINSON 6 carries for 156 yards, 2 TDs TAMARICK HOLMES 8 tackles including a sack and 3 tackles for a loss More photos at thewakullanews.com Wakulla High SchoolLady War Eagles District Champions Wakulla High School War Eagles JV Football GOES UNDEFEATED! Good Luck!Riversprings Middle School Bears vs. Lake City for Conference Friday! www.hicksair.com McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brak es Batteries Radia tors Wat er Pum ps Hub Bea rings Star ters Alterna tors and mor e!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093 Workout, lose weightƒ Each class feelsLIKE A PARTY!Saturdays 9AM-10AM (T.B.A.) Thursdays 6:30PM-7:30PMat VFW POST 4538, 475 Arran Rd., CrawfordvilleKim Crum 251-9195 Pam Chichester 459-5279 visit us on facebook Congratulations TheWakulla newsfrom your fans at

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 911AFlorida State at Boston CollegeThursday, 8 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPN.In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate Duke at MiamiSaturday, 3 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPN3.Vanderbilt at Florida Saturday, 12:20 p.m. The game can be seen on WCTV.By MARTY COHENof GatorBaitJACKSONVILLE … Understandably there is reason for Georgia to celebrate any win over Florida … after all, the Dawgs have now claimed just four victories in the last 22 meetings in this series. But the way a host of Georgia players frolicked around the “ eld at the conclusion of the cringe-inducing 24-20 victory Saturday night, jumping up in the stands to rejoice with their fans, you would have thought the release of pent-up emotion followed a triumph of the ages. Well. this was hardly a replica of Game Six of the recent World Series, OK. This was horrible football from start to “ nish, with Georgia winding up just a little less awful than Florida in coming out with a victory that keeps the Dawgs in the race for the East title. And if the Dawgs should make it to Atlanta, to face either Alabama or LSU, lets open the point spread at about 50. The Dawgs were able to out-terrible the Gators and we suppose, given the lack of anything to truly rejoice over during the last four seasons, success in this venue warrants, perhaps, some divine exultation for the Georgia folks. To God be the glory,Ž was actually the way Georgia head coach Mark Richt opened his postgame press conference. Really? After that game? Well, I dont want to sound blasphemous, but we heard outside the Florida locker room that God actually turned the contest off at halftime, after watching these two lousy clubs slog their way through 30 minutes of football. (Im just kidding, please dont take this crack the wrong way.) Richt went on to explain the secular signi“ cance of the circumstance, and why the outcome was so vital to Georgia. Im thankful for what just happened,Ž said Richt, who certainly should be. I know it was just a ballgame, but it seemed like a lot more than that. Just to see our players and fans celebrate in this place especially was awesome. Im very glad to be a part of this today. In hindsight I can say this now that its over, but this was more than just another game to win and keep pace in the Eastern Division. You could see it with our guys, but we didnt try to make it any bigger than it needed to be. We wanted them to focus on their jobs, and I thought they did that.Ž OK, so maybe that explains the Dawgs postgame revelry, but after the 60 minutes of agonizing football for Florida, its getting more dif“ cult to try and offer any perspective for the October spiral. The Gators have lost four straight for the “ rst time since 1988, and are staring down the barrel at the possibility of the “ rst losing season since the infamous 0-10-1 campaign of 1979. And its getting near-impossible to watch. Yes quarterback John Brantley returned and put forth a courageous effort, playing on a bad wheel for the “ rst time since going down near halftime against Alabama four weeks ago. Brantley supplied an early jolt to a staggering offense that eventually sunk under the weight of its own ineptitude. It was an embarrassing offensive effort, as the Gators were credited with minus-19 yards rushing, and even if you factor out the sacks and a 10-yard loss on a poor shotgun snap, Floridas running backs managed just 34 yards in 15 attempts. The lone positive running play was emblematic of the entire afternoon, a 17-yard run by Chris Rainey that ended with a fumble deep in Gator territory shortly before halftime, perhaps the pivotal mistake (and de“ nitely the most inexcusable) in a game “ lled with dozens of miscues. Offensively, Florida mustered an incredible 19 snaps (or almost snaps) that lost yardage, either through negative plays or penalties. Nineteen! Offensive coordinator Charlie Weis moved up to the press box for this game, offering a different perspective than he got from the sidelines, where hed been the “ rst seven contests. Maybe for Homecoming this Saturday he can watch the game from a couch in his of“ ce, because the further away from this ugly offense the better. It was a collectively abysmal effort on the offensive side, as the star of September … Rainey … became the goat of late October. The likable Rainey had a forgettable afternoon, unable to come up with a pair of passes that likely would have been touchdowns, on top of the egregious fumble. With Florida leading 17-3 and two minutes before halftime, Rainey tried to make something happen on a third-and-22 from the Gator 8-yard line. While doing his whirling dervish running and carrying the ball loosely, Rainey had the ball dislodged and with it, UFs fortunes began to crumble. A c r i n g e i n d u c i n g l o s s A cringe-inducing loss By TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaThe sti” ing run defense, stout secondary and physical hitting that Florida States defense has become accustomed to the last few weeks were all present Saturday afternoon at Doak Campbell Stadium. Weve been this defense all year. The difference between now and the “ rst games is we werent able to get turnovers,Ž safety Lamarcus Joyner said. If you dont get turnovers, all of a sudden you get points on the board. So with the turnovers we got today, that was just a great improvement for the defense. And thats what weve been focusing on. And this time, for a welcome change, so too were the turnovers. Three of them, to be exact … the most the Seminoles have forced this season. Each, two interceptions and a fumble recovery, were a part of a dominant effort by FSUs defense in a 34-0 victory over North Carolina State. Turnovers have been a bit of a sore spot for defensive coordinator Mark Stoop group. FSU had forced just nine turnovers „ against 14 committed … coming into Saturdays contest. The Seminoles bad turnover luck bordered on star-crossed when, in the second quarter, safety Lamarcus Joyner appeared to have his third interception near the sideline. Instead, replay showed that Joyner bobbled the ball as he fell out of bounds. No possession and no interception. The Seminoles, though, made things right later in the quarter when Glennon sailed a deep, “ rst-down pass over his receivers head and into the waiting arms of Florida States Xavier Rhodes, who juggled the ball a bit before securing the “ rst interception by a Florida State cornerback this season. It felt good to get that “ rst interception of the season. I really thought after a while that I wasnt going to get one,Ž said Rhodes, whose four interceptions in 2010 tied for the team lead. FSU didnt have to wait too long for its next turnover. On one of the Wolfpacks rare forays deep into Seminole territory (NC State “ nished just two drives on FSUs side of the 50-yard line), Christian Jones chased down Glennon on second-and-eight from the Florida State 21, forcing a fumble that freshman defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan recovered and returned 12 yards. Then on NC States next possession, defensive tackle Everett Dawkins tipped Glennons pass at the line and linebacker Vince Williams hauled in the ball for FSUs “ nal turnover of the day. Williams credited the defensive linemen with making his life as a linebacker a little bit easier. Those big boys up there are eating,Ž he said. It isnt that hard to play middle linebacker when your two D-tackles are just destroying guards and centers.Ž With Jernigan and Dawkins disrupting the middle and defensive Brandon Jenkins and Bjoern Werner turning in another solid combined effort, the Wolfpack became one-dimensional, allowing the Seminoles pass rush to chase after Glennon with impunity.FSU ‘D’ torments Wolfpack with three turnoversBulldog cornerback Brandon Boykin with the ball. PHOTO BY STEVE JOHNSONDefensive tackle Timmy Jernigan recovers a fumble and returns it for 12 yards. PHOTOS BY COLIN HACKLEY/ THE OSCEOLABy TIM LINAFELTof The OsceolaThere were times Saturday when EJ Manuel took a hit and was slow to get up. Then there were other times when Manuel absorbed a blow and perhaps made those in attendance wonder how he even got up at all. Thats simply the risk that Manuel takes when he runs the option … holding the ball until the last possible instant before pitching to a running back … and its a big reason why Florida States running game has opened up in recent weeks. Hes got a knack for (running the option),Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. He can get down the “ eld and run it and put pressure on. Hes got a natural knack for it, and if you dont hit him, he can run. Its another dimension that we have which we have to use.Ž The Seminoles used that dimension to perfection on the games “ rst touchdown. Facing “ rst-and-goal at the NC State 7-yard line, Manuel took the snap and ran off the left tackle, gaining a few yards before a host of Wolfpack defenders surrounded him. But instead of going down, Manuel withstood a big knock and pitched to freshman running back Devonta Freeman, who easily ran untouched into the end zone. Manuel pulled the same escape act later in the game, this time to the right side, with a surprise, two-handed pitch to Jermaine Thomas that went for another nice gain. Added Manuel: I think its just a matter of trying to make plays, knowing that if I hold it to the last second and get it out there, Devontas going to score a touchdown, bar none.Ž [Running backs] Coach [Eddie] Gran, he always preaches at us to make sure we always keep that pitch relationship with the quarterback, no matter what,Ž said Thomas, who “ nished with a team-high 48 rushing yards Saturday. Especially with EJ and how hes able to run the ball and pitching it at the last minute.ŽManuel ignites Noles option attackQuarterback EJ Manuel escapes from a North Carolina State defender. (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile HomesER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill hit Floridas Gulf Coast residents hard. Legal Services of North Florida can help with your BP claim or other civil legal needs. FREE of charge. If you need help, were here. 855.299.1337 | www.lsnf.org M a n a t e e Ti m e s Statewide advertising—one low priceReach a wide audience (850) 926-7102 TheWakullanews Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: € Back pain € Muscle pain € Arthritis pain € Joint pain

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com HOMECOMING 2011 PHOTO BY KAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHOMECOMING COURT: Freshman representatives Kasey James and Hunter Hurst; sophomore representatives Aaron Smith and Colbi King; junior represent atives Alexis Crockett, Amber Alvarez, Kevon White. John Cole; senior representatives Becca Pearce, Mary Warren Adkison, Brooke Edwards, Ashley Ro berts, Alina McCullers, Cody Cash, Tammarick Holmes, Will Thomas, Evan McCoy and Brandon Busby.WILLIAM SNOWDEN1981 STATE CHAMPS: Thirty years after winning the state football championship, former Head Coach J.D. Jones was reunited with members of his coaching staff, past players on the championship team, as well as cheerleaders and band members, who were recognized during the Homecoming festivities. BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMary Warren Adkison is crowned the 2011 Homecoming Queen by last years queen, Jasmine Casey. See more photos of Homecoming festivities online at thewakullanews.com Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Call us today to make your reservation!www.jacksbquick.comOpen Monday Friday • 7am 6pm Saturday by appointment only www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Giving to another as a gesture of love, respect, gratitude and appreciation is truly satisfying and ful f illing. Homemade gifts are a traditional, thrifty and meaningful way to express the season’s sentiments.Homemade For the Holidays Workshop November 3rd Homemade For the Holidays &Call the Extension Of f ice at 926-3931 to register Homemade for the Holidays is sponsored by Ope n to ALL ages Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. Tucker, AgentSince 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850-570-9734 800-226-7005www.tuckerlifehealth.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 13ABy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe fourth Annual 4-H National Youth Science Day was held earlier this month and to celebrate fourth graders participated in a science experiment entitled, Wired for Wind.Ž Students designed and created a wind turbine, making the blades out of paper and popsicle sticks. The students then tested their turbines to see if they would work. The students placed their turbines on a generator in front of a fan at various speeds and measured how much energy was being created. Sherri Kraeft, Wakulla County 4-H agent, said the students were learning about non-renewable and renewable energy and the experiment was a good way to compare the two. Kraeft said National Science Day is all about 4Hs 1 Million New Scientists, 1 Million New IdeasŽ campaign, which works to engage 1 million young people in science, engineering, technology and applied math programs by the year 2013. The idea is to show them these “ elds can be fun in hopes that they will purse a degree in one of these “ elds. Fourth grade teacher Margaret Callaghan said the students also learned that wind energy is used in all states but “ ve, one of those being Florida. They are learning by doing,Ž Callaghan said. Fourth grader at Riversink Elementary School, Siler Jones, said the experiment was fun. The more wind used for the windmill, the more electricity the windmill makes.Ž Jones said. Another fourth grader, Courtney Krause, tested her windmill and at “ rst it barely moved. She then “ gured out this was because all the blades werent facing the same way. If they were all the same, then they would be going, but if one was different, it wouldnt go at all,Ž Krause said. Krause was then able to redesign her windmill and it worked perfectly. Im glad we have wind,Ž Krause said with a huge smile on her face. The experiment was sponsored by 4-H and Progress Energy who donated all the kits. After the experiments were done, the students signed a banner thanking Progress Energy. National Youth Science Day is held every year and each year a different experiment is performed, Kraeft said. This year, the students shared their knowledge with public at a booth at the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 22. For more information about 4-H, visit wakulla.ifas. u” .edu or call 926-3931.Fourth graders investigate wind JENNIFER JENSENFourth grader Siler Jones tests his wind turbine as 4-H agent Sherri Kraeft looks on.TRICK OR TREAT JENNIFER JENSEN JENNIFER JENSEN PHOTO BY KAREN WELLS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHAPPY HALLOWEEN: Janet Creel, left, dresses as a witch and sits on her rooftop to talk to trick-or-treaters in Audubon Forest; Deputy Cole Wells, above, hands out candy in The Farms; and people get ready to be scared on a Haunted Hayride in St. Marks. More photos online at thewakulllanews.com NEED A NEW HOME?Come see if you qualify for a no interest home mortgage through Habitat for Humanity’s Housing Program!You must be a Wakulla County Resident for at least the last year.Where:Conference Room at Ameris Bank 2628 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville When:Tuesday, November 15 Time:6:30 P.M. enter through back door Bring paperwork to verify your income, dependents, savings and expenses, driver licenses for all drivers and social security cards for everyone who will live in your home.If you have any questions please call: Tara C. Sanders 926-5211 Linda Boles 926-6222Peggy Mackin 926-5037. TheWorks coffee•espresso•latts cappuccino•frapps andnowBAGELS! Monday-Friday630am-900pm Saturday8a m-9pm Sunday1 2-5pm 27FAzaleaDr•BehindBealls•850.253.7253•www.theworkscafe.com 2 0 1 1 S t a rt u p B u s i n e s s o f t h eY e a r! WalkOnYourDry&RestoredCarpetWhenWeLeave! (850)544-4439G aryGuy,owner2GreatGuys@comcast.net License#7692StateofFloridaCall 2 Great GuysDry ~CarpetCleaningRemovesand PreventsMold andMildewGrowth.Reduces DustMitesby70% DustMite Allergensby75% CatAllergensby87% MoldSporesby85% Safefor petsandchildren. MEMBER CERTIFIED Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq.Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate We now accept Credit Cards r i s 68-B Feli Way, Crawfordville (Just off MLK/Lower Bridge Rd.)

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsCooler weather is heating up the “ shingThe weather is great for “ shing and the cooler water temperatures are turning the “ sh on. Inshore and offshore “ shing is good right now and should stay good until we get a lot of rain. Last week Alan Lamarche, owner of Plantation Security, took Eric Staller from Tall Timbers Research Station, Ed Epps, plantation manager for Horseshoe Plantation, and Dale McCorkle, plantation manager of Dekle Plantation. They “ shed with live and dead bait in 35 to 60 feet of water and came in with their limits of red and gag grouper. Alan said there are plenty of grouper out there but not many people are “ shing for them because of gas prices and limits put on them. Larry Hess of Shell Point said the trout bite turned on and he has found them around the Oyster Bars looking for a grub under the Cajun Thunder. He has also been doing extremely well on black sea bass in about 30 feet of water. Occasionally he will hook a legal grouper while “ shing for sea bass and on trout rods they put up quite a “ ght. Buc Grice from Blakely, Ga., spent the week at his home on the Ochlockonee River and said he caught a lot of “ sh except for one day during that time. He primarily “ shes a grub on the bottom and “ shed from the Ochlockonee River mouth to the Shell Point Reef. On days with early morning low tides, he “ shed the outside of Shell Point Reef and caught lots of trout, a few reds and Spanish. He said he hooked quite a few big Spanish but got cut off by most. Mark and Louise Prance of Shell Point were gone for a month out west and then got back and had to take care of their rental properties. They did “ nally go “ shing last week and Mark said they caught a 26.5 and 27-inch red and quite a few nice ” ounder. They were using cut bait on the bottom. Capt. Luke Frazier over at AMS in Medart said he went over to the white trout hole at the mouth of the Panacea Channel and they caught about 50 nice white trout in about two hours. He used a white Gulp on the bottom and said if you tipped it with a piece of cut bait you could catch some of those big whiting that are over there. The folks at Shell Island Fish Camp said plenty of “ sh are being caught in the mouth of the St. Marks River and up in East River in the holes. The ” ats are also still producing trout and some nice reds are coming from Big Pass and Little Pass using pin“ sh and mudminnows. Capt. David Fife said the trout “ nally started cooperating and he has been doing pretty well using live mud minnows under a cork or on the bottom. He has been getting his limit of reds every time he goes and is catching some nice ” ounder. He said there are also plenty of white trout around. David “ shes from Spring Creek to Panacea. Capt. Randy Peart said he “ shed the mouth of the Ochlockonee River and they caught reds, trout and whiting using live pilchards. On Friday he took Harold Fulford from Carrolton, Ga., out and the trolled for grouper and then “ shed the bottom. He said they never got the “ rst strike. He then went to a rock pile in about 12 feet of water off the Aucilla River and he said they caught some huge rock bass, key west grunts, a 24-inch gag grouper and a bull red. They were using light tackle and pilchards on the bottom. To end the day they went in around Cobb Rocks and said they lost probably “ ve or six big trout and landed one that was more than 20 inches. He said “ shing around the Econ“ na has picked up and trout are being caught on live bait, top water and grubs. I have a lot of people ask me if I ever get tired of “ shing. I usually say no but if they had asked me that question on Sunday afternoon I would have had to say yes. I “ shed 12 days in a row and was sure glad not to have to get in that boat on Monday morning. The last thing I wanted to do was pick up a “ shing rod. Overall “ shing was good except for the Saturday that Buc Grice said he didnt catch any “ sh. We caught trout in 14 feet of water, on the ” ats and up in the creeks. During that time we probably caught 15 Spanish, one pompano and had six reds over 37 inches. Four of those reds were the biggest reds those folks had ever caught. We were fishing for white trout one day and had a king mackerel that looked to weigh about 40 pounds come straight up, grab the white trout I was reeling in and almost jump in the boat. That was pretty exciting. I was reeling in a white trout one day and felt something hit it coming in so I gave it some line and set the hook. I had it on for a minute and it came loose. It hit again and this time I was able to get the hook in it. I handed the rod to one of my clients and 20 minutes later we landed a 38-inch red, and it was on the lightest rod I had on the boat. The biggest trout we caught came from the flats using live shrimp under a cork. I could kick myself because the first time I “ shed there was on Friday afternoon and we only “ shed for about an hour. We caught three trout more than 20 inches and lost another three or four. On Saturday I had a group from Macon, Ga., and it seems like every time they come down in the wind howls. Saturday was no exception. I “ shed around Oyster Bay and we caught three nice reds, a few trout and some white trout and whiting. I “ nally decided to try the ” ats when we “ nally got enough water and thats where we did our best. We had some nice trout and Spanish out there. Capt. Jerry Alexander took part of the group that day and they “ shed way up in the creeks. They came in with four nice reds, threw back eight more than 25 inches and had eight real nice trout. They caught everything on mud minnows. The weather looks good for the next week so “ shing should continue to be good. Remember to know your limits and leave that ” oat plan with someone. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Eric Staller, resource coordinator/land manager at Tall Timbers Research Station & Land Conservancy, shows off one of a boat limit of gag and red grouper caught this week in Apalachee Bay. Also on board were Plantation Managers Ed Epp of Horseshoe and Dale McCorkle of Dekle. The crew were guests of Major Alan Lamarche of Plantation Security Inc. who took them “ shing out of Shell Point. Alan said that there are tons of gag grouper out there and no one to catch them. They “ shed all day, catching and releasing “ sh and never saw another boat. It appears evident that the economy, short season and restrictive recreational limits have discouraged and curtailed the hundreds of grouper “ shers who once traversed these Big Bend Gulf waters. Alan said that he has invited both FWC and NOAH Fisheries Biologists to go with him so he can show them that there are more gag grouper than ever, but they insist that the “ sh arent there.ALAN LAMARCHE/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCatching grouper HAVE YOU HEARD THE NEWS?has expanded their circulation department! – LOOK –The Wakulla News has a new number to call for Subscriptions.877-401-6408CALL ALISON OR NECIA TODAY! 877-401-6408 They haven't actually expanded, they're just taking advantage of Citrus Publishing's call center in Crystal River.Be a part of the conversationƒ Subscribe Today by calling Toll Free Subscribe Today by calling Toll Freeget 877-401-6408or visit TheWakullaNews.com LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GUNSMITHING F ASTTURNAROUND! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED Located on Main Street in St. Marks WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid for your gun! $ Selling Guns Since 1999 AK 47s in stock! IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 H UNT ING S EA S ON!! Get Ready for Grouper The Wakulla News

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 15Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonAgain, I want to continue sharing with all of you the fond memories and stories that have been coming in about Sherrie. Anne DelBello sent in a photo of Sherrie, one that I think Sherrie will feel worthy. She was given the wedding bouquet from Capt. and Mrs. James Montgomery on Feb. 14, 2009. Mo Davis, the current Division Commander sent in the following: I “ rst met Sherrie Alverson at our winter division meeting in 2004. I was fairly new in the Auxiliary and attending my “ rst division meeting. I think she sensed that I was a little unsure of myself as she quickly came over to me, introduced herself and made a point of introducing me to many other members. From the very first minute I met her, I knew I had a new friend. I found quickly that Sherrie was an old saltŽ and was the person to go to if there were any questions about the Auxiliary. After all, Sherrie was from Shell Point, Flotilla 13, which was recognized as one of the best Flotillas in the District and she had served as Flotilla Commander, Flotilla Staff Officer for many different positions, Division Finance Of“ cer and Chaplain. Through the years, I always enjoyed seeing Sherrie at our division meetings, getting that special hug and talking about what was going on. I always enjoyed the many emails we exchanged and remember that she, although she was having some health problems of her own, never forgot to ask how my wife was doing in her fight with cancer. Sherrie will leave a very rich heritage and will really be missed in the Auxiliary, but after 40 years of dedicated service she has earned a chance to lay back a little.Ž While technology has been great in many ways, this day it has failed me. Another long time Coast Guard Auxiliary member Mark Rosen was one of the “ rst to respond to my request for stories about Sherrie. Somehow I lost the e-mail and, due to a computer crash, so did Mark. What I can assure you is that Mark had great things to say, he always calls Sherrie the Queen of the Auxiliary, a title well deserved! If you have fond memories or funny stories about Sherrie, please send them to me at Carolyn.treadon@uscgaux. net. Sherrie can use all of our support and encouragement. It is time that we provide for her what she has so sel” essly given to all of us for so many years. This past weekend, several members of Flotilla 12 headed over to Carrabelle to participate in the Crooked River Lighthouse Lantern Festival. Tim Ashley, Phil and Norma Hill and Mike Harrison headed over. They were visited by Karen Katowski from the St. George Island branch of our ” otilla. Throughout the day members talked to visitors about the auxiliary and had lots of materials to share! As the night dawned, lanterns were lit and the festival took on a new light (no pun intended). Pictures do not do justice to the beauty that the lanterns held. Thank you to Phil and Norma Hill for sending along many wonderful pictures from the day. Tim Ashley, the Flotillas public affairs officer, wants to remind members that we will be staffing an exhibitors display promoting our various USCG Auxiliarys activities and programs at the North Florida Fair beginning Thursday, Nov. 3. Please stop by and visit if you are there. Saturday, Flotilla 12 will hold our November meeting at the former Flotilla 13 building at Shell Point. We will have fellowship from 9:30 a.m. with our business meeting at 10 a.m. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident! Sherrie Alverson with the bouquet at the wedding of Capt. and Mrs. James Montgomery in February 2009.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Jack Rosenau turned 92 last Friday. Many of you attended his party on Old Fort Drive in Tallahassee. He is best known locally for his many contributions to the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary at Shell Point, serving in nearly every capacity available including the evening Air Patrol. Many of his exploits have been heralded by Sherrie Alverson in the adjourning column so I will not repeat them here. What is less known, but equally impressive is that his real jobŽ was with the U.S. Geological Survey as the Floridas hydrologist. Most of us searching for windows into the Karst relied on decades of Jacks baseline water quality documents. He summarized them in a government printed book called The Springs of Florida.Ž Those of us who could keep a copy were popular since the referenced springs had latitude/longitude GPS coordinates, as well as water quality data. He visited as many of the springs as possible taking ” ow, chemical signature and morphological descriptions long before many of us were terribly concerned. He worked with a few cave divers, but back then, cave diving was a secret society. He did discover new springs and once named one KiniŽ in Wakulla, a Hawaiian name for his wife. I discussed underground water ” ow with him, but had little to contribute until Parker Turner joined our program at FSU. By then Jack had retired, one step ahead of the computer, an unwelcome intrusion into his world. I am moved to write this column about his contribution after attending Dr. Todd Kincades recent presentation at Wakulla Springs where his Project Baseline was discussed. The impressive Google Earth frame upon which the Karst features are overlaid represents technology not available back in Jacks time. But monitoring these features is not new, not invented by Global Underwater Explorers and certainly rich in historic interest. Project Baseline can become a very useful database if we see it as a continuation of previous pioneers. And I am proud to call him Dad, the father of my wife. Happy birthday, Dad. Mike Harrison greets visitors at the Crooked River Lighthouse Lantern Festival in Carrabelle. BALLROOMAlabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Online Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute! Nov. 14-17 & Nov. 21-22215 BankForeclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information 20960 N.E. Burlington Rd., Hosford, FL 32334 NOVEMBER 19, 2011 9AM EST --F&LAUCTION ---FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTION Tractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm EquipmentAuctioneers: Felton Hall, auctioneer license AU4266 business license AB2969 € John Stanley AU44.10% BUYERS PREMIUM all consignments are welcomed.For more info: 850-379-8410, Cell: 850-566-6646. auctionzip.com CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 FREE INTRODUCTORY SESSIONS FOR NOVEMBER. 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Nov 3, 11 Fr i Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a te 3.5 ft. 12:15 AM H i gh 1.8 ft. 1:18 AM 1.5 ft. 3:07 AM 1.1 ft. 4:23 AM 0.7 ft. 5:16 AM 0.4 ft. 5:58 AM 0.1 ft. 6:35 AM -0.1 ft. 7:10 AM Low 2.7 ft. 7:44 AM 2.7 ft. 9:43 AM 2.9 ft. 10:55 AM 3.0 ft. 11:46 AM 3.2 ft. 12:26 PM 3.3 ft. 1:03 PM 3.3 ft. 1:37 PM H i gh 1.1 ft. 2:46 PM 1.3 ft. 3:49 PM 1.3 ft. 4:40 PM 1.4 ft. 5:20 PM 1.4 ft. 5:54 PM 1.4 ft. 6:25 PM 1.4 ft. 6:55 PM Low 2.7 ft. 9:09 PM 2.9 ft. 10:00 PM 3.1 ft. 10:40 PM 3.2 ft. 11:15 PM 3.4 ft. 11:46 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fr i Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a te 3.6 ft. 12:12 AM H i gh 2.0 ft. 1:15 AM 1.7 ft. 3:04 AM 1.2 ft. 4:20 AM 0.8 ft. 5:13 AM 0.4 ft. 5:55 AM 0.1 ft. 6:32 AM -0.1 ft. 7:07 AM Low 2.8 ft. 7:41 AM 2.8 ft. 9:40 AM 2.9 ft. 10:52 AM 3.1 ft. 11:43 AM 3.2 ft. 12:23 PM 3.3 ft. 1:00 PM 3.4 ft. 1:34 PM H i gh 1.2 ft. 2:43 PM 1.4 ft. 3:46 PM 1.5 ft. 4:37 PM 1.5 ft. 5:17 PM 1.5 ft. 5:51 PM 1.5 ft. 6:22 PM 1.5 ft. 6:52 PM Low 2.8 ft. 9:06 PM 2.9 ft. 9:57 PM 3.1 ft. 10:37 PM 3.3 ft. 11:12 PM 3.4 ft. 11:43 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fr i Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a te 3.1 ft. 12:22 AM 3.2 ft. 12:51 AM H i gh 1.7 ft. 2:22 AM 1.4 ft. 4:11 AM 1.0 ft. 5:27 AM 0.7 ft. 6:20 AM 0.3 ft. 7:02 AM 0.1 ft. 7:39 AM -0.1 ft. 8:14 AM Low 2.5 ft. 8:20 AM 2.5 ft. 10:19 AM 2.7 ft. 11:31 AM 2.8 ft. 12:22 PM 2.9 ft. 1:02 PM 3.0 ft. 1:39 PM 3.1 ft. 2:13 PM H i gh 1.0 ft. 3:50 PM 1.1 ft. 4:53 PM 1.2 ft. 5:44 PM 1.3 ft. 6:24 PM 1.3 ft. 6:58 PM 1.3 ft. 7:29 PM 1.3 ft. 7:59 PM Low 2.5 ft. 9:45 PM 2.7 ft. 10:36 PM 2.8 ft. 11:16 PM 3.0 ft. 11:51 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fr i Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a te 2.6 ft. 12:07 AM H i gh 1.3 ft. 1:29 AM 1.1 ft. 3:18 AM 0.8 ft. 4:34 AM 0.5 ft. 5:27 AM 0.3 ft. 6:09 AM 0.1 ft. 6:46 AM -0.0 ft. 7:21 AM Low 2.0 ft. 7:36 AM 2.1 ft. 9:35 AM 2.2 ft. 10:47 AM 2.3 ft. 11:38 AM 2.4 ft. 12:18 PM 2.5 ft. 12:55 PM 2.5 ft. 1:29 PM H i gh 0.8 ft. 2:57 PM 0.9 ft. 4:00 PM 1.0 ft. 4:51 PM 1.0 ft. 5:31 PM 1.0 ft. 6:05 PM 1.0 ft. 6:36 PM 1.0 ft. 7:06 PM Low 2.0 ft. 9:01 PM 2.1 ft. 9:52 PM 2.3 ft. 10:32 PM 2.4 ft. 11:07 PM 2.5 ft. 11:38 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fr i Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a teH i gh 1.8 ft. 12:57 AM 1.5 ft. 2:46 AM 1.1 ft. 4:02 AM 0.7 ft. 4:55 AM 0.4 ft. 5:37 AM 0.1 ft. 6:14 AM -0.1 ft. 6:49 AM Low 2.1 ft. 7:28 AM 2.1 ft. 9:27 AM 2.2 ft. 10:39 AM 2.4 ft. 11:30 AM 2.5 ft. 12:10 PM 2.6 ft. 12:47 PM 2.6 ft. 1:21 PM H i gh 1.1 ft. 2:25 PM 1.2 ft. 3:28 PM 1.3 ft. 4:19 PM 1.4 ft. 4:59 PM 1.4 ft. 5:33 PM 1.4 ft. 6:04 PM 1.4 ft. 6:34 PM Low 2.1 ft. 8:53 PM 2.2 ft. 9:44 PM 2.4 ft. 10:24 PM 2.5 ft. 10:59 PM 2.6 ft. 11:30 PM 2.7 ft. 11:59 PM H i gh Thu Nov 3, 11 Fr i Nov 4, 11 S a t Nov 5, 11 Sun Nov 6, 11 Mon Nov 7, 11 Tue Nov 8, 11 Wed Nov 9, 11 D a teH i gh 1.5 ft. 1:25 AM 1.2 ft. 2:45 AM 0.9 ft. 3:48 AM 0.6 ft. 4:40 AM 0.3 ft. 5:25 AM 0.1 ft. 6:05 AM -0.1 ft. 6:42 AM Low 2.3 ft. 6:44 AM 2.2 ft. 8:38 AM 2.2 ft. 10:31 AM 2.3 ft. 11:57 AM 2.4 ft. 1:03 PM 2.5 ft. 1:57 PM 2.5 ft. 2:44 PM H i gh 0.7 ft. 2:08 PM 0.9 ft. 3:00 PM 1.1 ft. 3:47 PM 1.3 ft. 4:28 PM 1.5 ft. 5:05 PM 1.6 ft. 5:38 PM 1.7 ft. 6:08 PM Low 2.5 ft. 9:22 PM 2.5 ft. 9:49 PM 2.6 ft. 10:13 PM 2.7 ft. 10:35 PM 2.8 ft. 10:56 PM 2.8 ft. 11:17 PM 2.9 ft. 11:42 PM H i gh Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 3 Nov. 9First Nov. 2 Full Nov. 10 Last Nov. 18 New Nov. 24Major Times 8:12 AM 10:12 AM 8:34 PM 10:34 PM Minor Times 1:31 AM 2:31 AM 2:45 PM 3:45 PM Major Times 8:56 AM 10:56 AM 9:17 PM 11:17 PM Minor Times 2:26 AM 3:26 AM 3:17 PM 4:17 PM Major Times 9:38 AM 11:38 AM 9:58 PM 11:58 PM Minor Times 3:21 AM 4:21 AM 3:47 PM 4:47 PM Major Times 9:19 AM 11:19 AM 9:34 PM 11:34 PM Minor Times 3:13 AM 4:13 AM 3:18 PM 4:18 PM Major Times 10:00 AM 12:00 PM 10:22 PM 12:22 AM Minor Times 4:06 AM 5:06 AM 3:48 PM 4:48 PM Major Times 10:43 AM 12:43 PM 11:05 PM 1:05 AM Minor Times 4:59 AM 5:59 AM 4:21 PM 5:21 PM Major Times --:---:-11:27 AM 1:27 PM Minor Times 5:52 AM 6:52 AM 4:56 PM 5:56 PM Average Average Average Average Good Better Better6:52 am 5:48 pm 1:45 pm 12:32 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:53 am 5:47 pm 2:17 pm 1:28 am 6:54 am 5:47 pm 2:48 pm 2:21 am 6:54 am 5:46 pm 3:18 pm 3:14 am 6:55 am 5:45 pm 3:49 pm 4:07 am 6:56 am 5:45 pm 4:22 pm 4:59 am 6:57 am 5:44 pm 4:57 pm 5:53 am54% 60% 67% 73% 79% 85% 91% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakulla commercial “ shermen were in court in Tallahassee last week with their newest challenge to state rules on mullet “ shing. The state Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission was asking the court to throw out the lawsuit, contending the issues have been argued … and lost … by “ shermen before. But questions by Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford at the hearing on Oct. 25 indicated that perhaps she found some legal basis for the case to go forward. The judge is expected to have a ruling by the end of this week. Jonathan Glogau of the Attorney Generals Office, which represents the FWC in the lawsuit, argued that “ shermen have mounted two previous challenges to rules that regulate mullet nets and, in both cases, courts found the rules were not arbitrary and capricious … and that met the rational basisŽ test for rulemaking. Fishermen, represented by attorney Ron Mowrey, argue that the rule limiting mullet nets to mesh no larger than two-inches stretch catches only juvenile mullet … not legal-size, adult mullet. Ultimately, they claim, the rule is having the opposite effect of what was intended by the FWC, causing “ shermen to waste the resource by killing off the small “ sh. That was the point Judge Fulford made at the hearing in response to Glogaus argument that its all been argued before, noting that in the earlier cases challenging the two-inch mesh rule the effect … whether it caught juvenile “ sh or not … was speculation. Now, she asked, isnt the effect shown in the studies presented by “ shermen? And, she asked, if its true that the small-mesh nets are harming the resource, how are “ shermen supposed to challenge the rule? The court is not in the position off gauging the effectiveness of the rule,Ž Glogau answered. He argued that, once a court has determined that there is a rational basis for the rule, that is the end of proper court oversight. If this rule is creating a resource problem,Ž Glogau said, it is not for the court to tell the agency … thats for the political process... Its for the commission to look at the data if these rules do what they want them to do.Ž Mowrey argued that FWC has been negligent in its regulation of the “ sheries of the State of Florida. Causing the killing, over“ shing and wasteŽ of marine resources is a direct violation of the single purpose and intent of the 1994 net “ shing law, he said. The local “ shermen also contend they have been singled out for selective enforcement of net laws … noting that a Resource Protection Unit from FWC has targeted Wakulla and Franklin county “ shermen. While those two counties are among the smallest in the state, they rank one or two in number of prosecutions for net violations, Mowrey said, claiming it was directly a result of the political activism of local “ shermen in opposition to FWC regulations. Glogau countered that the Resource Protection Unit was working an area that has given the FWC trouble. Franklin and Wakulla counties and northwest Florida has a higher incidence of net violations, Glogau said, and putting of“ cers there is just good police work.ŽFishermens lawsuit challenges net ruleContinued from Page 1A First aid was administered by law enforcement until Wakulla EMS arrived on scene and transported the suspect to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. The suspect spent several days in the hospital under guard. As of Tuesday, Nov. 1, Davis was released from TMH and was being held at the Wakulla County Jail on $70,000 bond. The weapon allegedly used by the suspect was recovered at the scene. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement was called to the scene to investigate. The suspect faces charges of aggravated assault against a police officer, criminal mischief, burglary, possession of burglary tools and loitering and prowling in the case. The deputy has been placed on administrative leave until an internal review is conducted which is common practice in cases involving shootings. Suspect shot at storeContinued from Page 1ACarter is ” uid in his discussion of what the climate of those times were like, along with recollections of what the events triggered in him as a young man: I didnt want to just feel like a citizen of Florida, or of the United States,Ž he explains. I wanted to be a world citizen. But in order for me to do that, I would have to go out and see the world for myself.Ž Carters interest in Latin American history grew to the point that he once boarded a work-away freighter to Amsterdam, then took a train to Spain for enrollment at the University of Madrid. He would study Spanish language and culture for seven months as a special student. He later returned to University of Florida to receive his Bachelor of Arts degree. Four months later he would “ nd himself in Mexico on a motorcycle with nothing more than camping gear, writing implements, a recorder, and camera, capturing not only the visual aspects of his travels, but the spirit of the people and their culture as well. When discussing Latin America in the early 60s, it seemed like everyone was going communist or democratic,Ž he explains. He quotes the line often attributed to Winston Churchill: If youre not a liberal when youre 20, you have no heart. If youre not a conservative when youre 40, you have no brains.Ž What I found, when I went, was that it was not communist or democratic, but a land of the haves and have-nots. It was only when one couldnt get what they wanted, theyd call the other communist and things like that. I wanted to know more and understand, to “ nd a way to shine my light of democracy.Ž Upon his return home, he would arrive with numerous tapes, “ lm and more than 1,500 pages in journal form of his adventure. He was determined to study law, and did so, “ nishing 33 in his class of 90 graduates. From there, he would pass the Florida Bar exam, gaining admission into the Florida and American Bar Associations. He would go on to serve as assistant district attorney in Atlanta. He later resigned, leaving for Europe in 1973. I was developing my 15-year plan,Ž he explains. My “ rst 15 years, Id make as much money as possible. The second 15, Id work in the government to do all the good that I could do. The third 15, Id teach. In all, Id put in 45 years. After thatƒŽ His trip to Europe began Sept. 3, 1973, with his arrival in Reykjavik, Iceland. Within four months hed traveled to more than 13 countries. Jan. 11, 1974, found him in Cairo, Egypt. He would tour Africa by train, truck and the Nile River. From East Africa he took ship to India. In May he would leave Calcutta by plane, traveling to Hong Kong, South Korea, Japan and more. By July, he was back in the U.S., by way of Hawaii. By August he was in Tallahassee and ready to settle down. Which he did with his wife, Andrea. This appears to have been an adventure in itself. He speaks of their long courtship, and his going to Tampa to meet with her family: I walk in, and theres her immediate family, and extended family, many with clipboards, ready to evaluate me. I think I walked away with a B-plus.Ž Luckily, the head of the group was Jose, Andreas grandfather. He didnt speak English,Ž Carter explains. I knew then that my travels and studies in the language had prepared me for that very moment.Ž Carter will speak to Historical SocietySpecial to The NewsA 48-year-old Crawfordville man died in a one vehicle accident on Coastal Highway 98 in Medart early Sunday morning, Oct. 30, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. William Todd Sapp was discovered by a passing motorist who contacted the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. He was dead at the scene at the 2800 block of Coastal Highway (U.S. Highway 98) at 2:31 a.m. Investigators determined that Sapp was driving a 2003 Mitsubishi four door northbound on the highway when he failed to negotiate a curve near the former Pigotts Cash and Carry. The vehicle left the road and began to overturn as it crashed sideways and then roof-“ rst into a large palm tree. The cause of the crash is still under investigation. Lt. Dale Evans, Lt. Billy Jones and Deputy Ben Steinle investigated and they were assisted at the scene by Wakulla EMS.Man killed in wreck The student identi“ cation card used by Mike Carter during his travels to Europe in the 1970s. HEARING TECHNOLOGY SALE!FREE Demonstration!$1095SOLUTION 4 ALL SIZES. Located at 3295 Crawfordville Hwy. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 17AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Oct. 20, Elizabeth Webster of Crawfordville reported a hit-and-run accident at Timmons Road and Webster Road in Crawfordville. A motorist on Timmons Road was allegedly driving at a high rate of speed and struck the stop sign. The vehicle left the scene at a high rate of speed. The post was bent but the sign was still visible to motorists. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Oct. 21, Megan Scott of Sopchoppy reported the theft of her driver license. The license was taken from an unlocked vehicle at Azalea Park. Her purse was stolen but the license was the only item of value lost. Deputy Lorne Whaley investigated. € On Oct. 21, Darrin McGlamry of Riversprings Middle School reported the theft of a Blackberry from his classroom. Sgt. Ray Johnson and Coach Shannon Smith identi“ ed a student suspect through video evidence. The phone was returned to the victim and the 12-year-old juvenile was issued a juvenile civil citation and ordered to perform 32 hours of community service. € On Oct. 24, Edwin C. Brown of Crawfordville reported an illegal dumping of trash at a county park at 8046 Coastal Highway. The “ re pit where a group of juveniles were camping was covered in soda and beer cans. Cans were also observed at other locations at the park. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € On Oct. 24, Christina Hanna of Crawfordville reported the theft of an oversized mailbox from Hydra Engineering in Crawfordville. The box is valued at $50. Lt. C.L. Morrison investigated. On Oct. 23, David George of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Computer equipment, electronic equipment and other miscellaneous property, valued at $2,340, was taken from a vehicle. The items were entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € On Oct. 23, Lashawnia Webster of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone cut the victims vehicle fuel line. A forced entry was also observed at a door to her residence. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € On Oct. 23, Uvon James Martin, 26, of Tallahassee was charged with driving while license is suspended or revoked following a traf“ c stop on Crawfordville Highway. Deputy Nick Gray observed the motorist cross the solid white line three times within a quarter mile. Det. Rob Giddens determined that Martins driver license was suspended and this was his third violation. He was issued a traffic citation and taken to the Wakulla County Jail without incident by Deputy Jeremy Johnston. € On Oct. 24, a concerned parent contacted Riversprings Middle School Assistant Principal Michele Baggett regarding a male student passing out pills at school. A search of the students locker found pills and synthetic marijuana. The 14year-old male student was suspended from school for 10 days and placed at the Second Chance School for the remainder of the school year. The pills turned out to be Ritalin and were given to five female students. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € On Oct. 24, David Causey of Quincy reported a vehicle theft in Crawfordville. The victim was removing trees from local property when he discovered his truck missing. The equipment in the vehicle was valued at $1,215. The vehicle was entered in the NCIC/FCIC computer. Later, it was recovered in Tallahassee by Tallahassee Police Department investigators. Deputy Nick Gray removed the vehicle from the NCIC/FCIC listing. Missing property was also recovered with the truck. € On Oct. 26, Reed Brown of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. He arrived at his property and discovered a forced entry. Damage to the door and frame was estimated at $300. A radio, valued at $100, was discovered missing. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On Oct. 25, Fredrick Edward Strain, 44, of Panacea was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked after driving to the probation office without a valid license. Deputy Vicki Mitchell observed Strain driving on Crawfordville Highway and conducted a traf“ c stop. The suspect was warned by a probation of“ cer that he should not be driving without a valid license. € On Oct. 26, a clerk at the Sopchoppy Express Lane reported a retail theft as a female, who has been identi“ ed, removed beer from the establishment without paying for it. Yolanda Evette Calloway, 40, of Sopchoppy was issued a trespass warning for the store and a notice to appear in court for the theft of the two beers, valued at $2.78. Deputy Rachel Oliver investigated. € On Oct. 26, a disorderly conduct was reported at Sopchoppy Education Center when a 15-year-old female student was observed cursing at the school staff. She was charged with disruption of a school function. Sgt. Joe Page removed her from school property and released her into the custody of her father. € On Oct. 26, Andrew Jolly of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. Three unauthorized charges were discovered on the victims bank account which totaled $451. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On Oct. 26, Peter Gonzalez of Crawfordville reported an illegal dumping. The victim reported that two deer carcasses were dumped on his property. In 2010, the victim reported the dumping of 20 deer on his property. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € On Oct. 26, a concerned citizen reported a hit and run at the Mighty Mullet in Panacea. A suspect, who was identi“ ed, left the parking area and struck a vehicle owned by Tammie Barwick of Panacea. Investigators have been attempting to locate and speak to the hit and run driver. Sgt. John Zarate investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 704 calls for service during the past week including: 22 residential and business alarms; 75 citizen contacts; 11 disturbances; 44 investigations; 46 medical emergencies; 55 security checks; 23 special details; 11 traf“ c enforcements; 35 traffic stops; 13 reckless vehicles; and 114 welfare checks.Special to The NewsTwo Tallahassee men were arrested following a robbery at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville and an ensuing high speed vehicle chase that ended a few miles later, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum. Eustace J. Cameron, 39, was charged with grand theft, armed robbery and resisting an of“ cer without violence. Ronnie Bernard Spearman, Sr., 44, was charged with armed robbery, grand theft, knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked, aggravated ” eeing/eluding a law enforcement of“ cer when lights/sirens activated and resisting arrest without violence. Lt. Jimmy Sessor was on party patrol in the WalMart parking lot Monday, Oct. 31 at 12:36 a.m. when he observed Cameron pushing two shopping carts outside Wal-Mart with a store employee in pursuit asking him to stop. When the lieutenant attempted to stop the man, he jumped into a waiting vehicle and the two suspects drove north on U.S. Highway 319. Lt. Sessor followed the suspects to the U.S. Highway 319 and Highway 267 intersection where two Florida Highway Patrolmen, who were called in to assist, helped stop the vehicle. Spearman complied with orders to get out of the vehicle but Cameron jumped into the drivers seat and attempted to put the vehicle in gear before being physically removed from the vehicle. An inventory of the vehicle discovered $150 worth of clothing in the original packaging, two homemade pipes and 71 grams of an unknown powder wrapped in aluminum foil. A Wal-Mart employee told investigators that he attempted to stop Cameron from removing the two buggies from the store but Cameron threatened him with a gun which he did not have. The property in the two buggies was valued at $1,377 for a total of $1,528. The two men were transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Two arrested in Wal-Mart robbery case Ronnie B. Spearman Sr. Eustace J. 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Page 18A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comIts the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival in Panacea FISHY FASHIONS: Paul Johnson, David Kemp, Mullet King Ronald Fred Crum and his Queen Eloise Crum with Pam Portwood. Governors Executive Chef John Minas demonstrated cooking mullet and shared the results. Larry Tucker gets some tartar sauce.MULLET STYLE: The guys from Mineral Springs Seafood show off their mullet haircut-wigs while cooking mullet.BOATWORKS: Wakulla Jr. ROTC cadets help work on a mahogany boat donated to the Maritime Center. The weather was brisk on Saturday morning at Woolley Park, with the wind coming off the bay. There was lots to do at the Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival … from the crowning of the king and queen, to a cooking demonstration with Governors Executive Chef John Minas, listening to music from the Sarah Mac Band, or eating food and pursuing arts and crafts from the vendors. The real point of the festival is to celebrate the local maritime heritage, and there was information about boat building, navigation and even scrimshaw work on horns. A vendor at the festival, left, waits for customers after setting up. The cool weather may have kept the crowd down. More photos online at thewakullanews.com PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 C a n ’ t Can’t a c c e s s access T h e The W a k u l l a Wakulla n e w s ews o n l i n e online c o n t e n t ? content? S u b s c r i b e Subscribe t o d a y a n d today and g e t f u l l get full a c c e s s access! 15minute guaranteeTallahassee Memorial is pleased to bring InQuicker to the community for those patients requiring emergency care for non-life threatening medical conditions. With InQuicker, you never have to experience a long wait in a crowded emergency facility again. Instead, enjoy the comfort of your own home while waiting for your next emergency care visit. Simply access the InQuicker system at tmh.org to “nd projected treatment times at both the Tallahassee Memorial Bixler Emergency Center and Urgent Care Center. Once the system captures certain demographic and symptomatic information, you are added to the wait queue which holds your place in line, online. When you arrive at the emergency center for your projected treatment time, you will be seen by a nurse practitioner, physicians assistant or physician in 15 minutes or less, guaranteed. Your ER wait is over. Check-in at tmh.org to hold your place in line, online today. Online Check-in atTMH.ORG* InQuicker is only for patients experiencing non-life threatening conditions and does not affect the wait times of other emerg ency room patients. Priority treatment is always given to those with the most urgent medical conditions. your ER wait is over. Guaranteed.

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Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011By JOHN SHUFFChamber President My good friend Ralph Thomas and I were sitting together a few evenings ago at the Oct. 17 BOCC meeting. As I was leaving we agreed, being the policy wonks that we are, that our commissioners had not given us much to mull over this month. The only issue that has gotten the ” ags to ” ying has been the controversy over re-zoning Commodore Commons subdivision from commercial to residential reviving the old push-and-pull between property rights advocates and those who believe that as areas become more populated, a need is developed for more rules to encourage peaceful coexistence. Planning and zoning ordinances that allow for choices are good. The citizens and our county government have developed a plan for Crawfordville called Our Town.Ž We need to begin the lengthy work of implementing the comprehensive plan changes that are called for in that plan, making sure they allow developers optional uses, and developing a corridor along U.S. Highway 319 that allows for future road widening, with the goal being to make Crawfordville a more congruous and better functioning town. Your Chamber of Commerce is taking the lead on this issue and all the other facets of the Our Town plan to ultimately provide a better community within which to live our lives, raise our children and operate our businesses. We have been studying several funding sources for myriad projects, with our main emphasis on “ xing the intersections along 319 to improve traf“ c ” ow. Please note that we did not say four-lane 319 … which, at a $200 million price tag, is completely out of our range and beyond the budget parameters of a constrained DOT. Please also note that herein lies a reason for implementing the comprehensive plan changes and corridor mentioned above; if we dont encourage Crawfordville to broaden out then it will strip out. If it strips out we will all be trying to use one road to access all services causing gridlock for the citizens and driving up the value of property along the highway making it even more difficult to tackle the biggest challenge to growth in Wakulla County … the eventual four-laning of 319, we just went full circle. By not implementing the Our Town concept, your commute to Tallahassee will get worse as time goes by. And what type of impression do we think is conveyed to the 100,000 trips that typically pass through Crawfordville on any given weekend? Would having a few of those transients think this may be a nice place to live be good, thereby creating the critical mass necessary to give us the shopping choices we desire?Continued on Page 4B By JO ANN PALMERSpecial to The News On the third Thursday of each month, Chamber members look forward to the monthly mixer. We get together to reconnect, catch up on family and friends, hear news and happenings in the business community and Wakulla County, or just to enjoy a little time away from the hectic business of business.Ž On Oct. 20, Nancy Matheny, owner of Two Blondes Liquor & Gifts in Panacea opened her doors for the October mixer and featured beer tasting. The weather was perfect for the gathering to enjoy and meander around the quaint shop while snacking on a tray of sandwiches provided by Adam Cutter of the Coastal Corner. Adam, the new owner of Coastal Corner, wanted to show off his ability to provide visitors to the beautiful coastal area a great alternative to seafood, and Nancy was pleased to pair his food with the great selection of beer. Nancy introduced her staff which includes daughter and partner, Maura Evans, staff, Greta Williams and Trey McCulloch. She told the group that the property has been in her family since the 1970s and that Two Blondes began in 2009. She gave a brief history of the beer and liquor trade, and con“ rmed that while it has for many years been a male-dominated business, women are taking on the challenge and changing the face of the industry. Continued on Page 4B Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite #1 The Log Cabinƒƒƒ Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Presidents Message e Our Town issue continues to developTwo Blondes hosts mixer PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENBEER TASTING: Maura Evans of Two Blondes tells Chamber members Dan Hinchee and Bill Russell about some of the beers offered as Greta Williams assists. Barbara Guzzetta enjoys the food. Rapid Response Training at Wakulla Correctional See Page 10B Chamber members turn out for luncheon See Page 4B

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, November 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB will meet at Hudson Park at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA WRITERS GROUP will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. at the public library. Everyone is invited to attend.  WAKULLA GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at 6:30 p.m. in the main meeting room of the public library. All are invited to attend. Friday, November 4  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Saturday, November 5  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations and events. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate my phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu. register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_ faery@yahoo.com. Sunday, November 6  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, November 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  WAKULLA COUNTY AUTISM SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 7 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center. This gathering provides an opportunity for families of school age children (Pre-K through 12) with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. No cost and no registration is necessary. Tuesday, November 8  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will meet at 7 p.m. at the public library. The public is encouraged to attend all meetings. Wednesday, November 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, November 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Friday, November 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef O’Brady’s in Crawfordville. Please call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information.Special EventsThursday, November 3  FOCUS ON ABILITY, A PICNIC IN THE PARK will be held to recognize Disability Awareness Month in Hudson Park from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. by the Wakulla County School District There will be free hot dogs, informational booths and entertainment by Pyramid Players. Call 926-7125 or the ESE Department at 926-0065 for more information.  BLOOD DRIVE will be held by the Southeastern Community Blood Center from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce parking lot. Individuals who donate blood will receive a free tote bag. Anyone interested in donating blood is asked to call Captain Larry Massa at 251-5169. For more information about giving blood, visit http://www.scbcinfo.org/default.htm or call 877-7181. Saturday, November 5  FIFTH ANNUAL VETERAN’S PARADE will be held at 10 a.m. in Hudson Park by Wakulla Christian School and the Wakulla County Veterans Services Of ce. After the parade, there will be a Veterans Award Ceremony, live patriotic entertainment, a silent auction, game booths, rides, crafts and a sh fry. All proceeds will go to support local veteran’s programs. For more information, contact Wakulla Christian School at 926-5583.  UP AND CLOSE PERSONAL SPOTLIGHT with Wakulla County historian Betty Green will be held by the St. Marks Yacht Club at 7:30 p.m. Green is a charter member of the Wakulla County Historical Society and co-founder of the Historical Museum. This event is open to the public. There will be light refreshments, a meet and greet time at the beginning of the evening. The Club is located at 36 Yacht Club Lane, St. Marks. Seating is limited, call Mickey Cantner at 210-7058 or email pelicancove1@earthlink. net for reservations.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  YARD SALE will be held by the Sopchoppy United Methodist Women from 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2002 Sopchoppy Highway. A barbecue pork sandwich plate will also be for sale from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. All proceeds go toward missions. Call 962-5818 for more information.  FAMILY FUN DAY FESTIVAL will be hosted by Riversprings Middle School from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be bingo, a sweet shop, drawing, food, Champions-Titus Academy, yard sale, home run derby, athletic competitions, climbing wall, bean bag toss, soda ring toss and more. Money will go towards the school’s athletic programs. The school is located at 800 Spring Creek Highway. Call 9262300 for more information. Sunday, November 6  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will be held at 2 p.m. with a focus on Caves, Sinkholes and Springs presented by Harley Means. These geologic features are components of Karst Topography, and are common in our area of the Florida Panhandle, including on the St. Marks Refuge. Means supervises the Geological Investigations Section of the Florida Geological Survey and is an Assistant State Geologist. It will be held in the new Environmental Education Center at 1255 Lighthouse Road on the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Refreshments and informal discussion will follow. Monday, November 7  WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 2:30 p.m. in room 130. For more information, contact Angie Gentry, chairperson, at angela.gentry@ wcsb.us. Tuesday, November 8  SECOND ANNUAL BIG CATCH CHARITY FISH FRY will be held from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Posey’s Dockside Caf, 99 Rock Landing Road in Panacea. The event is for Big Brothers Big Sisters in Wakulla County. There will be shrimp plates, sides and iced tea, beer for purchase and live music. Tickets are $10 and available online at www. bbbs.org/BIGCatch or can be purchased at the event. For more information, contact Stacy Harvey at wakulla@ bbbsbigbend.org or 366-3865.  APALACHEE REGIONAL PLANNING COUNCIL will hold a public meeting of The Wakulla County Transportation Disadvantaged Coordinating Board at 10 a.m. at the public library. In addition to its regular business, the agenda includes the adoption of the annual evaluation of the CTC, grievance procedures, board bylaws and the TD Service Plan. The public is invited to the annual public hearing that will follow this meeting.  SENIOR SERVICE DAY will be held at the Senior Center, 22 Michael Drive, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. with the Area Agency on Aging. There will be application services for Medicare, home energy assistance, ampli ed telephone distribution, Medicaid and food stamp assistance. Thursday, November 10  FULL MOON CLIMB will be held at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and will include light hors d’oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. For reservations or more information, contact the Visitor Center at 850-927-7744 or 888-927-7744. Saturday, November 12  BENEFIT AND FISH FRY FOR JEANINE ABERPOSEY and her family will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park. Jeanine was involved in a serious accident that broke her back and left her paralyzed from the waist down. She and her husband are currently in Atlanta at Shepard’s Spinal Cord Clinic where she will go through extensive therapy. The bene t will feature live entertainment by the Coon Bottom Creek Band and Jerry Evans, a bake sale and yard sale, and face painting and other activities for the kids, as well as a sh fry. Sunday, November 13  VIEWING PARTY for From the Heart Music Hour episode 4 will be held at Indian Pass Raw Bar, 8391 C-30A, Port St. Joe, at 5 p.m. for the full 2-hour program featuring Brian Bowen, 19 South, Sarah Mac Band, Tobacco Road Band, Mimi & The HearnDogs, The Currys, Steve Leslie and Billy Dean. It was recorded and lmed at the Monticello Opera House. Some of the musicians will perform from 1 to 4:30 p.m. before the episode airs. Monday, November 14  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES GOVERNING BOARD will meet from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. By SCOTT JOYNERInterim Library DirectorFriday Night Movie On Friday, Nov. 4, we are happy to show the next action packed “ lm from Marvel Studios leading in to the sure to be blockbuster Avengers “ lm next summer. Starring Chris Evans (The Fantastic FourŽ) Tommy Lee Jones and Hugo Weaving (The Matrix TrilogyŽ) and following along the lines of Iron Man,Ž The Incredible HulkŽ and Thor,Ž this “ lm tells the story of a typical 98-pound weaklingŽ whose determination to join the military during World War II catches the eye of a scientist who is developing a super soldier serum for the United States. After the scientist is killed in an attack by the minions of the evil Red Skull, this CaptainŽ leads a group of soldiers into a battle to defeat the Red Skull, and make the world safe once again. Based upon one of the most iconic comic book characters of all time, this PG-13 (for violence and action) rated “ lm is sure to be fun for the entire family. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. show and we ask that minors be accompanied by an adult and not just dropped off. Genealogy Group Meeting This week the Wakulla Genealogy Group is proud to present Jay Collins, the president of the Tallahassee Genealogical Society as their speaker. Collins will be speaking on the importance of DNA to genealogical research using his 20 years of experience in genealogy and family history research. The meeting is at 6 p.m. in our Main Meeting Room and is of course open to the public. Computer Classes for November We are excited to offer the following computer classes to the citizens of Wakulla County this month. On Thursday, Nov. 3, we have Microsoft Publisher: Getting Started at 9:30 a.m. & Computer Basics: Sur“ ng the Internet at 1:30 p.m. On Thursday, Nov. 10, were offering Skype: Getting Started at 2:30 p.m. with Genealogy Basics: Documentation & Organization at 6 p.m. Finally on Thursday, Nov. 17, we have Facebook: New Features at 9:30 a.m. with Computer Basics: Email starting at 1:30 p.m. All are free and open to the public but do require early registration as seating is limited. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Focus on Ability, A Picnic in the Park from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hudson Park. Veterans Parade at 10 a.m. at Hudson Park. First Sunday at the Refuge presentation at 2 p.m. in the Educational Center. Senior Service Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Senior Center. ThursdaySaturdaySundayTuesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Library News... City and County MeetingMonday, November 7  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular commission meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, November 10  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers to discuss infrastructure shortfalls in historic neighborhoods.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 3B WE BUY ALL GOLD, SCRAP GOLD, GOLD JEWELRY*This amount depends upon rarity, condition and what collectors are willing to payWE HAVE UNCOVERED SOME OF THE RAREST NOTES IN UNITED STATES HISTORY! PAYING CASH FOR COINS PRE-1970 & CURRENCY BRING IN YOUR OLD BANK NOTES TO FIND OUT IF YOU HAVE A HIDDEN GEM! INDIAN CENT UP TO $500* $2.5 LIBERTY HEAD GOLD COIN UP TO $3,800* ARMS OF CALIFORNIA GOLD HALF DOLLAR UP TO $8,500* 1797 $1 UP TO $200,000* $5 LIBERTY HEAD GOLD COIN UP TO $4,500* GOLD DOLLAR TYPE II UP TO $14,000* 1798 $5 UP TO $125,000* $10 INDIAN GOLD COIN UP TO $5,500* $5 DRAPED BUST RIGHT LE UP TO $40,000* DRAPED BUST HALF CENT UP TO $5,000* $20 ST. GAUDENS GOLD COIN UP TO $6,800* FLOWING HAIR STELLA GOLD COIN UP TO $125,000* 1832 CLASSIC HALF CENT UP TO $80,000* MERCURY DIME UP TO $3,600* 3 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,500* MORGAN SILVER DOLLAR UP TO $100,000* LIBERTY VŽ NICKEL UP TO $2,800* BARBER DIME UP TO $2,800* JEFFERSON WARŽ NICKEL UP TO $2,000* WHEAT BACK CENT UP TO $1,500* STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER UP TO $4,400* SHIELD NICKEL UP TO $4,000* WALKING LIBERTY HALF DOLLAR UP TO $4,700* CAPPED BUST HALF DIME UP TO $10,000* BARBER QUARTER UP TO $3,200* 2 CENT PIECE UP TO $2,000* PEACE DOLLAR UP TO $3,000* BUFFALO NICKEL UP TO $1,800* BRAIDED HAIR LARGE CENT UP TO $3,800* SEATED LIBERTY DIME UP TO $6,500* BARBER HALF DOLLAR UP TO $6,750* KENNEDY HALF DOLLAR UP TO 8X FACE VALUE* O $125 000 WE ALSO PURCHASE POCKET & WRIST WATCHES, COSTUME JEWELRY, STERLING SILVER Paid Advertisement WE BUY ALL GOLD & SILVER JEWELRY GOLD GOLD JEW E L RY FREEADMISSIONCONTINUES IN CRAWFORDVILLE EVERY DAYTHROUGH SATURDAYOCT. 31ST NOV. 5THM…F 9AM…6PM SAT 9AM-4PMBEST WESTERN PLUS WAKULLA INN & SUITES3292 COASTAL HIGHWAY 98 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327DIRECTIONS: (850) 926-3737 SHOW INFO: (217) 787-7767

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comBy JO ANN PALMERSpecial to The NewsAt noon on Wednesday, Oct. 26, about 30 Chamber members and guests converged on the newly opened Bouys Restaurant in Panacea. Owner Kim Williams and her staff greeted the crowd attending the monthly networking luncheon with some of their famous smoked fish and deviled crab spread. As members moved from table to table chatting, Kim and her staff took orders from a menu offering a choice of three delicious meals. There was shrimp, grilled, fried or blackened, served with your choice of potato and a salad with your choice of shrimp or chicken. It was a great selection and truly showcased the talent of Kim and her staff. For the several brand new members in attendance, it was an opportunity to introduce themselves and give the audience an overview of what they do and what their business is about. Dee Shriver talked about the new package store she opened at the intersection of 98 and Spring Creek Road. Carol Ann Williams told us to watch for television ads about her new business, Legal Shield, Dallas Marshall told about the amenities he offers for visitors at the Panacea RV Park. And Mike Keller passed out menus for his new restaurant, Mikes Seafood Grille. He will be hosting the November networking luncheon on Nov. 30. Thanks to all the new members who attended. Mary Wallace introduced her guest and encouraged everyone to bring someone with them every time they attend. The luncheons are very successful and a venue for sharing information, networking and just spending a little time eating a great meal and visiting with fellow business people. Mary also encourages attendees to sit with someone they dont know, you might learn something. I sat with Mary Ellen Davis and learned that we both like big cities and motorcycles, so it works. Always an exciting part of the hour are the door prizes, and cash drawing. The $30 cash was won by Dallas Marshall, a new member. He said, Beginners luckŽ and happily took the money. Other prizes donated were gift certi“ cates from The Works Co-Working Caf, a beautiful glass platter donated by Lionel Dazevedo and was won by June Vauses mother, who was a guest. There were restaurant gift certi“ cates, a Halloween gift bag and an emergency ” ashlight from Cook Insurance. There are always a great variety of prizes and we appreciate everyone for their generosity. Thank you Kim for a great lunch. When you want fresh seafood, visit their market, Mineral Springs, the “ rst business on the right as you get into Panacea on 98, or come on down to the new restaurant, Bouys and let them do the cooking. Either way, youll be treated great and have wonderful food. Plan to join us next month, Nov. 30 at Mikes Seafood Grille. Watch for the invitation and if you are not a Chamber member, membership has many advantages. Contact Petra Shuff at (850) 926-1848 for information. T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Tell us about your business: Dr. Jim Carey opened his doors in 1974 in Tallahassee. Joining him in 1995 was Jeffrey Jones, our board certi“ ed orthodontist. In 2003, Dr. Careys son Bart joined the practice also. All three doctors received their undergraduate degrees from Florida State University. Dr. Jim Carey and Dr. Bart Carey are board certi“ ed pediatric dentists. Being a dual specialty of“ ce we are the only dental practice in the Wakulla area that can provide all your childs dental needs from infancy through high school in one location. Our Crawfordville patients can also be seen in our Tallahassee of“ ce when necessary. Dr. Jones also treats adults as well as children and teens for orthodontics (braces). You do not have to be a pediatric dental patient to be seen for orthodontics. What services, products do you offer? We are a dual specialty practice. The dental side of our practice is exclusive to children. Most children begin preventive dental visits around age 2 to 3. We offer comprehensive exams, nutrition counseling, dental cleanings, ” uoride treatments, dental bondings, stainless steel crowns for children, extractions for children when necessary, sealants and sedation dentistry for larger cases. Our orthodontic practice offers screenings for children beginning at age 7 to detect the need for early interceptive orthodontic treatment … i.e., appliances for crossbite and/or expansion. Comprehensive (full) orthodontic treatment (braces) is available for teens and adults. In addition to traditional braces we offer clear braces, lingual (behind the teeth) braces and the Invisalign clear aligner system. What sets your business apart from the competition? Our dual specialty practice offers dentistry for children and orthodontic treatment for adults, teens and children. We are the only childrens dentist in the Wakulla County area. All three doctors practice in both locations: Tallahassee and Crawfordville. All three doctors hold diplomate certi“ cates indicating advanced education and training in dentistry and all are board certi“ ed in their specialty. What should we be on the lookout for? We are always striving to improve our services and provide quality state-of-the-art dentistry for children. We also look forward to having more adults come to us for their orthodontic needs. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 1998. Why did you join the Chamber? We feel it is important to be a part of the community. It keeps us in touch with what the citizens of Wakulla County want and need in a local business. We enjoy sponsoring community events. Why should local businesses join the Chamber? Local businesses should join the Chamber for the same reasons as stated above. It also gives the businesses a voice in the community and a sense of camaraderie facilitating them to work together. Whats your reason why Wakulla residents should Shop Local? To create and maintain a thriving community it is important to support local business. Seeing businesses be successful entices other new businesses to come to our community assuring a standard of growth for the area as a whole. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Visit our website, www. drscareyandjones.com for information on our practice and the doctors. It also provides up-to-date information on dental procedures, FAQs and tips on what to do in a dental or orthodontic emergency situation. We can also be found on Facebook. To schedule an appointment or for questions call (850) 926-1777 or the Tallahassee of“ ce at (850) 893-5177. The address is 2001-A Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. The Tallahassee of“ ce is located at 1272 Timberlane Road. Business: Drs. Carey & Jones, Dentistry for Children Orthodontics for Adults and ChildrenOwner: James A. Carey, D.D.S.New Chamber membersLongleaf Timber Products, Inc. Panacea RV Park Black Bean Cuban Cuisine Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc. Legal Shield & Go Small BizChamber members turn out for luncheon JENNIFER JENSENMary Ellen Davis tastes a beer from Greta Williams as Two Blondes owner Nancy Matheny looks on. Continued from Page 1B Nancy boasts her store as the last stop for 40 miles and offers a great selection of beer, wine, liquor, snacks, local artist jewelry, gift baskets and crafts. She and her staff pride themselves on being available to assist customers with all their needs, including gift baskets for any occasion. She also offers special orders, so when you stop in, if you dont see what you are looking for, ask. The staff is always there to help you. Be sure to keep them in mind for special gifts and items during the holidays. Visit their website for the hours of operation at www.liquorandgifts.com or call them at (850) 9848808. If you are interested in joining the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce, contact Petra Shuff at (850) 926-1848 or visit the website at wakullacountychamber.com. Two Blondes hosts mixerShu : Our Town developsContinued from Page 1B With all this in mind, we have also been working with the property appraisers of“ ce to de“ ne the boundaries of Our TownŽ as one of our goals is to set up a Community Redevelopment Act (CRA) district, similar to the St. Marks district, to help fund projects that are inside the Our TownŽ boundaries. In fact, Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman, has just completed delineating the Our Town area, in less than two weeks using in-house staff. This is a perfect example of our government working with the citizens to better our community. These districts do not charge more tax, but instead, allow future tax increases caused by property value increases to be spent in the CRA area. We will continue to “ ll you in on our progress with this very complex project. THANKS TO JO ANN PALMER Enough of that stuff, we had a very enjoyable after-hours mixer at Two Blondes Liquors on Oct. 20. With Petra being gone Jo Ann Palmer filled in and did a great job of introducing the hosts and guests for a very enjoyable evening. Actually Jo Ann has been doing the Chamber a great service for the entire time that Petra has been out of town “ lling in for her on a daily basis at the Chamber of“ ce helping to keep the ball rolling. I sincerely hope everybody has reason to feel a little more optimistic as we approach the holiday season. One of the reasons for our increased membership has been the luncheons that Mary Wallace started, and they continue to be a great networking opportunity for our membership. The after-hours mixers, like the one at Two Blondes Liquors, are also good opportunities to meet and greet. Most of us have a tendency to plow that row,Ž and turn our mind inward as we go from day to day trying to survive the current conditions. Break out of that mold from time to time and “ nd out what everybody else is doing; it will be a bene“ t to us all! Congratulations to all who helped make the Food Drive a resounding success, and have a great November. JO ANN PALMERA table of Chamber members, including Don Henderson, Tim Jordan, Lynda Kinsey, Shirley Howard, Sharol Brown, Amy Geiger and Kelii Kirkland. New Chamber member Dallas Marshall, the new owner of Panacea RV Park, introduces himself. Also at the table are Dee Shriver and Carol Ann Williams and her guest.PHOTOS BY TAMMIE BARFIELD Mike Keller of Mikes Seafood Grille talks about his new restaurant. Carol Ann Williams talks about her new business, Legal Shield. Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce GREAT OFFICE SPACEat The Barry BuildingFREELast Months Rent!Facilities, great atmosphere, all utilities.850-210-5849RATES START AT $250/month www.BarryBuilding.com facebook.com/GamerZParadise Exp. 11/30/11 (850)926-9100|theGamerZParadise@yahoo.com 635WakullaArranRoadCrawfordville,Florida32327 Kinect | X-Box Live | PS3 | Wii | Wi-fiMON THURS: SUMMER HOURS 12 9 PM FRI:12 11 PM SAT: 12 11 PM SUN: 1 8 PMCome and PLAY!Buy 1 hr of Gaming for $3 Get 1 hr FREE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 5BBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 28 … The Republican “ eld for the U.S. Senate gained a well-known contender this week and lawmakers got their “ rst glimpse of a controversial gambling measure that has already attracted the attention of casino fat cats and The Mouse.Ž While backers of resort gaming began testing the waters, a federal judge early this week ordered state of“ cials to stop testing the water of applicants seeking temporary cash assistance from the feds in a battle pitting drug tests against federal protections from unnecessary searches. But the judicial “ reworks werent limited to the federal courts, as state circuit judges heard testimony on church/state separation and pension contributions from state employees. MACK ENTERS U.S. SENATE RACE U.S. Rep. Connie Mack (IV) entered an already crowded “ eld of GOP hopefuls vying to challenge popular Democratic incumbent, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson. The Cape Coral Republican brings to the race a recognizable name that has so far eluded the “ eld. Much of that is based on the fame of his father, a former U.S. senator, and his great-grandfather, a baseball manager for more than 50 years in the early 20th century. Macks entry immediately brought attacks from contenders who already were arguing who is more outside the Washington establishment. Its been a recurring theme in a tea party dominated primary season that even Pat Robertson worries is veering too far to the right. He knows first-hand from his many years working with the Washington establishment how broken our government is and Im certain that voters will closely examine his record on job creation, immigration and government spending,Ž said Mike McCalister, a candidate in that GOP primary who has never held elected public of“ ce. Macks campaign responded that he is the most viable candidate to challenge his two-term Democrat Nelson, but he still faces tough odds. A late March survey of GOP voters by Public Policy Polling, a Democratic “ rm based in North Carolina that regularly polls Florida, found Mack leading the race with 28 percent to 14 percent for LeMieux and 4 percent for Adam Hasner. The candidate emerging from the “ eld would still have to recoup a double digit gap with Nelson, though. GAMBLING BILL While many issues have yet to percolate up to the top of the legislative agenda, one sure bet took a step forward this week as backers of destination gambling showed their hand. A much anticipated bill permitting up to three luxury casinos was filed Wednesday, accelerating an intense lobbying war that will play a big role in the legislative session when it begins in January. The 142-page bill (HB 487) allows the state to issue up to three resort casino permits in counties where voters have already passed or would pass referenda approving expanding gambling. So far, only Broward and Miami-Dade counties have done so, but the bill as written does not limit the resorts to those counties only. These are not strip mall internet cafes. The proposal limits successful bids to those able to put together a development eclipsing $2 billion, of which gambling comprises not more than 10 percent of the footprint. It also creates more government. Modeled after similar regulatory agencies in New Jersey and Nevada, the proposed Department of Gaming Control would strictly regulate gambling in the state, from the parimutuel race track facilities, to Internet cafs. The proposal faces opposition from at least one business group: the Florida Chamber of Commerce has said it will “ ght the move to expand gaming in Florida. The statewide friend of business joins Disney as an opponent. The mouse that roars fears the luxury venues could prompt would-be Disney visitors to choose blackjack over Capt. Blackbeard. The venues are being touted for their economic development potential. Meanwhile, state-backed efforts to lure businesses may not be getting as much bang for their taxpayer bucks. The Department of Economic Opportunity released the names of six companies it says received state incentive money to create jobs but didnt deliver as many jobs as promised. The South Florida SunSentinel and Orlando Sentinel reported that nearly $40 million has been paid in incentives to companies that have fallen short of promised job creation by 3,600 jobs. Almost all of the incentive packages were negotiated a few years ago, when Charlie Crist was governor. One company, Gartner, Inc., was paid $1.2 million from 2009 to 2011 to create 400 jobs, but appears not to have been credited with any, the Sentinel papers reported. The state is renegotiating terms with the companies. COURTS A federal judge on Monday barred the state from drug testing applicants for federal “ nancial assistance until the lawsuit challenging the new law is resolved. U.S. District Court Judge Mary Scriven rejected the states arguments that the drug-testing program did not violate the U.S. Constitutions ban on unreasonable searches and would instead ensnare thousands of would-be welfare recipients in an impermissible dragnet. Meanwhile, a state circuit judge heard arguments this week on whether a proposed constitutional amendment making it easier for taxpayer funds to go to religious institutions should go on the ballot in November 2012. Leon Circuit Judge Terry Lewis is being asked to throw out the proposal crafted by lawmakers earlier this year. A lawsuit filed by the Florida Education Association, says the ballot language is misleading. STORY OF THE WEEK: Two: a federal judge in Miami issued an injunction, barring the state from enforcing its mandatory drug testing of federal cash assistance until a lawsuit challenging the law is resolved. And U.S. Rep. Connie Mack enters the U.S. Senate race, at least giving the Republican “ eld a name more than a few people know. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Its going to get a lot more fun,Ž Jennifer Duffy, senior editor of the Cook Political Report on the entrance of Connie Mack into Floridas Senate race.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)It’s a Mack Attack in Senate raceJudge sounds skeptical of pension changesBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 26 … The judge tasked with deciding the fate of an overhaul of the states pension plan voiced extreme skepticism about the plan last week, endangering one of the key accomplishments of the last legislative session and threatening to blow a nearly billion-dollar hole in the current budget. In one particularly pointed exchange, Circuit Court Judge Jackie Fulford forcefully pressed a lawyer for the state on how the changes to the pension plan, including a requirement that employees contribute 3 percent of their pay to their retirement and the elimination of cost-of-living adjustments for any work after June 30, 2011, would affect one of the state employees suing over the revamp. Hes paying more, getting less and in fact, the COLA does change. ... Its like youre punishing him for continuing to work,Ž said Fulford, who took the rare step of leaving the bench to point to a display on the wall while making her points. The legal questions about the changes to the pension plan revolve around whether the changes to the program break a portion of the law declaring the system a contractual obligation between the state and its employees. The employees and unions suing the state contend that the changes go too far. Attorneys defending the plan say it falls within the bounds of a 1981 Florida Supreme Court decision allowing the Legislature to alter pensions as long as it only does so with bene“ ts earned after the law takes effect. It happens only in the future,Ž said David Godofsky. It affects only the bene“ ts earned in the future.Ž But Ron Meyer, a lawyer for the Florida Education Association, argued that asking employees to contribute some of their income went to the very heart and structure of the pension plan.Ž And the complicated formula for “ guring out the cost-of-living adjustments essentially lowers the COLA percentage for current employees. Meyer said the Legislature would have been within its rights to make those changes for new employees alone. But the state got greedy,Ž he told Fulford. The state wanted more money.Ž Under the plan approved by the Legislature earlier this year, cost-of-living increases will not apply to wages earned after June 30 … leaving those employees who worked for the state before then with a split set of bene“ ts. The 3 percent COLA remains in effect for bene“ ts earned before that date, but doesnt apply for those earned after the cutoff. The state will calculate the COLA for those employees by reducing the 3 percent threshold based on how long after June 30 an employee works. That effectively lowers the COLA for those employees, breaking the states agreement, Meyer and an expert witness for the plaintiffs argued. The state and its expert countered that the annual COLA dollar amount employees receive will be the same as if they retired today; it simply wont increase as much as it would if the COLA were applied to bene“ ts earned in the future. The net effect is zero on the COLA,Ž said Paul Zeisler, an actuary who served as the states expert. Fulford sounded skeptical. The bene“ t from the COLA goes down period, right?Ž she pressed Zeisler, who denied that would be the effect. She also questioned the notion that asking employees to contribute to the plan for the “ rst time in more than 35 years could be compared to the changes in the calculation of bene“ ts the Supreme Court was weighing in the earlier case. But youre not changing their benefits,Ž she said. Youre saying, Give me money for it.ŽFeinberg is grilled on claims processGulf Coast members of Congress expressed frustration Thursday at what some said were dif“ culties in getting rightful compensation from BP by people who were affected by last years Gulf oil spill. In questioning Gulf Coast Claims Administrator Ken Feinberg, the House Natural Resources Committee urged him to be more aggressive in making sure those who lost money because of the spill last year. Id have to say were frustrated, many of us feel frustrated in the whole process,Ž said Rep. Steven Palazzo, a Republican who represents the Gulf coastal area of Mississippi. Id also say were insulted.Ž Members said theyre worried about the number of claims that arent being paid because of alleged fraud or lack of documentation. Is it not true that the burden you have placed on many of these individuals and businesses for additional infoƒ.that there has been a great inconsistency in the payment process,Ž asked Rep. Jo Bonner, RAla. Feinberg defended the work of the claims facility, which is paying compensation out of a $20 billion pot set aside by the British oil company. I point, with pride frankly, to the fact that overall theres $6 billion thats gone out in one year,Ž Feinberg said, adding that the claims facility is trying to make sure that all legitimate claims are paid. The Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in April of last year, killing 11 and spilling 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf. the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Anne urmondOctober 2011 Winner Her name was drawn fromI would like to thank all of the local businesses for sponsoring this contest. My husband and I are looking forward to visiting each restaurant. We enjoy the personal relationships we have with these local establishments. Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations ank You So Much! Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor PARTNE R… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com “ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special!” Let us perk u p your day! LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat Try One of Our Home Made Parfaits 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs.

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Two Sections 75 Cents Published Weekly, Read Daily Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 44th Issue Thursday, November 3, 2011 The Wakulla n ews Front row, left to right, Clara Alford, Madison Brown, Summer Broga, and in the back row, right to left, Madelyn Montpellier, Marina Harvey, Ella Roberts, Rachel Freeman, Alysse Warburton. Try Its: Media On my honor, I will try: To serve God and my country, To help people at all times, And to live by the Girl Scout Law.Girl Scouts Troop 165 visit This page sponsored in part by: List 10 words that rhyme with “time.” 1. ______________ 2. ______________ 3. ______________ 4. ______________ 5. ______________ 6. ______________ 7. ______________ 8. ______________ 9. ______________ 10. _____________What Rhymes with…Some answers: chime, crime, dime, grime, I’m, lime, mime, prime, rhyme, slime Answers: 1) Fact, 2) Fiction, every four years, a Leap Year takes place and February has 29 days, 3) Fiction, November has just 30 days, whereas other months have 31, 4) Fact, 5) Fiction, seven months have 31 days, 6) Fact, 7) Fiction, June has just 30 days, while July and August have 31 days, 8) Fiction, March has 31 days, while April and September have 30, 9) Fact, 10) Fact Years are divided into 12 months, January through December. Some months are shorter than others. Do you know how many days are in each month? Take this quiz and find out.1) February is the shortest month of the year. Fact or Fiction? 2) There are only 28 days in February. Fact or Fiction? 3) November is the longest month of the year. Fact or Fiction? 4) There are more months with 31 days than 30. Fact or Fiction? 5) Eight months have 31 days. Fact or Fiction? 6) Four months have 30 days. Fact or Fiction? 7) June and July have 31 days, Fact or Fiction? 8) March, April and September have 30 days. Fact or Fiction? 9) May and October have 31 days. Fact or Fiction? 10) January and December have 31 days. Fact or Fiction? Fact or Fiction? Month Challenge What Time Is It? The answer to that question depends upon where you are in the world. At midday in Chicago, your watch might read 12 p.m., Friday, January 15, 2010, whereas in Sydney, Australia, it would read 5 a.m., Saturday, January 16, 2010. The difference in time around the world has to do with the International Date Line and time zones. The International Date Line is an imaginary line in the middle of the Pacific Ocean that divides the earth into two days. Generally places in the eastern hemisphere are a day ahead of places in the western hemisphere. Earth is divided into time zones. The United States has several, including Eastern, Central, Mountain and Pacific Standard Time. Generally, the farther west the area, the earlier in the day it is. At 7 p.m. Central Time in Chicago, it is 6 p.m. Mountain Time in Denver and 5 p.m. Pacific Time in Los Angeles. COLORING PICTURE Name That Time Most clocks have two arrows. The short arrow is known as the little hand and tells the hour. The long arrow is known as the big hand and tells the minute. When the little hand is on 11 and the big hand is on 12, for example, it is 11 o’clock. Write in the time under each clock face pictured.Answers: 1) 12 o’clock, 2) 9 o’clock, 3) 1 o’clock, 4) 6 o’clock 4) ______ o’clock 3) ______ o’clock1) ______ o’clock2) ______ o’clock Jokes and Riddles Q: What month has 28 days?A: All of them! A: The letter “M.” Q: What occurs once in a minute, twice in a moment and never in a thousand years? Daylight Savings Time ends Sunday, November 6 Dont forget to turn back your clock 1 hour.

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ContactSandy850-697-2277 (Thursday-Saturday). 111 Medical/Dental Help Wanted Physician’s Assistant Needed LookingforPhysicianAssistant forverybusymedicalofficethat servicesprimarycare,urgent careandcountyinmates.Positionisfulltime.Ifyouareinterestedandwouldliketolearn moreaboutthisposition,please faxresumetofax850-926-3163, A ttn:RachelBrown.Pleasebe suretoincludesalaryrequirements. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 A IR CON OF WAKULLA Heating and Cooling Gary Limbaugh 926-5592 3232 Crawfordville Highway Service, Repair, Installation FL Lic. #CAC1814304. ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. No’s. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 130 Entertainment ZumbaWakulla,VFWPost4538, 475ArranRd.,Saturdays 9AM-10AMandonThursdays 6:30PM-7:30PM.$5/class.Party yourselfintoshape!CallPamat 459-5279orKimat251-9195. Look us u p in facebook! 255 Guns GUN SHOW Tallahassee Mall Sat.,Nov-5,9AM-5PM,Sun., Nov-6,9AM-4PM.GunTradersis nowbuyingGOLD!Concealed WeaponsClassesDaily.Bring yourGUNS&GOLDtosello r trade. GunTraderGunShows.com 352-339-4780 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org Lookingforagoodhomeforan 18-monthold,blackandwhite, spayedandmicrochippedcat. A bout10lbs.andasweetpersonality.Indoor/outdoor.Current withshotsandfleatreatment. Call 850-926-7451. LOW COST PET VACCINATIONAnimal Health Services will be at the CHATAdoption Center1 Oak Street, CrawfordvilleSATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5from 12:30pm to 1:30pm for more information call 926-0890 355 Yard Sales FIRSTFRIDAY&SATURDAY!8AM 2PMNO EARLYBIRDSMini-Warehouse-Boats-RV s519-5128•508-51772MILESSOUTHOFTHECOURTHOUSEYARD SALE ForeverFriendsFarmandCauzicanCareWeeklyYardSale! EveryThursday,FridayandSaturdayatMack’sMeats(corner ofSpringCreekHwy.and ShadevilleRd.)Lotsofstuff. Proceedstobenefitrescuedanimals. HUGESALE!Sat.,Nov.5, 8AM-1PM42CynthiaSt.(of f HarveyMillRd).Fullbed,accent table,chairs,misc.camping equipment,NASCARscanner w/dualheadphones,6000Lb. tow-hitch,holidayandhomedecor,jewelry/watches,purses, luggage,girl’sclothing/shoes, much more. HugeYardSale!Sat./Nov.5, 8AM-1PM,43Timberwood Court(WakullaStation).Fishing items,collectibles,toys,tools, VHS,DVD’s,LotsofMiscellaneousitems.421-6138.Canceli f rain. GIGANTICYARD SALEUnder the gigantic mastodon on Martin Luther King Road! HarvestThriftStore.1596CrawfordvilleHwy.NorthPointe Plaza.ISNOWOPEN!Mostall clothesandshoes$1.00.Nice nic-nacs.Comeseeour“twofo r one” rack! HugeMulti-FamilyYardSale!! Saturday,November5,9AM, 117ApacheeRd.(Turnon FeatherTrailoffofSpringCree k Hwy.) Look for the signs. INDOOR FLEA MARKET at Crawfordville Woman’s Club $15 donation for an 8’x10’ space Saturday, November 12, 2011 Call Nita Burke at 294-6482 to reserve your space. MultiFamilySale!!Saturday, 11/5,7:30AM-12Noon152Fox RunCircle,Crawfordville.All proceedsbenefitYouthwitha Mission. 440 Personals and Notices Singlewhitemale62lookingfo r female.Ihaveanicehomein Panacea.Liveinfree (room-&-board).Lighthousekeepingandcompanionship. Let’sMeet.Wes984-5733.No lar g e women p lease.

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 64 Blackfoot 1,300sf 3BR/2BA House with of ce & garage $850 Mo. No Smoking/Pets negotiable52 Deer Run 1BR Cabin in Sopchoppy $700 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 55 E.J. Stringer Road 3BR/2BA 1,200sf House with Screen Front Porch $850 Mo. No smoking or pets36 Stephen Donaldson Road 3BR/2BA Mobile Home on 1 Acre $700 No Smoking or petsAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate Lynn Cole-Eddinger lynncole5228@msn.comDavid Hoover dhoover2@hotmail.com NEW LISTING24 LAKE ELLEN, 3bedroom, 2 bath,double wide mobile home on 2 lotsdown the street from boat ramp. New metal roof, new ooring in living areas. All appliances including washer and dryer. Asking $32,900. REDUCED PRICE 23 HARBOUR POINT DRIVE, Immaculate furnished 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath 1774 sq. foot townhome on deep water canal w/dock. Community pool, oating dock, & gated community. Reduced to $229,000 457 HUNTERS TRACE/HUNTERS GLEN PLANTATION Ultimate 4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bath all brick, custom built home on 20 acres in gated community. Reduced $25,000! Go to COASTWISE. HOMESANDLAND.COM to view a list of all the special features and see pictures of this gorgeous home then call David or Lynn for appointment. FEATURED LISTING 14 HARRIS CIRCLE, BUCKHORN CREEK, Good as new, shows like a model home. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, mobile home with covered front porch and screened back porch. Backs up to Wildlife preserve and has private access to deep water landing providing quick access to the Ochlockonee River. Asking $69,000 Call David! COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. (850) 926…8038 ~ (850) 926…2390 fax 520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. 142 Shar-mel-re Rd. Crawfordville 3BR/2BA $825 per month. 1480 Alligator Dr. 3BR/2BA, 5 month rental: Nov. Mar. $1,500 per month. Commercial Of ce BuildingSouth of the library on Hwy. 319 $550 per month. BALLROOMONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE!Alabama, Georgia, Florida & South Carolina Many Selling Absolute!Tuesday, November 15, 6:00 p.m.215 Bank Foreclosed Properties RowellAuctions.comRowell Realty & Auction Co., Inc. 10% Buyers PremiumAU 479, AB 296 800-323-8388For More Information 91 Culbreath Lane, Crawfordville, FL 88 Midnight Pass, Crawfordville, FL 2 Lots on Block D Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville, FL .516 +/acres on the east side of Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Lot 49 Southside of Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 20 Lots in the Sellars Crossing Subdivision, Crawfordville, FL 45 Harry Morrison Road, Crawfordville, FL Lots 3 & 4 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, FL Lot 24 Mashes Sand Road, Panacea, FLSelling from St. James Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Road, Carrabelle, FL 4Br 2Ba House $1220mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $800mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1200mo + Sec. Dep. 2 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $615mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž(850) 926…5084 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens,CAH,GoodFloorPlan. $675/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease. A vailblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-508-8783 727-642-6043. 3BR/2BAM/Hforrent.Large deck,shed,roomy,quient neighborhood.Nopets-FIRM! A vailableOctober1st.Callfo r appt./application.$685/month, $600/security. 850-926-6212. Nice4BR/2BADoublewideon oneacre.NearMedartElementarySchool.C/H/A,utilityroom, fireplace.Rent$795/month.Garbagepick-upincluded.Call 850-228-7197. 605 Statewide Classi eds A nnouncements A dvertisingthatWorks.Putyou r adinOver100PapersthroughoutFloridaforoneLOWRATE! Call(866)742-1373orvisit: www.florida-classifieds.com Auctions MAJORLANDAUCTION-5228 +/-Acressoldin35tracts. TractslocatedinBenton,Henry, Carroll,PerryCountiesinTennesseeandCallowayCounty, Kentucky.SALEAheldThursday,November17,at2PMat ParisConventionCenterin Paris,TN.SALEBheldFriday November18,at1PMatPerry CountyCommunityBuildingin Linden,TN.Inspectionmeetings heldNovember4and11from 2-6PMatPerryCountyCommunityBuildinginLinden,andon November5and12from2-6PM attheHamptonInninParis. Woltz&Associates,Inc.;Real EstateBrokers&Auctioneers, Roanoke,VA.KY#72173, TL#2752.Goto www.woltz.com/755/orcall (800)551-3588formoreinformation. Autos Wanted CASHFORCARS!AnyMake, Model,orYear.WePayMORE! RunningorNot.SellYourCaro r TruckTODAY.FreeTowing!Instant Offer: (888)420-3807 Business Opportunities THINKCHRISTMAS,START NOW!OWNAREDHOT!DOLLAR,DOLLARPLUS,MAILBO X ORDISCOUNTPARTYSTORE FROM$51,900WORLDWIDE! 100%TURNKEY(800)518-3064 WWW.DRSS20.COM Education A LLIEDHEALTHcareer training-Attendcollege100% online.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.SCHE V certified.Call(800)481-9409 www.CenturaOnline.com Financial Services $$$ACCESSLAWSUITCASH NOW!!!$$$AsseenonTV.$$$ InjuryLawsuitDragging?Need $500-$500,000++within48/hrs? LowratesAPPLYNOWBY PHONE!CallToday!Toll-Free: (800)568-8321 www.lawcapital.com Help Wanted A pplyNow,12DriversNeeded Top5%Pay2Mos.CDLClass A DrivingExp(877)258-8782 www.meltontruck.com Drivers:RunGA,AL,MS,TN & FLHOMEWEEKENDS,EarnUp to39¢/mi,1yrOTRFlatbedexp. Call:SUNBELTTRANSPORT, LLC (800)572-5489 ext. 227 Miscellaneous A IRLINESAREHIRING-Train forhighpayingAviationMaintenanceCareer.FAAapproved program.Financialaidifqualified-HousingavailableCALL A viationInstituteofMaintenance (866)314-3769 A TTENDCOLLEGEONLINE fromHome.*Medical,*Business, *Paralegal,*Accounting,*CriminalJustice.Jobplacementassistance.Computeravailable.FinancialAidifqualified.Call (888)203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com. SAWMILLSfromonly$3997MAKEMONEY&SAVEMONEY withyourownbandmill-Cut lumberanydimension.Instoc k readytoship.FREEInfo&DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com (800)578-1363 Ext.300N Out of Area Real Estate Pre-GrandOpeningSale!6.34 acresw/directlakefrontage only$29,900!Brandnew,neve r beforeoffered!Gorgeous woodedsettingwithdeepwate r frontageonspectacularlake. Pavedrds,power,phone,much ,p,p, more.Unheardofprices-excellentfinancing.Hurryoutfor1st pick!Callnow(866)952-5302.x 67 BeautifulHomeon66Acres A uctionThursday,Novembe r 17th,10AMRoopville,Carroll County,GA10%BP,GAL#316 JLToddAuctionCo (800)241-7591 www.jltodd.com NewloghouseinFancyGap, Virgnia.Recessionprices,139k. 5acres42K.Magnificentviews, creeks,waterfalls,Paved,MountainTop.Call(336)210-2999o r visit mountainlandvirginia.com. 680 Legal Notices 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 11-216-C A CENTENNIALBANK,assuccessorininterest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. EDWARDR.LANGFORDandKARLYNC. LANGFORD, husband and wife, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISGIVENthatpursuanttoaFinal JudgmentofForeclosuredatedOctober6, 2011,intheabove-styledcause,Iwillsellto thehighestandbestbidderforcashinthe LobbyoftheClerk'sOffice,oftheWakulla CountyCourthouseinCrawfordville,Florida, onNovember10th,2011,at11:00a.m.,the following described property: EXHIBIT "A" Lot11,BlockC,SectionsC&D,OchlockoneeShores,asubdivisionaspermapor platthereofrecordedinPlatBook1,Page 17,ofthePublicRecordsofWakulla County, Florida. Subjecttoeasements,restrictionsandreservations of record. (ParcelIdentificationNumber:07-6S-01 W-027 -04697 -000). Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyowner(s)asofthedateoftheLis Pendens,mustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. DATED ON October 7, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court LAWYER FOR PLAINTIFF: Mary Ellen Davis, Esquire 17 High Drive, Suite C Post Office Box 1720 Crawfordville, FL 32326 (850) 926-6003 October 27, 2011 November 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 11-252-CA CENTENNIALBANK,asSuccessorinInterest to Wakulla Bank, Plaintiff, vs. ANDREWM.BAKER,amarriedman,the UnknownSpouseofAndrewM.Baker,andanyandallOthersClaimingInterestsBy, Under,ThroughorAgainstANDREWM. BAKER, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TODEFENDANTS,ANDREWM.BAKER, THEUNKNOWNSPOUSEOFANDREW M.BAKER,ANDANYANDALLOTHERS CLAIMINGINTERESTSBY,UNDER, THROUGHORAGAINSTANDREWM. BAKER,ANDALLPARTIESHAVINGOR CLAIMINGTOHAVEANYRIGHTTITLE ORINTERESTINTHEPROPERTY PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.ŽFamilial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthehear ing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 515 Apartments for Rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134 MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99 Application Fee $35 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE € Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) € Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) € Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 500 Real Estate Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BAone-storyhomeon1.5 lotwithgarage.Excellentcondition.$95,000.Ownerfinancing. 850-251-7588 850-962-2016. 555 Houses for Rent 2BR/1BA,duplexneardowntownCrawfordville.$600/month, $500/security. Call 566-7391. 3BR/1BA(onstilts).$700/month, plusutilities.Nopets!Pleasecall 850-926-2766 for more details. 3BR/1.5BAhomeinWakulla Gardens,$600/month,plusdeposit. Call 850-766-0170. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. Homes on Acreage Home on 3 acres. 2BR/2BA, porch, storage building, large oak trees, conveniently located near post office and Walgreens. $625/month. Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $695/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. Medart,studiohouseonfou r lots.$550/permonth,plusdeposit. Revell Realty 962-2212. Residential/Commercial,house forrentinthecenterofCrawfordville.2BR/1BA.Callformore details. 850-926-9782. 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCreek Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 2BR/2BA,SW,MHforrent. NorthofCrawfordville. $550/month.First,lastanddep osit. 850-960-4230. 535 Comm. Property for Sale

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 – Page 9B Brain Teaser 1 14 17 22 26 30 46 50 53 57 60 2 20 33 41 3 42 4 27 43 18 23 38 47 5 15 34 44 54 58 61 6 31 55 7 28 51 8 24 48 9 25 45 19 21 32 39 10 16 29 35 52 59 62 11 36 49 12 37 13 40 56 ACROSS1.Sportingwingtips 5.Predatory whales 10.Have the nerve 14.Golfer Isao __ 15.Boilsorbroils 16.QED middle 17."The Bridge on the River Kwai" tune, to a cheating golfer? 20.Brand that "nobody doesn'tlike" 21.Quite similar 22."Beavis and Butthead"chuckle 23.Wordbeforekiteor turtle 24.Hard-working sort 26.Outelder's yell 28.Form 1040 completer 29.Bottom-line gure 30.Deepsleeps 31.Agronomists' concerns 33.Shutterbug's command, to a cheating golfer? 38.Had a row? 39."Amistad" character 41.Go bad 44.Hightailedit 45.Propelledlikea shueboarddisk 46.Pooh-poohed 48.Bloomers worn around the neck 49.USNAgrad 50.Role for Patti or Madonna 51.Unyielding 53. Is in ne fettle, toa cheating golfer? 57."Rule, Britannia" composerThomas 58.Jelly avor 59.Watchreadouts, briey 60.Hanoi holidays 61.Surfer wannabe 62.Smeltery materialsDOWN1.Cul-de-__ 2.Slammer 3.State with a panhandle 4.Noted Christian 5.Spottedwildcat 6.Pricey timepiece 7.Faceone's responsibilities 8.Rapsheetletters 9.LatviaorLithuania, once:Abbr. 10.Admit to a poker game 11.Rollin, so to speak 12.Handful for Serena orVenus 13.Obsolete anesthetic 18.Oreo makers 19.Fold, spindle,or mutilate 22."How Dry IAm" punctuation, maybe 24.Gathered intelligence 25.Chaucerpiece 27.Titfor __ 28.Skater Sasha 31.Valuableviolin, for short 32.Sushi alternative 34.Also-ranof fable 35.Day-__ paints 36.Lilac color 37.Night, to poets 40.Magazine VIPs: Abbr. 41."One if by land" man 42.Pointin theright direction 43.Bibliography data 45.Bottom-feeder's milieu 46.Make more lean 47."__Kapital" 48.Parkinsonism treatment 51.Just__(the slightestbit) 52.Hesangabout Alice's 54."That'sdisgusting!" 55.Country club gure 56.Trickyturn American Prole Hometown Content 10/9/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 1 23 452 678 87 396 2394 12657 2 87 735 916 200 9 HtCtt 591 4287 6 3 784653219 362197485 875 349126 236571894 149286357 423 865971 617932548 958714632 S A C H I C D E F A T H O O S E G O W R E V E R E O K L A H O M A O R I E N T D I O R T A T T I T L E S N A B I S C O D A S O C E L O T H A R E U G H R O L E X S T R A D P R O C O P E C O H E N A T A D A K A S P I E D L D O P A S S R T A L E S E A B E D M A R S A S H I M I D E A L I N G L O A R L O A R R I V E L A V E N D E R R A C K E T E V E N T I D E E T H E R E D S E S S Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com 681 Foreclosure Proceedings OSO HEREIN DESCRIBED: YOUARENOTIFIEDThatanactiontoforecloseamortgageonthefollowingproperty in Wakulla County, Florida: Lots5and6,Block"11"ofPanaceaMineral Springs,Unit1,asubdivisionaspermapor platthereofrecordedinPlatBook1,Page 5,ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 24-5S-02W-057-03130-000) and: Lot55,Block"22"ofWakullaGardens,as permaporplatthereofrecordedinPlat Book1,Page39,ofthePublicRecordsof Wakulla County, Florida. (Parcel Identification Number 00-00-035-008-07819-000) hasbeenfiledagainstyou.Youarerequired toserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,if any,totheComplaintonMaryEllenDavis, thePlaintiffsattorney,whoseaddressis MaryEllenDavisLawOffice,17HighDrive, SuiteC,PostOfficeBox1720Crawfordville, Florida32326,onorbeforeDecember12, 2011,andfiletheoriginalwiththeClerkof thisCourteitherbeforeserviceonthePlaintiffsattorneyorimm.ediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated on October 27, 2011 BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2011 000093 CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100 Jacksonville, Florida 32256, Plaintiff, v. THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES OFLYLEF.RINKEL,DECEASED,AND ALLOTHERPERSONSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE NAMEDDEFENDANTS;THEUNKNOWN HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,CREDITORS,LIENORS,ANDTRUSTEESOFBETTYC.RINKELA/K/ABETTY RAILEYRINKEL,DECEASED,ANDALL OTHERPERSONSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANTS, DANNYDANFORD,MIKERINKEL,JERRY RINKEL,AMBERGREENE,BARBARA WALLACE,NANCYSYKES,CARISDAVIS, andTHEUNKNOWNTENANTINPOSSESSIONOF25ElizabethStreet,Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENTHAT,pursuanttoPlaintiff'sFinalSummaryJudgmentof Foreclosureenteredintheabove-captioned action,IwillsellthepropertysituatedinWakullaCounty,Florida,describedasfollows, to wit: Lot26,EvergreenAcresUnitNo.II,accordingtotheplatthereof,recordedinPlatBoo k 1,Page(s)77,ofthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida;togetherwiththatcertain1983EASTMobileHome ID#FS485142FX8740GAanda1972REE MobileHomeID#s2162217BGand 2162217AG. Property Address: 25 Elizabeth Street, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 atpublicsale,tothehighestandbestbidder,forcash,exce p tassetforthhereinaf,,p ter,atpublicsaleonNovember17,2011,at 11:00a.m.EST,orassoonthereafteras thesalemayproceed,tothehighestbidder forcash,exceptasprescribedinparagraph 7,attheWakullaCountyCourthouse,3056 CrawfordvilleHwy,Crawfordville,Florida 32327. Ifyouareasubordinatelienholderclaiming arighttofundsremainingafterthesale,you mustfileaclaimwiththeClerkofCourtno laterthan60daysafterthesale.Ifyoufail tofileaclaim,youwillnotbeentitledtoany remaining funds. NoticetoPersonsWithDisabilities:Ifyou areapersonwithadisabilitywhoneedsany accommodationinordertoparticipateinthis proceeding,youareentitled,atnocostto you,totheprovisionofcertainassistance. PleasecontacttheCourtAdministratorsofficenotlaterthansevendayspriortothe proceeding. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 27, 2011 November 3, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No. 65 2010-CA-000028 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS, INC., ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-21 Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD, ALVITA M., et al. Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderorFinalJudgmententerinCaseNo. 652010-CA-000028oftheCircuitCourtof the2NDJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,wherein,THEBANKOF NEWYORKMELLONFKATHEBANKOF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERSCWABS,INC.,ASSET BACKEDCERTIFICATES,SERIES 2006-21,isPlaintiff,and,HOWARD,ALVITAM.,et.al.,areDefendants,Iwillsellto thehighestbidderforcashattheLOBBYof theCourthouse,3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL32327,atthehourof 11a.m.onthe1stdayofDecember2011, the following described property: LOT10BLOCK52WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT5ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPOR PLATTHEREOFRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK1PAGE56OFPUBLICRECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesales,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwith60daysafterthe sale. DATED this 26th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court November 3, 10, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 37-2010-CA-00188 6 SEC.: ______________ AURORA LOAN SERVICES, LLC, Plaintiff, v. ANGELAD.FINDLAY ; CHRISTOPHER ; FINDLAY;ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIESCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER, ANDAGAINSTTHEHEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES MAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSES, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRANTEES,OR OTHERCLAIMANTS;andAMBERVALLEY HOMEOWNERSASSOCIATION,INC. F/K/ATIMBERRIDGEHOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF TALLAHASSEE, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalSummaryJudgmentofForeclosuredatedOctober13,2011,enteredin CivilCaseNo.37-2010-CA-001886ofthe CircuitCourtoftheSecondJudicialCircuit inandforLeonCounty,Florida,whereinthe Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highestbidderforcashon18thdayofNovember,2011,at11:00a.m.,intheNorthRotunda,PlazaLevel,LeonCountyCourthouse,301S.MonroeStreet,Tallahassee, Florida32301,relativetothefollowingdescribedpropertyassetforthintheFinal Judgment, to wit: LOT17,BLOCK"B",VILLAGESATWILSONGREEN,ASUBDIVISIONASPER MAPORPLATTHEREOF,RECORDEDIN PLATBOOK16,PAGE67,OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFLEONCOUNTY,FLORIDA. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance.Pleasecontact:CourtAdministrator Phone: (850) 577-4401 Ifyouarehearingorvoiceimpaired,call FloridaRelayService,hearing 800-955-8771, voice 800-955-8770. DATEDATTALLAHASSEE,FLORIDA THIS18th DAY OF October, 2011. BOB INZE R CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sANGELA BRADFORD AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Leon County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 27, 2011 November 3, 2011 INTHECIRCUITCOURTOFTHE2 n dJU DICIALCIRCUITOFFLORIDA,INAND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CASE # 2009-CA-000470 DIVISION #: BACHomeLoansServicing,L.P.f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff, vs. DebraMooreDyala/k/aDebraA.Dyaln/k/a DebraStory,IndividuallyandasCo-PersonalRepresentativeoftheEstateofJames ClarenceStorya/k/aJamesC.Story,DeceasedandRebeccaL.Story,Individually andasCo-PersonalRepresentativeofthe EstateofJamesClarenceStorya/k/a JamesC.Story,Deceased;UnknownHeirs, Devisees,Grantees,Assignees,Creditors, LienorsandTrusteesofJamesClarence Storya/k/aJamesC.Story,Deceased,and allotherPersonsClaimingBy,Through,UnderandAgainsttheNamedDefendant(s); UnknownPartiesinPossession#1;UnknownPartiesinPossession#2;Ifliving, andallUnknownPartiesclaimingby, through,underandagainsttheabove namedDefendant(s)whoarenotknownto bedeadoralive,whethersaidUnknown PartiesmayclaimaninterestasSpouse, Heirs,Devisees,Grantees,orOtherClaimants Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan Orderreschedulingforeclosuresaledated October13th,2011enteredinCivilCase No.2009-CA-000470oftheCircuitCourtof the2ndJudicialCircuitinandforWakulla County,Florida,whereinBACHomeLoan Servicing,L.P.f/k/aCountrywideHome LoanServicing,L.P.,PlaintiffandDebra MooreDyala/k/aDebraA.Dyaln/k/aDebra Story,IndividuallyandasCo-PersonalRepresentativeoftheEstateofJamesClarence Storya/k/aJamesC.Story,Deceasedand RebeccaL.Story,Individually,andas Co-PersonalRepresentativeoftheEstateof JamesClarenceStorya/k/aJamesC. Story,Deceasedaredefendant(s),Iwillsell tothehighestandbestbidderforcash,AT THEFRONTLOBBYOFTHEWAKULLA COUNTYCOURTHOUSELOCATEDAT CHURCHSTREET,HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE,FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M.,onNovember17,2011,thefollowing describedpropertyassetforthinsaidFinal Judgment, to wit: LOT23,BLOCKAŽ,NORTHWOOD,A SUBDIVISION,ACCORDINGTOTHEMAP ORPLATTHEREOF,ASRECORDEDIN PLATBOOK2,PAGES91THROUGH97, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSONCLAIMINGANINTEREST INTHESURPLUSFROMTHESALE,IF ANY,OTHERTHANTHEPROPERTY OWNERASOFTHEDATEOFTHELIS PENDENSMUSTFILEACLAIMWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATEDatCRAWFORDVILLE,Florida,this 14th day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sDESIREE D. WILLIS AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 27, 2011 November 3, 2011 682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF AUCTION UndertheauthorityoftheFloridaStorage facilityActthepropertydescribedbelowhas beenseizedfornonpaymentofrentand otheraccruedexpenses.Thepropertywill besoldatauctiontothehighestbidderas providedbytheselfstoragefacilityact 83.806DoubleDstorageLLCreservesthe righttorefuseanyandallbids.CashOnly. AmandaBass,Unit#37&23household items,CherylLongUnit#10household items.AuctiontobeheldatDoubleDStorageLLC289CajerPoseyRd.Crawfordville FL 32327 November 11, 2011 at 5:00 pm. November 3, 10, 2011 690 Gov Tax Notices NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 030 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 1490 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-078-013-10770-00 MAGNOLIA GARDENS LOT 47 BLK A OR 10 P 612 OR 204 P 367 NameinwhichassessedJOSHUACADAMS&ANGELAMAONEsaidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuchcertificateshallbesoldto thehighestbidderatthecourthousedooron the7thdayofDecember,2011,at10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 031 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 928 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-035-008-07103-000 WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT I BLOCK 12 LOT 21 OR 1 P 846 NameinwhichassessedWALTERSTEVEN&LILLIANODELLsaidpropertybeing intheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida. Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemed accordingtolawthepropertydescribedin suchcertificateshallbesoldtothehighest bidderatthecourthousedooronthe7th day of December, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 032 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDE CARTERKSRORDELORISSFORT WROStheholderofthefollowingcertificate hasfiledsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobe issuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 412 Year of Issuance 2003 Description of Property Parcel 25-5S-02W-046-03538-000 AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK U LOT 17 OR 46 P 56 NameinwhichassessedMETAH.WILLIS saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 033 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatCLYDEK CARTERSRORDELORISSFORTWROS theholderofthefollowingcertificatehas filedsaidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificatenumberand yearofissuance,thedescriptionofthe property,andthenamesinwhichitwasassessed are as follows: Certificate # 1628 Year of Issuance 2003 Description of Property Parcel 00-00-068-000-10108-006 P-1-1-M-23 1.23 AC ML IN SW CORNER OF SW 1/4 OF HS 68 NameinwhichassessedPHILLIPHARVEY saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 034 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 1197 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 35-3S-01E-263-05538-161 VILLAGES OF ST MARKS LOT BB COMMERCIAL LOT OR 293 P 623 OR 594 P 255 NameinwhichassessedLACYA.&MARY T.MURRAYsaidpropertybeinginthe CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unless suchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuch certificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidder atthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 035 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 930 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 15-3S-01W-000-04397-000 15-3S-1W P-16-M-64 IN FRACTIONAL SW 1/4 OR 4 P 394 OR 36 P 732 NameinwhichassessedVENETTAJ. WALKERsaidpropertybeingintheCounty ofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuch certificateshallberedeemedaccordingto lawthepropertydescribedinsuchcertificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidderat thecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 036 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatPLYMOUTHPARKTAXSERVICESLLCthe holderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiled saidcertificateforataxdeedtobeissued thereon.Thecertificatenumberandyearof issuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty, andthenamesinwhichitwasassessedare as follows: Certificate # 993 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property Parcel # 07-6S-01W-301-04626-A01 BULAH'S COVE SUBDV LOT 1 OR 491 P 13 OR 659 P 497 NameinwhichassessedJOHNNYPETRANDISIIsaidpropertybeinginthe CountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unless suchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthepropertydescribedinsuch certificateshallbesoldtothehighestbidder atthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2011 TXD 037 NOTICEISHEREBYGIVEN,thatR.E. MEADOWStheholderofthefollowingcertificatehasfiledsaidcertificateforatax deedtobeissuedthereon.Thecertificate numberandyearofissuance,thedescriptionoftheproperty,andthenamesinwhich it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 846 Year of Issuance 2004 Description of Property Parcel # 00-00-005-000-06249-001 P-18-1-M-3 1.31 AC M/L IN THE EAST 1/2 OF THE SW 1/4 OF HS 3 BEING ON WEST SIDE OF TRIPPLETT RD OR 319 P 427 OR 441 P 327 NameinwhichassessedLINDABAKERS saidpropertybeingintheCountyofWakulla,StateofFlorida.Unlesssuchcertificateshallberedeemedaccordingtolawthe propertydescribedinsuchcertificateshall besoldtothehighestbidderatthecourthousedooronthe7thdayofDecember, 2011, at 10:00 AM. Dated this 20 day of October, 2011. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Cler k By: Letha M. Wells, Deputy Cler k Clerk of Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida October 27, 2011 November 3, 10, 17, 2011

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, November 3, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comRapid Response Training at Wakulla CorrectionalBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTwenty-nine Rapid Response Teams from around the North Florida region converged on Wakulla Correctional Institutions Harry K. Singletary Training Academy on Oct. 21 for their annual training exercise. Each team represented a prison in the region, spanning from Pensacola to Gainesville. The teams are broken into seven platoons, consisting of four to five teams, and receive training in six different areas, including munitions, platoon and squad formation, a riot and baton scenario and a physical “ tness competition. The physical “ tness competition was an obstacle course where each team competed for the best “ nishing time. Taking home “ rst place was Gulf Correctional Institution. Second place went to Northwest Florida Reception Center and Holmes Correctional Institution took third place, according to Paula Bryant, with the Public Affairs Of“ ce of the Florida Department of Corrections. The Rapid Response Teams are the departments “ rst responders to incidents and disturbances on prison grounds. They are trained in crowd control and riot suppression, according to the DOC. The teams train monthly and gather to train with their platoons quarterly. All the platoons come together yearly at this event for a training exercise. Rapid Response Team members are required to pass an annual assessment where they are required to perform to a certain standard or they are removed from the team, Bryant said. e annual training exercise includes DOC teams from around the region. A Rapid Response Team member participates in a riot and baton scenario, above, where he learns how to use his baton properly. A platoon engages in a formation exercise, below. Two team members “ re during the munitions station, bottom, while another squad lines up in formation. At left, a platoon “ nishes its training exercise at the “ ring range. PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSEN More photos online at thewakullanews.com Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2011…2012.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 175 File & Use 10242011 Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Friday, November 4 Saturday, November 5 Monday, November 7 Friday, November 11 Monday, November 14 Tuesday, November 15 Tuesday, November 22 Friday, November 25 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan also ranked highest in Florida by NCQA At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink)