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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00378
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 10-13-2011
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00378
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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 41st Issue Thursday, October 13, 2011 Three Sections Three Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 5A Community....................Page 6A School...........................Page 7A Sports ....................Pages 8, 9A In The Huddle ............Page 10A Outdoors ...................Page 11A Water Ways...............Page 12A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 13A Green Scene ................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B n By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA five-person accreditation committee recommended that Wakulla schools be re-accredited, and praised the districts teachers, parents and administrators for working together to create a community atmosphere dedicated to the students. If I were a parent who lived in Florida, I would be very happy for my children to go here, said Dr. Patricia Golding, associate director of AdvancEd in Virginia who chaired the committee that looked at Wakullas schools. I would be happy to work here. Dr. Golding made a PowerPoint presentation of the committees report at a special school board meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 5. Wakulla schools were first accredited five years ago, Superintendent of Schools David Miller noted at the meeting. One of the rst small districts to be accredited, the fourth school district in Florida. Five years later, it was time to review the district again, and the five committee members came in to evaluate the local schools. They interviewed 196 people including the ve school board members, 21 administrators, 47 teachers and more than 60 parents and business leaders. Among the commendations for the district were its healthy educational culture, the mutual respect shown at every level of the districts chain of command, parental involvement in the system, and especially minimizing the direct impact of the economic downturn on students. You do so many things very, very well, said Golding. Of seven standards, in ve areas, Wakulla earned a designation of highly functional meaning it exceeded those goals. It was designated as operational, or meeting the goals. Two required actions were to develop a data system to allow analysis of achievement gaps of subgroups, and to focus on identifying and improving the lower quartile of students. But even that came with a sort of backhanded praise: In a high-performing school district like Wakulla, it was noted that the lower students may actually include students who are performing with certain pro ciency. After the accreditation committee left the meeting, Miller praised his district staff, especially Beth Mims, who worked on the school accreditation issue, and the school principals for their leadership. Im very pleased, Miller said. Beth ODonnell, who is assistant superintendent for curriculum, said her favorite comment she heard from committee members was how the school system was like a family from the parents to teachers to administrators. ODonnell added that, in Wakulla, The system is this community. Continued on Page 2A e accreditation committee was impressed with local schools, and the community of parents, teachers and administratorsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netDonnie Crum was swornin as sheriff on Wednesday, Oct. 5, at a ceremony held at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. The church was packed with deputies, elected of- cials and citizens for the oath of of ce service. Crum was administered the oath by Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford as Crums daughter, Natalie, held the Bible. Fulford was a prosecutor in Wakulla County with the state attorneys office and worked with Crum and other sheriffs deputies before she was appointed to the bench. Sheriffs deputies were also administered the oath of office and given their credentials. He thanked the deputies for their dedication to the job. Crum was appointed interim sheriff by Gov. Rick Scott to fill the term of Wakullas longtime Sheriff David Harvey, who stepped down Oct. 1 after 35 years to accept a position as director of the Florida Sheriffs Association Self-Insurance Fund. Im not going to try to ll the shoes of David Harvey, Crum said at the service. Those are some pretty big shoes to ll. Im going to be my own man. Major Maurice Langston is now undersheriff over law enforcement operations, and Major Jared Miller is over the jail. The command staff knelt at the churchs altar with their families and were surrounded by the church deacons and a prayer was said for their leadership during the coming year. County Commission Chairman Mike Stewart noted he comes from a Pentecostal background and he knelt along with them at the altar and said a prayer.Continued on Page 2A Donnie Crum sworn-in as sheriff Wakulla schools earn accreditation and praise WILLIAM SNOWDENDonnie Crum takes the oath of of ce last week from Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford. Crums daughter, Natalie, is holding the Bible, and Undersheriff Maurice Langston has the microphone. Taking over as interim to ll the remaining term of longtime Sheri David Harvey, Crum vows to be his own man DIANE FLOWERS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHelen and Tommy Gunn painting the Lion as a Monarch butter y last month.PHOT O BY JENNI FER JENSENBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Lion who calls Azalea Park his home is ever-changing. Each month the Lion takes on a new design, never wearing the same out t twice. A common theme for his out ts is holiday wear, dressing like Santa on Christmas or a turkey on Thanksgiving. Although he may have a Thanksgiving design each November, if one looks closely, they will see each one is different. This is because it is not always the same person who dresses the Lion. Helen Gunn, who has been the caretaker of the Lion since March 2008, paints the Lion often, but says she is always looking for people in the community to help her. A sign next to the Lion gives Gunns contact information for those who would like to paint the Lion. She says she has had families, friends and Boy Scout and Girls Scout troops paint the Lion over the years. Continued on Page 2A Clockwise from top left: The Lion as Spider-Man for Halloween is visited by trick-ortreaters; the Lion as Easter Bunny; Amya Herring helps paint the Lion last weekend; and the Lion as a Wakulla War Eagle. Christmastime Lion, with stockings hung by the chimney with care in hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there. e Lion at Azalea Park changes his look every month thanks to Helen Gunn and other volunteers Superintendent David Miller Published Weekly, Read Daily Woodstork Festival, Page 10BThe diffrent faces of the Lion

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A She wants the community to become more involved with the Lion because it is their Lion, she just looks after him, she says. While she is painting the Lion, Gunn says she always gets approached by people who ask questions about the Lion and who are curious about what she plans to turn him into. People are always wondering what he will be next, she says. She says she loves how people honk their horn in support when shes painting him. You may not think it is a big deal to paint the Lion, but wait until it is your time to paint him, Gunn says. Its amazing. While putting on the Lions costume for Halloween this past weekend, three children spot Gunn and run over to ask her what his Halloween costume was going to be. Gunn tells them she was turning him into a ying monkey from The Wizard of Oz. One of the children, Christopher Waters, says, Thats so awesome. His cousins, Amya Herring and Zane Herring, agree. Amya Herring says, I love the Wizard of Oz. Her grandmother explains that they just watched the movie and her granddaughter cant get enough of it. Gunn then invites the children to paint alongside her and they couldnt be happier. The children spend the next couple hours painting the Lions legs and body dark brown. A couple of hours later, the children leave and Gunn continues on to nish the job. The Lion now has a red vest and matching hat. Gunn also plans to add wings to nish the look. The fun part about this costume is that everyone knows and loves The Wizard of Oz, Gunn says. Plus, it is something that hasnt been done before. Something Gunn says she tries to do each month. The process of painting the Lion can take anywhere from a couple of hours to a full day. It depends on how dif cult the design is, she says. Before painting the design on the Lion, he must be painted white using Kiltz, to make sure the previous colors do not run through the art work. Once it is dry, Gunn uses outdoor acrylic paint to make her design. Last month, she turned the Lion into a Monarch butterfly complete with antennae. The butter ys pattern was very detailed and took a while to paint. Her inspiration for the butterfly came from her flower garden and best friend. She says she was working in the garden and noticed how the flowers attracted so many Monarch butter ies which made her think of the meaning of the butter y, change, letting go and starting over. She then thought of her best friend who was going through some personal changes. So at that moment, I decided that the butter y was a perfect idea for the Lion, Gunn says. Gunn dedicated the design to her best friend, which she wrote at the base of the Lion. So, the lion could be a personal statement, as well as a fun and colorful piece of work, Gunn says. The Lion has been painted many things over the years, Spider-Man, Batman, a ladybug, skeleton, green leprechaun, zebra, football player, reindeer, snorkeler in a bathing suit and more. Usually the painter takes a month and uses the holiday in that month as the inspiration for what the Lion will become, Gunn says. Although it is not known how many layers of paint are under the current design, Gunn says its almost 10 years worth. She had considered having the Lion sandblasted, but was told the condition of the Lion wasnt bad, so it wasnt necessary. Prior to Gunn taking over responsibility of the Lion, it belonged to Laura Gentry. Gentry owned Tattered Pages, a bookstore across the street from where the Lion currently stands. She purchased the Lion and placed him in front of her store and began painting him different designs each month. Gunn says, I was like everyone else. I would see the Lion outside of Tattered Pages and wonder myself what it would be painted next. One month, the Lion was painted into SpiderMan and Gunn says her boys went crazy for it. She then decided to go inside the store and ask who painted him. She did a great job, Gunn says. In 2007, Gentry announced that she would be retiring and closing Tattered Pages. She approached the county commission in June 2007 and decided to donate the Lion to the county with the stipulation that it remain visible from Crawfordville Highway. Gentry then began to look for someone to take over painting the Lion. She got permission to move the Lion to the park where the tradition of the painting of the Lion could continue, Gunn says. Gunns mother, Beverly Pitts, saw a newspaper article about the Lion and the need for a new caretaker. She thought I would be the perfect person because of my artistic ability, Gunn says. Gunn does not have a degree in art, but took several classes learning how to paint and has always loved to draw and paint. Gentry selected Gunn and she was ecstatic. I love art and it seems the community does too, Gunn says. It has been a joy in my life to keep the Lion painted. Not only is it fun, Gunn says, it is also a stress reliever. I guess you could say painting the Lion is therapeutic, Gunn says. By painting the Lion, I get therapeutic value from it and the sense of creating something that will make people smile. Those who would like to be a part of making the community smile and want to grab a paint brush and create a design for the Lion can contact Gunn at hgunn@comcast.net. Currently, Gunn says she has all months available for those who wish to paint the Lion. The Lions design changes monthly and re ects the seasons. Hes ready for summer, above, in shorts, shades and ip- ops, and as Batman, below, hes on the lookout for crime. e di erent faces of the Lion at Azalea ParkContinued from Page 1A School board member Jerry Evans said that was, indeed, the case. We are family, we are friends, we are close we are a community. We are blessed with living with this every day. Riversprings Middle School Principal Dod Walker said he had heard from the committee how taken aback they were by how happy the teachers and students were despite the economic conditions that have meant budget cutbacks. Wakulla High School Principal Mike Crouch echoed that, saying he too had heard a comment of surprise from an out-of-state member of the committee about the politics of education in Florida. Miller said that, despite the politics and budget cuts, he was most proud that parents and teachers have con dence in the districts leadership the school board, superintendent and administration. Times are dif cult, they know that, he said, but they have con dence in the decision-making. School board member Becky Cook, whose own involvement in the local schools includes working as a volunteer music teacher for Pre-K students, said: Money isnt a factor. Do whats best for the kids. The next school board meeting is set for Oct. 17 at 5:45 p.m. The school board will hold its reorganizational meeting on Nov. 22 to select a chair, vice-chair and set meeting times.Schools earn accreditation and praise Got an idea for painting the lion? Get in touch with Helen Gunn at hgunn@comcast.net.Continued from Page 1A Elected officials at the event included the local constitutional of cers: Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells and Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond. Wakulla Superintendent of Schools David Miller was there, as were numerous members of the school board. State Attorney Willie Meggs attended, as did two of his top assistants, both of whom were former Wakulla prosecutors, Jack Campbell, son of Leon County Sheriff Larry Campbell, and Eddie Evans, who also happens to be a deacon at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist. Crum has no intention of seeking election as sheriff in 2012. Charlie Creel, a former state trooper who challenged Harvey in 2008 and lost by fewer than 50 votes, is running for the of ce; and Undersheriff Langston has announced his candidacy for the job as well. Crum sworn-inSheriff Crum address the crowd at the ceremony. ITSTIMEFORFALL! HURRYIN!WHILESUPPLIESLAST!LOWESTPRICESOFTHESEASON AceHardwareisa proudsponsorof ChildrensMiracle NetworkHospitals CHAMPIONS across Americ aprogram.DownloadaQRcode readerappforyour smartphoneand thenscantolearn moreandmakea donation. 299Ea. Seal gapsand eliminate drafts. 9999 788 599 799 699Ea. APPLYIN-STORENOW! Save30%$4.29Value Save40%$169.99Value 1999699 PricesgoodthroughOctober31,2011. 0009ATE Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce has a new name because of action taken by the Wakulla County Commission at its Oct. 3 meeting. The commission chose to rename the building the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Center in honor of Harveys 35 years of service to the county. Harvey stepped down from his position on Oct. 1 to take a job as the director of the Florida Associations Sheriffs Self-Insurance Fund. Harvey said he had no intention of seeking re-election next year and this opportunity presented itself. The gesture was initiated by Commissioner Jerry Moore. Commissioner Lynn Artz voted against the renaming because she said she wasnt crazy about naming buildings after people and felt one of two things would make it appropriate, if the person had died or gave money for the building to be constructed. She added that this was the third request like this from Moore, who is still in his rst year as a commissioner. Im a little worried about how many more well see, Artz said. Commissioner Mike Stewart said he also wasnt crazy about naming buildings after people, but felt it was a worthy honor. The man has, like him or not, managed to get re-elected for 35 years, Stewart said. Hes done a lot of good things for a lot of people. Commissioner Alan Brock said he was the opposite of Stewart and Artz in the fact that he has no problem with naming a public building after someone. Its a tting tribute to him, Brock said. The commission voted four to one, with Artz opposing, to rename the building. A plaque will be made and erected on the building, similar to the one for Anita Townsend on the County Commission building. In other matters before the board: Commissioner Artz informed the commission that Capital Area YMCA will not begin programs at the Community Center while it is being used by Road Patrol and Criminal Investigation divisions of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. The YMCA was in contract negotiations with the county to run the community center. Previously, the YMCA said it could work around the sheriffs of ce, but did not realize how much space was going to be taken. Artz said she would like to see Volunteer Wakulla move in and begin to offer activities for the citizens. Volunteer Wakulla had requested the use of of ce space in the community center. Artz wanted to see what the group could provide in exchange for space. Not being able to have programs and activities at the community center because of the sheriffs of ce was a concern Artz expressed during the discussion of moving those divisions within the sheriffs office to the community center. The reason for the move was because the lease at the previous building had expired and they needed a new location. The commission agreed that they would like to see something offered at the community center for the residents. Construction on Rehwinkel Road could begin in November. Commissioner Stewart said the Department of Transportation decided to move the project ahead one year, which will include resurfacing and widening the road. The commission submitted Rehwinkel Road from Coastal Highway to MLK Jr. Memorial Road for consideration through FDOT Small County Road Assistance Agreement. There will be no cost to the county. It will be a much better road, Stewart said. During the commission meeting, Assistant County Administrator Tim Barden was recognized for his service as interim county administrator from Dec. 1, 2010, to Sept. 30, 2011. I appreciate the hard work you put in this, Stewart said. The Division of Animal Control for the county is looking to ll its vacant animal control of cer position. The commission approved advertising and then hiring for the position. Qualified applicants must possess a high school diploma or GED and two years of experience in animal welfare or control environment, public health, law enforcement or a related eld such as humane society, veterinary office or kennel. Must be able to lift animals and equipment in excess of 75 pounds and must be able to use a twoway radio. Those interested can get an application off the countys website, www. mywakulla.com, or stop by the County Administrators of ce located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway. The next county commission meeting is Oct. 17 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Items of interest are board approval to schedule a public hearing on adopting an ordinance for the Tourist Development Plan and application for a change of zoning for 20 lots in the Commodore Commons from commercial to residential. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThose wishing to bring awareness to mental illness, as well as ght the stigma associated with it, came together on Saturday, Oct. 8 for NAMIs Walk for Heroes. This is the second year NAMI Wakulla, an af liate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, has hosted the walk, which coincides with National Mental Health Awareness Week which was from Oct. 2 to Oct. 8. The purpose of the walk is to recognize those who suffer from a mental illness directly, as well as family members and friends who are affected, said Cheryl Creel, a volunteer with NAMI. It brings awareness that mental illness is a disease, Creel said. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, approximately 57.7 million people experience a mental health disorder. The goal of the walk, according to NAMIs national website, is to let people know what NAMI is and help them understand the role NAMI plays in their lives, which in turn can reduce the number of people that harbor misconceptions about mental illness and NAMI. The event began with those in attendance walking the path at Azalea Park and followed with a light breakfast and refreshments. Once everyone was nished walking, those in attendance heard from guest speaker Dr. Jay Reeves, chief executive officer of Apalachee Center. Reeves spoke of growing up with substance abuse in his family and the prejudice and stigma that went along with that. He said it was something his family never talked about. Once he was older, he said he was inspired by people, many who are a part of NAMI, who chose to speak about their experiences with mental illness. Because of NAMI and people bringing awareness to the disease, lives can be saved and the misconceptions of mental illness can be erased. This is very, very inspiring, Reeves said. This is inspiring to me and its inspiring to your community. Reeves said mental illness disrupt lives, disrupt families and end lives. NAMI and its supporters are taking on a massive task and its courageous to be willing to take it on publicly, he said. He added that NAMI can depend on Apalachee Center to be right beside them. The next guest speaker was Clint Rayner, chief of Consumer and Family Affairs at the Florida Department of Children and Families. Rayner spoke of his struggle with bipolar disorder. It can either kill you or make you stronger, Rayner said. It made me stronger. During the program, two local heroes were recognized. The rst was Rose Delaney, who is a director on the NAMI board and has struggled personally from a mental illness. Board Director Dana Peck introduced Delaney and said Delaneys life has been full of dark corners and deep holes, but she managed to get out of those corners and holes. Peck also spoke of Delaneys will and dedication to educating people about mental illness and helping anyone she can. There is no one she will not extend her hand to, Peck said. Delaney said she was surprised by the honor. I knew eventually that I was going to come out of that darkness and into the light, Delaney said. I know that its possible. The next hero that was honored was NAMI President Susie Tooke. Tooke said she didnt feel she deserved the honor, but those in attendance disagreed. Peck said Tooke is dedicated to education and ghting for those who suffer from mental illness. Shes a very quiet person in what she does, Peck said. But what she does is appreciated and noticed. Tooke got the board members in line and on task with what they needed to do, got an of ce for NAMI and organized fundraisers, Peck said. With tears in her eyes, Tooke said, I will continue to ght. After the program, people enjoyed hotdogs, popcorn, refreshments, face painting and music by Michael Turner from Common Zenz. For more information about NAMI Wakulla, call 926-1033 or visit their website at www.namiwakulla. org.NAMI Wakulla holds its annual Walk for HeroesBoard votes to name sheri s building in honor of David HarveyCOUNTY COMMISSION PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENDr. Jay Reeves, CEO of Apalachee Center, above, was guest speaker at the Walk. Susie Tooke, below left, and Rose Delaney were recognized as local Heroes. e local mental health advocacy group honors Susie Tooke and Rose Delaney for their e orts Former Wakulla Sheriff David HarveyThe sheriffs building will now be known as the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Center to honor the longtime sheri Im a little worried about how many more well see, one commissioner says of the spate of buildings being named. It passes by a vote of 4-1 PUBLIC NOTICEThe City of St. Marks household garbage collection day will be changed from Tuesdays to Thursdays after October 1st. with recycling included.OCTOBER 13, 2011 2011 WALK SPONSORS:The Wakulla News Wakulla.com Crums Mini Mall Winn Dixie, CrawfordvilleNAMI Wakulla, Inc. 850-926-1033 2140-C Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Our Guest Speakers:Dr. Jay Reeves, CEO Apalachee Services Clint Rayner, Director of Consumer and Family Affairs at the Department of Children and Families THANK YOU Wakulla County 2011 NAMI Wakulla Walk for Heroes A SPECIAL THANK YOU to all who made our 2011 Walk For Heroes Such a Success! Entertainment: Michael Turner, Common Zenz, Cierra Skye Face Painters: Terry Hillier, Sara Hillier, and Carly Hillier JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Answers about trash service Coastal Cleanup draws a big crowd Advisory lifted for Talquin water customers A look at garbage by the numbers Relief offered to lowincome residents Donnie Crum appointed interim sheriff thewakullanews.com READERS WRITE: Follow us onBy PAUL G. JOHNSON Back in 2005, a group of citizens from throughout Wakulla County came together to see how we could improve our downtown Crawfordville area from a business, transportation and community perspective. After six years of public surveys, workshops, business and government meetings and consultant reports, a vision plan for a Downtown Crawfordville in Wakulla County nally emerged. The vision plan, developed by Kimley-Horn and Associates, one of the countrys premier design consulting rms, was presented and unanimously accepted by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners earlier this year. More recently, the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce and Economic Development Council have come to the conclusion that, short of a major manufacturing or processing company dropping into the countys lap i.e. a Microsoft or Boeing Aircraft the downtown Crawfordville plan is our best bet to stimulate more businesses and jobs opportunities in these hard economic times. The plan would have the added bene t of reducing traf c congestion on Highway 319, the major north-south corridor in Wakulla, stimulate a walk-able/shop-able business and government district, interconnect our many beautiful downtown parks and recreation, solve existing parking and stormwater problems for businesses and generally improve the quality of life and economic vitality of our county. Crawfordville is the only unincorporated county seat in Florida. The vision plan describes a Crawfordville Planning District from East Ivan Road (above Wal-Mart) south on U.S. Highway 319 to the Lost Creek Bridge below Crawfordville. A smaller core area would capture and transform the Crawfordville parks, recreation, business and government areas into an interconnected, thriving downtown. Primarily based on existing land use and developable areas, the plan will use existing and planned U.S. 319 improvements and an alternative construction and development strategy to meet the Chamber and countys Our Town Initiative goal. This is dependent on stimulating existing and supporting new commercial and multiple commercial/ recreational land use changes within the downtown core district, which increase density of occupation, not to downsize it. A recent proposal to downzone existing commercial property to strictly residential (two lots per acre) within this downtown Crawfordville Core Area is entirely inconsistent with the plans goal. It has become apparent with the continual resetting of timetables and budgets that neither the state nor the federal government will be able to provide funding for four-laning Highway 319 or other ways to improve our downtown without Wakulla County businesses and citizens getting involved. I urge businesses and citizens interested in a downtown Crawfordville to attend the county commissioners meeting this coming Monday, Oct. 17, when this down-zoning proposal will be heard. Although this vision plan centers on Crawfordville, it will improve the accessibility of shopping and business opportunities for Sopchoppy, Ochlockonee Bay, Smith Creek, Panacea and all residents in the county on weekends and on their way to and from Tallahassee, where many of them work. It will truly be Wakulla Countys downtown!Paul G. Johnson is a local businessman and past president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce.Editor, The News: My mother, Hazel Imperiale, passed away last month at age 87. I bet she would say shes glad she did it before the sheriff retired. Miss Hazel loved her some Sheriff David Harvey. For more than 30 years, my mom was rst to put her David Harvey sign in her yard and you had to keep reminding her to take it down. Sheriff Harvey was always so gracious in thanking her that they got to be good friends. That might be one reason my mom sort of acted like she owned the Sheriffs of- ce. She would call for any and all reasons. Once it was to get a pygmy rattlesnake out of a birds nest. (They did it.) My mom felt safe living in Crawfordville and she would say thats because of David Harvey. It was nice to see the Sheriff and Mrs. Harvey front row at Miss Hazels funeral. Have a wonderful retirement, Sheriff Harvey. Thank you for keeping my mom safe. Nancy Imperiale Longwood Editor, The News: In recognition of National Disability Employment Awareness Month: Help our economy grow by hiring people with disabilities. Each day, Goodwill Industries-Big Bend Inc. bene- ts from the work of people with disabilities. We rely on talented professionals, including those with disabilities, to produce results and help us ful ll our mission of helping people in our community find jobs and build their careers. October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month. People with disabilities are productive and dependable workers, with higher rates of employee retention. They represent skilled employees in many industries but have higher rates of unemployment than the general population, at more than 16 percent. Goodwill knows that businesses, government agencies and nonpro t organizations in our community need to hire the right workers to help our economy grow. Consider hiring people with disabilities. It might be the best investment your make for your community. Brooke Lochoreblochore@goodwillbigbend.comGoodwill Industries Big Bend Editor, The News: Letter of thanks for support of the prom. Eden Springs second annual Senior Prom Dancing Under the Stars was a huge success Thanks to the staff of Eden Springs Rehab Center and our many community supporters, for their untiring effort to make this event special for our residents and families without them this would not have been possible. Planning and preparations took months and the closer we got to the date the more excited our residents and staff became. The residents were dressed up in their nest. The music by Sharon Fox was fantastic and made for great dancing music, which the residents, visitors and staff took full advantage of. Below is a list of those who contributed to our event: Stewart and Wanda Hof er, Wakulla wrestling team, Brooke Lochore/Goodwill Industries, Sharon Fox and the Singing Saxes, Radical Restorations, The Thread Tree, Lube Expert, Ace Hardware, Hardees, Pizza Hut, Burger King, Little Caesars Pizza, William Gatlin/Avis Car Rental, Huddle House, Black Bean Caf, Skybox Liquors, Winn-Dixie, Dux Liquors, Just Fruits & Exotics, Cindy Roberts, Clyde Hamilton, Gloria Monk, Tamara/Wakulla Senior Center, Beef OBradys, Maurice, Laura Floyd, Pat Vice and her girls from Medart Assembly of God, and Wood Run Church/Tallahassee. Thank you all again. Eden Springs Activities Department Medart Editor, The News: Do you want a Crawfordville center that feels like a town, a Crawfordville that enables you to park you car once and visit multiple businesses? Or, would you rather have Crawfordville develop as one continuous strip-mall? A strip mall that extends from south of the courthouse north to Bloxham Cutoff? An area where you would have to enter Highway 319 traf c multiple times? In other words, do you want our countys traf c ow, attractiveness, environment quality, etc. to improve or deteriorate as we grow? Yes, we all want better growth. That is not what the Board of County Commissioners will be considering at their Oct. 17 meeting. In fact, they are considering setting back the clock by not hours but decades. First, about a decade ago, a subdivision was created and zoned to contain a mixeduse residential community in downtown Crawfordville with residential, as well as commercial zoning. This would encourage a walkable community where residents would be able to be near 20 commercial lots that are located in back of current businesses such as Ace Hardware, Amazing Mail Solutions, Myra Jeans restaurant, etc. Fast-forward to 2005: In 2005 Camelot IV Inc. buys 17 of the 20 lots now being petitioned for rezoning from commercial to residential. In 2009 Camelot IV Inc. deeds these 17 lots to the Wakulla Bank. On July 15, a company called TFB buys these 17 lots zoned commercial. On July 28, less than two weeks after purchase, TFB Company petitions to rezone these 17 lots from commercial to residential. At the same time Beth Taff, as Trustee of the Oleta Lawhon Family Trust, petitions to rezone the other three lots from commercial to residential. On Sept. 12, these petitions came in front of the countys Planning and Zoning Board and they unanimously voted to turn down these petitions. On Oct. 3, these petitions reached the Board of County Commissioners where the majority of the commissioners appeared eager to overturn our Planning and Zoning Board by adding buffers between the existing commercial and proposed residential properties. At the Oct. 3, meeting our county attorney cautioned against proceeding with an af rmative vote without there being time to review the legal rami cations of adding buffers. Our commissioners voted to continue this item to its Oct. 17 meeting. The existing zoning on these lots is exactly what good downtown planning is all about. It is what is advocated in the Crawfordville Town Center vision and is what our Chamber of Commerce, CCOW and many other groups advocate. What our county commissioners are now considering, changing the zoning of 20 commercial lots to residential, goes against all the efforts that are meant to bring good and ef cient development to our downtown area. Why do our commissioners appear so eager to approve this rezoning? Local businesses oppose this zoning change (Ace Hardware, Myra Jeans, Bush Fire Services Inc., Florida Sun Termite, Wakulla Realty, Kevin Machine, Rascal Auto Sales, Engines Unlimited, Amazing Mail Solutions, Stans Barber Shop, Complete Automotive Repair Service and Easy Mail). It is opposed by property owners of the existing adjoining commercial lots (Gary and Trudy Lott). It is opposed by concerned citizens (Ernie Jaworski, Chris Wilson, Robert Grose, and Guinn Haskins), as well as other business people. In addition to poor planning, this proposed rezoning change is an affront to all the present homeowners who have seen their property values decline. Presently, there are 450 to 500 homes on the market in our county. Our countys Needs Analysis states we dont need more residential lots but states we do need more commercial lots. If the proposed rezoning is approved it will reduce the taxable value of the land and take money off the tax roles, as pointed out by our Tax Collector Cheryll Olah. This could place an additional burden on the average citizen by necessitating higher property taxes on their homes to make up for lost revenue. Our countys Planning and Zoning Board voted unanimously against this proposal. So why is our county commission even considering going in such a wrong direction? And if approved without doubt, our county is setting up future con icts between present existing businesses and future homeowners. This proposed zoning change would set the clock back for decades. Our county taxpayers deserve a well planned downtown Crawfordville. This change needs to be denied. Let your voice he heard. Howard Kessler Chairman CCOW Submitted by WAKULLA COALITION FOR YOUTH This is to correct some commonly held myths and misperceptions about Floridas Juvenile Justice System. For each myth, weve provided a response with links to research and documentation that provides the facts. Myth: Juvenile delinquency is increasing in Florida. Fact: Delinquency in Flor ida is down and has been declining for several years. Myth: More girls are entering the delinquency system. Fact: Fewer girls are entering the delinquency system. Myth: Girls are more violent today than in the past. Fact: Girls are substantially less violent today than in the past. Myth: Scared Straight programs can help troubled kids from entering the juvenile justice system. Fact: Research has repeatedly shown that Scared Straight programs are ineffective and can actually be harmful to some youth. The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice does not support and will not fund such initiatives. Myth: Delinquency increases in the summer when kids are out of school and have less formal supervision. Fact: Delinquency actually declines in December and over the summer. Myth: Most delinquents are habitual offenders who continue to cycle in and out of the system. Fact: Roughly two-thirds of the juveniles referred to DJJ in any given year are rst-time offenders. Myth: The longer a given juvenile stays in a residential program, the less likely he or she is to re-offend. Fact: Research has found that increased length of stay alone does not reduce re-offense. Myth: Secure detention is a good wake-up call for youth and will help them turn around their behavior. Fact: Research has found that being detained can actually make things worse for some youth. DJJ supports appropriate use of detention and is actively working to reduce unnecessary detentions. Myth: Juvenile boot camps are highly effective at rehabilitating offenders and reducing recidivism. Fact: Juvenile boot camps are less effective or the same at rehabilitation and recidivism reduction than residential or probation programs. In fact, DJJ is statutorily prohibited from funding boot camps.If you have any questions about this data, please contact Mark Greenwald, chief of Research and Planning, at mark.greenwald@djj.state. .us. anks for keeping mom safe, sheri Hire people with disabilities Support of Eden Springs Prom appreciated What kind of Crawfordville do you want?Floridas Juvenile Justice System Myths vs. Facts Crawfordville deser ves a downtown we can all be proud of

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 5AIrene S. CarterIrene Simas Carter, 83, passed away on the morning of Tuesday, Oct. 4, in her home after her third battle with cancer. Born July 27, 1928, in Brooklyn, N.Y., she graduated in 1946 from the Long Island School of Nursing at Brooklyn, where she later worked as a Registered Nurse at the Veterans Administration Hospital. Classmates described her as sweet as sugar, only more re ned. Irene spent her life as a nurturer. She cared for foster children before having her own who she devoted her life to. Later she cared for her father, Stanley, and her mother Teresa Simas. Irene enjoyed reading, dancing with her husband Bob, going to the theatre and taking care of her grandbabies. A friend once wrote: You occupy a special niche a niche reserved for those who endear themselves by just living, by being around, by gracing this world. The funeral was held Saturday, Oct. 8, at Abbey Funeral Home. The family received friends on Friday, Oct. 7, at the funeral home. Survivors include her husband of 61 years, Robert C. Carter; and her ve devoted children, Debbie Schuck, Chris Carter (Patti McMullen), Nancy Byington, Cassie Tucker (Richard) and Becky Leckinger. She thoroughly enjoyed her nine grandchildren. The family extends a special thanks and gratitude to the staff at Big Bend Hospice. Memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.Bruce R. CassidayBruce Raymond Cassiday, 54, of Crawfordville, died on Monday, Oct. 10, in Tallahassee. He was born in Great Falls, Mont., and had lived in this area for 15 years. He was a carpenter/framer. He loved to sh and hunt. Survivors include his mother, Beryl Cassiday; his sisters, Linda McConnell (Terry) of Havana and Kathleen Mackie (William) of Crawfordville; nieces, Kelly Mackie, Holly Mackie and Terra Linder; a nephew, Kelly Mackie; and numerous great nieces and great nephews. He was predeceased by his father, Wilmer Cassiday.Robert W. Elser Jr.Robert William Elser Jr., 67, passed away on Friday, Oct. 7, in his home. He was born Dec. 25, 1943, in Evergreen Park, Ill., to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Elser Sr. He moved here from Sarasota in 2000. He was retired from the City of Sarasota as a water treatment plant operator. He served in the U.S. Air Force, and was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church in Crawfordville. He was also an endowment member of the National Ri e Association. A memorial service for will be held at his home, located at 428 Hickory Hammock Road, on Saturday, Oct. 15, at 10 a.m. He loved his home and land out on the river and would like to share his joy with all. Please join us. The family requests that in lieu of flowers any memorial donations be made to the Trinity Lutheran Church at P.O. Box 940, Crawfordville FL 32326. Survivors include his mother, Virginia Elser of Elkhart, Ind.; his wife, Janet Elser; a daughter, Donna; a son, Russell of Carrabelle, who attends Concordia College in Selma, Ala.; a grandson, Christopher Piersall and soon-to-be granddaughter Samantha Thorpe, both of Muscatine, Iowa. Americare Funeral Home in Quincy is in charge of the arrangements.William Billy HowellWilliam Billy James Howell, 82, of Ocala passed away Oct. 2. He was born to Mabel and Robert l. Howell Jr. on Feb. 28, 1929, in Apalachicola. A 1947 graduate of Chapman High School in Apalachicola, he joined the Florida Power Corporation as a groundman in January 1948. He retired in December 1992, as vice president after 44 years of dedicated service. While in high school, he was an All-State athlete in both football and basketball. In 1950 he was offered a professional baseball contract to play in the Chicago White Sox organization, which he declined because of his commitment to Florida Power and his soon-to-be bride, Sally FitzGerald. Sally and Billy married in 1952, and spent 59 wonderful years together. They had two children, William Jr. (Bill) and Holly; and three wonderful grandchildren, Lacy and Hunter Townsend and William Howell III. He served his country as a member of the Florida Army National Guard for 22 years from 1948 until 1970. He retired as a captain. Billy and his family moved to Crawfordville from Apalachicola in 1958, where he was the district manager for Florida Power Corporation. While in Crawfordville, he served as the scoutmaster of the local Boy Scout troop, treasurer of the Methodist Church, and was president of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of the Lions club and the Masonic Lodge. Survivors include his wife, Sally, of Ocala; his daughter, Holly Townsend (Neil) of Ocala; his grandchildren, Lacy Townsend of Gainesville, Hunter Townsend of Ocala and William Howell III of Miami Shores; his son, William Jr. also of Miami Shores; and his sister, Frances Anne Monroe of Shellman, Ala. Funeral services were held Saturday, Oct. 8, at First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Hospice of Marion County, the First Presbyterian Church of Ocala or the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. He was predeceased by his parents, Mabel and Robert Howell; and his twin brother, Robert Bobby L. Howell III. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).William Guy TaylorWilliam Guy Taylor, 63, of Crawfordville, passed away Tuesday, Oct. 4. He was born in Panacea to W. Monroe and Minnie Lou Porter Taylor. He was of the Pentecostal faith and a member of the Apostolic Light Church in Perry. He enjoyed spending time with family and friends, hunting and fishing, cooking, southern gospel music and was an avid FSU Seminole fan. He was also a skilled carpenter. Family received friends, Friday, Oct. 7, at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church. Funeral Services were held on Saturday, Oct. 8, at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville with the Rev. James Box and the Rev. Bruce Taylor of ciating. Interment followed at Panacea Park Cemetery. Continued on Page 6AMedart Area Crawfordville Area SopchoppyWakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationIrene Simas Carter Bruce Raymond Cassiday Robert William Elser Jr. William Billy Howell William Guy Taylor Katherine Rose Strickland WoodsChurch News Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Grief RECOVERY for parents who have lost a childFor more information call Gigi Cavallaro at 850-926-6011. Coastal Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station will have the following events this week: Thursday, Oct. 13, at 9 a.m., Busy Bee Quilters will meet. Thursday, Oct. 13, at 7 p.m., United Methodist Women meeting. Saturday, Oct. 15 at 10 a.m., Bead Making Class will be held in the church Fellowship Hall. Lunch will be provided. Please call the church of ce 421-5741 for reservations and further details. Sunday, Oct. 16 at 4:30 p.m., Chancel Choir practice. Wakulla UMC is located at 1584 Old Woodville Road. The telephone number is 421-5741. Pastor Renita Allen-Dixon Presents, Worship at New Covenant Holy Temple Church, 420 Shelfer Road, in Tallahassee. Doors will open at 5 p.m. and the show starts at 6 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. For more information, contact Renita Allen-Dixon at 321-9027. Pastor Appreciation Service will be held at Faith Holiness House of Prayer, 726 Woodville Highway in Wakulla Station, on Sunday, Oct. 16, at 10:45 a.m. Pastor Cristine Dudley and Assistant Pastor Glinda Raker will host special speaker Evangelist Elizabeth McCormick. Special music provided by the Drummond Family (Southern Gospel). Lunch will be held after the service. Come and bring your gifts of ap-pr eciation and be blessed of the Lord Jesus Christ.Pastor Appreciation Service to be held Worship show set at New Covenant Events scheduled at Wakulla UMC

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our communityPeopleContinued from Page 5A Survivors include his wife, Betty Brumbley Taylor; his sons, Brandon and Wayne Durrance and William Taylor; daughter, Lisa (David) Gardner; brothers, Amos (Rita) Taylor, Robert (MaryAnn) Taylor Steven (Malissa) Taylor, Mitchell (Rhonda) Taylor, and Richard (Kathy) Taylor; sisters, Rochelle (Henry) Smith, Dorothy (Michael) Hall and Wanda (John) Lynn; and nine grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and numerous nieces, nephews and friends also survive. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home in Macclenny. (904) 259-4600. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome. net.Katherine R.S. WoodsKatherine Rose Strickland Woods left this earth for her heavenly home on Sunday, Oct. 9, at St. Augustine Plantation in Tallahassee with her loving family by her side. She was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. She was a member of First Baptist Church in Crawfordville and the Gleaners Sunday School Class. She loved to go to church, cook, read her Bible and be with her family. She was very active in Womens Missionionary Union locally and statewide. She traveled to Haiti and Jamaica on mission trips. She was known as a Prayer Warrior, and stood in the gap faithfully through intercessory prayer. Her great joy was to have her family over to visit and eat. She worked for the Wakulla County Health Department for many years with her close friend, Anita Townsend. In the past three years, she was lovingly cared for by her family and caregivers at St. Augustine Plantation, and also Big Bend Hospice. Visitation will be Thursday, Oct. 13, at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Services will be Friday, Oct. 14, at 2 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. Burial will follow at Crawfordville Cemetery. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to Florida Baptist Childrens Home. 8415 Buck Lake Road, Tallahassee FL 32317 (850-878-1458). Survivors include three sons, Kenneth A. Strickland Jr. of Milton, Richard W. Strickland (Callie) of Crawfordville, and Elmer Gene Strickland (Brenda) of Smith Creek; one daughter, Kathryn Lawhon (Larry) of Crawfordville; a beloved niece, Evelyn DiNunzio; grandchildren, David Sellick, Jason Lawhon (Krissia), Jeremy Lawhon (Lalie), Jennifer Kathryn Lawhon, Courtney S. Brogan (Frank), Jarvis Strickland (Amanda) and Ben Strickland; and 10 great-grandchildren. Additional survivors include her stepsons, Steven Woods (Frances) and Duane Woods (Shannon); stepdaughters, Gloria Cornelius and Carol Vice (Ron); and 13 grandchildren, 30 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild. She was predeceased by her husbands, Kenneth A. Strickland and Willis E. Woods; a daughter-in-law, Suellen Strickland; step-daughter, Alice LaSalle; grandson, Colby Strickland; and her parents, Corley J. and Sarah Rose. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Obituaries Michelle Feigeles and Michael J. WeltmanWeltman to wed FeigelesMr. And Mrs. Joseph and Claire Feigeles of Lyndhurst, Ohio, are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Michelle Feigeles, of Richmond Heights, Ohio, to Michael J. Weltman. Weltman is the son of June Kiner, Willoughby Hills, Ohio, and grandson of 100-year-old Esther Saginor, S. Euclid, Ohio. Weltman is a Mortgage Banker and Florida Sales Manager for FirstBank, based in Tennessee, specializing in senior products. A November 2011 wedding in Cleveland, Ohio, is planned at The Temple Tifereth Israel. The couple will reside in Wakulla County. Both were Brush High School graduates from the class of 1981 and were reunited at their recent reunion.Happy rst birthdayEthan James Koon celebrated his rst birthday on Sept. 29. His parents are Perry and Tricia Koon of Alachua. He has two sisters, Dilyn Brooke and Shelby Lynn. His maternal grandparents are Mrs. and Mrs. Harlan Chestnut of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Perry Koon of Williston. Ethan J. Koon Zach Harris Zach Harris celebrated his rst birthday on Oct. 15 in Washington, D.C., with family and friends. He was born on Oct. 17, 2010, in Atlanta, Ga. He is the son of Andrew and Clarissa Linton Harris. He is the grandson of John and Toni Harris of Atlanta, and Sid and Isabella Linton of Rockingham, N.C. He is the great-grandson of the late Sidney and Clarissa Taylor Linton of Wakulla Station and Rockingham, N.C. The late Lizzy Linton of River Sink was his great-greatgrandmother, and the late Ellender Strickland of Crawfordville, Thelma Linton of Wakulla Station and Betty Strickland of River Sink were his great aunts. Zach Harris Ethan James KoonNyle and Strain announce birth of baby girlRonald Nyle and Jana Strain, of Ochlockonee Bay, welcomed a baby girl, Aeven Elise Strain, on Sept. 28 at 1:35 p.m. She weighed 6 pounds, 3 ounces and was 19 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Andre and Mary Tollefsen of Ochlockonee Bay. Her paternal grandparents are Dale and Darlene Ellenbarger of Martinsville, Ohio. Volunteer mediators are needed for Wakulla CountySpecial to The News The Second Judicial Circuit Court needs volunteer county court mediators for Wakulla County. A mediator is a neutral and impartial person who meets with the parties in a small claims lawsuit to help the parties resolve their dispute. Volunteer mediators conduct mediations at 9 a.m. on the last Wednesday of each month at the Wakulla County Courthouse. Free training for new volunteer county court mediators will be held in Tallahassee, on November 1 through 4, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. each day. For more information about being invited to the training, please contact Susan Marvin, County Court Mediation Coordinator, before October 24 at 577-4434, susanm@leoncounty .gov.Training will be held Nov. 1 to Nov. 4 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the courthouse At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) Lordy, Lordy... Look Whos Forty Grace, Drew & Charlie GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 HATS US 98 PANACEAWinter Styles Coming Soon! Find Yours. Bandannas 2.00 incl. tax PANACEA HATSAFACT

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Special to The News Michael Crouch, principal of Wakulla High School, announced recently that Cora Atkinson and Zachary Broadway have been named Commended Students in the 2012 National Merit Scholarship Program. A letter of commendation from the school and National Merit Scholarship Corporation, which conducts the program, was presented by the principal to these scholastically talented students at a reception, on Thursday, Oct. 6. About 34,000 Commended Students throughout the nation are being recognized for their exceptional academic promise. Although they will not continue in the 2012 competition for National Merit Scholarships, Commended Students placed among the top 5 percent of more than 1.5 million students who entered the 2012 competition by taking the 2010 Preliminary SAT/ National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. The young men and women being named Commended Students have demonstrated outstanding potential for academic success, commented a spokesperson for NMSC. These students represent a valuable national resource; recognizing their accomplishments, as well as the key role their school plays in their academic development, is vital to the advancement of educational excellence in our nation. We hope that this recognition will broaden their educational opportunities and encourage them as they continue their pursuit of academic success. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 7Aeducation news from local schoolsSchool Atkinson and Broadway are Commended StudentsKAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla High School Principal Michael Crouch, students Cora Atkinson and Zachary Broadway, Superintendent of Schools David Miller and Assitant Superintendent of Instruction Beth ODonnell NJROTC annual sh fry scheculed for Oct. 21By CADET ENSIGN AZZARITONJROTC Public Affairs Of cerIts that time of year again, for the NJROTC annual sh fry, a Wakulla County tradition for 19 years and counting. This year is no exception. On Oct. 21, the NJROTC unit will host its sh fry before the Wakulla vs. Suwannee football game. It is only $7 for the meal and the menu for the sh fry includes shrimp, cheese grits, cole slaw, hush puppies and tea. It is prepared by Noah Posey and his crew from Poseys Up the Creek. Posey has graciously donated his services each year for this event. It will go from 4:30 to 7 p.m. outside the entrance to Reynolds Field at Wakulla High School. The sh fry is highly bene cial to the cadets in the NJROTC unit. The proceeds from the sh fry allow the cadets to take trips such as the one coming up next month to Parris Island, Marine Corps Depot in South Carolina. Parris Island shows the cadets the basics of Marine Corps recruit training and some of the fundamentals of Marine discipline. The sh fry also helps to fund the eld meets the cadets compete in around the state during the school year. Categories of competition include a variety of drill teams, color guard, athletics and academics. They help to build unit camaraderie and encourage friendly competition among the cadets around the state. The sh fry, among other fundraisers the unit does, also helps to fund other fun events such as dances, the dining in and the Olympicnic. Come out and support the NJROTC unit at their 19th annual sh fry. Tickets can be purchased from any cadet ahead of time or at the event.Wakulla Christian selling chocolate for fundraiser Special to The News Wakulla Christian School will be selling chocolate covered Almonds from Worlds Finest Chocolate for $2 a box. This chocolate is made from premium milk chocolate and is the No. 1 selling chocolate in the fundraising industry. Each box also has a Steak n Shake coupon on it worth $2. The sale is Oct. 13 through Oct. 31. Contact the school of ce at 926-5583, to nd out where they will be sold. Talquin Electric is accepting applications for youth tourSpecial to The News Talquin Electric Cooperative will sponsor four students from our four-county service area on an all-expense paid trip to Washington, D.C. this summer. Students from area high schools and home schools will rst be selected to represent Talquin Electric for Florida Electric Cooperatives Tallahassee Youth Tour on Feb. 8, 2012, and Feb. 9, 2012. During the Tallahassee Tour, students will visit the House of Representatives Chambers and attend a session in the Florida Supreme Court with students from around the state. During the Tallahassee Youth Tour, four students will be chosen to represent Talquin in Washington, D.C., for the National Rural Electric Youth Tour, June 16-21, 2012. Students are chosen based on leadership and public speaking skills, community service and academics. The Washington, D.C., trip will include visits to the Lincoln Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Mount Vernon and many more historic sites with hundreds of other students from around the nation. In order to qualify: Students must currently be enrolled as a junior in a local high school or home school. Students must have a relative who is currently a Talquin Member through business or residence. Students must currently live in Talquins four-county service area. Interested students should complete the Talquin Youth Tour Application, as well as submit a letter of reference and 250 word essay entitled, Why I want to be a Talquin Electric Youth Tour Representative in 2012. Applications are available at Talquin Area Of ces, or may be found at www. talquinelectric.com under the Community/Youth Tour link. For more information, contact Kim Gay, at (850) 627-7651. Deadline to turn in applications is December 10, 2011. ose attending the youth tour in Tallahassee will have a chance to go to Washington, D.C. Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints TCC WAKULLA CENTEROFFERINGTECHNIGHT CLASSESWord 2007 (2) October 20 6-9 p.m. $25 Excel 2007 (1) October 27 6-9 p.m. $25 Excel 2007 (2) November 3 6-9 p.m. $25 PowerPoint 2007 (1) November 17 6-9 p.m. $25 QuickBooks 2010 (1) December 1 6-9 p.m. $25 QuickBooks 2010 (2) December 8 6-9 p.m. $25ECOTOURISM CLASSESFL Archaeology and Pre-history October 20 6 -9 p.m. $20 Forest Field Trip (2) Wakulla Sinks October 23 1-5 p.m. $40 Ecosystems Workshop October 25 6-9 p.m. $20 Birds of the Region October 27 6-9 p.m. $20 Birding and Sea Life Field Trip October 30 8 a.m.noon $40For a complete class schedule visit:www.workforce.tcc.fl.edu/Wakulla For more information:(850) 922-6290 | mackiek@tcc.fl.edu HAVE YOU HEARD THE NEWS?has expanded their circulation department! LOOK The Wakulla News has a new number to call to subscribe.888-852-2340CALL ALISON OR NECIA TODAY! 888-852-2340 They haven't actually expanded, they're just taking advantage of Citrus Publishing's call center in Crystal River.Be a part of the conversationSubscribe Today by callingSubscribe Today by callingget888-852-2340or visit TheWakullaNews.com Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The News Two Wakulla travel baseball teams brought home the champions trophy in the Travelball USA Perfect Game Tournament in Marianna on Saturday, Oct. 8. The 12u Wakulla Red Sox went undefeated in the tournament, beating three teams on the road to victory over the Enterprise Wildcats, 6-5. The week prior, the Red Sox placed second in the USP Octoberfest III Tournament in Bainbridge, Ga. The Wakulla Red Sox are managed by Keith Anderson. The 13u Team Surge competed in the tournaments 14u bracket Saturday and defeated the Marianna Indians in its nal series match-up that evening, 19-5, thanks to clutch hitting and a strong defense. Team Surge is managed by Tracy Forester with coaches Ken Weber and Tommy Langston. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe Wakulla High School cross country teams competed Saturday, Oct. 8 at the Cougar Challenge, hosted by Godby High School, at Phipps Park north of Tallahassee. Runners from 13 high schools attended the meet to run a challenging course. The WHS girls team continued to perform exceptionally well and nished second overall. The boys team also competed well, finishing in fth place. The highlight of the meet for the local high harriers had to be the performance of senior runner Stanley Linton who won the overall boys title. In that race, Linton and Lincoln standout Trevor Touchton separated themselves from the rest of the eld early in the race and then waged a headto-head battle until they hit the 900 meters to go mark where Linton surged and opened up the gap on Touchton and held that lead to the end. Linton nished rst in an excellent time of 16:54, with Touchton running a strong 17:04 to come in second place. Senior Cody James also ran to a new personal record (PR) time of 18:26 and nished in 12th place. These were the only two WHS boys to be recognized for nishing in the top 15 overall. Completing the scoring for the War Eagles was J.P. Piortrowski (19:59), Mitchell Atkinson (20:14) and Hunter Phillips (20:19). In the girls race, the WHS girls employed their typical race strategy of starting out relatively slow and then working their way through the eld and nishing strong. Sophomore Marty Wiedeman led the charge through the eld and nished in fth place overall in 22:00. Senior captain Cora Atkinson was close behind, nishing in seventh place in 22:09 and freshman Lydia Wiedeman ran an excellent race to nish in 10th place in a new personal record time of 22:36. Freshman Lilli Broadway (23:25) and junior Raychel Gray (23:28) rounded out the scoring for the WHS squad. The Wiedeman sisters and Atkinson were individually recognized for finishing in the top 15 overall. Overall, this was a pretty good meet for us, said Coach Paul Hoover. The boys team was a little thin this week as three of our top 10 runners opted to compete in a soccer tournament, but our other kids did a good job. The performance of the day had to be Stanleys victory. That was pretty special. The girls team was strong again and Im pretty proud of them, said Hoover. Marty and Cora continue to perform well at every meet and set the standard for the team, and this week Lydia took a big step forward and ran a great PR. The girls team is pretty deep and it seems like every week we have one or two runners who have sub-par races, but someone else steps up and lls the void, which is how a team should work. The teams compete next on Saturday at the Mosley Invitational in Lynn Haven. By RICHARD LAWHONSpecial to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles hosted John Paul II on Oct. 6, for a disappointing loss. In the first set, the Lady War Eagles came out ghting, playing very good on both offense and defense. At the beginning of the rst set, the Lady War Eagles were on top 7-3 and it looked as though they would win, but the Panthers did not give up and came back to win 25-20. After losing the rst set, the Lady War Eagles were not giving up either and played very hard with the lead bouncing back and forth in the second set, but fell 28-26. If the Lady War Eagles were going to continuing playing, they would have to win the third set. They came out playing the third set better than they have played all season, but still fell to the Lady Panthers 25-22. The Lady War Eagles showed a lot of heart in this game, which is good considering that post season play is nearing. Some of the key players for this game were Ashley Roberts with 9 kills and 8 aces, Breighly Bolton with 7 kills, Chelsea Carroll with 26 assists and 4 blocks, Haley Brown with 10 digs and nally Jordan Pryor, who had an exceptional game with 20 digs. The next game for the Lady War Eagles will be Oct. 11 at Suwanee High School and then Chiles High School at home on Oct. 13. The JV team plays at 5:30 p.m. and Varsity plays at 7 p.m. CROSS COUNTRYTeams place at Cougar ChallengeThe Wakulla Red Sox: front, Bailey Fagan, Jared Weber, Carson Dykes, Thomas Anderson and Will Barwick; standing: Luke Ceci, Hunter Greene, Jacob Dismuke, Brad Lord and Lucas Briggs; back: Manager Keith Anderson and Coach Mike Barwick. Team Surge, front row, Chasen Chi-Chi Roulhac, John Weber, Oakley Ward, Chase Forester, Buddy Wood and Jackson Montgomery; standing, Kaleb Langston, Chance Harper, Skyler Talavera, Marc Carter and Aaron Ginn. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy JOEY JACOBSRMS CoachThe Riversprings Bears have had the motto of taking one game at a time this season, but it has been dif cult not to look ahead to Tolar. The returners from last years RMS team felt like last years Tolar game was one they should have won, but lost 26-24. They were determined to not let it happen again. Although the visiting undefeated Bulldogs played another great game, the Bears came out on top 32-16. The Bears were led offensively by Feleip Franks. Franks finished the night 5 of 7 for 87 yards and one touchdown. Franks also used his feet to extend plays. The running trio of Monterious Loggins, Demarcus Lindsey and Antonio Morris also had productive nights steering the RMS ground game. Lindsey was also on the receiving end of an 18 yard Franks touchdown pass. Early in the game it looked like the Bulldogs would be able to move the ball against Riversprings defense. After some adjustments by Defensive Coordinator Louis Hernandez, the defense turned the Lights Out on Tolar running back J.J. House and the Bulldog offense. RMS was led in tackles by Demarcus Lindsey and Isaiah Youmas. Lindsey had 5 tackles, 3 of which were for a loss, and one assist. Youmas nished with 4 tackles, 3 of them for losses. Keith Gavin also electri ed the crowd with a 70-yard interception return for a touchdown. Overall, the Bears played well, despite needing to improve in some fundamental areas, said RMS head Coach Joey Jacobs. The Bears will be back in action on Friday night, Oct. 14 at 7 p.m. when they will take on cross-county rival Wakulla Middle School for the Wakulla County Championship. The game will be at J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. War Eagles handle Rickards, 12-0By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagle defense stepped up on Friday night. Though tested throughout the game, and their backs put against the wall several times, the defense bent but didnt break. Weve been preaching it all year long, said Head Coach Scott Klees. They bent. They gave up some yardage, but no score. The Rickards Raiders were held scoreless despite having the ball a couple of times inside the red zone but were unable to convert, and two attempted eld goals were no good. In the second quarter, the War Eagles Ryan Henderson came on a blitz from the Raider quarterbacks blind side and knocked the ball out his hand and picked it up and ran it back 90 yards for a touchdown. The War Eagles went for a two-point conversion but it was no good. That was the score until the fourth quarter when running back Marshane Godbolt scored from 15 yards out to make it 12-0. There were seven fumbles in the game three by Wakulla and the War Eagles ran only eight plays on offense in the rst half, in which the Rickards offense dominated on time of possession but could not nd a hole in Wakullas defense. It was a big win against a district opponent, and improved the War Eagles to a 4-2 record. Im proud of where were at, Klees said. Running back Will Thomas was named offensive player of the week, carrying the ball 14 times for 136 yards. Defensive player of the week is Deonte Hutchinson, who had an interception, four tackles and graded out at 84 percent. Special teams player was Brett Buckridge, the long snapper, who Klees called outstanding, and had two tackles on punts. The team has a bye this week before facing Suwannee County next week at home. In the other district game last week, Suwannee was trounced by Godby but Klees warned that Wakulla has never beaten Suwannee in the schools history and anticipated a tough game. Wed better be clicking on all cylinders, he said. Typically, both teams are very good. A win against Suwannee, he said, puts us in the playoffs with two district wins. If we lose, it puts us in a must-win against Godby.MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLRMS defeats TolarPlayers of the Week OFFENSE SPECIAL TEAMS DEFENSEWill Thomas 14 carries for 136 yards Deonte Hutchinson Interception, 4 tackles Brett Buckridge Long snapper PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDefensive player of the week Deonte Hutchinson with the ball in the open eld.Wakulla wins the first district game, improves to 4-2 overall. After a bye week, up next is SuwanneCoach Klees praised his junior varsity team, who defeated Chiles High School on Thursday night, 40-0, to continue their high ying season. The JV is undefeated in four games, and has outscored their opponents 164-6. Were extremely proud of those guys and how hard theyve worked, Klees said. The JV next plays Taylor County away this Thursday night and, on Oct. 20, play Godby at home.JV keeps rolling Wakulla fans cheer on the War Eagles.More photos online at thewakullanews.com Im proud of where were at, Coach Klees says of the War Eagles after the win the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringRaymond RichSeptember 2011 Winnerank You So Much! His name was drawn fromank you to the restaurants & e News for this nice promotion OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations LUN CH PA RTN ER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive Deli DelioftheweekatTry One of Our Home Made Parfaits 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... 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Florida State at DukeSaturday, 3 p.m. The game can be seen on FSN Af liates (HD) / ESPN-GP / espn3. Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comIn The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate Miami at North CarolinaSaturday, 11:30 a.m. ESPN-GP *2 / ACC Network *3 (HD) / espn3Fisher faces biggest challenge of young careerFlorida at No. 24 AuburnSaturday, 7 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPN (HD) / espn3.By MARTY COHENof GatorBaitBATON ROUGE Theres lots of numbers to be tossed around in the aftermath of another dif cult defeat, this time by 30 points to the topranked team in the nation. But this numerical nugget is a touch startling its been 40 years since a Florida team has lost consecutive games by at least 28 points, when the Gators got whipped 40-7 at Auburn and 49-7 against Georgia in Jacksonville way back in 1971, a 4-7 season that turned the Super Sophs into Scuf ing Seniors. Its reminiscent of what Steve Spurrier said after the Gators shocking loss to Syracuse in the last time they played a regular-season game outside the Southeast, I told you wed break a lot of records around here. Spurriers deadpan remark came in response to the minus 17 yards rushing UF mustered in the Orange crush, which actually was the second-worst effort (minus 30 against West Virginia in the 1981 Peach Bowl was the dubious mark at the time), but we got the point. In retrospect, it was easy to smile about the Syracuse debacle because it became the only regular-season misstep in what turned into an SEC championship campaign. In the present, there has been nothing to feel good about for Florida since the calendar ipped to October, leaving behind a 4-0 September that seems awfully hollow after the beat-downs by Alabama and LSU in the last eight days. And make no mistake, these were physical manhandlings by two of the best, if the not the two best, teams in the country. Yes the Gators were in the game, from a scoreboard standpoint, against Alabama before John Brantley went down, but the Tide had exerted its will and in a basketball analogy, the Gators were basically making some 3s from the perimeter (throwing the ball around a bit in the rst half), while the Tide was bruising its way inside for easy layups. Eventually, the 3s will stop falling and the score will get out of hand. A week later, Floridas perimeter shooting was taken away due to the absence of Brantley. The Gators were going to have to play a near- awless game and hope that LSU de ed its recent character (the Tigers were an SEC-leading plus-9 in turnover margin coming into the game) to have a chance of walking into this den with a true freshman quarterback taking his rst snap. There was to be no such charity from the Tigers, who grabbed a 14-0 lead barely eight minutes into the contest and given the state of the Gators, it was lights-out. Its almost frightening to think that in between the 65-yard touchdown pass from Brantley to Andre Debose on the opening offensive play against Alabama, to the 65-yard touchdown pass from Jacoby Brissett to Debose with 40 seconds left in the third quarter against LSU, the Gators were out-scored a combined 65-6 in a hair under seven quarters against the SECs two behemoths. Another defeat Another defeatBy TIM LINAFELTof The OseolaThe fact that Florida State was besieged by penalties at Wake Forest should come as no surprise. The Seminoles have drawn an alarming number of penalty ags in recent weeks they were agged 11 times at Clemson and came into Saturdays contest averaging more than eight penalties per game. Indeed, FSUs penalty problems made the trip to Winston-Salem, as the Seminoles committed a season-high 13 penalties for 109 yards. But FSU on Saturday found another way to hinder its cause: with turnovers. Wake Forest turned ve FSU giveaways into 17 points as the Seminoles nearly matched their season turnover total in a single afternoon. Quarterbacks Clint Trickett and EJ Manuel each threw a pair of interceptions, Trickett lost a fumble and the Seminoles stumbled to a 35-30 defeat that leaves their 2011 season spiraling closer and closer to disaster. FSU (2-3, 0-2 in the Atlantic Coast Conference) is still winless since Sept. 10, still winless against BCS-conference opponents and 0-2 in the ACC for the second time in three years. You cant turn the ball over ve times, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. You cant have 13 penalties. After a weeks worth of speculation, Trickett made his second consecutive start and immediately looked more like a freshman playing on the road and less like the cool, collected player who nearly led FSU to a come-from-behind win at Clemson two weeks ago. On Florida States rst drive of the game, he led the Seminoles down to the Wake Forest 20-yard line before his throw to Kenny Shaw near the sideline was tipped and picked off by Joey Ehrmann and returned 50 yards to the FSU 30. Trickett later fumbled and threw another interception (another tipped ball) on back-to-back possessions, leading Manuel to grab his helmet and start warming up on the sideline. He took the eld for the rst time since Sept. 17 on the following possession. Manuel initially looked to be just the boost that FSU needed. His 46-yard touchdown strike to Rashad Greene at the end of the rst half cut Wakes lead to 16-14 and had the Seminoles feeling as if theyd weathered the storm. The Demon Deacons got to Manuel twice in the second half, once on the goal line and once late in the fourth quarter when the Seminoles desperately needed points and time as they hoped to complete the comeback. FSU didnt give up, but Wake never gave up the ball, which certainly didnt help matters. The Seminoles now have a minus-seven turnover ratio (11 giveaways, four takeaways) for the season.Noles plagued by miscues old and newThe LSU Tigers wrapped up the Gators.PHOTO COURTESY OF GATORBAITCoach Jimbo Fisher talks with EJ Manuel, who initially looked like just the boost that FSU needed. PHOTOS BY MIKE OLIVELLA Special to the Osceola Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! By TIM LINAFELTof The OseolaIts beginning to feel like old times around here, and not in a good way. But after back-to-back-to-back losses, most recently a lethargic, 35-30 letdown at Wake Forest, these Seminoles bear far more resemblance to their bitter 2009 vintage, rather than 1999. Just three weeks ago, Florida State was entertaining notions of a darkhorse national title run, and an Atlantic Coast Conference championship felt like a foregone conclusion. A 23-13 loss to Oklahoma, then the No. 1 team in the country? Understandable. A 35-30 loss at Clemson with a freshman quarterback making his rst career start? Forgivable, especially given the Tigers apparent evolution into a Top 10 team. But there are no excuses for the debacle that took place at BB&T Field Saturday. The Seminoles were sloppy and careless to the tune of ve turnovers. They were undisciplined, somehow eclipsing the seemingly unbeatable number of 12 penalties at Clemson with 13 against the Demon Deacons. And for the second consecutive game, the defense allowed 35 points as players over-pursued runs, missed coverages and continuing a troubling trend for this season couldnt come up with a crucial third-down stop in the fourth quarter. This time, it was Wake quarterback Tanner Price who evaded the FSU pass rush, kept his balance, stumbled his way out of the pocket and found fullback Tommy Bohanon for a 15-yard completion on third-and-seven. That led to a 32-yard eld goal that gave the Demon Deacons an 11-point lead with fewer than seven minutes to play in the fourth quarter. The game was reminiscent of two years ago, when the Seminoles started 2-4, 0-2 in the ACC. It was puzzling, it was frustrating, and it was just close enough to magnify the multitude of FSU miscues that proved to be the difference. Frankly, it was the type of game that led to a regime change at Florida State and to Jimbo Fishers ascension to head coach a few months later. The Noles have three losses in a row. Get 40 100mg/20mg pills for only $99.00CALL NOW AND GET 4 BONUS PILLS FREE! BUY THE BLUE PILL NOW!1-888-746-5615SATISFACTION GUARANTEED SAVE $500! VIAGRA or CIALIS?D o you take Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. Maximum strength analgesic for temporary relief from: Back pain Muscle pain Arthritis pain Joint pain

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsThe weather this weekend wasnt good for anything but staying inside. It was too windy to sail or y a kite, much less sh. I had to take my boat in to Mikes Marine for repairs and was talking to Mike Jr. He said the only place he has heard people catching a lot of sh was on Dog Island Reef. Spanish, blues plenty of lady sh and trout. A friend of his has been shing way up the Ochlockonee River past the old railroad crossing and catching reds on the bottom using red wigglers. Whats up with that? This is a good time to catch a big black drum under the Ochlockonee Bridge on Highway 98. Fish with a quarter or half a crab on the bottom and hang on. You might want to use a fairly stiff rod because there are some big bruisers under that bridge. Ill never forget the rst one I caught with a charter. We were anchored up and had no bites at all. I was sitting on the back of the boat and thought I had gotten hung. I was trying to pull it loose when the bottom moved. I handed it to my client and she landed a 38-pound black drum. We took some good pictures and let it go. The shrimp are in the bay over at Apalachicola and all you need to do is look for the diving birds. Get close enough to cast into the birds and hang on. Youre gonna nd plenty of trout feeding there, along with other sh. A lot of people use tandem rigs when shing under the birds and it doesnt take long to get your limit. Some big reds are being caught in the cut and ounder around the rocks in the cut and along the bridge. Live bull minnows are the best bet for them. Mike Pearson from Tifton came down Wednesday with a buddy and they shed Wednesday afternoon and Thursday. On Wednesday they caught a good number of trout on the ats but on Thursday they caught nothing. Same spots, same baits and same weather, just no sh. I had done extremely well on Sunday and Monday and thought our ats were getting ready to turn on. Then on Wednesday I shed with a charter and couldnt get a bite where I had shed Sunday and Monday. The majority of the sh we caught were out in about 14 feet of water and there were so many pig sh and lady sh out there it was hard to catch anything else. Despite the strong wind, yours truly was out there trying to catch sh in that mess for two days. I called both charters on Wednesday and told them what the forecast was and gave them the opportunity to cancel both trips. I said we could probably anchor and catch some white trout but shing for speckled trout had been slow and the rough water was gonna make it even slower. Both parties said lets give it a try and do what we can do. On Friday, the wind wasnt too terribly bad and we had three big trout, all caught in the rst 15 minutes of the trip. No more specs after that. We caught seven legal reds and kept our three and then we anchored on the white trout and caught them until they said they had all they wanted. On Saturday I shed the same pattern as Friday but the winds blew a lot harder. Capt. David Fife also had part of this group and we fought the wind all day. The two boats had two reds, four speckled trout, three ounder and 58 white trout, and most of them were about 15 inches long. Right now its the middle of October and we should be in the prime of our fall shing. Fishing around Shell Point just isnt that good right now and I sure hope it gets better. I dont do much freshwater shing these days so I dont write much about it. When I was in grammar school living in Chamblee, Ga., we would always listen to a shing program on the radio on Thursday afternoon. I believe the name of the program was John Martins Indoor/Outdoors and he would call down to South Georgia and North Florida and nd out how the shing was, both saltwater and freshwater. One of the people he always called was Jack Wingate at Wingates Lunker Lodge on Lake Seminole. Wingate, who is something of a shing legend in these parts, was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer and needs our prayers. Remember to leave that oat plan with someone and know your limits. Good luck and good shing! e wind has made the shing roughIn my many articles over the years, Ive stressed to those who wish to observe wildlife to go on a sunny day. Try to keep the sun to your back so things arent silhouetted and on a day when there is only a light breeze, as wind will buffet you around, and make viewing through binoculars and spotting scopes much harder, as the object being viewed will be bouncing all over the place! If looking for mammals, the cooler dawn or dusk is best, and this applies to birds too as birds are most active at dawn. Many binoculars now focus very close as more outdoor enthusiasts are trying to become familiar with butter ies and can now focus just a few feet away. Rainy days are usually bummers as most wildlife will hold up during an all out rain. An off-and-on drizzle, or occasional passing shower or thunderstorm isnt so bad if you do get some blue sky and sun as well. When overcast, flying birds are generally harder to identify against the gray sky. Basically you want the best lighting possible and the less breeze the better. Yet there are exceptions: waterfowl often really move around during foul weather, as any duck hunter will attest. Another exception is viewing migrating birds of prey, or raptors. About a month ago I was on Chimney Rock in New Jersey. Chimney Rock is just south of the Kittatinny Ridge, which extends into Pennsylvania where there is the famous Hawk Mountain Sanctuary the rst place in North America set aside to protect migrating hawks. At Chimney Rock a cold front had just passed through the day before, and overnight the air had cleared and it had turned much cooler. I was excited, as the hawks were also migrating there. But they were way up! Waves of broad-winged hawks in groups of 40 to 80 were shooting south over this viewing area one after the other, and even with my 10 power binoculars they were (to me) just specks in the blue sky. But the day before, right after the rain stopped, and the wind shifted into the north the observers had it much better. When the sky was blue it was harder to spot the hawks, whereas when the sky was gray, and the clouds were low as a front blasted through, the hawks stood out. So, on Sunday, while this tropical wave was moving through the state of Florida, I de ed my logic of windless clear sunny days and drove to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge because we were going to have low, menacing clouds, and the counter-clockwise wind of this tropical system was fairly strong, right out of the east, blowing in theory the migrating hawks over to our coast, as they headed south. It all sounded good, but when I got in the refuge about 8 a.m. it was raining and I saw little til I got out near the end of Lighthouse Road. About the time I reached the lighthouse and Gulf, the rain slacked up and then up on the observation tower I heard my name being called by my friends Mark and Selina Keiser. Mark and his wife are very involved with the states Florida Birding Trail, and were doing a census of sorts where they and other participants stay in one spot all day and see or hear what avian species they can record. This was their forth Big Sit as it is called. They had been there since dawn, and would stay until dark. Occasionally, others like myself would join them, and while I was there Carol Miller, a lady who recently identi ed a (very rare for our area) western Says Phoebe, joined us as well as Dana Bryant, state naturalist for our Florida Parks system. Gradually, the Keisers list passed 50 species, including some pretty nifty birds like the Peregrine Falcon and Cliff swallow. Just about the time Dana and I were thinking of heading home, he spotted a Tennessee Warbler, the rst Id seen in years. Though I saw 65 species by driving around, Mark and Selina got nearly that number from one spot pretty amazing. So far theyve had the highest number recorded every year since the Big Sits were started. Sometimes bad weather is good weather for birding From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHFWC News Wanted: Adventurous and outdoorsy women wishing to learn more about Floridas great outdoors in a comfortable, noncompetitive, hands-on environment. If this could be you, contact the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to participate in the Becoming an Outdoors-Woman mini-workshop in Panama City. The single-day workshop takes place Saturday, Oct. 15 at Gulf Coast State College along the beautiful shores of St. Andrews Bay. The workshop runs 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Although designed with women in mind, the workshop is open to anyone 18 years or older who wants to improve their outdoor skills and enjoy several recreational activities. The program offers a fun and supportive atmosphere for participants wishing to try new things and enjoy the camaraderie of other women wanting to do the same. In two, three-and-one-half-hour sessions, the Becoming an Outdoors Woman mini-workshop teaches skills associated with shing, hunting and other forms of outdoor recreation, at all levels of physical activity. The women will be able to choose two of the following sessions: basic archery skills; introduction to pan shing; kayaking basics; introduction to reading the woods; introduction to shotgun shooting and hunting; basic wilderness survival; and introduction to handgun shooting and hunting, said outdoors woman state coordinator Lynne Hawk. The cost for the one-day workshop is $50, and there are discounted slots available for low-income participants, single parents and college students. The workshop is restricted to 100 people on a rst-come, rst-served basis. For more information about the workshop or how you can register, visit MyFWC.com/BOW or contact Susan Harrass at 561-625-5122 or Susan.Harrass@MyFWC.com.Womens outdoor workshop to be held in Panama City Scott A. Smith850-228-100738 Rainbow Drive, Crawfordville (behind El Jalisco)Quality Marine Canvas Fabrication and Upholsteryof all kinds...www.agshipcanvas.com agshipcanvas@yahoo.com McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brak es Batteries Radia tors Wat er Pum ps Hub Bea rings Star ters Alterna tors and mor e!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093 www.hicksair.com Tues. Thurs. 9am 5:30pm Friday Sunday See Us at the Gun Shows LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKMany accessoriesLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GunSmithing Fast Turn Around! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED www.ronsgun.comLocated Main Street St. Marks483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks Gun Show Pricing Everyday! WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid $ for your gun! Selling GunsSince 1999AK 47s in stock! 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer DRIVE FOR THE BUILDGOLF TOURNAMENTpresented by: Friday, October 21, 2010 Wildwood Golf Course Registration is from 7:30 8:20am Shotgun Start 8:30am Awards & Lunch at Country Club Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County is presenting their 2nd Annual Drive for the Build Golf Tournament. This tournament will help fund the 2012 HabitatHomeBuild in Wakulla County. To enter the golf tournament, please contact our Team Chair, DorisHarrington at 850-926-6658. EntranceFee is $200 per team or $50 per player. 1st, 2nd, & 3rd place prizes will be awarded

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224www.fsucu.org UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonIt has been said that it is important to do your best in all you do, and this week that was evident in the dedication and organization of members from Flotilla 19 in Panama City who tirelessly worked to make the Division Conference and Joint Action Rescue Exercise (JAREX) a phenomenal success. And as with all planned activities, it is necessary to plan for the unexpected and be exible. Up until the day before the JAREX, Duane and I planned to head over Friday morning and prepare to document the JAREX while being non-participants. He was going to be onboard a vessel and I was going to stay dockside and take stills. Midday Thursday we got a request to be in Panama City Beach at 7:30 a.m. and we were going to both be on a boat, just not the one originally planned. The bonus for having to go so early in the morning was we got to be in civilian dress as we were on the victim boat. We headed over before the dawn and participated in the pre-underway check-off. Since two participants had not arrived, I was asked to be an actor in the exercise, and would not be able to take pictures since we were trying to be as realistic as possible. I did get a few shots in though. We spent the morning participating in two practice runs since we had so many agencies participating and we wanted to do our best in the real thing. We all based out of the Panama City Marina and were grateful for good weather and open dock space. Let me set the stage for all of you: The story begins with a boat being hailed by the Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) for suspicion. The suspect boat leads CPB on a chase and the suspect boat collides with our boat and then hits a boat full of intoxicated shermen. When they have the second collision, a person is thrown overboard as are several containers lled with drugs. The Coast Guard Auxiliary arrives and pulls the person from the water after making sure no one is hurt on our boat or the shing boat. Panama City Fire and Rescue come on scene when we have an explosion on our boat and a re begins. A person is badly burned on our boat and needs medical attention. A Coast Guard boat comes to assist transporting the burn victim onto their boat where a rescue swimmer is deployed from a helicopter and the victim is airlifted for medical care. All the while, the BCP has apprehended the criminals and arrested them as well as retrieved the packages thrown overboard, the Auxiliary has saved the sinking drunken shermens boat and Panama City Police have maintained security of the scene. This was the effort of months of planning to coordinate participation from the active duty Coast Guard from Station Panama City and Air Station Mobile, Auxiliary otillas from across the Division, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, Panama City Fire and Rescue and Panama City Police marine divisions. All totaled, we had 12 boats in the water and the helicopter. Flotilla 12 has a very strong representation with nine members attending the JAREX: Bob Asztalos, Raye Crews, Mike Harrison, Phil and Norma Hill, Rob Purvis, Carolyn and Duane Treadon, and Bill Wannall. Saturday at the conference was lled with training and some time for rest and relaxation. Several members from Flotilla 12 were able to stay and participate in courses. Joining the conference were Tim Ashley, Alex Gulde and Rich Rasmussen. The team split between learning about verifying aids to navigation and responding to pollution incidents. Sunday morning concluded the conference with the fall business meeting. We were lucky to have join us past Commodore Bill Crouch, Immediate Past Division Commander and Commodore East elect Jeff Brooks, Sector Mobile Capt. Rose, from DIRAUX Commander Russell Hellstern, Commodore East Larry King; BM1 Timothy Myers from Station Panama City and CWO James Todd from DIRAUX. Although the meetings last a few hours, it is a great opportunity to hear about what all the Flotillas are doing and get updates from our supporting gold side. It was mentioned more than one time that our division is one of the leading divisions in the district. What an honor for all of us involved! After such an exciting and adventure lled weekend, it was still good to get back home. A special thanks to Norma Hill for sharing her photographs. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident, but after this weekend, we are better prepared to respond to those accidents! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA swimmer is rescued as part of the Joint Action Rescue Exercise last weekend in Panama City. When diving, we used to breathe a mixed gas called Air. Air was cheap, plentiful and easy to compress into cylinders that we would strap on our backs, and carry beneath the waves. This mixture has the same ingredients as what we breathe on land but underwater everything changes. Pressure increases rapidly underwater altering the Air mixture into a less useful medium. Physics explains that each of the two dominant components of Air (Nitrogen and Oxygen), radically increase, the deeper we go underwater. Nitrogen becomes complicated, causing narcosis below 100 feet, and accumulates in tissues over time to increase the risk of decompression sickness if not closely monitored. Even the prince of gases, Oxygen, can become toxic at depth. Dr. Morgan Wells, diving of cer for the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, said Air was not the ideal breathing gas for divers. In the 1950s, Andre Galern of the International Underwater Contractors, began altering Air by adding oxygen and feeding it to his commercial divers. This proprietary gas gave his company twice the bottom times over his competitors. His divers were more productive post-dive, so he began to make more money with fewer injuries. During the 1970s, Dr. Wells studied this gas and adopted it for scienti c divers, publishing tables for Nitrox in 1979. By 1984, Dick Rutkowski, Wells assistant, formed the International Association of Nitrox Divers. Soon thereafter I was invited to survey the sh population on the Tenneco Template off Fort Lauderdale. We began the project breathing Air as it was our only protocol. The work was exhaustive, leaving us so fatigued that we could barely nd our bunks to sleep between a round-the-clock diving schedule. Mid-project we were invited to try a mystery gas. After the rst dive, I recall the lights becoming brighter, the energy return and the survey come alive! We were supercharged. Making Nitrox cant be that hard, but it is. The most hazardous aspect of Nitrox is blending the gas. We usually start with Air and either take the offensive nitrogen out or dilute Air by adding 100 percent oxygen to it. Either way we get a variety of blends -the most popular being 32 percent. Pure oxygen is hazardous because it encourages re. Provide a spark, a combustible material and your blending station is ablaze! Many homes were burned down before the diving community convinced folks to leave the blending to professionals. We began to blend by cascading pure oxygen into an oxygen cleaned cylinder and adding Air to the working pressure of the cylinder. The math is simple. But the labor to clean the cylinders and mix the gas is costly. So we graduated to small and later large storage cylinders. As Nitrox become more popular, we expanded and began blending the oxygen through an oxygen service compressor. And as demand continued, we nally graduated two weeks ago to using liquid oxygen (LOX). Over the past two weeks we converted 180 cubic feet (cf) of liquid oxygen into 5,000-cf of gaseous oxygen; and we compressor-blended 50,000-cf of 32 percent Nitrox now stored in banks at the Wakulla Diving Center. That is more Nitrox than we made for an entire year a decade ago. I think our fellow divers have discovered a better way to dive! With Nitrox, at two cents more per cf, Air is no longer the preferred breathing gas. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.8 ft. 2:45 AM 3.8 ft. 3:09 AM 3.8 ft. 3:35 AM 3.8 ft. 4:04 AM 3.7 ft. 4:37 AM 3.6 ft. 5:18 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:31 AM 0.1 ft. 10:02 AM 0.2 ft. 10:34 AM 0.3 ft. 11:10 AM 0.4 ft. 11:53 AM 0.5 ft. 12:47 PM 1.9 ft. 12:43 AM Low 3.6 ft. 3:55 PM 3.6 ft. 4:29 PM 3.4 ft. 5:07 PM 3.3 ft. 5:50 PM 3.1 ft. 6:41 PM 3.0 ft. 7:47 PM 3.4 ft. 6:11 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:23 PM 1.4 ft. 9:52 PM 1.5 ft. 10:25 PM 1.6 ft. 11:01 PM 1.8 ft. 11:45 PM 0.6 ft. 1:57 PM Low 2.9 ft. 9:04 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.9 ft. 2:42 AM 3.9 ft. 3:06 AM 3.9 ft. 3:32 AM 3.8 ft. 4:01 AM 3.8 ft. 4:34 AM 3.6 ft. 5:15 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:28 AM 0.1 ft. 9:59 AM 0.2 ft. 10:31 AM 0.3 ft. 11:07 AM 0.4 ft. 11:50 AM 0.5 ft. 12:44 PM 2.1 ft. 12:40 AM Low 3.7 ft. 3:52 PM 3.6 ft. 4:26 PM 3.5 ft. 5:04 PM 3.4 ft. 5:47 PM 3.2 ft. 6:38 PM 3.0 ft. 7:44 PM 3.4 ft. 6:08 AM High 1.4 ft. 9:20 PM 1.5 ft. 9:49 PM 1.6 ft. 10:22 PM 1.7 ft. 10:58 PM 1.9 ft. 11:42 PM 0.7 ft. 1:54 PM Low 3.0 ft. 9:01 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.5 ft. 3:21 AM 3.6 ft. 3:45 AM 3.5 ft. 4:11 AM 3.5 ft. 4:40 AM High 0.1 ft. 10:35 AM 0.1 ft. 11:06 AM 0.2 ft. 11:38 AM 0.2 ft. 12:14 PM 1.5 ft. 12:05 AM 1.6 ft. 12:49 AM 1.8 ft. 1:47 AM Low 3.4 ft. 4:31 PM 3.3 ft. 5:05 PM 3.2 ft. 5:43 PM 3.1 ft. 6:26 PM 3.4 ft. 5:13 AM 3.3 ft. 5:54 AM 3.1 ft. 6:47 AM High 1.2 ft. 10:27 PM 1.2 ft. 10:56 PM 1.3 ft. 11:29 PM 0.3 ft. 12:57 PM 0.5 ft. 1:51 PM 0.6 ft. 3:01 PM Low 2.9 ft. 7:17 PM 2.8 ft. 8:23 PM 2.7 ft. 9:40 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 2.9 ft. 2:37 AM 2.9 ft. 3:01 AM 2.9 ft. 3:27 AM 2.8 ft. 3:56 AM 2.8 ft. 4:29 AM 2.7 ft. 5:10 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:42 AM 0.1 ft. 10:13 AM 0.1 ft. 10:45 AM 0.2 ft. 11:21 AM 0.3 ft. 12:04 PM 0.4 ft. 12:58 PM 1.4 ft. 12:54 AM Low 2.7 ft. 3:47 PM 2.7 ft. 4:21 PM 2.6 ft. 4:59 PM 2.5 ft. 5:42 PM 2.3 ft. 6:33 PM 2.2 ft. 7:39 PM 2.5 ft. 6:03 AM High 0.9 ft. 9:34 PM 1.0 ft. 10:03 PM 1.1 ft. 10:36 PM 1.2 ft. 11:12 PM 1.3 ft. 11:56 PM 0.5 ft. 2:08 PM Low 2.2 ft. 8:56 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.0 ft. 2:29 AM 3.0 ft. 2:53 AM 3.0 ft. 3:19 AM 2.9 ft. 3:48 AM 2.9 ft. 4:21 AM 2.8 ft. 5:02 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:10 AM 0.1 ft. 9:41 AM 0.2 ft. 10:13 AM 0.2 ft. 10:49 AM 0.4 ft. 11:32 AM 0.5 ft. 12:26 PM 1.9 ft. 12:22 AM Low 2.8 ft. 3:39 PM 2.8 ft. 4:13 PM 2.7 ft. 4:51 PM 2.6 ft. 5:34 PM 2.4 ft. 6:25 PM 2.3 ft. 7:31 PM 2.6 ft. 5:55 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:02 PM 1.3 ft. 9:31 PM 1.4 ft. 10:04 PM 1.6 ft. 10:40 PM 1.8 ft. 11:24 PM 0.6 ft. 1:36 PM Low 2.3 ft. 8:48 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.2 ft. 2:00 AM 3.2 ft. 2:24 AM 3.3 ft. 2:52 AM 3.3 ft. 3:25 AM 3.2 ft. 4:04 AM 3.1 ft. 4:50 AM 3.0 ft. 5:47 AM High 0.3 ft. 9:00 AM 0.3 ft. 9:29 AM 0.2 ft. 10:00 AM 0.3 ft. 10:37 AM 0.3 ft. 11:24 AM 0.4 ft. 12:25 PM 0.4 ft. 1:37 PM Low 2.8 ft. 4:45 PM 2.7 ft. 5:30 PM 2.7 ft. 6:19 PM 2.7 ft. 7:15 PM 2.6 ft. 8:17 PM 2.6 ft. 9:21 PM 2.7 ft. 10:15 PM High 1.8 ft. 8:28 PM 1.9 ft. 8:51 PM 1.9 ft. 9:20 PM 2.0 ft. 9:56 PM 2.0 ft. 10:44 PM 2.0 ft. 11:56 PM LowGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 13 Oct. 19First Nov. 2 Full Nov. 10 Last Oct. 19 New Oct. 26Major Times 2:07 AM 4:07 AM 2:29 PM 4:29 PM Minor Times 8:57 AM 9:57 AM 7:56 PM 8:56 PM Major Times 2:52 AM 4:52 AM 3:16 PM 5:16 PM Minor Times 9:51 AM 10:51 AM 8:35 PM 9:35 PM Major Times 3:40 AM 5:40 AM 4:04 PM 6:04 PM Minor Times 10:45 AM 11:45 AM 9:20 PM 10:20 PM Major Times 4:29 AM 6:29 AM 4:54 PM 6:54 PM Minor Times 11:38 AM 12:38 PM 10:08 PM 11:08 PM Major Times 5:19 AM 7:19 AM 5:45 PM 7:45 PM Minor Times 12:28 PM 1:28 PM 11:01 PM 12:01 AM Major Times 6:10 AM 8:10 AM 6:36 PM 8:36 PM Minor Times 1:16 PM 2:16 PM 11:57 PM 12:57 AM Major Times 7:01 AM 9:01 AM 7:27 PM 9:27 PM Minor Times --:---:-2:00 PM 3:00 PM Better++ Better Average Average Average Average Average7:37 am 7:08 pm 7:57 pm 8:58 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:38 am 7:07 pm 8:36 pm 9:52 am 7:38 am 7:06 pm 9:20 pm 10:46 am 7:39 am 7:05 pm 10:09 pm 11:38 am 7:40 am 7:04 pm 11:02 pm 12:28 pm 7:40 am 7:03 pm 11:58 pm 1:16 pm 7:41 am 7:02 pm --:-2:01 pm93% 87% 81% 75% 68% 62% 56% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance PARTNER www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Sept. 29, William Anderson of Panacea reported a burglary on his property. A generator, garage door parts and copper were stolen from the property and the fence was damaged. Damage to the property was estimated at $1,500 and the value of the stolen property is valued at $750. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: On Sept. 29, Donald Speigner of Century Link reported a grand theft in Panacea. The phone company reported the loss of copper and damage to the property fence, totaling $2,000. Lt. Danny Harrell investigated. On Sept. 29, Travis Barfield of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. Electronics, tools and a mower, valued at $2,150, were reported missing. Suspects have been identi ed. On Sept. 29, John Ward of Tallahassee reported a Crawfordville theft. A lawn mower, valued at $500, was stolen. On Sept. 29, Deputy Rachel Oliver responded to a ght between two women at a Crawfordville home. The women, Amanda Bollivar, 26, and Natalie Jean Foles, 32, both of Crawfordville, were charged with battery and criminal mischief for damaging the home. Both women suffered minor injuries. Damage to the home was estimated at $400. On Sept. 30, Mandy McCranie of Panacea reported a grand theft of her bulldog from her residence. The dog is valued at $500. On Oct. 2, a re was reported at Walgreens in Crawfordville. The Wakulla County Fire Department put out a blaze that originated at the rear of the building where cardboard is stored. The re was ruled an accident. On Oct. 2, David K. Kemp of Panacea reported an animal incident. The victim reported that two bulldogs killed his cat and acted aggressively toward him on his property. The dogs were shot and the animal owner retrieved the bodies. No charges were led. On Oct. 2, a concerned citizen from Crawfordville reported spotting a small child playing in the middle of Obediah Triplett Road. The child followed the concerned citizen to her home. Deputy Clint Beam located the childs mother searching for him. The juvenile walked a little less than a mile before being spotted. The mother was sleeping and did not realize the child was missing until more than an hour passed. The case was reported to the Department of Children and Families. On Oct. 2, a retail theft was reported at CVS in Crawfordville after two female suspects allegedly put more than 30 boxes of medications into a large purse. The women ran out of the store when they were confronted. The medications are valued at $1,000. On Oct. 2, Pamela Power of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief at the Bridle Wood Apartments. The common area of the clubhouse was flooded from the womens restroom. Drains were clogged and the sink was left running. Feces were smeared on the walls and mirrors of the mens and womens restroom. Water damaged the wooden floor which will have to be replaced at a cost of $4,260. On Oct. 1, Deputy Mike Zimba responded to a traf c accident on Old Plank Road. Carla Summer Chouinard, 17, of Crawfordville was driving a Toyota Corolla northbound when a deer ran in front of the vehicle. The driver turned the wheel to avoid the deer and crashed into the woods, causing the vehicle to overturn. Three passengers were in the vehicle, but none of the teenagers or driver was seriously injured. Vehicle damage was estimated at $10,000. On Oct. 1, Scott McKinney of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his property gate. Someone pushed on the gate snapping a chain and bending the metal. Damage was estimated at $150. On Oct. 2, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a vehicle crash on East Ivan Road west of Lonnie Raker Lane. A van was observed in a ditch at the tree line. The airbags were deployed and the windshield was cracked. Blood was observed on the airbags, but nobody was at the scene of the wreck. Capt. Randall Taylor found the alleged driver and a passenger walking on Whiddon Lake Road. Craig Randall Brown, 37, of Crawfordville was determined to be the driver. He was accompanied by Sandra Jean Brown, 38, of Crawfordville. Craig Brown suffered a head injury in the accident and was transported by Wakulla EMS to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for treatment. A follow-up DUI investigation will be conducted. On Sept. 30, Kevin Donaldson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft from his home. An air conditioning unit, 40 tin panels and a set of metal trailer tongs were reported missing. The stolen property is valued at $2,500 and a suspect has been identi ed. On Oct. 3, Robin Dias of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary at his home. A rearm, holster, magazines and ammunition, valued at $740, were reported missing. On Oct. 3, Teresa Locke of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Two deep freezers, a saw, tiller handle for a motor, aluminum siding, two space heaters and dishes, valued at $1,700, were reported missing from the vacant home. A suspect has been identi ed. On Oct. 3, Connie Zuchowski of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Two males were observed on the victims property attempting to steal a 50-foot piece of growing bamboo. The plant is valued at $35. This is the second case where someone has attempted to steal bamboo from the property. On Oct. 4, a retail theft was reported at Hibbett Sports after an employee reportedly observed a suspect conceal a ball cap, valued at $25, and leave without purchasing it. On Oct. 4, Rajvinder Serai of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Furniture, a washer and dryer and a computer, valued at $3,300, were reported missing. The house appeared to have been ransacked. Locks were stolen off storage units on the property, but it has not been determined if anything was taken from the units. On Oct. 5, James Thomas of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered his home and tore out the walls. A forced entry into the mobile home was observed. Electrical wires were stolen along with light switches. Pipes in the bathroom were also stolen. The value of the stolen items was $1,000 and damage to the residence was estimated at $1,500. On Oct. 5, Amanda Win eld of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim returned to her home to nd a front door window broken. Damage was estimated at $50. On Oct. 5, Mark Moses of Progress Energy reported an illegal dumping at a company substation in Crawfordville. Someone dumped garbage into the companys leased trash container. The company uses the bin for scrap wood. A television, computer, medical supplies and scrap metal were recovered. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 729 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputies providing law enforcement coverage at the Wakulla War Eagle football game Friday, Oct. 7 arrested an 18-year-old Tallahassee man at 8:45 p.m. after allegedly observing him attempting to enter parked vehicles, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Brandon Lee Durrance, 18, of Tallahassee was charged with two counts of burglary of a vehicle and one count each of grand theft and attempted theft. A concerned citizen contacted Lt. Dale Evans about a suspicious male walking around parked vehicles in the bus loading area. Lt. Evans was joined by Lt. Billy Jones and Reserve Deputy Jerry Finney as the of cers observed their suspect checking to see if vehicle doors were locked. After observing Durrance checking for open vehicles, officers apprehended their suspect and discovered that he had a car stereo tucked inside his pants. While officers investigated the first theft, a second victim shouted out to deputies from a short distance away that his vehicle had been broken into as well. A stereo inside the second vehicle had been tampered with but was left inside the truck. Durrance was taken to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. He remains in jail under at $8,000 bond.Arrest made for vehicle break-ins at game WCSOBrandon Lee Durrance The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce K-9 Unit located a 4-year-old child who was reported missing from an Obediah Triplett Road residence in Crawfordville Tuesday, Oct. 4, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and his K-9 partner Gunny tracked the child and Sgt. Mitchell observed a small child running in the distance. He asked the child to stop and asked the boy if he wanted to play with the dog. The child came closer to pet Gunny and Sgt. Mitchell loaded the child, who was not wearing any shoes, on his back while K-9 Gunny retraced his track out of the woods. The child was returned to his mother. Several days earlier, the same child was found by a concerned citizen walking down Obediah Triplett Road unattended. K-9 nds missing child Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 5, 20 11 at Hudson Park Games, Food and Family Fun Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this Grand Event will be donated to local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to be involved as a vital part of this celebration by entering your loved ones names on your car, truck, or float in the parade, or by contributing as a sponsor in honoring our brave troops and veterans. For more information please contact Keven Hollan Parade Coordinator at 850-745-8649 or 850-926-5186. Or you can email him at keven.hollan@gmail.com Honoring All Who Served Soldier Care Packages 5th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola bars, books, soap, razors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. WCS is collecting names of soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan who will receive the care packages Please contact Wakulla Christian School Boosters @ 850-591-8132 Drop off any items at one of the following suppo rtive businesses in Wakulla or Leon counties: bigbendhospice.org2889 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-9308Committed to Excellence Committed to Wakulla County! My name is Amy Geiger and I recommend Big Bend Hospice.I am proud to be a volunteer with Big Bend Hospice. I have witnessed the outstanding care that hospice delivers in our community. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netRunners, walkers, bicyclists and others who have missed using the entire 16mile Tallahassee-St. Marks Historic Railroad State Trail while a portion was closed for construction will be happy to know it is now open and they can expect a smoother ride. St. Marks City Commissioner Gail Gilman said it was nice to see the trail nished. Avid riders want to go as far as they can go, Gilman said. Gilman said she also hopes it will bring more people to St. Marks. The southside of the trail ends at Riverside Drive in St. Marks. The portion from Riverside Drive to Wakulla Station was completed last October. The project was done in two phases so the entire trail wouldnt have to be closed. Gilman was at the ribbon cutting ceremony held on Oct. 6 for the reopening of the portion of the trail from Tallahassee to the Wakulla Station trailhead. This portion has been closed since January. The trail was repaved and widened from 8 feet to 12 feet. The base was also stabilized. New restrooms and several pavilions were also added at the Wakulla Station trailhead, as well as comfort stations every 3 miles along the trail. Chief of the Office of Greenways and Trails Jim Wood said the main goal was to improve and update the trail. The biggest issue was the width, Wood said. It was the only state trail that was not at the standard 12-foot width. The trail is a multi-use trail, which means varying speeds. The pavement was also an issue, Wood said. The trail was the rst rail trail to be paved 20 years ago and required a fair amount of maintenance, Wood said. Repaving the road was the most cost effective solution, Wood said. Wood said his office heard a lot of concern that the canopy along the trail would be ruined, but they made it a priority to keep it the same. The total cost of the project was $3.7 million and was paid for by a 2006 legislative appropriation. The trail was actually completed two months ago, but Wood said they were trying to tie the reopening to Greenways and Trails Month. Plus there were a few loose ends that needed to be completed once the repaving was done, Wood said. There were several speakers at the ribbon cutting, including a representative of Capital City Cyclists, Hans van Tol. Florida Park Service Director Donald Forgione was the keynote speaker and said trails were about connecting people. Its not just asphalt running down the side of the road, its community, Forgione said. Along with the repaving and widening of the trail, the Of ce of Greenways and Trails has also committed to building a boardwalk in St. Marks. The boardwalk will be funded by the Florida Department of Transportation. The boardwalk has been discussed for three years and construction has yet to begin. The city constructed its portion of the boardwalk and is waiting for its connector. City Manager Zoe Mans- eld said the boardwalk is still happening, but they are unsure when construction will begin. The city was also told an observation tower would be built. However, Mans eld said she was told that is no longer being funded. The Tallahassee-St. Marks Railroad began operation in 1837 and was the rst in Florida. Operating for 147 years, it was also the longest operating rail system. During the Civil War, it was used to transport Confederate Troops. It was also used primarily to transport cotton from plantations to ships. The Florida Department of Transportation purchased the 16 miles of property and dedicated the trail in 1988. It was the rst rail trail to receive a federal land grant to pave the route. It is now maintained by the Florida Park Service. Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service JENNIFER JENSENThe ribbon-cutting ceremony marked completion of improvements on the rail trail.Rail trail work is completedThe St. Marks Rail Trail is now open again from St. Marks to TallahasseeOptimists host Fashion Show WILLIAM SNOWDENThe Coastal Optimists Club held its second annual Fashion Show on Thursday, Oct. 6 at the senior center. The models, above, are seen backstage wearing out ts from local clothing stores. Larry Massa, below, makes his way through the diners wearing a casual ensemble. The fundraiser also included an auction of items and dinner.More photos from the Optimists fashion show plus a video of auctioneer Joe Abal is online at thewakullanews.com MEET THE FREE* INSTANT ISSUE DEBIT CARDOR AS OTHER BANKS CALL IT, THE SORRY-BUT-WELL-HAVE-TO-CHARGE-YOU-FIVEBUCKS-A-MONTH-AND-YOULL-HAVE-TO-WAIT-THREEPAINFULLY-LONG-WEEKS-TO-GET-IT-EVEN-THOUGHYOU-COULD-REALLY-USE-IT-TODAY-DEBIT-CARD. If you lose your card, replacement fee applies. Unlike other banks, Centennial Bank doesnt charge a monthly fee for our debit card. Just stop by one of our convenient locations, and well give you a personal instant-issue debit card thats ready before you walk out the door. Get it today. Use it today. How convenient is that? At Centennial Bank, we make banking easy. Even when it comes to changing banks. Call or visit any branch for complete details. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 BE SUREYOUSTOCKUPON HUNTINGEQUIPMENT BEFORETHE SEASON STARTS 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 HUNTING SEASON!! Get Ready for Grouper Friday, Oct. 14 at 8pmAt POSH JAVA in Downtown Sopchoppy$15 Cover/RESERVED SEATING: (850) 962-1010Organics & Gifts Hit Songwriter The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill hit Floridas Gulf Coast residents hard. Legal Services of North Florida can help with your BP claim or other civil legal needs. FREE of charge. If you need help, were here. 855.299.1337 | www.lsnf.org

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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Green cleaning products that actually cleanEarthTalk, Page 3BWoodstork Festival Page 10B Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite #1 The Log Cabin TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011By LYNN ARTZCounty CommissionerOn Sunday, Oct. 16, community volunteers are needed for an ambitious wild ower planting project along Highway 98. The volunteers will help sow native wild owers seeds in the right-of-way along 98 between Crawfordville Highway and Spring Creek Highway. This is the perfect opportunity for a family or a community group to come out together to enjoy the fresh air and help to beautify Wakulla County. In addition to seed sowers, volunteers are needed to pull up weeds such as dog fennel and ragweed that compete with roadside wild owers. Still more volunteers are needed to collect trash and recyclables along the roadside. Volunteers are to report on Sunday between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m., preferably on-the-hour. Volunteers should come to the parking lot beside Wakulla High School to sign in and obtain instructions and supplies. Volunteers may start and stop whenever they wish. Volunteers are encouraged to register in advance by calling Volunteer Wakulla at (850) 745-0060 or by sending an email to lynn_artz@hotmail.com. Please provide your name and contact information, your expected start time, and the number of volunteers who will accompany you. Volunteers should bring rakes and gardening gloves if they have them (and a shovel if willing to weed). For comfort, each volunteer should bring drinking water, a hat and sunblock. The seeds to be planted were obtained through a $500 grant awarded to Wakulla County by the Florida Wild ower Foundation (with funding from sales of Floridas State Wild ower license plate), and generous donations from ESG, Just Fruits & Exotics Nursery, the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and County Commissioner Lynn Artz. All seeds were obtained from the Florida Wild ower Growers Cooperative and are Florida ecotype seeds. Most of the seeds to be planted are a mixture of 16 plants. The upland meadow mix includes spring bloomers such as Coreopsis basalis (dye ower or goldenmane tickseed), fall bloomers such as Liatris (blazing star or gay feather) and Solidago (golden rod), and native grasses such as Tridens avus (purple top), Eragrostis spectabilis (purple love grass) and Muhlenbergia capillaris (purple muhly grass). Seeds for red and yellow blooms will be added to the mix for more color. These color boosters include Gaillardia pulchella (blanket ower) and Coreopsis basalis (dye ower or goldenmane tickseed). Wild owers provide food for butter ies and other pollinators which, in turn, bene ts local agriculture. Just as fall colors attract tourists in northern climates, so do wild ower blooms attract tourists in warmer climates. This stretch of 98 is part of Wakulla Countys roadside wild ower preservation project with the Florida Department of Transportation. It is also a segment of the Big Bend Scenic Byway.Extension agents often share ideas with each other that can be utilized both on the job and personally. I remember an Escambia Family and Consumer Sciences agent telling me about a border in their office gardens that was made out of recycled wine bottles. Since I was in the midst of landscaping my backyard, I immediately put the word out to all of my friends that I would utilize any wine bottles they wanted to offer. Before long, I had enough to nish this project. I now have a border that is made out of all beautiful blue bottles of which I placed upside down at various heights to make an interesting back drop for a planted area. It provides such a colorful addition and cost me nothing. I know of another friend who plans to use colored recycled glass that will be carefully broken and used to enhance the stepping stones she is making to place in an outside area that has insuf cient light to grow plants. I was happy to see that the UF/IFAS Solutions for your Life website utilized materials developed by the St. Lucie County extension agents to post ways to repurpose household items for the garden. This allows you to creatively use an item instead of allowing it to be trashed, delivered to our land ll to remain for years. I would like to share a few of their ideas offered while inserting a few of my own. CDs. I love the idea of using scratched or discarded CDs as coasters for potted plants that may stain your deck or patio furniture. The holes provide the necessary drainage for plants while protecting the wood from discoloration. Carpet. If you lay carpet over an area you intend for a new garden bed and leave it for several weeks, all the grass underneath will decompose, making it easier to dig. Carpet can also be used as a pathway liner that you can top with stone or mulch. It is recommended that you use woven, not rubber-backed carpet. The Wakulla County Extension Of ce, in partnership with the Department of Transportation and Sustainable Big Bend, had the silt cloth used along highway construction to control water be delivered to the of ce so that people could stop by and take as much as they needed for similar situations. DOT was happy not to have another delivery to the land ll and residents were happy to get weed resistant covering for gardens and ower beds. Consider contacting DOT if you see something similar. It is a win-win situation for everyone. Continued on Page 3B By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Ideas for recycling in the gardenSought: Volunteers to help sow wild owers along Highway 98 WILDFLOWER EXPLOSION: Coreopsis basalis blooming last year at Bloxham Cutoff and Shadeville Road. 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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, October 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce,2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, October 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The cruiser quilts are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef OBradys in Crawfordville. Call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information. Saturday, October 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu. register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_faery@ yahoo.com. UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY, the R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. WAKULLA COUNTY PATRIOTS will meet from 9 a.m. to noon at the library. Their mission is to promote freedom and understanding of the Constitution and promote its restoration. SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. at the library. Sunday, October 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, October 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, October 18 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at Beef OBradys at 6 p.m. IRIS GARDEN CLUB will meet from noon to 4 p.m. at the library. FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY, Sarracenia Chapter, will meet from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the library. Barney Parker of St. Marks NWR will make the feature presentation on the migration of the monarch butter y. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at noon at the Historic Wakulla County Courthouse on High Drive in Crawfordville. Wednesday, October 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, October 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. RECYCLE TASK FORCE will meet from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the library. CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA will meet from 7 to 8 p.m. at the library. Pam Portwood, director of the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council, will be the guest speaker. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Special EventsThursday, October 13 GRAND OPENING of Sen. Bill Montfords district satellite of ce in Apalachicola will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 58 Market Street. The of ce was opened to serve the communities between Wakulla and Bay counties. Friday, October 14 FOOD PRESERVATION WORSKHOP will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge director, and Shelley Swenson, extension agent, will be covering the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating. There is a $5 registration fee. Enroll by calling the Extension Of ce, 926-3931. NASHVILLE COUNTRY SINGER/SONGWRITER Joe Doyle will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Trafton Harvey and Chelsea Dix Kessler will open the show. To reserve seats contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $15. Saturday, October 15 GARAGE SALE at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. FALL FESTIVAL will be held at Shadeville Elementary School from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be childrens booths, laser tag, bingo and Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers. There will also be hamburgers and hotdogs, a cake walk, soda walk, nachos and cheese booth and a sweet shop. BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA BOOK GIVEAWAY will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library from 9 a.m. to noon. There will be books, video and audio available. MULLET FISH FRY will be hosted by the Sopchoppy Lions Club from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Sopchoppy Hardware Building. Price per plate is a $10 donation. Call 962-3711 or 962-2201 for more information. BENEFIT YARD SALE, BAKE SALE AND FACE PAINTING for the Anthony Revell Scholarship Fund will be held at Hudson Park from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will also be an opportunity to purchase tickets for a raf e in November. All proceeds will be donated to the scholarship fund. Donations can also be made directly to the TCC Foundations website in Anthony Revells name. Revell was killed in a motorcycle accident on June 29. TODD ALLEN SHOW: A Tribute to the Legends will be held at 7 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium in Sopchoppy. Call 962-3711 for ticket information. Sunday, October 16 REVELL FAMILY REUNION, descendants of Alexander Revell, Celia Strickland Revell and Laura Clemons Revell, will be held in the Sopchoppy City Park from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bring a covered dish if you plan to attend. For more information, call 766-4779. WILDFLOWER PLANTING PROJECT will be held along Coastal Highway (98) from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help sow native wild owers seeds in the right-of-way along 98 between Crawfordville Highway (319) and Spring Creek Highway. Volunteers should come to the parking lot beside Wakulla High School to sign in. Register by calling Volunteer Wakulla at (850) 745-0060 or by sending an email to lynn_artz@hotmail.com. Monday, October 17 BROWN BAG LUNCH SERIES on Managing through Coaching and Mentoring will be held at the Wakulla County Chamber Of ce from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. FSU Jim Moran Institute will be holding this class. RSVP the Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Classes are free to chamber members, nonmembers will be charged a fee. Tuesday, October 18 COMMUNITY MEETING will be held at the Summertrace Apartments Community Room at 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend and voice their opinion regarding water bill minimum and increases. Thursday, October 20 CHAMBER BUSINESS MIXER will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at Two Blondes Liquors and Gifts in Panacea, 82 Coastal Highway 98. There will be a beer tasting and appetizers. For reservations, call 926-1848. Friday, October 21 CREATURE FEATURE will be held at the Wakulla Springs State Park from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Entrance is free. The Creature from the Black Lagoon, will be shown on the big screen TV in the lobby. The Creature is expected to make an appearance. NJROTC FISH FRY will be held from 4:30 to 7 p.m. before the Wakulla vs. Suwannee football game. Plates are $7 and include shrimp, cheese grits, cole slaw, hush puppies and tea, provided by Poseys Up the Creek. Proceeds allow the cadets to take trips, such as the one to Parris Island, Marine Corps Depot, in South Carolina. FORE THE BUILD GOLF TOURNAMENT will be presented by Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County at Wildwood Golf Course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. and the shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m. Cost is $50 per player or $200 per team. For more information, call 545-7425. Saturday, October 22 TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville. RSVP to Carrie Stevens at (850) 274-9474 or carriejstevens@comcast.net. Children need to bring their favorite train and a snack and drink. All spectrum children and their siblings are invited. Children must be accompanied by a parent. MONARCH BUTTERFLY FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. For more information, email saintmarks@fws.gov or call (850) 925-6121. ST. MARKS STONE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in downtown St. Marks. Portions of the pro ts will go to the St. Marks Waterfronts Florida Partnership and the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department. For more information, call 925-1053 or visit www.stmarksstonecrabfest.com. Wednesday, October 26 CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at Bouys Bayside Restaurant in Panacea from noon to 1:15 p.m. RSVP to the Chamber of ce 926-1848. Thursday, October 27 CANDLELIGHT VIGIL will be held by the Narcotics Overdose and Prevention and Education Task Force at Hudson Park beginning with a reception at 6:30 p.m. followed by the vigil at 6:45 p.m. For more information, call 926-0024. Food preservation workshop at 7 p.m. at the extension of ce. Mullet Fish Fry at Sopchoppy Hardware from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wild ower planting project along Coastal Highway from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Managing through Coaching and Mentoring class at 11:30 a.m. at the chamber.FridaySaturdaySundayMonday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.comTail Wagger...By JOAN HENDRIXCHAT PresidentAs the fall season arrives and Halloween silently moves in with the wind, CHAT-OBERFEST patiently waits at the Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment for a day of fun and fright. Excitement is in the air and volunteers have been busy planning a party that is meant for all fun loving and dog loving Halloween trick or treaters. Put on your walking shoes, review your poker playing skills, round up your doxies, get those costumes out for yourself and your doggie, prepare to have your face painted, and wake up those taste buds. Join us for a fantastic day of events and delicious bratwurst right off the grill. The party begins at 9 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 29, at CHAT Adoption Center, 1 Oak Street, Crawfordville. The Poker Walk registration is from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., with winning hands of $300, $100 and $50. We are looking forward to the annual Pet Costume Contest; entry fee is $10 with categories of best costume and scariest costume. Prizes will be given for rst, second and third place and finally a king or queen will be crowned. Towards the end of the day, get ready for the nale event that everyone anxiously waits for, the weiner races. The pre registration is $15, on the day of the race $20. Age groups are: puppy up to 1 year, 2 to 5 years, and 6 years and older. If youve never seen those short little feet running to their family member or those little ears ying in the wind, youll never forget how wonderful this event is. We dare you to come! Well be waiting for you! City and County MeetingsThursday, October 13 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites, 3292 Coastal Highway 98. The purpose of this meeting is to conduct strategic planning and general business of the Council. Friday, October 14 WAKULLA COUNTY VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD will hold public hearings regarding petitions that have been led with the VAB. Hearings start at 1 p.m. and are held in the commission chambers. The meetings are open to the public. Monday, October 17 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, October 20 WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the county commission conference room.

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Dear EarthTalk: I want to use cleaning products that are healthier for the environment, but I worry that baking soda and the like wont really get my tub and toilet germ-free. Should I continue using bleach products in the bathroom? Margaret Pierce Columbia, Mo. When it comes to household cleaning products, most mainstream brands make use of chlorine bleach, ammonia or any number of other chemicals that can wreak havoc on the environment and human health. Ammonia is a volatile organic compound that can irritate the respiratory system and mucous membranes if inhaled, and can cause chemical burns if spilled on the skin. Bleach contains sodium hypochlorite, which can cause eczema and other skin ailments as well as breathing difficulties if inhaled. And when it reacts with other elements in the environment, toxic organochlorines can form, damaging the ozone layer and causing health issues such as immune suppression, reproductive difficulties and even cancer. Fortunately, growing public concern about the health effects of toxic exposure have led to an explosion of environmentally friendlier and non-toxic products, says the health information website. WebMD. There are many products in this category from laundry detergents and fabric softeners to multi-surface and oor cleaners, to tile and bathroom cleaners that aresafer for people and the planet. WebMD warns that while many are indeed safer, others are greenwashed, meaning they are marketed as natural while still including suspect chemicals. How does one know? Get in the simple practice of looking at product labels to see if the cleaning manufacturer is clearly disclosing all ingredients, reports WebMD. If it is notit could mean the manufacturer is trying to hide a particular suspect ingredient. Also, just because a product has an eco-certi cation printed on its label doesnt necessarily mean it should be trusted. To make sure, check the EcoLabels section of Consumer Reports Greener Choices website, which gives the low-down on what labels really mean and whether they are backed up by government regulations. Another good resource is the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Household Products Database, which provides ingredient lists for thousands of products on U.S. store shelves. If you want to play it safe and natural when cleaning your home, WebMD suggests using white distilled vinegar it kills mold and mildew, eliminates soap scum and sanitizes, all in one fell swoop to clean windows, tile, cutting boards and countertops. Another effective yet gentle natural cleaner for countertops and bathtubs is baking soda, especially when mixed with a few drops of mild soap. Borax can be called in for tougher stains. If youre interested in cleaning greener, there are many sources of natural cleaning recipes online. Or check out the cleaning products aisle at your local natural food store, where you will nd a wide range of cleaning formulations from the likes of Seventh Generation, Ecover, Green Works and Earth Friendly Products (which sells a Safeguard Your Home retail pack that includes one each of a window cleaner, an all-purpose cleaner, a dishwashing liquid, an automatic dishwasher gel, a laundry detergent and a fabric refresher), among many others. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 3B 1981 1981 Wakulla High School Wakulla High School Calling All Football Players, Cheerleaders, and Band Members to Attend Wakulla High SchoolTORECEIVEHALF-TIME RECOGNITIONGame time 7:30Friday,October 28at the Wakulla High School StadiumFor more information contact WHS Athletic Director Mike Smith850-926-7125 Come Join the Fun at Shadeville Elementarys Annual Fall Festival! TICKETS at TREATSCome see some 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95How do I get green cleaning products that really clean?Continued from Page 1B Styrofoam peanuts. Although we are nding more and more packing companies asking for the return of Styrofoam peanuts so they can be reused, the peanuts can also be used in the bottom of potted plants. It is recommended that you first insert a dryer sheet and then a layer of peanuts. Add your potting soil and plants. This helps reduce the weight of a big planter. Larger foam pieces can be broken or cut and used as space fillers in larger pots or as bases for raised garden beds. Plastic bottles and containers. Cut the bottom off gallon jugs and place them over seedlings and young plants to protect them for the cold. Take them off during the day to keep the plants from overheating. Turn them into funnels or scoops needed when gardening. Make a bird feeder by making cutouts with cross dowels for perches on the side of the bottle. Keep the lid on to keep the seed dry. Rainwater. It is so simple to collect and use rainwater. With planning, rainwater can be collected and used for watering plants. Whether it is through bucket collection or a rain barrel, this is a resource that should never be overlooked. The idea is to put collection barrels or buckets under downspouts. I dont have that option due to the design of my home but you would be surprised at how much I can collect even without the downspout location for my rain barrel. It is necessary that after you collect the water, in any fashion, you put a screen over the water to keep mosquitoes for being attracted. Screen is a lot more user friendly than it has been in the past; the materials used are more exible and less harsh with which to work. Stretched elastic is a perfect way to keep the screen in place. Miscellaneous ideas: A dryer sheet in the bottom of a ower pot keeps the soil from coming out of the drainage holes. Very few women wear hose any more, but if you can nd some discarded hose, cut in desired lengths make excellent ties for vines and tomatoes. Discarded mini-blinds, cut it 6-8 inch lengths make great identi cation tags for plants. Look around and see other items that can be utilized through garden re-purposing. Perhaps you have old dishes that can be converted to planters, utensils used as plant markers or wind chimes, tree branches and trunk as sculptures, bed sets turned into benches, and headboards, sunk into the ground as trellises or furniture pieces planted with owers. If you have additional ideas, I would love to know them. County Extension Office staff are always trying to encourage the creative re-use of things to keep our environment cleaner and less waste nding its way to land lls. I would share your ideas with my colleagues across the panhandle. Recycling is a good way to bring out your creative side and build a uniquely beautiful garden area. Swenson: Ideas for recycling in the garden If youre interested in cleaning greener, there are many sources of natural cleaning recipes online. Or check out the cleaning products aisle at your local natural food store, where you will nd a wide range of cleaning formulations safe for your health and the environment. Pictured is Earth Friendly Products Safeguard Your Home retail pack.PHOTO BY EARTH FRIENDLY PRODUCTS

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH AND FITNESSWhat prevents people from jumping on the yoga bandwagon? According to a new survey conducted by Yoga Alliance, several misconceptions could be whats keeping non-yogis from trying their rst class. Below is an excerpt from the press release: The research sought feedback from people who have never stepped foot in a studio as well as those who have made yoga an essential part of their lives. It found that, despite growing buzz, there are many Americans who know little about yoga or, worse, have incorrect assumptions which inhibit them from participation. The three most common misperceptions are that yoga: Is religion-based. Fiftyseven percent of those who do not currently practice yoga believe that it requires mantras or chanting related to a form of worship. Requires exibility in order to practice. Nearly three in ve Americans 59 percent of respondents who do not practice yoga think that it requires a person to be in at least decent shape. In truth, however, anyone of any size, shape or physical state can bene t. Is not really exercise. Half of men who have never practiced yoga believe it isnt a workout. In contrast, 73 percent of people who do practice believe it is just as effective as running, swimming or weightlifting. That con rms my suspicions about why some people are simply not interested in yoga. I think its a shame that misinformation about the practice has led so many to shun something that so many have found bene cial. It makes me wonder, what are we, as a community, doing wrong? What can we do to help people understand more clearly what yoga is really all about? Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 3800140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Lets face it: Women are the superheroes of the planet. We are the negotiators, referees, breadwinners, daycare attendants, doctors, lawyers and therapists for our families. At the end of the day, we can make a meal out of almost anything in the fridge and call it a meal t for a king. Yep, that is a superhero in my book, more like a Wonder Woman. Naturally, where there is a superhero there is always a villain who wants to destroy us. That arch enemy is breast cancer. October is National Breast Cancer and Awareness Month. What super powers do we have to do battle our arch-rival? As we know, self-exams, annual physicals and mammograms, right? What about keeping our bodies strong to do battle if needed? Everyone knows that if you exercise and eat a healthy diet you will reduce body fat. Better than that is when you exercise you also reduce your chances of breast cancer. The American Cancer Society predicts that 288,000 American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and that the disease will take the lives of 39,520 American women this year. So what are you going to do to take your battle to the next level? Research proves that we can reduce these numbers if we exercise and stay active. In fact, several studies have proven that physical activity reduces the risk of breast cancer. Active women have roughly a 20 percent lower risk of getting breast cancer than their less active counterparts. So, Wonder Woman, with so many choices of how to stay active and healthy, you never have to give up on this battle. We have come a long way, baby, from Jane Fonda exercise tapes and jazzercise (nothing wrong with old school). This day and age we have a wide variety of physical tness programs to choose from: health and wellness CDs, internet classes on YouTube, webinars and articles on how to exercise. Step aerobics, kickboxing and spinning classes are popping up everywhere. Certi ed Personal Trainers are there to help you pump up. There are many races to enter such as Race for the Cure, Tuff Mudder and Disney Marathons. One of my favorites is Zumba Fitness, which uses dances such as salsa and merengue to build those leg muscles, keep the heart healthy and have fun at the same time. We have so many choices, it is like an exercise buffet. You, Wonder Woman, can choose your line of defense whether it is weightlifting, running or dancing. It is up to you to choose your hero power and train to keep yourself strong. The most important thing is that you GOTTA MOVE. In our beloved Wakulla County right now, we have several women battling their arch enemy and we need to make sure that they know they are not alone and that we support them in their battle with this evil doer. Please stay strong, Wonder Woman, so we can ght another day. To help you on your journey, heres a famous DC Comic Wonder Woman Series quote for you: Go in peace my daughter, and remember that in a world of ordinary mortals, you are a Wonder Woman. Please remember this is the month to donate. Go to www.nationalbreastcancer. org to nd out more about breast cancer events and donations opportunities.Pamela Chichester, CFT, is manager of Body-Tek 24 Hour Fitness.For information about the gym and classes call (850) 926-2348 or visit Body-Teks Facebook page. GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERWonder Women vs. breast cancerYoga misconceptionsThe American Arthritis Society has compiled in its publication Arthritis Info useful and practical tips for selfcare. Each tip is interesting and easy to follow. For a free sample issue of Arthritis Info, write to American Arthritis Society, P.O. Box 271010, Minneapolis MN 55427. Please include a loose 44 cent stamp for return postage. Special to The NewsCooler temperatures and the fall months mean one thing u season is here. On average, between 5 to 20 percent of Americans contract influenza every year, with thousands dying from the disease annually. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida encourages all Floridians to ght the u bug and follow these easy tips to make it through u season without a single cough. The rst item on anyones u prevention checklist is to get your u shot. The Center for Disease Control recommends that everyone over the age of six months receive the shot annually. Wash your hands often with soap and water, or make sure to use an alcoholbased sanitizer. Make sure to always cover your mouth when coughing or sneezing. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth unnecessarily this is a catalyst for spreading germs. Dont share utensils, or personal items like drinking glasses and towels, with others. If you fall ill, take a sick day and stay home and consult a healthcare provider. Keep children home as well if they become sick. Try to avoid people who have the flu or are showing symptoms.Some tips on how to be u-free this fall Arthritis Info available

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 5B Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Business Planning and Incorporations Title Insurance Probate and Heir Land Resolution General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926 or 510 T IRED ?RUNDOWN? FEELING Florida Certied ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction Wildwood Country Club October 28, 20 1 1 COOLING HEATING ANDBy JIM SAUNDERS THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 7, This wasnt the way it was supposed to work. State lawmakers were supposed to bite the bullet and make cuts in the 201112 budget and take a deep breath things would all get better. But as budget committees met this week, gloom set in again. Medicaid costs are rising, schools need to nd money, tax revenues are lagging. You get the picture. Gambling-industry lobbyists, however, had a better week. Lawmakers are talking about the possibility of allowing resort casinos in Florida, and an appeals-court ruling fueled visions of ringing slot machines outside Miami-Dade and Broward counties. Also enjoying an uptick was Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who visited one of Tallahassees all-you-can eat buffets as he tries to sop up Southern votes. HERE WE GO AGAIN Maybe Sen. Steve Oelrich, R-Gainesville, summed it up best Thursday as lawmakers waded into another round of health and human services budget problems. The worst years seem to keep on coming, and weve got limited resources and lots of services we have piled up over the years, Oelrich said. The numbers will start to become clear Tuesday, when economists meet to revise the states general revenue estimates. But of- cials this week indicated the 2012-13 budget shortfall could hit $2 billion. Republican leaders said they wont raise taxes to deal with the problems. That will leave them looking for ways to chop programs that have already been pared during the past few years. The biggest targets are always education and health and human services because they absorb the largest amounts of general revenue. The states continuing economic problems also have hurt property values, which are another key piece of funding public schools. Senate Health and Human Services Appropriations Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, said projected Medicaid costs are expected to grow nearly $1 billion next year because of such factors as larger caseloads. Negron and his House counterpart, Naples Republican Matt Hudson, warned that they will have to make cuts to balance the budget. Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, likened the situation to playing lifeboat deciding which programs and services get saved and which get tossed overboard to try to survive on their own. CHA-CHING Balancing the budget and drawing new political districts are the must-dos of the 2012 legislative session. But for the pure sport of it, the upcoming battles about gambling might be the most entertaining to watch. Rep. Erik Fresen, R-Miami, and Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, were working on legislation this week that would allow three resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and set up a regulatory gaming commission. Meanwhile, the 1st District Court of Appeal ruled in a Hialeah Park case that a 2004 constitutional amendment did not prevent lawmakers from allowing slot machines across the state. The combination of those issues could lead to a flurry of lobbying and deal-making, as gambling interests try to expand or tap into the huge Florida market. Fresen said the resort-casino bill could be a vehicle for other gambling proposals. He said he also will try to limit the resort casino portion to South Florida. This bill is going to have every single belt and suspender on it to make sure it is limited only to Miami-Dade and Broward, he said. We have every attorney imaginable looking at it to make sure it is not some Trojan horse for any county to be able to do it. A major expansion of gambling, however, is anything but guaranteed. The House in the past has blocked ideas such as allowing video lottery terminals which are similar to slot machines in pari-mutuel facilities. An expansion also likely will face opposition from religious conservatives and other anti-gambling forces. In a recent editorial about the possibility of resort casinos, James A. Smith Sr., executive editor of the Florida Baptist Witness newspaper, described casino gambling as a cancer on our society. It is truly evil in every sense of the word that the state would rely upon making its own citizens losers in order to seek economic development to benefit others, and even worse to make its citizens losers to pay the states bills, Smith wrote in the editorial posted on the newspapers website. The supposedly conservative, pro-family elected leadership in Tallahassee need to be statesmen and stateswomen and reject yet the latest permutation of gambling expansion in our state. DOES MITT EAT GRITS? Trying to top Georgian Herman Cain and Texan Rick Perry in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney on Wednesday blew through the Seminole Wind restaurant in Tallahassee. Load up on some fried chicken at the Seminole Wind, and you are a long way from the Back Bay in Boston. But with Florida moving up its primary to Jan. 31, Romney and the others will probably spend a lot of time in the states dining rooms during the next few months. On the same day Romney visited Tallahassee, for instance, Cain signed copies of his book in The Villages, a sprawling Central Florida retirement community that is a magnet for Republican politicians. Romney also met privately with Gov. Rick Scott at the Capitol, though there was no word about which candidate Scott will support in the primary. Scott, however, did make clear this week that he plans to run for re-election in 2014. While he has been plagued by poor approval ratings, Scott said, I like this job. Im going to do my best to keep the cost of living as low as I can in the state and make sure people get an education and can get a job. So, I plan on running for re-election, Scott said. FASANO FIRES THEM UP Senate presidents dont usually rebuke senators in public especially committee chairmen from the same party. But President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, went after Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New Port Richey, this week after a judge tossed out a plan to privatize prisons in South Florida. Fasano criticized the privatization plan, which he said was approved by inserting last minute proviso language into the budget, thus circumventing the committee process. A Leon County judge in late September agreed that the plan should have been approved in a regular bill instead of in the budgets ne print. But Haridopolos bristled at Fasanos description of it being inserted at the last minute and circumventing scrutiny. This was addressed early and often, and people all saw it coming, both in the House and the Senate, Haridopolos told reporters. STORY OF THE WEEK: Two South Florida lawmakers prepared a proposal that could lead to three resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties. Meanwhile, the 1st District Court of Appeal opened the door to slot machines in various parts of the state. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Were not that optimistic at all (about the budget), said Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island. Were all hopeful that the economy will turn around. But at this point, we dont see it.WEEKLY ROUNDUP: (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Betting the state budget on more cuts, and slots Special to The NewsState Rep. Leonard Bembry is proud to announce that Governor Rick Scott held a ceremonial bill signing for three of his sponsored bills from the 2011 session. House Bill 421 clari- es and preserves the exemptions farmers have historically had for bona de agricultural practices. It also allows them to use agriculture lands for agriculture purposes without unnecessary environmental resource permitting requirements when bona de agricultural practices are being carried out on our farms. House Bill 1037 allows Florida seniors the opportunity to contract for Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) services while still remaining in their home. Due to the slow economy, seniors are not able to sell their homes at a reasonable value to support their lifestyle in the future. Some seniors may want to live in their homes longer and this legislation will allow them to do so by providing supportive services. Continuing care at-home (CCAH) will allow seniors that reside outside the community future access to shelter, nursing care, or personal services at the CCRC until they sell their home or decide to move. House Bill 95 allows the parents of fallen military veterans, as well as surviving spouses and parents of fallen law enforcement of cers and re ghters, to join a select group of people eligible to receive lifetime free entry to Florida State Parks. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRep. Leonard Bembry with Gov. Rick Scott at a bill-signing ceremony. ree of Rep. Bembrys bills are signed 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Look for the next chapter of The Brass Bell in next weeks edition of The Wakulla news This page sponsored in part by: Find us on When we think about Hispanic culture we think of sombreros, tacos, hasta la vista baby, Miami, Machu Pichu, salsa, tango, Julio Iglesias, Jeniffer Lopez, Speedy Gonzales, three amigos, Sonia Sotomayor and illegal aliens. But Hispanics are more than all of this. I have learned it rst hand because my mother is Hispanic; she was born in Puerto Rico and came to the U.S. in 1992 to go to graduate school. Hispanics have many things in common, for example most of them speak Spanish and/or have been influenced by the Spanish culture in combination with the Indian and/or the African culture. My greatgrandmother looks very Indian but her relatives came from Spain to Puerto Rico in the 19th Century. Her husband looked like a mix of African and Chinese. My uncle (my mothers brother) is much darker than my mother. The Hispanic experience is diverse in other ways too. For example, Puerto Ricans, unlike people from Mexico, are U.S. citizens whether they are born here or in Puerto Rico even though, Mexicans were here rst. Puerto Rico was invaded by U.S. in 1898 and became a commonwealth of the U.S. in 1952. The relationship between the two countries has been of giving-and-taking even before 1898. My great-grandparents ancestors lost their land to the Spanish landowners and U.S. corporations. They worked as cane cutters and farmed the land to support their families and the local and U.S. economies. One of my great-grandfathers, who became a merchant, got some land back thanks to Luis Munoz Marins land reform. Munoz Marin was the rst elected governor of Puerto Rico. The U.S. government suspected him of communism for making this reform. The commonwealth status happened under him. My greatgrandparents supported Munoz Marin and the new status because they thought, even if temporarily, it could stop poverty in the island without destroying Puerto Rican culture. My great-grandparents and grandparents worked hard doing different jobs to support their families. My grandfather did maintenance work, carpentry and farming and my grandmother was a secretary for more than thirty years. They are both now retired, but are still active in their community. Some of their relatives moved to the U.S. searching for job opportunities and a better life. Their migration, like the migration of many Puerto Ricans in the s and s, was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Labor. Other Puerto Ricans have continued to migrate to the U.S. for different reasons. The new census tells us that more Puerto Ricans (including people of Puerto Rican descent) live in the U.S. than on the island. The Puerto Rican experience in Puerto Rico and in the U.S. today is not the same as my great-grandparents. It continues to change and to change in some good ways and some bad ways. Fewer Puerto Ricans work the land and more do industrial and professional work. Some have a better education and more money than others. Some speak Spanish and some dont. Some Puerto Ricans are Catholics or Protestants while some practice other religions. Families live more separated now than when my mother was growing up (She grew up on a mountain surrounded by her extended family). Some Puerto Ricans travel back and forth to the island and others do not. Some prefer to live in New York and others like Florida better. However, what I like the most from what I have learned and experienced is: Puerto Ricans work hard, love nature and their families, are very hospitable and enjoy sharing delicious food, dancing and good conversation. We Puerto Ricans also love music. One of the things I look forward to during this coming Christmas in Puerto Rico is parrandas caroling the whole night with family and friends. By Adriana Fortier, 9 years old, with help from Samiri Hernandez Hiraldo, mother Crawfordville 9-year-old Adriana Fortier gathering owers in her familys garden. What type of reptile am I?chameleonNorth Florida Hispanic Festival 2011 October 15 & 16 at St. Louis ChurchCorner of Fred George and Old Bainbridge Rd., TallahasseeFREE AdmissionEthnic Foods, Arts & Crafts, Hispanic Folklore, Live Entertainment and More

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 926-7102 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting pressure washing sheetrock wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RVs2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 CARPET CLEANING of Wakulla Residential and Commercial WATER EXTRACTION 24/7 EMERGENCY850-567-6734CAMO New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Crawfordville CarpetCleanersaffordable carpet care free estimates850-459-0106 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building. Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved850-356-6801Affordable for every budget! ...Refresh Home Detailingfor a new home feel...Call for a free and friendly estimateLICENSED HAYHORSE QUALITYLOWEST PRICES IN TOWN!!!850-528-0770delivery available Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!!5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGEGreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUYSELLTRADEREPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @comcast.net Denises ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Money Making Opportunity. Computer a must. Free evaluation & Training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www.freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939. 110 Help Wanted Certified Prescribed Burner Prescribed burner needed. Full-time or part-time employment. Must have burn experience, including 130-190 certifications, heavy equipment operation, and clean driving record. Salary negotiable. Contact Bobbie Dugger with B&B Du gg er Inc. 850-566-0831. P/Tw/potentialforF/Taccordingtocompanysgrowth.Light officemanagement.LightBookkeeping.Computerknowledgea must.Flexiblehours.Pleasemail resume:P.O.Box648,Panacea, FL 32346. EMPLOYMENTOPPORTUNITIES AnimalControlOfficer Vacancy DepartmentofPublicSafetyTheWakullaCountyBoardofCounty Commissionersisseekingqualified applicantsforafull-timeAnimal ControlOfficerwithintheDepartment of Public Safety. Qualifiedapplicantsmustpossessa HighSchoolDiplomaorGEDandtwo yearsofexperienceinanimalwelfareorcontrolenvironment,public health,lawenforcementorarelated fieldsuchashumanesociety,veterinaryoffice,orkennel.Mustbeable toliftanimalsandequipmentinexcessof75pounds.Mustbeableto use a two-way radio. MustcurrentlyholdavalidFlorida AnimalControlOfficerCertification,includingChemicalCapture andEuthanasiatraining.Applicantsmaybepermittedtoobtain thecertificationslistedabove within 6 months of employment. Experienceinvolvingintensivepublic contactisdesirable.Possessionof ortheabilitytoobtainavalidFlorida driverslicense.Applicantsmust passabackgroundinvestigation, driverslicensehistory,anddrug screening.Mustbeavailableto workweekends,earlyandlate shifts,periodicallybeon-call,and available on short notice. Startingsalaryis$10.01anhour.To apply,sendaWakullaCountyemploymentapplicationtoHumanResources,P.O.Box1263,Crawfordville,FL32326.Applicationsmaybe obtainedbyvisitingourwebsiteat www.mywakulla.comorcanbe pickedupattheCountyAdministratorsofficelocatedat3093CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL. Ifyouhavequestionsregarding qualificationsand/ordutiesandresponsibilities,youmaycontact DeborahDuBoseat850.926.9500. Veteranspreferencewillbegivento qualifiedapplicants.WakullaCounty isanAffirmativeAction/EqualOpportunityEmployer.Thisadvertisement willremainopenuntilpositionis filled. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. Nos. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. POLLY NICHOLSSpecial Touch CleaningConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential.pray like it s up to God, Work like it s up to you519-7238 926-3065Licensed &Insured 200 Items For Sale NeedStoneCrabcertificates?I have189forsale!Willnotdivide. Serious inquiries only. 926-3381. 220 Cars 2003FordEscapeXLT.62,000 miles. $9,000.00 Call 926-8167. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org 355 Yard Sales BarnSale!3-Families.Friday, October14andSaturday,October 15. From 8AM-until. 16 SummerwindCircle.Furniture,tires, antiques and baby items. Friday,10/14andSaturday 10/15,8AM-3PMatSopchoppy MiniStorage,SopchoppyHwy. Yearsofcollectibles,household items. Lots more!! GarageSale!Saturday,October 15,8AM-12NatTheFlowers Subdivision.69MarigoldDrive. No earl y birds p lease! HugeThree-familysale!Saturday-10/15,87MonocoupeCircle,OchlockoneeBayinTarpine (adjacenttoWakullaCountyAirport).8AM-3PMSharp!Furniture,kitchenware,smallappliances,tools,clothes,children books/toys,doors/windows, knick-knacks.Muchmore!No earl y birds p lease! MovingSale!!Friday,10/14;Saturday,10/15;Sunday,10/16 from8AM-until.22MapleDrive. Ever y thin g must g o!! October15,9AM-3PMat1002 WakullaSpringsRoad.Lookfor signs. Traveling treasures. 440 Personals and Notices Singlewhitemale62lookingfor female40to60.Nosmoking,no drinking.Ihaveanicehomein Panacea.Liveinfree (room-&-board).Lighthousekeepingandcompanionship. LetsMeet.Wes984-5733.No large women, please. 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.Familial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthe hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 515 Apartments for Rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99Application Fee $35 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Visit me on the web www.WakullaInfo.com Dawn Reed -Realtor GRICell (850) 294-3468 53 Hummingbird Lane$174,500This immaculate 3/2 home on 1/2 acre features beautiful oak hard-wood oors, eat-in kitchen plus a formal dining room, gas replace, huge screened-in porch with glass windows (perfect all year round), big master bedroom with walk-in closet, master bath suite with jetted tub and walk-in shower. Check out www.WakullaShortSales.com P.O. Box 833 Crawfordville, FL 32327 Office/Fax 850-926-5611 Mobile: 850-528-5603 elderjerrypayne@gmail.com Elder Jerry PayneMajor Appliance Repairs & ServicesCall Jerry Payne today!850-528-5603 $199INSTALLEDAny size room A/C (cooling & heating, window or wall) PTAC, Mini-Splits or portable A/C units Choose from Haier, LG, Amana, Trane, Carrier, Goodman, Mitsubishi, Friedrich, Klimaire, Frigidaire, Air Con 115 or 230 volts available.starting as low as We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!91 Posey Rd., Medart2BR/1BA, secluded cypress home w/ replace, 2 screened porches on 30 Acres. Perfect for nature lovers.$875 per month.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 80 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 2BR/2BA House/beachfront, dock $1,250 No Smoking or Pets 26 Manatee Lane 2BR/2BA House $1,500 Mo. (Vacation Rental also $100 night) No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $950 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Efciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 64 Blackfoot 1,300sf 3BR/2BA House with ofce & garage $850 Mo. No Smoking/Pets negotiable4BR/3BA Over 2,000sf House with 3 car garage $1,400 Mo. No SmokingAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 530 Comm. Property for Rent WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BAone-storyhomeon1.5 lotwithgarage.Excellentcondition.$95,000.Ownerfinancing. 850-251-7588 850-962-2016. 555 Houses for Rent 3BR/1BACH&A,closetoMedartElementaryandWakulla HighSchool.Referencesrequired.$700/mo.,plusdeposit. Please call 850-556-4464. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$795/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. House/Acreage Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $750/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCreek Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 2BR/2BASW/MH.WakullaGardensKlickitatRd.Niceinterio r andexterior,openfloorplan. $575/month, first, last. 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens, CAH, Good Floor Plan. $675/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease.Both availblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-554-5267, 850-524-4090. 3BR/1.5BA,CentralH/A,dishwasher,largeprivateyard, porches,storage,nosmoking. Referencesrequired.$575/mo., $300/security. 352-493-2232. 3BR/2BA,largeporch,backsto theNationalForest.Doublecarport.Sitson5beautifulacres withapond.$650/month.plus deposit. 850-984-0044. Nice4BR/2BADoublewideon oneacre.NearMedartElementarySchool.C/H/A,utilityroom, fireplace.Rent$850/month.Garbagepick-upincluded.Call 850-228-7197. 680 Legal Notices 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-00028 3 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,OROTHER CLAIMANTSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ORAGAINSTDEBRA HOUSSERA/K/ADEBRAJ.HOUSSER A/K/ADEBRAJEANEHOUSSER,DECEASED et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofMortgageForeclosure datedSeptember28,2011andenteredin CaseNo.65-2010-CA-000283oftheCircuit CourtoftheSECONDJudicialCircuitinand forWAKULLACounty,Floridawherein WELLSFARGOBANK,NAisthePlaintiff andTHEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,OROTHER CLAIMANTSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ORAGAINSTDEBRA HOUSSERA/K/ADEBRAJ.HOUSSER A/K/ADEBRAJEANEHOUSSER,DECEASED;ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIESCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER, ANDAGAINSTTHEHEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES MAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSE, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRNTEES,OR OTHERCLAIMANTS;SUMMERWIND ROADOWNERSMAINTENANCEASSOCIATION,INC.;TENANT#1N/K/AJOSEPHBRONCZEKaretheDefendants,The ClerkoftheCourtwillselltothehighestand bestbidderforcashattheLOBBYofthe WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSEat 11:00A.M.,onthe10thdayofNovember, 2011,thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT5BLOCKD,SUMMERWIND(UNRECORDED): COMMENCEATACONCRETEMONUMENTMARKINGTHESOUTHEASTCORNEROFSECTION32,TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH,RANGE1EAST,WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDAANDTHENCERUN NORTH01DEGREES24MINUTES50 SECONDSEASTALONGTHEEAST BOUNDARYOFSAIDSECTION32ADISTANCEOF2749.18FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT,THENCERUN NORTH89DEGREES48MINUTES00 SECONDSWEST666.79FEETTOAN IRONRODINTHECENTERLINEOFA60 FOOTROADWAYEASEMENT,THENCE RUNNORTH89DEGREES49MINUTES 49SECONDSWEST1339.53FEETTOAN IRONROD,THENCERUNSOUTH00DEGREES10MINUTES11SECONDSWEST ALONGTHECENTERLINEOFA60FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT974.82FEETTO THEPOINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAID POINTOFBEGINNINGCONTINUE SOUTH00DEGREES10MINUTES11 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDCENTERLINE324.94FEET,THENCERUNNORTH 89DEGREES49MINUTES49SECONDS WEST731.72FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNNORTH00 DEGREES10MINUTES11SECONDS EAST324.94FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNSOUTH89 DEGREES49MINUTES49SECONDS EAST731.72FEETTOTHEPOINTOF BEGINNING. TOGETHERWITH198952X27FLEETWOODMOBLLEHOME:TITLENUMBER 47769185AND47769185;IDNO. FLFLK32A11289GHAND FLFLK32B11289GH. a/k/a72BLUEBERRYLANE,CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on October 3rd, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sMICHELLE CHRISTENSEN AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-387CA DUANEEVANSLLC,aFloridaLimitedLiability Company, Plaintiff v. ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTE C. WALKER-LIPPLETT, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO:ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTEC.WALKER-LIPPLETT,ifalive, andifdead,herunknownspouse,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andall otherpartiesclaimingby,through,under,or againstthem;theunknownspouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,andjudgmentcreditors ofdeceaseddefendant,andallotherparties claimingby,through,under,oragainstdefendant;andallunknownnaturalpersonsif alive,andifdeadornotknowntobedead oralive,theirseveralandrespectiveunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditors,orotherparties claimingby,through,orunderthoseunknownnaturalpersons;andtheseveraland respectiveunknownassigns,successorsin interest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby,through,under,oragainstanycorporationorotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant;andallclaimants,personsorparties,naturalorcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusisunknown,claimingunderthe abovenamedordescribeddefendantor claimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterestin tlle property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet taxtitletothefollowingpropertyinWakulla County, Florida: ThatpartofLot2inPlatfiledforrecordrepresentingtheWestone-halfofLot36,in HartsfieldSurveythatliesNorthofState Road 61 LESSANDEXCEPTthatparcelonthe NorthwestcornerofsaidLot2,identifiedas Tax Folio Number 00-00-036-000-09673-000 ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: Commenceataplainconcretemonument markingthenorthwestcornerofLot36of theHartsfieldSurvey,WakullaCounty,Florida,andalsobeingthesouthwestcornerof ShadevilleSouth,aplattedsubdivisionof WakullaCounty,Florida,asrecordedinPlat Book3,Page19,ofthepublicrecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida;thencerunNorth 72degrees21minutes11secondsEast 262.78feetalongthesouthboundaryof saidsubdivisiontoanironrodandcap(LB &017)forthePOINTOFBEGINNING.From saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidsouthboundaryasfollows:North72 degrees21minutes11secondsEast37.30 feettoaconcretemonumentonsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees21minutes06secondsEast413.84feettoaconcretemonument(LB4923)onsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees20minutes40secondsEast124.78feettoaniron rodandcap(LB7017)onsaidsouthboundary;thenceleavingsaidsouthboundaryrun South17degrees31minutes23seconds East247.85feettoanironrodandcap(LB 7017)onthenortherlyrightofwayboundary ofStateRoadNo.61(ShadevilleRoad); thencealongsaidrightofwayboundaryrun South70degrees44minutes36seconds West476.17feettoa2inchdiameteriron pipe;thenceleavingsaidrightofway boundaryrunNorth17degrees31minutes 23secondsWest264.00feettothePOINT OF BEGINNING. Theabove-describedpropertyismoreparticularly described as: CommenceataconcretemonumentmarkingtheNorthwestcornerofLot36ofthe HartsfieldSurveyoflandsinWakulla County,Florida;thencerunalongtheWesterlyboundarylineofsaidLot36andalso theWesterlyboundarylineofLot2Peter GavinsEstateasrecordedinDeedBoo k 21Page75inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,FloridaSouth16degrees58 minutes11secondsEast271.25feettoa re-barmarkingtheintersectionofsaid WesterlyboundarylinewiththeNortherly monumentedrightofwaylineofCounty Road#61(alsoknownasShadevilleRoad); thenceleavingsaidWesterlyboundaryline runalongsaidNortherlymonumentedright ofwaylineasfollows:North70degrees52 minutes39secondsEast265.25feettoan ironpipemarkingtheSoutheastcornerof propertydescribedinOfficialRecordBoo k 162Page1inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida,saidpointalsomarkingtheSouthwestcornerofpropertyasdescribedinOfficialRecordsBook527Page 476inthePublicRecordsofWakulla County,Florida;thencecontinuealongsaid Northerlymonumenteclrightofwayline, alsobeingtheSoutherlyboundarylineof saidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476North70degrees46 minutes53secondsEast576.12feettoa rodandcapmarkingtheSoutheastcorner ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476,saidpointbeingthe POINTOFBEGINNING;thenceleaving saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline North70degrees47minutes29seconds East289.09feettoare-bar;thenceleaving saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline runNorth17degrees12minutes51secondsWest239.54feettoare-barlyingon theSoutherlyboundarylineofLot9of ShadevilleSouthSubdivisionasrecordedin PlatBook3Page19ofthePublicRecords ofWakullaCounty,Florida,alsobeingthe NortherlyboundarylineofHartsfieldSurvey Lot36;thencerunalongsaidSoutherly boundarylineofLot9ofShadevilleSouth SubdivisionandsaidNortherlyboundary lineofHartsfieldSurveyLot36South72degrees26minutes37secondsWest289.99 feettoarodandcapmarkingtheNortheast cornerofpropertydescribedinOfficialRecordBook527Page476inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida;thence leavingsaidSoutherlyandNortherlyboundarylinerunalongtheEasterlyboundaryline ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476South17degrees27 minutes46secondsEast247.87feettothe POINTOFBEGINNING,containing1.62 acres, more or less. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress isPostOfficeBox4128,Tallahassee,FlorisPostOfficeBox4128,Tallahassee,Flor ida,32315,onorbeforeOctober15,2011, andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkofthis courteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff's attorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON September 8th, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 October 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-102-CA DIVISION: CIRCUIT CIVIL JAMES BANKS, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS CUDIHY, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalJudgmententeredinCase No.2011-102-CAoftheCircuitCourtofthe SecondJudicialCircuitinandforWAKULLA County,Florida,wherein,JamesBanks, Plaintiff,andThomasCudihy,Defendant,I willselltothehighestbidderforcashat, 3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida32327,atthehourof11:00a.m.on the27thdayofOctober,2011,thefollowing described property: THEFOLLOWINGDESCRIBEDLAND SITUATE,LYINGANDBEINGINWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TO-WIT: Lot3,HuntersGlennPlantation,Phase2as permaporplatthereofrecordedinPlat Book3,Page81ofthePublicRecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida,beingtheRe-Plat ofLots2,3and28ofHuntersGlennPlantationaspermaporplatthereofrecordedin PlatBook3,Page40ofthePublicRecords of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel I.D. Number: 29-3S-01E-268-05506-H03 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Dated this 28th day of September, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance.PleasecontacttheClerkofthe Courtsdisabilitycoordinatoratleast7days beforeyourscheduledcourtappearance,or immediatelyuponreceivingthisnotification ifthetimebeforethescheduledappearance islessthan7days;ifyouarehearingor voice impaired, call 711. October 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-00026 8 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. WESLEY K. THOMAS et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofMortgageForeclosure datedSeptember28,2011andenteredin CaseNo.65-2010-CA-000268oftheCircuit CourtoftheSECONDJudicialCircuitinand forWAKULLACounty,Floridawherein WELLSFARGOBANK,NAisthePlaintiff andWESLEYK.THOMAS;MARYE. BRISBIN;aretheDefendants,TheClerkof theCourtwillselltothehighestandbest bidderforcashattheLOBBYOFTHEWAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSEat 11:00AM,onthe3rddayofNovember, 2011,thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment: THENORTHERLYONEHALFOFTRACT 58OFKIRKLANDESTATES,ASPERMAP ORPLATTHEREOFRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK2,PAGE2,OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDA; TOGETHERWITHAMOBILEHOMELOCATEDTHEREONASAFIXTUREAND APPURTENANCETHERETOBEARING VINNO.GAFLV39A08515VH21,TITLE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 24 31 40 43 50 57 62 66 69 2 32 51 3 33 52 4 25 28 46 63 18 21 41 58 5 15 34 47 67 70 6 29 44 59 7 35 64 8 22 30 48 60 9 26 42 53 19 36 49 10 16 27 45 65 68 71 11 23 37 54 61 12 38 55 13 39 56 ACROSS1.Navydiver 5.Barberchair attachment 10.Clevelandfive,for short 14.Therefore,to Descartes 15.Pamphleteerof 1776 16.Sandusky'slake 17.MINNIE 20. "__itorloseit" 21.Animalthat bugles 22.__Locks(Great Lakes passage) 23."Twospades," e.g. 24."Stormy"bird 26.Negotiations result, often 28.ManofOman 30.__carotene 31.Standlookoutfor, perhaps 34.FrenchRiviera city 36.Statuettethat's over90%tin 40.MIDDIE 43.Letteraftereta 44.Stand-up's arsenal 45.Anthropologist Margaret 46.Tippy-top 48.Kettofold funnies 50.__tank(disposal system) 53.Burgerhuckster __McDonald 57.ActressMeyers 58.SillyPuttyholder 60.Sportscaster McCarver 61.Anyof13popes 62.MAXIE 66.ActressMcClurg 67.Pastone'sprime 68.ActressHeche 69.Needabathbadly 70.Habits 71.UnwantedfloraDOWN1.Clinch,asa victory 2.Clearfromthe board 3.Shoelacetip 4. Kitand caboodle 5.Hammer'screator 6.To-dolistitem 7.__TinTin 8.Vendingmachine inserts 9.Mescalinesource 10.Corp.'stopdog 11.Caribbean getaway 12.Dropinon 13.Down-at-the-heel 18.Ruralroadsign picture 19.Jazzman"Jelly Roll"__ 25.Machinegun noise 27.Boxcamera inventor 29.Pigout 30.Hosieryhue 31.Hillbuilder 32.CrytoCratchit 33.Edenevictee 35.JohnnyReb's initials 37.CedarRapids campus 38.Attorneys'org. 39.Rouletteplay 41.Morefrilly 42.Stripper'sclosetful 47.Hanna-Barbera horse Quick Draw __ 49.Mausoleum 50.Cavalryman's sidearm 51.Chipawayat 52.Playfulsprite 54.Unescorted 55.Sierra__ 56.Likesome ballparks 59.Wordsinmany disco names 60.Camper'sshelter 63.Cartoonsqueal 64.Fallfromgrace 65.Wordwithblueor lemon American Prole Hometown Content 9/18/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 2009 HtCtt 12 345 563 718 6 97 8492 361 5 86 914 78536 00 9 HtCtt 192 3684 7 5 487592613 536741289 615 429837 874153962 329687541 253 876194 961234758 748915326 S E W U P A N T S A B E R E R A S E B A H E R O D E A G L E T E V E P I X I E L O T R A T A T A T E E K D E E R L A C I E R S P I L L A N E M C G R A W T A S K B I N G E G O G O R I N C S A S I N O N E S B E I G E T E N T P E Y O T E G S T R I N G S M O R T O N T O M B C E O E A S T M A N L A W A R U B A C O E A L O N E V I S I T A B A L E O N E S E E D Y R E D D O M E D Brought to you by High Speed Internet Complimentary Hot Breakfast Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com681 Foreclosure Proceedings NO. 73264110 A/K/A 163 KIRKLAND DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on September 29, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-00024 6 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. SAMANTHA KILBOURN et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofMortgageForeclosure datedSeptember28,2011andenteredin CaseNo.65-2010-CA-000246oftheCircuit CourtoftheSECONDJudicialCircuitinand forWAKULLACounty,Floridawherein WELLSFARGOBANK,NAisthePlaintiff andSAMANTHAKILBOURN;GEORGE KILBOURNA/K/AGEORGEC.KILBOURN; WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.;WOODLAND HERITAGEHOMEOWNERSASSOCIATION,INC.;aretheDefendants,TheCler k oftheCourtwillselltothehighestandbest bidderforcashattheLOBBYOFTHEWAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSEat 11:00AM,onthe3rddayofNovember, 2011,thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment: TRACT9,WOODLANDHERITAGE(UNRECORDED):COMMENCEATACONCRETEMONUMENTMARKINGTHE SOUTHWESTCORNEROFSECTION4, TOWNSHIP3SOUTH,RANGE1WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDA,AND THENCERUNSOUTH89DEGREES37 MINUTES02SECONDSEASTALONG THESOUTHBOUNDARYOFSAIDSECTION4,ADISTANCEOF475.62FEETTO THECENTERLINEOFA60.0FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENTFORTHEPOINT OFBEGINNING.FROMSAIDPOINTOF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES23MINUTES19SECONDSEAST ALONGSAIDCENTERLINE670.04FEET, THENCERUNSOUTH89DEGREES36 MINUTES41SECONDSEAST400.00 FEET,THENCERUNSOUTH00DEGREES23MINUTES19SECONDSWEST 670.00FEETTOTHESOUTHBOUNDARY OFSAIDSECTION4,THENCERUN NORTH89DEGREES37MINUTES02 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDSOUTH BOUNDARY400.00FEETTOTHEPOINT OFBEGINNING.SUBJECTTOAROADWAYEASEMENTOVERANDACROSS THE WESTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. A/K/A 119 WILDFLOWER LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on September 29, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000074CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. KIMBALLCARPENTER,ASTRUSTEEOF THETRUSTF/B/OSAMANTHACARPENTER,ESTABLISHEDUNDERTHELAST WILLANDTESTAMENTOFJOHNF. BRINKMAN,DECEASEDMAY14,2008; BANKOFAMERICA,N.A.;SHUGHARBOURHOMEOWNERSASSOCIATIONOF SHELLPOINT,INC.;CATHYGESKICK; ESTELLABRINKMANCARPENTER;UNKNOWNTENANT(S);INPOSSESSIONOF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderResettingForeclosureSaledatedthe 3rddayofOctober,2011,andetneredin CaseNO.65-2010-CA-000074CA,ofthe CircuitCourtofthe2NDJudicialCircuitin andforWakullaCounty,FLorida,wherein BANKOFAMERICA,N.A.isthePlaintiff andKIMBALLCARPENTER,ASTRUSTEE OFTHETRUSTF/B/OSAMANTHACARPENTER,ESTABLISHEDUNDERTHE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JOHN F. BRINKMAN,DECEASEDMAY14,2008; BANKOFAMERICA,N.A.;SHUGHARBOURHOMEOWNERSASSOCIATIONOF SHELLPOINT,INC.;CATHYGESICK;ESTELLABRINKMANCARPENTER;andUNKNOWNTENANT(S);INPOSSESSIONOF THESUBJECTPROPERTYaredefendants.TheClerkofthisCourtshallsellto thehighestandbestbidderforcashatthe LOBBYOFWAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE,3056CRAWFORDVILLEHIGHWAY,CRAWFORDVILLE,FL32326,11:00 AMonthe10thdayofNovember,2011,the followingdescribedpropertyassetforthin said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT3,OFSHUGHARBOR,ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLATTHEREOF RECORDEDINPLATBOOK2,PAGE37, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSONCLAIMINGANINTEREST INTHESURPLUSFROMTHESALE,IF ANY,OTHERTHANTHEPROPERTY OWNERASOFTHEDATEOFTHELIS PENDENSMUSTFILEACLAIMWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 3rd day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-00004 3 DIVISION: REGIONSBANKDBAREGIONSMORTGAGE, Plaintiff, vs. JEFF ELLIOTT et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofMortgageForeclosure datedSeptember28,2011andenteredin CaseNo.65-2011-CA-000043oftheCircuit CourtoftheSECONDJudicialCircuitinand forWAKULLACounty,FloridawhereinREGIONSBANKDBAREGIONSMORTGAGE isthePlaintiffandJEFFELLIOTT;DEBRA ELLIOTT;CAMELOTTOWNHOMEOWNERS'ASSOCIATION,INC.;TENANT#1 N/K/AMICHELLEYATES,andTENANT#2 N/K/AROGERYATESaretheDefendants, TheClerkoftheCourtwillselltothehighest andbestbidderforcashattheLOBBYOF THEWAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at11:00AM,onthe3rddayofNovember, 2011,thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT25,CAMELOT,PHASEII,ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLATTHEREOF RECORDEDINPLATBOOK4,PAGE9, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 6 SIR LANCELOT WAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on October 3, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BYBECKYWHALEY CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-00010 6 SEC.: CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, v. SERENAD.WEST;ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIESCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE HEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOTKNOWNTOBE DEADORALIVE,WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIESMAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSES,HEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,OROTHERCLAIMANTS; ANDESCAMBIACOUNTYHOUSINGFINANCE AUTHORITY. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalSummaryJudgmentofForeclosuredatedSeptember28,2011,entered inCivilCaseNo.65-2011-CA-000106ofthe CircuitCourtoftheSecondJudicialCircuit inandforWakullaCounty,Florida,wherein theClerkoftheCircuitCourtwillselltothe highestbidderforcashonthe3rddayof November,2011,at11:00a.m.atthefront dooroftheWakullaCountyCourthouse, 3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida32327,relativetothefollowingdescribedpropertyassetforthintheFinal Judgment, to wit: LOT59,BLOCK3,WAKULLAGARDENS UNITTWO,ACCORDINGTOTHEPLAT THEREOF,RECORDEDINPLATBOOK1, PAGE42,OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance. Please contact: Thisisanattempttocollectadebtandany informationobtainedmaybeusedforthat purpose. Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 Phone: (850) 577-4401 atleast7daysbeforeyourscheduledcourt appearance,orimmediatelyuponreceiving thisnotificationifthetimebeforethescheduledappearanceislessthan7days;ifyou are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATEDATCRAWFORDVILLE,FLORIDA THIS 29th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 13, 20, 2011 682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV NoticeisgivenpursuanttoFloridaSelf-StorageFaciltiyAct,FloridaStatutes,Chapter 83,PartIVthatCrawfordvilleSelfStorage willholdasalebysealedbidonSaturday, October29,2011,at10:00a.m.at3291 CrawfordvilleHwy.ofthecontentsof Mini-Warehousecontainingpersonalproperty of: ROSA LEE GREEN JACQUELYN GODBOLT BeforethesaledateofSaturday,October 29,2011,theownersmayredeemtheir propertybyapaymentoftheoutstanding balanceandcostbypayinginpersonat 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. October 13, 20, 2011 LEGAL NOTICE NoticeisgivenpursuanttoFloridaSelf-StorageFacilityAct,FloridaStatutes,Chapter 83,PartIVthatSeminoleSelfStoragewill holdasalebysealedbidonOctober29, 2011at10:00a.m.at2314Crawfordville Hwy.,Crawfordville,Florida32327,ofthe contentsofMini-Warehousecontainingpersonal property of: JENNIFER BABCOCK CASEY LARSON BeforethesaledateofOctober29,2011, theOwnersmayredeemtheirpropertyby paymentoftheOutstandingBalanceand costbymailingitto2314Crawfordville Hwy.,Crawfordville,Florida32327orpaying in person at the warehouse location. October 13, 20, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-60-PR PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JIMMY ERASTUS STRICKLAND, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofJIMMY ERASTUSSTRICKLAND,deceased,File Number11-60-PR,ispendingintheCircuit CourtforWakullaCounty,Florida,Probate Division,theaddressofwhichis3056 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Florida,32327.Thenamesandaddressesof thepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentative'sattorneyaresetforth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedent'sestate,includingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaims,onwhoma copyofthisnoticeisservedmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHINTHELATER OF3MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHE FIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE OR30DAYSAFTERTHEDATEOF SERVICEOFACOpyOFTHISNOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandother personshavingclaimsordemandsagainst decedent'sestate,includingunmatured, contingentorunliquidatedclaims,mustfile theirclaimswiththiscourtWITHIN3 MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTSOFILEDWILLBE FOREVER BARRED. ThedateoffirstpublicationofthisNoticeis October 13, 2011 Petitioner JIMMY DAWAYNE STRICKLAND W. Bradley Munroe W. Bradley Munroe, P.A. Fla. Bar ID No: 010530 239 East Virginia Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301 (850)222-7731 (850)224-7528 Fascimile Attorney for Personal Representative October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 11-59-PR IN RE: The Estate of JAMESREGINALDSANDERS Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION TheadministrationoftheestateofJAMES REGINALDSANDERS,deceased,File Number11-59-PR,ispendingintheCircuit CourtforWakullaCounty,Florida,Probate Division,theaddressofwhichis3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Thenamesandaddressesofthepersonal representativeandthepersonalrepresentative's attorney are set forth below. ALLINTERESTEDPERSONSARENOTIFIED THAT: Allpersonsonwhomthisnoticeisserved whohaveobjectionsthatchallengethevalidityofthewill,thequalificationsofthepersonalrepresentative,venue,orjurisdiction ofthisCourtarerequiredtofiletheirobjectionswiththisCourtWITHINTHELATER OFTHREEMONTHSAFTERTHEDATE OFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHIS NOTICEORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERTHE DATEOFSERVICEOFACOPYOFTHIS NOTICE OF THEM. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdegg cedent'sestateonwhomacopyofthisnoticeisservedwithinthreemonthsafterthe dateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THELATEROFTHREEMONTHSAFTER THEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OFTHISNOTICEORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERTHEDATEOFSERVICEOFACOPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstthe decedent'sestatemustfiletheirclaimswith thisCourtWITHINTHREEMONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS,DEMANDSANDOBJECTIONSNOTSOFILEDWILLBEFOREVER BARRED. ThedateofthefirstpublicationofthisNotice is October 13 and October 20, 2011. AttorneyforPersonalRepresentatives: THOMASR.THOMSPON Thompson,Crawford&Smiley AttorneysatLaw PostOfficeBox 15158 Tallahassee, FL 32317 (850) 386-5777 Florida Bar No. 890596 Personal Representative: Jason Sanders 986 Macco Rd. Cocoa, FL 32927 October 13, 20, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AT RISK SERVICES Project Name: Wakulla Middle School HVAC Renovations Project Location: Wakulla Middle School, 22 Jean Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Bid Number: 11/12-05 TheWakullaCountySchoolBoard,DepartmentofFacilitiesandConstruction,requestsqualificationsfromconstructionmanagementatriskfirmstoprovideservicesfor thisproject.Constructionbudgetestimate forthisprojectis$4,000,000.Construction startisTBAApplicant mustbealicensed generalcontractorintheStateofFlorida atthetimeofapplication.Further,ifacorporation,theapplicantmustberegisteredby theDepartmentofState,DivisionofCorporations,tooperateintheStateofFloridaat the time of application. Theselectionwillbemadeinaccordance withSection287.055FloridaStatutes,the SchoolBoardPolicies,SREFrulesandproceduresandcriteriawhichmaybeobtained fromWilliamR.Bristolattheaddressand phone number below. Firmsinterestedinbeingconsideredforthis projectmustattendaPre-requestforQualificationmeetingattheBoardRoomatthe SuperintendentsOfficeonNovember7, 2011@2:00p.m.RequestforQualification ProceduresmaybepickeduppriortomeetingattheFacilitiesOfficeattheWakulla CountySchoolBoard.Inaddition,interested firmsmustsubmitanapplicationwiththe following information. 1.Aletterofinterestdetailingthefirms qualificationtomeettheabovereferenced selection criteria. 2.AnExperienceQuestionnaireasreferencedinRFQ,whichmaybeobtainedat thePre-requestforQualificationmeeting fromWilliamR.Bristol,phonenumber(850) 926-0065 3.ThevendermustprovideacurrentFloridaProfessionalRegistrationCertificatefor a Florida General Contractor License. Submit6copiesofyourapplicationtothe WakullaCountySchoolBoard,DavidMiller, Superintendent,69ArranRoad,Crawfordville,Florida32327.DeadlinedateisNovember10,2011@1:00p.m.Theresults ofthisselectionwillbepostedattheSuperintendentsOffice69ArranRoad,Crawfordville,Florida32327,duringregularbusiness hoursstartingDecember20,2011.Anyprotestontheselectionmustbemadewithin 72hours.Contractnegotiationandaward will proceed with the selected firm. October 13, 20, 27, 2011 685 Notice of Fictitious Name NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENthattheundersigned,desiringtoengageinbusinessunderthefictitiousnameofTomssSmallEngineRepair,locatedat42KellyAnnStreet, Crawfordville,FL32327,intheCountyo f Wakulla,inCrawfordville,Florida32327,intendstoregisterthesaidnamewiththeDivisionofCorporationsoftheFloridaDepartmentofState,Tallahassee,Florida. DatedatCrawfordville,this27thdayo f September, 2011. -sThomas A. Deese, Jr. October 13, 2011Selling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 926-7102 Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall888-852-2340 LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com Cant Cant access access The The Wakulla Wakulla news ews online online content? content? Subscribe Subscribe today and today and get full get full access! access!

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Crowd turns out for this weekends Woodstork FestivalBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netMore than 500 people turned out for the annual Woodstork Festival held on Oct. 8 at 3Y Ranch. The weather was perfect, sunny with a cool breeze, for people to browse through the different arts and craft booths, participate in the cake walk, sign up for the silent auction, buy tickets for the raf e, taste the various food offered and listen to the different bands that performed throughout the day. All funds raised for this event bene ted the Florida Wild Mammal Association, which takes in orphaned, sick or injured wildlife from around the area with the goal of rehabilitating them so they can be returned to their natural habitat or as a safe haven for those unable to return to the wild. Noni Beck and Marilyn Penot from Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary were also on hand at the festival, bringing with them Rufus, an eastern screech owl, and Nyx, a barred owl. The sanctuary works closely with FWMA and both have the same goal, protecting wildlife. Attendees were also able to view the entries for the FWMAs annual photo contest. The winners were announced at the festival. Best in Show for the adult category went to Rosalie Vincent. First place went to George Burton, second went to Gene Vincent and third place went to Carol Robertson. Vincent also received an honorable mention for another photo, along with Elaine Youngblood. There was also a category for youth with Joan Robertson winning best in show and third place. Emerie Galloway took first place and Diana Robertson took second place. The top prize for the raffle was a kayak. Mike Beatty ended up winning the kayak, but decided to give it to Jeff True instead of keeping it for himself. To learn more about FWMA, visit www.wakullawildlife.org. SCENES FROM WOODSTORK: Clockwise from above, the band Swingin Harpoon performs; Mike Beatty, left, won the kayak in the raf e but gave it to Jeff True; Marilyn Penot with Nyx the owl; vendors and festival-goers at 3Y Ranch; Paige McLaughlin has a lion painted on her face.PHOTO BY LYNDA KINSEY PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSEN JENNIFER JENSEN JENNIFER JENSEN JENNIFER JENSEN pure speed. pure performance. pure simplicity.pure broadband is everything you want from an internet connection with no phone line required. Its all the speed you need to surf, watch, download and game without slowing down. call 866.958.7873to get pure speed today. givemepure.com stop by your CenturyLink store *Offer ends 1/28/2012. Pure Broadband available to qualifying residential customers only. The monthly rate of $29.95 requires a minimum service commitment of twelve (12) months (after which the rate reverts to the then-current standard rate), and applies to up to 1.5 Mbps service. An additional monthly fee (including professional installation, if applicable) and separate shipping and handling fee will apply to customers modem or router. General Services and offers not available everywhere. CenturyLink may change, cancel, or substitute offers and services, or vary them by service area, at its sole discretion without notice. Requires credit approval and deposit may be required. Additional restrictions apply. Terms and Conditions All products and services are governed by tariffs, terms of service, or terms and conditions posted at www.centurylink.com. Taxes, Fees, and Surcharges Applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges include a Carrier Universal Service charge, National Access Fee surcharge, a one-time Pure Broadband activation fee, state and local fees that vary by area and certain instate surcharges. Cost recovery fees are not taxes or government-required charges for use. Taxes, fees, and surcharges apply ba sed on standard monthly, not promotional, rates. Call for a listing of applicable taxes, fees, and surcharges. Monthly Rate Monthly rate applies while customer subscribes to all qualifying services. If one (1) or more services are cancelled, the stan dard monthly fee will apply to each remaining service. Pure Broadband As determined by service location, an early termination fee will apply as either a at $99 fee or the applicable monthly recurring service fee multiplied by the number of months remaining in the minimum service period, up to $200. Performance will vary due to conditions outside of network control and no speed is guaranteed. Telephone landline is part of the service only for the purpose of data trafc transmission/connection and cannot be used for voice trafc transmission, except for 911 services. 2011 CenturyLink, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The name CenturyLink and the pathways logo are the property of CenturyLink, Inc. All other marks are the property of their respective owne rs. a month*all high-speed internet. no phone line required.



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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 116th Year, 41st Issue Thursday, October 13, 2011 T h r e e S e c t i o n s Three Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsThe WakullanewsInside This Week Public Notices ..............Page 3A Comment & Opinion ....Page 4A Church..........................Page 5A Community....................Page 6A School...........................Page 7A Sports ....................Pages 8, 9A In The Huddle ............Page 10A Outdoors ...................Page 11A Water Ways...............Page 12A Sheriffs Report ..........Page 13A Green Scene ................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..........Page 2B Classi eds ....................Page 7B Legal Notices ...............Page 8B n By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA five-person accreditation committee recommended that Wakulla schools be re-accredited, and praised the districts teachers, parents and administrators for working together to create a community atmosphere dedicated to the students. If I were a parent who lived in Florida, I would be very happy for my children to go here,Ž said Dr. Patricia Golding, associate director of AdvancEd in Virginia who chaired the committee that looked at Wakullas schools. I would be happy to work here.Ž Dr. Golding made a PowerPoint presentation of the committees report at a special school board meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 5. Wakulla schools were first accredited five years ago, Superintendent of Schools David Miller noted at the meeting. One of the “ rst small districts to be accredited, the fourth school district in Florida. Five years later, it was time to review the district again, and the five committee members came in to evaluate the local schools. They interviewed 196 people … including the “ ve school board members, 21 administrators, 47 teachers and more than 60 parents and business leaders. Among the commendations for the district were its healthy educational culture, the mutual respect shown at every level of the districts chain of command, parental involvement in the system, and especially minimizing the direct impact of the economic downturn on students. You do so many things very, very well,Ž said Golding. Of seven standards, in “ ve areas, Wakulla earned a designation of highly functionalŽ … meaning it exceeded those goals. It was designated as operational,Ž or meeting the goals. Two required actions were to develop a data system to allow analysis of achievement gaps of subgroups, and to focus on identifying and improving the lower quartile of students. But even that came with a sort of backhanded praise: In a high-performing school district like Wakulla, it was noted that the lower students may actually include students who are performing with certain pro“ ciency. After the accreditation committee left the meeting, Miller praised his district staff, especially Beth Mims, who worked on the school accreditation issue, and the school principals for their leadership. Im very pleased,Ž Miller said. Beth ODonnell, who is assistant superintendent for curriculum, said her favorite comment she heard from committee members was how the school system was like a family … from the parents to teachers to administrators. ODonnell added that, in Wakulla, The system is this community.Ž Continued on Page 2A e accreditation committee was impressed with local schools, and the community of parents, teachers and administratorsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netDonnie Crum was swornin as sheriff on Wednesday, Oct. 5, at a ceremony held at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church. The church was packed with deputies, elected of“ cials and citizens for the oath of of“ ce service. Crum was administered the oath by Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford as Crums daughter, Natalie, held the Bible. Fulford was a prosecutor in Wakulla County with the state attorneys office and worked with Crum and other sheriffs deputies before she was appointed to the bench. Sheriffs deputies were also administered the oath of office and given their credentials. He thanked the deputies for their dedication to the job. Crum was appointed interim sheriff by Gov. Rick Scott to fill the term of Wakullas longtime Sheriff David Harvey, who stepped down Oct. 1 after 35 years to accept a position as director of the Florida Sheriffs Association Self-Insurance Fund. Im not going to try to “ ll the shoes of David Harvey,Ž Crum said at the service. Those are some pretty big shoes to “ ll. Im going to be my own man.Ž Major Maurice Langston is now undersheriff over law enforcement operations, and Major Jared Miller is over the jail. The command staff knelt at the churchs altar with their families and were surrounded by the church deacons and a prayer was said for their leadership during the coming year. County Commission Chairman Mike Stewart noted he comes from a Pentecostal background and he knelt along with them at the altar and said a prayer.Continued on Page 2A Donnie Crum sworn-in as sheriff Wakulla schools earn accreditation and praise WILLIAM SNOWDENDonnie Crum takes the oath of of“ ce last week from Wakulla Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford. Crums daughter, Natalie, is holding the Bible, and Undersheriff Maurice Langston has the microphone. Taking over as interim to “ ll the remaining term of longtime Sheri David Harvey, Crum vows to be his own man DIANE FLOWERS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHelen and Tommy Gunn painting the Lion as a Monarch butter” y last month.PHOT O BY JENNI FER JENSENBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Lion who calls Azalea Park his home is ever-changing. Each month the Lion takes on a new design, never wearing the same out“ t twice. A common theme for his out“ ts is holiday wear, dressing like Santa on Christmas or a turkey on Thanksgiving. Although he may have a Thanksgiving design each November, if one looks closely, they will see each one is different. This is because it is not always the same person who dresses the Lion. Helen Gunn, who has been the caretaker of the Lion since March 2008, paints the Lion often, but says she is always looking for people in the community to help her. A sign next to the Lion gives Gunns contact information for those who would like to paint the Lion. She says she has had families, friends and Boy Scout and Girls Scout troops paint the Lion over the years. Continued on Page 2A Clockwise from top left: The Lion as Spider-Man for Halloween is visited by trick-ortreaters; the Lion as Easter Bunny; Amya Herring helps paint the Lion last weekend; and the Lion as a Wakulla War Eagle. Christmastime Lion, with stockings hung by the chimney with care in hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there. e Lion at Azalea Park changes his look every month … thanks to Helen Gunn and other volunteers Superintendent David Miller P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Woodstork Festival, Page 10BT h e d i f f r e n t f a c e s o f t h e Lion

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comContinued from Page 1A She wants the community to become more involved with the Lion because it is their Lion, she just looks after him, she says. While she is painting the Lion, Gunn says she always gets approached by people who ask questions about the Lion and who are curious about what she plans to turn him into. People are always wondering what he will be next, she says. She says she loves how people honk their horn in support when shes painting him. You may not think it is a big deal to paint the Lion, but wait until it is your time to paint him,Ž Gunn says. Its amazing.Ž While putting on the Lions costume for Halloween this past weekend, three children spot Gunn and run over to ask her what his Halloween costume was going to be. Gunn tells them she was turning him into a ” ying monkey from The Wizard of Oz.Ž One of the children, Christopher Waters, says, Thats so awesome.Ž His cousins, Amya Herring and Zane Herring, agree. Amya Herring says, I love the Wizard of Oz.Ž Her grandmother explains that they just watched the movie and her granddaughter cant get enough of it. Gunn then invites the children to paint alongside her and they couldnt be happier. The children spend the next couple hours painting the Lions legs and body dark brown. A couple of hours later, the children leave and Gunn continues on to “ nish the job. The Lion now has a red vest and matching hat. Gunn also plans to add wings to “ nish the look. The fun part about this costume is that everyone knows and loves The Wizard of Oz,Ž Gunn says. Plus, it is something that hasnt been done before. Something Gunn says she tries to do each month. The process of painting the Lion can take anywhere from a couple of hours to a full day. It depends on how dif“ cult the design is, she says. Before painting the design on the Lion, he must be painted white using Kiltz, to make sure the previous colors do not run through the art work. Once it is dry, Gunn uses outdoor acrylic paint to make her design. Last month, she turned the Lion into a Monarch butterfly complete with antennae. The butter” ys pattern was very detailed and took a while to paint. Her inspiration for the butterfly came from her flower garden and best friend. She says she was working in the garden and noticed how the flowers attracted so many Monarch butter” ies which made her think of the meaning of the butter” y, change, letting go and starting over. She then thought of her best friend who was going through some personal changes. So at that moment, I decided that the butter” y was a perfect idea for the Lion,Ž Gunn says. Gunn dedicated the design to her best friend, which she wrote at the base of the Lion. So, the lion could be a personal statement, as well as a fun and colorful piece of work,Ž Gunn says. The Lion has been painted many things over the years, Spider-Man, Batman, a ladybug, skeleton, green leprechaun, zebra, football player, reindeer, snorkeler in a bathing suit and more. Usually the painter takes a month and uses the holiday in that month as the inspiration for what the Lion will become,Ž Gunn says. Although it is not known how many layers of paint are under the current design, Gunn says its almost 10 years worth. She had considered having the Lion sandblasted, but was told the condition of the Lion wasnt bad, so it wasnt necessary. Prior to Gunn taking over responsibility of the Lion, it belonged to Laura Gentry. Gentry owned Tattered Pages, a bookstore across the street from where the Lion currently stands. She purchased the Lion and placed him in front of her store and began painting him different designs each month. Gunn says, I was like everyone else. I would see the Lion outside of Tattered Pages and wonder myself what it would be painted next.Ž One month, the Lion was painted into SpiderMan and Gunn says her boys went crazy for it. She then decided to go inside the store and ask who painted him. She did a great job,Ž Gunn says. In 2007, Gentry announced that she would be retiring and closing Tattered Pages. She approached the county commission in June 2007 and decided to donate the Lion to the county with the stipulation that it remain visible from Crawfordville Highway. Gentry then began to look for someone to take over painting the Lion. She got permission to move the Lion to the park where the tradition of the painting of the Lion could continue,Ž Gunn says. Gunns mother, Beverly Pitts, saw a newspaper article about the Lion and the need for a new caretaker. She thought I would be the perfect person because of my artistic ability,Ž Gunn says. Gunn does not have a degree in art, but took several classes learning how to paint and has always loved to draw and paint. Gentry selected Gunn and she was ecstatic. I love art and it seems the community does too,Ž Gunn says. It has been a joy in my life to keep the Lion painted.Ž Not only is it fun, Gunn says, it is also a stress reliever. I guess you could say painting the Lion is therapeutic,Ž Gunn says. By painting the Lion, I get therapeutic value from it and the sense of creating something that will make people smile.Ž Those who would like to be a part of making the community smile and want to grab a paint brush and create a design for the Lion can contact Gunn at hgunn@comcast.net. Currently, Gunn says she has all months available for those who wish to paint the Lion. The Lions design changes monthly and re” ects the seasons. Hes ready for summer, above, in shorts, shades and ” ip-” ops, and as Batman, below, hes on the lookout for crime. e di erent faces of the Lion at Azalea Park Continued from Page 1A School board member Jerry Evans said that was, indeed, the case. We are family, we are friends, we are close … we are a community. We are blessed with living with this every day.Ž Riversprings Middle School Principal Dod Walker said he had heard from the committee how taken aback they were by how happy the teachers and students were … despite the economic conditions that have meant budget cutbacks. Wakulla High School Principal Mike Crouch echoed that, saying he too had heard a comment of surprise from an out-of-state member of the committee about the politics of education in Florida. Miller said that, despite the politics and budget cuts, he was most proud that parents and teachers have con“ dence in the districts leadership … the school board, superintendent and administration. Times are dif“ cult, they know that,Ž he said, but they have con“ dence in the decision-making.Ž School board member Becky Cook, whose own involvement in the local schools includes working as a volunteer music teacher for Pre-K students, said: Money isnt a factor. Do whats best for the kids.Ž The next school board meeting is set for Oct. 17 at 5:45 p.m. The school board will hold its reorganizational meeting on Nov. 22 to select a chair, vice-chair and set meeting times.Schools earn accreditation and praise Got an idea for painting the lion? Get in touch with Helen Gunn at hgunn@comcast.net.Continued from Page 1A Elected officials at the event included the local constitutional of“ cers: Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells and Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond. Wakulla Superintendent of Schools David Miller was there, as were numerous members of the school board. State Attorney Willie Meggs attended, as did two of his top assistants, both of whom were former Wakulla prosecutors, Jack Campbell, son of Leon County Sheriff Larry Campbell, and Eddie Evans, who also happens to be a deacon at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist. Crum has no intention of seeking election as sheriff in 2012. Charlie Creel, a former state trooper who challenged Harvey in 2008 and lost by fewer than 50 votes, is running for the of“ ce; and Undersheriff Langston has announced his candidacy for the job as well. Crum sworn-inSheriff Crum address the crowd at the ceremony. ITSTIMEFORFALL! HURRYIN!WHILESUPPLIESLAST!LOWESTPRICESOFTHESEASON AceHardwareisa proudsponsorof ChildrensMiracle NetworkHospitals CHAMPIONSŽ across Americaprogram.DownloadaQRcode readerappforyour smartphoneand thenscantolearn moreandmakea donation. 299Ea. Seal gapsand eliminate drafts. 9999 788 599 799 699Ea. APPLYIN-STORENOW! Save 30%$4.29Value Save40% $169.99Value 1999 699 PricesgoodthroughOctober31,2011. 0009ATE Daviod Rossetti 850 591-6161 Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Loren Joiner 850 544-3508 Kelly Dykes 850 528-3063 all akullas inest 850 926-1011 our ome own ealtor734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce has a new name because of action taken by the Wakulla County Commission at its Oct. 3 meeting. The commission chose to rename the building the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Center in honor of Harveys 35 years of service to the county. Harvey stepped down from his position on Oct. 1 to take a job as the director of the Florida Associations Sheriffs Self-Insurance Fund. Harvey said he had no intention of seeking re-election next year and this opportunity presented itself. The gesture was initiated by Commissioner Jerry Moore. Commissioner Lynn Artz voted against the renaming because she said she wasnt crazy about naming buildings after people and felt one of two things would make it appropriate, if the person had died or gave money for the building to be constructed. She added that this was the third request like this from Moore, who is still in his “ rst year as a commissioner. Im a little worried about how many more well see,Ž Artz said. Commissioner Mike Stewart said he also wasnt crazy about naming buildings after people, but felt it was a worthy honor. The man has, like him or not, managed to get re-elected for 35 years,Ž Stewart said. Hes done a lot of good things for a lot of people.Ž Commissioner Alan Brock said he was the opposite of Stewart and Artz in the fact that he has no problem with naming a public building after someone. Its a “ tting tribute to him,Ž Brock said. The commission voted four to one, with Artz opposing, to rename the building. A plaque will be made and erected on the building, similar to the one for Anita Townsend on the County Commission building. In other matters before the board: € Commissioner Artz informed the commission that Capital Area YMCA will not begin programs at the Community Center while it is being used by Road Patrol and Criminal Investigation divisions of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. The YMCA was in contract negotiations with the county to run the community center. Previously, the YMCA said it could work around the sheriffs of“ ce, but did not realize how much space was going to be taken. Artz said she would like to see Volunteer Wakulla move in and begin to offer activities for the citizens. Volunteer Wakulla had requested the use of of“ ce space in the community center. Artz wanted to see what the group could provide in exchange for space. Not being able to have programs and activities at the community center because of the sheriffs of“ ce was a concern Artz expressed during the discussion of moving those divisions within the sheriffs office to the community center. The reason for the move was because the lease at the previous building had expired and they needed a new location. The commission agreed that they would like to see something offered at the community center for the residents. € Construction on Rehwinkel Road could begin in November. Commissioner Stewart said the Department of Transportation decided to move the project ahead one year, which will include resurfacing and widening the road. The commission submitted Rehwinkel Road from Coastal Highway to MLK Jr. Memorial Road for consideration through FDOT Small County Road Assistance Agreement. There will be no cost to the county. It will be a much better road,Ž Stewart said. € During the commission meeting, Assistant County Administrator Tim Barden was recognized for his service as interim county administrator from Dec. 1, 2010, to Sept. 30, 2011. I appreciate the hard work you put in this,Ž Stewart said. € The Division of Animal Control for the county is looking to “ ll its vacant animal control of“ cer position. The commission approved advertising and then hiring for the position. Qualified applicants must possess a high school diploma or GED and two years of experience in animal welfare or control environment, public health, law enforcement or a related “ eld such as humane society, veterinary office or kennel. Must be able to lift animals and equipment in excess of 75 pounds and must be able to use a twoway radio. Those interested can get an application off the countys website, www. mywakulla.com, or stop by the County Administrators of“ ce located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway. The next county commission meeting is Oct. 17 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Items of interest are board approval to schedule a public hearing on adopting an ordinance for the Tourist Development Plan and application for a change of zoning for 20 lots in the Commodore Commons from commercial to residential. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThose wishing to bring awareness to mental illness, as well as “ ght the stigma associated with it, came together on Saturday, Oct. 8 for NAMIs Walk for Heroes. This is the second year NAMI Wakulla, an af“ liate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, has hosted the walk, which coincides with National Mental Health Awareness Week which was from Oct. 2 to Oct. 8. The purpose of the walk is to recognize those who suffer from a mental illness directly, as well as family members and friends who are affected, said Cheryl Creel, a volunteer with NAMI. It brings awareness that mental illness is a disease, Creel said. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, approximately 57.7 million people experience a mental health disorder. The goal of the walk, according to NAMIs national website, is to let people know what NAMI is and help them understand the role NAMI plays in their lives, which in turn can reduce the number of people that harbor misconceptions about mental illness and NAMI. The event began with those in attendance walking the path at Azalea Park and followed with a light breakfast and refreshments. Once everyone was “ nished walking, those in attendance heard from guest speaker Dr. Jay Reeves, chief executive officer of Apalachee Center. Reeves spoke of growing up with substance abuse in his family and the prejudice and stigma that went along with that. He said it was something his family never talked about. Once he was older, he said he was inspired by people, many who are a part of NAMI, who chose to speak about their experiences with mental illness. Because of NAMI and people bringing awareness to the disease, lives can be saved and the misconceptions of mental illness can be erased. This is very, very inspiring,Ž Reeves said. This is inspiring to me and its inspiring to your community.Ž Reeves said mental illness disrupt lives, disrupt families and end lives. NAMI and its supporters are taking on a massive task and its courageous to be willing to take it on publicly, he said. He added that NAMI can depend on Apalachee Center to be right beside them. The next guest speaker was Clint Rayner, chief of Consumer and Family Affairs at the Florida Department of Children and Families. Rayner spoke of his struggle with bipolar disorder. It can either kill you or make you stronger,Ž Rayner said. It made me stronger.Ž During the program, two local heroes were recognized. The “ rst was Rose Delaney, who is a director on the NAMI board and has struggled personally from a mental illness. Board Director Dana Peck introduced Delaney and said Delaneys life has been full of dark corners and deep holes, but she managed to get out of those corners and holes. Peck also spoke of Delaneys will and dedication to educating people about mental illness and helping anyone she can. There is no one she will not extend her hand to,Ž Peck said. Delaney said she was surprised by the honor. I knew eventually that I was going to come out of that darkness and into the light,Ž Delaney said. I know that its possible.Ž The next hero that was honored was NAMI President Susie Tooke. Tooke said she didnt feel she deserved the honor, but those in attendance disagreed. Peck said Tooke is dedicated to education and “ ghting for those who suffer from mental illness. Shes a very quiet person in what she does,Ž Peck said. But what she does is appreciated and noticed. Tooke got the board members in line and on task with what they needed to do, got an of“ ce for NAMI and organized fundraisers, Peck said. With tears in her eyes, Tooke said, I will continue to “ ght.Ž After the program, people enjoyed hotdogs, popcorn, refreshments, face painting and music by Michael Turner from Common Zenz. For more information about NAMI Wakulla, call 926-1033 or visit their website at www.namiwakulla. org.NAMI Wakulla holds its annual Walk for HeroesBoard votes to name sheri s building in honor of David HarveyCOUNTY COMMISSION PHOTOS BY JENNIFER JENSENDr. Jay Reeves, CEO of Apalachee Center, above, was guest speaker at the Walk. Susie Tooke, below left, and Rose Delaney were recognized as local Heroes. e local mental health advocacy group honors Susie Tooke and Rose Delaney for their e orts Former Wakulla Sheriff David HarveyThe sheriffs building will now be known as the David F. Harvey Criminal Justice Center to honor the longtime sheri Im a little worried about how many more well see, one commissioner says of the spate of buildings being named. It passes by a vote of 4-1 PUBLIC NOTICEThe City of St. Marks household garbage collection day will be changed from Tuesdays to Thursdays after October 1st. with recycling included.OCTOBER 13, 2011 2011 WALK SPONSORS:The Wakulla News Wakulla.com Crum’s Mini Mall Winn Dixie, Crawfordville NAMI Wakulla, Inc. 850-926-1033 2140-C Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Our Guest Speakers:Dr. Jay Reeves, CEO Apalachee Services Clint Rayner, Director of Consumer and Family Affairs at the Department of Children and Families THANK YOU Wakulla County 2011 NAMI Wakulla Walk for Heroes A SPECIAL THANK YOU to all who made our 2011 Walk For Heroes Such a Success! Entertainment: Michael Turner, Common Zenz, Cierra Skye Face Painters: Terry Hillier, Sara Hillier, and Carly Hillier JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com readers speak out Comment & OpinionThe Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.General Manager: Tammie Bar eld ........................tbar eld@thewakullanews.net Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Staff Writer/Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ......................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising/Photographer: Lynda Kinsey .................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Classi eds/Legals: Denise Folh ...........................classi eds@thewakullanews.net Bookkeeping/Circulation: Sherry Balchuck .......accounting@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ................estanton@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Answers about trash service •Coastal Cleanup draws a big crowd • Advisory lifted for Talquin water customers • A look at garbage by the numbers • Relief offered to lowincome residents • Donnie Crum appointed interim sheriff thewakullanews.com READERS WRITE: Follow us onBy PAUL G. JOHNSON Back in 2005, a group of citizens from throughout Wakulla County came together to see how we could improve our downtown Crawfordville area from a business, transportation and community perspective. After six years of public surveys, workshops, business and government meetings and consultant reports, a vision plan for a Downtown Crawfordville in Wakulla County “ nally emerged. The vision plan, developed by Kimley-Horn and Associates, one of the countrys premier design consulting “ rms, was presented and unanimously accepted by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners earlier this year. More recently, the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce and Economic Development Council have come to the conclusion that, short of a major manufacturing or processing company dropping into the countys lap … i.e. a Microsoft or Boeing Aircraft … the downtown Crawfordville plan is our best bet to stimulate more businesses and jobs opportunities in these hard economic times. The plan would have the added bene“ t of reducing traf“ c congestion on Highway 319, the major north-south corridor in Wakulla, stimulate a walk-able/shop-able business and government district, interconnect our many beautiful downtown parks and recreation, solve existing parking and stormwater problems for businesses and generally improve the quality of life and economic vitality of our county. Crawfordville is the only unincorporated county seat in Florida. The vision plan describes a Crawfordville Planning District from East Ivan Road (above Wal-Mart) south on U.S. Highway 319 to the Lost Creek Bridge below Crawfordville. A smaller core area would capture and transform the Crawfordville parks, recreation, business and government areas into an interconnected, thriving downtown. Primarily based on existing land use and developable areas, the plan will use existing and planned U.S. 319 improvements and an alternative construction and development strategy to meet the Chamber and countys Our Town InitiativeŽ goal. This is dependent on stimulating existing and supporting new commercial and multiple commercial/ recreational land use changes within the downtown core district, which increase density of occupation, not to downsize it. A recent proposal to downzone existing commercial property to strictly residential (two lots per acre) within this downtown Crawfordville Core Area is entirely inconsistent with the plans goal. It has become apparent with the continual resetting of timetables and budgets that neither the state nor the federal government will be able to provide funding for four-laning Highway 319 or other ways to improve our downtown without Wakulla County businesses and citizens getting involved. I urge businesses and citizens interested in a downtown Crawfordville to attend the county commissioners meeting this coming Monday, Oct. 17, when this down-zoning proposal will be heard. Although this vision plan centers on Crawfordville, it will improve the accessibility of shopping and business opportunities for Sopchoppy, Ochlockonee Bay, Smith Creek, Panacea and all residents in the county on weekends and on their way to and from Tallahassee, where many of them work. It will truly be … Wakulla Countys downtown!Paul G. Johnson is a local businessman and past president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce.Editor, The New s: My mother, Hazel Imperiale, passed away last month at age 87. I bet she would say shes glad she did it before the sheriff retired. Miss Hazel loved her some Sheriff David Harvey. For more than 30 years, my mom was “ rst to put her David Harvey sign in her yard and you had to keep reminding her to take it down. Sheriff Harvey was always so gracious in thanking her that they got to be good friends. That might be one reason my mom sort of acted like she ownedŽ the Sheriffs of“ ce. She would call for any and all reasons. Once it was to get a pygmy rattlesnake out of a birds nest. (They did it.) My mom felt safe living in Crawfordville and she would say thats because of David Harvey. It was nice to see the Sheriff and Mrs. Harvey front row at Miss Hazels funeral. Have a wonderful retirement, Sheriff Harvey. Thank you for keeping my mom safe. Nancy Imperiale Longwood Editor, The News: In recognition of National Disability Employment Awareness Month: Help our economy grow by hiring people with disabilities. Each day, Goodwill Industries-Big Bend Inc. bene“ ts from the work of people with disabilities. We rely on talented professionals, including those with disabilities, to produce results and help us ful“ ll our mission of helping people in our community find jobs and build their careers. October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month. People with disabilities are productive and dependable workers, with higher rates of employee retention. They represent skilled employees in many industries but have higher rates of unemployment than the general population, at more than 16 percent. Goodwill knows that businesses, government agencies and nonpro“ t organizations in our community need to hire the right workers to help our economy grow. Consider hiring people with disabilities. It might be the best investment your make for your community. Brooke Lochoreblochore@goodwillbigbend.comGoodwill Industries Big Bend Editor, The News: Letter of thanks for support of the prom. Eden Springs second annual Senior Prom Dancing Under the StarsŽ was a huge success Thanks to the staff of Eden Springs Rehab Center and our many community supporters, for their untiring effort to make this event special for our residents and families … without them this would not have been possible. Planning and preparations took months and the closer we got to the date the more excited our residents and staff became. The residents were dressed up in their “ nest. The music by Sharon Fox was fantastic and made for great dancing music, which the residents, visitors and staff took full advantage of. Below is a list of those who contributed to our event: Stewart and Wanda Hof” er, Wakulla wrestling team, Brooke Lochore/Goodwill Industries, Sharon Fox and the Singing Saxes, Radical Restorations, The Thread Tree, Lube Expert, Ace Hardware, Hardees, Pizza Hut, Burger King, Little Caesars Pizza, William Gatlin/Avis Car Rental, Huddle House, Black Bean Caf, Skybox Liquors, Winn-Dixie, Dux Liquors, Just Fruits & Exotics, Cindy Roberts, Clyde Hamilton, Gloria Monk, Tamara/Wakulla Senior Center, Beef OBradys, Maurice, Laura Floyd, Pat Vice and her girls from Medart Assembly of God, and Wood Run Church/Tallahassee. Thank you all again. Eden Springs Activities Department Medart Editor, The News: Do you want a Crawfordville center that feels like a town, a Crawfordville that enables you to park you car once and visit multiple businesses? Or, would you rather have Crawfordville develop as one continuous strip-mall? A strip mall that extends from south of the courthouse north to Bloxham Cutoff? An area where you would have to enter Highway 319 traf“ c multiple times? In other words, do you want our countys traf“ c ” ow, attractiveness, environment quality, etc. to improve or deteriorate as we grow? Yes, we all want better growth. That is not what the Board of County Commissioners will be considering at their Oct. 17 meeting. In fact, they are considering setting back the clock by not hours but decades. First, about a decade ago, a subdivision was created and zoned to contain a mixeduse residential community in downtownŽ Crawfordville with residential, as well as commercial zoning. This would encourage a walkable community where residents would be able to be near 20 commercial lots that are located in back of current businesses such as Ace Hardware, Amazing Mail Solutions, Myra Jeans restaurant, etc. Fast-forward to 2005: € In 2005 Camelot IV Inc. buys 17 of the 20 lots now being petitioned for rezoning from commercial to residential. € In 2009 Camelot IV Inc. deeds these 17 lots to the Wakulla Bank. € On July 15, a company called TFB buys these 17 lots zoned commercial. € On July 28, less than two weeks after purchase, TFB Company petitions to rezone these 17 lots from commercial to residential. € At the same time Beth Taff, as Trustee of the Oleta Lawhon Family Trust, petitions to rezone the other three lots from commercial to residential. € On Sept. 12, these petitions came in front of the countys Planning and Zoning Board and they unanimously voted to turn down these petitions. € On Oct. 3, these petitions reached the Board of County Commissioners where the majority of the commissioners appeared eager to overturn our Planning and Zoning Board by adding buffers between the existing commercial and proposed residential properties. At the Oct. 3, meeting our county attorney cautioned against proceeding with an af“ rmative vote without there being time to review the legal rami“ cations of adding buffers. Our commissioners voted to continue this item to its Oct. 17 meeting. The existing zoning on these lots is exactly what good downtown planning is all about. It is what is advocated in the Crawfordville Town Center vision and is what our Chamber of Commerce, CCOW and many other groups advocate. What our county commissioners are now considering, changing the zoning of 20 commercial lots to residential, goes against all the efforts that are meant to bring good and ef“ cient development to our downtown area. Why do our commissioners appear so eager to approve this rezoning? Local businesses oppose this zoning change (Ace Hardware, Myra Jeans, Bush Fire Services Inc., Florida Sun Termite, Wakulla Realty, Kevin Machine, Rascal Auto Sales, Engines Unlimited, Amazing Mail Solutions, Stans Barber Shop, Complete Automotive Repair Service and Easy Mail). It is opposed by property owners of the existing adjoining commercial lots (Gary and Trudy Lott). It is opposed by concerned citizens (Ernie Jaworski, Chris Wilson, Robert Grose, and Guinn Haskins), as well as other business people. In addition to poor planning, this proposed rezoning change is an affront to all the present homeowners who have seen their property values decline. Presently, there are 450 to 500 homes on the market in our county. Our countys Needs Analysis states we dont need more residential lots but states we do need more commercial lots. If the proposed rezoning is approved it will reduce the taxable value of the land and take money off the tax roles, as pointed out by our Tax Collector Cheryll Olah. This could place an additional burden on the average citizen by necessitating higher property taxes on their homes to make up for lost revenue. Our countys Planning and Zoning Board voted unanimously against this proposal. So why is our county commission even considering going in such a wrong direction? And if approved without doubt, our county is setting up future con” icts between present existing businesses and future homeowners. This proposed zoning change would set the clock back for decades. Our county taxpayers deserve a well planned downtown Crawfordville. This change needs to be denied. Let your voice he heard. Howard Kessler Chairman CCOW Submitted by WAKULLA COALITION FOR YOUTH This is to correct some commonly held myths and misperceptions about Floridas Juvenile Justice System. For each myth, weve provided a response with links to research and documentation that provides the facts. Myth: Juvenile delinquency is increasing in Florida. Fact: Delinquency in Florida is down and has been declining for several years. Myth: More girls are entering the delinquency system. Fact: Fewer girls are entering the delinquency system. Myth: Girls are more violent today than in the past. Fact: Girls are substantially less violent today than in the past. Myth: Scared StraightŽ programs can help troubled kids from entering the juvenile justice system. Fact: Research has repeatedly shown that Scared StraightŽ programs are ineffective and can actually be harmful to some youth. The Florida Department of Juvenile Justice does not support and will not fund such initiatives. Myth: Delinquency increases in the summer when kids are out of school and have less formal supervision. Fact: Delinquency actually declines in December and over the summer. Myth: Most delinquents are habitual offenders who continue to cycle in and out of the system. Fact: Roughly two-thirds of the juveniles referred to DJJ in any given year are “ rst-time offenders. Myth: The longer a given juvenile stays in a residential program, the less likely he or she is to re-offend. Fact: Research has found that increased length of stay alone does not reduce re-offense. Myth: Secure detention is a good wake-upŽ call for youth and will help them turn around their behavior. Fact: Research has found that being detained can actually make things worse for some youth. DJJ supports appropriate use of detention and is actively working to reduce unnecessary detentions. Myth: Juvenile boot camps are highly effective at rehabilitating offenders and reducing recidivism. Fact: Juvenile boot camps are less effective or the same at rehabilitation and recidivism reduction than residential or probation programs. In fact, DJJ is statutorily prohibited from funding boot camps.If you have any questions about this data, please contact Mark Greenwald, chief of Research and Planning, at mark.greenwald@djj.state. ” .us. anks for keeping mom safe, sheri Hire people with disabilities Support of Eden Springs Prom appreciated What kind of Crawfordville do you want?Floridas Juvenile Justice System Myths vs. Facts Crawfordville deser ves a downtown we can all be proud of

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 5AIrene S. CarterIrene Simas Carter, 83, passed away on the morning of Tuesday, Oct. 4, in her home after her third battle with cancer. Born July 27, 1928, in Brooklyn, N.Y., she graduated in 1946 from the Long Island School of Nursing at Brooklyn, where she later worked as a Registered Nurse at the Veterans Administration Hospital. Classmates described her as sweet as sugar, only more re“ ned.Ž Irene spent her life as a nurturer. She cared for foster children before having her own who she devoted her life to. Later she cared for her father, Stanley, and her mother Teresa Simas. Irene enjoyed reading, dancing with her husband Bob, going to the theatre and taking care of her grandbabies. A friend once wrote: You occupy a special niche … a niche reserved for those who endear themselves by just living, by being around, by gracing this world.Ž The funeral was held Saturday, Oct. 8, at Abbey Funeral Home. The family received friends on Friday, Oct. 7, at the funeral home. Survivors include her husband of 61 years, Robert C. Carter; and her “ ve devoted children, Debbie Schuck, Chris Carter (Patti McMullen), Nancy Byington, Cassie Tucker (Richard) and Becky Leckinger. She thoroughly enjoyed her nine grandchildren. The family extends a special thanks and gratitude to the staff at Big Bend Hospice. Memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh. com.Bruce R. CassidayBruce Raymond Cassiday, 54, of Crawfordville, died on Monday, Oct. 10, in Tallahassee. He was born in Great Falls, Mont., and had lived in this area for 15 years. He was a carpenter/framer. He loved to “ sh and hunt. Survivors include his mother, Beryl Cassiday; his sisters, Linda McConnell (Terry) of Havana and Kathleen Mackie (William) of Crawfordville; nieces, Kelly Mackie, Holly Mackie and Terra Linder; a nephew, Kelly Mackie; and numerous great nieces and great nephews. He was predeceased by his father, Wilmer Cassiday.Robert W. Elser Jr.Robert William Elser Jr., 67, passed away on Friday, Oct. 7, in his home. He was born Dec. 25, 1943, in Evergreen Park, Ill., to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Elser Sr. He moved here from Sarasota in 2000. He was retired from the City of Sarasota as a water treatment plant operator. He served in the U.S. Air Force, and was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church in Crawfordville. He was also an endowment member of the National Ri” e Association. A memorial service for will be held at his home, located at 428 Hickory Hammock Road, on Saturday, Oct. 15, at 10 a.m. He loved his home and land out on the riverŽ and would like to share his joy with all. Please join us. The family requests that in lieu of flowers any memorial donations be made to the Trinity Lutheran Church at P.O. Box 940, Crawfordville FL 32326. Survivors include his mother, Virginia Elser of Elkhart, Ind.; his wife, Janet Elser; a daughter, Donna; a son, Russell of Carrabelle, who attends Concordia College in Selma, Ala.; a grandson, Christopher Piersall and soon-to-be granddaughter Samantha Thorpe, both of Muscatine, Iowa. Americare Funeral Home in Quincy is in charge of the arrangements.William ‘Billy’ HowellWilliam BillyŽ James Howell, 82, of Ocala passed away Oct. 2. He was born to Mabel and Robert l. Howell Jr. on Feb. 28, 1929, in Apalachicola. A 1947 graduate of Chapman High School in Apalachicola, he joined the Florida Power Corporation as a groundman in January 1948. He retired in December 1992, as vice president after 44 years of dedicated service. While in high school, he was an All-State athlete in both football and basketball. In 1950 he was offered a professional baseball contract to play in the Chicago White Sox organization, which he declined because of his commitment to Florida Power and his soon-to-be bride, Sally FitzGerald. Sally and Billy married in 1952, and spent 59 wonderful years together. They had two children, William Jr. (Bill) and Holly; and three wonderful grandchildren, Lacy and Hunter Townsend and William Howell III. He served his country as a member of the Florida Army National Guard for 22 years from 1948 until 1970. He retired as a captain. Billy and his family moved to Crawfordville from Apalachicola in 1958, where he was the district manager for Florida Power Corporation. While in Crawfordville, he served as the scoutmaster of the local Boy Scout troop, treasurer of the Methodist Church, and was president of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce. He was a member of the Lions club and the Masonic Lodge. Survivors include his wife, Sally, of Ocala; his daughter, Holly Townsend (Neil) of Ocala; his grandchildren, Lacy Townsend of Gainesville, Hunter Townsend of Ocala and William Howell III of Miami Shores; his son, William Jr. also of Miami Shores; and his sister, Frances Anne Monroe of Shellman, Ala. Funeral services were held Saturday, Oct. 8, at First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Hospice of Marion County, the First Presbyterian Church of Ocala or the First United Methodist Church of Apalachicola. He was predeceased by his parents, Mabel and Robert Howell; and his twin brother, Robert BobbyŽ L. Howell III. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).William Guy TaylorWilliam Guy Taylor, 63, of Crawfordville, passed away Tuesday, Oct. 4. He was born in Panacea to W. Monroe and Minnie Lou Porter Taylor. He was of the Pentecostal faith and a member of the Apostolic Light Church in Perry. He enjoyed spending time with family and friends, hunting and fishing, cooking, southern gospel music and was an avid FSU Seminole fan. He was also a skilled carpenter. Family received friends, Friday, Oct. 7, at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church. Funeral Services were held on Saturday, Oct. 8, at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville with the Rev. James Box and the Rev. Bruce Taylor of“ ciating. Interment followed at Panacea Park Cemetery. Continued on Page 6AMedart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Wakulla Worship Centers religious views and events ChurchObituaries Wakulla StationIrene Simas Carter Bruce Raymond Cassiday Robert William Elser Jr. William ‘Billy’ Howell William Guy Taylor Katherine Rose Strickland WoodsChurch News Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship......................11 a.m. Evening Worship.......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service..................7 p.m. & Youth Service........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers...........................7 p.m. Missionettes..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F(3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Service 7 p.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Rinehart 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults & Children10:30am Worship Service Nursery available850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanThursday 10:30 am Adult Bible Study Wednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Crawfordville United Methodist Church Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchSpirit Filled NEW LOCATION! 131 Rose Street € Sopchoppy, FL 962-9000 Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Schedule of Services Sunday School Refreshments Worship Prayer Wednesday Supper Wed. Pioneer Club Wed. Adult Group Studies 9:45am 10:30am 11:00am 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm 6:30pm Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers 1s t Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study...9:30 a.m. Worship...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship.............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Grief RECOVERY for parents who have lost a childFor more information call Gigi Cavallaro at 850-926-6011. Coastal Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station will have the following events this week: Thursday, Oct. 13, at 9 a.m., Busy Bee Quilters will meet. Thursday, Oct. 13, at 7 p.m., United Methodist Women meeting. Saturday, Oct. 15 at 10 a.m., Bead Making Class will be held in the church Fellowship Hall. Lunch will be provided. Please call the church of“ ce 421-5741 for reservations and further details. Sunday, Oct. 16 at 4:30 p.m., Chancel Choir practice. Wakulla UMC is located at 1584 Old Woodville Road. The telephone number is 421-5741. Pastor Renita Allen-Dixon Presents, WorshipŽ at New Covenant Holy Temple Church, 420 Shelfer Road, in Tallahassee. Doors will open at 5 p.m. and the show starts at 6 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. For more information, contact Renita Allen-Dixon at 321-9027. Pastor Appreciation Service will be held at Faith Holiness House of Prayer, 726 Woodville Highway in Wakulla Station, on Sunday, Oct. 16, at 10:45 a.m. Pastor Cristine Dudley and Assistant Pastor Glinda Raker will host special speaker Evangelist Elizabeth McCormick. Special music provided by the Drummond Family (Southern Gospel). Lunch will be held after the service. Come and bring your gifts of ap-pr eciation and be blessed of the Lord Jesus Christ.Pastor Appreciation Service to be held ‘Worship’ show set at New Covenant Events scheduled at Wakulla UMC

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our communityPeopleContinued from Page 5A Survivors include his wife, Betty Brumbley Taylor; his sons, Brandon and Wayne Durrance and William Taylor; daughter, Lisa (David) Gardner; brothers, Amos (Rita) Taylor, Robert (MaryAnn) Taylor Steven (Malissa) Taylor, Mitchell (Rhonda) Taylor, and Richard (Kathy) Taylor; sisters, Rochelle (Henry) Smith, Dorothy (Michael) Hall and Wanda (John) Lynn; and nine grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and numerous nieces, nephews and friends also survive. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home in Macclenny. (904) 259-4600. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome. net.Katherine R.S. WoodsKatherine Rose Strickland Woods left this earth for her heavenly home on Sunday, Oct. 9, at St. Augustine Plantation in Tallahassee with her loving family by her side. She was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. She was a member of First Baptist Church in Crawfordville and the Gleaners Sunday School Class. She loved to go to church, cook, read her Bible and be with her family. She was very active in Womens Missionionary Union locally and statewide. She traveled to Haiti and Jamaica on mission trips. She was known as a Prayer Warrior, and stood in the gapŽ faithfully through intercessory prayer. Her great joy was to have her family over to visit and eat. She worked for the Wakulla County Health Department for many years with her close friend, Anita Townsend. In the past three years, she was lovingly cared for by her family and caregivers at St. Augustine Plantation, and also Big Bend Hospice. Visitation will be Thursday, Oct. 13, at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Services will be Friday, Oct. 14, at 2 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. Burial will follow at Crawfordville Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, memorial donations may be made to Florida Baptist Childrens Home. 8415 Buck Lake Road, Tallahassee FL 32317 (850-878-1458). Survivors include three sons, Kenneth A. Strickland Jr. of Milton, Richard W. Strickland (Callie) of Crawfordville, and Elmer Gene Strickland (Brenda) of Smith Creek; one daughter, Kathryn Lawhon (Larry) of Crawfordville; a beloved niece, Evelyn DiNunzio; grandchildren, David Sellick, Jason Lawhon (Krissia), Jeremy Lawhon (Lalie), Jennifer Kathryn Lawhon, Courtney S. Brogan (Frank), Jarvis Strickland (Amanda) and Ben Strickland; and 10 great-grandchildren. Additional survivors include her stepsons, Steven Woods (Frances) and Duane Woods (Shannon); stepdaughters, Gloria Cornelius and Carol Vice (Ron); and 13 grandchildren, 30 great-grandchildren and one great-great grandchild. She was predeceased by her husbands, Kenneth A. Strickland and Willis E. Woods; a daughter-in-law, Suellen Strickland; step-daughter, Alice LaSalle; grandson, Colby Strickland; and her parents, Corley J. and Sarah Rose. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Obituaries Michelle Feigeles and Michael J. WeltmanWeltman to wed FeigelesMr. And Mrs. Joseph and Claire Feigeles of Lyndhurst, Ohio, are pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daughter, Michelle Feigeles, of Richmond Heights, Ohio, to Michael J. Weltman. Weltman is the son of June Kiner, Willoughby Hills, Ohio, and grandson of 100-year-old Esther Saginor, S. Euclid, Ohio. Weltman is a Mortgage Banker and Florida Sales Manager for FirstBank, based in Tennessee, specializing in senior products. A November 2011 wedding in Cleveland, Ohio, is planned at The Temple Tifereth Israel. The couple will reside in Wakulla County. Both were Brush High School graduates from the class of 1981 and were reunited at their recent reunion.Happy “ rst birthdayEthan James Koon celebrated his “ rst birthday on Sept. 29. His parents are Perry and Tricia Koon of Alachua. He has two sisters, Dilyn Brooke and Shelby Lynn. His maternal grandparents are Mrs. and Mrs. Harlan Chestnut of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. Perry Koon of Williston. Ethan J. Koon Zach Harris Zach Harris celebrated his “ rst birthday on Oct. 15 in Washington, D.C., with family and friends. He was born on Oct. 17, 2010, in Atlanta, Ga. He is the son of Andrew and Clarissa Linton Harris. He is the grandson of John and Toni Harris of Atlanta, and Sid and Isabella Linton of Rockingham, N.C. He is the great-grandson of the late Sidney and Clarissa Taylor Linton of Wakulla Station and Rockingham, N.C. The late Lizzy Linton of River Sink was his great-greatgrandmother, and the late Ellender Strickland of Crawfordville, Thelma Linton of Wakulla Station and Betty Strickland of River Sink were his great aunts. Zach Harris Ethan James KoonNyle and Strain announce birth of baby girlRonald Nyle and Jana Strain, of Ochlockonee Bay, welcomed a baby girl, Aeven Elise Strain, on Sept. 28 at 1:35 p.m. She weighed 6 pounds, 3 ounces and was 19 inches long. Her maternal grandparents are Andre and Mary Tollefsen of Ochlockonee Bay. Her paternal grandparents are Dale and Darlene Ellenbarger of Martinsville, Ohio. Volunteer mediators are needed for Wakulla CountySpecial to The News The Second Judicial Circuit Court needs volunteer county court mediators for Wakulla County. A mediator is a neutral and impartial person who meets with the parties in a small claims lawsuit to help the parties resolve their dispute. Volunteer mediators conduct mediations at 9 a.m. on the last Wednesday of each month at the Wakulla County Courthouse. Free training for new volunteer county court mediators will be held in Tallahassee, on November 1 through 4, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. each day. For more information about being invited to the training, please contact Susan Marvin, County Court Mediation Coordinator, before October 24 at 577-4434, susanm@leoncounty” .gov.Training will be held Nov. 1 to Nov. 4 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the courthouse At participatingBloxham Cutoff and Hwy 319 Crawfordville Wakulla Station Spring Creek Road and Hwy 98 Look for Inside all Stop-n-Save locations! Single copies of may also be purchased at all four Wakulla County Stop n Save locations for 75¢.(Oer also good with purchase of fountain drink) “Lordy, Lordy... Look Who’s Forty” Grace, Drew & Charlie GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR:MacCLEANWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926–8116 HATS US 98 PANACEAWinter Styles Coming Soon! Find Yours. Bandannas 2.00 incl. tax PANACEA HATSAFACT

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Special to The News Michael Crouch, principal of Wakulla High School, announced recently that Cora Atkinson and Zachary Broadway have been named Commended Students in the 2012 National Merit Scholarship Program. A letter of commendation from the school and National Merit Scholarship Corporation, which conducts the program, was presented by the principal to these scholastically talented students at a reception, on Thursday, Oct. 6. About 34,000 Commended Students throughout the nation are being recognized for their exceptional academic promise. Although they will not continue in the 2012 competition for National Merit Scholarships, Commended Students placed among the top 5 percent of more than 1.5 million students who entered the 2012 competition by taking the 2010 Preliminary SAT/ National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. The young men and women being named Commended Students have demonstrated outstanding potential for academic success,Ž commented a spokesperson for NMSC. These students represent a valuable national resource; recognizing their accomplishments, as well as the key role their school plays in their academic development, is vital to the advancement of educational excellence in our nation. We hope that this recognition will broaden their educational opportunities and encourage them as they continue their pursuit of academic success. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 7Aeducation news from local schoolsSchool Atkinson and Broadway are Commended StudentsKAREN JAMES/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla High School Principal Michael Crouch, students Cora Atkinson and Zachary Broadway, Superintendent of Schools David Miller and Assitant Superintendent of Instruction Beth ODonnell NJROTC annual “ sh fry scheculed for Oct. 21By CADET ENSIGN AZZARITONJROTC Public Affairs Of“ cerIts that time of year again, for the NJROTC annual “ sh fry, a Wakulla County tradition for 19 years and counting. This year is no exception. On Oct. 21, the NJROTC unit will host its “ sh fry before the Wakulla vs. Suwannee football game. It is only $7 for the meal and the menu for the “ sh fry includes shrimp, cheese grits, cole slaw, hush puppies and tea. It is prepared by Noah Posey and his crew from Poseys Up the Creek. Posey has graciously donated his services each year for this event. It will go from 4:30 to 7 p.m. outside the entrance to Reynolds Field at Wakulla High School. The “ sh fry is highly bene“ cial to the cadets in the NJROTC unit. The proceeds from the “ sh fry allow the cadets to take trips such as the one coming up next month to Parris Island, Marine Corps Depot in South Carolina. Parris Island shows the cadets the basics of Marine Corps recruit training and some of the fundamentals of Marine discipline. The “ sh fry also helps to fund the “ eld meets the cadets compete in around the state during the school year. Categories of competition include a variety of drill teams, color guard, athletics and academics. They help to build unit camaraderie and encourage friendly competition among the cadets around the state. The “ sh fry, among other fundraisers the unit does, also helps to fund other fun events such as dances, the dining in and the Olympicnic. Come out and support the NJROTC unit at their 19th annual “ sh fry. Tickets can be purchased from any cadet ahead of time or at the event.Wakulla Christian selling chocolate for fundraiser Special to The News Wakulla Christian School will be selling chocolate covered Almonds from Worlds Finest Chocolate for $2 a box. This chocolate is made from premium milk chocolate and is the No. 1 selling chocolate in the fundraising industry. Each box also has a Steak n Shake coupon on it worth $2. The sale is Oct. 13 through Oct. 31. Contact the school of“ ce at 926-5583, to “ nd out where they will be sold. Talquin Electric is accepting applications for youth tourSpecial to The News Talquin Electric Cooperative will sponsor four students from our four-county service area on an all-expense paid trip to Washington, D.C. this summer. Students from area high schools and home schools will “ rst be selected to represent Talquin Electric for Florida Electric Cooperatives Tallahassee Youth Tour on Feb. 8, 2012, and Feb. 9, 2012. During the Tallahassee Tour, students will visit the House of Representatives Chambers and attend a session in the Florida Supreme Court with students from around the state. During the Tallahassee Youth Tour, four students will be chosen to represent Talquin in Washington, D.C., for the National Rural Electric Youth Tour, June 16-21, 2012. Students are chosen based on leadership and public speaking skills, community service and academics. The Washington, D.C., trip will include visits to the Lincoln Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Mount Vernon and many more historic sites with hundreds of other students from around the nation. In order to qualify: Students must currently be enrolled as a junior in a local high school or home school. Students must have a relative who is currently a Talquin Member through business or residence. Students must currently live in Talquins four-county service area. Interested students should complete the Talquin Youth Tour Application, as well as submit a letter of reference and 250 word essay entitled, Why I want to be a Talquin Electric Youth Tour Representative in 2012.Ž Applications are available at Talquin Area Of“ ces, or may be found at www. talquinelectric.com under the Community/Youth Tour link. For more information, contact Kim Gay, at (850) 627-7651. Deadline to turn in applications is December 10, 2011. ose attending the youth tour in Tallahassee will have a chance to go to Washington, D.C. Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints TCC WAKULLA CENTEROFFERING TECHNIGHT CLASSESWord 2007 (2) October 20 6-9 p.m. $25 Excel 2007 (1) October 27 6-9 p.m. $25 Excel 2007 (2) November 3 6-9 p.m. $25 PowerPoint 2007 (1) November 17 6-9 p.m. $25 QuickBooks 2010 (1) December 1 6-9 p.m. $25 QuickBooks 2010 (2) December 8 6-9 p.m. $25ECOTOURISM CLASSESFL Archaeology and Pre-history October 20 6 -9 p.m. $20 Forest Field Trip (2) Wakulla Sinks October 23 1-5 p.m. $40 Ecosystems Workshop October 25 6-9 p.m. $20 Birds of the Region October 27 6-9 p.m. $20 Birding and Sea Life Field Trip October 30 8 a.m.noon $40 For a complete class schedule visit:www.workforce.tcc.fl.edu/Wakulla For more information:(850) 922-6290 | mackiek@tcc.fl.edu HAVE YOU HEARD THE NEWS?has expanded their circulation department! – LOOK –The Wakulla News has a new number to call to subscribe.888-852-2340CALL ALISON OR NECIA TODAY! 888-852-2340 They haven't actually expanded, they're just taking advantage of Citrus Publishing's call center in Crystal River.Be a part of the conversationƒ Subscribe Today by calling Subscribe Today by callingget 888-852-2340or visit TheWakullaNews.com Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r sTM Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team viewsSportsSpecial to The News Two Wakulla travel baseball teams brought home the champions trophy in the Travelball USA Perfect Game Tournament in Marianna on Saturday, Oct. 8. The 12u Wakulla Red Sox went undefeated in the tournament, beating three teams on the road to victory over the Enterprise Wildcats, 6-5. The week prior, the Red Sox placed second in the USP Octoberfest III Tournament in Bainbridge, Ga. The Wakulla Red Sox are managed by Keith Anderson. The 13u Team Surge competed in the tournaments 14u bracket Saturday and defeated the Marianna Indians in its “ nal series match-up that evening, 19-5, thanks to clutch hitting and a strong defense. Team Surge is managed by Tracy Forester with coaches Ken Weber and Tommy Langston. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe Wakulla High School cross country teams competed Saturday, Oct. 8 at the Cougar Challenge, hosted by Godby High School, at Phipps Park north of Tallahassee. Runners from 13 high schools attended the meet to run a challenging course. The WHS girls team continued to perform exceptionally well and “ nished second overall. The boys team also competed well, finishing in “ fth place. The highlight of the meet for the local high harriers had to be the performance of senior runner Stanley Linton who won the overall boys title. In that race, Linton and Lincoln standout Trevor Touchton separated themselves from the rest of the “ eld early in the race and then waged a headto-head battle until they hit the 900 meters to go mark where Linton surged and opened up the gap on Touchton and held that lead to the end. Linton “ nished “ rst in an excellent time of 16:54, with Touchton running a strong 17:04 to come in second place. Senior Cody James also ran to a new personal record (PR) time of 18:26 and “ nished in 12th place. These were the only two WHS boys to be recognized for “ nishing in the top 15 overall. Completing the scoring for the War Eagles was J.P. Piortrowski (19:59), Mitchell Atkinson (20:14) and Hunter Phillips (20:19). In the girls race, the WHS girls employed their typical race strategy of starting out relatively slow and then working their way through the “ eld and “ nishing strong. Sophomore Marty Wiedeman led the charge through the “ eld and “ nished in “ fth place overall in 22:00. Senior captain Cora Atkinson was close behind, “ nishing in seventh place in 22:09 and freshman Lydia Wiedeman ran an excellent race to “ nish in 10th place in a new personal record time of 22:36. Freshman Lilli Broadway (23:25) and junior Raychel Gray (23:28) rounded out the scoring for the WHS squad. The Wiedeman sisters and Atkinson were individually recognized for finishing in the top 15 overall. Overall, this was a pretty good meet for us,Ž said Coach Paul Hoover. The boys team was a little thin this week as three of our top 10 runners opted to compete in a soccer tournament, but our other kids did a good job. The performance of the day had to be Stanleys victory. That was pretty special.Ž The girls team was strong again and Im pretty proud of them,Ž said Hoover. Marty and Cora continue to perform well at every meet and set the standard for the team, and this week Lydia took a big step forward and ran a great PR. The girls team is pretty deep and it seems like every week we have one or two runners who have sub-par races, but someone else steps up and “ lls the void, which is how a team should work.Ž The teams compete next on Saturday at the Mosley Invitational in Lynn Haven. By RICHARD LAWHONSpecial to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles hosted John Paul II on Oct. 6, for a disappointing loss. In the first set, the Lady War Eagles came out “ ghting, playing very good on both offense and defense. At the beginning of the “ rst set, the Lady War Eagles were on top 7-3 and it looked as though they would win, but the Panthers did not give up and came back to win 25-20. After losing the “ rst set, the Lady War Eagles were not giving up either and played very hard with the lead bouncing back and forth in the second set, but fell 28-26. If the Lady War Eagles were going to continuing playing, they would have to win the third set. They came out playing the third set better than they have played all season, but still fell to the Lady Panthers 25-22. The Lady War Eagles showed a lot of heart in this game, which is good considering that post season play is nearing. Some of the key players for this game were Ashley Roberts with 9 kills and 8 aces, Breighly Bolton with 7 kills, Chelsea Carroll with 26 assists and 4 blocks, Haley Brown with 10 digs and “ nally Jordan Pryor, who had an exceptional game with 20 digs. The next game for the Lady War Eagles will be Oct. 11 at Suwanee High School and then Chiles High School at home on Oct. 13. The JV team plays at 5:30 p.m. and Varsity plays at 7 p.m. CROSS COUNTRYTeams place at Cougar ChallengeThe Wakulla Red Sox: front, Bailey Fagan, Jared Weber, Carson Dykes, Thomas Anderson and Will Barwick; standing: Luke Ceci, Hunter Greene, Jacob Dismuke, Brad Lord and Lucas Briggs; back: Manager Keith Anderson and Coach Mike Barwick. Team Surge, front row, Chasen Chi-ChiŽ Roulhac, John Weber, Oakley Ward, Chase Forester, Buddy Wood and Jackson Montgomery; standing, Kaleb Langston, Chance Harper, Skyler Talavera, Marc Carter and Aaron Ginn. Pair of Wakulla teams win LISA KINARDWakulla runner Stanley Linton “ nished “ rst overall.VOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles stumble to JPII October 24th 28thwww.BidOnBankREO.comAL Auctioneer #1832; Broker #000058515-0 / FL Auctioneer #AU220; Broker #CQ1036111877.765.3786 BANK OWNED AUCTIONSperry Van Ness Accelerated Marketing Obhh K O WNED N N AN B A A U C TI O N V V an N N ess A Ac ce l le ra t te d d M Ma k rk t et i in g y V V y rr y Sp S e Live Auctions with Online Bidding AvailableOVER 110 PROPERTIESTHRU-OUT ALABAMA & FLORIDAMOST SELLING ABSOLUTENO MINIMUM NO RESERVE!Broker Participation Invited COMMERCIAL HOMES CONDOS ACREAGE & LOTS BANK OWNED ONLINE ONLY BANK OWNED ONLINE ONLYREAL ESTATE AUCTION REAL ESTATE AUCTION800.701.896610% Buyers Premium | TAL #684 Co-Broker Howe Realty & Auctionwww.PottsBrothersAuction.com w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w . 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 9Asports news and team viewsSportsBy JOEY JACOBSRMS CoachThe Riversprings Bears have had the motto of taking one game at a time this season, but it has been dif“ cult not to look ahead to Tolar. The returners from last years RMS team felt like last years Tolar game was one they should have won, but lost 26-24. They were determined to not let it happen again. Although the visiting undefeated Bulldogs played another great game, the Bears came out on top 32-16. The Bears were led offensively by Feleip Franks. Franks finished the night 5 of 7 for 87 yards and one touchdown. Franks also used his feet to extend plays. The running trio of Monterious Loggins, Demarcus Lindsey and Antonio Morris also had productive nights steering the RMS ground game. Lindsey was also on the receiving end of an 18 yard Franks touchdown pass. Early in the game it looked like the Bulldogs would be able to move the ball against Riversprings defense. After some adjustments by Defensive Coordinator Louis Hernandez, the defense turned the Lights OutŽ on Tolar running back J.J. House and the Bulldog offense. RMS was led in tackles by Demarcus Lindsey and Isaiah Youmas Lindsey had 5 tackles, 3 of which were for a loss, and one assist. Youmas “ nished with 4 tackles, 3 of them for losses. Keith Gavin also electri“ ed the crowd with a 70-yard interception return for a touchdown. Overall, the Bears played well, despite needing to improve in some fundamental areas, said RMS head Coach Joey Jacobs. The Bears will be back in action on Friday night, Oct. 14 at 7 p.m. when they will take on cross-county rival Wakulla Middle School for the Wakulla County Championship. The game will be at J.D. Jones Stadium at Reynolds Field. War Eagles handle Rickards, 12-0By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagle defense stepped up on Friday night. Though tested throughout the game, and their backs put against the wall several times, the defense bent but didnt break. Weve been preaching it all year long,Ž said Head Coach Scott Klees. They bent. They gave up some yardage, but no score.Ž The Rickards Raiders were held scoreless despite having the ball a couple of times inside the red zone … but were unable to convert, and two attempted “ eld goals were no good. In the second quarter, the War Eagles Ryan Henderson came on a blitz from the Raider quarterbacks blind side and knocked the ball out his hand and picked it up and ran it back 90 yards for a touchdown. The War Eagles went for a two-point conversion but it was no good. That was the score until the fourth quarter when running back Marshane Godbolt scored from 15 yards out to make it 12-0. There were seven fumbles in the game … three by Wakulla … and the War Eagles ran only eight plays on offense in the “ rst half, in which the Rickards offense dominated on time of possession but could not “ nd a hole in Wakullas defense. It was a big win against a district opponent, and improved the War Eagles to a 4-2 record. Im proud of where were at,Ž Klees said. Running back Will Thomas was named offensive player of the week, carrying the ball 14 times for 136 yards. Defensive player of the week is Deonte Hutchinson, who had an interception, four tackles and graded out at 84 percent. Special teams player was Brett Buckridge, the long snapper, who Klees called outstanding,Ž and had two tackles on punts. The team has a bye this week before facing Suwannee County next week at home. In the other district game last week, Suwannee was trounced by Godby … but Klees warned that Wakulla has never beaten Suwannee in the schools history and anticipated a tough game. Wed better be clicking on all cylinders,Ž he said. Typically, both teams are very good.Ž A win against Suwannee, he said, puts us in the playoffsŽ with two district wins. If we lose, it puts us in a must-win against Godby.ŽMIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLRMS defeats TolarPlayers of the Week OFFENSE SPECIAL TEAMS DEFENSEWill Thomas 14 carries for 136 yards Deonte Hutchinson Interception, 4 tackles Brett Buckridge Long snapper PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDefensive player of the week Deonte Hutchinson with the ball in the open “ eld.Wakulla wins the first district game, improves to 4-2 overall. After a bye week, up next is SuwanneCoach Klees praised his junior varsity team, who defeated Chiles High School on Thursday night, 40-0, to continue their high” ying season. The JV is undefeated in four games, and has outscored their opponents 164-6. Were extremely proud of those guys and how hard theyve worked,Ž Klees said. The JV next plays Taylor County away this Thursday night and, on Oct. 20, play Godby at home.JV keeps rolling Wakulla fans cheer on the War Eagles.More photos online at thewakullanews.com Im proud of where were at, Coach Klees says of the War Eagles after the win the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Raymond RichSeptember 2011 Winnerank You So Much! His name was drawn fromank you to the restaurants & e News for this nice promotion Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name_____________________________________ Address___________________________________ __________________________________________ City______________________________________ State__________Zip_______________________ Phone____________________________________ e-mail_____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Ever y Resta urantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Deli Deli Congratulations LUN CH PA RTN ER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News aComplimentaryCopyofwhile quantities last.926-3500• Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Orderthespecialandreceive… Deli Delioftheweekat Try One of Our Home Made Parfaits 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BRE AKF AST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29Breakfast Platter $249 $199 Breakfast SpecialCoastalRestaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Freeon Wed.AUCEChicken Tues. & urs. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary LimbaughLic. # CAC1814304 The Workswakullas coworking caf www.theworkscafe.com “ReceiveacomplimentarycopyofPastry and Coffee Special!” Let us perk up your day! Thank you for a successful The inaugural BACK TO BACK BALL to benefit The Spine Foundation was a tremendous success. We are forever grateful to the sponsors, supporters and attendees who contributed in many generous and significant ways. Your efforts will make a meaningful impact in our efforts to increase access to the world’s most scientifically advanced spinal care.Laser Spine Institute Holland & Knight New Jersey Spine & Rehabilitation Cornelia & Dick Corbett Charlotte & Bill Horne James St. Louis Dr. & Mrs. Michael Perry Response Mine Interactive Sandi & Chris Sullivan / Chris T. Sullivan Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Michael Weiss 2011 SPONSORS Inaugural

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Florida State at DukeSaturday, 3 p.m. The game can be seen on FSN Af liates (HD) / ESPN-GP / espn3. Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comIn The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102 F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate Miami at North CarolinaSaturday, 11:30 a.m. ESPN-GP *2 / ACC Network *3 (HD) / espn3Fisher faces biggest challenge of young careerFlorida at No. 24 AuburnSaturday, 7 p.m. The game can be seen on ESPN (HD) / espn3.By MARTY COHENof GatorBaitBATON ROUGE … Theres lots of numbers to be tossed around in the aftermath of another dif“ cult defeat, this time by 30 points to the topranked team in the nation. But this numerical nugget is a touch startling … its been 40 years since a Florida team has lost consecutive games by at least 28 points, when the Gators got whipped 40-7 at Auburn and 49-7 against Georgia in Jacksonville way back in 1971, a 4-7 season that turned the Super Sophs into Scuf” ing Seniors. Its reminiscent of what Steve Spurrier said after the Gators shocking loss to Syracuse in the last time they played a regular-season game outside the Southeast, I told you wed break a lot of records around here.Ž Spurriers deadpan remark came in response to the minus 17 yards rushing UF mustered in the Orange crush, which actually was the second-worst effort (minus 30 against West Virginia in the 1981 Peach Bowl was the dubious mark at the time), but we got the point. In retrospect, it was easy to smile about the Syracuse debacle because it became the only regular-season misstep in what turned into an SEC championship campaign. In the present, there has been nothing to feel good about for Florida since the calendar ” ipped to October, leaving behind a 4-0 September that seems awfully hollow after the beat-downs by Alabama and LSU in the last eight days. And make no mistake, these were physical manhandlings by two of the best, if the not the two best, teams in the country. Yes the Gators were in the game, from a scoreboard standpoint, against Alabama before John Brantley went down, but the Tide had exerted its will and in a basketball analogy, the Gators were basically making some 3s from the perimeter (throwing the ball around a bit in the “ rst half), while the Tide was bruising its way inside for easy layups. Eventually, the 3s will stop falling and the score will get out of hand. A week later, Floridas perimeter shooting was taken away due to the absence of Brantley. The Gators were going to have to play a near-” awless game and hope that LSU de“ ed its recent character (the Tigers were an SEC-leading plus-9 in turnover margin coming into the game) to have a chance of walking into this den with a true freshman quarterback taking his “ rst snap. There was to be no such charity from the Tigers, who grabbed a 14-0 lead barely eight minutes into the contest and given the state of the Gators, it was lights-out. Its almost frightening to think that in between the 65-yard touchdown pass from Brantley to Andre Debose on the opening offensive play against Alabama, to the 65-yard touchdown pass from Jacoby Brissett to Debose with 40 seconds left in the third quarter against LSU, the Gators were out-scored a combined 65-6 in a hair under seven quarters against the SECs two behemoths. A n o t h e r d e f e a t Another defeatBy TIM LINAFELTof The OseolaThe fact that Florida State was besieged by penalties at Wake Forest should come as no surprise. The Seminoles have drawn an alarming number of penalty ” ags in recent weeks „ they were ” agged 11 times at Clemson and came into Saturdays contest averaging more than eight penalties per game. Indeed, FSUs penalty problems made the trip to Winston-Salem, as the Seminoles committed a season-high 13 penalties for 109 yards. But FSU on Saturday found another way to hinder its cause: with turnovers. Wake Forest turned “ ve FSU giveaways into 17 points as the Seminoles nearly matched their season turnover total in a single afternoon. Quarterbacks Clint Trickett and EJ Manuel each threw a pair of interceptions, Trickett lost a fumble and the Seminoles stumbled to a 35-30 defeat that leaves their 2011 season spiraling closer and closer to disaster. FSU (2-3, 0-2 in the Atlantic Coast Conference) is still winless since Sept. 10, still winless against BCS-conference opponents and 0-2 in the ACC for the second time in three years. You cant turn the ball over “ ve times,Ž FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said. You cant have 13 penalties.Ž After a weeks worth of speculation, Trickett made his second consecutive start and immediately looked more like a freshman playing on the road and less like the cool, collected player who nearly led FSU to a come-from-behind win at Clemson two weeks ago. On Florida States “ rst drive of the game, he led the Seminoles down to the Wake Forest 20-yard line before his throw to Kenny Shaw near the sideline was tipped and picked off by Joey Ehrmann and returned 50 yards to the FSU 30. Trickett later fumbled and threw another interception (another tipped ball) on back-to-back possessions, leading Manuel to grab his helmet and start warming up on the sideline. He took the “ eld for the “ rst time since Sept. 17 on the following possession. Manuel initially looked to be just the boost that FSU needed. His 46-yard touchdown strike to Rashad Greene at the end of the “ rst half cut Wakes lead to 16-14 and had the Seminoles feeling as if theyd weathered the storm. The Demon Deacons got to Manuel twice in the second half, once on the goal line and once late in the fourth quarter when the Seminoles desperately needed points … and time … as they hoped to complete the comeback. FSU didnt give up, but Wake never gave up the ball, which certainly didnt help matters. The Seminoles now have a minus-seven turnover ratio (11 giveaways, four takeaways) for the season.‘Noles plagued by miscues old and newThe LSU Tigers wrapped up the Gators.PHOTO COURTESY OF GATORBAITCoach Jimbo Fisher talks with EJ Manuel, who initially looked like just the boost that FSU needed. PHOTOS BY MIKE OLIVELLA Special to the Osceola Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! By TIM LINAFELTof The OseolaIts beginning to feel like old times around here, and not in a good way. But after back-to-back-to-back losses, most recently a lethargic, 35-30 letdown at Wake Forest, these Seminoles bear far more resemblance to their bitter 2009 vintage, rather than 1999. Just three weeks ago, Florida State was entertaining notions of a darkhorse national title run, and an Atlantic Coast Conference championship felt like a foregone conclusion. A 23-13 loss to Oklahoma, then the No. 1 team in the country? Understandable. A 35-30 loss at Clemson with a freshman quarterback making his “ rst career start? Forgivable, especially given the Tigers apparent evolution into a Top 10 team. But there are no excuses for the debacle that took place at BB&T Field Saturday. The Seminoles were sloppy and careless to the tune of “ ve turnovers. They were undisciplined, somehow eclipsing the seemingly unbeatable number of 12 penalties at Clemson with 13 against the Demon Deacons. And for the second consecutive game, the defense allowed 35 points as players over-pursued runs, missed coverages and … continuing a troubling trend for this season … couldnt come up with a crucial third-down stop in the fourth quarter. This time, it was Wake quarterback Tanner Price who evaded the FSU pass rush, kept his balance, stumbled his way out of the pocket and found fullback Tommy Bohanon for a 15-yard completion on third-and-seven. That led to a 32-yard “ eld goal that gave the Demon Deacons an 11-point lead with fewer than seven minutes to play in the fourth quarter. The game was reminiscent of two years ago, when the Seminoles started 2-4, 0-2 in the ACC. It was puzzling, it was frustrating, and it was just close enough to magnify the multitude of FSU miscues that proved to be the difference. Frankly, it was the type of game that led to a regime change at Florida State and to Jimbo Fishers ascension to head coach a few months later. The Noles have three losses in a row. Get 40 100mg/20mg pills for only $99.00CALL NOW AND GET 4 BONUS PILLS FREE! BUY THE BLUE PILL NOW!1-888-746-5615 SATISFACTION GUARANTEED SAVE $500! VIAGRA or CIALIS?D o you take Go Painlessly’ with THERA-GESIC. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsThe weather this weekend wasnt good for anything but staying inside. It was too windy to sail or ” y a kite, much less “ sh. I had to take my boat in to Mikes Marine for repairs and was talking to Mike Jr. He said the only place he has heard people catching a lot of “ sh was on Dog Island Reef. Spanish, blues plenty of lady“ sh and trout. A friend of his has been “ shing way up the Ochlockonee River past the old railroad crossing and catching reds on the bottom using red wigglers. Whats up with that? This is a good time to catch a big black drum under the Ochlockonee Bridge on Highway 98. Fish with a quarter or half a crab on the bottom and hang on. You might want to use a fairly stiff rod because there are some big bruisers under that bridge. Ill never forget the “ rst one I caught with a charter. We were anchored up and had no bites at all. I was sitting on the back of the boat and thought I had gotten hung. I was trying to pull it loose when the bottom moved. I handed it to my client and she landed a 38-pound black drum. We took some good pictures and let it go. The shrimp are in the bay over at Apalachicola and all you need to do is look for the diving birds. Get close enough to cast into the birds and hang on. Youre gonna “ nd plenty of trout feeding there, along with other “ sh. A lot of people use tandem rigs when “ shing under the birds and it doesnt take long to get your limit. Some big reds are being caught in the cut and ” ounder around the rocks in the cut and along the bridge. Live bull minnows are the best bet for them. Mike Pearson from Tifton came down Wednesday with a buddy and they “ shed Wednesday afternoon and Thursday. On Wednesday they caught a good number of trout on the ” ats but on Thursday they caught nothing. Same spots, same baits and same weather, just no “ sh. I had done extremely well on Sunday and Monday and thought our ” ats were getting ready to turn on. Then on Wednesday I “ shed with a charter and couldnt get a bite where I had “ shed Sunday and Monday. The majority of the “ sh we caught were out in about 14 feet of water and there were so many pig“ sh and lady“ sh out there it was hard to catch anything else. Despite the strong wind, yours truly was out there trying to catch “ sh in that mess for two days. I called both charters on Wednesday and told them what the forecast was and gave them the opportunity to cancel both trips. I said we could probably anchor and catch some white trout but “ shing for speckled trout had been slow and the rough water was gonna make it even slower. Both parties said lets give it a try and do what we can do. On Friday, the wind wasnt too terribly bad and we had three big trout, all caught in the “ rst 15 minutes of the trip. No more specs after that. We caught seven legal reds and kept our three and then we anchored on the white trout and caught them until they said they had all they wanted. On Saturday I “ shed the same pattern as Friday but the winds blew a lot harder. Capt. David Fife also had part of this group and we fought the wind all day. The two boats had two reds, four speckled trout, three ” ounder and 58 white trout, and most of them were about 15 inches long. Right now its the middle of October and we should be in the prime of our fall “ shing. Fishing around Shell Point just isnt that good right now and I sure hope it gets better. I dont do much freshwater “ shing these days so I dont write much about it. When I was in grammar school living in Chamblee, Ga., we would always listen to a “ shing program on the radio on Thursday afternoon. I believe the name of the program was John Martins Indoor/Outdoors and he would call down to South Georgia and North Florida and “ nd out how the “ shing was, both saltwater and freshwater. One of the people he always called was Jack Wingate at Wingates Lunker Lodge on Lake Seminole. Wingate, who is something of a “ shing legend in these parts, was diagnosed with stage 4 prostate cancer and needs our prayers. Remember to leave that ” oat plan with someone and know your limits. Good luck and good “ shing! e wind has made the “ shing roughIn my many articles over the years, Ive stressed to those who wish to observe wildlife to go on a sunny day. Try to keep the sun to your back so things arent silhouetted and on a day when there is only a light breeze, as wind will buffet you around, and make viewing through binoculars and spotting scopes much harder, as the object being viewed will be bouncing all over the place! If looking for mammals, the cooler dawn or dusk is best, and this applies to birds too as birds are most active at dawn. Many binoculars now focus very close as more outdoor enthusiasts are trying to become familiar with butter” ies and can now focus just a few feet away. Rainy days are usually bummersŽ as most wildlife will hold up during an all out rain. An off-and-on drizzle, or occasional passing shower or thunderstorm isnt so bad if you do get some blue sky and sun as well. When overcast, flying birds are generally harder to identify against the gray sky. Basically you want the best lighting possible and the less breeze the better. Yet there are exceptions: waterfowl often really move around during foul weather, as any duck hunter will attest. Another exception is viewing migrating birds of prey, or raptors. About a month ago I was on Chimney Rock in New Jersey. Chimney Rock is just south of the Kittatinny Ridge, which extends into Pennsylvania where there is the famous Hawk Mountain Sanctuary … the “ rst place in North America set aside to protect migrating hawks. At Chimney Rock a cold front had just passed through the day before, and overnight the air had cleared and it had turned much cooler. I was excited, as the hawks were also migrating there. But they were way up! Waves of broad-winged hawks in groups of 40 to 80 were shooting south over this viewing area one after the other, and even with my 10 power binoculars they were (to me) just specks in the blue sky. But the day before, right after the rain stopped, and the wind shifted into the north the observers had it much better. When the sky was blue it was harder to spot the hawks, whereas when the sky was gray, and the clouds were low as a front blasted through, the hawks stood out. So, on Sunday, while this tropical wave was moving through the state of Florida, I de“ ed my logic of windless clear sunny days and drove to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge because we were going to have low, menacing clouds, and the counter-clockwise wind of this tropical system was fairly strong, right out of the east, blowing in theory the migrating hawks over to our coast, as they headed south. It all sounded good, but when I got in the refuge about 8 a.m. it was raining and I saw little til I got out near the end of Lighthouse Road. About the time I reached the lighthouse and Gulf, the rain slacked up and then up on the observation tower I heard my name being called by my friends Mark and Selina Keiser. Mark and his wife are very involved with the states Florida Birding Trail, and were doing a census of sorts where they and other participants stay in one spot all day and see or hear what avian species they can record. This was their forth Big SitŽ as it is called. They had been there since dawn, and would stay until dark. Occasionally, others like myself would join them, and while I was there Carol Miller, a lady who recently identi“ ed a (very rare for our area) western Says Phoebe, joined us … as well as Dana Bryant, state naturalist for our Florida Parks system. Gradually, the Keisers list passed 50 species, including some pretty nifty birds … like the Peregrine Falcon and Cliff swallow. Just about the time Dana and I were thinking of heading home, he spotted a Tennessee Warbler, the “ rst Id seen in years. Though I saw 65 species by driving around, Mark and Selina got nearly that number from one spot … pretty amazing. So far theyve had the highest number recorded every year since the Big Sits were started. Sometimes bad weather is good weather for birding From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHFWC News Wanted: Adventurous and outdoorsy women wishing to learn more about Floridas great outdoors in a comfortable, noncompetitive, hands-on environment. If this could be you, contact the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission to participate in the Becoming an Outdoors-Woman mini-workshop in Panama City. The single-day workshop takes place Saturday, Oct. 15 at Gulf Coast State College along the beautiful shores of St. Andrews Bay. The workshop runs 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Although designed with women in mind, the workshop is open to anyone 18 years or older who wants to improve their outdoor skills and enjoy several recreational activities. The program offers a fun and supportive atmosphere for participants wishing to try new things and enjoy the camaraderie of other women wanting to do the same. In two, three-and-one-half-hour sessions, the Becoming an Outdoors Woman mini-workshop teaches skills associated with “ shing, hunting and other forms of outdoor recreation, at all levels of physical activity. The women will be able to choose two of the following sessions: basic archery skills; introduction to pan“ shing; kayaking basics; introduction to reading the woods; introduction to shotgun shooting and hunting; basic wilderness survival; and introduction to handgun shooting and hunting,Ž said outdoors woman state coordinator Lynne Hawk. The cost for the one-day workshop is $50, and there are discounted slots available for low-income participants, single parents and college students. The workshop is restricted to 100 people on a “ rst-come, “ rst-served basis. For more information about the workshop or how you can register, visit MyFWC.com/BOW or contact Susan Harrass at 561-625-5122 or Susan.Harrass@MyFWC.com.Womens outdoor workshop to be held in Panama City Scott A. Smith850-228-100738 Rainbow Drive, Crawfordville (behind El Jalisco)Quality Marine Canvas Fabrication and Upholsteryof all kinds...www.”agshipcanvas.com ”agshipcanvas@yahoo.com McClendon Auto Service, LLCFree EstimatesSpecializing in:Owned and operated by Fred McClendon 10 years experienceMV#66653Brak es Batteries Radia tors Wat er Pum ps Hub Bea rings Star ters Alterna tors and mor e!MOBILE AUTO REPAIR850-933-4093 www.hicksair.com Tues. Thurs. 9am 5:30pm Friday Sunday See Us at the Gun Shows LOWER PRICED AMMO IN STOCKMany accessoriesLargest Selection of Guns in the Tallahassee Wakulla Area GunSmithing Fast Turn Around! OFFICIALPRODUCTLICENSED www.ronsgun.comLocated Main Street St. Marks483 Port Leon Dr., St. Marks Gun Show Pricing Everyday! WE BUY GUNS$ Highest Dollar Paid $ for your gun! Selling GunsSince 1999AK 47s in stock! 850925-5685Your Boats One Stop Paint & Body Shop 56 Industrial Court St. Marks Industrial Park,St. Marks 32355Fiberglass Supplies and Repair Marine Battery Dealer DRIVE FOR THE BUILDGOLF TOURNAMENTpresented by: Friday, October 21, 2010 Wildwood Golf Course Registration is from 7:30 8:20am Shotgun Start 8:30am Awards & Lunch at Country Club Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County is presenting their 2nd Annual Drive for the Build Golf Tournament. This tournament will help fund the 2012 HabitatHomeBuild in Wakulla County. To enter the golf tournament, please contact our Team Chair, DorisHarrington at 850-926-6658. EntranceFee is $200 per team or $50 per player. 1st, 2nd, & 3rd place prizes will be awarded

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Almanac Brought To You By Crawfordville Branch Now Open224…4960www.fsucu.org UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg StantonIt has been said that it is important to do your best in all you do, and this week that was evident in the dedication and organization of members from Flotilla 19 in Panama City who tirelessly worked to make the Division Conference and Joint Action Rescue Exercise (JAREX) a phenomenal success. And as with all planned activities, it is necessary to plan for the unexpected and be ” exible. Up until the day before the JAREX, Duane and I planned to head over Friday morning and prepare to document the JAREX while being non-participants. He was going to be onboard a vessel and I was going to stay dockside and take stills. Midday Thursday we got a request to be in Panama City Beach at 7:30 a.m. and we were going to both be on a boat, just not the one originally planned. The bonus for having to go so early in the morning was we got to be in civilian dress as we were on the victim boat. We headed over before the dawn and participated in the pre-underway check-off. Since two participants had not arrived, I was asked to be an actor in the exercise, and would not be able to take pictures since we were trying to be as realistic as possible. I did get a few shots in though. We spent the morning participating in two practice runs since we had so many agencies participating and we wanted to do our best in the real thing.Ž We all based out of the Panama City Marina and were grateful for good weather and open dock space. Let me set the stage for all of you: The story begins with a boat being hailed by the Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) for suspicion. The suspect boat leads CPB on a chase and the suspect boat collides with our boat and then hits a boat full of intoxicated “ shermen. When they have the second collision, a person is thrown overboard as are several containers “ lled with drugs. The Coast Guard Auxiliary arrives and pulls the person from the water after making sure no one is hurt on our boat or the “ shing boat. Panama City Fire and Rescue come on scene when we have an explosion on our boat and a “ re begins. A person is badly burned on our boat and needs medical attention. A Coast Guard boat comes to assist transporting the burn victim onto their boat where a rescue swimmer is deployed from a helicopter and the victim is airlifted for medical care. All the while, the BCP has apprehended the criminals and arrested them as well as retrieved the packages thrown overboard, the Auxiliary has saved the sinking drunken “ shermens boat and Panama City Police have maintained security of the scene. This was the effort of months of planning to coordinate participation from the active duty Coast Guard from Station Panama City and Air Station Mobile, Auxiliary ” otillas from across the Division, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, Panama City Fire and Rescue and Panama City Police marine divisions. All totaled, we had 12 boats in the water and the helicopter. Flotilla 12 has a very strong representation with nine members attending the JAREX: Bob Asztalos, Raye Crews, Mike Harrison, Phil and Norma Hill, Rob Purvis, Carolyn and Duane Treadon, and Bill Wannall. Saturday at the conference was “ lled with training and some time for rest and relaxation. Several members from Flotilla 12 were able to stay and participate in courses. Joining the conference were Tim Ashley, Alex Gulde and Rich Rasmussen. The team split between learning about verifying aids to navigation and responding to pollution incidents. Sunday morning concluded the conference with the fall business meeting. We were lucky to have join us past Commodore Bill Crouch, Immediate Past Division Commander and Commodore East elect Jeff Brooks, Sector Mobile Capt. Rose, from DIRAUX Commander Russell Hellstern, Commodore East Larry King; BM1 Timothy Myers from Station Panama City and CWO James Todd from DIRAUX. Although the meetings last a few hours, it is a great opportunity to hear about what all the Flotillas are doing and get updates from our supporting gold side. It was mentioned more than one time that our division is one of the leading divisions in the district. What an honor for all of us involved! After such an exciting and adventure “ lled weekend, it was still good to get back home. A special thanks to Norma Hill for sharing her photographs. As Sherrie reminds us, safe boating is no accident, but after this weekend, we are better prepared to respond to those accidents! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA swimmer is rescued as part of the Joint Action Rescue Exercise last weekend in Panama City. When diving, we used to breathe a mixed gas called Air. Air was cheap, plentiful and easy to compress into cylinders that we would strap on our backs, and carry beneath the waves. This mixture has the same ingredients as what we breathe on land but underwater everything changes. Pressure increases rapidly underwater altering the Air mixture into a less useful medium. Physics explains that each of the two dominant components of Air (Nitrogen and Oxygen), radically increase, the deeper we go underwater. Nitrogen becomes complicated, causing narcosis below 100 feet, and accumulates in tissues over time to increase the risk of decompression sickness if not closely monitored. Even the prince of gases, Oxygen, can become toxic at depth. Dr. Morgan Wells, diving of“ cer for the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, said Air was not the ideal breathing gas for divers. In the 1950s, Andre Galern of the International Underwater Contractors, began altering Air by adding oxygen and feeding it to his commercial divers. This proprietary gas gave his company twice the bottom times over his competitors. His divers were more productive post-dive, so he began to make more money with fewer injuries. During the 1970s, Dr. Wells studied this gas and adopted it for scienti“ c divers, publishing tables for Nitrox in 1979. By 1984, Dick Rutkowski, Wells assistant, formed the International Association of Nitrox Divers. Soon thereafter I was invited to survey the “ sh population on the Tenneco Template off Fort Lauderdale. We began the project breathing Air as it was our only protocol. The work was exhaustive, leaving us so fatigued that we could barely “ nd our bunks to sleep between a round-the-clock diving schedule. Mid-project we were invited to try a mystery gas. After the “ rst dive, I recall the lights becoming brighter, the energy return and the survey come alive! We were supercharged. Making Nitrox cant be that hard, but it is. The most hazardous aspect of Nitrox is blending the gas. We usually start with Air and either take the offensive nitrogen out or dilute Air by adding 100 percent oxygen to it. Either way we get a variety of blendsŽ -the most popular being 32 percent. Pure oxygen is hazardous because it encourages “ re. Provide a spark, a combustible material and your blending station is ablaze! Many homes were burned down before the diving community convinced folks to leave the blending to professionals. We began to blend by cascading pure oxygen into an oxygen cleaned cylinder and adding Air to the working pressure of the cylinder. The math is simple. But the labor to clean the cylinders and mix the gas is costly. So we graduated to small and later large storage cylinders. As Nitrox become more popular, we expanded and began blending the oxygen through an oxygen service compressor. And as demand continued, we “ nally graduated two weeks ago to using liquid oxygen (LOX). Over the past two weeks we converted 180 cubic feet (cf) of liquid oxygen into 5,000-cf of gaseous oxygen; and we compressor-blended 50,000-cf of 32 percent Nitrox now stored in banks at the Wakulla Diving Center. That is more Nitrox than we made for an entire year a decade ago. I think our fellow divers have discovered a better way to dive! With Nitrox, at two cents more per cf, Air is no longer the preferred breathing gas. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wenesday Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.8 ft. 2:45 AM 3.8 ft. 3:09 AM 3.8 ft. 3:35 AM 3.8 ft. 4:04 AM 3.7 ft. 4:37 AM 3.6 ft. 5:18 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:31 AM 0.1 ft. 10:02 AM 0.2 ft. 10:34 AM 0.3 ft. 11:10 AM 0.4 ft. 11:53 AM 0.5 ft. 12:47 PM 1.9 ft. 12:43 AM Low 3.6 ft. 3:55 PM 3.6 ft. 4:29 PM 3.4 ft. 5:07 PM 3.3 ft. 5:50 PM 3.1 ft. 6:41 PM 3.0 ft. 7:47 PM 3.4 ft. 6:11 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:23 PM 1.4 ft. 9:52 PM 1.5 ft. 10:25 PM 1.6 ft. 11:01 PM 1.8 ft. 11:45 PM 0.6 ft. 1:57 PM Low 2.9 ft. 9:04 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.9 ft. 2:42 AM 3.9 ft. 3:06 AM 3.9 ft. 3:32 AM 3.8 ft. 4:01 AM 3.8 ft. 4:34 AM 3.6 ft. 5:15 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:28 AM 0.1 ft. 9:59 AM 0.2 ft. 10:31 AM 0.3 ft. 11:07 AM 0.4 ft. 11:50 AM 0.5 ft. 12:44 PM 2.1 ft. 12:40 AM Low 3.7 ft. 3:52 PM 3.6 ft. 4:26 PM 3.5 ft. 5:04 PM 3.4 ft. 5:47 PM 3.2 ft. 6:38 PM 3.0 ft. 7:44 PM 3.4 ft. 6:08 AM High 1.4 ft. 9:20 PM 1.5 ft. 9:49 PM 1.6 ft. 10:22 PM 1.7 ft. 10:58 PM 1.9 ft. 11:42 PM 0.7 ft. 1:54 PM Low 3.0 ft. 9:01 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.5 ft. 3:21 AM 3.6 ft. 3:45 AM 3.5 ft. 4:11 AM 3.5 ft. 4:40 AM High 0.1 ft. 10:35 AM 0.1 ft. 11:06 AM 0.2 ft. 11:38 AM 0.2 ft. 12:14 PM 1.5 ft. 12:05 AM 1.6 ft. 12:49 AM 1.8 ft. 1:47 AM Low 3.4 ft. 4:31 PM 3.3 ft. 5:05 PM 3.2 ft. 5:43 PM 3.1 ft. 6:26 PM 3.4 ft. 5:13 AM 3.3 ft. 5:54 AM 3.1 ft. 6:47 AM High 1.2 ft. 10:27 PM 1.2 ft. 10:56 PM 1.3 ft. 11:29 PM 0.3 ft. 12:57 PM 0.5 ft. 1:51 PM 0.6 ft. 3:01 PM Low 2.9 ft. 7:17 PM 2.8 ft. 8:23 PM 2.7 ft. 9:40 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 2.9 ft. 2:37 AM 2.9 ft. 3:01 AM 2.9 ft. 3:27 AM 2.8 ft. 3:56 AM 2.8 ft. 4:29 AM 2.7 ft. 5:10 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:42 AM 0.1 ft. 10:13 AM 0.1 ft. 10:45 AM 0.2 ft. 11:21 AM 0.3 ft. 12:04 PM 0.4 ft. 12:58 PM 1.4 ft. 12:54 AM Low 2.7 ft. 3:47 PM 2.7 ft. 4:21 PM 2.6 ft. 4:59 PM 2.5 ft. 5:42 PM 2.3 ft. 6:33 PM 2.2 ft. 7:39 PM 2.5 ft. 6:03 AM High 0.9 ft. 9:34 PM 1.0 ft. 10:03 PM 1.1 ft. 10:36 PM 1.2 ft. 11:12 PM 1.3 ft. 11:56 PM 0.5 ft. 2:08 PM Low 2.2 ft. 8:56 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.0 ft. 2:29 AM 3.0 ft. 2:53 AM 3.0 ft. 3:19 AM 2.9 ft. 3:48 AM 2.9 ft. 4:21 AM 2.8 ft. 5:02 AM High 0.1 ft. 9:10 AM 0.1 ft. 9:41 AM 0.2 ft. 10:13 AM 0.2 ft. 10:49 AM 0.4 ft. 11:32 AM 0.5 ft. 12:26 PM 1.9 ft. 12:22 AM Low 2.8 ft. 3:39 PM 2.8 ft. 4:13 PM 2.7 ft. 4:51 PM 2.6 ft. 5:34 PM 2.4 ft. 6:25 PM 2.3 ft. 7:31 PM 2.6 ft. 5:55 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:02 PM 1.3 ft. 9:31 PM 1.4 ft. 10:04 PM 1.6 ft. 10:40 PM 1.8 ft. 11:24 PM 0.6 ft. 1:36 PM Low 2.3 ft. 8:48 PM High Thu Oct 13, 11 Fri Oct 14, 11 Sat Oct 15, 11 Sun Oct 16, 11 Mon Oct 17, 11 Tue Oct 18, 11 Wed Oct 19, 11 Date 3.2 ft. 2:00 AM 3.2 ft. 2:24 AM 3.3 ft. 2:52 AM 3.3 ft. 3:25 AM 3.2 ft. 4:04 AM 3.1 ft. 4:50 AM 3.0 ft. 5:47 AM High 0.3 ft. 9:00 AM 0.3 ft. 9:29 AM 0.2 ft. 10:00 AM 0.3 ft. 10:37 AM 0.3 ft. 11:24 AM 0.4 ft. 12:25 PM 0.4 ft. 1:37 PM Low 2.8 ft. 4:45 PM 2.7 ft. 5:30 PM 2.7 ft. 6:19 PM 2.7 ft. 7:15 PM 2.6 ft. 8:17 PM 2.6 ft. 9:21 PM 2.7 ft. 10:15 PM High 1.8 ft. 8:28 PM 1.9 ft. 8:51 PM 1.9 ft. 9:20 PM 2.0 ft. 9:56 PM 2.0 ft. 10:44 PM 2.0 ft. 11:56 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacOct. 13 Oct. 19First Nov. 2 Full Nov. 10 Last Oct. 19 New Oct. 26Major Times 2:07 AM 4:07 AM 2:29 PM 4:29 PM Minor Times 8:57 AM 9:57 AM 7:56 PM 8:56 PM Major Times 2:52 AM 4:52 AM 3:16 PM 5:16 PM Minor Times 9:51 AM 10:51 AM 8:35 PM 9:35 PM Major Times 3:40 AM 5:40 AM 4:04 PM 6:04 PM Minor Times 10:45 AM 11:45 AM 9:20 PM 10:20 PM Major Times 4:29 AM 6:29 AM 4:54 PM 6:54 PM Minor Times 11:38 AM 12:38 PM 10:08 PM 11:08 PM Major Times 5:19 AM 7:19 AM 5:45 PM 7:45 PM Minor Times 12:28 PM 1:28 PM 11:01 PM 12:01 AM Major Times 6:10 AM 8:10 AM 6:36 PM 8:36 PM Minor Times 1:16 PM 2:16 PM 11:57 PM 12:57 AM Major Times 7:01 AM 9:01 AM 7:27 PM 9:27 PM Minor Times --:---:-2:00 PM 3:00 PM Better++ Better Average Average Average Average Average7:37 am 7:08 pm 7:57 pm 8:58 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:38 am 7:07 pm 8:36 pm 9:52 am 7:38 am 7:06 pm 9:20 pm 10:46 am 7:39 am 7:05 pm 10:09 pm 11:38 am 7:40 am 7:04 pm 11:02 pm 12:28 pm 7:40 am 7:03 pm 11:58 pm 1:16 pm 7:41 am 7:02 pm --:-2:01 pm93% 87% 81% 75% 68% 62% 56% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings:High TideLow Tide Carrabelle28 Min.25 Min. Apalachicola1 Hr., 53 Min.2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point1 Hr., 13 Min.2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage1 Hr., 36 Min.2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass1 Hr., 26 Min.2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance PARTNER… www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News while quantities last. Corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave. Downtown Sopchoppy926-1010Order a baked good and drink and receive a complimentary copy of Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSAFFORDABLE COVERAGE TO SAVE YOU MONEY Ross E. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 13AreportsLaw Enforcement and CourtsOn Sept. 29, William Anderson of Panacea reported a burglary on his property. A generator, garage door parts and copper were stolen from the property and the fence was damaged. Damage to the property was estimated at $1,500 and the value of the stolen property is valued at $750. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: € On Sept. 29, Donald Speigner of Century Link reported a grand theft in Panacea. The phone company reported the loss of copper and damage to the property fence, totaling $2,000. Lt. Danny Harrell investigated. € On Sept. 29, Travis Barfield of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. Electronics, tools and a mower, valued at $2,150, were reported missing. Suspects have been identi“ ed. € On Sept. 29, John Ward of Tallahassee reported a Crawfordville theft. A lawn mower, valued at $500, was stolen. € On Sept. 29, Deputy Rachel Oliver responded to a “ ght between two women at a Crawfordville home. The women, Amanda Bollivar, 26, and Natalie Jean Foles, 32, both of Crawfordville, were charged with battery and criminal mischief for damaging the home. Both women suffered minor injuries. Damage to the home was estimated at $400. € On Sept. 30, Mandy McCranie of Panacea reported a grand theft of her bulldog from her residence. The dog is valued at $500. € On Oct. 2, a “ re was reported at Walgreens in Crawfordville. The Wakulla County Fire Department put out a blaze that originated at the rear of the building where cardboard is stored. The “ re was ruled an accident. € On Oct. 2, David K. Kemp of Panacea reported an animal incident. The victim reported that two bulldogs killed his cat and acted aggressively toward him on his property. The dogs were shot and the animal owner retrieved the bodies. No charges were “ led. € On Oct. 2, a concerned citizen from Crawfordville reported spotting a small child playing in the middle of Obediah Triplett Road. The child followed the concerned citizen to her home. Deputy Clint Beam located the childs mother searching for him. The juvenile walked a little less than a mile before being spotted. The mother was sleeping and did not realize the child was missing until more than an hour passed. The case was reported to the Department of Children and Families. €On Oct. 2, a retail theft was reported at CVS in Crawfordville after two female suspects allegedly put more than 30 boxes of medications into a large purse. The women ran out of the store when they were confronted. The medications are valued at $1,000. € On Oct. 2, Pamela Power of Crawfordville reported a felony criminal mischief at the Bridle Wood Apartments. The common area of the clubhouse was flooded from the womens restroom. Drains were clogged and the sink was left running. Feces were smeared on the walls and mirrors of the mens and womens restroom. Water damaged the wooden floor which will have to be replaced at a cost of $4,260. € On Oct. 1, Deputy Mike Zimba responded to a traf“ c accident on Old Plank Road. Carla Summer Chouinard, 17, of Crawfordville was driving a Toyota Corolla northbound when a deer ran in front of the vehicle. The driver turned the wheel to avoid the deer and crashed into the woods, causing the vehicle to overturn. Three passengers were in the vehicle, but none of the teenagers or driver was seriously injured. Vehicle damage was estimated at $10,000. € On Oct. 1, Scott McKinney of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his property gate. Someone pushed on the gate snapping a chain and bending the metal. Damage was estimated at $150. € On Oct. 2, Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a vehicle crash on East Ivan Road west of Lonnie Raker Lane. A van was observed in a ditch at the tree line. The airbags were deployed and the windshield was cracked. Blood was observed on the airbags, but nobody was at the scene of the wreck. Capt. Randall Taylor found the alleged driver and a passenger walking on Whiddon Lake Road. Craig Randall Brown, 37, of Crawfordville was determined to be the driver. He was accompanied by Sandra Jean Brown, 38, of Crawfordville. Craig Brown suffered a head injury in the accident and was transported by Wakulla EMS to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for treatment. A follow-up DUI investigation will be conducted. € On Sept. 30, Kevin Donaldson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft from his home. An air conditioning unit, 40 tin panels and a set of metal trailer tongs were reported missing. The stolen property is valued at $2,500 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Oct. 3, Robin Dias of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary at his home. A “ rearm, holster, magazines and ammunition, valued at $740, were reported missing. € On Oct. 3, Teresa Locke of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Two deep freezers, a saw, tiller handle for a motor, aluminum siding, two space heaters and dishes, valued at $1,700, were reported missing from the vacant home. A suspect has been identi“ ed. € On Oct. 3, Connie Zuchowski of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Two males were observed on the victims property attempting to steal a 50-foot piece of growing bamboo. The plant is valued at $35. This is the second case where someone has attempted to steal bamboo from the property. € On Oct. 4, a retail theft was reported at Hibbett Sports after an employee reportedly observed a suspect conceal a ball cap, valued at $25, and leave without purchasing it. € On Oct. 4, Rajvinder Serai of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Furniture, a washer and dryer and a computer, valued at $3,300, were reported missing. The house appeared to have been ransacked. Locks were stolen off storage units on the property, but it has not been determined if anything was taken from the units. € On Oct. 5, James Thomas of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered his home and tore out the walls. A forced entry into the mobile home was observed. Electrical wires were stolen along with light switches. Pipes in the bathroom were also stolen. The value of the stolen items was $1,000 and damage to the residence was estimated at $1,500. € On Oct. 5, Amanda Win“ eld of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim returned to her home to “ nd a front door window broken. Damage was estimated at $50. € On Oct. 5, Mark Moses of Progress Energy reported an illegal dumping at a company substation in Crawfordville. Someone dumped garbage into the companys leased trash container. The company uses the bin for scrap wood. A television, computer, medical supplies and scrap metal were recovered. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 729 calls for service during the past week.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputies providing law enforcement coverage at the Wakulla War Eagle football game Friday, Oct. 7 arrested an 18-year-old Tallahassee man at 8:45 p.m. after allegedly observing him attempting to enter parked vehicles, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Brandon Lee Durrance, 18, of Tallahassee was charged with two counts of burglary of a vehicle and one count each of grand theft and attempted theft. A concerned citizen contacted Lt. Dale Evans about a suspicious male walking around parked vehicles in the bus loading area. Lt. Evans was joined by Lt. Billy Jones and Reserve Deputy Jerry Finney as the of“ cers observed their suspect checking to see if vehicle doors were locked. After observing Durrance checking for open vehicles, officers apprehended their suspect and discovered that he had a car stereo tucked inside his pants. While officers investigated the first theft, a second victim shouted out to deputies from a short distance away that his vehicle had been broken into as well. A stereo inside the second vehicle had been tampered with but was left inside the truck. Durrance was taken to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. He remains in jail under at $8,000 bond.Arrest made for vehicle break-ins at game WCSOBrandon Lee Durrance The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce K-9 Unit located a 4-year-old child who was reported missing from an Obediah Triplett Road residence in Crawfordville Tuesday, Oct. 4, according to Sheriff Donnie Crum. Sgt. Ronald Mitchell and his K-9 partner Gunny tracked the child and Sgt. Mitchell observed a small child running in the distance. He asked the child to stop and asked the boy if he wanted to play with the dog. The child came closer to pet Gunny and Sgt. Mitchell loaded the child, who was not wearing any shoes, on his back while K-9 Gunny retraced his track out of the woods. The child was returned to his mother. Several days earlier, the same child was found by a concerned citizen walking down Obediah Triplett Road unattended. K-9 “ nds missing child Wakulla Christian School, in coordination with the Wakulla County Veterans Services Office, is proud to host the Saturday, November 5, 20 11 at Hudson Park Games, Food and Family Fun Parade Starts @ 10:00a.m. A portion of the proceeds from this Grand Event will be donated to local Veterans Services Office. Your family or organization is invited to be involved as a vital part of this celebration by entering your loved ones’ names on your car, truck, or float in the parade, or by contributing as a sponsor in honoring our brave troops and veterans. For more information please contact Keven Hollan Parade Coordinator at 850-745-8649 or 850-926-5186. Or you can email him at keven.hollan@gmail.com “Honoring All Who Served” Soldier Care Packages 5th Annual Veterans Day Parade and Celebration to Support Our Troops and Honor Our Veterans Wakulla Christian School is collecting public donations of items to send to our troops wish list items include individually wrapped beef jerky, Pringles, individually wrapped sunflower seeds, individually wrapped nuts, individually packaged mix of Propel Fitness Water and Gatorade, individually packaged hard candy and gummy bears, white tube socks, protein bars, granola bars, books, soap, razors, sunscreen, nail files, AA batteries and Ziploc bags. WCS is collecting names of soldiers serving in Iraq and Afghanistan who will receive the care packages Please contact Wakulla Christian School Boosters @ 850-591-8132 Drop off any items at one of the following suppo rtive businesses in Wakulla or Leon counties: bigbendhospice.org2889 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-9308Committed to Excellence… Committed to Wakulla County! My name is Amy Geiger and I recommend Big Bend Hospice.”“I am proud to be a volunteer with Big Bend Hospice. I have witnessed the outstanding care that hospice delivers in our community. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netRunners, walkers, bicyclists and others who have missed using the entire 16mile Tallahassee-St. Marks Historic Railroad State Trail while a portion was closed for construction will be happy to know it is now open and they can expect a smoother ride. St. Marks City Commissioner Gail Gilman said it was nice to see the trail “ nished. Avid riders want to go as far as they can go,Ž Gilman said. Gilman said she also hopes it will bring more people to St. Marks. The southside of the trail ends at Riverside Drive in St. Marks. The portion from Riverside Drive to Wakulla Station was completed last October. The project was done in two phases so the entire trail wouldnt have to be closed. Gilman was at the ribbon cutting ceremony held on Oct. 6 for the reopening of the portion of the trail from Tallahassee to the Wakulla Station trailhead. This portion has been closed since January. The trail was repaved and widened from 8 feet to 12 feet. The base was also stabilized. New restrooms and several pavilions were also added at the Wakulla Station trailhead, as well as comfort stations every 3 miles along the trail. Chief of the Office of Greenways and Trails Jim Wood said the main goal was to improve and update the trail. The biggest issue was the width, Wood said. It was the only state trail that was not at the standard 12-foot width. The trail is a multi-use trail, which means varying speeds. The pavement was also an issue, Wood said. The trail was the “ rst rail trail to be paved 20 years ago and required a fair amount of maintenance, Wood said. Repaving the road was the most cost effective solution, Wood said. Wood said his office heard a lot of concern that the canopy along the trail would be ruined, but they made it a priority to keep it the same. The total cost of the project was $3.7 million and was paid for by a 2006 legislative appropriation. The trail was actually completed two months ago, but Wood said they were trying to tie the reopening to Greenways and Trails Month. Plus there were a few loose ends that needed to be completed once the repaving was done, Wood said. There were several speakers at the ribbon cutting, including a representative of Capital City Cyclists, Hans van Tol. Florida Park Service Director Donald Forgione was the keynote speaker and said trails were about connecting people. Its not just asphalt running down the side of the road, its community,Ž Forgione said. Along with the repaving and widening of the trail, the Of“ ce of Greenways and Trails has also committed to building a boardwalk in St. Marks. The boardwalk will be funded by the Florida Department of Transportation. The boardwalk has been discussed for three years and construction has yet to begin. The city constructed its portion of the boardwalk and is waiting for its connector. City Manager Zoe Mans“ eld said the boardwalk is still happening, but they are unsure when construction will begin. The city was also told an observation tower would be built. However, Mans“ eld said she was told that is no longer being funded. The Tallahassee-St. Marks Railroad began operation in 1837 and was the “ rst in Florida. Operating for 147 years, it was also the longest operating rail system. During the Civil War, it was used to transport Confederate Troops. It was also used primarily to transport cotton from plantations to ships. The Florida Department of Transportation purchased the 16 miles of property and dedicated the trail in 1988. It was the “ rst rail trail to receive a federal land grant to pave the route. It is now maintained by the Florida Park Service. Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TODIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition isFREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service JENNIFER JENSENThe ribbon-cutting ceremony marked completion of improvements on the rail trail.Rail trail work is completedThe St. Marks Rail Trail is now open again from St. Marks to TallahasseeOptimists host Fashion Show WILLIAM SNOWDENThe Coastal Optimists Club held its second annual Fashion Show on Thursday, Oct. 6 at the senior center. The models, above, are seen backstage wearing out“ ts from local clothing stores. Larry Massa, below, makes his way through the diners wearing a casual ensemble. 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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 Green cleaning products that actually cleanEarthTalk, Page 3BWoodstork Festival Page 10B Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance General Landscaping/Lawn Maint. Licensed-Insured3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite #1 The Log Cabinƒƒƒ TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011By LYNN ARTZCounty Commissioner On Sunday, Oct. 16, community volunteers are needed for an ambitious wild” ower planting project along Highway 98. The volunteers will help sow native wild” owers seeds in the right-of-way along 98 between Crawfordville Highway and Spring Creek Highway. This is the perfect opportunity for a family or a community group to come out together to enjoy the fresh air and help to beautify Wakulla County. In addition to seed sowers, volunteers are needed to pull up weeds such as dog fennel and ragweed that compete with roadside wild” owers. Still more volunteers are needed to collect trash and recyclables along the roadside. Volunteers are to report on Sunday between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m., preferably on-the-hour. Volunteers should come to the parking lot beside Wakulla High School to sign in and obtain instructions and supplies. Volunteers may start and stop whenever they wish. Volunteers are encouraged to register in advance by calling Volunteer Wakulla at (850) 745-0060 or by sending an email to lynn_artz@hotmail.com. Please provide your name and contact information, your expected start time, and the number of volunteers who will accompany you. Volunteers should bring rakes and gardening gloves if they have them (and a shovel if willing to weed). For comfort, each volunteer should bring drinking water, a hat and sunblock. The seeds to be planted were obtained through a $500 grant awarded to Wakulla County by the Florida Wild” ower Foundation (with funding from sales of Floridas State Wild” ower license plate), and generous donations from ESG, Just Fruits & Exotics Nursery, the Iris Garden Club of Wakulla, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and County Commissioner Lynn Artz. All seeds were obtained from the Florida Wild” ower Growers Cooperative and are Florida ecotype seeds. Most of the seeds to be planted are a mixture of 16 plants. The upland meadow mix includes spring bloomers such as Coreopsis basalis (dye ” ower or goldenmane tickseed), fall bloomers such as Liatris (blazing star or gay feather) and Solidago (golden rod), and native grasses such as Tridens ” avus (purple top), Eragrostis spectabilis (purple love grass) and Muhlenbergia capillaris (purple muhly grass). Seeds for red and yellow blooms will be added to the mix for more color. These color boosters include Gaillardia pulchella (blanket ” ower) and Coreopsis basalis (dye ” ower or goldenmane tickseed). Wild” owers provide food for butter” ies and other pollinators which, in turn, bene“ ts local agriculture. Just as fall colors attract tourists in northern climates, so do wild” ower blooms attract tourists in warmer climates. This stretch of 98 is part of Wakulla Countys roadside wild” ower preservation project with the Florida Department of Transportation. It is also a segment of the Big Bend Scenic Byway.Extension agents often share ideas with each other that can be utilized both on the job and personally. I remember an Escambia Family and Consumer Sciences agent telling me about a border in their office gardens that was made out of recycled wine bottles. Since I was in the midst of landscaping my backyard, I immediately put the word out to all of my friends that I would utilize any wine bottles they wanted to offer. Before long, I had enough to “ nish this project. I now have a border that is made out of all beautiful blue bottles of which I placed upside down at various heights to make an interesting back drop for a planted area. It provides such a colorful addition and cost me nothing. I know of another friend who plans to use colored recycled glass that will be carefully broken and used to enhance the stepping stones she is making to place in an outside area that has insuf“ cient light to grow plants. I was happy to see that the UF/IFAS Solutions for your Life website utilized materials developed by the St. Lucie County extension agents to post ways to repurpose household items for the garden. This allows you to creatively use an item instead of allowing it to be trashed, delivered to our land“ ll to remain for years. I would like to share a few of their ideas offered while inserting a few of my own. € CDs. I love the idea of using scratched or discarded CDs as coasters for potted plants that may stain your deck or patio furniture. The holes provide the necessary drainage for plants while protecting the wood from discoloration. € Carpet. If you lay carpet over an area you intend for a new garden bed and leave it for several weeks, all the grass underneath will decompose, making it easier to dig. Carpet can also be used as a pathway liner that you can top with stone or mulch. It is recommended that you use woven, not rubber-backed carpet. The Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce, in partnership with the Department of Transportation and Sustainable Big Bend, had the silt cloth used along highway construction to control water be delivered to the of“ ce so that people could stop by and take as much as they needed for similar situations. DOT was happy not to have another delivery to the land“ ll and residents were happy to get weed resistant covering for gardens and ” ower beds. Consider contacting DOT if you see something similar. It is a win-win situation for everyone. Continued on Page 3B By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Ideas for recycling in the gardenSought: Volunteers to help sow wild owers along Highway 98 WILDFLOWER EXPLOSION: Coreopsis basalis blooming last year at Bloxham Cutoff and Shadeville Road. 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IMPROVE YOUR INDOOR AIR QUALITY: Just one cleaning with the Host System reduces is NOT is not 2 Great Guys www.hostdry.comhost is a member of the U.S. GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL Safer Detergents Stewartship Initiative PROUDPRODUCERSO F Certied BioPreferred Call us Today for a FREE Consultation! 85054 4-4439Walk on your Dry & Restored Carpet when we leave!

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, October 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce,2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, October 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Friday at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  FRIDAY AFTERNOON BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  SASSY STRIPPERS QUILTERS GROUP meets at the public library from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. to make quilts for traumatized children. The “cruiser quilts” are donated to Wakulla County deputies to be used for children in need. New members welcome. For information, call 926-6290.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  BIG BEND HOSPICE ADVISORY COUNCIL will meet at 1 p.m. at Beef O’Brady’s in Crawfordville. Call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 or 508-8749 for more information. Saturday, October 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Saturday at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS meets at 3128 Crawfordville Highway at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWER’S MARKET is held every Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., in front of Posh Java in Sopchoppy. The market features local organic and unsprayed vegetables, homemade fresh bread from Crescent Moon Farm, live music and varying demonstrations, events, vendors and activities. Growers and seafood vendors wanting to participate may phone Jennifer Taylor at (850) 241-3873 or email famu. register@gmail.com. For more information, contact Posh at 962-1010 or Debbie Dix at 528-5838, or email posh_faery@ yahoo.com.  UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY, the R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library.  WAKULLA COUNTY PATRIOTS will meet from 9 a.m. to noon at the library. Their mission is to promote freedom and understanding of the Constitution and promote its restoration.  SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS will meet from 6 to 7 p.m. at the library. Sunday, October 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets each Sunday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. Monday, October 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Marks First Baptist Church.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN meets each Monday at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring your loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  YOGAS CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, October 18  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at Beef O’Brady’s at 6 p.m.  IRIS GARDEN CLUB will meet from noon to 4 p.m. at the library.  FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY, Sarracenia Chapter, will meet from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the library. Barney Parker of St. Marks NWR will make the feature presentation on the migration of the monarch butter y.  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at noon at the Historic Wakulla County Courthouse on High Drive in Crawfordville. Wednesday, October 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, October 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  BINGO will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. at La Cantina Grille in Panacea to bene t Florida Wild Mammal Association.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  RECYCLE TASK FORCE will meet from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the library.  CONCERNED CITIZENS OF WAKULLA will meet from 7 to 8 p.m. at the library. Pam Portwood, director of the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council, will be the guest speaker.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Special EventsThursday, October 13  GRAND OPENING of Sen. Bill Montford’s district satellite of ce in Apalachicola will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at 58 Market Street. The of ce was opened to serve the communities between Wakulla and Bay counties. Friday, October 14  FOOD PRESERVATION WORSKHOP will be held at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. David Moody, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge director, and Shelley Swenson, extension agent, will be covering the basics of food preservation through pressure canning and dehydrating. There is a $5 registration fee. Enroll by calling the Extension Of ce, 926-3931.  NASHVILLE COUNTRY SINGER/SONGWRITER Joe Doyle will perform at Posh Java in Sopchoppy at 8 p.m. Trafton Harvey and Chelsea Dix Kessler will open the show. To reserve seats contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com. Tickets are $15. Saturday, October 15  GARAGE SALE at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.  FALL FESTIVAL will be held at Shadeville Elementary School from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be children’s booths, laser tag, bingo and Polynesian Fire Knife Dancers. There will also be hamburgers and hotdogs, a cake walk, soda walk, nachos and cheese booth and a sweet shop.  BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA BOOK GIVEAWAY will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library from 9 a.m. to noon. There will be books, video and audio available.  MULLET FISH FRY will be hosted by the Sopchoppy Lions Club from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Sopchoppy Hardware Building. Price per plate is a $10 donation. Call 962-3711 or 962-2201 for more information.  BENEFIT YARD SALE, BAKE SALE AND FACE PAINTING for the Anthony Revell Scholarship Fund will be held at Hudson Park from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will also be an opportunity to purchase tickets for a raf e in November. All proceeds will be donated to the scholarship fund. Donations can also be made directly to the TCC Foundation’s website in Anthony Revell’s name. Revell was killed in a motorcycle accident on June 29.  TODD ALLEN SHOW: A Tribute to the Legends will be held at 7 p.m. at the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium in Sopchoppy. Call 962-3711 for ticket information. Sunday, October 16  REVELL FAMILY REUNION, descendants of Alexander Revell, Celia Strickland Revell and Laura Clemons Revell, will be held in the Sopchoppy City Park from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Bring a covered dish if you plan to attend. For more information, call 766-4779.  WILDFLOWER PLANTING PROJECT will be held along Coastal Highway (98) from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help sow native wild owers seeds in the right-of-way along 98 between Crawfordville Highway (319) and Spring Creek Highway. Volunteers should come to the parking lot beside Wakulla High School to sign in. Register by calling Volunteer Wakulla at (850) 745-0060 or by sending an email to lynn_artz@hotmail.com. Monday, October 17  BROWN BAG LUNCH SERIES on Managing through Coaching and Mentoring will be held at the Wakulla County Chamber Of ce from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. FSU Jim Moran Institute will be holding this class. RSVP the Chamber of ce at 926-1848. Classes are free to chamber members, nonmembers will be charged a fee. Tuesday, October 18  COMMUNITY MEETING will be held at the Summertrace Apartments Community Room at 6 p.m. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to attend and voice their opinion regarding water bill minimum and increases. Thursday, October 20  CHAMBER BUSINESS MIXER will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. at Two Blondes Liquors and Gifts in Panacea, 82 Coastal Highway 98. There will be a beer tasting and appetizers. For reservations, call 926-1848. Friday, October 21  CREATURE FEATURE will be held at the Wakulla Springs State Park from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Entrance is free. “The Creature from the Black Lagoon,” will be shown on the big screen TV in the lobby. The Creature is expected to make an appearance.  NJROTC FISH FRY will be held from 4:30 to 7 p.m. before the Wakulla vs. Suwannee football game. Plates are $7 and include shrimp, cheese grits, cole slaw, hush puppies and tea, provided by Posey’s Up the Creek. Proceeds allow the cadets to take trips, such as the one to Parris Island, Marine Corps Depot, in South Carolina.  FORE THE BUILD GOLF TOURNAMENT will be presented by Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County at Wildwood Golf Course. Registration starts at 7:30 a.m. and the shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m. Cost is $50 per player or $200 per team. For more information, call 545-7425. Saturday, October 22  TRAIN CLUB FOR SPECTRUM CHILDREN OF WAKULLA COUNTY will be held from 10 a.m. to noon at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville. RSVP to Carrie Stevens at (850) 274-9474 or carriejstevens@comcast.net. Children need to bring their favorite train and a snack and drink. All spectrum children and their siblings are invited. Children must be accompanied by a parent.  MONARCH BUTTERFLY FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. For more information, email saintmarks@fws.gov or call (850) 925-6121.  ST. MARKS STONE CRAB FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. in downtown St. Marks. Portions of the pro ts will go to the St. Marks Waterfronts Florida Partnership and the St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department. For more information, call 925-1053 or visit www.stmarksstonecrabfest.com. Wednesday, October 26  CHAMBER NETWORKING LUNCHEON will be held at Bouy’s Bayside Restaurant in Panacea from noon to 1:15 p.m. RSVP to the Chamber of ce 926-1848. Thursday, October 27  CANDLELIGHT VIGIL will be held by the Narcotics Overdose and Prevention and Education Task Force at Hudson Park beginning with a reception at 6:30 p.m. followed by the vigil at 6:45 p.m. For more information, call 926-0024. Food preservation workshop at 7 p.m. at the extension of ce. Mullet Fish Fry at Sopchoppy Hardware from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wild ower planting project along Coastal Highway from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Managing through Coaching and Mentoring class at 11:30 a.m. at the chamber.FridaySaturdaySundayMonday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.netPost your event on TheWakullaNews.com Tail Wagger...By JOAN HENDRIXCHAT PresidentAs the fall season arrives and Halloween silently moves in with the wind, CHAT-OBERFEST patiently waits at the Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment for a day of fun and fright. Excitement is in the air and volunteers have been busy planning a party that is meant for all fun loving and dog loving Halloween trick or treaters. Put on your walking shoes, review your poker playing skills, round up your doxies, get those costumes out for yourself and your doggie, prepare to have your face painted, and wake up those taste buds. Join us for a fantastic day of events and delicious bratwurst right off the grill. The party begins at 9 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 29, at CHAT Adoption Center, 1 Oak Street, Crawfordville. The Poker Walk registration is from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., with winning hands of $300, $100 and $50. We are looking forward to the annual Pet Costume Contest; entry fee is $10 with categories of best costume and scariest costume. Prizes will be given for “ rst, second and third place and finally a king or queen will be crowned. Towards the end of the day, get ready for the “ nale event that everyone anxiously waits for, the weiner races. The pre registration is $15, on the day of the race $20. Age groups are: puppy up to 1 year, 2 to 5 years, and 6 years and older. If youve never seen those short little feet running to their family member or those little ears ” ying in the wind, youll never forget how wonderful this event is. We dare you to come! Well be waiting for you! City and County MeetingsThursday, October 13  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will meet for its regular commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall.  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at 8:30 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites, 3292 Coastal Highway 98. The purpose of this meeting is to conduct strategic planning and general business of the Council. Friday, October 14  WAKULLA COUNTY VALUE ADJUSTMENT BOARD will hold public hearings regarding petitions that have been led with the VAB. Hearings start at 1 p.m. and are held in the commission chambers. The meetings are open to the public. Monday, October 17  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will meet for its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, October 20  WAKULLA COUNTY ENERGY CONSERVATION COMMITTEE will meet at 10 a.m. in the county commission conference room.

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Dear EarthTalk: I want to use cleaning products that are healthier for the environment, but I worry that baking soda and the like wont really get my tub and toilet germ-free. Should I continue using bleach products in the bathroom? Margaret Pierce Columbia, Mo. When it comes to household cleaning products, most mainstream brands make use of chlorine bleach, ammonia or any number of other chemicals that can wreak havoc on the environment and human health. Ammonia is a volatile organic compound that can irritate the respiratory system and mucous membranes if inhaled, and can cause chemical burns if spilled on the skin. Bleach contains sodium hypochlorite, which can cause eczema and other skin ailments as well as breathing difficulties if inhaled. And when it reacts with other elements in the environment, toxic organochlorinesŽ can form, damaging the ozone layer and causing health issues such as immune suppression, reproductive difficulties and even cancer. Fortunately, growing public concern about the health effects of toxic exposure have led to an explosion of environmentally friendlier and non-toxic products,Ž says the health information website. WebMD. There are many products in this category … from laundry detergents and fabric softeners to multi-surface and ” oor cleaners, to tile and bathroom cleaners … that areƒsafer for people and the planet.Ž WebMD warns that while many are indeed safer, others are greenwashed,Ž meaning they are marketed as natural while still including suspect chemicals.Ž How does one know? Get in the simple practice of looking at product labels to see if the cleaning manufacturer is clearly disclosing all ingredients,Ž reports WebMD. If it is notƒit could mean the manufacturer is trying to hide a particular suspect ingredient.Ž Also, just because a product has an eco-certi“ cation printed on its label doesnt necessarily mean it should be trusted. To make sure, check the EcoLabels section of Consumer Reports Greener Choices website, which gives the low-down on what labels really mean and whether they are backed up by government regulations. Another good resource is the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Household Products Database, which provides ingredient lists for thousands of products on U.S. store shelves. If you want to play it safe and natural when cleaning your home, WebMD suggests using white distilled vinegar … it kills mold and mildew, eliminates soap scum and sanitizes, all in one fell swoop … to clean windows, tile, cutting boards and countertops. Another effective yet gentle natural cleaner for countertops and bathtubs is baking soda, especially when mixed with a few drops of mild soap. Borax can be called in for tougher stains. If youre interested in cleaning greener, there are many sources of natural cleaning recipes online. Or check out the cleaning products aisle at your local natural food store, where you will “ nd a wide range of cleaning formulations from the likes of Seventh Generation, Ecover, Green Works and Earth Friendly Products (which sells a Safeguard Your HomeŽ retail pack that includes one each of a window cleaner, an all-purpose cleaner, a dishwashing liquid, an automatic dishwasher gel, a laundry detergent and a fabric refresher), among many others. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 3B 1981 1981 Wakulla High School Wakulla High School Calling All Football Players, Cheerleaders, and Band Members to Attend Wakulla High School TORECEIVEHALF-TIME RECOGNITIONGame time 7:30Friday,October 28at the Wakulla High School StadiumFor more information contact WHS Athletic Director Mike Smith850-926-7125 Come Join the Fun at Shadeville Elementarys Annual Fall Festival! TICKETS at TREATSCome see some 713-001499 Rock Landing Road Summer HOurs: Open Thursday, Sunday, & Monday 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Friday & Saturday 11 A.M. 10 P.M. Enjoy Outdoor Seating Ove rlo oki ng Bea uti ful Dic ker son Bay!SATURD AY AND SUNDA Y LUN CH SPE CIALS 11a. m. 3 p.m A ll U nde r $ 10. DOMESTIC BEER$1.50WELLS$2 THURSDAYS THURSDAYS$3.00 DOZ OYSTERS ALL YOU CAN EAT SHRIMP $12.95 BABY BACK RIBS $9.95How do I get green cleaning products that really clean?Continued from Page 1B € Styrofoam peanuts. Although we are “ nding more and more packing companies asking for the return of Styrofoam peanuts so they can be reused, the peanuts can also be used in the bottom of potted plants. It is recommended that you first insert a dryer sheet and then a layer of peanuts. Add your potting soil and plants. This helps reduce the weight of a big planter. Larger foam pieces can be broken or cut and used as space fillers in larger pots or as bases for raised garden beds. € Plastic bottles and containers. Cut the bottom off gallon jugs and place them over seedlings and young plants to protect them for the cold. Take them off during the day to keep the plants from overheating. Turn them into funnels or scoops needed when gardening. Make a bird feeder by making cutouts with cross dowels for perches on the side of the bottle. Keep the lid on to keep the seed dry. € Rainwater. It is so simple to collect and use rainwater. With planning, rainwater can be collected and used for watering plants. Whether it is through bucket collection or a rain barrel, this is a resource that should never be overlooked. The idea is to put collection barrels or buckets under downspouts. I dont have that option due to the design of my home but you would be surprised at how much I can collect even without the downspout location for my rain barrel. It is necessary that after you collect the water, in any fashion, you put a screen over the water to keep mosquitoes for being attracted. Screen is a lot more user friendly than it has been in the past; the materials used are more ” exible and less harsh with which to work. Stretched elastic is a perfect way to keep the screen in place. € Miscellaneous ideas: A dryer sheet in the bottom of a ” ower pot keeps the soil from coming out of the drainage holes. Very few women wear hose any more, but if you can “ nd some discarded hose, cut in desired lengths make excellent ties for vines and tomatoes. Discarded mini-blinds, cut it 6-8 inch lengths make great identi“ cation tags for plants. Look around and see other items that can be utilized through garden re-purposing. Perhaps you have old dishes that can be converted to planters, utensils used as plant markers or wind chimes, tree branches and trunk as sculptures, bed sets turned into benches, and headboards, sunk into the ground as trellises or furniture pieces planted with ” owers. If you have additional ideas, I would love to know them. County Extension Office staff are always trying to encourage the creative re-use of things to keep our environment cleaner and less waste “ nding its way to land“ lls. I would share your ideas with my colleagues across the panhandle. Recycling is a good way to bring out your creative side and build a uniquely beautiful garden area. Swenson: Ideas for recycling in the garden If youre interested in cleaning greener, there are many sources of natural cleaning recipes online. Or check out the cleaning products aisle at your local natural food store, where you will “ nd a wide range of cleaning formulations safe for your health and the environment. Pictured is Earth Friendly Products Safeguard Your HomeŽ retail pack.PHOTO BY EARTH FRIENDLY PRODUCTS

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH AND FITNESSWhat prevents people from jumping on the yoga bandwagon? According to a new survey conducted by Yoga Alliance, several misconceptions could be whats keeping non-yogis from trying their “ rst class. Below is an excerpt from the press release: The research sought feedback from people who have never stepped foot in a studio as well as those who have made yoga an essential part of their lives. It found that, despite growing buzz, there are many Americans who know little about yoga or, worse, have incorrect assumptions which inhibit them from participation. The three most common misperceptions are that yoga: Is religion-based. Fiftyseven percent of those who do not currently practice yoga believe that it requires mantras or chanting related to a form of worship. Requires ” exibility in order to practice. Nearly three in “ ve Americans … 59 percent of respondents … who do not practice yoga think that it requires a person to be in at least decent shape. In truth, however, anyone … of any size, shape or physical state … can bene“ t. Is not really exercise. Half of men who have never practiced yoga believe it isnt a workout. In contrast, 73 percent of people who do practice believe it is just as effective as running, swimming or weightlifting.Ž That con“ rms my suspicions about why some people are simply not interested in yoga. I think its a shame that misinformation about the practice has led so many to shun something that so many have found bene“ cial. It makes me wonder, what are we, as a community, doing wrong? What can we do to help people understand more clearly what yoga is really all about? Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu teacher in Panacea. She can be reached at (228) 3800140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Lets face it: Women are the superheroes of the planet. We are the negotiators, referees, breadwinners, daycare attendants, doctors, lawyers and therapists for our families. At the end of the day, we can make a meal out of almost anything in the fridge and call it a meal “ t for a king. Yep, that is a superhero in my book, more like a Wonder Woman. Naturally, where there is a superhero there is always a villain who wants to destroy us. That arch enemy is breast cancer. October is National Breast Cancer and Awareness Month. What super powers do we have to do battle our arch-rival? As we know, self-exams, annual physicals and mammograms, right? What about keeping our bodies strong to do battle if needed? Everyone knows that if you exercise and eat a healthy diet you will reduce body fat. Better than that is when you exercise you also reduce your chances of breast cancer. The American Cancer Society predicts that 288,000 American women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and that the disease will take the lives of 39,520 American women this year. So what are you going to do to take your battle to the next level? Research proves that we can reduce these numbers if we exercise and stay active. In fact, several studies have proven that physical activity reduces the risk of breast cancer. Active women have roughly a 20 percent lower risk of getting breast cancer than their less active counterparts. So, Wonder Woman, with so many choices of how to stay active and healthy, you never have to give up on this battle. We have come a long way, baby, from Jane Fonda exercise tapes and jazzercise (nothing wrong with old school). This day and age we have a wide variety of physical “ tness programs to choose from: health and wellness CDs, internet classes on YouTube, webinars and articles on how to exercise. Step aerobics, kickboxing and spinning classes are popping up everywhere. Certi“ ed Personal Trainers are there to help you pump up. There are many races to enter such as Race for the Cure, Tuff Mudder and Disney Marathons. One of my favorites is Zumba Fitness, which uses dances such as salsa and merengue to build those leg muscles, keep the heart healthy and have fun at the same time. We have so many choices, it is like an exercise buffet. You, Wonder Woman, can choose your line of defense whether it is weightlifting, running or dancing. It is up to you to choose your hero power and train to keep yourself strong. The most important thing is that you GOTTA MOVE.Ž In our beloved Wakulla County right now, we have several women battling their arch enemy and we need to make sure that they know they are not alone and that we support them in their battle with this evil doer. Please stay strong, Wonder Woman, so we can “ ght another day. To help you on your journey, heres a famous DC Comic Wonder Woman Series quote for you: Go in peace my daughter, and remember that in a world of ordinary mortals, you are a Wonder Woman.Ž Please remember this is the month to donate. Go to www.nationalbreastcancer. org to “ nd out more about breast cancer events and donations opportunities.Pamela Chichester, CFT, is manager of Body-Tek 24 Hour Fitness.For information about the gym and classes call (850) 926-2348 or visit Body-Teks Facebook page. GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTERWonder Women vs. breast cancerYoga misconceptionsThe American Arthritis Society has compiled in its publication Arthritis Info useful and practical tips for selfcare. Each tip is interesting and easy to follow. For a free sample issue of Arthritis Info, write to American Arthritis Society, P.O. Box 271010, Minneapolis MN 55427. Please include a loose 44 cent stamp for return postage. Special to The NewsCooler temperatures and the fall months mean one thing … ” u season is here. On average, between 5 to 20 percent of Americans contract influenza every year, with thousands dying from the disease annually. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida encourages all Floridians to “ ght the ” u bug and follow these easy tips to make it through ” u season without a single cough. € The “ rst item on anyones ” u prevention checklist is to get your ” u shot. The Center for Disease Control recommends that everyone over the age of six months receive the shot annually. € Wash your hands often with soap and water, or make sure to use an alcoholbased sanitizer. € Make sure to always cover your mouth when coughing or sneezing. € Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth unnecessarily … this is a catalyst for spreading germs. € Dont share utensils, or personal items like drinking glasses and towels, with others. € If you fall ill, take a sick day and stay home and consult a healthcare provider. Keep children home as well if they become sick. € Try to avoid people who have the flu or are showing symptoms.Some tips on how to be ” u-free this fall Arthritis Info available

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 5B Phone 926-8245 926-2396“As always, client service is our ultimate priority.”Frances Casey Lowe, P.A.of counsel to Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A.• Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Business Planning and Incorporations • Title Insurance • Probate and Heir Land Resolution • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 CUSTOM PROGRAMS DESIGNED JUST FOR YOU!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 T IRED ?RUNDOWN? FEELING Florida Certi“ed ContractorResidential License #CRC057939 Commercial License #RB0067082 MorrisBROWNMorrisBROWN 850-509-3632 construction Wildwood Country Club October 28, 20 1 1 COOLING HEATING AND By JIM SAUNDERS THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Oct. 7, … This wasnt the way it was supposed to work. State lawmakers were supposed to bite the bullet and make cuts in the 201112 budget and … take a deep breath … things would all get better. But as budget committees met this week, gloom set in again. Medicaid costs are rising, schools need to “ nd money, tax revenues are lagging. You get the picture. Gambling-industry lobbyists, however, had a better week. Lawmakers are talking about the possibility of allowing resort casinos in Florida, and an appeals-court ruling fueled visions of ringing slot machines outside Miami-Dade and Broward counties. Also enjoying an uptick was Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, who visited one of Tallahassees all-you-can eat buffets as he tries to sop up Southern votes. HERE WE GO AGAIN Maybe Sen. Steve Oelrich, R-Gainesville, summed it up best Thursday as lawmakers waded into another round of health and human services budget problems. The worst years seem to keep on coming, and weve got limited resources and lots of services we have piled up over the years, Oelrich said. The numbers will start to become clear Tuesday, when economists meet to revise the states general revenue estimates. But of“ cials this week indicated the 2012-13 budget shortfall could hit $2 billion. Republican leaders said they wont raise taxes to deal with the problems. That will leave them looking for ways to chop programs that have already been pared during the past few years. The biggest targets are always education and health and human services because they absorb the largest amounts of general revenue. The states continuing economic problems also have hurt property values, which are another key piece of funding public schools. Senate Health and Human Services Appropriations Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, said projected Medicaid costs are expected to grow nearly $1 billion next year because of such factors as larger caseloads. Negron and his House counterpart, Naples Republican Matt Hudson, warned that they will have to make cuts to balance the budget. Sen. Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, likened the situation to playing lifeboatŽ … deciding which programs and services get saved and which get tossed overboard to try to survive on their own. CHA-CHING Balancing the budget and drawing new political districts are the must-dos of the 2012 legislative session. But for the pure sport of it, the upcoming battles about gambling might be the most entertaining to watch. Rep. Erik Fresen, R-Miami, and Sen. Ellyn Bogdanoff, R-Fort Lauderdale, were working on legislation this week that would allow three resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties and set up a regulatory gaming commission. Meanwhile, the 1st District Court of Appeal ruled in a Hialeah Park case that a 2004 constitutional amendment did not prevent lawmakers from allowing slot machines across the state. The combination of those issues could lead to a flurry of lobbying and deal-making, as gambling interests try to expand or tap into the huge Florida market. Fresen said the resort-casino bill could be a vehicle for other gambling proposals. He said he also will try to limit the resort casino portion to South Florida. This bill is going to have every single belt and suspender on it to make sure it is limited only to Miami-Dade and Broward, he said. We have every attorney imaginable looking at it to make sure it is not some Trojan horse for any county to be able to do it. A major expansion of gambling, however, is anything but guaranteed. The House in the past has blocked ideas such as allowing video lottery terminals … which are similar to slot machines … in pari-mutuel facilities. An expansion also likely will face opposition from religious conservatives and other anti-gambling forces. In a recent editorial about the possibility of resort casinos, James A. Smith Sr., executive editor of the Florida Baptist Witness newspaper, described casino gambling as a cancer on our society. It is truly evil … in every sense of the word … that the state would rely upon making its own citizens losers in order to seek economic development to benefit others, and even worse to make its citizens losers to pay the states bills, Smith wrote in the editorial posted on the newspapers website. The supposedly conservative, pro-family elected leadership in Tallahassee need to be statesmen and stateswomen and reject yet the latest permutation of gambling expansion in our state. DOES MITT EAT GRITS? Trying to top Georgian Herman Cain and Texan Rick Perry in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney on Wednesday blew through the Seminole Wind restaurant in Tallahassee. Load up on some fried chicken at the Seminole Wind, and you are a long way from the Back Bay in Boston. But with Florida moving up its primary to Jan. 31, Romney and the others will probably spend a lot of time in the states dining rooms during the next few months. On the same day Romney visited Tallahassee, for instance, Cain signed copies of his book in The Villages, a sprawling Central Florida retirement community that is a magnet for Republican politicians. Romney also met privately with Gov. Rick Scott at the Capitol, though there was no word about which candidate Scott will support in the primary. Scott, however, did make clear this week that he plans to run for re-election in 2014. While he has been plagued by poor approval ratings, Scott said, I like this job. Im going to do my best ƒ to keep the cost of living as low as I can in the state and make sure people get an education and can get a job. So, I plan on running for re-election, Scott said. FASANO FIRES THEM UP Senate presidents dont usually rebuke senators in public … especially committee chairmen from the same party. But President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island, went after Sen. Mike Fasano, R-New Port Richey, this week after a judge tossed out a plan to privatize prisons in South Florida. Fasano criticized the privatization plan, which he said was approved by inserting last minute proviso language into the budget, thus circumventing the committee process. A Leon County judge in late September agreed that the plan should have been approved in a regular bill instead of in the budgets “ ne print. But Haridopolos bristled at Fasanos description of it being inserted at the last minuteŽ and circumventing scrutiny. This was addressed early and often, and people all saw it coming, both in the House and the Senate, Haridopolos told reporters. STORY OF THE WEEK: Two South Florida lawmakers prepared a proposal that could lead to three resort casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward counties. Meanwhile, the 1st District Court of Appeal opened the door to slot machines in various parts of the state. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Were not that optimistic at all (about the budget), said Senate President Mike Haridopolos, R-Merritt Island. Were all hopeful that the economy will turn around. But at this point, we dont see it.WEEKLY ROUNDUP: (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Betting the state budget on more cuts, and slots Special to The NewsState Rep. Leonard Bembry is proud to announce that Governor Rick Scott held a ceremonial bill signing for three of his sponsored bills from the 2011 session. House Bill 421 clari“ es and preserves the exemptions farmers have historically had for bona “ de agricultural practices. It also allows them to use agriculture lands for agriculture purposes without unnecessary environmental resource permitting requirements when bona “ de agricultural practices are being carried out on our farms. House Bill 1037 allows Florida seniors the opportunity to contract for Continuing Care Retirement Communities (CCRCs) services while still remaining in their home. Due to the slow economy, seniors are not able to sell their homes at a reasonable value to support their lifestyle in the future. Some seniors may want to live in their homes longer and this legislation will allow them to do so by providing supportive services. Continuing care at-home (CCAH) will allow seniors that reside outside the community future access to shelter, nursing care, or personal services at the CCRC until they sell their home or decide to move. House Bill 95 allows the parents of fallen military veterans, as well as surviving spouses and parents of fallen law enforcement of“ cers and “ re“ ghters, to join a select group of people eligible to receive lifetime free entry to Florida State Parks. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRep. Leonard Bembry with Gov. Rick Scott at a bill-signing ceremony. ree of Rep. Bembrys bills are signed 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Look for the next chapter of The Brass Bell in next weeks edition of The Wakulla news This page sponsored in part by: Find us on When we think about Hispanic culture we think of sombreros, tacos, hasta la vista baby,Ž Miami, Machu Pichu, salsa, tango, Julio Iglesias, Jeniffer Lopez, Speedy Gonzales, three amigos, Sonia Sotomayor and illegal aliens. But Hispanics are more than all of this. I have learned it “ rst hand because my mother is Hispanic; she was born in Puerto Rico and came to the U.S. in 1992 to go to graduate school. Hispanics have many things in common, for example most of them speak Spanish and/or have been influenced by the Spanish culture in combination with the Indian and/or the African culture. My greatgrandmother looks very Indian but her relatives came from Spain to Puerto Rico in the 19th Century. Her husband looked like a mix of African and Chinese. My uncle (my mothers brother) is much darker than my mother. The Hispanic experience is diverse in other ways too. For example, Puerto Ricans, unlike people from Mexico, are U.S. citizens whether they are born here or in Puerto Rico even though, Mexicans were here “ rst. Puerto Rico was invaded by U.S. in 1898 and became a commonwealth of the U.S. in 1952. The relationship between the two countries has been of giving-and-taking even before 1898. My great-grandparents ancestors lost their land to the Spanish landowners and U.S. corporations. They worked as cane cutters and farmed the land to support their families and the local and U.S. economies. One of my great-grandfathers, who became a merchant, got some land back thanks to Luis Munoz Marins land reform. Munoz Marin was the “ rst elected governor of Puerto Rico. The U.S. government suspected him of communism for making this reform. The commonwealth status happened under him. My greatgrandparents supported Munoz Marin and the new status because they thought, even if temporarily, it could stop poverty in the island without destroying Puerto Rican culture. My great-grandparents and grandparents worked hard doing different jobs to support their families. My grandfather did maintenance work, carpentry and farming and my grandmother was a secretary for more than thirty years. They are both now retired, but are still active in their community. Some of their relatives moved to the U.S. searching for job opportunities and a better life. Their migration, like the migration of many Puerto Ricans in the 40s and 50s, was encouraged by the U.S. Department of Labor. Other Puerto Ricans have continued to migrate to the U.S. for different reasons. The new census tells us that more Puerto Ricans (including people of Puerto Rican descent) live in the U.S. than on the island. The Puerto Rican experience in Puerto Rico and in the U.S. today is not the same as my great-grandparents. It continues to change and to change in some good ways and some bad ways. Fewer Puerto Ricans work the land and more do industrial and professional work. Some have a better education and more money than others. Some speak Spanish and some dont. Some Puerto Ricans are Catholics or Protestants while some practice other religions. Families live more separated now than when my mother was growing up (She grew up on a mountain surrounded by her extended family). Some Puerto Ricans travel back and forth to the island and others do not. Some prefer to live in New York and others like Florida better. However, what I like the most from what I have learned and experienced is: Puerto Ricans work hard, love nature and their families, are very hospitable and enjoy sharing delicious food, dancing and good conversation. We Puerto Ricans also love music. One of the things I look forward to during this coming Christmas in Puerto Rico is parrandas … caroling the whole night with family and friends. By Adriana Fortier, 9 years old, with help from Samiri Hernandez Hiraldo, mother Crawfordville 9-year-old Adriana Fortier gathering ” owers in her familys garden. What type of reptile am I?chameleonNorth Florida Hispanic Festival 2011 October 15 & 16 at St. Louis ChurchCorner of Fred George and Old Bainbridge Rd., TallahasseeFREE AdmissionEthnic Foods, Arts & Crafts, Hispanic Folklore, Live Entertainment and More

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 7B Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! 926-7102 Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $10.00 a week! Cars  Real Estate  Rentals  Employment  Services  Yard Sales  Announcements A New Look PaintingSpecializing in residential and commercial Re-painting € pressure washing € sheetrock € wood rot repairsLICENSED &INSURED850-926-2400CALL JIM PORTER: ABCSTORAGEMini-Warehouses Boats RV’s2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE519-5128 508-5177 CARPET CLEANING of Wakulla Residential and Commercial WATER EXTRACTION 24/7 EMERGENCY 850-567-6734CAMO New Construction, Remodeling & Repairs850.524.5894 Home Maintenance & Repair--Cliff Westbrook Services ---Full Service home maintenance and repair. Foreclosure, rental, yard cleanups. Flower beds, window washing, trash hauling. EXPERIENCED and RELIABLE850-926-2004 Crawfordville CarpetCleanersaffordable carpet care free estimates850-459-0106 850-210-5849or visit us at www.BarryBuilding.com Affordable Office Spaceat the Barry Building Enjoy working surrounded by a great atmosphere with many amenities. Rates start at $250/mo., utilities included! Come take a tour at www.BarryBuilding.com. TheNews Wakulla Readers  Choice 2011 Readers Choice2011 Gatortrax ServicesLLCProfessional Property Maintenance 850-545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Junior P.SandersSeptic Tank Services18-YR Experience. New System Installation-All Types. Drain Repair. Washing Machine Systems.SR0111684NO JOB TOO SMALL, FAIR PRICES, FRIENDLY GUARANTEED SERVICE!850-210-5777 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 N & R SEPTIC, LLCWe install Wakulla County approved Septic SystemsNEW INSTALLATION ~ PUMPOUTS & REPAIRS SEPTICTANK INSPECTIONS ~ PERMITASSISTANCE(850) 962-3669Licensed & Insured SR0931149State Approved 850-356-6801Affordable for every budget! ...Refresh Home Detailingfor a new home feel...Call for a free and friendly estimateLICENSED HAYHORSE QUALITYLOWEST PRICES IN TOWN!!!850-528-0770delivery available Will help you make the most of your outdoor space. Cabins, Barns, Playhouses, Utilities, Gazebos, Tables, Swings, Rockers and More! Pricing and Sizes to “t your needs. Cash Discounts. $25 credit on a new building with this ad. See Melissa at 1580 Crawfordville Hwy., next to Happy Time Day Care850-926-3441SOUTHERN STORAGE SOLUTIONS Stow it Away!! 5X10, 10X10, 10X20 available now! www.stowawaycenter.com 850-926-5725SELFSTORAGE GreatRates! STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.BUY€SELL€TRADE€REPAIRBoats, Motors, Trailers, New/Used Marine Supplies Sold 4815D Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Pro p Service Center Interstate Batter y Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-556-4652www.wakullaboatsales.com stowawaymarine @ comcast.net Denise’s ListCall Denise today to get your services on her list!850-926-7102 Classi eds@TheWakullaNews.net THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 105 Business Opportunities BRING YOUR OLD PHOTOS TO LIFE!!I can fix those wonderful old pictures so you can enjoy them again, and make copies to share. Keep the family heritage alive with restored photographs Just $15 per photo. 850-766-7655dougapple@gmail.com Money Making Opportunity. Computer a must. Free evaluation & Training. Flexible hours. Great incentives. www.freedomtodream.net 352-360-5939. 110 Help Wanted Certified Prescribed Burne r Prescribed burner needed. Full-time or part-time employment. Must have burn experience, including 130-190 certifications, heavy equipment operation, and clean driving record. Salary negotiable. Contact Bobbie Dugger with B&B Du gg er Inc. 850-566-0831. P/Tw/potentialforF/Taccordingtocompany’sgrowth.Light officemanagement.LightBookkeeping.Computerknowledgea must.Flexiblehours.Pleasemail resume:P.O.Box648,Panacea, FL 32346. EMPLOYMENTOPPORTUNITIES AnimalControlOfficer Vacancy DepartmentofPublicSafetyTheWakullaCountyBoardofCounty Commissionersisseekingqualified applicantsforafull-timeAnimal ControlOfficerwithintheDepartment of Public Safety. Qualifiedapplicantsmustpossessa HighSchoolDiplomaorGEDandtwo yearsofexperienceinanimalwelfareorcontrolenvironment,public health,lawenforcementorarelated fieldsuchashumanesociety,veterinaryoffice,orkennel.Mustbeable toliftanimalsandequipmentinexcessof75pounds.Mustbeableto use a two-way radio. MustcurrentlyholdavalidFlorida AnimalControlOfficerCertification,includingChemicalCapture andEuthanasiatraining.Applicantsmaybepermittedtoobtain thecertificationslistedabove within 6 months of employment. Experienceinvolvingintensivepublic contactisdesirable.Possessionof ortheabilitytoobtainavalidFlorida driverslicense.Applicantsmust passabackgroundinvestigation, driverslicensehistory,anddrug screening.Mustbeavailableto workweekends,earlyandlate shifts,periodicallybeon-callŽ,and available on short notice. Startingsalaryis$10.01anhour.To apply,sendaWakullaCountyemploymentapplicationtoHumanResources,P.O.Box1263,Crawfordville,FL32326.Applicationsmaybe obtainedbyvisitingourwebsiteat www.mywakulla.comorcanbe pickedupattheCountyAdministratorsofficelocatedat3093CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,FL. Ifyouhavequestionsregarding qualificationsand/ordutiesandresponsibilities,youmaycontact DeborahDuBoseat850.926.9500. Veteranspreferencewillbegivento qualifiedapplicants.WakullaCounty isanAffirmativeAction/EqualOpportunityEmployer.Thisadvertisement willremainopenuntilpositionis filled. 120 Services and Businesses A -1 PRESSURE CLEANING Free Estimates Licensed ~ John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550 Mr. Stump Stump Grinding Quick Service Cellular: 509-8530 ALL ABOUT...CONCRETE blocks bricks pavers LANDSCAPE plants sod tractor workcall JOSEPH FRANCIS850-556-1178 / 850-556-3761 BACK FORTY TRACTOR SERVICE Bushhogging, Boxblading Driveway. Larry Carter Owner/Operator. 850-925-7931, 850-694-7041. Licensed/Insured. Harold Burse Stump Grinding 926-7291. HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIRSales, Installation & Repair ELECTRICAL SERVICES Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & soundLocated in Crawfordville Doug & Sherry Quigg, Owners Lic. No’s. ER0010924, CAC1814368(850) 926 -5790 KEITH KEY HEATING & AIR Commercial,residentialandmobilehomes.Repair,sales,service,installation.Allmakesand models.Lic.#RA0062516. 926-3546. POLLY NICHOLSSpecial Touch CleaningConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential.“pray like it ’ s up to God, Work like it ’ s up to you”519-7238 926-3065Licensed &Insured 200 Items For Sale NeedStoneCrabcertificates?I have189forsale!Willnotdivide. Serious inquiries only. 926-3381. 220 Cars 2003FordEscapeXLT.62,000 miles. $9,000.00 Call 926-8167. 320 Farm Products & Produce Farm-freshvegetables.Peas, blanchedandfrozen,okra choppedandfrozen,greenboilingpeanutsandboiledgreen peanuts.Wealsocustom-processcows,hogs,goatsanddeer. Raker Farm 926-7561. 335 Pets DOGS,PUPPIES,NICECATS ANDKITTENS...Come,take alookandbringanew friendhomeTODAY!CHAT Adoption Center:Mondays closed. Tuesdays through Wednesday& Fridays: 11:00AM to 4:30PM Thursdays: 11:00AM to 7:00 P M Saturdays: 10:00AM to 4:30 PM Sundays: 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM1 OAK STREET, CRAW FORDVILLE The unconditional love of a pet is waiting for you at th e C.H.A.T. Adoption Center. orvisit: chatofwakulla.org 355 Yard Sales BarnSale!3-Families.Friday, October14andSaturday,October 15. From 8AM-until. 16 SummerwindCircle.Furniture,tires, antiques and baby items. Friday,10/14andSaturday 10/15,8AM-3PMatSopchoppy MiniStorage,SopchoppyHwy. Yearsofcollectibles,household items. Lots more!! GarageSale!Saturday,October 15,8AM-12NatTheFlowers Subdivision.69MarigoldDrive. No earl y birds p lease! HugeThree-familysale!Saturday-10/15,87MonocoupeCircle,OchlockoneeBayinTarpine (adjacenttoWakullaCountyAirport).8AM-3PMSharp!Furniture,kitchenware,smallappliances,tools,clothes,children books/toys,doors/windows, knick-knacks.Muchmore!No earl y birds p lease! MovingSale!!Friday,10/14;Saturday,10/15;Sunday,10/16 from8AM-until.22MapleDrive. Ever y thin g must g o!! October15,9AM-3PMat1002 WakullaSpringsRoad.Lookfor signs. Traveling treasures. 440 Personals and Notices Singlewhitemale62lookingfor female40to60.Nosmoking,no drinking.Ihaveanicehomein Panacea.Liveinfree (room-&-board).Lighthousekeepingandcompanionship. Let’sMeet.Wes984-5733.No large women, please. 500 Real Estate PUBLISHERS NOTICEAllrealestateadvertisinginthis newspaperissubjecttotheFair HousingActwhichmakesitillegaltoadvertiseanypreference, limitation,ordiscrimination basedonrace,color,religion, sex,handicap,familialstatusor nationaloriginoranintentionto makeanysuchpreference,limitationordiscrimination.ŽFamilial statusincludeschildrenunder theageof18livingwithparents orlegalcustodians,pregnant womenandpeoplesecuringthe custodyofchildrenunderthe age of 18. Thisnewspaperwillnotaccept anyadvertisingforrealestate thatisaviolationofthelaw.Our readersareherebyinformedthat alldwellingsadvertisedinthis newspaperareavailableonan equalopportunitybasis.TocomplainofdiscriminationcallHUD tollfreeat1-800-669-9777.The tollfreenumberforthe hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 515 Apartments for Rent 1BDR as LOW as $600/mo. 2BDR as LOW as $700/mo. 3BDR as LOW as $800/m o. swimming pool and gym850-926-1134 MOVE IN SPECIAL $99 DEPOSIT $300 LOCAL HERO DISCOUNT $99 Application Fee $35 530 Comm. Property for Rent A ffordableOfficeSpaceatthe BarryBuilding.Greatatmosphere!Includesallutilities,trash p/u,fullkitchenuse,conference room.Ratesstartat$250/mo. 850-210-5849orourwebsiteat www.Barr y Buildin g .com JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com Visit me on the web www.WakullaInfo.com Dawn Reed -Realtor GRICell (850) 294-3468 53 Hummingbird Lane$174,500This immaculate 3/2 home on 1/2 acre features beautiful oak hard-wood oors, eat-in kitchen plus a formal dining room, gas replace, huge screened-in porch with glass windows (perfect all year round), big master bedroom with walk-in closet, master bath suite with jetted tub and walk-in shower. “Check out www.WakullaShortSales.com” P.O. Box 833 Crawfordville, FL 32327 Office/Fax 850-926-5611 • Mobile: 850-528-5603 elderjerrypayne@gmail.com Elder Jerry PayneMajor Appliance Repairs & Services Call Jerry Payne today!850-528-5603 $199INSTALLEDAny size room A/C (cooling & heating, window or wall) PTAC, Mini-Splits or portable A/C units Choose from Haier, LG, Amana, Trane, Carrier, Goodman, Mitsubishi, Friedrich, Klimaire, Frigidaire, Air Con 115 or 230 volts available.starting as low as We Offer Long-Term Rentals in Wakulla and Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 323246 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you! Call 984-0001 to nd out how!91 Posey Rd., Medart2BR/1BA, secluded cypress home w/ replace, 2 screened porches on 30 Acres. Perfect for nature lovers.$875 per month.1119 Aligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. 28 Endeavor DriveTradewinds of Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/3BA, community club house, pool, pier, and a private boat slip. $2,500 per month. RENTALSNEEDED!! Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! “A New Level of Service!!!” 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com 4379 Crawfordville Hwy (Commercial Building) $3,500 Mo. 7,000sf., incl. 800sf of of ce space, fenced 4 Choctaw Road 3BR/2BA House on double lot $850 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 25 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 4BR/2BA House $1,900 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 80 Sawgrass Drive Live Oak Isl. 2BR/2BA House/beachfront, dock $1,250 No Smoking or Pets 26 Manatee Lane 2BR/2BA House $1,500 Mo. (Vacation Rental also $100 night) No Smoking or Pets 10 Hidden Springs Panacea 2BR/2BA House on pilings $950 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 51A & 49B Dispennette Drive 3BR/2BA Duplex $750 Mo. Incl.Water/Swr No Smoking/Pets ok 174 Beaty Taff Drive Shell Pt. Beach House – 2 BR/2 BA with separate 1 BR Ef ciency. $1,350 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 26C Guinevere Lane 3BR/2BA Townhouse $800 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 8 Osprey 3BR/2BA 2,390sf House with replace $1,200 Mo. No Smoking or Pets 64 Blackfoot 1,300sf 3BR/2BA House with of ce & garage $850 Mo. No Smoking/Pets negotiable4BR/3BA Over 2,000sf House with 3 car garage $1,400 Mo. No SmokingAVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & RealEstate 530 Comm. Property for Rent WOODVILLE RETAIL SPACE AVAILABLE € Fitness Studio -1000/sf,(wall to wall mat & mirrors) € Retail -1250/sf (storefront w/back storage) € Divided Office Space -1074/sf.Lewiswood Center 850-421-5039 535 Comm. Property for Sale Choicecornerlotatjunctureo f CrawfordvilleHighwayand pavedWhitlockWay.200'X300'. CommercialZoningGuaranteed, $70,000.DixieProperties(850) 656-6340. 545 Homes for Sale 3BR/2BAone-storyhomeon1.5 lotwithgarage.Excellentcondition.$95,000.Ownerfinancing. 850-251-7588 850-962-2016. 555 Houses for Rent 3BR/1BACH&A,closetoMedartElementaryandWakulla HighSchool.Referencesrequired.$700/mo.,plusdeposit. Please call 850-556-4464. 3BR/2BATHinMysteriousWaters.$795/rent,samedeposit. No pets. Call Jim at 566-5165. Crawfordville,clean,large2 bedrooms,2fullbathduplex, $675permonth.CallLinda, 850-926-0283. House/Acreage Charming 3BR/1BA, HVAC, appliances, ceiling fans, located on 3 acres in North Wakulla. Workshop, 2 storage sheds, $750/month, plus $500/deposit. 850-251-1253. Brenda Hicks Realty. 560 Land for Sale 2-acrelotforsalenearnew ShadevilleSchool,cornero f SteelCourtandSpringCreek Hwy.(citywater).Ownerfinancing.Call850-556-1178or 850-556-3765. 565 Mobile Homes for Rent 2BR/2BASW/MH.WakullaGardensKlickitatRd.Niceinterio r andexterior,openfloorplan. $575/month, first, last. 3BR/2BADWMH,WakullaGardens, CAH, Good Floor Plan. $675/month+deposit,application,references.1-yrlease.Both availblenow!Callfordiscount! Informationorforappointment 850-554-5267, 850-524-4090. 3BR/1.5BA,CentralH/A,dishwasher,largeprivateyard, porches,storage,nosmoking. Referencesrequired.$575/mo., $300/security. 352-493-2232. 3BR/2BA,largeporch,backsto theNationalForest.Doublecarport.Sitson5beautifulacres withapond.$650/month.plus deposit. 850-984-0044. Nice4BR/2BADoublewideon oneacre.NearMedartElementarySchool.C/H/A,utilityroom, fireplace.Rent$850/month.Garbagepick-upincluded.Call 850-228-7197. 680 Legal Notices 681 Foreclosure Proceedings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-00028 3 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. THEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,OROTHER CLAIMANTSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ORAGAINSTDEBRA HOUSSERA/K/ADEBRAJ.HOUSSER A/K/ADEBRAJEANEHOUSSER,DECEASED et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofMortgageForeclosure datedSeptember28,2011andenteredin CaseNo.65-2010-CA-000283oftheCircuit CourtoftheSECONDJudicialCircuitinand forWAKULLACounty,Floridawherein WELLSFARGOBANK,NAisthePlaintiff andTHEUNKNOWNHEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,ASSIGNEES,LIENORS, CREDITORS,TRUSTEES,OROTHER CLAIMANTSCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ORAGAINSTDEBRA HOUSSERA/K/ADEBRAJ.HOUSSER A/K/ADEBRAJEANEHOUSSER,DECEASED;ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIESCLAIMINGBY,THROUGH,UNDER, ANDAGAINSTTHEHEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOT KNOWNTOBEDEADORALIVE, WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIES MAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSE, HEIRS,DEVISEES,GRNTEES,OR OTHERCLAIMANTS;SUMMERWIND ROADOWNERSMAINTENANCEASSOCIATION,INC.;TENANT#1N/K/AJOSEPHBRONCZEKaretheDefendants,The ClerkoftheCourtwillselltothehighestand bestbidderforcashattheLOBBYofthe WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSEat 11:00A.M.,onthe10thdayofNovember, 2011,thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT5BLOCKD,SUMMERWIND(UNRECORDED): COMMENCEATACONCRETEMONUMENTMARKINGTHESOUTHEASTCORNEROFSECTION32,TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH,RANGE1EAST,WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDAANDTHENCERUN NORTH01DEGREES24MINUTES50 SECONDSEASTALONGTHEEAST BOUNDARYOFSAIDSECTION32ADISTANCEOF2749.18FEETTOACONCRETEMONUMENT,THENCERUN NORTH89DEGREES48MINUTES00 SECONDSWEST666.79FEETTOAN IRONRODINTHECENTERLINEOFA60 FOOTROADWAYEASEMENT,THENCE RUNNORTH89DEGREES49MINUTES 49SECONDSWEST1339.53FEETTOAN IRONROD,THENCERUNSOUTH00DEGREES10MINUTES11SECONDSWEST ALONGTHECENTERLINEOFA60FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT974.82FEETTO THEPOINTOFBEGINNING.FROMSAID POINTOFBEGINNINGCONTINUE SOUTH00DEGREES10MINUTES11 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDCENTERLINE324.94FEET,THENCERUNNORTH 89DEGREES49MINUTES49SECONDS WEST731.72FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNNORTH00 DEGREES10MINUTES11SECONDS EAST324.94FEETTOACONCRETE MONUMENT,THENCERUNSOUTH89 DEGREES49MINUTES49SECONDS EAST731.72FEETTOTHEPOINTOF BEGINNING. TOGETHERWITH198952X27FLEETWOODMOBLLEHOME:TITLENUMBER 47769185AND47769185;IDNO. FLFLK32A11289GHAND FLFLK32B11289GH. a/k/a72BLUEBERRYLANE,CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on October 3rd, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sMICHELLE CHRISTENSEN AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION FILE NUMBER: 10-387CA DUANEEVANSLLC,aFloridaLimitedLiability Company, Plaintiff v. ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTE C. WALKER-LIPPLETT, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO:ANTOINETTEC.WALKER,a/k/aANTOINETTEC.WALKER-LIPPLETT,ifalive, andifdead,herunknownspouse,heirs,devisees,grantees,judgmentcreditors,andall otherpartiesclaimingby,through,under,or againstthem;theunknownspouse,heirs, devisees,grantees,andjudgmentcreditors ofdeceaseddefendant,andallotherparties claimingby,through,under,oragainstdefendant;andallunknownnaturalpersonsif alive,andifdeadornotknowntobedead oralive,theirseveralandrespectiveunknownspouses,heirs,devisees,grantees, andjudgmentcreditors,orotherparties claimingby,through,orunderthoseunknownnaturalpersons;andtheseveraland respectiveunknownassigns,successorsin interest,trustees,oranyotherpersonclaimingby,through,under,oragainstanycorporationorotherlegalentitynamedasadefendant;andallclaimants,personsorparties,naturalorcorporate,orwhoseexactlegalstatusisunknown,claimingunderthe abovenamedordescribeddefendantor claimingtohaveanyright,title,orinterestin tlle property, YOUARENOTIFIEDthatanactiontoquiet taxtitletothefollowingpropertyinWakulla County, Florida: ThatpartofLot2inPlatfiledforrecordrepresentingtheWestone-halfofLot36,in HartsfieldSurveythatliesNorthofState Road 61 LESSANDEXCEPTthatparcelonthe NorthwestcornerofsaidLot2,identifiedas Tax Folio Number 00-00-036-000-09673-000 ALSO LESS AND EXCEPT: Commenceataplainconcretemonument markingthenorthwestcornerofLot36of theHartsfieldSurvey,WakullaCounty,Florida,andalsobeingthesouthwestcornerof ShadevilleSouth,aplattedsubdivisionof WakullaCounty,Florida,asrecordedinPlat Book3,Page19,ofthepublicrecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida;thencerunNorth 72degrees21minutes11secondsEast 262.78feetalongthesouthboundaryof saidsubdivisiontoanironrodandcap(LB &017)forthePOINTOFBEGINNING.From saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidsouthboundaryasfollows:North72 degrees21minutes11secondsEast37.30 feettoaconcretemonumentonsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees21minutes06secondsEast413.84feettoaconcretemonument(LB4923)onsaidsouth boundary;thenceNorth72degrees20minutes40secondsEast124.78feettoaniron rodandcap(LB7017)onsaidsouthboundary;thenceleavingsaidsouthboundaryrun South17degrees31minutes23seconds East247.85feettoanironrodandcap(LB 7017)onthenortherlyrightofwayboundary ofStateRoadNo.61(ShadevilleRoad); thencealongsaidrightofwayboundaryrun South70degrees44minutes36seconds West476.17feettoa2inchdiameteriron pipe;thenceleavingsaidrightofway boundaryrunNorth17degrees31minutes 23secondsWest264.00feettothePOINT OF BEGINNING. Theabove-describedpropertyismoreparticularly described as: CommenceataconcretemonumentmarkingtheNorthwestcornerofLot36ofthe HartsfieldSurveyoflandsinWakulla County,Florida;thencerunalongtheWesterlyboundarylineofsaidLot36andalso theWesterlyboundarylineofLot2Peter GavinsEstateasrecordedinDeedBoo k 21Page75inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,FloridaSouth16degrees58 minutes11secondsEast271.25feettoa re-barmarkingtheintersectionofsaid WesterlyboundarylinewiththeNortherly monumentedrightofwaylineofCounty Road#61(alsoknownasShadevilleRoad); thenceleavingsaidWesterlyboundaryline runalongsaidNortherlymonumentedright ofwaylineasfollows:North70degrees52 minutes39secondsEast265.25feettoan ironpipemarkingtheSoutheastcornerof propertydescribedinOfficialRecordBoo k 162Page1inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida,saidpointalsomarkingtheSouthwestcornerofpropertyasdescribedinOfficialRecordsBook527Page 476inthePublicRecordsofWakulla County,Florida;thencecontinuealongsaid Northerlymonumenteclrightofwayline, alsobeingtheSoutherlyboundarylineof saidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476North70degrees46 minutes53secondsEast576.12feettoa rodandcapmarkingtheSoutheastcorner ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476,saidpointbeingthe POINTOFBEGINNING;thenceleaving saidPOINTOFBEGINNINGcontinuealong saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline North70degrees47minutes29seconds East289.09feettoare-bar;thenceleaving saidNortherlymonumentedrightofwayline runNorth17degrees12minutes51secondsWest239.54feettoare-barlyingon theSoutherlyboundarylineofLot9of ShadevilleSouthSubdivisionasrecordedin PlatBook3Page19ofthePublicRecords ofWakullaCounty,Florida,alsobeingthe NortherlyboundarylineofHartsfieldSurvey Lot36;thencerunalongsaidSoutherly boundarylineofLot9ofShadevilleSouth SubdivisionandsaidNortherlyboundary lineofHartsfieldSurveyLot36South72degrees26minutes37secondsWest289.99 feettoarodandcapmarkingtheNortheast cornerofpropertydescribedinOfficialRecordBook527Page476inthePublicRecordsofWakullaCounty,Florida;thence leavingsaidSoutherlyandNortherlyboundarylinerunalongtheEasterlyboundaryline ofsaidpropertydescribedinOfficialRecord Book527Page476South17degrees27 minutes46secondsEast247.87feettothe POINTOFBEGINNING,containing1.62 acres, more or less. hasbeenfiledagainstyouandyouarerequiredtoserveacopyofyourwrittendefenses,ifany,toitonGeorgeH.Gwynn, Esq.,theplaintiff'sattorney,whoseaddress isPostOfficeBox4128,Tallahassee,FlorisPostOfficeBox4128,Tallahassee,Flor ida,32315,onorbeforeOctober15,2011, andfiletheoriginalwiththeclerkofthis courteitherbeforeserviceontheplaintiff's attorneyorimmediatelythereafter;otherwiseadefaultwillbeenteredagainstyou forthereliefdemandedinthecomplaintor petition. DATED ON September 8th, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court September 22, 29, 2011 October 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2011-102-CA DIVISION: CIRCUIT CIVIL JAMES BANKS, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS CUDIHY, Defendant. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalJudgmententeredinCase No.2011-102-CAoftheCircuitCourtofthe SecondJudicialCircuitinandforWAKULLA County,Florida,wherein,JamesBanks, Plaintiff,andThomasCudihy,Defendant,I willselltothehighestbidderforcashat, 3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida32327,atthehourof11:00a.m.on the27thdayofOctober,2011,thefollowing described property: THEFOLLOWINGDESCRIBEDLAND SITUATE,LYINGANDBEINGINWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA TO-WIT: Lot3,HuntersGlennPlantation,Phase2as permaporplatthereofrecordedinPlat Book3,Page81ofthePublicRecordsof WakullaCounty,Florida,beingtheRe-Plat ofLots2,3and28ofHuntersGlennPlantationaspermaporplatthereofrecordedin PlatBook3,Page40ofthePublicRecords of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel I.D. Number: 29-3S-01E-268-05506-H03 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateofthelispendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Dated this 28th day of September, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance.PleasecontacttheClerkofthe Courtsdisabilitycoordinatoratleast7days beforeyourscheduledcourtappearance,or immediatelyuponreceivingthisnotification ifthetimebeforethescheduledappearance islessthan7days;ifyouarehearingor voice impaired, call 711. October 6, 13, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-00026 8 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. WESLEY K. THOMAS et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofMortgageForeclosure datedSeptember28,2011andenteredin CaseNo.65-2010-CA-000268oftheCircuit CourtoftheSECONDJudicialCircuitinand forWAKULLACounty,Floridawherein WELLSFARGOBANK,NAisthePlaintiff andWESLEYK.THOMAS;MARYE. BRISBIN;aretheDefendants,TheClerkof theCourtwillselltothehighestandbest bidderforcashattheLOBBYOFTHEWAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSEat 11:00AM,onthe3rddayofNovember, 2011,thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment: THENORTHERLYONEHALFOFTRACT 58OFKIRKLANDESTATES,ASPERMAP ORPLATTHEREOFRECORDEDINPLAT BOOK2,PAGE2,OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDA; TOGETHERWITHAMOBILEHOMELOCATEDTHEREONASAFIXTUREAND APPURTENANCETHERETOBEARING VINNO.GAFLV39A08515VH21,TITLE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 – Page 9BBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 24 31 40 43 50 57 62 66 69 2 32 51 3 33 52 4 25 28 46 63 18 21 41 58 5 15 34 47 67 70 6 29 44 59 7 35 64 8 22 30 48 60 9 26 42 53 19 36 49 10 16 27 45 65 68 71 11 23 37 54 61 12 38 55 13 39 56 ACROSS1.Navydiver 5.Barberchair attachment 10.Clevelandfive,for short 14.Therefore,to Descartes 15.Pamphleteerof 1776 16.Sandusky'slake 17.MINNIE 20. "__itorloseit" 21.Animalthat bugles 22.__Locks(Great Lakes passage) 23."Twospades," e.g. 24."Stormy"bird 26.Negotiations result, often 28.ManofOman 30.__carotene 31.Standlookoutfor, perhaps 34.FrenchRiviera city 36.Statuettethat's over90%tin 40.MIDDIE 43.Letteraftereta 44.Stand-up's arsenal 45.Anthropologist Margaret 46.Tippy-top 48.Kettofold funnies 50.__tank(disposal system) 53.Burgerhuckster __McDonald 57.ActressMeyers 58.SillyPuttyholder 60.Sportscaster McCarver 61.Anyof13popes 62.MAXIE 66.ActressMcClurg 67.Pastone'sprime 68.ActressHeche 69.Needabathbadly 70.Habits 71.UnwantedfloraDOWN1.Clinch,asa victory 2.Clearfromthe board 3.Shoelacetip 4. Kitand caboodle 5.Hammer'screator 6.To-dolistitem 7.__TinTin 8.Vendingmachine inserts 9.Mescalinesource 10.Corp.'stopdog 11.Caribbean getaway 12.Dropinon 13.Down-at-the-heel 18.Ruralroadsign picture 19.Jazzman"Jelly Roll"__ 25.Machinegun noise 27.Boxcamera inventor 29.Pigout 30.Hosieryhue 31.Hillbuilder 32.CrytoCratchit 33.Edenevictee 35.JohnnyReb's initials 37.CedarRapids campus 38.Attorneys'org. 39.Rouletteplay 41.Morefrilly 42.Stripper'sclosetful 47.Hanna-Barbera horse Quick Draw __ 49.Mausoleum 50.Cavalryman's sidearm 51.Chipawayat 52.Playfulsprite 54.Unescorted 55.Sierra__ 56.Likesome ballparks 59.Wordsinmany disco names 60.Camper'sshelter 63.Cartoonsqueal 64.Fallfromgrace 65.Wordwithblueor lemon American Prole Hometown Content 9/18/2011 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square.Solutions 200 9 HtCtt 12 345 563 718 6 97 8492 361 5 86 914 78536 200 9 HtCtt 192 3684 7 5 487592613 536741289 615 429837 874153962 329687541 253 876194 961234758 748915326 S E W U P A N T S A B E R E R A S E B A H E R O D E A G L E T E V E P I X I E L O T R A T A T A T E E K D E E R L A C I E R S P I L L A N E M C G R A W T A S K B I N G E G O G O R I N C S A S I N O N E S B E I G E T E N T P E Y O T E G S T R I N G S M O R T O N T O M B C E O E A S T M A N L A W A R U B A C O E A L O N E V I S I T A B A L E O N E S E E D Y R E D D O M E D Brought to you by… • High Speed Internet • Complimentary Hot Breakfast • Meeting Rooms 850 926-3737Scenic Hwy 98 Medart3292 Coastal Hwy.www.WakullaInnHotel.com 681 Foreclosure Proceedings NO. 73264110 A/K/A 163 KIRKLAND DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on September 29, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-00024 6 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. SAMANTHA KILBOURN et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofMortgageForeclosure datedSeptember28,2011andenteredin CaseNo.65-2010-CA-000246oftheCircuit CourtoftheSECONDJudicialCircuitinand forWAKULLACounty,Floridawherein WELLSFARGOBANK,NAisthePlaintiff andSAMANTHAKILBOURN;GEORGE KILBOURNA/K/AGEORGEC.KILBOURN; WELLSFARGOBANK,N.A.;WOODLAND HERITAGEHOMEOWNERSASSOCIATION,INC.;aretheDefendants,TheCler k oftheCourtwillselltothehighestandbest bidderforcashattheLOBBYOFTHEWAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSEat 11:00AM,onthe3rddayofNovember, 2011,thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment: TRACT9,WOODLANDHERITAGE(UNRECORDED):COMMENCEATACONCRETEMONUMENTMARKINGTHE SOUTHWESTCORNEROFSECTION4, TOWNSHIP3SOUTH,RANGE1WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY,FLORIDA,AND THENCERUNSOUTH89DEGREES37 MINUTES02SECONDSEASTALONG THESOUTHBOUNDARYOFSAIDSECTION4,ADISTANCEOF475.62FEETTO THECENTERLINEOFA60.0FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENTFORTHEPOINT OFBEGINNING.FROMSAIDPOINTOF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES23MINUTES19SECONDSEAST ALONGSAIDCENTERLINE670.04FEET, THENCERUNSOUTH89DEGREES36 MINUTES41SECONDSEAST400.00 FEET,THENCERUNSOUTH00DEGREES23MINUTES19SECONDSWEST 670.00FEETTOTHESOUTHBOUNDARY OFSAIDSECTION4,THENCERUN NORTH89DEGREES37MINUTES02 SECONDSWESTALONGSAIDSOUTH BOUNDARY400.00FEETTOTHEPOINT OFBEGINNING.SUBJECTTOAROADWAYEASEMENTOVERANDACROSS THE WESTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. A/K/A 119 WILDFLOWER LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on September 29, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION: CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000074CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. KIMBALLCARPENTER,ASTRUSTEEOF THETRUSTF/B/OSAMANTHACARPENTER,ESTABLISHEDUNDERTHELAST WILLANDTESTAMENTOFJOHNF. BRINKMAN,DECEASEDMAY14,2008; BANKOFAMERICA,N.A.;SHUGHARBOURHOMEOWNERSASSOCIATIONOF SHELLPOINT,INC.;CATHYGESKICK; ESTELLABRINKMANCARPENTER;UNKNOWNTENANT(S);INPOSSESSIONOF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderResettingForeclosureSaledatedthe 3rddayofOctober,2011,andetneredin CaseNO.65-2010-CA-000074CA,ofthe CircuitCourtofthe2NDJudicialCircuitin andforWakullaCounty,FLorida,wherein BANKOFAMERICA,N.A.isthePlaintiff andKIMBALLCARPENTER,ASTRUSTEE OFTHETRUSTF/B/OSAMANTHACARPENTER,ESTABLISHEDUNDERTHE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JOHN F. BRINKMAN,DECEASEDMAY14,2008; BANKOFAMERICA,N.A.;SHUGHARBOURHOMEOWNERSASSOCIATIONOF SHELLPOINT,INC.;CATHYGESICK;ESTELLABRINKMANCARPENTER;andUNKNOWNTENANT(S);INPOSSESSIONOF THESUBJECTPROPERTYaredefendants.TheClerkofthisCourtshallsellto thehighestandbestbidderforcashatthe LOBBYOFWAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE,3056CRAWFORDVILLEHIGHWAY,CRAWFORDVILLE,FL32326,11:00 AMonthe10thdayofNovember,2011,the followingdescribedpropertyassetforthin said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT3,OFSHUGHARBOR,ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLATTHEREOF RECORDEDINPLATBOOK2,PAGE37, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSONCLAIMINGANINTEREST INTHESURPLUSFROMTHESALE,IF ANY,OTHERTHANTHEPROPERTY OWNERASOFTHEDATEOFTHELIS PENDENSMUSTFILEACLAIMWITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 3rd day of October, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-00004 3 DIVISION: REGIONSBANKDBAREGIONSMORTGAGE, Plaintiff, vs. JEFF ELLIOTT et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoa FinalJudgmentofMortgageForeclosure datedSeptember28,2011andenteredin CaseNo.65-2011-CA-000043oftheCircuit CourtoftheSECONDJudicialCircuitinand forWAKULLACounty,FloridawhereinREGIONSBANKDBAREGIONSMORTGAGE isthePlaintiffandJEFFELLIOTT;DEBRA ELLIOTT;CAMELOTTOWNHOMEOWNERS'ASSOCIATION,INC.;TENANT#1 N/K/AMICHELLEYATES,andTENANT#2 N/K/AROGERYATESaretheDefendants, TheClerkoftheCourtwillselltothehighest andbestbidderforcashattheLOBBYOF THEWAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at11:00AM,onthe3rddayofNovember, 2011,thefollowingdescribedpropertyas set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT25,CAMELOT,PHASEII,ASUBDIVISIONASPERMAPORPLATTHEREOF RECORDEDINPLATBOOK4,PAGE9, OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 6 SIR LANCELOT WAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithinsixty(60) days after the sale. WITNESSMYHANDandthesealofthis Court on October 3, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BYBECKYWHALEY CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sBECKY WHALEY AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court AnypersonswithadisabilityrequiringreasonableaccommodationsshouldcallCler k of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-00010 6 SEC.: CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, v. SERENAD.WEST;ANYANDALLUNKNOWNPARTIESCLAIMINGBY, THROUGH,UNDER,ANDAGAINSTTHE HEREINNAMEDINDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S)WHOARENOTKNOWNTOBE DEADORALIVE,WHETHERSAIDUNKNOWNPARTIESMAYCLAIMANINTERESTASSPOUSES,HEIRS,DEVISEES, GRANTEES,OROTHERCLAIMANTS; ANDESCAMBIACOUNTYHOUSINGFINANCE AUTHORITY. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENpursuanttoan OrderofFinalSummaryJudgmentofForeclosuredatedSeptember28,2011,entered inCivilCaseNo.65-2011-CA-000106ofthe CircuitCourtoftheSecondJudicialCircuit inandforWakullaCounty,Florida,wherein theClerkoftheCircuitCourtwillselltothe highestbidderforcashonthe3rddayof November,2011,at11:00a.m.atthefront dooroftheWakullaCountyCourthouse, 3056CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville, Florida32327,relativetothefollowingdescribedpropertyassetforthintheFinal Judgment, to wit: LOT59,BLOCK3,WAKULLAGARDENS UNITTWO,ACCORDINGTOTHEPLAT THEREOF,RECORDEDINPLATBOOK1, PAGE42,OFTHEPUBLICRECORDSOF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Anypersonclaiminganinterestinthesurplusfromthesale,ifany,otherthanthe propertyownerasofthedateoftheLis Pendensmustfileaclaimwithin60daysafter the sale. Ifyouareapersonwithadisabilitywho needsanyaccommodationinordertoparticipateinthisproceeding,youareentitled, atnocosttoyou,totheprovisionofcertain assistance. Please contact: Thisisanattempttocollectadebtandany informationobtainedmaybeusedforthat purpose. Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225 Tallahassee, FL 32303 Phone: (850) 577-4401 atleast7daysbeforeyourscheduledcourt appearance,orimmediatelyuponreceiving thisnotificationifthetimebeforethescheduledappearanceislessthan7days;ifyou are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATEDATCRAWFORDVILLE,FLORIDA THIS 29th DAY OF SEPTEMBER, 2011. BRENT X. THURMON D CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BY -sTAMIKA PETERSON AS DEPUTY CLERK (Seal, Wakulla County Cler k of the Circuit Court October 13, 20, 2011 682 Public Sales and Auctions NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV NoticeisgivenpursuanttoFloridaSelf-StorageFaciltiyAct,FloridaStatutes,Chapter 83,PartIVthatCrawfordvilleSelfStorage willholdasalebysealedbidonSaturday, October29,2011,at10:00a.m.at3291 CrawfordvilleHwy.ofthecontentsof Mini-Warehousecontainingpersonalproperty of: ROSA LEE GREEN JACQUELYN GODBOLT BeforethesaledateofSaturday,October 29,2011,theownersmayredeemtheir propertybyapaymentoftheoutstanding balanceandcostbypayinginpersonat 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. October 13, 20, 2011 LEGAL NOTICE NoticeisgivenpursuanttoFloridaSelf-StorageFacilityAct,FloridaStatutes,Chapter 83,PartIVthatSeminoleSelfStoragewill holdasalebysealedbidonOctober29, 2011at10:00a.m.at2314Crawfordville Hwy.,Crawfordville,Florida32327,ofthe contentsofMini-Warehousecontainingpersonal property of: JENNIFER BABCOCK CASEY LARSON BeforethesaledateofOctober29,2011, theOwnersmayredeemtheirpropertyby paymentoftheOutstandingBalanceand costbymailingitto2314Crawfordville Hwy.,Crawfordville,Florida32327orpaying in person at the warehouse location. October 13, 20, 2011 683 Estate (Probate) Filings IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 11-60-PR PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: THE ESTATE OF JIMMY ERASTUS STRICKLAND, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TheadministrationoftheestateofJIMMY ERASTUSSTRICKLAND,deceased,File Number11-60-PR,ispendingintheCircuit CourtforWakullaCounty,Florida,Probate Division,theaddressofwhichis3056 CrawfordvilleHighway,Crawfordville,Florida,32327.Thenamesandaddressesof thepersonalrepresentativeandthepersonalrepresentative'sattorneyaresetforth below. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdecedent'sestate,includingunmatured,contingentorunliquidatedclaims,onwhoma copyofthisnoticeisservedmustfiletheir claimswiththiscourtWITHINTHELATER OF3MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHE FIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHISNOTICE OR30DAYSAFTERTHEDATEOF SERVICEOFACOpyOFTHISNOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandother personshavingclaimsordemandsagainst decedent'sestate,includingunmatured, contingentorunliquidatedclaims,mustfile theirclaimswiththiscourtWITHIN3 MONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMSNOTSOFILEDWILLBE FOREVER BARRED. ThedateoffirstpublicationofthisNoticeis October 13, 2011 Petitioner JIMMY DAWAYNE STRICKLAND W. Bradley Munroe W. Bradley Munroe, P.A. Fla. Bar ID No: 010530 239 East Virginia Street Tallahassee, Florida 32301 (850)222-7731 (850)224-7528 Fascimile Attorney for Personal Representative October 13, 20, 2011 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 11-59-PR IN RE: The Estate of JAMESREGINALDSANDERS Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION TheadministrationoftheestateofJAMES REGINALDSANDERS,deceased,File Number11-59-PR,ispendingintheCircuit CourtforWakullaCounty,Florida,Probate Division,theaddressofwhichis3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Thenamesandaddressesofthepersonal representativeandthepersonalrepresentative's attorney are set forth below. ALLINTERESTEDPERSONSARENOTIFIED THAT: Allpersonsonwhomthisnoticeisserved whohaveobjectionsthatchallengethevalidityofthewill,thequalificationsofthepersonalrepresentative,venue,orjurisdiction ofthisCourtarerequiredtofiletheirobjectionswiththisCourtWITHINTHELATER OFTHREEMONTHSAFTERTHEDATE OFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATIONOFTHIS NOTICEORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERTHE DATEOFSERVICEOFACOPYOFTHIS NOTICE OF THEM. Allcreditorsofthedecedentandotherpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstdegg cedent'sestateonwhomacopyofthisnoticeisservedwithinthreemonthsafterthe dateofthefirstpublicationofthisnotice mustfiletheirclaimswiththisCourtWITHIN THELATEROFTHREEMONTHSAFTER THEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OFTHISNOTICEORTHIRTYDAYSAFTERTHEDATEOFSERVICEOFACOPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. Allothercreditorsofthedecedentandpersonshavingclaimsordemandsagainstthe decedent'sestatemustfiletheirclaimswith thisCourtWITHINTHREEMONTHSAFTERTHEDATEOFTHEFIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS,DEMANDSANDOBJECTIONSNOTSOFILEDWILLBEFOREVER BARRED. ThedateofthefirstpublicationofthisNotice is October 13 and October 20, 2011. AttorneyforPersonalRepresentatives: THOMASR.THOMSPON Thompson,Crawford&Smiley AttorneysatLaw PostOfficeBox 15158 Tallahassee, FL 32317 (850) 386-5777 Florida Bar No. 890596 Personal Representative: Jason Sanders 986 Macco Rd. Cocoa, FL 32927 October 13, 20, 2011 684 Miscellaneous Notices WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AT RISK SERVICES Project Name: Wakulla Middle School HVAC Renovations Project Location: Wakulla Middle School, 22 Jean Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Bid Number: 11/12-05 TheWakullaCountySchoolBoard,DepartmentofFacilitiesandConstruction,requestsqualificationsfromconstructionmanagementatriskfirmstoprovideservicesfor thisproject.Constructionbudgetestimate forthisprojectis$4,000,000.Construction startisTBAApplicant mustbealicensed generalcontractorintheStateofFlorida atthetimeofapplication.Further,ifacorporation,theapplicantmustberegisteredby theDepartmentofState,DivisionofCorporations,tooperateintheStateofFloridaat the time of application. Theselectionwillbemadeinaccordance withSection287.055FloridaStatutes,the SchoolBoardPolicies,SREFrulesandproceduresandcriteriawhichmaybeobtained fromWilliamR.Bristolattheaddressand phone number below. Firmsinterestedinbeingconsideredforthis projectmustattendaPre-requestforQualificationmeetingattheBoardRoomatthe Superintendent’sOfficeonNovember7, 2011@2:00p.m.RequestforQualification ProceduresmaybepickeduppriortomeetingattheFacilitiesOfficeattheWakulla CountySchoolBoard.Inaddition,interested firmsmustsubmitanapplicationwiththe following information. 1.Aletterofinterestdetailingthefirm’s qualificationtomeettheabovereferenced selection criteria. 2.AnExperienceQuestionnaireasreferencedinRFQ,whichmaybeobtainedat thePre-requestforQualificationmeeting fromWilliamR.Bristol,phonenumber(850) 926-0065 3.ThevendermustprovideacurrentFloridaProfessionalRegistrationCertificatefor a Florida General Contractor License. Submit6copiesofyourapplicationtothe WakullaCountySchoolBoard,DavidMiller, Superintendent,69ArranRoad,Crawfordville,Florida32327.DeadlinedateisNovember10,2011@1:00p.m.Theresults ofthisselectionwillbepostedattheSuperintendent’sOffice69ArranRoad,Crawfordville,Florida32327,duringregularbusiness hoursstartingDecember20,2011.Anyprotestontheselectionmustbemadewithin 72hours.Contractnegotiationandaward will proceed with the selected firm. October 13, 20, 27, 2011 685 Notice of Fictitious Name NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICEISHEREBYGIVENthattheundersigned,desiringtoengageinbusinessunderthefictitiousnameofToms’sSmallEngineRepair,locatedat42KellyAnnStreet, Crawfordville,FL32327,intheCountyo f Wakulla,inCrawfordville,Florida32327,intendstoregisterthesaidnamewiththeDivisionofCorporationsoftheFloridaDepartmentofState,Tallahassee,Florida. DatedatCrawfordville,this27thdayo f September, 2011. -sThomas A. Deese, Jr. October 13, 2011 Selling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $10 A Week 926-7102 Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall888-852-2340 LOCAL NEWS The Wak ulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com C a n ’ t Can’t a c c e s s access T h e The W a k u l l a Wakulla n e w s ews o n l i n e online c o n t e n t ? content? S u b s c r i b e Subscribe t o d a y a n d today and g e t f u l l get full a c c e s s access!

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, October 13, 2011 www.thewakullanews.com JoinTheNature Conservancytoplant abilliontrees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Crowd turns out for this weekends Woodstork FestivalBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netMore than 500 people turned out for the annual Woodstork Festival held on Oct. 8 at 3Y Ranch. The weather was perfect, sunny with a cool breeze, for people to browse through the different arts and craft booths, participate in the cake walk, sign up for the silent auction, buy tickets for the raf” e, taste the various food offered and listen to the different bands that performed throughout the day. All funds raised for this event bene“ ted the Florida Wild Mammal Association, which takes in orphaned, sick or injured wildlife from around the area with the goal of rehabilitating them so they can be returned to their natural habitat … or as a safe haven for those unable to return to the wild. Noni Beck and Marilyn Penot from Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary were also on hand at the festival, bringing with them Rufus, an eastern screech owl, and Nyx, a barred owl. The sanctuary works closely with FWMA and both have the same goal, protecting wildlife. Attendees were also able to view the entries for the FWMAs annual photo contest. The winners were announced at the festival. Best in Show for the adult category went to Rosalie Vincent. First place went to George Burton, second went to Gene Vincent and third place went to Carol Robertson. Vincent also received an honorable mention for another photo, along with Elaine Youngblood. There was also a category for youth with Joan Robertson winning best in show and third place. Emerie Galloway took first place and Diana Robertson took second place. The top prize for the raffle was a kayak. Mike Beatty ended up winning the kayak, but decided to give it to Jeff True instead of keeping it for himself. To learn more about FWMA, visit www.wakullawildlife.org. SCENES FROM WOODSTORK: Clockwise from above, the band Swingin Harpoon performs; Mike Beatty, left, won the kayak in the raf” e but gave it to Jeff True; Marilyn Penot with Nyx the owl; vendors and festival-goers at 3Y Ranch; Paige McLaughlin has a lion painted on her face.PHOTO BY LYNDA KINSEY PHOTO BY JENNIFER JENSEN JENNIFER JENSEN JENNIFER JENSEN JENNIFER JENSEN pure speed. pure performance. pure simplicity. pure broadband is everything you want from an internet connection … with no phone line required. Its all the speed you need to surf, watch, download and game without slowing down. call 866.958.7873to get pure speed today. givemepure.com stop by your CenturyLink store *Offer ends 1/28/2012. Pure Broadband available to qualifying residential customers only. 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